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Sample records for archaeon haloferax volcanii

  1. Structural characterization of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating glycoproteins of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiba, Lina; Lin, Chia-Wei; Aebi, Markus; Eichler, Jerry; Guerardel, Yann

    2016-07-01

    N-Glycosylation is a post-translational modification performed in all three domains of life. In the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii, glycoproteins such as the S-layer glycoprotein are modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide assembled by a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins. In the present study, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to define the structure of this glycan attached to at least four of the seven putative S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation sites, namely Asn-13, Asn-83, Asn-274 and Asn-279. Such approaches detected a trisaccharide corresponding to glucuronic acid (GlcA)-β1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, a tetrasaccharide corresponding to methyl-O-4-GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, and a pentasaccharide corresponding to hexose-1,2-[methyl-O-4-]GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, with previous MS and radiolabeling experiments showing the hexose at the non-reducing end of the pentasaccharide to be mannose. The present analysis thus corrects the earlier assignment of the penultimate sugar as a methyl ester of a hexuronic acid, instead revealing this sugar to be a methylated GlcA. The assignments made here are in good agreement with what was already known of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway from previous genetic and biochemical efforts while providing new insight into the process. PMID:26863921

  2. In vivo characterization of the homing endonuclease within the polB gene in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

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    Adit Naor

    Full Text Available Inteins are parasitic genetic elements, analogous to introns that excise themselves at the protein level by self-splicing, allowing the formation of functional non-disrupted proteins. Many inteins contain a homing endonuclease (HEN gene, and rely on its activity for horizontal propagation. In the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, the gene encoding DNA polymerase B (polB contains an intein with an annotated but uncharacterized HEN. Here we examine the activity of the polB HEN in vivo, within its natural archaeal host. We show that this HEN is highly active, and able to insert the intein into both a chromosomal target and an extra-chromosomal plasmid target, by gene conversion. We also demonstrate that the frequency of its incorporation depends on the length of the flanking homologous sequences around the target site, reflecting its dependence on the homologous recombination machinery. Although several evolutionary models predict that the presence of an intein involves a change in the fitness of the host organism, our results show that a strain deleted for the intein sequence shows no significant changes in growth rate compared to the wild type.

  3. In vivo characterization of the homing endonuclease within the polB gene in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Adit; Lazary, Rona; Barzel, Adi; Papke, R Thane; Gophna, Uri

    2011-01-01

    Inteins are parasitic genetic elements, analogous to introns that excise themselves at the protein level by self-splicing, allowing the formation of functional non-disrupted proteins. Many inteins contain a homing endonuclease (HEN) gene, and rely on its activity for horizontal propagation. In the halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, the gene encoding DNA polymerase B (polB) contains an intein with an annotated but uncharacterized HEN. Here we examine the activity of the polB HEN in vivo, within its natural archaeal host. We show that this HEN is highly active, and able to insert the intein into both a chromosomal target and an extra-chromosomal plasmid target, by gene conversion. We also demonstrate that the frequency of its incorporation depends on the length of the flanking homologous sequences around the target site, reflecting its dependence on the homologous recombination machinery. Although several evolutionary models predict that the presence of an intein involves a change in the fitness of the host organism, our results show that a strain deleted for the intein sequence shows no significant changes in growth rate compared to the wild type. PMID:21283796

  4. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

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    ScottChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  5. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii

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    Lisa-Katharina Maier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable—the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated. Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I–III and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  6. Archaeal membrane-associated proteases: insights on Haloferax volcanii and other haloarchaea

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    Maria Ines Giménez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The function of membrane proteases range from general house-keeping to regulation of cellular processes. Although the biological role of these enzymes in archaea is poorly understood, some of them are implicated in the biogenesis of the archaeal cell envelope and surface structures. The membrane-bound ATP-dependent Lon protease is essential for cell viability and affects membrane carotenoid content in Haloferax volcanii. At least two different proteases are needed in this archaeon to accomplish the posttranslational modifications of the S-layer glycoprotein. The rhomboid protease RhoII is involved in the N-glycosylation of the S-layer protein with a sulfoquinovose-containing oligosaccharide while archaeosortase ArtA mediates the proteolytic processing coupled-lipid modification of this glycoprotein facilitating its attachment to the archaeal cell surface. Interestingly, two different signal peptidase I homologs exist in H. volcanii, Sec11a and Sec11b, which likely play distinct physiological roles. Type IV prepilin peptidase PibD processes flagellin/pilin precursors, being essential for the biogenesis and function of the archaellum and other cell surface structures in H. volcanii.

  7. Fructose Degradation in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii Involves a Bacterial Type Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System, Fructose-1-Phosphate Kinase, and Class II Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase

    OpenAIRE

    Pickl, Andreas; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii utilizes fructose as a sole carbon and energy source. Genes and enzymes involved in fructose uptake and degradation were identified by transcriptional analyses, deletion mutant experiments, and enzyme characterization. During growth on fructose, the gene cluster HVO_1495 to HVO_1499, encoding homologs of the five bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS) components enzyme IIB (EIIB), enzyme I (EI), histidine protein (HPr), EIIA, and EIIC, was highly ...

  8. A Gateway platform for functional genomics in Haloferax volcanii: deletion of three tRNA modification genes

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    Basma El Yacoubi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In part due to the existence of simple methods for its cultivation and genetic manipulation, Haloferax volcanii is a major archaeal model organism. It is the only archaeon for which the whole set of post-transcriptionally modified tRNAs has been sequenced, allowing for an in silico prediction of all RNA modification genes present in the organism. One approach to check these predictions experimentally is via the construction of targeted gene deletion mutants. Toward this goal, an integrative “Gateway vector” that allows gene deletion in H. volcanii uracil auxotrophs was constructed. The vector was used to delete three predicted tRNA modification genes: HVO_2001 (encoding an archaeal transglycosyl tranferase or arcTGT, which is involved in archeosine biosynthesis; HVO_2348 (encoding a newly discovered GTP cyclohydrolase I, which catalyzes the first step common to archaeosine and folate biosynthesis; and HVO_2736 (encoding a member of the COG1444 family, which is involved in N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C formation. Preliminary phenotypic analysis of the deletion mutants was conducted, and confirmed all three predictions.

  9. Comparative Survival Analysis of Deinococcus Radiodurans and the Haloarchaea Natrialba Magadii and Haloferax Volcanii, Exposed to Vacuum Ultraviolet Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G.; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Corton, Eduardo; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2011-01-01

    The haloarchaea Natrialba magadii and Haloferax volcanii, as well as the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to vacuum-UV (V-UV) radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Cell monolayers (containing 105 - 106 cells per sample) were prepared over polycarbonate filters and irradiated under high vacuum (10-5 Pa) with polychromatic synchrotron radiation. N. magadii was remarkably resistant to high vacuum with a survival fraction of ((3.77 \\pm ...

  10. Effect of organic solvents on the activity and stability of halophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) from Haloferax volcanii

    OpenAIRE

    Alsafadi, Diya; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The effect of various organic solvents on the catalytic activity, stability and substrate specificity of alchohol dehydrogenase from Haloferax volcanii (HvADH2) was evaluated. The HvADH2 showed remarkable stability and catalysed the reaction in aqueous–organic medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH). Tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile were also investigated and adversely affected the stability of the enzyme. High concentration of salt, essential to maintain the enzymatic...

  11. Production of halophilic proteins using Haloferax volcanii H1895 in a stirred-tank bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Strillinger, Eva

    2015-10-01

    The success of biotechnological processes is based on the availability of efficient and highly specific biocatalysts, which can satisfy industrial demands. Extreme and remote environments like the deep brine pools of the Red Sea represent highly interesting habitats for the discovery of novel halophilic and thermophilic enzymes. Haloferax volcanii constitutes a suitable expression system for halophilic enzymes obtained from such brine pools. We developed a batch process for the cultivation of H. volcanii H1895 in controlled stirred-tank bioreactors utilising knockouts of components of the flagella assembly system. The standard medium Hv-YPC was supplemented to reach a higher cell density. Without protein expression, cell dry weight reaches 10 g L−1. Two halophilic alcohol dehydrogenases were expressed under the control of the tryptophanase promoter p.tna with 16.8 and 3.2 mg gCDW −1, respectively, at a maximum cell dry weight of 6.5 g L−1. Protein expression was induced by the addition of l-tryptophan. Investigation of various expression strategies leads to an optimised two-step induction protocol introducing 6 mM l-tryptophan at an OD650 of 0.4 followed by incubation for 16 h and a second induction step with 3 mM l-tryptophan followed by a final incubation time of 4 h. Compared with the uncontrolled shaker-flask cultivations used until date, dry cell mass concentrations were improved by a factor of more than 5 and cell-specific enzyme activities showed an up to 28-fold increased yield of the heterologous proteins.

  12. Comparative Survival Analysis of Deinococcus Radiodurans and the Haloarchaea Natrialba Magadii and Haloferax Volcanii, Exposed to Vacuum Ultraviolet Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Mauas, Pablo J D; Corton, Eduardo; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2011-01-01

    The haloarchaea Natrialba magadii and Haloferax volcanii, as well as the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to vacuum-UV (V-UV) radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Cell monolayers (containing 105 - 106 cells per sample) were prepared over polycarbonate filters and irradiated under high vacuum (10-5 Pa) with polychromatic synchrotron radiation. N. magadii was remarkably resistant to high vacuum with a survival fraction of ((3.77 \\pm 0.76) x 10-2), larger than the one of D. radiodurans ((1.13 \\pm 0.23) x 10-2). The survival fraction of the haloarchaea H. volcanii, of ((3.60 \\pm 1.80) x 10-4), was much smaller. Radiation resistance profiles were similar between the haloarchaea and D. radiodurans for fluencies up to 150 J m-2. For fluencies larger than 150 J m-2 there was a significant decrease in the survival of haloarchaea, and in particular H. volcanii did not survive. Survival for D. radiodurans was 1% after exposure to the higher V-UV fluency (1350...

  13. Crystal structures of a halophilic archaeal malate synthase from Haloferax volcanii and comparisons with isoforms A and G

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    Thomas Geoffrey C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malate synthase, one of the two enzymes unique to the glyoxylate cycle, is found in all three domains of life, and is crucial to the utilization of two-carbon compounds for net biosynthetic pathways such as gluconeogenesis. In addition to the main isoforms A and G, so named because of their differential expression in E. coli grown on either acetate or glycolate respectively, a third distinct isoform has been identified. These three isoforms differ considerably in size and sequence conservation. The A isoform (MSA comprises ~530 residues, the G isoform (MSG is ~730 residues, and this third isoform (MSH-halophilic is ~430 residues in length. Both isoforms A and G have been structurally characterized in detail, but no structures have been reported for the H isoform which has been found thus far only in members of the halophilic Archaea. Results We have solved the structure of a malate synthase H (MSH isoform member from Haloferax volcanii in complex with glyoxylate at 2.51 Å resolution, and also as a ternary complex with acetyl-coenzyme A and pyruvate at 1.95 Å. Like the A and G isoforms, MSH is based on a β8/α8 (TIM barrel. Unlike previously solved malate synthase structures which are all monomeric, this enzyme is found in the native state as a trimer/hexamer equilibrium. Compared to isoforms A and G, MSH displays deletion of an N-terminal domain and a smaller deletion at the C-terminus. The MSH active site is closely superimposable with those of MSA and MSG, with the ternary complex indicating a nucleophilic attack on pyruvate by the enolate intermediate of acetyl-coenzyme A. Conclusions The reported structures of MSH from Haloferax volcanii allow a detailed analysis and comparison with previously solved structures of isoforms A and G. These structural comparisons provide insight into evolutionary relationships among these isoforms, and also indicate that despite the size and sequence variation, and the truncated C

  14. Effect of organic solvents on the activity and stability of halophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) from Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsafadi, Diya; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The effect of various organic solvents on the catalytic activity, stability and substrate specificity of alchohol dehydrogenase from Haloferax volcanii (HvADH2) was evaluated. The HvADH2 showed remarkable stability and catalysed the reaction in aqueous-organic medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH). Tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile were also investigated and adversely affected the stability of the enzyme. High concentration of salt, essential to maintain the enzymatic activity and structural integrity of the halophilic enzyme under standard conditions may be partially replaced by DMSO and MeOH. The presence of organic solvents did not induce gross changes in substrate specificity. DMSO offered a protective effect for the stability of the enzyme at nonoptimal pHs such as 6 and 10. Salt and solvent effects on the HvADH2 conformation and folding were examined through fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence findings were consistent with the activity and stability results and corroborated the denaturing properties of some solvents. The intrinsic tolerance of this enzyme to organic solvent makes it highly attractive to industry. PMID:23179592

  15. The crystal structure of Haloferax volcanii proliferating cell nuclear antigen reveals unique surface charge characteristics due to halophilic adaptation

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    Morroll Shaun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high intracellular salt concentration required to maintain a halophilic lifestyle poses challenges to haloarchaeal proteins that must stay soluble, stable and functional in this extreme environment. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a fundamental protein involved in maintaining genome integrity, with roles in both DNA replication and repair. To investigate the halophilic adaptation of such a key protein we have crystallised and solved the structure of Haloferax volcanii PCNA (HvPCNA to a resolution of 2.0 Å. Results The overall architecture of HvPCNA is very similar to other known PCNAs, which are highly structurally conserved. Three commonly observed adaptations in halophilic proteins are higher surface acidity, bound ions and increased numbers of intermolecular ion pairs (in oligomeric proteins. HvPCNA possesses the former two adaptations but not the latter, despite functioning as a homotrimer. Strikingly, the positive surface charge considered key to PCNA's role as a sliding clamp is dramatically reduced in the halophilic protein. Instead, bound cations within the solvation shell of HvPCNA may permit sliding along negatively charged DNA by reducing electrostatic repulsion effects. Conclusion The extent to which individual proteins adapt to halophilic conditions varies, presumably due to their diverse characteristics and roles within the cell. The number of ion pairs observed in the HvPCNA monomer-monomer interface was unexpectedly low. This may reflect the fact that the trimer is intrinsically stable over a wide range of salt concentrations and therefore additional modifications for trimer maintenance in high salt conditions are not required. Halophilic proteins frequently bind anions and cations and in HvPCNA cation binding may compensate for the remarkable reduction in positive charge in the pore region, to facilitate functional interactions with DNA. In this way, HvPCNA may harness its environment as

  16. Haloferax volcanii archaeosortase is required for motility, mating, and C-terminal processing of the S-layer glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Mohd F.; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Zou, James; Frisch, Andrew; Haft, Daniel H.; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Brewer, Heather M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-06-01

    Cell surfaces are decorated by a variety of proteins that facilitate interactions with their environments and support cell stability.These secreted proteins are anchored to the cell by mechanisms that are diverse, and, in archaea, poorly understood. Recently published in silico data suggest that in some species a subset of secreted euryarchaeal proteins, which includes the S-­‐layer glycoprotein, is processed and covalently linked tot he cell membrane by enzymes referred to as archaeosortases. In silico work led to the proposal that an independent, sortase-like system for proteolysis-coupled carboxy-terminal lipid modification exists in bacteria (exosortase) and archaea (archaeosortase). Here, we provide the first in vivo characterization of an archaeosortase in the haloarchaeal model organism Haloferax volcanii. Deletion of the artA gene (HVO_0915) resulted in multiple biological phenotypes: (a) poor growth, especially under low-salt conditions, (b) alterations in cell shape and the S-layer, (c) impaired motility, suppressors of which still exhibit poor growth, and (d) impaired conjugation. We studied one of the ArtA substrates, the S-layer glycoprotein, using detailed proteomic analysis. While the carboxy-terminal region of S-layer glycoproteins, consisting of a threonine-rich O-glycosylated region followed by a hydrophobic transmembrane helix, has been notoriously resistant to any proteomic peptide identification, we were able to identify two overlapping peptides from the transmembrane domain present in the ΔartA strain but not in the wild-type strain. This clearly shows that ArtA is involved in carboxy-terminal posttranslational processing of the S-layer glycoprotein. As it is known from previous studies that a lipid is covalently attached to the carboxy-terminal region of the S-layer glycoprotein, our data strongly support the conclusion that archaeosortase functions analogously to sortase, mediating proteolysis-coupled, covalent cell surface attachment.

  17. Utilization of vinasse for production of poly-3-(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) by Haloferax mediterranei

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Pramanik, Arnab; Maji, Sudipta Kumar; Haldar, Saubhik; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal Kumar; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2012-01-01

    Vinasse, a highly polluting waste of the ethanol industry was utilized for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by the extremely halophilic archaeon, Haloferax mediterranei in shake-flasks. Following pre-treatment through adsorption on activated carbon, 25%-50% (v/v) pre-treated vinasse was utilized leading to 70% maximum accumulation of PHA. Maximum PHA concentration of 19.7 g/l, product yield coefficient (based on total carbohydrates) of 0.87 and 0.21 g/l h volumetric productivity w...

  18. Comparison of four phaC genes from Haloferax mediterranei and their function in different PHBV copolymer biosyntheses in Haloarcula hispanica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Jing; Li, Ming; Hou, Jing;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei is able to accumulate large amounts of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) with high molar fraction of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) from unrelated carbon sources. A Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase composed of two subunits, ...... might meet various application requirements. CONCLUSION: We discover three cryptic phaC genes in Hfx. mediterranei, and demonstrate that genetic engineering of these newly identified phaC genes has biotechnological potential for PHBV production with tailor-made material properties....

  19. Evidence for surfactant production by the haloarchaeon Haloferax sp. MSNC14 in hydrocarbon-containing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeridi, Ikram; Militon, Cécile; Grossi, Vincent; Cuny, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    The potential for surfactant production by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloferax sp. MSNC14 in the presence of individual hydrocarbon substrates was studied. This strain was selected for its ability to grow on different types of hydrocarbons at high NaCl concentrations. Linear (n-heptadecane or C17) and isoprenoid (pristane) alkanes, a polyaromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene) and ammonium acetate (highly water-soluble control compound) were used as growth substrates. The adherence potential was demonstrated by the ability of the cells to adhere to liquid or solid hydrocarbons. The biosurfactant production was indicated by the reduction of the surface tension (ST) and by the emulsification activity (EA) of cell-free supernatants. Growth on acetate was accompanied by a low EA (lower than 0.1) and a high ST (~70 mN/m), whereas an important EA (up to 0.68 ± 0.08) and a reduction of ST (down to 32 ± 2.3 mN/m) were observed during growth on the different hydrocarbons. Both ST and EA varied with the growth phase. The adhesion to hydrocarbons was higher when cells were grown on C17 (by 60-70 %) and pristane (by 30-50 %) than on phenanthrene (~25 %). The results demonstrated that strain MNSC14 was able to increase the bioavailability of insoluble hydrocarbons, thus facilitating their uptake and their biodegradation even at high salt concentration. PMID:23748377

  20. A Simple Laser-Based Device for Simultaneous Microbial Culture and Absorbance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Abrevaya, X C; Areso, O; Mauas, P J D

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a device specifically designed to study microbial growth with several applications related to environmental microbiology and other areas of research as astrobiology. The Automated Measuring and Cultivation device (AMC-d) enables semi-continuous absorbance measurements directly during cultivation. It can measure simultaneously up to 16 samples. Growth curves using low and fast growing microorganism were plotted, including: Escherichia coli, and Haloferax volcanii, an halophilic archaeon.

  1. Characterisation of chlorate reduction in the haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Espinosa, Rosa María; Richardson, David J.; Bonete Pérez, María José

    2015-01-01

    Background: Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying haloarchaeon using nitrate as a respiratory electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions in a reaction catalysed by pNarGH. Other ions such as bromate, perchlorate and chlorate can also be reduced. Methods: Hfx. mediterranei cells were grown anaerobically with nitrate as electron acceptor and chlorate reductase activity measured in whole cells and purified nitrate reductase. Results: No genes encoding (per)chlorate reductases have been dete...

  2. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  3. Effects of Culture Conditions on Poly(β-Hydroxybutyric Acid) Production by Haloferax mediterranei

    OpenAIRE

    Lillo, Jose Garcia; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    1990-01-01

    The halobacterium Haloferax mediterranei accumulates poly(β-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) as intracellular granules. The conditions for PHB production in batch and continuous cultures have been studied and optimized. Phosphate limitation is essential for PHB accumulation in large quantities. Glucose and starch are the best carbon sources. With 2% starch, 0.00375% KH2PO4, and 0.2% NH4Cl in batch culture, a production of ca. 6 g of PHB per liter was reached, being 60% of the total biomass dry weight, ...

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of d-2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Haloferax mediterranei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The d-2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Haloferax mediterranei has been crystallized in two different forms. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution for the non-productive ternary complex of the enzyme and to 2.7 Å for the selenomethionyl derivative. d-2-Hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (D2-HDH) from Haloferax mediterranei has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, solubilized in 8 M urea and refolded by rapid dilution. The protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate or PEG 3350 as precipitant. Two crystal forms representing the free enzyme and the nonproductive ternary complex with α-ketohexanoic acid and NAD+ grew under these conditions. Crystals of form I diffracted to beyond 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.0, b = 119.6, c = 86.2 Å, β = 96.3°. Crystals of form II diffracted to beyond 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.5, b = 75.2, c = 77.6 Å, α = 109.1, β = 107.5, γ = 95.9°. The calculated values for VM and analysis of the self-rotation and self-Patterson functions suggest that the asymmetric unit in both crystal forms contains two dimers related by pseudo-translational symmetry

  5. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    OpenAIRE

    Rákhely Gábor; Varga András; Bogos Balázs; Tóth András; Takács Mária; Kovács Kornél L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were as...

  6. Sugar metabolism and regulation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Qiuhao

    2004-01-01

    A novel trehalose glycosyl transferring synthase (TreT) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon T. litoralis was identified. This enzyme produces trehalose by the transfer of glucose from ADP-glucose (or, less effectively, UDP-glucose and GDP-glucose) onto the 1-position of glucose to form trehalose and ADP. Such an enzymatic activity in the synthesis of trehalose has not yet been described for any other organisms. It catalyzes a reversible reaction for trehalose synthesis and degradation by conv...

  7. Characterization of CRISPR RNA Biogenesis and Cas6 Cleavage-Mediated Inhibition of a Provirus in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hailong; Han, Jing; Liu, Jingfang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Dahe; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive immune system comprising CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) arrays and cas (CRISPR-associated) genes has been discovered in a wide range of bacteria and archaea and has recently attracted comprehensive investigations. However, the subtype I-B CRISPR-Cas system in haloarchaea has been less characterized. Here, we investigated Cas6-mediated RNA processing in Haloferax mediterranei. The Cas6 cleavage site, as well as the CRISPR transcription start sit...

  8. Identification of carotenoids from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie eYatsunami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoids produced by extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica were extracted and identified by their chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic characteristics (UV-Vis and mass spectrometry. The composition (mol% was 68.1% bacterioruberin, 22.5% monoanhydrobacterioruberin, 9.3% bisanhydrobacterioruberin, < 0.1% isopentenyldehydrorhodopin, and trace amounts of lycopene and phytoene. The in vitro scavenging capacity of a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, extracted from Ha. japonica cells against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals was evaluated. The antioxidant capacity of bacterioruberin was much higher than that of β-carotene.

  9. Microarray analysis in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum strain R1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Twellmeyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phototrophy of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum was explored for decades. The research was mainly focused on the expression of bacteriorhodopsin and its functional properties. In contrast, less is known about genome wide transcriptional changes and their impact on the physiological adaptation to phototrophy. The tool of choice to record transcriptional profiles is the DNA microarray technique. However, the technique is still rarely used for transcriptome analysis in archaea. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a whole-genome DNA microarray based on our sequence data of the Hbt. salinarum strain R1 genome. The potential of our tool is exemplified by the comparison of cells growing under aerobic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. We processed the raw fluorescence data by several stringent filtering steps and a subsequent MAANOVA analysis. The study revealed a lot of transcriptional differences between the two cell states. We found that the transcriptional changes were relatively weak, though significant. Finally, the DNA microarray data were independently verified by a real-time PCR analysis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first DNA microarray analysis of Hbt. salinarum cells that were actually grown under phototrophic conditions. By comparing the transcriptomics data with current knowledge we could show that our DNA microarray tool is well applicable for transcriptome analysis in the extremely halophilic archaeon Hbt. salinarum. The reliability of our tool is based on both the high-quality array of DNA probes and the stringent data handling including MAANOVA analysis. Among the regulated genes more than 50% had unknown functions. This underlines the fact that haloarchaeal phototrophy is still far away from being completely understood. Hence, the data recorded in this study will be subject to future systems biology analysis.

  10. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Halophilic Archaeon AJ6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiaohong; Wu Min; Cao Yi; Wu Yuehong; Zhang Ting

    2006-01-01

    Halophilic archaeon A J6 was isolated and purified from the Altun Mountain National Nature Reserve of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.Strain AJ6 is a Gram-negative rod whose size is 0.2-0.6 by 1.6-4.2 μm,wherein a few cells are globular.The optimum salt concentration for its growth is 20% NaC1 and 0.6% Mg2+,and the optimum pH is 6.0-7.0.Morphological,physiological,and biochemical characteristics of strain AJ6 were observed.The 16S rRNA encoding gene (16S rDNA)sequence of strain A J6 was amplified by PCR,and its nucteotide sequence was determined subsequently."Clustalw"and"PHYLIP"software bags were used to analyze the 16S rDNA sequence;the homology was compared,and then the phylogenetic tree was established.The results indicate that strain AJ6 is a novel species of the genus Natrinema.The GenBank accession number of the 16S rDNA sequences of strain AJ6 is AY277584.

  11. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  12. Metabolic reconstruction of the archaeon methanogen Methanosarcina Acetivorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranas Costas D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogens are ancient organisms that are key players in the carbon cycle accounting for about one billion tones of biological methane produced annually. Methanosarcina acetivorans, with a genome size of ~5.7 mb, is the largest sequenced archaeon methanogen and unique amongst the methanogens in its biochemical characteristics. By following a systematic workflow we reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for M. acetivorans. This process relies on previously developed computational tools developed in our group to correct growth prediction inconsistencies with in vivo data sets and rectify topological inconsistencies in the model. Results The generated model iVS941 accounts for 941 genes, 705 reactions and 708 metabolites. The model achieves 93.3% prediction agreement with in vivo growth data across different substrates and multiple gene deletions. The model also correctly recapitulates metabolic pathway usage patterns of M. acetivorans such as the indispensability of flux through methanogenesis for growth on acetate and methanol and the unique biochemical characteristics under growth on carbon monoxide. Conclusions Based on the size of the genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and extent of validated predictions this model represents the most comprehensive up-to-date effort to catalogue methanogenic metabolism. The reconstructed model is available in spreadsheet and SBML formats to enable dissemination.

  13. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rákhely Gábor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation.

  14. The genome of the square archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi : life at the limits of water activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Henk; Palm, Peter; Wende, Andy; Falb, Michaela; Rampp, Markus; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Background: The square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi dominates NaCl- saturated and MgCl2 enriched aquatic ecosystems, which imposes a serious desiccation stress, caused by the extremely low water activity. The genome sequence was analyzed and physiological and physical experiments were c

  15. Identification and molecular characterization of the first a-xylosidase from an Archaeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moracci, M.; Cobucci-Ponzano, B.; Trincone, A.; Fusco, S.; Rosa, de M.; Oost, van der J.; Sensen, C.W.; Charlebois, R.L.; Rossi, M.

    2000-01-01

    We here report the first molecular characterization of an -xylosidase (XylS) from an Archaeon. Sulfolobus solfataricus is able to grow at temperatures higher than 80 °C on several carbohydrates at acidic pH. The isolated xylS gene encodes a monomeric enzyme homologous to -glucosidases, -xylosidases,

  16. Impact of Molecular Hydrogen on Chalcopyrite Bioleaching by the Extremely Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Metallosphaera sedula▿

    OpenAIRE

    Auernik, Kathryne S.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen served as a competitive inorganic energy source, impacting the CuFeS2 bioleaching efficiency of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula. Open reading frames encoding key terminal oxidase and electron transport chain components were triggered by CuFeS2. Evidence of heterotrophic metabolism was noted after extended periods of bioleaching, presumably related to cell lysis.

  17. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi

    OpenAIRE

    Simona LoBasso; Patrizia LoPalco; Giuseppe Mascolo; Angela Corcelli

    2008-01-01

    The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylg...

  18. Production of beta-xylanase and beta-xylosidase by the extremely halophilic archaeon Halorhabdus utahensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wainø, M.; Ingvorsen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The extremely halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis, isolated from the Great Salt Lake, Utah, produced beta-xylanase and beta-xylosidase activities. Both enzymes were active over a broad NaCl range from near zero to 30% NaCl when tested with culture broth. A broad NaCl optimum was observed f...

  19. First Insights into the Genome Sequence of the Halophilic Archaeon Halalkalicoccus paucihalophilus (DSM 24557).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlein, Anja; Mucek, Katharina; Enders, Marieke; Pankok, Frederik; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Halalkalicoccus paucihalophilus is an extremely halophilic, Gram-negative, and nonmotile coccus-like archaeon, which was originally isolated from the Lop Nur region in the northwest of China. The genome consists of a single replicon (3.98 Mbp). H. paucihalophilus is able to utilize mannose, which is unique for members of this genus. PMID:27198019

  20. The cobY Gene of the Archaeon Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1 Is Required for De Novo Cobamide Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Woodson, J. D.; Peck, R. F.; Krebs, M P; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    2003-01-01

    Genetic and nutritional analyses of mutants of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 showed that open reading frame (ORF) Vng1581C encodes a protein with nucleoside triphosphate:adenosylcobinamide-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase enzyme activity. This activity was previously associated with the cobY gene of the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain ΔH, but no evidence was obtained to demonstrate the direct involvement of this protein in c...

  1. Influence of nutritive factors on C50 carotenoids production by Haloferax mediterranei ATCC 33500 with two-stage cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chun-Jen; Ku, Kuo-Lung; Lee, Min-Hsiung; Su, Nan-Wei

    2010-08-01

    The production of pigments by Haloferax mediterranei ATCC 33500 with two-stage cultivation in response to nutritive factors in culture media was studied. Sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate in the second-stage media showed a marked effect upon the production of pigments, and sodium acetate could enhance the production. As the cells were harvested at mid-log phase of growth in first-stage cultivation and transferred to the defined media containing 5% sodium chloride, 0.1% sodium acetate and 8% magnesium sulfate at 37 degrees C, 120 rpm for further 24 h of cultivation, H. mediterranei exhibited to be an efficient producer of pigments. The yield of pigments could reach up to 0.604 A(494 nm) mL(-1) broth. TLC analysis and the UV-Vis spectra of individual spots thereof revealed that H. mediterranei produced three red pigments of C(50) carotenoid, namely bisanhydrobacterioruberin, monoanhydrobacterioruberin and bacterioruberin, as well as a C(45) carotenoid, 2-isopentenyl-3,4-dehydrorhodopin. PMID:20362434

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of binary and ternary complexes of Haloferax mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of binary and ternary complexes of wild-type and D38C mutant H. mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Haloferax mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) belongs to the medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily and requires zinc for catalysis. In the majority of these family members, the catalytic zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated by the side chains of a cysteine, a histidine, a cysteine or glutamate and a water molecule. In H. mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase, sequence analysis indicates that the zinc coordination is different, with the invariant cysteine replaced by an aspartate residue. In order to analyse the significance of this replacement and to contribute to an understanding of the role of the metal ion in catalysis, a range of binary and ternary complexes of the wild-type and a D38C mutant protein have been crystallized. For most of the complexes, crystals belonging to space group I222 were obtained using sodium/potassium citrate as a precipitant. However, for the binary and non-productive ternary complexes with NADPH/Zn, it was necessary to replace the citrate with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol. Despite the radical change in conditions, the crystals thus formed were isomorphous

  3. Description of a halocin-producing Haloferax larsenii HA1 isolated from Pachpadra salt lake in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Saxena, Jyoti; Tiwari, Santosh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Haloarchaea grow in the extreme environment, such as high salt concentration, and secrete antimicrobial peptides known as halocins. Identification of Haloferax larsenii strain HA1 was carried out using biochemical and molecular methods. Strain HA1 was found as a strict aerobe, catalase positive and Gram negative. It was able to grow optimally at 15 % NaCl (w/v), 42 °C and pH 7.2. Strain HA1 was sensitive to bile acid, was resistant to chloramphenicol and could not utilize arginine. Halocin, produced by strain HA1, was stable up to 100 °C and in a pH range of 5.0-9.0. Antimicrobial activity was not affected by organic solvents, surfactants and detergents, but it was completely lost in the presence of proteinase K, suggesting proteinaceous nature of the compound. It was halocidal against indicator strain Hfx. larsenii HA10. The molecular weight of halocin HA1 was found to be ~14 kDa. These properties of halocin HA1 may be applicable to the preservation of salted foods. PMID:26659359

  4. Biochemical Properties of a Putative Signal Peptide Peptidase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2005-01-01

    We have performed the first biochemical characterization of a putative archaeal signal peptide peptidase (SppATk) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. SppATk, comprised of 334 residues, was much smaller than its counterpart from Escherichia coli (618 residues) and harbored a single predicted transmembrane domain near its N terminus. A truncated mutant protein without the N-terminal 54 amino acid residues (ΔN54SppATk) was found to be stable against autoproteolys...

  5. Isolation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Biofilms of the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    OpenAIRE

    Jachlewski, Silke; Jachlewski, Witold D.; Linne, Uwe; Bräsen, Christopher; Wingender, Jost; Siebers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78°C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosp...

  6. Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a DNA-guided nuclease that targets cognate DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Swarts, Daan C.; Hegge, Jorrit W.; Hinojo, Ismael; Shiimori, Masami; Ellis, Michael A.; Dumrongkulraksa, Justin; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; van der Oost, John

    2015-01-01

    Functions of prokaryotic Argonautes (pAgo) have long remained elusive. Recently, Argonautes of the bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermus thermophilus were demonstrated to be involved in host defense. The Argonaute of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PfAgo) belongs to a different branch in the phylogenetic tree, which is most closely related to that of RNA interference-mediating eukaryotic Argonautes. Here we describe a functional and mechanistic characterization of PfAgo. Like the bac...

  7. Acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing in a methanogenic archaeon

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guishan; Zhang, Fan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Jinxing; Zhou, Liguang; Cai, Shichun; Liu, Xiaoli; Luo, Yuanming; Zhang, Guifeng; Shi, Wenyuan; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2012-01-01

    Acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing commonly refers to cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms found in bacteria. However, beyond bacteria, this cell-to-cell communication mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea 6Ac, encodes an active quorum sensing system that is used to regulate cell assembly and carbon metabolic flux. The methanogen 6Ac showed a cell density-dependent physiology transition, which was related t...

  8. Isolation and characterization of extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing Euryarchaeota from hypersaline cinders, sediments and soils and description of a novel CO oxidizer, Haloferax namakaokahaiae Mke2.3T, sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuff, S; King, G M; Neupane, S; Myers, M R

    2016-04-01

    The phylogenetic affiliations of organisms responsible for aerobic CO oxidation in hypersaline soils and sediments were assessed using media containing 3.8 M NaCl. CO-oxidizing strains of the euryarchaeotes, Haloarcula, Halorubrum, Haloterrigena and Natronorubrum, were isolated from the Bonneville Salt Flats (UT) and Atacama Desert salterns (Chile). A halophilic euryarchaeote, Haloferax strain Mke2.3(T), was isolated from Hawai'i Island saline cinders. Haloferax strain Mke2.3(T) was most closely related to Haloferax larsenii JCM 13917(T) (97.0% 16S rRNA sequence identity). It grew with a limited range of substrates, and oxidized CO at a headspace concentration of 0.1%. However, it did not grow with CO as a sole carbon and energy source. Its ability to oxidize CO, its polar lipid composition, substrate utilization and numerous other traits distinguished it from H. larsenii JCM 13917(T), and supported designation of the novel isolate as Haloferax namakaokahaiae Mke2.3(T), sp. nov (= DSM 29988, = LMG 29162). CO oxidation was also documented for 'Natronorubrum thiooxidans' HG1 (Sorokin, Tourova and Muyzer 2005), N. bangense (Xu, Zhou and Tian 1999) and N. sulfidifaciens AD2(T) (Cui et al. 2007). Collectively, these results established a previously unsuspected capacity for extremely halophilic aerobic CO oxidation, and indicated that the trait might be widespread among the Halobacteriaceae, and occur in a wide range of hypersaline habitats. PMID:26906098

  9. A cell-free transcription system for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hethke, C; Geerling, A C; Hausner, W.; de Vos, W.M.; Thomm, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe here the establishment of a cell-free transcription system for the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using the cloned glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) gene as template. The in vitro system that operated up to a temperature of 85 degrees C initiated transcription 23 bp downstream of a TATA box located 45 bp upstream of the translational start codon of gdh mRNA, at the same site as in Pyrococcus cells. Mutational analyses revealed that this TATA box is essential for in vit...

  10. Properties of a Thermostable Nitrate Reductase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    OpenAIRE

    Afshar, Sepideh; Johnson, Eric; de Vries, Simon; Schröder, Imke

    2001-01-01

    The nitrate reductase of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum was purified 137-fold from the cytoplasmic membrane. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, the enzyme complex consists of three subunits with apparent molecular weights of 130,000, 52,000, and 32,000. The enzyme contained molybdenum (0.8-mol/mol complex), iron (15.4-mol/mol complex) and cytochrome b (0.49-mol/mol complex) as cofactors. The P. aerophilum nitrate reductase disti...

  11. Proteomic mapping of the hyperthermophilic and acidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Richard C.; Young, Mark J.; Stedman, Kenneth M.; Dratz, Edward A.

    2006-07-14

    A proteomic map of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, an archaeon that grows optimally at 80 C and pH 3.2, was developed using high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. A total of 867 protein spots (659 aqueous tris-soluble spots and 208 aqueous tris-insoluble) were mapped over IPG 3-10, 4-7, and 6-11, with second dimension gels made of 8-18% polyacrylamide. 324 different gene products were represented by the 867 spots, with 274 gene products being identified in the tris-soluble fractions and 100 gene products in the tris-insoluble portion. Fifty gene products were found on gels from both fractions. Additionally, an average of 1.50 + 0.12 isoforms/per protein were identified. This mapping study confirmed the expression of proteins involved in numerous metabolic, transport, energy production, nucleic acid replication, translation, and transcription pathways. Of particular interest, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (SSO2537) was detected even though the pathway for gluconeogenesis is unknown for this archaeon. Tris-soluble fractions contained many cytosolic proteins while tris-insoluble fractions contained many membrane-associated proteins, including ABC transporters and an ATP synthase. This study provides an optimized 2-DE approach for investigating the biochemical pathways and post-translational modifications employed by Sulfolobus to survive in its extreme environment.

  12. Enrichment and Characterization of an Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Mesophilic Crenarchaeal Group I.1a from an Agricultural Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Min, D.; Kim, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, G.J.; Madsen, E.L.; Rhee, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Soil nitrification is an important process for agricultural productivity and environmental pollution. Though one cultivated representative of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from soil has been described, additional representatives warrant characterization. We describe an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (strain

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complet...

  14. Effect of DNA binding protein Ssh12 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae on DNA supercoiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼慧强; 黄力; VietQ.Mai

    1999-01-01

    An 11.5-ku DNA binding protein, designated as Sshl2, was purified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae by column chromatography in SP Sepharose, DNA cellulose and phosphocellulose. Sshl2 accounts for about 4 % of the total cellular protein. The protein is capable of binding to both negatively supercoiled and relaxed DNAs. Nick closure analysis revealed that Sshl2 constrains negative supercoils upon binding to DNA. While the ability of the protein to constrain supercoils is weak at 22℃ , it is enhanced substantially at temperatures higher than 37℃ . Both the cellular content and supercoil-constraining ability of Sshl2 suggest that the protein may play an important role in the organization and stabilization of the chromosome of S. shibatae.

  15. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Corcelli, Angela

    2008-12-01

    The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea. PMID:19054744

  16. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona LoBasso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea.

  17. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In archaea and eukaryotes aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) associate in multi-synthetase complexes (MSCs), however the role of such MSCs in translation is unknown. MSC function was investigated in vivo in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, wherein six aaRSs were affinity co-purified together...... with several other factors involved in protein synthesis, suggesting that MSCs may interact directly with translating ribosomes. In support of this hypothesis, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) activities of the MSC were enriched in isolated T. kodakarensis polysome fractions. These data indicate...... that components of the archaeal protein synthesis machinery associate into macromolecular assemblies in vivo and provide the potential to increase translation efficiency by limiting substrate diffusion away from the ribosome, thus facilitating rapid recycling of tRNAs. STRUCTURED SUMMARY OF PROTEIN...

  18. Maltose Metabolism in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus litoralis: Purification and Characterization of Key Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Karina B.; Peist, Ralf; Kossmann, Marina; Boos, Winfried; Santos, Helena

    1999-01-01

    Maltose metabolism was investigated in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis. Maltose was degraded by the concerted action of 4-α-glucanotransferase and maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP). The first enzyme produced glucose and a series of maltodextrins that could be acted upon by MalP when the chain length of glucose residues was equal or higher than four, to produce glucose-1-phosphate. Phosphoglucomutase activity was also detected in T. litoralis cell extracts. Glucose derived from the action of 4-α-glucanotransferase was subsequently metabolized via an Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The closely related organism Pyrococcus furiosus used a different metabolic strategy in which maltose was cleaved primarily by the action of an α-glucosidase, a p-nitrophenyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (PNPG)-hydrolyzing enzyme, producing glucose from maltose. A PNPG-hydrolyzing activity was also detected in T. litoralis, but maltose was not a substrate for this enzyme. The two key enzymes in the pathway for maltose catabolism in T. litoralis were purified to homogeneity and characterized; they were constitutively synthesized, although phosphorylase expression was twofold induced by maltodextrins or maltose. The gene encoding MalP was obtained by complementation in Escherichia coli and sequenced (calculated molecular mass, 96,622 Da). The enzyme purified from the organism had a specific activity for maltoheptaose, at the temperature for maximal activity (98°C), of 66 U/mg. A Km of 0.46 mM was determined with heptaose as the substrate at 60°C. The deduced amino acid sequence had a high degree of identity with that of the putative enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (66%) and with sequences of the enzymes from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima (60%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (31%) but not with that of the enzyme from E. coli (13%). The consensus binding site for pyridoxal 5′-phosphate is conserved in the T. litoralis

  19. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We report here that oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2 that operates close to thermodynamic equilibrium is coupled to vectorial H+ and Na+ transport across the cytoplasmic membrane of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1. The ion gradient established then drives ATP synthesis via a Na+-ATP synthase. The energy-converting enzyme complex involves a formate dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound hydrogenase with similarity to complex I of the aerobic electron transport chain and a...

  20. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of a Protein-Serine/Threonine Phosphatase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi TAG11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Bianca; Frey, Gerhard; Swanson, Ronald V.; Mathur, Eric J.; Stetter, K. O.

    1998-01-01

    An open reading frame coding for a putative protein-serine/threonine phosphatase was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi TAG11 and named Py-PP1. Py-PP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified from inclusion bodies, and biochemically characterized. The phosphatase gene is part of an operon which may provide, for the first time, insight into a physiological role for archaeal protein phosphatases in vivo. PMID:9696747

  1. The cobY gene of the archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 is required for de novo cobamide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, J D; Peck, R F; Krebs, M P; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    2003-01-01

    Genetic and nutritional analyses of mutants of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 showed that open reading frame (ORF) Vng1581C encodes a protein with nucleoside triphosphate:adenosylcobinamide-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase enzyme activity. This activity was previously associated with the cobY gene of the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain DeltaH, but no evidence was obtained to demonstrate the direct involvement of this protein in cobamide biosynthesis in archaea. Computer analysis of the Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 ORF Vng1581C gene and the cobY gene of M. thermoautotrophicum strain DeltaH showed the primary amino acid sequence of the proteins encoded by these two genes to be 35% identical and 48% similar. A strain of Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 carrying a null allele of the cobY gene was auxotrophic for cobinamide-GDP, a known intermediate of the late steps of cobamide biosynthesis. The auxotrophic requirement for cobinamide-GDP was corrected when a wild-type allele of cobY was introduced into the mutant strain, demonstrating that the lack of cobY function was solely responsible for the observed block in cobamide biosynthesis in this archaeon. The data also show that Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 possesses a high-affinity transport system for corrinoids and that this archaeon can synthesize cobamides de novo under aerobic growth conditions. To the best of our knowledge this is the first genetic and nutritional analysis of cobalamin biosynthetic mutants in archaea. PMID:12486068

  2. Biology and survival of extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui RR12 isolated from Mumbai salterns, India in response to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S; Shinde, Vinaya D; Oke, Radhika S; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2016-01-01

    Haloarchaea are unique microorganism's resistant to environmental and osmotic stresses and thrive in their habitats despite extreme fluctuating salinities. In the present study, haloarchaea were isolated from hypersaline thalossohaline salterns of Bhandup, Mumbai, India and were identified as Haloferax prahovense, Haloferax alexandrines, Haloferax lucentense, Haloarcula tradensis, Haloarcula marismortui and Haloarcula argentinensis. The mechanism of adaptation to contrasting salinities (1.5 M and 4.5 M) was investigated in the extreme haloarchaeon, Hal. marismortui RR12. Hal. marismortui RR12 increased the intracellular sequestration of K(+) and Cl(-) ions in hypo salinity and hyper salinity respectively as detected by Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDAX) and Inductively Coupled Plasma- atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) indicating the presence of 'salt-in' strategy of osmoadaptation. As a cellular response to salinity stress, it produced small heat shock like proteins (sHSP) identified using MALDI-TOF MS and increased the production of protective red carotenoid pigment. This is the first report on the study of the concomitant cellular, molecular and physiological mechanism adapted by Hal. marismortui RR12 when exposed to contrasting salinities in external environment. PMID:27231230

  3. Identification and characterization of arsenite methyltransferase from an archaeon, Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Sun, Guo-Xin; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous toxic contaminant in the environment. The methylation of arsenic can affect its toxicity and is primarily mediated by biological processes. Few studies have focused on the mechanism of arsenic methylation in archaea although archaea are widespread in the environment. Here, an arsenite [As(III)] methyltransferase (ArsM) was identified and characterized from an archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A. Heterologous expression of MaarsM was shown to confer As(III) resistance to an arsenic-sensitive strain of E. coli through arsenic methylation and subsequent volatilization. Purified MaArsM protein was further identified the function in catalyzing the formation of various methylated products from As(III) in vitro. Methylation of As(III) by MaArsM is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiol cofactors used, with some of them (coenzyme M, homocysteine, and dithiothreitol) more efficient than GSH. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that three conserved cysteine (Cys) residues (Cys62, Cys150, and Cys200) in MaArsM were necessary for As(III) methylation, of which only Cys150 and Cys200 were required for the methylation of monomethylarsenic. These results present a molecular pathway for arsenic methylation in archaea and provide some insight into the role of archaea in As biogeochemistry. PMID:25295694

  4. Molecular Characterization of Copper and Cadmium Resistance Determinants in the Biomining Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Orell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfolobus metallicus is a thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon used in high-temperature bioleaching processes that is able to grow under stressing conditions such as high concentrations of heavy metals. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for heavy metal resistance in S. metallicus remain uncharacterized. Proteomic analysis of S. metallicus cells exposed to 100 mM Cu revealed that 18 out of 30 upregulated proteins are related to the production and conversion of energy, amino acids biosynthesis, and stress responses. Ten of these last proteins were also up-regulated in S. metallicus treated in the presence of 1 mM Cd suggesting that at least in part, a common general response to these two heavy metals. The S. metallicus genome contained two complete cop gene clusters, each encoding a metallochaperone (CopM, a Cu-exporting ATPase (CopA, and a transcriptional regulator (CopT. Transcriptional expression analysis revealed that copM and copA from each cop gene cluster were cotranscribed and their transcript levels increased when S. metallicus was grown either in the presence of Cu or using chalcopyrite (CuFeS2 as oxidizable substrate. This study shows for the first time the presence of a duplicated version of the cop gene cluster in Archaea and characterizes some of the Cu and Cd resistance determinants in a thermophilic archaeon employed for industrial biomining.

  5. Production and properties of an exopolysaccharide synthesized by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillaci, Giuseppe; Finamore, Rosario; Diana, Paola; Restaino, Odile Francesca; Schiraldi, Chiara; Arbucci, Salvatore; Ionata, Elena; La Cara, Francesco; Morana, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    We have isolated a novel exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica. Some features, remarkable from an industrial point of view, such as emulsifying and antioxidant properties, were investigated. H. turkmenica excreted 20.68 mg of EPS per 100 ml of culture medium when grown in usual medium supplemented with glucose. The microorganism excreted the biopolymer mainly in the middle exponential growth phase and reached the maximal production in the stationary phase. Analyses by anion exchange chromatography and SEC-TDA Viscotek indicated that the EPS was composed of two main fractions of 801.7 and 206.0 kDa. It was a sulfated heteropolysaccharide containing glucose, galactose, glucosamine, galactosamine, and glucuronic acid. Studies performed utilizing the mixture of EPS anionic fractions showed that the biopolymer had emulsifying activity towards vegetable oils comparable or superior to that exhibited by the controls, moderate antioxidant power when tested with 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(·)), and moisture-retention ability higher than hyaluronic acid (HA). The EPS from H. turkmenica is the first exopolysaccharide produced by an archaea to be characterized in terms of properties that can have potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26403921

  6. ATP synthesis at 100 degrees C by an ATPase purified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeier, R; Hauska, G; Stetter, K O

    2000-02-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi isolate TAG 11 lives close to 100 degrees C and gains energy by sulfur respiration, with hydrogen as electron donor. From the membranes of this hyperthermophile, an ATPase complex was isolated. The purified enzyme consists of six major polypeptides, the 67, 51, 41, 26 and 22 kDa subunits composing the AF(1) headpiece, and the 7 kDa proteolipid of the AF(0) component. The headpiece of the enzyme restored the formation of ATP during sulfur respiration in membrane vesicles from which it had been removed by low salt treatment. Characteristics of the reconstituted activity suggest that the same enzyme is responsible for ATP formation in untreated membranes. ATP formation was neither sensitive to ionophores and uncouplers, nor to dicyclohexyl carbodiimide, but depended on closed vesicles. Both ATPase activity (up to 2 micromol per min and mg protein) as well as ATP formation (up to 0.4 micromol per min and mg membrane protein) were highest at 100 degrees C. A P/e2 ratio of close to one can be estimated for sulfur respiration with hydrogen. In addition to ATP, autoradiographic detection revealed the formation of high quantities of (33)P(i)-labeled ADP and of another compound not identified so far. PMID:10664465

  7. Methanosarcina subterranea sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeon isolated from a deep subsurface diatomaceous shale formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Naganuma, Takeshi; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    A methanogenic archaeon, strain HC-2(T), was isolated from a deep diatomaceous shale formation. The strain grew on methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine and dimethylsulphide, but not on acetate, H2/CO2, formate, 2-propanol, 2-butanol or cyclopentanol. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, and coccus-like, 0.9-1.4 µm in diameter, and occurred singly, in pairs, or as aggregates. The strain grew at 10-40 °C (optimum 35 °C), pH 5.9-7.4 (optimum pH 6.6-6.8) and in 0-0.6 M NaCl (optimum 0.1-0.2 M). The genomic DNA G+C content was 41.5 mol% and the 16S rRNA gene sequence was closely related to those of Methanosarcina lacustris DSM 13486(T) (99.1%) and Methanosarcina siciliae DSM 3028(T) (98.3%). Values for DNA-DNA hybridization with these strains were less than 30%. The phenotypic and phylogenetic features of HC-2(T) indicate that it represents a novel species of the genus Methanosarcina , for which the name Methanosarcina subterranea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HC-2(T) ( = DSM 22503(T) = JCM 15540(T) = NBRC 102578(T)). PMID:25604340

  8. Molecular characterization of copper and cadmium resistance determinants in the biomining thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orell, Alvaro; Remonsellez, Francisco; Arancibia, Rafaela; Jerez, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Sulfolobus metallicus is a thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon used in high-temperature bioleaching processes that is able to grow under stressing conditions such as high concentrations of heavy metals. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for heavy metal resistance in S. metallicus remain uncharacterized. Proteomic analysis of S. metallicus cells exposed to 100 mM Cu revealed that 18 out of 30 upregulated proteins are related to the production and conversion of energy, amino acids biosynthesis, and stress responses. Ten of these last proteins were also up-regulated in S. metallicus treated in the presence of 1 mM Cd suggesting that at least in part, a common general response to these two heavy metals. The S. metallicus genome contained two complete cop gene clusters, each encoding a metallochaperone (CopM), a Cu-exporting ATPase (CopA), and a transcriptional regulator (CopT). Transcriptional expression analysis revealed that copM and copA from each cop gene cluster were cotranscribed and their transcript levels increased when S. metallicus was grown either in the presence of Cu or using chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) as oxidizable substrate. This study shows for the first time the presence of a duplicated version of the cop gene cluster in Archaea and characterizes some of the Cu and Cd resistance determinants in a thermophilic archaeon employed for industrial biomining. PMID:23509422

  9. Characterization of the proteasome from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franzetti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20S proteasome, comprising two subunits α and β, was purified from the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui, which grows only in saturated salt conditions. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the H. marismortui proteasome (Hm proteasome, obtained from negatively stained electron micrographs, is virtually identical to the structure of a thermophilic proteasome filtered to the same resolution. The stability of the Hm proteasome was found to be less salt-dependent than that of other halophilic enzymes previously described. The proteolytic activity of the Hm proteasome was investigated using the malate dehydrogenase from H. marismortui (HmMalDH as a model substrate. The HmMalDH denatures when the salt concentration is decreased below 2 M. Under these conditions, the proteasome efficiently cleaves HmMalDH during its denaturation process, but the fully denatured HmMalDH is poorly degraded. These in vitro experiments show that, at low salt concentrations, the 20S proteasome from halophilic archaea eliminates a misfolded protein.

  10. Proteomic Insights into Sulfur Metabolism in the Hydrogen-Producing Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Jung Moon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 has been shown to produce H2 when using CO, formate, or starch as a growth substrate. This strain can also utilize elemental sulfur as a terminal electron acceptor for heterotrophic growth. To gain insight into sulfur metabolism, the proteome of T. onnurineus NA1 cells grown under sulfur culture conditions was quantified and compared with those grown under H2-evolving substrate culture conditions. Using label-free nano-UPLC-MSE-based comparative proteomic analysis, approximately 38.4% of the total identified proteome (589 proteins was found to be significantly up-regulated (≥1.5-fold under sulfur culture conditions. Many of these proteins were functionally associated with carbon fixation, Fe–S cluster biogenesis, ATP synthesis, sulfur reduction, protein glycosylation, protein translocation, and formate oxidation. Based on the abundances of the identified proteins in this and other genomic studies, the pathways associated with reductive sulfur metabolism, H2-metabolism, and oxidative stress defense were proposed. The results also revealed markedly lower expression levels of enzymes involved in the sulfur assimilation pathway, as well as cysteine desulfurase, under sulfur culture condition. The present results provide the first global atlas of proteome changes triggered by sulfur, and may facilitate an understanding of how hyperthermophilic archaea adapt to sulfur-rich, extreme environments.

  11. Pyrobaculum calidifontis sp. nov., a novel hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows in atmospheric air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Amo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel, facultatively aerobic, heterotrophic hyperthermophilic archaeon was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring in the Philippines. Cells of the new isolate, strain VA1, were rod-shaped with a length of 1.5 to 10 μm and a width of 0.5 to 1.0 μm. Isolate VA1 grew optimally at 90 to 95 °C and pH 7.0 under atmospheric air. Oxygen served as a final electron acceptor under aerobic growth conditions, and vigorous shaking of the medium significantly enhanced growth. Elemental sulfur inhibited cell growth under aerobic growth conditions, whereas thiosulfate stimulated cell growth. Under anaerobic growth conditions, nitrate served as a final electron acceptor, but nitrite or sulfur-containing compounds such as elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfate and sulfite could not act as final electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 51 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain VA1 exhibited close relationships to species of the genus Pyrobaculum. A DNA–DNA hybridization study revealed a low level of similarity (≤ 18% between strain VA1 and previously described members of the genus Pyrobaculum. Physiological characteristics also indicated that strain VA1 was distinct from these Pyrobaculum species. Our results indicate that isolate VA1 represents a novel species, named Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

  12. Cloning and Characterization of an Alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular a-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  13. Cysteine desulphurase plays an important role in environmental adaptation of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidese, Ryota; Inoue, Takahiro; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    The sulphur atoms of sulphur-containing cofactors that are essential for numerous cellular functions in living organisms originate from L-cysteine via cysteine desulphurase (CSD) activity. However, many (hyper)thermophilic archaea, which thrive in solfataric fields and are positioned near the root of the evolutionary tree of life, lack CSD orthologues. The existence of CSD orthologues in a subset of (hyper)thermophilic archaea is of interest with respect to the evolution of sulphur-trafficking systems for the cofactors. This study demonstrates that the disruption of the csd gene of Thermococcus kodakarensis, a facultative elemental sulphur (S(0))-reducing hyperthermophilic archaeon, encoding Tk-CSD, conferred a growth defect evident only in the absence of S(0), and that growth can be restored by the addition of S(0), but not sulphide. We show that the csd gene is not required for biosynthesis of thiamine pyrophosphate or molybdopterin, irrespective of the presence or absence of S(0), but is necessary for iron-sulphur cluster biosynthesis in the absence of S(0). Recombinant form of Tk-CSD expressed in Escherichia coli was obtained and it was found to catalyse the desulphuration of L-cysteine. The obtained data suggest that hyperthermophiles might benefit from a capacity for CSD-dependent iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis, which allows them to thrive outside solfataric environments. PMID:24893566

  14. Functional organization of a single nif cluster in the mesophilic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ehlers

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesophilic methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 is able to utilize molecular nitrogen (N2 as its sole nitrogen source. We have identified and characterized a single nitrogen fixation (nif gene cluster in M. mazei Gö1 with an approximate length of 9 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed seven genes with sequence similarities to nifH, nifI1, nifI2, nifD, nifK, nifE and nifN, similar to other diazotrophic methanogens and certain bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, with the two glnB-like genes (nifI1 and nifI2 located between nifH and nifD. Phylogenetic analysis of deduced amino acid sequences for the nitrogenase structural genes of M. mazei Gö1 showed that they are most closely related to Methanosarcina barkeri nif2 genes, and also closely resemble those for the corresponding nif products of the gram-positive bacterium C. acetobutylicum. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the M. mazei nif genes constitute an operon transcribed only under nitrogen starvation as a single 8 kb transcript. Sequence analysis revealed a palindromic sequence at the transcriptional start site in front of the M. mazei nifH gene, which may have a function in transcriptional regulation of the nif operon.

  15. A laboratory experiment of intact polar lipid degradation in sandy sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Logemann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intact polar lipids (IPLs are considered biomarkers for living biomass. Their degradation in marine sediments, however, is poorly understood and complicates interpretation of their occurrence in geological samples. To investigate the turnover of IPLs, a degradation experiment with anoxic sandy sediments from the North Sea was conducted. Intact cells of two organisms that do not naturally occur in North Sea sediments were chosen as IPL sources: (i Saccharomyces cerevisiae, representative for ester-bound acyl lipids that also occur in Bacteria, and (ii the archaeon Haloferax volcanii, representative for ether-bound isoprenoid lipids. Surprisingly, IPLs with phosphoester-bound head groups showed approximately the same degradation rate as IPLs with glycosidic head groups. Furthermore, the results indicate a relatively fast degradation of S. cerevisiae IPLs with ester-bound moieties (analogs of bacterial membrane lipids and no significant degradation of archaeal IPLs with ether-bound moieties. Pore water and 16S rRNA-based DGGE analysis showed only a minor influence of the IPL source on microbial metabolism and community profiles. Due to our results, the IPL-based quantification of Archaea and Bacteria should be interpreted with caution.

  16. A laboratory experiment of intact polar lipid degradation in sandy sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, J.; Graue, J.; Köster, J.; Engelen, B.; Rullkötter, J.; Cypionka, H.

    2011-09-01

    Intact polar lipids (IPLs) are considered biomarkers for living biomass. Their degradation in marine sediments, however, is poorly understood and complicates interpretation of their occurrence in geological samples. To investigate the turnover of IPLs, a degradation experiment with anoxic sandy sediments from the North Sea was conducted. Intact cells of two organisms that do not naturally occur in North Sea sediments were chosen as IPL sources: (i) Saccharomyces cerevisiae, representative for ester-bound acyl lipids that also occur in Bacteria, and (ii) the archaeon Haloferax volcanii, representative for ether-bound isoprenoid lipids. Surprisingly, IPLs with phosphoester-bound head groups showed approximately the same degradation rate as IPLs with glycosidic head groups. Furthermore, the results indicate a relatively fast degradation of S. cerevisiae IPLs with ester-bound moieties (analogs of bacterial membrane lipids) and no significant degradation of archaeal IPLs with ether-bound moieties. Pore water and 16S rRNA-based DGGE analysis showed only a minor influence of the IPL source on microbial metabolism and community profiles. Due to our results, the IPL-based quantification of Archaea and Bacteria should be interpreted with caution.

  17. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. PMID:27226589

  18. A new type of didhydroorotate dehydrogenase, type 1S, from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P. G.; Dandanell, Gert

    2002-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) (EC 1.3.3.1) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 (DSM 1617) was partially purified 3,158-fold, characterized, and the encoding genes identified. Based on enzymological as well as phylogenetic methods, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from S....... solfataricus (DHODS) represents a new type of DHOD, type 1S. Furthermore, it is unable to use any of the (type-specific) natural electron acceptors employed by all other presently known DHODs. DHODS shows optimal activity at 70°C in the pH range 7-8.5. It is capable of using ferricyanide, 2...

  19. Different roles of two transcription factor B proteins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidese, Ryota; Nishikawa, Ryo; Gao, Le; Katano, Masahiro; Imai, Tomohiro; Kato, Satoru; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2014-05-01

    Two genes, TK1280 and TK2287, encode orthologous transcription factor B proteins (TFB1 and TFB2, respectively) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. The functional difference between their TFBs remains unknown. While TFB1 and TFB2 displayed equivalent thermostability, mRNA levels of tfb1 at 93 °C were eightfold higher than those at 60 or 85 °C, and were 4- to 10-fold greater than those of tfb2 at all temperatures. This suggests that TFB1 is the abundant TFB in T. kodakarensis and is heat-inducible. By contrast, the mRNA level of tfb2 increased at 93 °C, but the levels were less than twofold of those at 60 or 85 °C. No significant differences in growth were observed among the DTF1 (∆tfb1, ∆pyrF), DTF2 (∆tfb2 ∆pyrF), and parental host strain KU216 (∆pyrF) at 60 °C. However, DTF2 showed a decrease in cell yield at 85 °C, and both DTF1 and DTF2 showed growth defects at 93 °C. Comparative transcriptome analysis between KU216 and DTF1 or DTF2 indicated that TFB1 apparently controls the expression of genes essential for motility/adhesion, whereas TFB2 regulates genes involved in mevalonate/lipid biosynthesis. In DTF1, the ratio of cells with flagella decreased at 85 and 93 °C, and reporter studies indicated that flaB1 transcription is dependent on TFB1 at 85 °C but not at 60 °C. PMID:24627188

  20. Isolation of extracellular polymeric substances from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eJachlewski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78 °C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER extraction and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundredshundred of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25 kDa to 116 kDa and pI values of 5 to 8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse groups of enzymes such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms.

  1. Apo and ligand-bound structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sum; Giuroiu, Iulia; Chernishof, Irina; Sawaya, Michael R; Chiang, Janet; Gunsalus, Robert P; Arbing, Mark A; Perry, L Jeanne

    2010-03-01

    The trace-element oxyanion molybdate, which is required for the growth of many bacterial and archaeal species, is transported into the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily uptake system called ModABC. ModABC consists of the ModA periplasmic solute-binding protein, the integral membrane-transport protein ModB and the ATP-binding and hydrolysis cassette protein ModC. In this study, X-ray crystal structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaModA) have been determined in the apoprotein conformation at 1.95 and 1.69 A resolution and in the molybdate-bound conformation at 2.25 and 2.45 A resolution. The overall domain structure of MaModA is similar to other ModA proteins in that it has a bilobal structure in which two mixed alpha/beta domains are linked by a hinge region. The apo MaModA is the first unliganded archaeal ModA structure to be determined: it exhibits a deep cleft between the two domains and confirms that upon binding ligand one domain is rotated towards the other by a hinge-bending motion, which is consistent with the 'Venus flytrap' model seen for bacterial-type periplasmic binding proteins. In contrast to the bacterial ModA structures, which have tetrahedral coordination of their metal substrates, molybdate-bound MaModA employs octahedral coordination of its substrate like other archaeal ModA proteins. PMID:20208152

  2. Isolation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Biofilms of the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachlewski, Silke; Jachlewski, Witold D; Linne, Uwe; Bräsen, Christopher; Wingender, Jost; Siebers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78°C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER) extraction, and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether, or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability, and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundreds of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25-116 kDa and pI values of 5-8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse enzyme classes, such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases, and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms. PMID:26380258

  3. Structural characterization of ether lipids from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus by high-resolution shotgun lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sara Munk; Brandl, Martin; Treusch, Alexander H; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-03-01

    The molecular structures, biosynthetic pathways and physiological functions of membrane lipids produced by organisms in the domain Archaea are poorly characterized as compared with that of counterparts in Bacteria and Eukaryota. Here we report on the use of high-resolution shotgun lipidomics to characterize, for the first time, the lipid complement of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. To support the identification of lipids in S. islandicus, we first compiled a database of ether lipid species previously ascribed to Archaea. Next, we analyzed the lipid complement of S. islandicus by high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry using an ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This analysis identified five clusters of molecular ions that matched ether lipids in the database with sub-ppm mass accuracy. To structurally characterize and validate the identities of the potential lipid species, we performed structural analysis using multistage activation on the ion trap-orbitrap instrument as well as tandem mass analysis using a quadrupole time-of-flight machine. Our analysis identified four ether lipid species previously reported in Archaea, and one ether lipid species that had not been described before. This uncharacterized lipid species features two head group structures composed of a trisaccharide residue carrying an uncommon sulfono group (-SO3) and an inositol phosphate group. Both head groups are linked to a glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether core structure having isoprenoid chains with a total of 80 carbon atoms and 4 cyclopentane moieties. The shotgun lipidomics approach deployed here defines a novel workflow for exploratory lipid profiling of Archaea. PMID:25800184

  4. Characterization of an archaeal malic enzyme from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakao Fukuda

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the interconversion between C4 and C3 compounds has an important role in overall metabolism, limited information is available on the properties and regulation of enzymes acting on these metabolites in hyperthermophilic archaea. Malic enzyme is one of the enzymes involved in this interconversion, catalyzing the oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate as well as the reductive carboxylation coupled with NAD(PH. This study focused on the enzymatic properties and expression profile of an uncharacterized homolog of malic enzyme identified in the genome of a heterotrophic, hyperthermophilic archaeon T hermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 (Tk-Mae. The amino acid sequence of Tk-Mae was 52–58% identical to those of malic enzymes from bacteria, whereas the similarities to the eukaryotic homologs were lower. Several catalytically important regions and residues were conserved in the primary structure of Tk-Mae. The recombinant protein, which formed a homodimer, exhibited thermostable malic enzyme activity with strict divalent cation dependency. The enzyme preferred NADP+ rather than NAD+, but did not catalyze the decarboxylation of oxaloacetate, unlike the usual NADP-dependent malic enzymes. The apparent Michaelis constant (Km of Tk-Mae for malate (16.9 mM was much larger than those of known enzymes, leading to no strong preference for the reaction direction. Transcription of the gene encoding Tk-Mae and intracellular malic enzyme activity in T. kodakaraensis were constitutively weak, regardless of the growth substrates. Possible roles of Tk-Mae are discussed based on these results and the metabolic pathways of T. kodakaraensis deduced from the genome sequence.

  5. Recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PCNA from the psychrophilic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii DSM 6242

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from the eurypsychrophilic archaeon M. burtonii DSM 6242 has been cloned, overproduced, purified and crystallized. Crystals were deemed to be suitable for X-ray analysis and structure determination to 2.40 Å resolution. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a DNA-clamping protein that is responsible for increasing the processivity of the replicative polymerases during DNA replication and repair. The PCNA from the eurypsychrophilic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii DSM 6242 (MbPCNA) has been targeted for protein structural studies. A recombinant expression system has been created that overproduces MbPCNA with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag in Escherichia coli. As a result, recombinant MbPCNA with a molecular mass of 28.3 kDa has been purified to at least 95% homogeneity and crystallized by vapor-diffusion equilibration. Preliminary X-ray analysis revealed a trigonal hexagonal R3 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.5, c = 97.5 Å. A single MbPCNA crystal was subjected to complete diffraction data-set collection using synchrotron radiation and reflections were measured to 2.40 Å resolution. The diffraction data were of suitable quality for indexing and scaling and an unrefined molecular-replacement solution has been obtained

  6. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of proliferating cell nuclear antigen from the archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from a novel hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens has been crystallized, and diffraction data have been collected to 1.86 Å. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a DNA sliding clamp which confers processivity on replicative DNA polymerases. PCNA also acts as a sliding platform that enables the association of many DNA-processing proteins with DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner. In this investigation, the PCNA from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens (TtPCNA) was cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to greater than 90% homogeneity. TtPCNA crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor-diffusion methods and the best ordered crystal diffracted to 1.86 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P63, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 89.0, c = 62.8 Å. Crystals of TtPCNA proved to be amenable to complete X-ray analysis and future structure determination

  7. Genome-wide transcriptional response of the archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans to cadmium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Lagorce

    Full Text Available Thermococcus gammatolerans, the most radioresistant archaeon known to date, is an anaerobic and hyperthermophilic sulfur-reducing organism living in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Knowledge of mechanisms underlying archaeal metal tolerance in such metal-rich ecosystem is still poorly documented. We showed that T. gammatolerans exhibits high resistance to cadmium (Cd, cobalt (Co and zinc (Zn, a weaker tolerance to nickel (Ni, copper (Cu and arsenate (AsO(4 and that cells exposed to 1 mM Cd exhibit a cellular Cd concentration of 67 µM. A time-dependent transcriptomic analysis using microarrays was performed at a non-toxic (100 µM and a toxic (1 mM Cd dose. The reliability of microarray data was strengthened by real time RT-PCR validations. Altogether, 114 Cd responsive genes were revealed and a substantial subset of genes is related to metal homeostasis, drug detoxification, re-oxidization of cofactors and ATP production. This first genome-wide expression profiling study of archaeal cells challenged with Cd showed that T. gammatolerans withstands induced stress through pathways observed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes but also through new and original strategies. T. gammatolerans cells challenged with 1 mM Cd basically promote: 1 the induction of several transporter/permease encoding genes, probably to detoxify the cell; 2 the upregulation of Fe transporters encoding genes to likely compensate Cd damages in iron-containing proteins; 3 the induction of membrane-bound hydrogenase (Mbh and membrane-bound hydrogenlyase (Mhy2 subunits encoding genes involved in recycling reduced cofactors and/or in proton translocation for energy production. By contrast to other organisms, redox homeostasis genes appear constitutively expressed and only a few genes encoding DNA repair proteins are regulated. We compared the expression of 27 Cd responsive genes in other stress conditions (Zn, Ni, heat shock, γ-rays, and showed that the Cd transcriptional pattern is

  8. Structural characterization of ether lipids from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus by high-resolution shotgun lipidomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sara Munk; Brandl, Martin; Treusch, Alexander H; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-01-01

    characterize, for the first time, the lipid complement of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. To support the identification of lipids in S. islandicus, we first compiled a database of ether lipid species previously ascribed to Archaea. Next, we analyzed the lipid complement of S. islandicus by high......-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry using an ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This analysis identified five clusters of molecular ions that matched ether lipids in the database with sub-ppm mass accuracy. To structurally characterize and validate the identities of the potential lipid species, we...... performed structural analysis using multistage activation on the ion trap-orbitrap instrument as well as tandem mass analysis using a quadrupole time-of-flight machine. Our analysis identified four ether lipid species previously reported in Archaea, and one ether lipid species that had not been described...

  9. Anaerobic desulfurization of ground rubber with the thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus--a new method for rubber recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredberg, K; Persson, J; Christiansson, M; Stenberg, B; Holst, O

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic sulfur-reducing archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated regarding its capacity to desulfurize rubber material. The microorganism's sensitivity towards common rubber elastomers and additives was tested and several were shown to be toxic to P. furiosus. The microorganism was shown to utilize sulfur in vulcanized natural rubber and an increase in cell density was obtained when cultivated in the presence of spent tire rubber. Ethanol-leached cryo-ground tire rubber treated with P. furiosus for 10 days was vulcanized together with virgin rubber material (15% w/w) and the mechanical properties of the resulting material were determined. The increase in the stress at break value and the decrease in swell ratio and stress relaxation rate obtained for material containing microbially treated rubber (compared to untreated material) show the positive effects of microbial desulfurization on rubber. PMID:11234957

  10. Adaptive engineering of a hyperthermophilic archaeon on CO and discovering the underlying mechanism by multi-omics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hyuk; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kim, Tae Wan; Bae, Seung Seob; Lee, Sung-Mok; Jung, Hae Chang; Yang, Tae-Jun; Choi, Ae Ran; Cho, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2016-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 can grow and produce H2 on carbon monoxide (CO) and its H2 production rates have been improved through metabolic engineering. In this study, we applied adaptive evolution to enhance H2 productivity. After over 150 serial transfers onto CO medium, cell density, CO consumption rate and H2 production rate increased. The underlying mechanism for those physiological changes could be explained by using multi-omics approaches including genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses. A putative transcriptional regulator was newly identified to regulate the expression levels of genes related to CO oxidation. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the transcript levels of genes belonging to the categories of transcription, translation and energy metabolism. Our study presents the first genome-scale methylation pattern of hyperthermophilic archaea. Adaptive evolution led to highly enhanced H2 productivity at high CO flow rates using synthesis gas produced from coal gasification. PMID:26975345

  11. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  12. The genome sequence of the metal-mobilizing, extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula provides insights into bioleaching-associated metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auernik, Kathryne S; Maezato, Yukari; Blum, Paul H; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-02-01

    Despite their taxonomic description, not all members of the order Sulfolobales are capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur species, which, in addition to iron oxidation, is a desirable trait of biomining microorganisms. However, the complete genome sequence of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula DSM 5348 (2.2 Mb, approximately 2,300 open reading frames [ORFs]) provides insights into biologically catalyzed metal sulfide oxidation. Comparative genomics was used to identify pathways and proteins involved (directly or indirectly) with bioleaching. As expected, the M. sedula genome contains genes related to autotrophic carbon fixation, metal tolerance, and adhesion. Also, terminal oxidase cluster organization indicates the presence of hybrid quinol-cytochrome oxidase complexes. Comparisons with the mesophilic biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 indicate that the M. sedula genome encodes at least one putative rusticyanin, involved in iron oxidation, and a putative tetrathionate hydrolase, implicated in sulfur oxidation. The fox gene cluster, involved in iron oxidation in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus, was also identified. These iron- and sulfur-oxidizing components are missing from genomes of nonleaching members of the Sulfolobales, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM 639. Whole-genome transcriptional response analysis showed that 88 ORFs were up-regulated twofold or more in M. sedula upon addition of ferrous sulfate to yeast extract-based medium; these included genes for components of terminal oxidase clusters predicted to be involved with iron oxidation, as well as genes predicted to be involved with sulfur metabolism. Many hypothetical proteins were also differentially transcribed, indicating that aspects of the iron and sulfur metabolism of M. sedula remain to be identified and characterized. PMID:18083856

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a cohesin-like module from AF2375 of the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cohesin-like module from the hyperthermophilic archaeon A. fulgidus was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.82 Å resolution. A cohesin-like module of 160 amino-acid residues from the hypothetical protein AF2375 of the noncellulolytic, hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus was cloned, expressed, purified, crystallized and subjected to X-ray structural study in order to compare its structure with those of cellulolytic cohesins. The crystals had cubic symmetry, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 101.75 Å in space group P4332, and diffracted to 1.82 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained a single cohesin molecule. A model assembled from six cohesin structures of very low sequence identity to the cohesin-like module was used in molecular-replacement attempts, producing a marginal solution

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a novel dye-linked l-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel dye-linked l-proline dehydrogenase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon was successfully isolated and crystallized. A novel dye-linked l-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212 or its enantiomorph P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.1, c = 276.3 Å, and diffracted to 2.87 Å resolution using a Cu Kα rotating-anode generator with an R-AXIS VII detector. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, giving a crystal volume per enzyme mass (VM) of 2.75 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 55.3%

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a dye-linked d-lactate dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dye-linked d-lactate dehydrogenase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon was successfully isolated and crystallized. A dye-linked d-lactate dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.4, b = 119.4, c = 70.2 Å, β = 112.0°, and diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution on the BL26B1 beamline at SPring-8. The overall Rmerge was 4.5% and the completeness was 99.8%

  16. Characterization of an Exo-β-d-Glucosaminidase Involved in a Novel Chitinolytic Pathway from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2003-01-01

    We previously clarified that the chitinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 produces diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2) as an end product from chitin. Here we sought to identify enzymes in T. kodakaraensis that were involved in the further degradation of GlcNAc2. Through a search of the T. kodakaraensis genome, one candidate gene identified as a putative β-glycosyl hydrolase was found in the near vicinity of the chitinase gene. The primary structure of the candida...

  17. The Genome Sequence of the Metal-Mobilizing, Extremely Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Metallosphaera sedula Provides Insights into Bioleaching-Associated Metabolism▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Auernik, Kathryne S.; Maezato, Yukari; Paul H. Blum; Kelly, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite their taxonomic description, not all members of the order Sulfolobales are capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur species, which, in addition to iron oxidation, is a desirable trait of biomining microorganisms. However, the complete genome sequence of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula DSM 5348 (2.2 Mb, ∼2,300 open reading frames [ORFs]) provides insights into biologically catalyzed metal sulfide oxidation. Comparative genomics was used to identify pathways an...

  18. Assessment of the Carbon Monoxide Metabolism of the Hyperthermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus VC-16 by Comparative Transcriptome Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, William P.; Irene Roalkvam; Carina Magnussen; Runar Stokke; Steen, Ida H.

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, utilizes CO as an energy source and it is resistant to the toxic effects of high CO concentrations. Herein, transcription profiles were obtained from A. fulgidus during growth with CO and sulfate or thiosulfate, or without an electron acceptor. This provided a basis for a model of the CO metabolism of A. fulgidus. The model suggests proton translocation by “Mitchell-type” loops facilitated by Fqo catalyzing a Fdred:mena...

  19. Disruption of a Sugar Transporter Gene Cluster in a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Using a Host-Marker System Based on Antibiotic Resistance▿

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumi, Rie; Manabe, Kenji; Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a gene disruption system in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis using the antibiotic simvastatin and a fusion gene designed to overexpress the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene (hmgTk) with the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter. With this system, we disrupted the T. kodakaraensis amylopullulanase gene (apuTk) or a gene cluster which includes apuTk and genes encoding components of a putative sugar transporter. Disruption plasm...

  20. Sequence, expression in Escherichia coli, and analysis of the gene encoding a novel intracellular protease (PfpI) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Halio, S B; Blumentals, I. I.; Short, S. A.; Merrill, B M; Kelly, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    A previously identified intracellular proteolytic activity in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (I. I. Blumentals, A. S. Robinson, and R. M. Kelly, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1992-1998, 1990) was found to be a homomultimer consisting of 18.8-kDa subunits. Dissociation of this native P. furiosus protease I (PfpI) into a single subunit was seen by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) but only after trichloroacetic acid precipitation; heating to...

  1. The carbamate kinase-like carbamoyl phosphate synthetase of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, a missing link in the evolution of carbamoyl phosphate biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Durbecq, Virginie; Legrain, Christianne; Roovers, Martine; Piérard, André; Glansdorff, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    Microbial carbamoyl phosphate synthetases (CPS) use glutamine as nitrogen donor and are composed of two subunits (or domains), one exhibiting glutaminase activity, the other able to synthesize carbamoyl phosphate (CP) from bicarbonate, ATP, and ammonia. The pseudodimeric organization of this synthetase suggested that it has evolved by duplication of a smaller kinase, possibly a carbamate kinase (CK). In contrast to other prokaryotes the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was found...

  2. Improving the Thermostability and Optimal Temperature of a Lipase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Covalent Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta V. Branco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A recombinant thermostable lipase (Pf2001Δ60 from the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (PFUL was immobilized by hydrophobic interaction on octyl-agarose (octyl PFUL and by covalent bond on aldehyde activated-agarose in the presence of DTT at pH = 7.0 (one-point covalent attachment (glyoxyl-DTT PFUL and on glyoxyl-agarose at pH 10.2 (multipoint covalent attachment (glyoxyl PFUL. The enzyme’s properties, such as optimal temperature and pH, thermostability, and selectivity, were improved by covalent immobilization. The highest enzyme stability at 70°C for 48 h incubation was achieved for glyoxyl PFUL (around 82% of residual activity, whereas glyoxyl-DTT PFUL maintained around 69% activity, followed by octyl PFUL (27% remaining activity. Immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose improved the optimal temperature to 90°C, while the optimal temperature of octyl PFUL was 70°C. Also, very significant changes in activity with different substrates were found. In general, the covalent bond derivatives were more active than octyl PFUL. The E value also depended substantially on the derivative and the conditions used. It was observed that the reaction of glyoxyl-DTT PFUL using methyl mandelate as a substrate at pH 7 presented the best results for enantioselectivity E=22 and enantiomeric excess (ee (% = 91.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a RecB-family nuclease from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A RecB-like nuclease from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2221 with a = 81.5, b = 159.8, c = 100.8 Å, and a native data set was collected to 2.65 Å resolution. Nucleases are required to process and repair DNA damage in living cells. One of the best studied nucleases is the RecB protein, which functions in Escherichia coli as a component of the RecBCD enzyme complex that amends double-strand breaks in DNA. Although archaea do not contain the RecBCD complex, a RecB-like nuclease from Pyrococcus abyssi has been cloned, expressed and purified. The protein was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 159.8, c = 100.8 Å. Self-rotation function and native Patterson map calculations revealed that there is a dimer in the asymmetric unit with its local twofold axis running parallel to the crystallographic twofold screw axis. The crystals diffracted to about 2 Å and a complete native data set was collected to 2.65 Å resolution

  4. Highly thermostable RadA protein from the archaeon Pyrococcus woesei enhances specificity of simplex and multiplex PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Gaffke, Lidia; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-05-01

    The radA gene of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus woesei (Thermococcales) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1050-bp gene codes for a 349-amino-acid polypeptide with an M r of 38,397 which shows 100 % positional amino acid identity to Pyrococcus furiosus RadA and 27.1 % to the E. coli RecA protein. Recombinant RadA was overproduced in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged fusion protein and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity using a simple procedure consisting of ammonium sulfate precipitation and metal-affinity chromatography. In solution RadA exists as an undecamer (11-mer). The protein binds both to ssDNA and dsDNA. RadA has been found to be highly thermostable, it remains almost unaffected by a 4-h incubation at 94 °C. The addition of the RadA protein to either simplex or multiplex PCR assays, significantly improves the specificity of DNA amplification by eliminating non-specific products. Among applications tested the RadA protein proved to be useful in allelic discrimination assay of HADHA gene associated with long-chain 3-hydroxylacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency that in infancy may lead to hypotonia, serious heart and liver problems and even sudden death. PMID:26337425

  5. A novel acidophilic, thermophilic iron and sulfur-oxidizing archaeon isolated from a hot spring of tengchong, yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiannan Ding

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermoacidophilic iron and sulfur-oxidizing archaeon, strain YN25, was isolated from an in situ enriched acid hot spring sample collected in Yunnan, China. Cells were irregular cocci, about 0.9-1.02 µm×1.0-1.31 µm in the medium containing elemental sulfur and 1.5-2.22 µm×1.8-2.54 µm in ferrous sulfate medium. The ranges of growth and pH were 50-85 (optimum 65 and pH 1.0-6.0 (optimum 1.5-2.5. The acidophile was able to grow heterotrophically on several organic substrates, including various monosaccharides, alcohols and amino acids, though the growth on single substrate required yeast extract as growth factor. Growth occurred under aerobic conditions or via anaerobic respiration using elemental sulfur as terminal electron acceptor. Results of morphology, physiology, fatty acid analysis and analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain YN25 should be grouped in the species Acidianus manzaensis. Bioleaching experiments indicated that this strain had excellent leaching capacity, with a copper yielding ratio up to 79.16% in 24 d. The type strain YN25 was deposited in China Center for Type Culture Collection (=CCTCCZNDX0050.

  6. Crystallization of leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with tRNALeu from the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from P. horikoshii has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and cocrystallizations with each of the tRNALeu isoacceptors have been attempted. Cocrystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, but only when the tRNALeu isoacceptor with the anticodon CAA was used. All five tRNALeu isoacceptors from the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii have been transcribed in vitro and purified. The leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from P. horikoshii was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified, and cocrystallizations with each of the tRNALeu isoacceptors were attempted. Cocrystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, but only when the tRNALeu isoacceptor with the anticodon CAA was used. Electrophoretic analyses revealed that the crystals contain both LeuRS and tRNALeu, suggesting that they are LeuRS–tRNALeu complex crystals. A data set diffracting to 3.3 Å resolution was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.18, b = 120.55, c = 231.13 Å. The asymmetric unit is expected to contain two complexes of LeuRS–tRNALeu, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight of 2.9 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 57.3%

  7. Molecular chaperone accumulation as a function of stress evidences adaptation to high hydrostatic pressure in the piezophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cario, Anaïs; Jebbar, Mohamed; Thiel, Axel; Kervarec, Nelly; Oger, Phil M.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of mannosyl-glycerate (MG), the salinity stress response osmolyte of Thermococcales, was investigated as a function of hydrostatic pressure in Thermococcus barophilus strain MP, a hyperthermophilic, piezophilic archaeon isolated from the Snake Pit site (MAR), which grows optimally at 40 MPa. Strain MP accumulated MG primarily in response to salinity stress, but in contrast to other Thermococcales, MG was also accumulated in response to thermal stress. MG accumulation peaked for combined stresses. The accumulation of MG was drastically increased under sub-optimal hydrostatic pressure conditions, demonstrating that low pressure is perceived as a stress in this piezophile, and that the proteome of T. barophilus is low-pressure sensitive. MG accumulation was strongly reduced under supra-optimal pressure conditions clearly demonstrating the structural adaptation of this proteome to high hydrostatic pressure. The lack of MG synthesis only slightly altered the growth characteristics of two different MG synthesis deletion mutants. No shift to other osmolytes was observed. Altogether our observations suggest that the salinity stress response in T. barophilus is not essential and may be under negative selective pressure, similarly to what has been observed for its thermal stress response. PMID:27378270

  8. The aerobic respiratory chain of the acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum: A membrane-bound complex oxidizing ferrous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelle, Cindy J; Roger, Magali; Bauzan, Marielle; Brugna, Myriam; Lignon, Sabrina; Nimtz, Manfred; Golyshina, Olga V; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    The extremely acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum is found in iron-rich biomining environments and is an important micro-organism in naturally occurring microbial communities in acid mine drainage. F. acidiphilum is an iron oxidizer that belongs to the order Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota), which harbors the most extremely acidophilic micro-organisms known so far. At present, little is known about the nature or the structural and functional organization of the proteins in F. acidiphilum that impact the iron biogeochemical cycle. We combine here biochemical and biophysical techniques such as enzyme purification, activity measurements, proteomics and spectroscopy to characterize the iron oxidation pathway(s) in F. acidiphilum. We isolated two respiratory membrane protein complexes: a 850 kDa complex containing an aa3-type cytochrome oxidase and a blue copper protein, which directly oxidizes ferrous iron and reduces molecular oxygen, and a 150 kDa cytochrome ba complex likely composed of a di-heme cytochrome and a Rieske protein. We tentatively propose that both of these complexes are involved in iron oxidation respiratory chains, functioning in the so-called uphill and downhill electron flow pathways, consistent with autotrophic life. The cytochrome ba complex could possibly play a role in regenerating reducing equivalents by a reverse ('uphill') electron flow. This study constitutes the first detailed biochemical investigation of the metalloproteins that are potentially directly involved in iron-mediated energy conservation in a member of the acidophilic archaea of the genus Ferroplasma. PMID:25896560

  9. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: a model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ostrom

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9–24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  10. Impact of Substrate Glycoside Linkage and Elemental Sulfur on Bioenergetics of and Hydrogen Production by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Chung-Jung; Shockley, Keith R.; Conners, Shannon B.; Lewis, Derrick L.; Comfort, Donald A.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoside linkage (cellobiose versus maltose) dramatically influenced bioenergetics to different extents and by different mechanisms in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus when it was grown in continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.45 h−1 at 90°C. In the absence of S0, cellobiose-grown cells generated twice as much protein and had 50%-higher specific H2 generation rates than maltose-grown cultures. Addition of S0 to maltose-grown cultures boosted cell protein production fou...

  11. A dual role of divalent metal ions in catalysis and folding of RNase H1 from extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous, Elias; Yokoyama, Koji; You, Dong-Ju; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2012-01-01

    RNase H1 from extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 (Halo-RNH1) consists of an N-terminal domain with unknown function and a C-terminal RNase H domain. It is characterized by the high content of acidic residues on the protein surface. The far- and near-UV CD spectra of Halo-RNH1 suggested that Halo-RNH1 assumes a partially folded structure in the absence of salt and divalent metal ions. It requires either salt or divalent metal ions for folding. However, thermal denaturation of ...

  12. Allosteric regulation of the GTP activated and CTP inhibited uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Arent, Susan; Larsen, Sine;

    2005-01-01

    The upp gene, encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It behaved as a tetramer in solution and showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 when...... assayed at 60 °C. Enzyme activity was strongly stimulated by GTP and inhibited by CTP. GTP caused an approximately 20-fold increase in the turnover number kcat and raised the Km values for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) and uracil by two- and >10-fold, respectively. The inhibition by CTP was...

  13. Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov., a Novel Hyperthermophilic, Obligately Sulfur-Reducing Archaeon from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Itoh, Takashi; Bej, Asim K.; Tang, Jane; Whitman, William B.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic, sulfur-reducing, organo-heterotrophic archaeon, strain OGL-20P(sup T), was isolated from 'black smoker' chimney material from the Rainbow hydrothermal vent site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36.2degN, 33.9degW). The cells of strain OGL-20P(T) have an irregular coccoid shape and are motile with a single flagellum. Growth was observed within a pH range of 5.0-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0), an NaCl concentration range of 1-5%(w/v) (optimum 3%)and a temperature range of 55-94 C (optimum 83-85 C). The novel isolate is strictly anaerobic and obligately dependent upon elemental sulfur as an electron acceptor, but it does not reduce sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, Fe(III) or nitrate. Proteolysis products (peptone, bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids and yeast extract) are utilized as substrates during sulfur reduction. Strain OGL-20P(sup T) is resistant to ampicillin, chloram phenicol, kanamycin and gentamicin, but sensitive to tetracycline and rifampicin. The G + C content of the DNA is 52.9 mol% The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain OGL-20P(sup T) is closely related to Thermococcus coalescens and related species, but no significant homology by DNA-DNA hybridization was observed between those species and the new isolate. On the basis of physiological and molecular properties of the new isolate, we conclude that strain OGL-20P(sup T) represents a new separate species within the genus Thermococcus, for which we propose the name Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov. The type strain is OGL-20P(sup T) (=JCM 12859(exp T) = DSM 14981(exp T)=ATCC BAA-394(exp T)).

  14. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between

  15. Impact of a homing intein on recombination frequency and organismal fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Adit; Altman-Price, Neta; Soucy, Shannon M; Green, Anna G; Mitiagin, Yulia; Turgeman-Grott, Israela; Davidovich, Noam; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Gophna, Uri

    2016-08-01

    Inteins are parasitic genetic elements that excise themselves at the protein level by self-splicing, allowing the formation of functional, nondisrupted proteins. Many inteins contain a homing endonuclease (HEN) domain and rely on its activity for horizontal propagation. However, successful invasion of an entire population will make this activity redundant, and the HEN domain is expected to degenerate quickly under these conditions. Several theories have been proposed for the continued existence of the both active HEN and noninvaded alleles within a population. However, to date, these models were not directly tested experimentally. Using the natural cell fusion ability of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii we were able to examine this question in vivo, by mating polB intein-positive [insertion site c in the gene encoding DNA polymerase B (polB-c)] and intein-negative cells and examining the dispersal efficiency of this intein in a natural, polyploid population. Through competition between otherwise isogenic intein-positive and intein-negative strains we determined a surprisingly high fitness cost of over 7% for the polB-c intein. Our laboratory culture experiments and samples taken from Israel's Mediterranean coastline show that the polB-c inteins do not efficiently take over an inteinless population through mating, even under ideal conditions. The presence of the HEN/intein promoted recombination when intein-positive and intein-negative cells were mated. Increased recombination due to HEN activity contributes not only to intein dissemination but also to variation at the population level because recombination tracts during repair extend substantially from the homing site. PMID:27462108

  16. Integration of poly-3-(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) production by Haloferax mediterranei through utilization of stillage from rice-based ethanol manufacture in India and its techno-economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Jana, Kuntal; Haldar, Saubhik; Bhowmic, Asit; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal Kumar; De, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2015-05-01

    Haloferax mediterranei has potential for economical industrial-scale production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) as it can utilize cheap carbon sources, has capacity for nonsterile cultivation and allows simple product recovery. Molasses-based Indian distilleries are converting themselves to cereal-based distilleries. Waste stillage (14 l) of rice-based ethanol industry was used for the production of PHA by H. mediterranei in the simple plug-flow reactor configuration of the activated sludge process. Cells utilized stillage and accumulated 63 ± 3 % PHA of dry cell weight and produced 13.12 ± 0.05 g PHA/l. The product yield coefficient was 0.27 while 0.14 g/l h volumetric productivity was reached. Simultaneous lowering of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values of stillage by 82 % was attained. The biopolymer was characterized as poly-3-(hydroxybutyrate-co-17.9 mol%-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). Directional properties of decanoic acid jointly with temperature-dependent water solubility in decanoic acid were employed for two-step desalination of the spent stillage medium in a cylindrical baffled-tank with an immersed heater and a stirrer holding axial and radial impellers. 99.3 % of the medium salts were recovered and re-used for PHA production. The cost of PHBV was estimated as US$2.05/kg when the annual production was simulated as 1890 tons. Desalination contributed maximally to the overall cost. Technology and cost-analysis demonstrate that PHA production integrated with ethanol manufacture is feasible in India. This study could be the basis for construction of a pilot plant. PMID:25690843

  17. Activities of methionine-γ-lyase in the acidophilic archaeon “Ferroplasma acidarmanus” strain fer1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan MA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available M A Khan,1 Madeline M López-Muñoz,2 Charles W Kaspar,3 Kai F Hung1 1Department of Biological Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA; 2Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; 3Bacteriology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Biogeochemical processes on exposed pyrite ores result in extremely high levels of sulfuric acid at these locations. Acidophiles that thrive in these conditions must overcome significant challenges, including an environment with proton concentrations at pH 3 or below. The role of sulfur metabolism in the archaeon “Ferroplasma acidarmanus” strain fer1's ability to thrive in this environment was investigated due to its growth-dependent production of methanethiol, a volatile organic sulfur compound. Two putative sequences for methionine-γ-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11, an enzyme known to carry out α, γ-elimination on L-methionine to produce methanethiol, were identified in fer1. Bioinformatic analyses identified a conserved pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP binding domain and a partially conserved catalytic domain in both putative sequences. Detection of PLP-dependent and L-methionine-dependent production of α-keto compounds and thiol groups in fer1 confirmed the presence of methionine-γ-lyase activity. Further, fer1 lysate was capable of processing related substrates, including D-methionine, L-cysteine, L-cystathionine, and L/D-homocysteine. When the two putative fer1 methionine-γ-lyase gene-coded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, one sequence demonstrated an ability to carry out α, γ-elimination activity, while the other exhibited γ-replacement activity. These fer1 methionine-γ-lyases also exhibited optimum pH, substrate specificity, and catalytic preferences that are different from methionine-γ-lyases from other organisms. These differences are discussed in the context of molecular phylogeny constructed using a maximum

  18. Archaeal Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Displays Robust Activity under High-Salt Conditions and in Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    McMillan, Lana J.; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPAs) that hydrolyze inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to orthophosphate (Pi) are commonly used to accelerate and detect biosynthetic reactions that generate PPi as a by-product. Current PPAs are inactivated by high salt concentrations and organic solvents, which limits the extent of their use. Here we report a class A type PPA of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii (HvPPA) that is thermostable and displays robust PPi-hydrolyzing activity under conditions of 25...

  19. A Simple Laser-Based Device for Simultaneous Microbial Culture and Absorbance Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Abrevaya, X. C.; Cortón, E.; Areso, O.; Mauas, P. J. D

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a device specifically designed to study microbial growth with several applications related to environmental microbiology and other areas of research as astrobiology. The Automated Measuring and Cultivation device (AMC-d) enables semi-continuous absorbance measurements directly during cultivation. It can measure simultaneously up to 16 samples. Growth curves using low and fast growing microorganism were plotted, including: Escherichia coli, and Haloferax volcanii, an ha...

  20. Polyploidy in haloarchaea: advantages for growth and survival

    OpenAIRE

    JörgSoppa

    2014-01-01

    The investigated haloarchaeal species, Halobacterium salinarum, Haloferax mediterranei, and H. volcanii, have all been shown to be polyploid. They contain several replicons that have independent copy number regulation, and most have a higher copy number during exponential growth phase than in stationary phase. The possible evolutionary advantages of polyploidy for haloarchaea, most of which have experimental support for at least one species, are discussed. These advantages include a low mutat...

  1. Mutation of the gene encoding the ribonuclease P RNA in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis causes decreased growth rate and impaired processing of tRNA precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Toshifumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Suematsu, Kotaro; Nakashima, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Kimura, Makoto

    2015-12-25

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the processing of 5' leader sequences of tRNA precursors in all three phylogenetic domains. RNase P also plays an essential role in non-tRNA biogenesis in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. For archaeal RNase Ps, additional functions, however, remain poorly understood. To gain insight into the biological function of archaeal RNase Ps in vivo, we prepared archaeal mutants KUWΔP3, KUWΔP8, and KUWΔP16, in which the gene segments encoding stem-loops containing helices, respectively, P3, P8 and P16 in RNase P RNA (TkopRNA) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis were deleted. Phenotypic analysis showed that KUWΔP3 and KUWΔP16 grew slowly compared with wild-type T. kodakarensis KUW1, while KUWΔP8 displayed no difference from T. kodakarensis KUW1. RNase P isolated using an affinity-tag from KUWΔP3 had reduced pre-tRNA cleavage activity compared with that from T. kodakarensis KUW1. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Northern blots analyses of KUWΔP3 showed greater accumulation of unprocessed transcripts for pre-tRNAs than that of T. kodakarensis KUW1. The current study represents the first attempt to prepare mutant T. kodakarensis with impaired RNase P for functional investigation. Comparative whole-transcriptome analysis of T. kodakarensis KUW1 and KUWΔP3 should allow for the comprehensive identification of RNA substrates for archaeal RNase Ps. PMID:26551464

  2. Biogenic inorganic crystalline phase formation as a result of biogeochemical interactions in between the chemolithotrophic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula and meteorite: implications for potential microbial biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Tetyana; Blazevic, Amir; Kutlucinar, Kaan Georg

    2016-04-01

    Chemolithotrophy has been indicated as the most primordial form of microbial metabolism on the early Earth and proposed as a possible metabolic form for other iron-mineral-rich planets like Mars. Rock-eating extremophiles represent an exciting field of research for the study of microbe-mineral interactions in order to find the unique biosignatures of life in the extreme conditions. Metallosphaera sedula is the chemolithotrophic archaeon, which thrives at 73°C and pH 2, using energy derived from metal oxidation at the edge of living limits. When given an access to extraterrestrial material (a stony meteorite H5 ordinary chondrite NWA1172), M. sedula releases soluble metal ions into the solution from NWA1172 due to its metal oxidizing metabolic activity. Here we report the formation of inorganic crystalline phase as a result of biogeochemical interactions in between M. sedula and extraterrestrial material. Inorganic ions released from meteorite as a result of M. sedula mediated leaching were trapped into crystalline material by solvent evaporation technique. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations and EDX analysis revealed that this crystalline phase is mainly composed of Ni, S, Mg and O elements. Biogenicity of this inorganic crystalline material was evaluated by comparing to abiotic conditions. Biological nature of Ni-, S-, Mg- and O -containing crystalline phase was established, since it was not mimicked in abiotic experimental conditions, allowing clearly to exclude abiogenic origin. Further investigations of exact mineralogical nature of biogenic of Ni-, S-, Mg- and O -crystalline material and its implication as a biosignature for detection of life are going to be investigated.

  3. Polyploidy in haloarchaea: advantages for growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerulla, Karolin; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The investigated haloarchaeal species, Halobacterium salinarum, Haloferax mediterranei, and H. volcanii, have all been shown to be polyploid. They contain several replicons that have independent copy number regulation, and most have a higher copy number during exponential growth phase than in stationary phase. The possible evolutionary advantages of polyploidy for haloarchaea, most of which have experimental support for at least one species, are discussed. These advantages include a low mutation rate and high resistance toward X-ray irradiation and desiccation, which depend on homologous recombination. For H. volcanii, it has been shown that gene conversion operates in the absence of selection, which leads to the equalization of genome copies. On the other hand, selective forces might lead to heterozygous cells, which have been verified in the laboratory. Additional advantages of polyploidy are survival over geological times in halite deposits as well as at extreme conditions on earth and at simulated Mars conditions. Recently, it was found that H. volcanii uses genomic DNA as genetic material and as a storage polymer for phosphate. In the absence of phosphate, H. volcanii dramatically decreases its genome copy number, thereby enabling cell multiplication, but diminishing the genetic advantages of polyploidy. Stable storage of phosphate is proposed as an alternative driving force for the emergence of DNA in early evolution. Several additional potential advantages of polyploidy are discussed that have not been addressed experimentally for haloarchaea. An outlook summarizes selected current trends and possible future developments. PMID:24982654

  4. Polyploidy in haloarchaea: advantages for growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin eZerulla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigated haloarchaeal species, Halobacterium salinarum, Haloferax mediterranii, and H. volcanii, have all been shown to be polyploid. They contain several replicons that have independent copy number regulation, and most have a higher copy number during exponential growth phase than stationary phase. The possible evolutionary advantages of polyploidy for haloarchaea, most of which have experimental support for at least one species, are discussed. These advantages include a low mutation rate and high resistance towards X-ray irradiation and desiccation, which depend on homologous recombination. For H. volcanii, it has been shown that gene conversion operates in the absence of selection, which leads to the equalization of genome copies. On the other hand, selective forces might lead to heterozygous cells, which have been verified in the laboratory. Additional advantages of polyploidy are survival over geological times in halite deposits as well as at extreme conditions on earth and at simulated Mars conditions. Recently, it was found that H. volcanii uses genomic DNA as genetic material and as a storage polymer for phosphate. In the absence of phosphate, H. volcanii dramatically decreases its genome copy number, thereby enabling cell multiplication, but diminishing the genetic advantages of polyploidy. Stable storage of phosphate is proposed as an alternative driving force for the emergence of DNA in early evolution. Several additional potential advantages of polyploidy are discussed that have not been addressed experimentally for haloarchaea. An outlook summarizes selected current trends and possible future developments.

  5. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana P Kristensen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of dihydrofolate reductase in salt solution%二氢叶酸还原酶在盐溶液中的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王四华; 付晓平; 王文研; 张光亚

    2012-01-01

    In oder to find how halophilic enzyme maintain stability and activity in high salt concentration.dihydrofolate reductase from the Haloferax volcanii and Escherichia coli has been chosen as an model respectively, and suffer molecular dynamics simulation in five different concentration of salt solution. Molecular dynamics trajectories of the dihydrofolate reductases in the five different salt solutions were obtained after 9 ns of simulation, by a detailed analysis of the trajectories, we obtain their dynamical characteristics in different salt solution. The results showed that the salt bridge and protein-solvent H-bond of dihydrofolate reductase from the Haloferax volcanii are significantly more than that of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli, while the solvent accessible surface area of dihydrofolate reductase from the Escherichia coli is significantly large than that of dihydrofolate reductase from the Haloferax volcanii. The RMSD and each amino acids RMSF value were also addressed.%为了研究嗜盐酶如何在高盐环境下维持稳定性与活性,本文以沃尔卡尼极嗜盐菌及大肠杆菌的二氢叶酸还原酶(DHFR)为模型,将二者分别置于5种不同盐浓度的水溶液中进行分子动力学模拟.经9 ns动力学模拟,得到了二者在不同浓度盐溶液中的运动轨迹,通过对运动轨迹的分析,获取了二者在不同盐浓度下的动力学特性.结果发现嗜盐古生菌的二氢叶酸还原酶自身所形成盐桥及与溶剂所形成的氢键均比大肠杆菌的二氢叶酸还原酶多,而溶剂可及性表面则要小,二者差异均达极显著水平.同时还分析了这两种分子及其氨基酸残基的柔性等.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02608-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s) Database: CSM 6905 sequences; 5,674,871 total letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Cont.................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( BJ340160 ) Dictyoste...... 70 2e-10 3 ( BX732541 ) Xenopus tropicalis EST, clone TTpA073e13 5'. 56 2e-10...d. 46 4e-04 2 ( BW366463 ) Ciona intestinalis cDNA, clone:cima838j20, 5'end,... 56 4e-04 2 ( BC166312 ) Xenopus tropical...7303_1( AY627303 |pid:none) Haloferax volcanii DS2 proteasome-... 148 6e-34 BC122550_1( BC122550 |pid:none) Homo sapiens val

  8. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  9. Factor requirements for transcription in the Archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae.

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, S A; Bell, S.D.; Jackson, S P

    1997-01-01

    Archaea (archaebacteria) constitute a domain of life that is distinct from Bacteria (eubacteria) and Eucarya (eukaryotes). Although archaeal cells share many morphological features with eubacteria, their transcriptional apparatus is more akin to eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II and III than it is to eubacterial transcription systems. Thus, in addition to possessing a 10 subunit RNA polymerase and a homologue of the TATA-binding protein (TBP), Archaea possess a polypeptide termed TFB that is h...

  10. Alpha-amylase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, E. C. M. J.; Pusey, M. L.; Ng, M. L.; Garriott, O. K.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments such as hot springs. The ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered enzymes from extremophiles to be of interest in industrial applications. One approach to producing these extremozymes entails the expression of the enzyme-encoding gene in a mesophilic host such as E.coli. This method has been employed in the effort to produce an alpha-amylase from a hyperthermophile (an organism that displays optimal growth above 80 C) isolated from a hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow vent site in the Atlantic Ocean. alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to produce smaller sugars and constitute a class of industrial enzymes having approximately 25% of the enzyme market. One application for thermostable alpha-amylases is the starch liquefaction process in which starch is converted into fructose and glucose syrups. The a-amylase encoding gene from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and sequenced, revealing high similarity with other archaeal hyperthermophilic a-amylases. The gene encoding the mature protein was expressed in E.coli. Initial characterization of this enzyme has revealed an optimal amylolytic activity between 85-90 C and around pH 5.3-6.0.

  11. Components of calcium homeostasis in Archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cells of Archaea are interesting from several points of view. Among others there are: (a) the evolutionary relationship to procaryotes and eucaryotes and (b) the involvement of Na+ and H+ gradient in archaeal bio-energetics. The observations are presented which are devoted to the description of components of Ca2+ homeostasis, an apparatus is vital for both procaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, in obligate anaerobe Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. This is, after the demonstration of the ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport in Halobacterium halobium membrane vesicles, the first complex description of processes of Ca2+ homeostasis in Archaea. The Ca2+ influx and efflux was measured using radionuclide 45Ca2+. The experiment were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions. The measurement of the membrane potential by means of 3H-tetraphenyl phosphonium chloride showed that the presence of Na+ depolarized the membrane from -110 to -60 mV. The growth of M. thermoautotrophicum and methanogenesis was suppressed but nor arrested by the presence EGTA suggesting that the Ca2+ homeostasis may be involved in controlling these cellular functions. The results indicate the presence of three components involved in establishing the Ca2+ homeostasis in cell of M. thermoautotrophicum. The first is the Ca2+-carrier mediating the CA2+ influx driven by the proton motive force or the membrane potential. The Ca2+ efflux is mediated by two transport systems, Na+/Ca2+ and H+/Ca2+ anti-porters. The evidence for the presence of the Ca2+-transporting ATPase was not obtained so far. (authors)

  12. "Hot standards" for the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaparty, Melanie; Esser, Dominik; Gertig, Susanne; Haferkamp, Patrick; Kouril, Theresa; Manica, Andrea; Pham, Trong K.; Reimann, Julia; Schreiber, Kerstin; Sierocinski, Pawel; Teichmann, Daniela; van Wolferen, Marleen; von Jan, Mathias; Wieloch, Patricia; Albers, Sonja V.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Schleper, Christa; Schomburg, Dietmar; van der Oost, John; Wright, Phillip C.; Siebers, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Within the archaea, the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus has become an important model organism for physiology and biochemistry, comparative and functional genomics, as well as, more recently also for systems biology approaches. Within the Sulfolobus Systems Biology ("SulfoSYS

  13. Regulation of tryptophan operon expression in the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunwei; Reeve, John N

    2005-09-01

    Conserved trp genes encode enzymes that catalyze tryptophan biosynthesis in all three biological domains, and studies of their expression in Bacteria and eukaryotes have revealed a variety of different regulatory mechanisms. The results reported here provide the first detailed description of an archaeal trp gene regulatory system. We have established that the trpEGCFBAD operon in Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is transcribed divergently from a gene (designated trpY) that encodes a tryptophan-sensitive transcription regulator. TrpY binds to TRP box sequences (consensus, TGTACA) located in the overlapping promoter regions between trpY and trpE, inhibiting trpY transcription in the absence of tryptophan and both trpY and trpEGCFBAD transcription in the presence of tryptophan. TrpY apparently inhibits trpY transcription by blocking RNA polymerase access to the site of trpY transcription initiation and represses trpEGCFBAD transcription by preventing TATA box binding protein (TBP) binding to the TATA box sequence. Given that residue 2 (W2) is the only tryptophan in TrpY and in TrpY homologues in other Euryarchaea and that there is only one tryptophan codon in the entire trpEGCFBAD operon (trpB encodes W175), expression of the trp operon may also be regulated in vivo by the supply of charged tRNA(Trp) available to translate the second codon of the trpY mRNA. PMID:16159776

  14. Regulation of Tryptophan Operon Expression in the Archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yunwei; Reeve, John N.

    2005-01-01

    Conserved trp genes encode enzymes that catalyze tryptophan biosynthesis in all three biological domains, and studies of their expression in Bacteria and eukaryotes have revealed a variety of different regulatory mechanisms. The results reported here provide the first detailed description of an archaeal trp gene regulatory system. We have established that the trpEGCFBAD operon in Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is transcribed divergently from a gene (designated trpY) that encodes a try...

  15. Box C/D RNA guides for the ribose methylation of archaeal tRNAs. The tRNATrp intron guides the formation of two ribose-methylated nucleosides in the mature tRNATrp

    Science.gov (United States)

    d’Orval, Béatrice Clouet; Bortolin, Marie-Line; Gaspin, Christine; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Following a search of the Pyrococcus genomes for homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs, we have experimentally identified in Pyrococcus abyssi four novel box C/D small RNAs predicted to direct 2′-O-ribose methylations onto the first position of the anticodon in tRNALeu(CAA), tRNALeu(UAA), elongator tRNAMet and tRNATrp, respectively. Remarkably, one of them corresponds to the intron of its presumptive target, pre-tRNATrp. This intron is predicted to direct in cis two distinct ribose methylations within the unspliced tRNA precursor, not only onto the first position of the anticodon in the 5′ exon but also onto position 39 (universal tRNA numbering) in the 3′ exon. The two intramolecular RNA duplexes expected to direct methylation, which both span an exon–intron junction in pre-tRNATrp, are phylogenetically conserved in euryarchaeotes. We have experimentally confirmed the predicted guide function of the box C/D intron in halophile Haloferax volcanii by mutagenesis analysis, using an in vitro splicing/RNA modification assay in which the two cognate ribose methylations of pre-tRNATrp are faithfully reproduced. Euryarchaeal pre-tRNATrp should provide a unique system to further investigate the molecular mechanisms of RNA-guided ribose methylation and gain new insights into the origin and evolution of the complex family of archaeal and eukaryotic box C/D small RNAs. PMID:11713301

  16. Role of the denitrifying Haloarchaea in the treatment of nitrite-brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera-Fernández, Cindy; Zafrilla, Basilio; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2012-09-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying halophilic archaeon able to reduce nitrate and nitrite under oxic and anoxic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite are used as nitrogen sources for growth. Under oxygen scarcity, this haloarchaeon uses both ions as electron acceptors via a denitrification pathway. In the present work, the maximal nitrite concentration tolerated by this organism was determined by studying the growth of H. mediterranei in minimal medium containing 30, 40 and 50 mM nitrite as sole nitrogen source and under initial oxic conditions at 42 degrees C. The results showed the ability of H. mediterranei to withstand nitrite concentrations up to 50 mM. At the beginning of the incubation, nitrate was detected in the medium, probably due to the spontaneous oxidation of nitrite under the initial oxic conditions. The complete removal of nitrite and nitrate was accomplished in most of the tested conditions, except in culture medium containing 50 mM nitrite, suggesting that this concentration compromised the denitrification capacity of the cells. Nitrite and nitrate reductases activities were analyzed at different growth stages of H. mediterranei. In all cases, the activities of the respiratory enzymes were higher than their assimilative counterparts; this was especially the case for NirK. The denitrifying and possibly detoxifying role of this enzyme might explain the high nitrite tolerance of H. mediterranei. This archaeon was also able to remove 60% of the nitrate and 75% of the nitrite initially present in brine samples collected from a wastewater treatment facility. These results suggest that H. mediterranei, and probably other halophilic denitrifying Archaea, are suitable candidates for the bioremediation of brines with high nitrite and nitrate concentrations. PMID:23847815

  17. The effects of extremes of pH on the growth and transcriptomic profiles of three haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran-Reyna, Aida; Coker, James A

    2014-01-01

    The halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) live in saline environments, which are found across the globe.  In addition to salinity, these niches can be quite dynamic and experience extreme conditions such as low oxygen content, radiation (gamma and UV), pH and temperature.  However, of all the naturally occurring stresses faced by the haloarchaea, only one, pH, has not been previously investigated in regard to the changes induced in the transcriptome. Therefore, we endeavored to determine the responses in three haloarchaea: Halorubrum lacusprofundi (Hla), Haloferax volcanii (Hvo), and Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 (NRC-1) to growth under acidic and alkaline pH. Our observations showed that the transcriptomes of Hvo and NRC-1 regulated stress, motility, and ABC transporters in a similar manner, which is in line with previous reports from other prokaryotes when grown in an acidic environment.  However, the pattern for Hla was more species specific. For alkaline stress, all three haloarchaea responded in a manner similar to well-studied archaea and bacteria showing the haloarchaeal response was general to prokaryotes. Additionally, we performed an analysis on the changes in the transcriptomes of the three haloarchaea when shifting from one pH extreme to the other. The results showed that the transcriptomes of all three haloarchaea respond more similarly when moving from alkaline to acidic conditions compared to a shift in the opposite direction. Interestingly, our studies also showed that individual genes of multiple paralogous gene families ( tbp, tfb, orc/ cdc6, etc.) found in the haloarchaea were regulated under specific stresses thereby providing evidence that they modulate the response to various environmental stresses. The studies described here are the first to catalog the changes in the haloarchaeal transcriptomes under growth in extreme pH and help us understand how life is able to thrive under all conditions present on Earth and, if present, on extraterrestrial

  18. The effects of extremes of pH on the growth and transcriptomic profiles of three haloarchaea [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/48e

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Moran-Reyna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The halophilic archaea (haloarchaea live in saline environments, which are found across the globe.  In addition to salinity, these niches can be quite dynamic and experience extreme conditions such as low oxygen content, radiation (gamma and UV, pH and temperature.  However, of all the naturally occurring stresses faced by the haloarchaea, only one, pH, has not been previously investigated in regard to the changes induced in the transcriptome. Therefore, we endeavored to determine the responses in three haloarchaea: Halorubrum lacusprofundi (Hla, Haloferax volcanii (Hvo, and Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 (NRC-1 to growth under acidic and alkaline pH. Our observations showed that the transcriptomes of Hvo and NRC-1 regulated stress, motility, and ABC transporters in a similar manner, which is in line with previous reports from other prokaryotes when grown in an acidic environment.  However, the pattern for Hla was more species specific. For alkaline stress, all three haloarchaea responded in a manner similar to well-studied archaea and bacteria showing the haloarchaeal response was general to prokaryotes. Additionally, we performed an analysis on the changes in the transcriptomes of the three haloarchaea when shifting from one pH extreme to the other. The results showed that the transcriptomes of all three haloarchaea respond more similarly when moving from alkaline to acidic conditions compared to a shift in the opposite direction. Interestingly, our studies also showed that individual genes of multiple paralogous gene families (tbp, tfb, orc/cdc6, etc. found in the haloarchaea were regulated under specific stresses thereby providing evidence that they modulate the response to various environmental stresses. The studies described here are the first to catalog the changes in the haloarchaeal transcriptomes under growth in extreme pH and help us understand how life is able to thrive under all conditions present on Earth and, if present, on

  19. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs as potential antisense regulators in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tang, T. H.; Polacek, N.; Zywicki, M.; Huber, Harald; Brügger, Kim; Garrett, Roger Antony; Bachellerie, J. P.; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    -box RNAs, where the latter only exhibit partial complementarity to RNA targets. The most prominent group of antisense RNAs is transcribed in the opposite orientation to the transposase genes, encoded by insertion elements (transposons). Thus, these antisense RNAs may regulate transposition of insertion...... first report of stably expressed antisense RNAs in an archaeal species and it raises the prospect that antisense-based mechanisms are also used widely in Archaea to regulate gene expression....

  20. Mercury Inactivates Transcription and the Generalized Transcription Factor TFB in the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Vidula; Bini, Elisabetta; Drozda, Melissa; Blum, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Mercury has a long history as an antimicrobial agent effective against eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Despite its prolonged use, the basis for mercury toxicity in prokaryotes is not well understood. Archaea, like bacteria, are prokaryotes but they use a simplified version of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus. This study examined the mechanism of mercury toxicity to the archaeal prokaryote Sulfolobus solfataricus. In vivo challenge with mercuric chloride instantaneously blocked cel...

  1. Conservation of chromosomal arrangement among three strains of the genetically unstable archaeon Halobacterium salinarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, N R; Bobovnikova, Y; Heyrovska, N

    1994-12-01

    Phenotypic variants of Halobacterium salinarium NRC-1 arise at a frequency of 10(-2). These result from transpositions of halobacterial insertion sequences and rearrangements mediated by halobacterial insertion sequences. We have tested the hypothesis that such mutations are confined to only a portion of the genome by comparing the chromosomal restriction map of H. salinarium NRC-1 and that of the derivative S9, which was made in 1969. The two chromosomes were mapped by using two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the restriction enzymes AflII, AseI, and DraI. A comparison of the two deduced maps showed a domain of about 210 kbp to be subject to many rearrangements, including an inversion in S9 relative to NRC-1. However, the rest of the chromosome was conserved among NRC-1, S9, and an independent Halobacterium isolate, GRB, previously mapped by St. Jean et al. (A. St. Jean, B. A. Trieselmann, and R. L. Charlebois, Nucleic Acids Res. 22:1476-1483, 1994). This concurs with data from eubacteria suggesting strong selective forces maintaining gene order even in the face of rearrangement events occurring at a high frequency. PMID:8002597

  2. Conservation of chromosomal arrangement among three strains of the genetically unstable archaeon Halobacterium salinarium.

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, N R; Bobovnikova, Y; Heyrovska, N

    1994-01-01

    Phenotypic variants of Halobacterium salinarium NRC-1 arise at a frequency of 10(-2). These result from transpositions of halobacterial insertion sequences and rearrangements mediated by halobacterial insertion sequences. We have tested the hypothesis that such mutations are confined to only a portion of the genome by comparing the chromosomal restriction map of H. salinarium NRC-1 and that of the derivative S9, which was made in 1969. The two chromosomes were mapped by using two-dimensional ...

  3. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y.; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra” provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  4. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra" provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  5. LUCA, or just a conserved Archaeon?: Comments on Xue et al. (2003)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejchan, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 333, Supplement (2004), s. 47-50. ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/03/1124 Keywords : Last universal common ancestor * universal tree * phylogeny Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.705, year: 2004

  6. Variation of the virus-related elements within syntenic genomes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon aeropyrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki;

    2013-01-01

    having stable genomes, interference of synteny occurred with two proviruses, A. pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1) and A. pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements. Spacer sequences derived from the A. camini CRISPR showed significant...

  7. A phytoene desaturase homolog gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans is responsible for hydroxyarchaeol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takeshi; Isobe, Keisuke; Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2015-10-16

    Hydroxyarchaeols are the typical core structures of archaeal membrane lipids uniquely produced by a limited number of methanogenic lineages, which are mainly classified in orders Methanosarcinales and Methanococcales. However, the biosynthetic machinery that is used for the biosynthesis of hydroxyarcheol core lipids has not been discovered. In this study, the ma0127 gene from Methanosarcina acetivorans, which encodes a phytoene desaturase-like protein, was found to be responsible for the hydration of a geranylgeranyl group in an archaeal-lipid precursor, sn-2,3-O-digeranylgeranylglyceryl phosphoglycerol, produced in Escherichia coli cells expressing several archaeal enzymes. LC-ESI-tandem-MS analyses proved that hydration occurs at the 2',3'-double bond of the geranylgeranyl group, yielding a 3'-hydroxylated lipid precursor. This result suggests that the encoded protein MA0127 is a hydratase involved in hydroxyarchaeol biosynthesis, because M. acetivorans is known to produce hydroxyarchaeol core lipids with a 3'-hydroxyphytanyl group. Furthermore, the distribution of the putative orthologs of ma0127 among methanogens is generally in good agreement with that of hydroxyarchaeol producers, including anaerobic methanotrophs (ANMEs). PMID:26361140

  8. Analysis of ATPases of putative secretion operons in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, SV; Driessen, AJM

    2005-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use a wide variety of complex mechanisms to secrete proteins across their membranes or to assemble secreted proteins into surface structures. As most archaea only possess a cytoplasmic membrane surrounded by a membrane-anchored S-layer, the organization of such complexes might

  9. Protein modification in archaeon%古菌蛋白质修饰研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢化; 金城

    2014-01-01

    20世纪50年代中期,在古菌的表层(S-层)首次发现了糖蛋白;21世纪初又在空肠弯曲菌(Campylobacter jejuni)中发现了蛋白质N-糖基化修饰.由此,同行开始认识到,蛋白质的糖基化修饰广泛存在于古菌、细菌及真核生物三域中.近十年来,古菌蛋白质糖基化修饰的研究取得了进展,特别是古菌蛋白质N-糖基化修饰研究进展快速.但对古菌糖蛋白O-糖基化修饰和脂修饰的了解甚少.本文综述了古菌蛋白质糖基化修饰的研究进展.

  10. Thermococcus acidaminovorans sp. nov., a new hyperthermophilic alkalophilic archaeon growing on amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeier, R; Keller, M; Hafenbradl, D; Braun, F J; Rachel, R; Burggraf, S; Stetter, K O

    1998-05-01

    From a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano (Italy), a new hyperthermophilic member of the Archaea was isolated. The cells are coccoid - shaped and possess up to five flagella. They grow between 56 degrees and 93 degrees C (optimum 85 degrees C) and pH 5.0-9.5 (optimum 9.0). The organism is strictly anaerobic and grows heterotrophically on defined amino acids and complex organic substrates such as casamino acids, yeast extract, peptone, meat extract, tryptone, and casein. Polysulfide and elemental sulfur are reduced to H2S. In the absence of polysulfide or elemental sulfur, the isolate grows at a significantly reduced rate. Growth is not influenced by the presence of H2. DNA- DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA partial sequences indicated that the new isolate belongs to the genus Thermococcus, and represents a new species, Thermococcus acidaminovorans. The type stain is isolate AEDII10 (DSM 11906). PMID:9672685

  11. Halorhabdus rudnickae sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon isolated from a salt mine borehole in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Luciana; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Stączek, Paweł; d'Auria, Giuseppe; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; da Costa, Milton S

    2016-03-01

    Two halophilic archaea, designated strains WSM-64(T) and WSM-66, were isolated from a sample taken from a borehole in the currently unexploited Barycz mining area belonging to the "Wieliczka" Salt Mine Company, in Poland. Strains are red pigmented and form non-motile cocci that stain Gram-negative. Strains WSM-64(T) and WSM-66 showed optimum growth at 40°C, in 20% NaCl and at pH 6.5-7.5. The strains were facultative anaerobes. The major polar lipids of the two strains were phosphatidylglycerol (PG2), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me) and sulfated diglycosyl diether (S-DGD). Menaquinone MK-8 was the major respiratory quinone. The DNA G+C content of strain WSM-64(T) was 61.2mol% by HPLC method; 61.0mol% by genome sequencing. Analysis of the almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strains WSM-64(T) and WSM-66 (99.7% identity) represented a member of the genus Halorhabdus in the family Halobacteriaceae. Both strains formed a distinct cluster and were most closely related to Halorhabdus tiamatea SARL4B(T) and Halorhabdus utahensis AX-2(T) (DSM 12940(T)) (95.4% and 95.6%, respectively). ANI values of WSM-64(T) with the closest relative type strains were <78.5%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and whole genome analyses, physiological and biochemical characteristics we describe a new species represented by strain WSM-64(T) (=DSM 29498(T) =CECT 8673(T)) for which we propose the name Halorhabdus rudnickae sp. nov. PMID:26749115

  12. Differential transport properties of D-leucine and L-leucine in the archaeon, Halobacterium salinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Mukohata, Y; Yuasa, S

    2000-04-01

    The transport of D-leucine was compared with that of L-leucine in Halobacterium salinarum. When a high-outside/low-inside Na+ gradient was imposed, D-leucine as well as L-leucine accumulated in envelope vesicles, supporting the hypothesis that D-leucine is transported via a symport system along with Na+. Kinetic analyses, including inhibition experiments, indicated that both enantiomers are transported via a common carrier. However, a Hill plot indicated a single binding site for Na+ during L-leucine transport, but dual binding sites for Na+ during D-leucine transport. Furthermore, D-leucine transport was dependent on electrical membrane potential, suggesting that a transporter bound with D-leucine is positively charged. L-leucine transport was slightly, if at all, dependent on membrane potential, suggesting that a transporter bound with L-leucine is electrically neutral. These results indicate that the leucine carrier in Halobacterium salinarum translocates two moles of Na+ per mole of D-leucine, and one mole of Na+ per mole of L-leucine. PMID:10779875

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Maillard Reaction Products on Growth of the Aerobic Marine Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kee Woung; Lee, Sun Bok

    2003-01-01

    It was found that the growth of Aeropyrum pernix was severely inhibited in a medium containing reducing sugars and tryptone due to the formation of Maillard reaction products. The rate of the Maillard browning reaction was markedly enhanced under aerobic conditions, and the addition of Maillard reaction products to the culture medium caused fatal growth inhibition.

  14. Copper tolerance of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus: possible role of polyphosphate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Orell, Alvaro; Jerez, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    It has been postulated that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) and transport of metal-phosphate complexes could participate in heavy metal tolerance in some bacteria. To study if such a system exists in archaea, the presence of polyP was determined by the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) procedure and quantified by using specific enzymic methods in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, Sulfolobus metallicus and Sulfolobus solfataricus. All three micro-organisms synthesized polyP during growth, but only S. metallicus greatly accumulated polyP granules. The differences in the capacity to accumulate polyP between these archaea may reflect adaptive responses to their natural environment. Thus, S. metallicus could grow in and tolerate up to 200 mM copper sulfate, with a concomitant decrease in its polyP levels with increasing copper concentrations. On the other hand, S. solfataricus could not grow in or tolerate more than 1-5 mM copper sulfate, most likely due to its low levels of polyP. Shifting S. metallicus cells to copper sulfate concentrations up to 100 mM led to a rapid increase in their exopolyphosphatase (PPX) activity which was concomitant in time with a decrease in their polyP levels and a stimulation of phosphate efflux. Furthermore, copper in the range of 10 microM greatly stimulated PPX activity in cell-free extracts from S. metallicus. The results strongly suggest that a metal tolerance mechanism mediated through polyP is functional in members of the genus Sulfolobus. This ability to accumulate and hydrolyse polyP may play an important role not only in the survival of these micro-organisms in sulfidic mineral environments containing high toxic metals concentrations, but also in their applications in biomining. PMID:16385115

  15. Molecular Characterization of Copper and Cadmium Resistance Determinants in the Biomining Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Orell; Francisco Remonsellez; Rafaela Arancibia; Jerez, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfolobus metallicus is a thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon used in high-temperature bioleaching processes that is able to grow under stressing conditions such as high concentrations of heavy metals. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for heavy metal resistance in S. metallicus remain uncharacterized. Proteomic analysis of S. metallicus cells exposed to 100 mM Cu revealed that 18 out of 30 upregulated proteins are related to the production and conversion of energy,...

  16. Genomic Analysis of the Archaeon Ferroplasma acidarmanus: New Insights Into the Evolution of Arsenic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gihring, T. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Arsenic resistance allows microbes to live in As-rich solutions and in proximity to As-bearing minerals and thus, to impact dissolution and precipitation reactions. As-resistance is a characteristic of both Bacteria and Archaea. In some cases, it is conferred by the acquisition of a plasmid, in other instances the genes are located on the chromosome. Through analysis of newly acquired genomic data for the highly arsenic-resistant, iron-oxidizing extreme acidophile Ferroplasma acidarmanus and genomic data for other organisms we can gain insight into the mechanisms, origin, and evolution of genes that confer arsenic resistance. The deduced protein sequences of all known arsenic resistance genes were compiled from genomic and protein databases. Sequence alignments and phylogenic analyses were performed. Comparisons of arsenite efflux pump (ArsB) and 16S rDNA phylogenies indicated a parallel evolutionary history for the two genes. Results indicate that the As(III) efflux pump was present in the ancestor common to the Bacterial and Archaeal domains. This pump, conferring resistance to arsenite, was probably important to early life living in metal-rich environments. Previous work has shown that the gene encoding for ArsA, an ATPase that increases the efficiency of arsenic efflux, clearly arose via gene duplication. Ferroplasma and related Thermoplasmales group organisms contain a pre-duplication subunit of uncertain function. ArsA phylogeny shows two separate and distinct lines of evolution for the chromosomal- and plasmid-based proteins. This study provides the first evidence of metal resistance developing early in the evolution of life and gives new insights into the evolutionary history of the arsenic resistance proteins.

  17. A novel ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from wastewater treatment plant: Its enrichment, physiological and genomic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyang; Ding, Kun; Wen, Xianghua; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng

    2016-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are recently found to participate in the ammonia removal processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), similar to their bacterial counterparts. However, due to lack of cultivated AOA strains from WWTPs, their functions and contributions in these systems remain unclear. Here we report a novel AOA strain SAT1 enriched from activated sludge, with its physiological and genomic characteristics investigated. The maximal 16S rRNA gene similarity between SAT1 and other reported AOA strain is 96% (with “Ca. Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis”), and it is affiliated with Wastewater Cluster B (WWC-B) based on amoA gene phylogeny, a cluster within group I.1a and specific for activated sludge. Our strain is autotrophic, mesophilic (25 °C–33 °C) and neutrophilic (pH 5.0–7.0). Its genome size is 1.62 Mb, with a large fragment inversion (accounted for 68% genomic size) inside. The strain could not utilize urea due to truncation of the urea transporter gene. The lack of the pathways to synthesize usual compatible solutes makes it intolerant to high salinity (>0.03%), but could adapt to low salinity (0.005%) environments. This adaptation, together with possibly enhanced cell-biofilm attachment ability, makes it suitable for WWTPs environment. We propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis cloacae” for the strain SAT1.

  18. Activation of methanogenesis by cadmium in the marine archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Lira-Silva

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina acetivorans was cultured in the presence of CdCl(2 to determine the metal effect on cell growth and biogas production. With methanol as substrate, cell growth and methane synthesis were not altered by cadmium, whereas with acetate, cadmium slightly increased both, growth and methane rate synthesis. In cultures metabolically active, incubations for short-term (minutes with 10 µM total cadmium increased the methanogenesis rate by 6 and 9 folds in methanol- and acetate-grown cells, respectively. Cobalt and zinc but not copper or iron also activated the methane production rate. Methanogenic carbonic anhydrase and acetate kinase were directly activated by cadmium. Indeed, cells cultured in 100 µM total cadmium removed 41-69% of the heavy metal from the culture and accumulated 231-539 nmol Cd/mg cell protein. This is the first report showing that (i Cd(2+ has an activating effect on methanogenesis, a biotechnological relevant process in the bio-fuels field; and (ii a methanogenic archaea is able to remove a heavy metal from aquatic environments.

  19. Heteroduplex formation, mismatch resolution, and genetic sectoring during homologous recombination in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DennisW.Grogan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic archaea exhibit certain molecular-genetic features not seen in bacteria or eukaryotes, and their systems of homologous recombination (HR remain largely unexplored in vivo. We transformed a Sulfolobus acidocaldarius pyrE mutant with short DNAs that contained multiple non-selected genetic markers within the pyrE gene. From 20 to 40% of the resulting colonies were found to contain two Pyr+ clones with distinct sets of the non-selected markers. The dual-genotype colonies could not be attributed to multiple DNAs entering the cells or conjugation between transformed and non-transformed cells. These colonies thus appear to represent genetic sectoring in which stretches of heteroduplex DNA formed during HR and segregated without complete resolution of inter-strand differences. Surprisingly, sectoring was also frequent in transformation with single-stranded DNAs. Oligonucleotides, for example, produced somewhat more sectored transformants when electroporated as single strands than as a duplex, although all forms (positive-strand, negative-strand, and duplex produced a diversity of genotypes from the limited number of markers. The marker patterns in the recombinants indicate that S. acidocaldarius resolves individual mismatches through un-coordinated short-patch excision followed by re-filling of the resulting gap. These gene-conversion events exhibit little strand bias, and can occur in pre-formed heteroduplex. These properties suggest that this process does not play a central role in the fidelity of genome replication, but may generate 3’ single-strand tails, and thereby initiate the incorporation of duplex DNA into the recipient chromosome. Regardless of the molecular details of its mechanism, HR between the S. acidocaldarius chromosome and a multiply-marked DNA produces a strikingly high level of genetic diversity in a very short chromosomal interval, and suggests that HR in Sulfolobus has significant mutagenic potential if not controlled.

  20. Did group II intron proliferation in an endosymbiont-bearing archaeon create eukaryotes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poole Anthony M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Martin & Koonin recently proposed that the eukaryote nucleus evolved as a quality control mechanism to prevent ribosome readthrough into introns. In their scenario, the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria was resident in an archaeal cell, and group II introns (carried by the fledgling mitochondrion inserted into coding regions in the archaeal host genome. They suggest that if transcription and translation were coupled, and because splicing is expected to have been slower than translation, the effect of insertion would have been ribosome readthrough into introns, resulting in production of aberrant proteins. The emergence of the nuclear compartment would thus have served to separate transcription and splicing from translation, thereby alleviating this problem. In this article, I argue that Martin & Koonin's model is not compatible with current knowledge. The model requires that group II introns would spread aggressively through an archaeal genome. It is well known that selfish elements can spread through an outbreeding sexual population despite a substantial fitness cost to the host. The same is not true for asexual lineages however, where both theory and observation argue that such elements will be under pressure to reduce proliferation, and may be lost completely. The recent introduction of group II introns into archaea by horizontal transfer provides a natural test case with which to evaluate Martin & Koonin's model. The distribution and behaviour of these introns fits prior theoretical expectations, not the scenario of aggressive proliferation advocated by Martin & Koonin. I therefore conclude that the mitochondrial seed hypothesis for the origin of eukaryote introns, on which their model is based, better explains the early expansion of introns in eukaryotes. The mitochondrial seed hypothesis has the capacity to separate the origin of eukaryotes from the origin of introns, leaving open the possibility that the cell that engulfed the ancestor of mitochondria was a sexually outcrossing eukaryote cell.

  1. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ulas

    Full Text Available We describe the reconstruction of a genome-scale metabolic model of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, a hyperthermoacidophilic microorganism. It grows in terrestrial volcanic hot springs with growth occurring at pH 2-4 (optimum 3.5 and a temperature of 75-80°C (optimum 80°C. The genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 contains 2,992,245 bp on a single circular chromosome and encodes 2,977 proteins and a number of RNAs. The network comprises 718 metabolic and 58 transport/exchange reactions and 705 unique metabolites, based on the annotated genome and available biochemical data. Using the model in conjunction with constraint-based methods, we simulated the metabolic fluxes induced by different environmental and genetic conditions. The predictions were compared to experimental measurements and phenotypes of S. solfataricus. Furthermore, the performance of the network for 35 different carbon sources known for S. solfataricus from the literature was simulated. Comparing the growth on different carbon sources revealed that glycerol is the carbon source with the highest biomass flux per imported carbon atom (75% higher than glucose. Experimental data was also used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. In addition to the commonly known heterotrophic growth of S. solfataricus, the crenarchaeon is also able to grow autotrophically using the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle for bicarbonate fixation. We integrated this pathway into our model and compared bicarbonate fixation with growth on glucose as sole carbon source. Finally, we tested the robustness of the metabolism with respect to gene deletions using the method of Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment (MOMA, which predicted that 18% of all possible single gene deletions would be lethal for the organism.

  2. A Phosphohexomutase from the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus Is Covalently Modified by Phosphorylation on Serine

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, W. Keith; Keith, Sabrina M.; DeSantis, Andrea M.; Hunt, Jeremy P.; Larson, Timothy J.; Helm, Richard F.; Kennelly, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    A phosphoserine-containing peptide was identified from tryptic digests from Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Its amino acid sequence closely matched that bracketing Ser-309 in the predicted protein product of open reading frame sso0207, a putative phosphohexomutase, in the genome of S. solfataricus P2. Open reading frame sso0207 was cloned, and its protein product expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein proved capable of interconvert...

  3. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuininga, J E; Verhees, C H; van der Oost, J; Kengen, S W; Stams, A J; de Vos, W M

    1999-07-23

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway involving two ADP-dependent kinases. Using the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the previously purified ADP-dependent glucokinase, the corresponding gene as well as a related open reading frame were detected in the genome of P. furiosus. Both genes were successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, yielding highly thermoactive ADP-dependent glucokinase and phosphofructokinase. The deduced amino acid sequences of both kinases were 21.1% identical but did not reveal significant homology with those of other known sugar kinases. The ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase was purified and characterized. The oxygen-stable protein had a native molecular mass of approximately 180 kDa and was composed of four identical 52-kDa subunits. It had a specific activity of 88 units/mg at 50 degrees C and a pH optimum of 6.5. As phosphoryl group donor, ADP could be replaced by GDP, ATP, and GTP to a limited extent. The K(m) values for fructose 6-phosphate and ADP were 2.3 and 0.11 mM, respectively. The phosphofructokinase did not catalyze the reverse reaction, nor was it regulated by any of the known allosteric modulators of ATP-dependent phosphofructokinases. ATP and AMP were identified as competitive inhibitors of the phosphofructokinase, raising the K(m) for ADP to 0.34 and 0.41 mM, respectively. PMID:10409652

  4. TreT, a novel trehalose glycosyltransferring synthase of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Qiuhao; Lee, Sung-Jae; Boos, Winfried

    2004-11-12

    The gene cluster in Thermococcus litoralis encoding a multicomponent and binding protein-dependent ABC transporter for trehalose and maltose contains an open reading frame of unknown function. We cloned this gene (now called treT), expressed it in Escherichia coli, purified the encoded protein, and identified it as an enzyme forming trehalose and ADP from ADP-glucose and glucose. The enzyme can also use UDP- and GDP-glucose but with less efficiency. The reaction is reversible, and ADP-glucose plus glucose can also be formed from trehalose and ADP. The rate of reaction and the equilibrium favor the formation of trehalose. At 90 degrees C, the optimal temperature for the enzymatic reaction, the half-maximal concentration of ADP-glucose at saturating glucose concentrations is 1.14 mm and the V(max) is 160 units/mg protein. In the reverse reaction, the half-maximal concentration of trehalose at saturating ADP concentrations is 11.5 mm and the V(max) was estimated to be 17 units/mg protein. Under non-denaturating in vitro conditions the enzyme behaves as a dimer of identical subunits of 48 kDa. As the transporter encoded in the same gene cluster, TreT is induced by trehalose and maltose in the growth medium. PMID:15364950

  5. Cloning and characterization of ftsZ and pyrF from the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, T; Laksanalamai, P; Jiemjit, A; Kagawa, H K; Alton, T; Trent, J D

    2000-09-01

    To characterize cytoskeletal components of archaea, the ftsZ gene from Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and sequenced. In T. acidophilum ftsZ, which is involved in cell division, was found to be in an operon with the pyrF gene, which encodes orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC), an essential enzyme in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Both ftsZ and pyrF from T. acidophilum were expressed in Escherichia coli and formed functional proteins. FtsZ expression in wild-type E. coli resulted in the filamentous phenotype characteristic of ftsZ mutants. T. acidophilum pyrF expression in an E. coli mutant lacking pyrF complemented the mutation and rescued the strain. Sequence alignments of ODCs from archaea, bacteria, and eukarya reveal five conserved regions, two of which have homology to 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (HPS), suggesting a common substrate recognition and binding motif. PMID:10973825

  6. Purification and biochemical characterization of the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natronococcus occultus extracellular serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studdert, C A; Herrera Seitz, M K; Plasencia, I; Sanchez, J J; de Castro, R E

    2001-01-01

    other halobacteria nor with commercial proteases except subtilisin. The amino acid sequences of three tryptic peptides obtained from Natronococcus occultus protease did not show significant similarity to other known proteolytic enzymes. This fact, in addition to its high molecular mass suggests that...

  7. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  8. Biotransformation of Two Pharmaceuticals by the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon Nitrososphaera gargensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Yujie; Han, Ping; Helbling, Damian E; Jehmlich, Nico; Herbold, Craig; Gulde, Rebekka; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Gu, April Z; Johnson, David R; Wagner, Michael; Fenner, Kathrin

    2016-05-01

    The biotransformation of some micropollutants has previously been observed to be positively associated with ammonia oxidation activities and the transcript abundance of the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) in nitrifying activated sludge. Given the increasing interest in and potential importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), we investigated the capabilities of an AOA pure culture, Nitrososphaera gargensis, to biotransform ten micropollutants belonging to three structurally similar groups (i.e., phenylureas, tertiary amides, and tertiary amines). N. gargensis was able to biotransform two of the tertiary amines, mianserin (MIA) and ranitidine (RAN), exhibiting similar compound specificity as two ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) strains that were tested for comparison. The same MIA and RAN biotransformation reactions were carried out by both the AOA and AOB strains. The major transformation product (TP) of MIA, α-oxo MIA was likely formed via a two-step oxidation reaction. The first hydroxylation step is typically catalyzed by monooxygenases. Three RAN TP candidates were identified from nontarget analysis. Their tentative structures and possible biotransformation pathways were proposed. The biotransformation of MIA and RAN only occurred when ammonia oxidation was active, suggesting cometabolic transformations. Consistently, a comparative proteomic analysis revealed no significant differential expression of any protein-encoding gene in N. gargensis grown on ammonium with MIA or RAN compared with standard cultivation on ammonium only. Taken together, this study provides first important insights regarding the roles played by AOA in micropollutant biotransformation. PMID:27046099

  9. Activation of Methanogenesis by Cadmium in the Marine Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Lira-Silva; M Geovanni Santiago-Martínez; Viridiana Hernández-Juárez; Rodolfo García-Contreras; Rafael Moreno-Sánchez; Ricardo Jasso-Chávez

    2012-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans was cultured in the presence of CdCl(2) to determine the metal effect on cell growth and biogas production. With methanol as substrate, cell growth and methane synthesis were not altered by cadmium, whereas with acetate, cadmium slightly increased both, growth and methane rate synthesis. In cultures metabolically active, incubations for short-term (minutes) with 10 µM total cadmium increased the methanogenesis rate by 6 and 9 folds in methanol- and acetate-grown cel...

  10. Biosynthesis, Characterization, and Hemostasis Potential of Tailor-Made Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) Produced by Haloferax mediterranei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Jing; Wu, Linping; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Dahe; Xiang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    weight and its distribution, and thermal and mechanical properties were characterized by NMR, GPC, DSC, TGA, and universal testing machine, respectively. (13)C NMR studies showed that O-PHBV copolymers consisted of short segments of PHB and PHV covalently linked together with random PHBV segments...

  11. NrpRII mediates contacts between NrpRI and general transcription factors in the archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Gö1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbach, Katrin; Ehlers, Claudia; Kock, Jutta; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2010-11-01

    We report here on the formation of a complex between the two NrpR homologs present in Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 and their binding properties to the nifH and glnK(1) promoters. Reciprocal co-chromatography demonstrated that NrpRI forms stable complexes with NrpRII (at an NrpRI : NrpRII molar ratio of ∼ 1 : 3), which are not affected by 2-oxoglutarate. Promoter-binding, analyses using DNA-affinity chromatography and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays, verified that NrpRII is not able to bind to either the nifH promoter or the glnK(1) promoter except when in complex with NrpRI. Specific binding of NrpRI to the nifH and glnK(1) promoters was shown to be highly sensitive to 2-oxoglutarate, regardless of whether only NrpRI, or NrpRI in complex with NrpRII, bound to the promoter. Finally, strong interactions between NrpRII and the general transcription factors TATA-binding proteins (TBP) 1-3 and the general transcription factor TFIIB (TFB) were demonstrated, interactions which are also sensitive to 2-oxoglutarate. On the basis of these findings we propose the following: under nitrogen sufficiency NrpRII binds from solution to either the nifH promoter or the glnK(1) promoter by simultaneously contacting NrpRI and TBP plus TFB, resulting in full repression of transcription; whereas, under nitrogen limitation, increasing 2-oxoglutarate concentrations significantly decrease the binding of NrpRI to the operator as well as the binding of NrpRII to TBP and TFB, ultimately allowing recruitment of RNA polymerase to the promoter. PMID:20875081

  12. The origin of a derived superkingdom: how a gram-positive bacterium crossed the desert to become an archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourne Philip E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tree of life is usually rooted between archaea and bacteria. We have previously presented three arguments that support placing the root of the tree of life in bacteria. The data have been dismissed because those who support the canonical rooting between the prokaryotic superkingdoms cannot imagine how the vast divide between the prokaryotic superkingdoms could be crossed. Results We review the evidence that archaea are derived, as well as their biggest differences with bacteria. We argue that using novel data the gap between the superkingdoms is not insurmountable. We consider whether archaea are holophyletic or paraphyletic; essential to understanding their origin. Finally, we review several hypotheses on the origins of archaea and, where possible, evaluate each hypothesis using bioinformatics tools. As a result we argue for a firmicute ancestry for archaea over proposals for an actinobacterial ancestry. Conclusion We believe a synthesis of the hypotheses of Lake, Gupta, and Cavalier-Smith is possible where a combination of antibiotic warfare and viral endosymbiosis in the bacilli led to dramatic changes in a bacterium that resulted in the birth of archaea and eukaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Patrick Forterre, Eugene Koonin, and Gáspár Jékely

  13. Genomics and genetics of Sulfolobus islandicus LAL14/1, a model hyperthermophilic archaeon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaubert, Carole; Danioux, Chloë; Oberto, Jacques;

    2013-01-01

    common core genome of approximately 2 Mb and a long hyperplastic region containing most of the strain-specific genes. In LAL14/1, the latter region is enriched in insertion sequences, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), glycosyl transferase genes, toxin-antitoxin genes and...... MITE (miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements). The tRNA genes of LAL14/1 are preferential targets for the integration of mobile elements but clusters of atypical genes (CAG) are also integrated elsewhere in the genome. LAL14/1 carries five CRISPR loci with 10 per cent of spacers matching...... perfectly or imperfectly the genomes of archaeal viruses and plasmids found in the Icelandic hot springs. Strikingly, the CRISPR_2 region of LAL14/1 carries an unusually long 1.9 kb spacer interspersed between two repeat regions and displays a high similarity to pING1-like conjugative plasmids. Finally, we...

  14. The ultrastructure of Ignicoccus: Evidence for a novel outer membrane and for intracellular vesicle budding in an archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel genus of hyperthermophilic, strictly chemolithotrophic archaea, Ignicoccus, has been described recently, with (so far three isolates in pure culture. Cells were prepared for ultrastructural investigation by cultivation in cellulose capillaries and processing by high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution and embedding in Epon. Cells prepared in accordance with this protocol consistently showed a novel cell envelope structure previously unknown among the Archaea: a cytoplasmic membrane; a periplasmic space with a variable width of 20 to 400 nm, containing membrane-bound vesicles; and an outer sheath, approximately 10 nm wide, resembling the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. This sheath contained three types of particles: numerous tightly, irregularly packed single particles, about 8 nm in diameter; pores with a diameter of 24 nm, surrounded by tiny particles, arranged in a ring with a diameter of 130 nm; and clusters of up to eight particles, each particle 12 nm in diameter. Freeze-etched cells exhibited a smooth surface, without a regular pattern, with frequent fracture planes through the outer sheath, indicating the presence of an outer membrane and the absence of an S-layer. The study illustrates the novel complex architecture of the cell envelope of Ignicoccus as well as the importance of elaborate preparation procedures for ultrastructural investigations.

  15. Mutational analyses of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of hydrogen by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit J Schut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C by fermenting carbohydrates to produce hydrogen (H2 or, if elemental sulfur (S0, is present hydrogen sulfide instead. It contains two cytoplasmic hydrogenases, SHI and SHII, that use NADP(H as an electron carrier, and a membrane bound hydrogenase (MBH, that utilizes the redox protein ferredoxin. We previously constructed deletion strains lacking SHI and/or SHII and showed that they exhibited no obvious phenotype. This study has now been extended to include biochemical analyses and growth studies using the ΔSHI and ΔSHII deletion strains together with strains lacking a functional MBH (ΔMbhL. Hydrogenase activities in cytoplasmic extracts of ΔSHII and the parent strain were similar but were much lower (<10% in the ΔSHI strain, and no activity was detected in the ΔSHIΔSHII double deletion strain, indicating that SHI is responsible for most of the cytoplasmic hydrogenase activity. In contrast, the ΔmbhL strain showed no growth in the absence of S0, confirming the hypothesis that, in the absence of S0, MBH is the only enzyme that can dispose of reductant (as H2 generated during sugar oxidation. The deletion strain devoid of all three hydrogenases also grew only in the presence of S0 and did not produce any detectable H2. When grown in the presence of limiting S0, both H2S and H2 were produced by the parent and ΔSHI/ΔSHII strains. A significant amount of H2 was also produced by the ΔmbhL strain, showing that SHI can produce H2 from NADPH in vivo, although this does not enable significant growth of ΔmbhL in the absence of S0. We propose that the physiological function of SHI is to recycle H2 and provide a link between external H2 and the intracellular pool of NADPH needed for biosynthesis. This likely has a distinct energetic advantage in the environment, but it is clearly not required for growth of the organism under the usual laboratory conditions. The function of SHII, however, remains unknown.

  16. The 1.5 resolution structure of the [Fe4S3]-ferredoxin from the hyperthermiphilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Ericsson Skovbo; Harris, Pernille; Ooi, Bee Lean; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    contains a double-conformation disulfide bond existing in a left-handed and a right-handed spiral conformation. The crystal packing reveals a beta-sheet interaction, which supports the suggestion that P. furiosus ferredoxin is a functional dimer. The extraordinary thermostability of P. furiosus ferredoxin...

  17. Molecular cloning and enzymological characterization of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate independent aspartate racemase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Tsubasa; Kato, Shiro; Oikawa, Tadao

    2016-09-01

    We succeeded in expressing the aspartate racemase homolog gene from Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473 in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) and found that the gene encodes aspartate racemase. The aspartate racemase gene consisted of 687 bp and encoded 228 amino acid residues. The purified enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity with a specific activity of 1590 U/mg. The enzyme was a homodimer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa and did not require pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a coenzyme. The enzyme showed aspartate racemase activity even at 95 °C, and the activation energy of the enzyme was calculated to be 51.8 kJ/mol. The enzyme was highly thermostable, and approximately 50 % of its initial activity remained even after incubation at 90 °C for 11 h. The enzyme showed a maximum activity at a pH of 7.5 and was stable between pH 6.0 and 7.0. The enzyme acted on L-cysteic acid and L-cysteine sulfinic acid in addition to D- and L-aspartic acids, and was strongly inhibited by iodoacetic acid. The site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme showed that the essential cysteine residues were conserved as Cys83 and Cys194. D-Forms of aspartic acid, serine, alanine, and valine were contained in T. litoralis DSM 5473 cells. PMID:27438592

  18. FK506 Binding Protein from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii Suppresses the Aggregation of Proteins in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Ideno, Akira; Furutani, Masahiro; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    The 29-kDa FK506 binding protein (FKBP) gene is the only peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) gene in the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. We characterized the function of this FKBP (PhFKBP29) and used it to increase the production yield of soluble recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. The PPIase activity (kcat/Km) of PhFKBP29 was found to be much lower than that of other archaeal 16- to 18-kDa FKBPs by a chymotrypsin-coupled assay of the oligo-peptidyl substrate at 15°C. Besides t...

  19. FK506 binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii suppresses the aggregation of proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideno, Akira; Furutani, Masahiro; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2002-02-01

    The 29-kDa FK506 binding protein (FKBP) gene is the only peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) gene in the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. We characterized the function of this FKBP (PhFKBP29) and used it to increase the production yield of soluble recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. The PPIase activity (k(cat)/K(m)) of PhFKBP29 was found to be much lower than that of other archaeal 16- to 18-kDa FKBPs by a chymotrypsin-coupled assay of the oligo-peptidyl substrate at 15 degrees C. Besides this low PPIase activity, PhFKBP29 showed chaperone-like protein folding activity which enhanced the refolding yield of chemically unfolded rhodanese in vitro. In addition, it suppressed thermal protein aggregation in a temperature range of 45 to 100 degrees C. When the PhFKBP29 gene was coexpressed with the recombinant Fab fragment gene of the anti-hen egg lysozyme antibody in the cytoplasm of E. coli, whose expressed product tended to form an inactive aggregate in E. coli, it improved the yield of the soluble Fab fragments with antibody specificity. PhFKBP29 exerted protein folding and aggregation suppression in E. coli cells. PMID:11823179

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Highly Flagellated, Fast-Swimming Archaeon, Methanocaldococcus villosus Strain KIN24-T80 (DSM 22612)

    KAUST Repository

    Thennarasu, Sugumar

    2013-07-11

    We report the draft genome sequence of a hyperthermophilic Methanocaldococcus villosus strain, KIN24-T80. The gene associated with its heavy flagellum formation was annotated in the 1.2-Mb draft genome sequence, and this strain may be a good model system to study the extensive functional role of flagella and their fast motor activity.

  1. Genome sequence of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first archaeon isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine lake.

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Andre

    2011-09-01

    We present the draft genome of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first member of the Archaea ever isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine. Genome comparison with Halorhabdus utahensis revealed some striking differences, including a marked increase in genes associated with transmembrane transport and putative genes for a trehalose synthase and a lactate dehydrogenase.

  2. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte;

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransfe......Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine...... phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase), the protein product turned out to be a PRTase highly specific for adenine and we suggest that the reading frame should be renamed apT. The other reading frame SSO2424 (gpT-2) proved to be a true 6-oxopurine PRTase active with hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanine as substrates, and we.......5, while maximal activity with xanthine was observed at pH 7.5. We discuss likely reasons why SSO2341 in S. solfataricus and similar open reading frames in other Crenarchaeota could not be identified as genes encoding APRTase....

  3. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    response by hsp70(dnaK), and a similar response by trkA. The data suggest that the moderate thermophile TM-1 has an active Hsp70(DnaK)-chaperone machine in contrast to hyperthermophilic archaea, and that trkA is a stress gene, inasmuch as it responds like classic heat-shock genes to stressors that induce a...... typical heat-shock response. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......-negative bacteria - first described in the S-6 molecule and later found to be present in all homologs from archaea and Gram positives. The genes responded to a temperature elevation in a manner that demonstrated that they are heat-shock genes, functionally active in vivo. Ammonia also induced a heat-shock type of...

  4. Genetic and transcriptomic analysis of transcription factor genes in the model halophilic Archaeon: coordinate action of TbpD and TfbA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea are prokaryotic organisms with simplified versions of eukaryotic transcription systems. Genes coding for the general transcription factors TBP and TFB are present in multiple copies in several Archaea, including Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. Multiple TBP and TFBs have been proposed to participate in transcription of genes via recognition and recruitment of RNA polymerase to different classes of promoters. Results We attempted to knock out all six TBP and seven TFB genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 using the ura3-based gene deletion system. Knockouts were obtained for six out of thirteen genes, tbpCDF and tfbACG, indicating that they are not essential for cell viability under standard conditions. Screening of a population of 1,000 candidate mutants showed that genes which did not yield mutants contained less that 0.1% knockouts, strongly suggesting that they are essential. The transcriptomes of two mutants, ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA, were compared to the parental strain and showed coordinate down regulation of many genes. Over 500 out of 2,677 total genes were regulated in the ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA mutants with 363 regulated in both, indicating that over 10% of genes in both strains require the action of both TbpD and TfbA for normal transcription. Culturing studies on the ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA mutant strains showed them to grow more slowly than the wild-type at an elevated temperature, 49°C, and they showed reduced viability at 56°C, suggesting TbpD and TfbA are involved in the heat shock response. Alignment of TBP and TFB protein sequences suggested the expansion of the TBP gene family, especially in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and TFB gene family in representatives of five different genera of haloarchaea in which genome sequences are available. Conclusion Six of thirteen TBP and TFB genes of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 are non-essential under standard growth conditions. TbpD and TfbA coordinate the expression of over 10% of the genes in the NRC-1 genome. The ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA mutant strains are temperature sensitive, possibly as a result of down regulation of heat shock genes. Sequence alignments suggest the existence of several families of TBP and TFB transcription factors in Halobacterium which may function in transcription of different classes of genes.

  5. Genetic and transcriptomic analysis of transcription factor genes in the model halophilic Archaeon: coordinate action of TbpD and TfbA

    OpenAIRE

    DasSarma Shiladitya; Coker James A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Archaea are prokaryotic organisms with simplified versions of eukaryotic transcription systems. Genes coding for the general transcription factors TBP and TFB are present in multiple copies in several Archaea, including Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. Multiple TBP and TFBs have been proposed to participate in transcription of genes via recognition and recruitment of RNA polymerase to different classes of promoters. Results We attempted to knock out all six TBP and seven TFB genes...

  6. Genomic Analysis of Anaerobic Respiration in the Archaeon Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1: Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Trimethylamine N-Oxide as Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Jochen A.; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated anaerobic respiration of the archaeal model organism Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 by using phenotypic and genetic analysis, bioinformatics, and transcriptome analysis. NRC-1 was found to grow on either dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as the sole terminal electron acceptor, with a doubling time of 1 day. An operon, dmsREABCD, encoding a putative regulatory protein, DmsR, a molybdopterin oxidoreductase of the DMSO reductase family (DmsEABC), and...

  7. Identification and characterization of a thermostable bifunctional enzyme with phosphomannose isomerase and sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidylyltransferase activities from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Jun-ichi; Zhang, Zilian; Morita, Rihito; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Mannosylglycerate is known as a compatible solute, and plays important roles for salinity adaptation and high temperature stability of microorganisms. In the gene cluster for the mannosylglycerate biosynthetic pathway predicted from the genomic data of Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, the PH0925 protein was found as a putative bifunctional enzyme with phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) and mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase (Man-1-P GTase) activities, which can synthesize GDP-mannose when accompanied by a phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM) enzyme (PH0923). The recombinant PH0925 protein, expressed in E. coli, exhibited both expected PMI and Man-1-P GTase activities, as well as absolute thermostability; 95 °C was the optimum reaction temperature. According to the guanylyltransferase activity (GTase) of the PH0925 protein, it was found that the protein can catalyze glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) and glucosamine-1-phosphate (GlcN-1-P) in addition to Man-1-P. The analyses of C-terminus-truncated forms of the PH0925 protein indicated that sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidylyltransferase (Sugar-1-P NTase) activity was located in the region from the N-terminus to the 345th residue, and that the C-terminal 114 residue region of the PH0925 protein inhibited the Man-1-P GTase activity. Conversely, the PMI activity was abolished by deletion of the C-terminal 14 residues. This is the first report of a thermostable enzyme with both PMI and multiple Sugar-1-P NTase activities. PMID:26290359

  8. Methanospirillum stamsii sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed bioreactor operated at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshina, Sofiya N; Ermakova, Anna V; Bomberg, Malin; Detkova, Ekaterina N

    2014-01-01

    A psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain Pt1, was isolated from a syntrophic propionate-oxidizing methanogenic consortium obtained from granulated biomass of a two-stage low-temperature (3-8 °C) anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) bioreactor, fed with a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) (acetate, propionate and butyrate). The strain was strictly anaerobic, and cells were curved rods, 0.4-0.5×7.5-25 µm, that sometimes formed wavy filaments from 25 to several hundred micrometres in length. Cells stained Gram-negative and were non-sporulating. They were gently motile by means of tufted flagella. The strain grew at 5-37 °C (optimum at 20-30 °C), at pH 6.0-10 (optimum 7.0-7.5) and with 0-0.3 M NaCl (optimum 0 M NaCl). Growth and methane production was found with H2/CO2 and very weak growth with formate. Acetate and yeast extract stimulated growth, but were not essential. The G+C content of the DNA of strain Pt1 was 40 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Pt1 was a member of the genus Methanospirillum and showed 97.5 % sequence similarity to Methanospirillum hungatei JF1(T) and 94 % sequence similarity to Methanospirillum lacunae Ki8-1(T). DNA-DNA hybridization of strain Pt1 with Methanospirillum hungatei JF1(T) revealed 39 % relatedness. On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strain Pt1 is a representative of a novel species of the genus Methanospirillum, for which the name Methanospirillum stamsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Pt1(T) ( = DSM 26304(T) = VKM B-2808(T)). PMID:24048867

  9. The Elemental Sulfur-Responsive Protein (SipA) from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus Is Regulated by Sulfide in an Iron-Dependent Manner ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, Sonya M; Newcomer, Elizabeth C.; Young, Everett G.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2010-01-01

    The gene (sipA) encoding the sulfur-induced protein A (PF2025) is highly upregulated during growth of Pyrococcus furiosus on elemental sulfur (S0). Expression of sipA is regulated by sulfide, the product of S0 reduction, but in an iron-dependent manner. SipA is proposed to play a role in intracellular iron sulfide detoxification.

  10. Gene content and organization of a 281-kbp contig from the genome of the extremely thermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlebois, R.; Confalonieri, F.; Curtis, B.; Doolittle, W.F.; Duguet, M.; Erauso, G.; Faguy, D.; Gaasterland, T.; Garrett, R.A.; Gordon, P.; Kozera, C.; Medina, N.; Oost, van der J.; Peng, X.; Ragan, M.; She, Q.; Singh, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The sequence of a 281-kbp contig from the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was determined and analysed. Notable features in this region include 29 ribosomal protein genes, 12 tRNA genes (four of which contain archaeal-type introns), operons encoding enzymes of histidine biosynthesis, pyrimid

  11. Cloning, functional organization, transcript studies, and phylogenetic analysis of the complete nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) and associated genes in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Y T; Zinder, S H

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) from Methanosarcina barkeri 227 was completed in this study by cloning and sequencing a 2.7-kb BamHI fragment containing the 3' end of nifK2 and 1,390 bp of the nifE2-homologous genes. Open reading frame nifK2 is 1,371 bp long including the stop codon TAA and encodes a polypeptide of 456 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the nifK2 and nifE2 gene products from M. barkeri showed that both genes cluster most closely with the corresponding nif-1 gene products from Clostridium pasteurianum, consistent with our previous analyses of nifH2 and nifD2. The nifE gene product is known to be homologous to that of nifD, and our analysis shows that the branching pattern for the nifE proteins resembles that for the nifD product (with the exception of vnfE from Azotobacter vinelandii), suggesting that a gene duplication occurred before the divergence of nitrogenases. Primer extension showed that nifH2 had a single transcription start site located 34 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translation start site for nifH2, and a sequence resembling the archaeal consensus promoter sequence [TTTA(A/T)ATA] was found 32 nucleotides upstream from that transcription start site. A tract of four T's, previously identified as a transcription termination site in archaea, was found immediately downstream of the nifK2 gene, and a potential promoter was located upstream of the nifE2 gene. Hybridization with nifH2 and nifDK2 probes with M. barkeri RNA revealed a 4.6-kb transcript from N2-grown cells, large enough to harbor nifHDK genes and their internal open reading frames, while no transcript was detected from NH4(+)-grown cells. These results support a model in which the nitrogenase structural genes in M. barkeri are cotranscribed in a single NH4(+)-repressed operon. PMID:8550408

  12. Cloning, functional organization, transcript studies, and phylogenetic analysis of the complete nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) and associated genes in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Y T; Zinder, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) from Methanosarcina barkeri 227 was completed in this study by cloning and sequencing a 2.7-kb BamHI fragment containing the 3' end of nifK2 and 1,390 bp of the nifE2-homologous genes. Open reading frame nifK2 is 1,371 bp long including the stop codon TAA and encodes a polypeptide of 456 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the nifK2 and nifE2 gene products from M. barke...

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) from M. mazei has been overexpressed in an N-terminally truncated form PylRS(c270) in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) from Methanosarcina mazei was overexpressed in an N-terminally truncated form PylRS(c270) in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The native PylRS(c270) crystals in complex with an ATP analogue belonged to space group P64, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.88, c = 70.43 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of PylRS(c270). Selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals were prepared in order to solve the structure by the MAD phasing method

  14. Deletion of the topoisomerase III gene in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus results in slow growth and defects in cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiyang; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling;

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerase III (topo III), a type IA topoisomerase, is widespread in hyperthermophilic archaea. In order to interrogate the in vivo role of archaeal topo III, we constructed and characterized a topo III gene deletion mutant of Sulfolobus islandicus. The mutant was viable but grew more slowly t...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Candidatus Methanomethyllophilus sp. 1R26m -Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, T.;

    2016-01-01

    Olsenella scatoligenes SK9K4(T) is a strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from pig feces that produces the malodorous compounds 3-methylindole (skatole) and 4-methylphenol (p-cresol). Here, we report the 2.47 Mbp draft genome sequence of SK9K4(T), exploring pathways for the synthesis of skatole...... and p-cresol from the amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, respectively....

  16. Lesion-Induced Mutation in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Its Avoidance by the Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dbh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea offer certain advantages as models of genome replication, and Sulfolobus Y-family polymerases Dpo4 (S. solfataricus) and Dbh (S. acidocaldarius) have been studied intensively in vitro as biochemical and structural models of trans-lesion DNA synthesis (TLS). However, the genetic functions of these enzymes have not been determined in the native context of living cells. We developed the first quantitative genetic assays of replication past defined DNA lesions and error-prone motifs in Sulfolobus chromosomes and used them to measure the efficiency and accuracy of bypass in normal and dbh(-) strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Oligonucleotide-mediated transformation allowed low levels of abasic-site bypass to be observed in S. acidocaldarius and demonstrated that the local sequence context affected bypass specificity; in addition, most erroneous TLS did not require Dbh function. Applying the technique to another common lesion, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), revealed an antimutagenic role of Dbh. The efficiency and accuracy of replication past 8-oxo-dG was higher in the presence of Dbh, and up to 90% of the Dbh-dependent events inserted dC. A third set of assays, based on phenotypic reversion, showed no effect of Dbh function on spontaneous -1 frameshifts in mononucleotide tracts in vivo, despite the extremely frequent slippage at these motifs documented in vitro. Taken together, the results indicate that a primary genetic role of Dbh is to avoid mutations at 8-oxo-dG that occur when other Sulfolobus enzymes replicate past this lesion. The genetic evidence that Dbh is recruited to 8-oxo-dG raises questions regarding the mechanism of recruitment, since Sulfolobus spp. have eukaryotic-like replisomes but no ubiquitin. PMID:26224736

  17. Functional-Genomics-Based Identification and Characterization of Open Reading Frames Encoding α-Glucoside-Processing Enzymes in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Comfort, Donald A.; Chou, Chung-Jung; Conners, Shannon B.; VanFossen, Amy L.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioinformatics analysis and transcriptional response information for Pyrococcus furiosus grown on α-glucans led to the identification of a novel isomaltase (PF0132) representing a new glycoside hydrolase (GH) family, a novel GH57 β-amylase (PF0870), and an extracellular starch-binding protein (1,141 amino acids; PF1109-PF1110), in addition to several other putative α-glucan-processing enzymes.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus” sp. 1R26, Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højberg, Ole; Urich, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus” sp. 1R26, a member of the newly described Methanomassiliicoccales order of Euryarcheaota. The enrichment culture was established from bovine rumen contents and produced methane from trimethylamine and methanol. The draft genome contains genes for methanogenesis from methylated compounds. PMID:26893425

  19. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    response by hsp70(dnaK), and a similar response by trkA. The data suggest that the moderate thermophile TM-1 has an active Hsp70(DnaK)-chaperone machine in contrast to hyperthermophilic archaea, and that trkA is a stress gene, inasmuch as it responds like classic heat-shock genes to stressors that induce a...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus” sp. 1R26, Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order

    OpenAIRE

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, Tim; Poulsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus” sp. 1R26, a member of the newly described Methanomassiliicoccales order of Euryarcheaota. The enrichment culture was established from bovine rumen contents and produced methane from trimethylamine and methanol. The draft genome contains genes for methanogenesis from methylated compounds.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methanomethylophilus" sp. 1R26, Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, Tim; Poulsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of "Candidatus Methanomethylophilus" sp. 1R26, a member of the newly described Methanomassiliicoccales order of Euryarcheaota. The enrichment culture was established from bovine rumen contents and produced methane from trimethylamine and methanol. The draft genome contains genes for methanogenesis from methylated compounds. PMID:26893425

  2. The Mre11 protein interacts with both Rad50 and the HerA bipolar helicase and is recruited to DNA following gamma irradiation in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forterre Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquitous Rad50 and Mre11 proteins play a key role in many processes involved in the maintenance of genome integrity in Bacteria and Eucarya, but their function in the Archaea is presently unknown. We showed previously that in most hyperthermophilic archaea, rad50-mre11 genes are linked to nurA encoding both a single-strand endonuclease and a 5' to 3' exonuclease, and herA, encoding a bipolar DNA helicase which suggests the involvement of the four proteins in common molecular pathway(s. Since genetic tools for hyperthermophilic archaea are just emerging, we utilized immuno-detection approaches to get the first in vivo data on the role(s of these proteins in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Results We first showed that S. acidocaldarius can repair DNA damage induced by high doses of gamma rays, and we performed a time course analysis of the total levels and sub-cellular partitioning of Rad50, Mre11, HerA and NurA along with the RadA recombinase in both control and irradiated cells. We found that during the exponential phase, all proteins are synthesized and display constant levels, but that all of them exhibit a different sub-cellular partitioning. Following gamma irradiation, both Mre11 and RadA are immediately recruited to DNA and remain DNA-bound in the course of DNA repair. Furthermore, we show by immuno-precipitation assays that Rad50, Mre11 and the HerA helicase interact altogether. Conclusion Our analyses strongly support that in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the Mre11 protein and the RadA recombinase might play an active role in the repair of DNA damage introduced by gamma rays and/or may act as DNA damage sensors. Moreover, our results demonstrate the functional interaction between Mre11, Rad50 and the HerA helicase and suggest that each protein play different roles when acting on its own or in association with its partners. This report provides the first in vivo evidence supporting the implication of the Mre11 protein in DNA repair processes in the Archaea and showing its interaction with both Rad50 and the HerA bipolar helicase. Further studies on the functional interactions between these proteins, the NurA nuclease and the RadA recombinase, will allow us to define their roles and mechanism of action.

  3. Reaction Mechanism and Structural Model of ADP-forming Acetyl-CoA Synthetase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: EVIDENCE FOR A SECOND ACTIVE SITE HISTIDINE RESIDUE*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Bräsen, Christopher; Schmidt, Marcel; Grötzinger, Joachim; Schönheit, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In Archaea, acetate formation and ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA is catalyzed by an unusual ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACD) (acetyl-CoA + ADP + Pi ⇆ acetate + ATP + HS-CoA) catalyzing the formation of acetate from acetyl-CoA and concomitant ATP synthesis by the mechanism of substrate level phosphorylation. ACD belongs to the protein superfamily of nucleoside diphosphate-forming acyl-CoA synthetases, which also include succinyl-CoA synthetases (SCSs). ACD differs from SCS in domain orga...

  4. Discovery of a novel restriction endonuclease by genome comparison and application of a wheat-germ-based cell-free translation assay: PabI (5′-GTA/C) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Ken; Watanabe, Miki; Kuroita, Toshihiro; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Kawakami, Bunsei; Tanokura, Masaru; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-01-01

    To search for restriction endonucleases, we used a novel plant-based cell-free translation procedure that bypasses the toxicity of these enzymes. To identify candidate genes, the related genomes of the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus horikoshii were compared. In line with the selfish mobile gene hypothesis for restriction–modification systems, apparent genome rearrangement around putative restriction genes served as a selecting criterion. Several candidate restricti...

  5. Halobacterium Salinarum: Polyextremophile Model for Life Inside Martian Halite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.

    2014-07-01

    The present work briefly reviews the recent studies on long-term survival potential of Halobacterium salinarum in ancient terrestrial halite and studies the possible survival ability of this poly-extremophilic archaeon inside martian halite.

  6. Promoter recognition in archaea is mediated by transcription factors: identification of transcription factor aTFB from Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus as archaeal TATA-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Gohl, H P; Gröndahl, B; Thomm, M

    1995-01-01

    At least two transcription factors, aTFB and aTFA, are required for accurate and faithful in vitro transcription of homologous templates in cell-free extracts from the methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus. We have recently shown that the function of aTFB can be replaced by eucaryal TATA-binding proteins. Here we demonstrate using template commitment experiments that promoter recognition in an Archaeon is mediated by transcription factors. The archaeal TATA box was identifi...

  7. Reiterated DNA Sequences in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, M.; González, V.; Brom, S; Martínez, E.; Piñero, D; Romero, D.; Dávila, G; Palacios, R

    1988-01-01

    Repeated DNA sequences are a general characteristic of eucaryotic genomes. Although several examples of DNA reiteration have been found in procaryotic organisms, only in the case of the archaebacteria Halobacterium halobium and Halobacterium volcanii [C. Sapienza and W. F. Doolittle, Nature (London) 295:384-389, 1982], has DNA reiteration been reported as a common genomic feature. The genomes of two Rhizobium phaseoli strains, one Rhizobium meliloti strain, and one Agrobacterium tumefaciens s...

  8. Quantifying Homologous Replacement of Loci between Haloarchaeal Species

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of...

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PAT, an acetyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAT, an acetyltransferase from the archaeon S. solfataricus that specifically acetylates the chromatin protein Alba, was expressed, purified and crystallized. PAT is an acetyltransferase from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus that specifically acetylates the chromatin protein Alba. The enzyme was expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Native diffraction data were collected to 1.70 Å resolution on the BL13C1 beamline of NSRRC from a flash-frozen crystal at 100 K. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.30, b = 46.59, c = 68.39 Å

  10. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus. The reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ban, van den E.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic acids.Reductions of carboxylic acids are interes

  11. Tryptophan auxotrophs were obtained by random transposon insertions in the Methanococcus maripaludis tryptophan operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Iris; Whitman, William B

    2009-08-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis is an anaerobic, methane-producing archaeon that utilizes H(2) or formate for the reduction of CO(2) to methane. Tryptophan auxotrophs were constructed by in vitro insertions of the Tn5 transposon into the tryptophan operon, followed by transformation into M. maripaludis. This method could serve for rapid insertions into large cloned DNA regions. PMID:19566682

  12. Tryptophan auxotrophs were obtained by random transposon insertions in the Methanonococcus maripaludis tryptophan operon

    OpenAIRE

    Porat, Iris; Whitman, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis is an anaerobic, methane-producing archaeon that utilizes H2 or formate for the reduction of CO2 to methane. Tryptophan auxotrophs were constructed by in vitro insertions of the Tn5 transposon into the tryptophan operon, followed by transformation into M. maripaludis. This method could serve for rapid insertions into large cloned DNA regions.

  13. An Immunological Assay for Detection and Enumeration of Thermophilic Biomining Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Amaro, Ana M.; Hallberg, Kevin B.; Lindström, E. Börje; Jerez, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    A specific, fast, and sensitive nonradioactive immunobinding assay for the detection and enumeration of the moderate thermophile Thiobacillus caldus and the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was developed. It employs enhanced chemiluminescence or peroxidase-conjugated immunoglobulins in a dot or slot blotting system and is very convenient for monitoring thermophilic bioleaching microorganisms in effluents from industrial bioleaching processes.

  14. Amylomaltase of Pyrobaculum aerophilum IM2 produces thermoreversible starch gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, T.; Talik, B.; Ettema, T.J.; Bos, H.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2005-01-01

    Amylomaltases are 4-α-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.25) of glycoside hydrolase family 77 that transfer α-1,4-linked glucans to another acceptor, which can be the 4-OH group of an α-1,4-linked glucan or glucose. The amylomaltase-encoding gene (PAE1209) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum

  15. Amylomaltase of Pyrobaculum aerophilum IM2 produces thermoreversible starch gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, T.; Talik, B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Bos, H.; Maarel, van der M.J.E.C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2005-01-01

    Amylomaltases are 4-¿-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.25) of glycoside hydrolase family 77 that transfer ¿-1,4-linked glucans to another acceptor, which can be the 4-OH group of an ¿-1,4-linked glucan or glucose. The amylomaltase-encoding gene (PAE1209) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum

  16. An immunological assay for detection and enumeration of thermophilic biomining microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, A M; Hallberg, K B; Lindström, E B; Jerez, C A

    1994-09-01

    A specific, fast, and sensitive nonradioactive immunobinding assay for the detection and enumeration of the moderate thermophile Thiobacillus caldus and the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was developed. It employs enhanced chemiluminescence or peroxidase-conjugated immunoglobulins in a dot or slot blotting system and is very convenient for monitoring thermophilic bioleaching microorganisms in effluents from industrial bioleaching processes. PMID:16349398

  17. Interdomain Conjugal Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Archaea▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Li, Lei; Wei, Shiping; Hedlund, Brian P.; Leigh, John A.; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli transforms the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis at frequencies ranging from 0.2 × 10−6 to 2 × 10−6 per recipient cell. Transformation requires cell-to-cell contact, oriT, and tra functions, is insensitive to DNase I, and otherwise displays hallmarks of conjugation.

  18. Temperature effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction by two strains of the hyperthermophilic Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, K.; Heyer, A.; Canfield, D.E.; Hoek, J.; Habicht, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by two strains of the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (strains VC-16 and Z) was explored over the entire temperature range of growth. The optimal cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (14 fmol cell-1 h -1) was fo

  19. Specific single-cell isolation and genomic amplification of uncultured microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Thomas; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Lasken, R.S.; Westermann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We in this study describe a new method for genomic studies of individual uncultured prokaryotic organisms, which was used for the isolation and partial genome sequencing of a soil archaeon. The diversity of Archaea in a soil sample was mapped by generating a clone library using group-specific pri...

  20. Virology: Independent virus development outside a host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häring, M.; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Rachel, R.;

    2005-01-01

    Viruses are thought to be functionally inactive once they are outside and independent of their host cell 1 . Here we describe an exceptional property of a newly discovered virus that infects a hyperthermophilic archaeon growing in acidic hot springs: the lemon-shaped viral particle develops a very...

  1. Regulation of the hydrogen metabolism in Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, Linda Martine Isabel de

    2002-01-01

    Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus is an archaeon that reduces CO2 into methane with hydrogen as the electron donor. Under natural and laboratory conditions, hydrogen concentrations may vary over orders of magnitude. The organism has to adapt to these changes. In this thesis, the adaptation of

  2. Practical applications of hydrogenase I from Pyrococcus furiosus for NADPH generation and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, R.; Greiner, L.; Ban, van den E.C.D.; Haaker, H.B.C.M.; Liese, A.

    2003-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase I (H-2:NADP(+) oxidoreductase, EC 1.18.99.1) from the marine hyperthermophilic strain of the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was partially purified by anion-exchange chromatography. This P furiosus hydrogenase I preparation (PF H(2)ase I) has been used as biocatalyst in the enzy

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of an Obligately Methylotrophic Methanogen, Methanococcoides methylutens, Isolated from Marine Sediment

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Y.

    2014-11-20

    Methanococcoides methylutens, the type species of the genus Methanococcoides, is a slightly halophilic methanogenic archaeon with a methylotrophic metabolism. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of M. methylutens, which comprises 2,508,511 bp with 2,482 coding sequences, 51 tRNA genes, and a G+C content of 42.5%.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a PaaX-like protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the PaaX-like protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was successfully crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. PaaX is a global regulator of the phenylacetyl-coenzyme A catabolon that adjusts the expression of different operons to that of the paa-encoded central pathway. In this study, the PaaX-like protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was successfully crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were obtained to a resolution of 3.0 Å using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystal belonged to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = 86.4, b = 86.4, c = 105.5 Å

  5. Expression, purification and crystallization of the ammonium transporter Amt-1 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Susana L. A., E-mail: sandrad@uni-goettingen.de; Dickmanns, Antje; Ficner, Ralf; Einsle, Oliver, E-mail: sandrad@uni-goettingen.de [Abteilung Molekulare Strukturbiologie, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    The ammonium transporter Amt-1 from the cytoplasmic membrane of the hyperthermophilic archaeon A. fulgidus has been purified and crystallized. Ammonium transporters (Amts) are a class of membrane-integral transport proteins found in organisms from all kingdoms of life. Their key function is the transport of nitrogen in its reduced bioavailable form, ammonia, across cellular membranes, a crucial step in nitrogen assimilation for biosynthetic purposes. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been annotated with three individual genes for ammonium transporters, amt1–3, the roles of which are as yet unknown. The amt1 gene product has been produced by heterologous overexpression in Escherichia coli and the resulting protein has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. Crystals of Amt-1 have been obtained by sitting-drop vapour diffusion and diffraction data have been collected.

  6. Events during Initiation of Archaeal Transcription: Open Complex Formation and DNA-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Transcription in Archaea is initiated by association of a TATA box binding protein (TBP) with a TATA box. This interaction is stabilized by the binding of the transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) orthologue TFB. We show here that the RNA polymerase of the archaeon Methanococcus, in contrast to polymerase II, does not require hydrolysis of the β-γ bond of ATP for initiation of transcription and open complex formation on linearized DNA. Permanganate probing revealed that the archaeal open complex s...

  7. Archaeal Transcription: Function of an Alternative Transcription Factor B from Pyrococcus furiosus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Micorescu, Michael; Grünberg, Sebastian; Franke, Andreas; Cramer, Patrick; Thomm, Michael; Bartlett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The genome of the hyperthermophile archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus encodes two transcription factor B (TFB) paralogs, one of which (TFB1) was previously characterized in transcription initiation. The second TFB (TFB2) is unusual in that it lacks recognizable homology to the archaeal TFB/eukaryotic TFIIB B-finger motif. TFB2 functions poorly in promoter-dependent transcription initiation, but photochemical cross-linking experiments indicated that the orientation and occupancy of transcription com...

  8. Exploring the reductive capacity of Pyrococcus furiosus. The reduction of carboxylic acids and pyridine nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, van den, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    This Ph.D. project started in 1997 and its main goal was to obtain insight in the reductive capacity of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus . The research was focused on the biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic acids.Reductions of carboxylic acids are interesting reactions, since the generated products, aldehydes and alcohols, are potentially applicable in the fine-chemical industry. However, the reduction of carboxylic acids to the corresponding aldehydes is a thermodynamicall...

  9. Enumeration and Characterization of Acidophilic Microorganisms Isolated from a Pilot Plant Stirred-Tank Bioleaching Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Okibe, Naoko; Gericke, Mariekie; Hallberg, Kevin B.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    2003-01-01

    Microorganisms were enumerated and isolated on selective solid media from a pilot-scale stirred-tank bioleaching operation in which a polymetallic sulfide concentrate was subjected to biologically accelerated oxidation at 45°C. Four distinct prokaryotes were isolated: three bacteria (an Acidithiobacillus caldus-like organism, a thermophilic Leptospirillum sp., and a Sulfobacillus sp.) and one archaeon (a Ferroplasma-like isolate). The relative numbers of these prokaryotes changed in the three...

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Methanomethylovorans hollandica gen. nov., sp. nov., Isolated from Freshwater Sediment, a Methylotrophic Methanogen Able To Grow on Dimethyl Sulfide and Methanethiol

    OpenAIRE

    Bart P. Lomans; Maas, Ronald; Luderer, Rianne; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Pol, Arjan; van der Drift, Chris; Vogels, Godfried D.

    1999-01-01

    A newly isolated methanogen, strain DMS1T, is the first obligately anaerobic archaeon which was directly enriched and isolated from a freshwater sediment in defined minimal medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as the sole carbon and energy source. The use of a chemostat with a continuous DMS-containing gas stream as a method of enrichment, followed by cultivation in deep agar tubes, resulted in a pure culture. Since the only substrates utilized by strain DMS1T are methanol, methylamines, ...

  11. Charakterisierung von TrmB und TrmBL1, zwei Transkriptionsregulatoren im Zentrum des Zuckerstoffwechsels von Pyrococcus furiosus

    OpenAIRE

    Surma, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit Untersuchungen zur Funktionsweise der beiden zuckerspezifischen Transkriptionsregulatoren TrmB und TrmBL1 innerhalb des Zuckerstoffwechsels des hyperthermophilen Archaeons Pyrococcus furiosus. Die Aufnahme von Kohlenhydraten in die Zelle wird bei P. furiosus von zwei substratspezifischen ABC–Transportern vermittelt. Der Maltose/Trehalose-Transporter ist dabei ausschließlich für den Transport von Maltose und Trehalose zuständig, während der Malto...

  12. Analysis of Nanoarchaeum equitans genome and proteome composition: indications for hyperthermophilic and parasitic adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Bag Sumit K; Paul Sandip; Das Sabyasachi; Dutta Chitra

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known hyperthermophilic archaeon exhibiting parasitic life style, has raised some new questions about the evolution of the Archaea and provided a model of choice to study the genome landmarks correlated with thermo-parasitic adaptation. In this context, we have analyzed the genome and proteome composition of N. equitans and compared the same with those of other mesophiles, hyperthermophiles and obligatory host-associated organisms. Results A...

  13. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species

    OpenAIRE

    Haney, Paul J.; Jonathan H Badger; Buldak, Gerald L.; Reich, Claudia I.; Woese, Carl R.; Olsen, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50°C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include hig...

  14. Small RNA-guided processes in the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanopyrus kandleri

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Andreas A. H.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, a combination of RNAseq, computational and biochemical methods was applied to analyze processes that use small RNAs (sRNAs) as guide molecules at extreme temperatures. Here, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri, which grows at temperatures of up to 110°C, was used as a model organism. The genome of M. kandleri harbors two CRISPR-Cas systems that use CRISPR RNA (crRNA) as guide molecules to target fo...

  15. 食品廃棄物のメタン発酵及び水素・メタン二段発酵

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashimada, Yutaka; Nishio, Naomichi

    2003-01-01

    To treat and recover energy from food industrial solid wastes, methane fermantion is very altractive, in this article, therefore, researches on methane fermentation of solid wastes from a Japanese Sake brewery, bread manufacture and soy sauce brewery were reviewed. To solubilize and acidify the waste from a Japanese Sake brewery, hyperthemophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus could be applied. A perfusion culture developed to increase cell concentration gave 0.4 g/l/h of acetate production rat...

  16. Comparative genomic and transcriptional analyses of CRISPR systems across the genus Pyrobaculum

    OpenAIRE

    Bernick, David L.; Cox, Courtney L.; Dennis, Patrick P.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    Within the domain Archaea, the CRISPR immune system appears to be nearly ubiquitous based on computational genome analyses. Initial studies in bacteria demonstrated that the CRISPR system targets invading plasmid and viral DNA. Recent experiments in the model archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus have uncovered a novel RNA-targeting variant of the CRISPR system. Because our understanding of CRISPR system evolution in other archaea is limited, we have taken a comparative genomic and transcriptomic view...

  17. Comparative Genomic and Transcriptional Analyses of CRISPR Systems Across the Genus Pyrobaculum

    OpenAIRE

    Bernick, David L.; Cox, Courtney L.; Dennis, Patrick P.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    Within the domain Archaea, the CRISPR immune system appears to be nearly ubiquitous based on computational genome analyses. Initial studies in bacteria demonstrated that the CRISPR system targets invading plasmid and viral DNA. Recent experiments in the model archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus uncovered a novel RNA-targeting variant of the CRISPR system potentially unique to archaea. Because our understanding of CRISPR system evolution in other archaea is limited, we have taken a comparative genom...

  18. Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Niftrik, L.A.M.P. van; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria defy many microbiological concepts and share numerous properties with both eukaryotes and archaea. Among their most intriguing characteristics are their compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like cell wall. Here we review our current knowledge about anammox cell biology. The anammox cell is divided into three separate compartments by bilayer membranes. The anammox cell consists of (from outside to inside) the cell wall, paryphoplasm,...

  19. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Poly(δ-Valerolactone) Using a Thermophilic Esterase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus as Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Xuedong Fang; Lingfei Zhang; Yan Yang; Jiebing Yang; Guangquan Li; Haobo Han; Hong Cao; Quanshun Li

    2012-01-01

    The ring-opening polymerization of δ-valerolactone catalyzed by a thermophilic esterase from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus was successfully conducted in organic solvents. The effects of enzyme concentration, temperature, reaction time and reaction medium on monomer conversion and product molecular weight were systematically evaluated. Through the optimization of reaction conditions, poly(δ-valerolactone) was produced in 97% monomer conve...

  20. CbiZ, an amidohydrolase enzyme required for salvaging the coenzyme B12 precursor cobinamide in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of a pathway for salvaging the coenzyme B12 precursor dicyanocobinamide (Cbi) from the environment was established by genetic and biochemical means. The pathway requires the function of a previously unidentified amidohydrolase enzyme that converts adenosylcobinamide to adenosylcobyric acid, a bona fide intermediate of the de novo coenzyme B12 biosynthetic route. The cbiZ gene of the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Göl was cloned, was overproduced in Escherichia...

  1. Regulation of the hydrogen metabolism in Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus

    OpenAIRE

    Poorter, Linda Martine Isabel de

    2002-01-01

    Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus is an archaeon that reduces CO2 into methane with hydrogen as the electron donor. Under natural and laboratory conditions, hydrogen concentrations may vary over orders of magnitude. The organism has to adapt to these changes. In this thesis, the adaptation of M. thermoautotrophicus to varying hydrogen concentrations is investigated at the bioenergetic and physiological levels. The study includes the development of new methods for the determination of in...

  2. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners—the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)—and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic ...

  3. Genome Update: alignment of bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Jensen, Mette; Poulsen, Tine Rugh;

    2004-01-01

    There are four new microbial genomes listed in this month's Genome Update, three belonging to Gram-positive bacteria and one belonging to an archaeon that lives at pH 0; all of these genomes are listed in Table 1⇓. The method of genome comparison this month is that of genome alignment and......, as an example, an alignment of seven Staphylococcus aureus genomes and one Staphylococcus epidermidis genome is presented....

  4. Assessing methanotrophy and carbon fixation for biofuel production by Methanosarcina acetivorans

    OpenAIRE

    Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; James G. Ferry; Thomas K. Wood; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Methanosarcina acetivorans is a model archaeon with renewed interest due to its unique reversible methane production pathways. However, the mechanism and relevant pathways implicated in (co)utilizing novel carbon substrates in this organism are still not fully understood. This paper provides a comprehensive inventory of thermodynamically feasible routes for anaerobic methane oxidation, co-reactant utilization, and maximum carbon yields of major biofuel candidates by M. acetivorans....

  5. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses of threonyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain from Aeropyrum pernix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The editing domain of threonyl-tRNA synthetase from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.66 Å. The proofreading function of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is crucial in maintaining the fidelity of protein synthesis. Most archaeal threonyl-tRNA synthetases (ThrRSs) possess a unique proofreading domain unrelated to their eukaryotic/bacterial counterpart. The crystal structure of this domain from the archaeon Pyrococcus abysii in complex with its cognate and noncognate substrate analogues had given insights into its catalytic and discriminatory mechanisms. To probe further into the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of this domain, work has been extended to another archaeon Aeropyrum pernix. The organism possesses two proteins corresponding to threonyl-tRNA synthetase, i.e. ThrRS1 and ThrRS2, encoded by two different genes, thrS1 and thrS2, respectively. ThrRS1 is responsible for aminoacylation and ThrRS2 for proofreading activity. Here the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic investigation of the N-terminal proofreading domain of ThrRS2 from A. pernix is reported. The crystals belong to either the P41212 or P43212 space group and consist of one monomer per asymmetric unit

  6. Bioaccumulation of U(VI) by Sulfolobus acidocaldarius under moderate acidic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U(VI) accumulation by the acidothermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius at a moderate acidic pH of 4.5 was investigated. This pH value is relevant for some heavy metal and uranium polluted environments where populations of S. acidocaldarius were found to persist. We demonstrate that U(VI) is rapidly complexed by the archaeal cells. A combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that at pH 4.5 organic phosphate and carboxylic groups are involved in the U(VI) complexation. These results are in contrast to those published for most bacteria which at this pH precipitate U(VI) mainly in inorganic uranyl phosphate phases. As demonstrated by TEM only a limited part of the added U(VI) was biomineralized extracellularly in the case of the studied archaeon. Most of the U(VI) accumulates were localized in a form of intracellular deposits which were associated with the inner side of the cytoplasma membrane. Observed differences in U(VI) bioaccumulation between the studied archaeon and bacteria can be explained by the significant differences in their cell wall structures as well as by their different physiological characteristics. (orig.)

  7. A proton shelter inspired by the sugar coating of acidophilic archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Xiumei Wang; Bei’er Lv; Guixin Cai; Long Fu; Yuanzi Wu; Xiang Wang; Bin Ren; Hongwei Ma

    2012-01-01

    The acidophilic archaeons are a group of single-celled microorganisms that flourish in hot acid springs (usually pH < 3) but maintain their internal pH near neutral. Although there is a lack of direct evidence, the abundance of sugar modifications on the cell surface has been suggested to provide the acidophiles with protection against proton invasion. In this study, a hydroxyl (OH)-rich polymer brush layer was prepared to mimic the OH-rich sugar coating. Using a novel pH-sensitive dithioacet...

  8. A novel interference mechanism by a type IIIB CRISPR-Cmr module in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Garrett, Roger Antony; Shah, Shiraz Ali;

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on CRISPR-based adaptive immune systems have revealed extensive structural and functional diversity of the interference complexes which often coexist intracellularly. The archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A encodes three interference modules, one of type IA and two of type IIIB...... targeting. A rationale is provided for the intracellular coexistence of the different interference systems in S.¿islandicus REY15A which cooperate functionally by sharing a single Cas6 protein for crRNA processing and utilize crRNA products from identical CRISPR spacers....

  9. A Single-Culture Bioprocess of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus to Upgrade Digester Biogas by CO 2 -to-CH 4 Conversion with H 2

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Matthew R.; Fornero, Jeffrey J.; Rebecca Stark; Laurens Mets; Largus T. Angenent

    2013-01-01

    We optimized and tested a postbioprocessing step with a single-culture archaeon to upgrade biogas (i.e., increase methane content) from anaerobic digesters via conversion of CO2 into CH4 by feeding H2 gas. We optimized a culture of the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus using: (1) a synthetic H2/CO2 mixture; (2) the same mixture with pressurization; (3) a synthetic biogas with different CH4 contents and H2; and (4) an industrial, untreated biogas and H2. A laborato...

  10. A New Thermoactive Pullulanase from Desulfurococcus mucosus: Cloning, Sequencing, Purification, and Characterization of the Recombinant Enzyme after Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffner, Fiona; Bertoldo, Costanzo; Andersen, Jens T.; Wagner, Karen; Antranikian, Garabed

    2000-01-01

    The gene encoding a thermoactive pullulanase from the hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon Desulfurococcus mucosus (apuA) was cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. apuA from D. mucosus showed 45.4% pairwise amino acid identity with the pullulanase from Thermococcus aggregans and contained the four regions conserved among all amylolytic enzymes. apuA encodes a protein of 686 amino acids with a 28-residue signal peptide and has a predicted mass of 74 kDa after signal cleavage. The apuA gene...

  11. Sulfolobus tengchongensis Spindle-Shaped Virus STSV1: Virus-Host Interactions and Genomic Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiang, X.; Chen, L.; Huang, X;

    2005-01-01

    A virus infecting the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tengchongensis has been isolated from a field sample from Tengchong, China, and characterized. The virus, denoted STSV1 (Sulfolobus tengchongensis spindle-shaped virus 1), has the morphology of a spindle (230 by 107 nm) with a tail of...... genome contains a total of 74 open reading frames (ORFs), among which 14 have a putative function. Five ORFs encode viral structural proteins, including a putative coat protein of high abundance. The products of the other nine ORFs are probably involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis, nucleotide...

  12. Insights into archaeal evolution and symbiosis from the genomes of a Nanoarchaeon and its crenarchaeal host from Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Koonin, Eugene [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Wolf, Yuri [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Makarova, Kira S. [National Center for Biotechnology Information

    2013-01-01

    A hyperthemophilic member of the Nanoarchaeota from Obsidian Pool, a thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park was characterized using single cell isolation and sequencing, together with its putative host, a Sulfolobales archaeon. This first representative of a non-marine Nanoarchaeota (Nst1) resembles Nanoarchaeum equitans by lacking most biosynthetic capabilities, the two forming a deep-branching archaeal lineage. However, the Nst1 genome is over 20% larger, encodes a complete gluconeogenesis pathway and a full complement of archaeal flagellum proteins. Comparison of the two genomes suggests that the marine and terrestrial Nanoarchaeota lineages share a common ancestor that was already a symbiont of another archaeon. With a larger genome, a smaller repertoire of split protein encoding genes and no split non-contiguous tRNAs, Nst1 appears to have experienced less severe genome reduction than N. equitans. The inferred host of Nst1 is potentially autotrophic, with a streamlined genome and simplified central and energetic metabolism as compared to other Sulfolobales. The two distinct Nanoarchaeota-host genomic data sets offer insights into the evolution of archaeal symbiosis and parasitism and will further enable studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these relationships.

  13. High CO2 subsurface environment enriches for novel microbial lineages capable of autotrophic carbon fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, A. J.; Jerett, J.; Castelle, C. J.; Thomas, B. C.; Sharon, I.; Brown, C. T.; Anantharaman, K.; Emerson, J. B.; Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tringe, S. G.; Woyke, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface environments span the planet but remain little understood from the perspective of the capacity of the resident organisms to fix CO2. Here we investigated the autotrophic capacity of microbial communities in range of a high-CO2 subsurface environments via analysis of 250 near-complete microbial genomes (151 of them from distinct species) that represent the most abundant organisms over a subsurface depth transect. More than one third of the genomes belonged to the so-called candidate phyla radiation (CPR), which have limited metabolic capabilities. Approximately 30% of the community members are autotrophs that comprise 70% of the microbiome with metabolism likely supported by sulfur and nitrogen respiration. Of the carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin Benson Basham Cycle was most common, but the Wood-Ljungdhal pathway was present in the greatest phylogenetic diversity of organisms. Unexpectedly, one organism from a novel phylum sibling to the CPR is predicted to fix carbon by the reverse TCA cycle. The genome of the most abundant organism, an archaeon designated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum", was also found in subsurface samples from other continents including Europe and Asia. The archaeon was proven to be a carbon fixer using a novel reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. These results provide evidence that carbon dioxide is the major carbon source in these environments and suggest that autotrophy in the subsurface represents a substantial carbon dioxide sink affecting the global carbon cycle.

  14. Thermococcus kodakarensis modulates its polar membrane lipids and elemental composition according to growth stage and phosphate availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TravisB.Meador

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed significant changes in the elemental and intact polar lipid (IPL composition of the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (KOD1 in response to growth stage and phosphorus supply. Reducing the amount of organic supplements and phosphate in growth media resulted in significant decreases in cell size and cellular quotas of carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P, which coincided with significant increases in cellular IPL quota and IPLs comprising multiple P atoms and hexose moieties. Relatively more cellular P was stored as IPLs in P-limited cells (2-8% compared to control cells (< 0.8%. We also identified a specific IPL biomarker containing a phosphatidyl-N-acetylhexoseamine headgroup that was relatively enriched during rapid cell division. These observations serve as empirical evidence of IPL adaptations in Archaea that will help to interpret the distribution of these biomarkers in natural systems. The reported cell quotas of C, N, and P represent the first such data for a specific archaeon and suggest that thermophiles are C-rich compared to the cell carbon-to-volume relationship reported for planktonic bacteria.

  15. Geranylgeranyl reductase and ferredoxin from Methanosarcina acetivorans are required for the synthesis of fully reduced archaeal membrane lipid in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Ogawa, Takuya; Hirose, Kana; Yokoi, Takeru; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Archaea produce membrane lipids that typically possess fully saturated isoprenoid hydrocarbon chains attached to the glycerol moiety via ether bonds. They are functionally similar to, but structurally and biosynthetically distinct from, the fatty acid-based membrane lipids of bacteria and eukaryotes. It is believed that the characteristic lipid structure helps archaea survive under severe conditions such as extremely low or high pH, high salt concentrations, and/or high temperatures. We detail here the first successful production of an intact archaeal membrane lipid, which has fully saturated isoprenoid chains, in bacterial cells. The introduction of six phospholipid biosynthetic genes from a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosarcina acetivorans, in Escherichia coli enabled the host bacterium to synthesize the archaeal lipid, i.e., diphytanylglyceryl phosphoglycerol, while a glycerol modification of the phosphate group was probably catalyzed by endogenous E. coli enzymes. Reduction of the isoprenoid chains occurred only when archaeal ferredoxin was expressed with geranylgeranyl reductase, suggesting the role of ferredoxin as a specific electron donor for the reductase. This report is the first identification of a physiological reducer for archaeal geranylgeranyl reductase. On the other hand, geranylgeranyl reductase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius could, by itself, replace both its orthologue and ferredoxin from M. acetivorans, which indicated that an endogenous redox system of E. coli reduced the enzyme. PMID:24214941

  16. Biomining Microorganisms: Molecular Aspects and Applications in Biotechnology and Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, Carlos A.

    The microbial solubilization of metals using chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms has successfully been used in industrial processes called biomining to extract metals such as copper, gold, uranium and others. The most studied leaching bacteria are from the genus Acidithiobacillus belonging to the Gram-negative γ-proteobacteria. Acidithiobacillus spp. obtain their energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron, elemental sulfur, or partially oxidized sulfur compounds. Other thermophilic archaeons capable of oxidizing sulfur and iron (II) have also been known for many years, and they are mainly from the genera Sulfolobus, Acidianus, Metallosphaera and Sulfurisphaera. Recently, some mesophilic iron (II)-oxidizing archaeons such as Ferroplasma acidiphilium and F. acidarmanus belonging to the Thermoplasmales have also been isolated and characterized. Recent studies of microorganisms consider them in their consortia, integrating fundamental biological knowledge with metagenomics, metaproteomics, and other data to obtain a global picture of how a microbial community functions. The understanding of microbial growth and activities in oxidizing metal ions will be useful for improving applied microbial biotechnologies such as biomining, bioshrouding, biomonitoring and bioremediation of metals in acidic environments.

  17. Transcriptome changes and cAMP oscillations in an archaeal cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soppa Jörg

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell cycle of all organisms includes mass increase by a factor of two, replication of the genetic material, segregation of the genome to different parts of the cell, and cell division into two daughter cells. It is tightly regulated and typically includes cell cycle-specific oscillations of the levels of transcripts, proteins, protein modifications, and signaling molecules. Until now cell cycle-specific transcriptome changes have been described for four eukaryotic species ranging from yeast to human, but only for two prokaryotic species. Similarly, oscillations of small signaling molecules have been identified in very few eukaryotic species, but not in any prokaryote. Results A synchronization procedure for the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum was optimized, so that nearly 100% of all cells divide in a time interval that is 1/4th of the generation time of exponentially growing cells. The method was used to characterize cell cycle-dependent transcriptome changes using a genome-wide DNA microarray. The transcript levels of 87 genes were found to be cell cycle-regulated, corresponding to 3% of all genes. They could be clustered into seven groups with different transcript level profiles. Cluster-specific sequence motifs were detected around the start of the genes that are predicted to be involved in cell cycle-specific transcriptional regulation. Notably, many cell cycle genes that have oscillating transcript levels in eukaryotes are not regulated on the transcriptional level in H. salinarum. Synchronized cultures were also used to identify putative small signaling molecules. H. salinarum was found to contain a basal cAMP concentration of 200 μM, considerably higher than that of yeast. The cAMP concentration is shortly induced directly prior to and after cell division, and thus cAMP probably is an important signal for cell cycle progression. Conclusion The analysis of cell cycle-specific transcriptome changes of H. salinarum

  18. ANME-2D Archaea Catalyze Methane Oxidation in Deep Subsurface Sediments Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ise, K.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial sediments are an important global reservoir for methane. Microorganisms in the deep subsurface play a critical role in the methane cycle, yet much remains to be learned about their diversity and metabolisms. To provide more comprehensive insight into the microbiology of the methane cycle in the deep subsurface, we conducted a genome-resolved study of samples collected from the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (HURL), Japan. Groundwater samples were obtained from three boreholes from a depth range of between 140 m and 250 m in two consecutive years. Groundwater was filtered and metagenomic DNA extracted and sequenced, and the sequence data assembled. Based on the sequences of phylogenetically informative genes on the assembled fragments, we detected a high degree of overlap in community composition across a vertical transect within one borehole at the two sampling times. However, there was comparatively little similarity observed among communities across boreholes. Spatial and temporal abundance patterns were used in combination with tetranucleotide signatures of assembled genome fragments to bin the data and reconstruct over 200 unique draft genomes, of which 137 are considered to be of high quality (>90% complete). The deepest samples from one borehole were highly dominated by an archaeon identified as ANME-2D; this organism was also present at lower abundance in all other samples from that borehole. Also abundant in these microbial communities were novel members of the Gammaproteobacteria, Saccharibacteria (TM7) and Tenericute phyla. Notably, a ~2 Mbp draft genome for the ANME-2D archaeon was reconstructed. As expected, the genome encodes all of the genes predicted to be involved in the reverse methanogenesis pathway. In contrast with the previously reported ANME2-D genome, the HURL ANME-2D genome lacks the capacity to reduce nitrate. However, we identified many multiheme cytochromes with closest similarity to those of the known Fe

  19. Accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates by halophilic archaea isolated from traditional solar salterns of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Mani, Kabilan; Bragança, Judith Maria

    2013-09-01

    Extremely halophilic archaeal isolates obtained from brine and sediment samples of solar salterns of Goa and Tamil Nadu, India were screened for accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Seven polymer accumulating haloarchaeal strains (TN4, TN5, TN6, TN7, TN9, TN10 and BBK2) were selected based on their growth and intensity of fluorescence when grown on 20 % NaCl synthetic medium supplemented with 2 % glucose and incorporated with Nile red dye. The polymer was quantified by conversion of PHA to crotonic acid which gave a characteristic absorption maxima at 235 nm. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characterization the cultures TN4, TN5, TN6, TN7, TN10 and BBK2 were grouped under genus Haloferax whereas isolate TN9 was grouped under the genus Halogeometricum. Growth kinetics and polymer accumulation studies revealed that the culture Halogeometricum borinquense strain TN9 accumulates PHA maximally at the mid-log phase, i.e. 5th day of growth (approx. 14 wt% PHA of CDW). Analysis of the polymer by IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR confirmed it to be a homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:23887358

  20. Haloarchaea Endowed with Phosphorus Solubilization Attribute Implicated in Phosphorus Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sharma, Divya; Gulati, Sneha; Singh, Surender; Dey, Rinku; Pal, Kamal Krishna; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are unique microorganisms that are present in ecological niches of high temperature, pH and salinity. A total of 157 archaea were obtained from thirteen sediment, water and rhizospheric soil samples collected from Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India. With an aim to screen phosphate solubilizing archaea, a new medium was designed as Haloarchaea P Solubilization (HPS) medium. The medium supported the growth and P solubilization activity of archaea. Employing the HPS medium, twenty isolates showed the P-solubilization. Phosphate solubilizing archaea were identified as seventeen distinct species of eleven genera namely Haloarcula, Halobacterium, Halococcus, Haloferax, Halolamina, Halosarcina, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, Natrialba, Natrinema and Natronoarchaeum. Natrinema sp. strain IARI-WRAB2 was identified as the most efficient P-solubilizer (134.61 mg/L) followed by Halococcus hamelinensis strain IARI-SNS2 (112.56 mg/L). HPLC analysis detected seven different kinds of organic acids, namely: gluconic acid, citric acid, formic acid, fumaric acid succinic acid, propionic acid and tartaric acid from the cultures of these isolates. These phosphate solubilizing halophilic archaea may play a role in P nutrition to vegetation growing in these hypersaline soils. This is the first report for these haloarchaea to solubilize considerable amount of P by production of organic acids and lowering of pH. PMID:26216440

  1. Quantifying homologous replacement of loci between haloarchaeal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Gogarten, J Peter; Papke, R Thane

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies of the haloarchaeal genus Haloferax have demonstrated their ability to frequently exchange DNA between species, whereas rates of homologous recombination estimated from natural populations in the genus Halorubrum are high enough to maintain random association of alleles between five loci. To quantify the effects of gene transfer and recombination of commonly held (relaxed core) genes during the evolution of the class Halobacteria (haloarchaea), we reconstructed the history of 21 genomes representing all major groups. Using a novel algorithm and a concatenated ribosomal protein phylogeny as a reference, we created a directed horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) network of contemporary and ancestral genomes. Gene order analysis revealed that 90% of testable HGTs were by direct homologous replacement, rather than nonhomologous integration followed by a loss. Network analysis revealed an inverse log-linear relationship between HGT frequency and ribosomal protein evolutionary distance that is maintained across the deepest divergences in Halobacteria. We use this mathematical relationship to estimate the total transfers and amino acid substitutions delivered by HGTs in each genome, providing a measure of chimerism. For the relaxed core genes of each genome, we conservatively estimate that 11-20% of their evolution occurred in other haloarchaea. Our findings are unexpected, because the transfer and homologous recombination of relaxed core genes between members of the class Halobacteria disrupts the coevolution of genes; however, the generation of new combinations of divergent but functionally related genes may lead to adaptive phenotypes not available through cumulative mutations and recombination within a single population. PMID:23160063

  2. Isolation and identification of culturable extremely halophilic archaea of Inche-Boroun wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Rasooli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Haloarchaeal diversity of Inche-Boroun wetland in north of Iran in Golestan province was investigated by using culture-dependent methods. Sampling was carried out in May and September 2010. In each sampling, 4 distinct region of wetland were analyzed by using complex media like MGM, JCM168, MH1 and an alkaliphilic medium containing 23% salts. After incubation at 40ºC, a total of 406 isolates were prepared and 2.1×106 CFU/ml were obtained in culture media. Among all isolates, 361 isolates were obtained from MGM and 39 isolates from JCM 168, 3 isolates from MH1 and 3 isolate from alkaliphilic media. Initial morphological, biochemical and physiological tests were performed. According to the results, 45 isolates were selected and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA was performed for them. Among selected strains, 40 isolates belonged to Halobacteriacaea and were related to Haloarcula, Halorubrum, Haloferax, Halobellus, Halogeometricum, Halobacterium, Halolamina, Halorhabdus and Halostagnicola (respectively 30, 27.5, 17.5, 10, 5.2, 2.6, 2.6, 2.6 and 2.6 percent of Haloarchaeal strains. A total of 5 strains belonged to the kingdom of Bacteria and were related to Rhodovibrio, Pseudomonas and Salicola (respectively 40, 40 and 20 percent of bacterial strains. According to our results and the limited numbers of haloarchaeal genera that having been discovered until now, it seemed that the culturable prokaryotic populations in this hypersaline environment was diverse.

  3. Responses of Haloarchaea to Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Legat, Andrea; Schwimbersky, Karin; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2011-04-01

    Various effects of microgravity on prokaryotes have been recognized in recent years, with the focus on studies of pathogenic bacteria. No archaea have been investigated yet with respect to their responses to microgravity. For exposure experiments on spacecrafts or on the International Space Station, halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) are usually embedded in halite, where they accumulate in fluid inclusions. In a liquid environment, these cells will experience microgravity in space, which might influence their viability and survival. Two haloarchaeal strains, Haloferax mediterranei and Halococcus dombrowskii, were grown in simulated microgravity (SMG) with the rotary cell culture system (RCCS, Synthecon). Initially, salt precipitation and detachment of the porous aeration membranes in the RCCS were observed, but they were avoided in the remainder of the experiment by using disposable instead of reusable vessels. Several effects were detected, which were ascribed to growth in SMG: Hfx. mediterranei's resistance to the antibiotics bacitracin, erythromycin, and rifampicin increased markedly; differences in pigmentation and whole cell protein composition (proteome) of both strains were noted; cell aggregation of Hcc. dombrowskii was notably reduced. The results suggest profound effects of SMG on haloarchaeal physiology and cellular processes, some of which were easily observable and measurable. This is the first report of archaeal responses to SMG. The molecular mechanisms of the effects induced by SMG on prokaryotes are largely unknown; haloarchaea could be used as nonpathogenic model systems for their elucidation and in addition could provide information about survival during lithopanspermia (interplanetary transport of microbes inside meteorites).

  4. Fermentation Technologies for the Optimization of Marine Microbial Exopolysaccharide Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Finore

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, research has focused on the capabilities of microbes to secrete exopolysaccharides (EPS, because these polymers differ from the commercial ones derived essentially from plants or algae in their numerous valuable qualities. These biopolymers have emerged as new polymeric materials with novel and unique physical characteristics that have found extensive applications. In marine microorganisms the produced EPS provide an instrument to survive in adverse conditions: They are found to envelope the cells by allowing the entrapment of nutrients or the adhesion to solid substrates. Even if the processes of synthesis and release of exopolysaccharides request high-energy investments for the bacterium, these biopolymers permit resistance under extreme environmental conditions. Marine bacteria like Bacillus, Halomonas, Planococcus, Enterobacter, Alteromonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Vibrio, Rhodococcus, Zoogloea but also Archaea as Haloferax and Thermococcus are here described as EPS producers underlining biopolymer hyperproduction, related fermentation strategies including the effects of the chemical composition of the media, the physical parameters of the growth conditions and the genetic and predicted experimental design tools.

  5. Biofilms constructed for the removal of hydrocarbon pollutants from hypersaline liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mailem, D M; Eliyas, M; Khanafer, M; Radwan, S S

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbonoclastic biofilms were established on sterile glass plates vertically submerged for 1 month in a hypersaline soil/water suspension containing 0.3% crude oil. The culture-dependent analysis of the microbial community in those biofilms revealed hydrocarbonoclastic species in the magnitude of 10(3) cells cm(-2). Those species belonged to the halophilic bacterial genera Marinobacter, Halomonas, Dietzia, Bacillus, Arhodomonas, Aeromonas and Kocuria as well as to the haloarchaeal genera Haloferax and Halobacterium. Those organisms were not evenly distributed over the biofilm surface area. The culture-independent analysis revealed a different community composition, which was based on four uncultured and four cultured taxa. Depending on the culture conditions and the sort of chemical amendments, the biofilms succeeded in removing in 2 weeks up to about 60-70% of crude oil, pure n-hexadecane and pure phenanthrene in hypersaline pond water samples. The amendment with KCl, MgSO4 and a vitamin mixture composed of thiamin, pyridoxine, vitamin B12, biotin, riboflavin and folic acid was most effective. PMID:25293792

  6. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Baños, Montserrat; Garbayo, Inés; Vílchez, Carlos; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i) many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii) downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii) carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv) carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v) carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei) is also discussed. PMID:26308012

  7. Immobilization and Characterization of a Recombinant Thermostable Lipase (Pf2001 from Pyrococcus furiosus on Supports with Different Degrees of Hydrophobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Vieira Branco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the immobilization of a recombinant thermostable lipase (Pf2001Δ60 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus on supports with different degrees of hydrophobicity: butyl Sepabeads and octadecyl Sepabeads. The enzyme was strongly adsorbed in both supports. When it was adsorbed on these supports, the enzyme showed 140 and 237% hyperactivation, respectively. The assessment of storage stability showed that the octadecyl Sepabeads immobilized enzyme showed 100% of residual activity after 30 days of storage. However, the greatest stability at 70∘C was obtained in butyl Sepabeads immobilized enzyme, which retained 77% activity after 1 hour incubation. The maximum activity of the immobilized preparations was obtained with the pH between 6 and 7, at 70∘C. Thus, this study achieved a new extremophilic biocatalyst with greater stability, for use in several biotechnological processes.

  8. A proton shelter inspired by the sugar coating of acidophilic archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiumei; Lv, Bei'er; Cai, Guixin; Fu, Long; Wu, Yuanzi; Wang, Xiang; Ren, Bin; Ma, Hongwei

    2012-11-01

    The acidophilic archaeons are a group of single-celled microorganisms that flourish in hot acid springs (usually pH polymer brush layer was prepared to mimic the OH-rich sugar coating. Using a novel pH-sensitive dithioacetal molecule as a probe, we studied the proton-resisting property and found that a 10-nm-thick polymer layer was able to raise the pH from 1.0 to > 5.0, indicating that the densely packed OH-rich layer is a proton shelter. As strong evidence for the role of sugar coatings as proton barriers, this biomimetic study provides insight into evolutionary biology, and the results also could be expanded for the development of biocompatible anti-acid materials.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PH1010, a DUF54-family protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii OT3, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins, was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group of the crystal was determined to be P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 49.5, c = 132.7 Å. The crystal contained two PH1010 molecules in the asymmetric unit (VM = 2.4 Å3 Da−1) and had a solvent content of 48%

  10. Microbial metalloproteomes explored using MIRAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Hagen, Wilfred R; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2012-09-01

    Metalloproteomics is a rapidly developing field of science that involves the comprehensive analysis of all metal-containing or metal-binding proteins in a biological sample. The purpose of this review is to offer an overview of the research involving Metal Isotope native RadioAutography in Gel Electrophoresis (MIRAGE), a powerful new method to visualize and study the proteome of a particular metal ion. MIRAGE involves four steps: i) labelling of target proteins with a radioisotope; ii) separation of intact holo-proteins using native isoelectric focusing (1D) combined with Blue Native PAGE (2D); iii) spot visualization and quantification using autoradiography; and iv) protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. MIRAGE Investigations of the soluble Cu, Zn, and Fe metalloproteomes of Escherichia coli, and of the soluble Mo and W proteomes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus are reviewed. PMID:22976984

  11. Diversity and similarity of microbial communities in petroleum crude oils produced in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Kunio; Maki, Hideaki; Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2008-11-01

    To understand microbial communities in petroleum crude oils, we precipitated DNA using high concentrations of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) and purified. Samples of DNA from five crude oils, (Middle East, 3; China, 1; and Japan, 1) were characterized based upon their 16S rRNA gene sequences after PCR amplification and the construction of clone libraries. We detected 48 eubacterial species, one cyanobacterium, and one archaeon in total. The microbial constituents were diverse in the DNA samples. Most of the bacteria affiliated with the sequences of the three oils from the Middle East comprised similar mesophilic species. Acinetobacter, Propionibacterium, Sphingobium and a Bacillales were common. In contrast, the bacterial communities in Japanese and Chinese samples were unique. Thermophilic Petrotoga-like bacteria (11%) and several anaerobic-thermophilic Clostridia- and Synergistetes-like bacteria (20%) were detected in the Chinese sample. Different thermophiles (12%) and Clostridia (2%) were detected in the Japanese sample. PMID:18997416

  12. Effects of Oxytetracycline on Methane Production and the Microbial Communities During Anaerobic Digestion of Cow Manure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Xin; WANG Chun-yong; LI Run-dong; ZHANG Yun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) on the dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion (37°C) of cow manure were investigated. Before anaerobic digestion, OTC was added to digesters at concentrations of 20, 50, and 80 mg L-1, respectively. Compared with no-antibiotic control, all methane productions underwent different levels of inhibition at different concentrations of OTC. Changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities were discussed by using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Results showed that OTC affected the richness and diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities. The bacterial genus Flavobacterium and an uncultured bacterium (JN256083.1) were detected throughout the entire process of anaerobic digestion and seemed to be the functional bacteria. Methanobrevibacter boviskoreani and an uncultured archaeon (FJ230982.1) dominated the archaeal communities during anaerobic digestion. These microorganisms may have high resistance to OTC and may play vital roles in methane production.

  13. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Å resolution.

  14. Preliminary crystallography confirms that the archaeal DNA-binding and tryptophan-sensing regulator TrpY is a dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafasso, Jacquelyn; Manjasetty, Babu A; Karr, Elizabeth A; Sandman, Kathleen; Chance, Mark R; Reeve, John N

    2010-11-01

    TrpY regulates the transcription of the metabolically expensive tryptophan-biosynthetic operon in the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. TrpY was crystallized using the hanging-drop method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2 or P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87, c = 147 Å, and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. The possible packing of molecules within the cell based on the values of the Matthews coefficient (V(M)) and analysis of the self-rotation function are consistent with the asymmetric unit being a dimer. Determining the structure of TrpY in detail will provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA binding, tryptophan sensing and transcription regulation at high temperature by this novel archaeal protein. PMID:21045304

  15. Preliminary Crystallography Confirms that the Archaeal DNA-binding and Tryptophan-sensing Regulator TrpY is a Dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Cafasso; B Manjasetty; E Karr; K Sandman; M Chance; J Reeve

    2011-12-31

    TrpY regulates the transcription of the metabolically expensive tryptophan-biosynthetic operon in the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. TrpY was crystallized using the hanging-drop method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87, c = 147 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The possible packing of molecules within the cell based on the values of the Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) and analysis of the self-rotation function are consistent with the asymmetric unit being a dimer. Determining the structure of TrpY in detail will provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA binding, tryptophan sensing and transcription regulation at high temperature by this novel archaeal protein.

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15152-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fatibacillum alkenivorans ... 62 8e-08 EU874252_13( EU874252 |pid:none) Uncultured so... 4e-05 CU861906_909( CU861906 |pid:none) Ralstonia solanacearum strain Mo... 53 4...00480_4791( CP000480 |pid:none) Mycobacterium smegmatis str. MC... 49 4e-04 CP000140_1569( CP000140 |pid:none) Parabacteroid...W, com... 88 1e-15 AM114193_508( AM114193 |pid:none) Uncultured methanogenic archaeon... 87 1e-15 (Q12YW2) RecName: Full=Digera...eptomyces antibioticus acetyltr... 84 1e-14 AP009153_2587( AP009153 |pid:none) Gemmatimonas auran

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10475-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e) Rickettsia peacockii str. Rustic... 49 7e-05 CP000140_1264( CP000140 |pid:none) Parabacteroides distasoni...genomic c... 40 0.39 2 ( AL445564 ) Mycoplasma pulmonis (strain UAB CTIP) complete ge... 36 0.42 9 ( AC223854 ) Bos taurus clon...e-05 CP000103_1930( CP000103 |pid:none) Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 2... 52 1e-... 33 5.2 AM910994_300( AM910994 |pid:none) Plasmodium knowlesi strain H chr... 33 5.2 FN357596_1( FN357596 |pid:none) Schistoso...complete... 33 5.2 AY714825_20( AY714825 |pid:none) Uncultured archaeon GZfos18B6 clo... 33 6.8 S07558( S07558 ) translation elon

  18. Genetic manipulation in Sulfolobus islandicus and functional analysis of DNA repair genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Changyi; Tian, Bin; Li, Suming;

    2013-01-01

    enzymes already impaired cell growth, highlighting their important roles in archaeal DNA repair. Systematically characterizing these mutants and generating mutants lacking two or more DNA repair genes will yield further insights into the genetic mechanisms of DNA repair in this model organism.......Recently, a novel gene-deletion method was developed for the crenarchaeal model Sulfolobus islandicus, which is a suitable tool for addressing gene essentiality in depth. Using this technique, we have investigated functions of putative DNA repair genes by constructing deletion mutants and studying...... their phenotype. We found that this archaeon may not encode a eukarya-type of NER (nucleotide excision repair) pathway because depleting each of the eukaryal NER homologues XPD, XPB and XPF did not impair the DNA repair capacity in their mutants. However, among seven homologous recombination proteins...

  19. Genetic Studies on CRISPR-Cas Functions in Invader Defense in Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wenfang

    Archaea and bacteria contain CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-CRISPR-associated) systems that protect themselves against invasion by viruses and plasmids. There are three major types of CRISPR-Cas systems, type I, II and III, that are further divided into at...... least 11 subtypes. I employed Sulfolobus islandicus Rey15A as the model to study CRISPR mechanisms. The model archaeon encodes one subtype I-A (Cascade) and two subtype III-B (Cmr-α and Cmr-β) interference systems with no apparent redundancy in cas genes or in CRISPR systems, which is ideal for genetic...... analysis of cas gene function. Furthermore, a range of genetic tools have been developed for S. islandicus Rey15A in our laboratory and a plasmid interference assay has been successfully developed for testing CRISPR-directed DNA targeting activity, which have provided a solid basis for studying the...

  20. Evaluation of Three Automated Genome Annotations for Halorhabdus utahensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Peter; Carney, Nick; DeLoache, Will;

    2009-01-01

    Genome annotations are accumulating rapidly and depend heavily on automated annotation systems. Many genome centers offer annotation systems but no one has compared their output in a systematic way to determine accuracy and inherent errors. Errors in the annotations are routinely deposited in...... databases such as NCBI and used to validate subsequent annotation errors. We submitted the genome sequence of halophilic archaeon Halorhabdus utahensis to be analyzed by three genome annotation services. We have examined the output from each service in a variety of ways in order to compare the methodology...... and effectiveness of the annotations, as well as to explore the genes, pathways, and physiology of the previously unannotated genome. The annotation services differ considerably in gene calls, features, and ease of use. We had to manually identify the origin of replication and the species...

  1. Current and emerging strategies for organophosphate decontamination: special focus on hyperstable enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Pauline; Daudé, David; Bzdrenga, Janek; Masson, Patrick; Elias, Mikael; Chabrière, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Organophosphorus chemicals are highly toxic molecules mainly used as pesticides. Some of them are banned warfare nerve agents. These compounds are covalent inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme in central and peripheral nervous systems. Numerous approaches, including chemical, physical, and biological decontamination, have been considered for developing decontamination methods against organophosphates (OPs). This work is an overview of both validated and emerging strategies for the protection against OP pollution with special attention to the use of decontaminating enzymes. Considerable efforts have been dedicated during the past decades to the development of efficient OP degrading biocatalysts. Among these, the promising biocatalyst SsoPox isolated from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is emphasized in the light of recently published results. This hyperthermostable enzyme appears to be particularly attractive for external decontamination purposes with regard to both its catalytic and stability properties. PMID:26832878

  2. Over-expression of carboxypeptidase of extreme thermophile pyrococcus furiosus in escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermophiles and extreme thermophiles are potential source of thermostable proteases for economical application. This study deals with cloning and over-expression of a carboxypeptidase (CBP) from the extreme thermophile archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus in E. coli. Using the forward and the reverse primers designed according to the putative CBP gene sequence analysed from the published genome sequence of P. furiosus, 1.5 kb fragment of CBP gene was PCR amplified. After TA-cloning in pTZ57R/T vector, the gene was ligated into pET-22b(+) and the recombinant plasmid thus obtained was used to transform E. coli BL21 (DE3)RIPL. On induction with IPTG for 6-8 hours CBP was expressed up to 30% of the total cell proteins. The enzyme, however, was expressed in an insoluble form which was refolded to an active state by treatment with urea. (author)

  3. Birth of the eukaryotes by a set of reactive innovations: New insights force us to relinquish gradual models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speijer, Dave

    2015-12-01

    Of two contending models for eukaryotic evolution the "archezoan" has an amitochondriate eukaryote take up an endosymbiont, while "symbiogenesis" states that an Archaeon became a eukaryote as the result of this uptake. If so, organelle formation resulting from new engulfments is simplified by the primordial symbiogenesis, and less informative regarding the bacterium-to-mitochondrion conversion. Gradualist archezoan visions still permeate evolutionary thinking, but are much less likely than symbiogenesis. Genuine amitochondriate eukaryotes have never been found and rapid, explosive adaptive periods characteristic of symbiogenetic models explain this. Mitochondrial proteomes, encoded by genes of "eukaryotic origin" not easily linked to host or endosymbiont, can be understood in light of rapid adjustments to new evolutionary pressures. Symbiogenesis allows "expensive" eukaryotic inventions via efficient ATP generation by nascent mitochondria. However, efficient ATP production equals enhanced toxic internal ROS formation. The synergistic combination of these two driving forces gave rise to the rapid evolution of eukaryotes. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26577075

  4. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiladitya DasSarma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs. GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications.

  5. Harnessing type I and type III CRISPR-Cas systems for genome editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingjun; Pan, Saifu; Zhang, Yan;

    2016-01-01

    -CRISPR array and a donor DNA containing a non-target sequence. Transformation of a pGE plasmid would yield two alternative fates to transformed cells: wild-type cells are to be targeted for chromosomal DNA degradation, leading to cell death, whereas those carrying the mutant gene would survive the cell killing...... and selectively retained as transformants. Using this strategy, different types of mutation were generated, including deletion, insertion and point mutations. We envision this method is readily applicable to different bacteria and archaea that carry an active CRISPR-Cas system of DNA interference provided...... report on harnessing a Type I or Type III system for genome editing. Here, a method was developed to repurpose both CRISPR-Cas systems for genetic manipulation in Sulfolobus islandicus, a thermophilic archaeon. A novel type of genome-editing plasmid (pGE) was constructed, carrying an artificial mini...

  6. Electrochemical behavior of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase on glassy carbon electrodes modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Zheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A glassy carbon electrode (GC was modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The modified electrode showed a pair of redox peaks that resulted from the oxygen-containing functional groups on the nanotube surface. A recombinant thermostable dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase (L-proDH from hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus profundus was further immobilized by physical adsorption. The modified electrode (GC/MWCNTs/L-proDH exhibited an electrocatalytic signal for L-proline compared to bare GC, GC/L-proDH and GC/MWCNTs electrodes, which suggested that the presence of MWCNTs efficiently enhances electron transfer between the active site of enzyme and electrode surface. The immobilized L-proDH showed a typical Michaelis–Menten catalytic response with lower apparent constant.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00318-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 001140 |pid:none) Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis 1... 111 7e-23 T31596( T31596 )hypothetical protein Y48C3A.n - Caenorhabditis ele...U0) RecName: Full=Putative tRNA pseudouridine synthase Pus1... 213 1e-53 AK029866_1( AK029866 |pid:none) Mus musculus adult male... AM114193_809( AM114193 |pid:none) Uncultured methanogenic archaeon... 103 1e-20 CP000562_1953( CP000562 |pid:none) Methanoculle...10 sequences; 101,790,757,118 total letters Searching..................................................done ...ized gastrula pE... 62 5e-06 2 ( AK017063 ) Mus musculus adult male testis cDNA, RIKEN full-

  8. Utilization of keratin-containing biowaste to produce biohydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, B.; Rakhely, G.; Kovacs, K.L. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biotechnology; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Biophysics; Bagi, Z.; Perei, K. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biotechnology; Toth, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Biophysics

    2005-12-01

    A two-stage fermentation system was constructed to test and demonstrate the feasibility of biohydrogen generation from keratin-rich biowaste. We isolated a novel aerobic Bacillus strain (Bacillus licheniformis KK1) that displays outstanding keratinolytic activity. The isolated strain was employed to convert keratin-containing biowaste into a fermentation product that is rich in amino acids and peptides. The process was optimized for the second fermentation step, in which the product of keratin fermentation-supplemented with essential minerals-was metabolized by Thermococcus litoralis, an anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon. T. litoralis grew on the keratin hydrolysate and produced hydrogen gas as a physiological fermentation byproduct. Hyperthermophilic cells utilized the keratin hydrolysate in a similar way as their standard nutrient, i.e., bacto-peptone. The generalization of the findings to protein-rich waste treatment and production of biohydrogen is discussed and possible means of further improvements are listed. (orig.)

  9. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    The antibiotic chloramphenicol produces modifications in 23S rRNA when bound to ribosomes from the bacterium Escherichia coli and the archaeon Halobacterium halobium and irradiated with 365 nm light. The modifications map to nucleotides m(5)U747 and C2611/C2612, in domains II and V, respectively......, of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site on...

  10. Model Construction and Analysis of Respiration in Halobacterium salinarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherryl O Talaue

    Full Text Available The archaeon Halobacterium salinarum can produce energy using three different processes, namely photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation and fermentation of arginine, and is thus a model organism in bioenergetics. Compared to its bacteriorhodopsin-driven photosynthesis, less attention has been devoted to modeling its respiratory pathway. We created a system of ordinary differential equations that models its oxidative phosphorylation. The model consists of the electron transport chain, the ATP synthase, the potassium uniport and the sodium-proton antiport. By fitting the model parameters to experimental data, we show that the model can explain data on proton motive force generation, ATP production, and the charge balancing of ions between the sodium-proton antiporter and the potassium uniport. We performed sensitivity analysis of the model parameters to determine how the model will respond to perturbations in parameter values. The model and the parameters we derived provide a resource that can be used for analytical studies of the bioenergetics of H. salinarum.

  11. POLYPEPTIDE AND POLYSACCHARIDE PROCESSING IN HYPERTHERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY, ROBERT M.

    2008-12-22

    This project focused on the microbial physiology and biochemistry of heterotrophic hyperthermophiles with respect to mechanisms by which these organisms process polypeptides and polysaccharides under normal and stressed conditions. Emphasis is on two model organisms, for which completed genome sequences are available: Pyrococcus furiosus (growth Topt of 98°C), an archaeon, and Thermotoga maritima (growth Topt of 80°C), a bacterium. Both organisms are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs that reduce sulfur facultatively. Whole genome cDNA spotted microarrays were used to follow transcriptional response to a variety of environmental conditions in order to identify genes encoding proteins involved in the acquisition, synthesis, processing and utilization of polypeptides and polysaccharides. This project provided new insights into the physiological aspects of hyperthermophiles as these relate to microbial biochemistry and biological function in high temperature habitats. The capacity of these microorganisms to produce biohydrogen from renewable feedstocks makes them important for future efforts to develop biofuels.

  12. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Poly(δ-Valerolactone Using a Thermophilic Esterase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus as Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Cao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ring-opening polymerization of δ-valerolactone catalyzed by a thermophilic esterase from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus was successfully conducted in organic solvents. The effects of enzyme concentration, temperature, reaction time and reaction medium on monomer conversion and product molecular weight were systematically evaluated. Through the optimization of reaction conditions, poly(δ-valerolactone was produced in 97% monomer conversion, with a number-average molecular weight of 2225 g/mol, in toluene at 70 °C for 72 h. This paper has produced a new biocatalyst for the synthesis of poly(δ-valerolactone, and also deeper insight has been gained into the mechanism of thermophilic esterase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization.

  13. Biocatalytic synthesis of poly(δ-valerolactone) using a thermophilic esterase from archaeoglobus fulgidus as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong; Han, Haobo; Li, Guangquan; Yang, Jiebing; Zhang, Lingfei; Yang, Yan; Fang, Xuedong; Li, Quanshun

    2012-01-01

    The ring-opening polymerization of δ-valerolactone catalyzed by a thermophilic esterase from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus was successfully conducted in organic solvents. The effects of enzyme concentration, temperature, reaction time and reaction medium on monomer conversion and product molecular weight were systematically evaluated. Through the optimization of reaction conditions, poly(δ-valerolactone) was produced in 97% monomer conversion, with a number-average molecular weight of 2225 g/mol, in toluene at 70 °C for 72 h. This paper has produced a new biocatalyst for the synthesis of poly(δ-valerolactone), and also deeper insight has been gained into the mechanism of thermophilic esterase-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization. PMID:23202895

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the non-Pfam protein AF1514 from Archeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-Pfam protein, AF1514, from A. fulgidus has been crystallized. A 10.5 kDa non-Pfam hypothetical protein, AF1514, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archeoglobus fulgidus has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.09 Å resolution and a data set was collected at 100 K using Cu Kα radiation from a rotating-anode X-ray source. The crystals belong to space group P41212 or P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 49.27, c = 106.61 Å. The calculated Matthews coefficient was 3.16 Å3 Da−1, suggesting the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  15. Evolution and thermodynamics of the slow unfolding of hyperstable monomeric proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga Yuichi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolding speed of some hyperthermophilic proteins is dramatically lower than that of their mesostable homologs. Ribonuclease HII from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis (Tk-RNase HII is stabilized by its remarkably slow unfolding rate, whereas RNase HI from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (Tt-RNase HI unfolds rapidly, comparable with to that of RNase HI from Escherichia coli (Ec-RNase HI. Results To clarify whether the difference in the unfolding rate is due to differences in the types of RNase H or differences in proteins from archaea and bacteria, we examined the equilibrium stability and unfolding reaction of RNases HII from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (Tm-RNase HII and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa-RNase HII and RNase HI from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI. These proteins from hyperthermophiles are more stable than Ec-RNase HI over all the temperature ranges examined. The observed unfolding speeds of all hyperstable proteins at the different denaturant concentrations studied are much lower than those of Ec-RNase HI, which is in accordance with the familiar slow unfolding of hyperstable proteins. However, the unfolding rate constants of these RNases H in water are dispersed, and the unfolding rate constant of thermophilic archaeal proteins is lower than that of thermophilic bacterial proteins. Conclusions These results suggest that the nature of slow unfolding of thermophilic proteins is determined by the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. The unfolding rate constants in water are related to the amount of buried hydrophobic residues in the tertiary structure.

  16. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Gerrit J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Nguyen, Diep M N; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a CO dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na(+) motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na(+)-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms. PMID:26858706

  17. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  18. Cloning, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a hypothetical protein, MJ0754, from Methanococcus jannaschii DSM 2661

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, two forms of MJ0754 from the archaeon M. jannaschii were overexpressed and crystallized. The crystal of MJ0754 belonged to the hexagonal space group P61 and diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution, while the crystal of MJ0754t belonged to the orthogonal space group C2221 and diffracted to 1.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The protein encoded by the MJ0754 gene from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii DSM 2661 is an unknown hypothetical protein. Two recombinant proteins, MJ0754 (residues 1–185) and MJ0754t (a truncated form of MJ0754, residues 11–185), were cloned from MJ0754, overexpressed as His-tag fusion proteins and purified. The crystals were found to grow under two different conditions and to have two different shapes. The crystal of MJ0754 belonged to space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.015, c = 48.929 Å, a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.85 Å3 Da−1 and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystal of MJ0754t belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.915, b = 79.122, c = 93.869 Å, a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.41 Å3 Da−1 and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The SeMet-labelled P61 crystal diffracted to a resolution of 3.1 Å, while the native C2221 crystal diffracted to 1.3 Å resolution

  19. Production of glycolic acid by chemolithotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and its role in delineating and sustaining acidophilic sulfide mineral-oxidizing consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2010-01-01

    Glycolic acid was detected as an exudate in actively growing cultures of three chemolithotrophic acidophiles that are important in biomining operations, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus (At.) ferrooxidans, and At. caldus. Although similar concentrations of glycolic acid were found in all cases, the concentrations corresponded to ca. 24% of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in cultures of L. ferriphilum but only ca. 5% of the total DOC in cultures of the two Acidithiobacillus spp. Rapid acidification (to pH 1.0) of the culture medium of At. caldus resulted in a large increase in the level of DOC, although the concentration of glycolic acid did not change in proportion. The archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum grew in the cell-free spent medium of At. caldus; glycolic acid was not metabolized, although other unidentified compounds in the DOC pool were metabolized. Glycolic acid exhibited levels of toxicity with 21 strains of acidophiles screened similar to those of acetic acid. The most sensitive species were chemolithotrophs (L. ferriphilum and At. ferrivorans), while the most tolerant species were chemoorganotrophs (Acidocella, Acidobacterium, and Ferroplasma species), and the ability to metabolize glycolic acid appeared to be restricted (among acidophiles) to Firmicutes (chiefly Sulfobacillus spp.). Results of this study help explain why Sulfobacillus spp. rather than other acidophiles are the main organic carbon-degrading bacteria in continuously fed stirred tanks used to bioprocess sulfide mineral concentrates and also why temporary cessation of pH control in these systems, resulting in rapid acidification, often results in a plume of the archaeon Ferroplasma. PMID:19933342

  20. Genomic expansion of Domain Archaea highlights roles for organisms from new phyla in anaerobic carbon cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelle, Cindy; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Thomas, Brian C.; Hug, Laura A.; Brown, Christopher T.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Singh, Andrea; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    Domain Archaea is currently represented by one phylum (Euryarchaeota) and two superphyla (TACK and DPANN). However, gene surveys indicate the existence of a vast diversity of uncultivated archaea for which metabolic information is lacking. We sequenced DNA from complex sediment- and groundwater-associated microbial communities sampled prior to and during an acetate biostimulation field experiment to investigate the diversity and physiology of uncultivated subsurface archaea. We sampled 15 genomes that improve resolution of a new phylum within the TACK superphylum and 119 DPANN genomes that highlight a major subdivision within the archaeal domain that separates DPANN from TACK/Euryarchaeota lineages. Within the DPANN superphylum, which lacks any isolated representatives, we defined two new phyla using sequences from 100 newly sampled genomes. The first new phylum, for which we propose the name Woesearchaeota, was defined using 54 new sequences. We reconstructed a complete (finished) genome for an archaeon from this phylum that is only 0.8 Mb in length and lacks almost all core biosynthetic pathways, but has genes encoding enzymes predicted to interact with bacterial cell walls, consistent with a symbiotic lifestyle. The second new phylum, for which we propose the name Pacearchaeota, was defined based on 46 newly sampled archaeal genomes. This phylum includes the first non-methanogen with an intermediate Type II/III RuBisCO. We also reconstructed a complete (1.24 Mb) genome for another DPANN archaeon, a member of the Diapherotrites phylum. Metabolic prediction and transcriptomic data indicate that this organism has a fermentation-based lifestyle. In fact, genomic analyses consistently indicate lack of recognizable pathways for sulfur, nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and metal cycling, and suggest that symbiotic and fermentation-based lifestyles are widespread across the DPANN superphylum. Thus, as for a recently identified superphylum of bacteria with small genomes and no

  1. Regulated polyploidy in halophilic archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Breuert

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1 cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2 Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell, and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy.

  2. Cleanroom Maintenance Significantly Reduces Abundance but Not Diversity of Indoor Microbiomes.

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    Alexander Mahnert

    Full Text Available Cleanrooms have been considered microbially-reduced environments and are used to protect human health and industrial product assembly. However, recent analyses have deciphered a rather broad diversity of microbes in cleanrooms, whose origin as well as physiological status has not been fully understood. Here, we examined the input of intact microbial cells from a surrounding built environment into a spacecraft assembly cleanroom by applying a molecular viability assay based on propidium monoazide (PMA. The controlled cleanroom (CCR was characterized by ~6.2*103 16S rRNA gene copies of intact bacterial cells per m2 floor surface, which only represented 1% of the total community that could be captured via molecular assays without viability marker. This was in contrast to the uncontrolled adjoining facility (UAF that had 12 times more living bacteria. Regarding diversity measures retrieved from 16S rRNA Illumina-tag analyzes, we observed, however, only a minor drop in the cleanroom facility allowing the conclusion that the number but not the diversity of microbes is strongly affected by cleaning procedures. Network analyses allowed tracking a substantial input of living microbes to the cleanroom and a potential enrichment of survival specialists like bacterial spore formers and archaeal halophiles and mesophiles. Moreover, the cleanroom harbored a unique community including 11 exclusive genera, e.g., Haloferax and Sporosarcina, which are herein suggested as indicators of cleanroom environments. In sum, our findings provide evidence that archaea are alive in cleanrooms and that cleaning efforts and cleanroom maintenance substantially decrease the number but not the diversity of indoor microbiomes.

  3. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Zhereppa Fathepure

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles.

  4. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first structures from the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663) reveal that some members of this family form tightly intertwined dimers consisting of two domains (N-terminal α+β core and C-terminal zinc-finger domains), whereas others contain only the core domain. The presence of the zinc-finger domain suggests that some members of this family may perform functions associated with transcriptional regulation, protein–protein interaction, RNA binding or metal-ion sensing. Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2-DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23-SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63-THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2-DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure

  5. Pyruvate: A key Nutrient in Hypersaline Environments?

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    Aharon Oren

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most commonly occurring but difficult to isolate halophilic prokaryotes, Archaea as well as Bacteria, require or prefer pyruvate as carbon and energy source. The most efficient media for the enumeration and isolation of heterotrophic prokaryotes from natural environments, from freshwater to hypersaline, including the widely used R2A agar medium, contain pyruvate as a key ingredient. Examples of pyruvate-loving halophiles are the square, extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the halophilic gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. However, surprisingly little is known about the availability of pyruvate in natural environments and about the way it enters the cell. Some halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum saccharovorum, Haloarcula spp. partially convert sugars and glycerol to pyruvate and other acids (acetate, lactate which are excreted to the medium. Pyruvate formation from glycerol was also shown during a bloom of halophilic Archaea in the Dead Sea. However, no pyruvate transporters were yet identified in the genomes of halophilic Archaea, and altogether, our understanding of pyruvate transport in the prokaryote world is very limited. Therefore, the preference for pyruvate by fastidious and often elusive halophiles and the empirically proven enhanced colony recovery on agar media containing pyruvate are still poorly understood.

  6. Flexibility of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Phototaxis Transducer II from Natronomonas pharaonis

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    Ivan L. Budyak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemo- and phototaxis systems in bacteria and archaea serve as models for more complex signal transduction mechanisms in higher eukaryotes. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic fragment of the phototaxis transducer (pHtrII-cyt from the halophilic archaeon Natronomonas pharaonis showed that it takes the shape of a monomeric or dimeric rod under low or high salt conditions, respectively. CD spectra revealed only approximately 24% helical structure, even in 4 M KCl, leaving it an open question how the rod-like shape is achieved. Here, we conducted CD, FTIR, and NMR spectroscopic studies under different conditions to address this question. We provide evidence that pHtrII-cyt is highly dynamic with strong helical propensity, which allows it to change from monomeric to dimeric helical coiled-coil states without undergoing dramatic shape changes. A statistical analysis of predicted disorder for homologous sequences suggests that structural flexibility is evolutionarily conserved within the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein family.

  7. Phototaxis of Haloarcula marismortui revealed through a novel microbial motion analysis algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Yang, Chii-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Haloarcula marismortui has been described to be nonmotile prior to the recent identification of flagellar filaments, suggesting the motile nature of H. marismortui. Here we observed the locomotion of freshly cultured H. marismortui cells and tracked the swimming trajectories via ImageJ. Trajectories of H. marismortui are intrinsically noisy, posing difficulties in motion analysis with previously established algorithms. By introducing the concept of "window vector," a Microsoft Excel-VBA-implemented microbial motion analysis algorithm reported here was able to (1) discriminate nonswimming objects from swimming cells without empirical customization by applying a power-law relationship and (2) reduce the noise caused by Brownian motion, thus enhancing the accuracy of swim reversal identification. Based on this motion analysis algorithm, two recently identified sensory rhodopsins, HmSRI and HmSRII, were shown to mediate photoattractant and photorepellent responses, respectively, revealing the phototactic activity of H. marismortui, the only archaeon showing such phenomenon other than Halobacterium salinarum. PMID:20553410

  8. Co-expression with RadA and the characterization of stRad55B, a RadA paralog from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaea Sulfolobus tokodaii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    ST0838 (designed stRad55B) is one of the four RadA paralogs (or Rad55 homologues) in the genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. The gene is induced by UV irradiation, sug-gesting that it is involved in DNA recombinational repair in this organism. However, this protein could not be expressed normally in vitro. In this study, thermostable and soluble stRad55B was obtained by co-expression with S. tokodaii RadA (stRadA) in E. coli, and the enzymatic properties were examined. It was found that stRad55B bound ssDNA preferentially and had a very weak ATPase activity that was not stimulated by DNA. The recombinant protein inhibited the strand exchange activity promoted by stRadA, indicating that stRad55B might be an inhibitor to the homologous recombination in this ar-chaeon. The results will be helpful for further functional and interaction analysis of RadA paralogs and for the understanding of the mechanism of recombinational repair in archaea.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) from Desulfurococcus amylolyticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flap endonuclease 1 from D. amylolyticus was expressed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution. Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5′-overhanging flaps in DNA repair and removes the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment in lagging-strand DNA replication. FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with monoammonium dihydrogen phosphate as the precipitant at pH 8.3. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution. The space group of the crystal was determined as the primitive hexagonal space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.76, c = 84.58 Å. The crystal contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  10. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  11. Solution Structure of Pfu RPP21, a Component of the Archaeal RNase P Holoenzyme, and Interactions with its RPP29 Protein Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5′-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentration, four proteins subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with Pfu RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step towards understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  12. Solution structure of Pyrococcus furiosus RPP21, a component of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme, and interactions with its RPP29 protein partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2008-11-11

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentrations, four protein subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30, and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus ( Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha-helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step toward understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  13. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (perchlorate in oil reservoirs

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    Martin G Liebensteiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese- and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (perchlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (perchlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (perchlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (metagenome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (perchlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (perchlorate for bioremediation, souring control and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed.

  14. Clustering of OB-fold domains of the partner protease complexed with trimeric stomatin from Thermococcales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Hiramoto, Kana; Forterre, Patrick; Matsui, Ikuo

    2013-07-01

    The C-terminal soluble domain of stomatin operon partner protein (STOPP) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii has an oligonucleotide binding-fold (OB-fold). STOPP lacks the conserved surface residues necessary for binding to DNA/RNA. A tryptophan (W) residue is conserved instead at the molecular surface. Solvent-accessible W residues are often found at interfaces of protein-protein complexes, which suggested the possibility of self-assembling of STOPP. Protein-protein interactions among the C-terminal soluble domains of STOPP PH1510 (1510-C) were then analyzed by chemical linking and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) methods. These results suggest that the soluble domains of STOPP could assemble into homo-oligomers. Since hexameric subcomplex I from archaeal proteasome consists of coiled-coil segments and OB-fold domains, molecular modeling of 1510-C was performed using hexameric subcomplex I as a template. Although 1510-C is a comparatively small polypeptide consisting of approximately 60 residues, numerous salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were observed in the predicted hexamer of 1510-C, suggesting the stability of the homo-oligomeric structure. This oligomeric property of STOPP may be favorable for triplicate proteolysis of the trimer of prokaryotic stomatin. PMID:23587725

  15. Comparative Genomic and Transcriptional Analyses of CRISPR Systems Across the Genus Pyrobaculum

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    David L Bernick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the domain Archaea, the CRISPR immune system appears to be nearly ubiquitous based on computational genome analyses. Initial studies in bacteria demonstrated that the CRISPR system targets invading plasmid and viral DNA. Recent experiments in the model archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus uncovered a novel RNA-targeting variant of the CRISPR system potentially unique to archaea. Because our understanding of CRISPR system evolution in other archaea is limited, we have taken a comparative genomic and transcriptomic view of the CRISPR arrays across six diverse species within the crenarchaeal genus Pyrobaculum. We present transcriptional data from each of four species in the genus (P. aerophilum, P. islandicum, P. calidifontis, P. arsenaticum, analyzing mature CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance from over 20 arrays. Within the genus, there is remarkable conservation of CRISPR array structure, as well as unique features that are have not been studied in other archaeal systems. These unique features include: a nearly invariant CRISPR promoter, conservation of direct repeat families, the 5' polarity of CRISPR-associated small RNA abundance, and a novel CRISPR-specific association with homologues of nurA and herA. These analyses provide a genus-level evolutionary perspective on archaeal CRISPR systems, broadening our understanding beyond existing non-comparative model systems.

  16. MTH187 from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum has three HEAT-like Repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julien, Olivier; Gignac, Isabelle [Universite Laval, Departement de biochimie et de microbiologie and CREFSIP (Canada); Hutton, Anna [University of Alberta, Institute for Biomolecular Design (Canada); Yee, Adelinda; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Division of Molecular and Structural Biology, Department of Medical Biophysics, Ontario Cancer Institute (Canada); Gagne, Stephane M. [Universite Laval, Departement de biochimie et de microbiologie and CREFSIP (Canada)], E-mail: sgagne@rsvs.ulaval.ca

    2006-06-15

    With the completion of genome sequencing projects, there are a large number of proteins for which we have little or no functional information. Since protein function is closely related to three-dimensional conformation, structural proteomics is one avenue where the role of proteins with unknown function can be investigated. In the present structural project, the structure of MTH187 has been determined by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. This protein of 12.4 kDa is one of the 424 non-membrane proteins that were cloned and purified for the structural proteomic project of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum [Christendat, D., Yee, A., Dharamsi, A., Kluger, Y., Gerstein, M., Arrowsmith, C.H. and Edwards, A.M. (2000) Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol., 73, 339-345]. Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum is a thermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 65 deg. C. A particular characteristic of this microorganism is its ability to generate methane from carbon dioxide and hydrogen [Smith, D.R., Doucette-Stamm, L.A., Deloughery, C., Lee, H., Dubois, J., Aldredge, T., Bashirzadeh, R., Blakely, D., Cook, R., Gilbert, K., Harrison, D., Hoang, L., Keagle, P., Lumm, W., Pothier, B., Qiu, D., Spadafora, R., Vicaire, R., Wang, Y., Wierzbowski, J., Gibson, R., Jiwani, N., Caruso, A., Bush, D., Reeve, J. N. et al. (1997) J. Bacteriol., 179, 7135-7155].

  17. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

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    Ricardo Jasso-Chávez

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells. In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  18. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  19. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  20. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a flavoenzyme amine dehydrogenase/oxidase from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the crystallization of a recombinant flavoprotein amine dehydrogenase/oxidase with specificity for l-proline from the hyperthermophile P. furiosus DSM 3638 and X-ray diffraction data collection. Crystals belonged to space group P1 and diffracted to a resolution of 3.3 Å. A flavoprotein amine dehydrogenase/oxidase with subunit molecular weights of 54.8 kDa (α-subunit) and 42.4 kDa (β-subunit) and specificity for l-proline was cloned from the genomic DNA of the hyperthermophilic marine archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638. The enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 3.3 and 3.6 Å, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Both crystals belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 91.3, b = 136.3, c = 203.8 Å, α = 94.5, β = 99.4, γ = 102.7° and a = 93.7, b = 116.3, c = 126.9 Å, α = 97.3, β = 99.9, γ = 104.6°

  2. Co-expression with RadA and the characterization of stRad55B, a RadA paralog from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaea Sulfolobus tokodaii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    ST0838 (designed stRad55B) is one of the four RadA paralogs (or Rad55 homologues) in the genome of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. The gene is induced by UV irradiation, suggesting that it is involved in DNA recombinational repair in this organism. However, this protein could not be expressed normally in vitro. In this study, thermostable and soluble stRad55B was obtained by co-expression with S. tokodaii RadA (stRadA) in E. coli, and the enzymatic properties were examined. It was found that stRad55B bound ssDNA preferentially and had a very weak ATPase activity that was not stimulated by DNA. The recombinant protein inhibited the strand exchange activity promoted by stRadA, indicating that stRad55B might be an inhibitor to the homologous recombination in this archaeon. The results will be helpful for further functional and interaction analysis of RadA paralogs and for the understanding of the mechanism of recombinational repair in archaea.

  3. Purification and properties of an extremely thermostable membrane-bound sulfur-reducing complex from the hyperthermophilic Pyrodictium abyssi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeier, R; Keller, M; Frey, G; Huber, H; Stetter, K O

    1998-03-15

    The chemolithoautotrophic archaeon Pyrodictium abyssi isolate TAG 11 gains energy by reducing sulfur with H2 to H2S. From this hyperthermophile, a sulfur-reducing complex catalyzing this reaction was purified 13.5-fold. The native complex exhibited a brownish-yellow colour and showed an apparent molecular mass of 520 kDa. SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of nine different major polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 82, 72, 65, 50, 47, 42, 40, 30 and 24 kDa. The native complex contained 50-55 mol acid-labile sulfur, 50-55 mol iron, 1.6 mol nickel, 1.2 mol copper, 2.8 mol cytochrome b and 0.3 mol cytochrome c (all per mol native complex). The temperature optimum of the H2:sulfur oxidoreductase complex was 100 degrees C, which is consistent with the physiological growth optimum of the native organism. The complex is extremely heat stable. During 5 h incubation at 100 degrees C, no decrease in H2S-forming activity could be observed. PMID:9546664

  4. Temperature and pH dependence of DNA ejection from archaeal lemon-shaped virus His1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhijärvi, K J; Ziedaite, G; Hæggström, E; Bamford, D H

    2016-07-01

    The archaeal virus His1 isolated from a hypersaline environment infects an extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica. His1 features a lemon-shaped capsid, which is so far found only in archaeal viruses. This unique capsid can withstand high salt concentrations, and can transform into a helical tube, which in turn is resistant to extremely harsh conditions. Hypersaline environments exhibit a wide range of temperatures and pH conditions, which present an extra challenge to their inhabitants. We investigated the influence of pH and temperature on DNA ejection from His1 virus using single-molecule fluorescence experiments. The observed number of ejecting viruses is constant in pH 5 to 9, while the ejection process is suppressed at pH below 5. Similarly, the number of ejections within 15-42 °C shows only a minor increase around 25-37 °C. The maximum velocity of single ejected DNA increases with temperature, in qualitative agreement with the continuum model of dsDNA ejection. PMID:26820561

  5. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kristin Perras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The uncultivated Ca. Altiarchaeum hamiconexum (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks (hami on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal phylum at their N-terminal region (47-44% identity. Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  6. Molecular genetic and physical analysis of gas vesicles in buoyant enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Monson, Rita E; Ramsay, Joshua P; Salmond, George P C

    2016-04-01

    Different modes of bacterial taxis play important roles in environmental adaptation, survival, colonization and dissemination of disease. One mode of taxis is flotation due to the production of gas vesicles. Gas vesicles are proteinaceous intracellular organelles, permeable only to gas, that enable flotation in aquatic niches. Gene clusters for gas vesicle biosynthesis are partially conserved in various archaea, cyanobacteria, and some proteobacteria, such as the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006). Here we present the first systematic analysis of the genes required to produce gas vesicles in S39006, identifying how this differs from the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. We define 11 proteins essential for gas vesicle production. Mutation of gvpN or gvpV produced small bicone gas vesicles, suggesting that the cognate proteins are involved in the morphogenetic assembly pathway from bicones to mature cylindrical forms. Using volumetric compression, gas vesicles were shown to comprise 17% of S39006 cells, whereas in Escherichia coli heterologously expressing the gas vesicle cluster in a deregulated environment, gas vesicles can occupy around half of cellular volume. Gas vesicle production in S39006 and E. coli was exploited to calculate the instantaneous turgor pressure within cultured bacterial cells; the first time this has been performed in either strain. PMID:26743231

  7. Methanohalophilus levihalophilus sp. nov., a slightly halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen isolated from natural gas-bearing deep aquifers, and emended description of the genus Methanohalophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Mochimaru, Hanako; Meng, Xian-Ying; Muramoto, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Jun; Ikeda, Hidefumi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2014-06-01

    A mesophilic, slightly halophilic, obligately methylotrophic, methanogenic archaeon, designated strain GTA13(T), was isolated from natural gas-bearing confined aquifers in the Minami-Kanto gas field, Japan. The cells were non-motile, slightly irregular cocci, 0.7-1.0 µm in diameter and occurred singly, in pairs or as small aggregates. The cells grew with tri- or dimethylamine but not with H2/CO2, formate, acetate, methanol or dimethyl sulphide. Vitamins, sodium and magnesium were required for growth. Optimal growth occurred at pH 7.0-7.5, 35 °C, 0.35-0.40 M NaCl and 15-50 mM MgCl2. The NaCl range for growth was 0.2-1.3 M. The DNA G+C content was 43.7 mol%. Strain GTA13(T) showed highest levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF-1(T) (96.4% sequence similarity) and Methanohalophilus halophilus DSM 3094(T) (96.0%). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic features, strain GTA13(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Methanohalophilus, for which the name Methanohalophilus levihalophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GTA13(T) ( = NBRC 110099(T) = DSM 28452(T)). An emended description of the genus Methanohalophilus is also proposed. PMID:24670897

  8. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James J; Whitmore, Laura M; Isern, Nancy G; Romine, Margaret F; Riha, Krystin M; Inskeep, William P; Kreuzer, Helen W

    2016-05-01

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonensis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with (13)C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community. PMID:26995682

  9. Preliminary crystallography confirms that the archaeal DNA-binding and tryptophan-sensing regulator TrpY is a dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TrpY was crystallized using the hanging-drop method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P43212 or P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87, c = 147 Å, and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. TrpY regulates the transcription of the metabolically expensive tryptophan-biosynthetic operon in the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. TrpY was crystallized using the hanging-drop method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P43212 or P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87, c = 147 Å, and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. The possible packing of molecules within the cell based on the values of the Matthews coefficient (VM) and analysis of the self-rotation function are consistent with the asymmetric unit being a dimer. Determining the structure of TrpY in detail will provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA binding, tryptophan sensing and transcription regulation at high temperature by this novel archaeal protein

  10. Discovery and characterization of a second extremely thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaozhou; Huang, Rong; Gao, Shuaihua; Li, Xinxin; Zheng, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    A thermostable formamidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was revealed to be a novel, thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase. This (+)-γ-lactamase (Sso2810) is composed of only 318 amino acid residues, in contrast to a previously reported (+)-γ-lactamase (Sso2122) with 504 amino acid residues from the same strain. Herein, we demonstrate that a single strain may contain diverse (+)-γ-lactamases. The gene of this thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified by a simple yet effective heat treatment method. Sso2810 was biochemically characterized and compared to Sso2122, with phylogenetic analysis indicating different evolutionary histories for the two encoding genes. This newly found thermostable enzyme shows promising properties for industrial applications; specifically, it could be used for the production of chirally pure (-)-γ-lactam for the synthesis of well-known carbocyclic nucleoside antiretroviral agents like Abacavir and Peramivir. The chiral product of the enzyme was purified to >99% enantiomeric excess. PMID:26685014

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Sulfolobus solfataricus nucleotide-exchange factor 1β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, Alessia [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, CNR, Via Mezzocannone 16, I-80134 Napoli (Italy); Masullo, Mariorosario [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmacobiologiche, Università degli Studi Magna Graecia, Roccelletta di Borgia, I-88021 Catanzaro (Italy); Arcari, Paolo [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università degli Studi Federico II, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Raimo, Gennaro [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università degli Studi Federico II, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie per l’Ambiente e il Territorio, Università degli Studi del Molise, I-86170 Isernia (Italy); Vitagliano, Luigi [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, CNR, Via Mezzocannone 16, I-80134 Napoli (Italy); Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi (CIRPEB), I-80134 Napoli (Italy); Zagari, Adriana, E-mail: zagari@unina.it [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, CNR, Via Mezzocannone 16, I-80134 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento delle Scienze Biologiche, Sezione di Biostrutture, Università degli Studi Federico II, I-80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2005-11-01

    Nucleotide-exchange factor from S. solfataricus (SsEF-1β) has been successfully crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected from the native enzyme and from the selenomethionine derivative of SsEF-1β to 1.97 and 1.83 Å resolution, respectively. The nucleotide-exchange factor isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsEF-1β) consists of 90 residues and differs from eukaryal EF-1βs. The protein has been successfully crystallized using either microbatch-under-oil or vapour-diffusion methods. Crystals of native SsEF-1β diffract to 1.97 Å resolution and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.46, b = 54.87, c = 44.03 Å. Diffraction data have also been collected from a selenomethionine derivative of SsEF-1β at 1.83 Å resolution. Model building using the phases derived from the MAD experiment is in progress.

  12. Isolation of an extremely halophilic arhaeon Natrialba sp. C21 able to degrade aromatic compounds and to produce stable biosurfactant at high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemili-Talbi, Souad; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Akmoussi-Toumi, Siham; Angar, Yassmina; Gana, Mohamed Lamine

    2015-11-01

    Natrialba sp. strain C21 was isolated from oil contaminated saline water in Ain Salah (Algeria) and has exhibited a good potential for degrading phenol (3% v/v), naphthalene (3% v/v), and pyrene (3% v/v) at high salinity with high growth, enzymatic activity and biosurfactant production. Successful metabolism of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds of the strain Natrialba sp. C21 appears to require the ortho-cleavage pathway. Indeed, assays of the key enzymes involved in the ring cleavage of catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase indicated that degradation of the phenol, naphthalene and pyrene by strain Natrialba sp. C21 was via the ortho-cleavage pathway. Cells grown on aromatic hydrocarbons displayed greater ortho-activities mainly towards catechol, while the meta-activity was very low. Besides, biosurfactants derived from the strain C21 were capable of effectively emulsifying both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and seem to be particularly promising since they have particular adaptations like the increased stability at high temperature and salinity conditions. This study clearly demonstrates for the first time that strain belonging to the genera Natrialba is able to grow at 25% (w/v) NaCl, utilizing phenol, naphthalene, and pyrene as the sole carbon sources. The results suggest that the isolated halophilic archaeon could be a good candidate for the remediation process in extreme environments polluted by aromatic hydrocarbons. Moreover, the produced biosurfactant offers a multitude of interesting potential applications in various fields of biotechnology. PMID:26334644

  13. Transcriptome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytidine RNA modifications in bacteria, archaea, and yeast reveals m5C within archaeal mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Edelheit

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of 5-methylcytidine (m(5C in tRNA and rRNA molecules of a wide variety of organisms was first observed more than 40 years ago. However, detection of this modification was limited to specific, abundant, RNA species, due to the usage of low-throughput methods. To obtain a high resolution, systematic, and comprehensive transcriptome-wide overview of m(5C across the three domains of life, we used bisulfite treatment on total RNA from both gram positive (B. subtilis and gram negative (E. coli bacteria, an archaeon (S. solfataricus and a eukaryote (S. cerevisiae, followed by massively parallel sequencing. We were able to recover most previously documented m(5C sites on rRNA in the four organisms, and identified several novel sites in yeast and archaeal rRNAs. Our analyses also allowed quantification of methylated m(5C positions in 64 tRNAs in yeast and archaea, revealing stoichiometric differences between the methylation patterns of these organisms. Molecules of tRNAs in which m(5C was absent were also discovered. Intriguingly, we detected m(5C sites within archaeal mRNAs, and identified a consensus motif of AUCGANGU that directs methylation in S. solfataricus. Our results, which were validated using m(5C-specific RNA immunoprecipitation, provide the first evidence for mRNA modifications in archaea, suggesting that this mode of post-transcriptional regulation extends beyond the eukaryotic domain.

  14. Expression, Purification and Crystal Structure of a Truncated Acylpeptide Hydrolase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Feng ZHANG; Bai-Song ZHENG; Ying PENG; Zhi-Yong LOU; Yan FENG; Zi-He RAO

    2005-01-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) catalyzes the N-terminal hydrolysis of Nα-acylpeptides to release Nα-acylated amino acids. The crystal structure of recombinant APH from the thermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (apAPH) was reported recently to be at a resolution of 2.1 A using X-ray diffraction. A truncated mutant of apAPH that lacks the first short α-helix at the N-terminal, apAPH-△(1-21), was cloned, expressed,characterized and crystallized. Data from biochemical experiments indicate that the optimum temperature of apAPH is decreased by 15 ℃ with the deletion of the N-terminal α-helix. However, the enzyme activity at the optimal temperature does not change. It suggests that this N-terminal α-helix is essential for thermostability. Here, the crystal structure of apAPH-△(1-21) has been determined by molecular replacement to 2.5A. A comparison between the two structures suggests a difference in thermostability, and it can be concluded that by adding or deleting a linking structure (located over different domains), the stability or even the activity of an enzyme can be modified.

  15. Magnetic Au Nanoparticles on Archaeal S-Layer Ghosts as Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Selenska-Pobell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell‐ghosts representing empty cells of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, consisting only of their highly ordered and unusually stable outermost proteinaceous surface layer (S‐layer, were used as templates for Au nanoparticles fabrication. The properties of these archaeal Au nanoparticles differ significantly from those produced earlier by us onto bacterial S‐layer sheets. The archaeal Au nanoparticles, with a size of about 2.5 nm, consist exclusively of metallic Au(0, while those produced on the bacterial S‐layer had a size of about 4 nm and represented a mixture of Au(0 and Au(III in the ratio of 40 to 60 %. The most impressive feature of the archaeal Au nanoparticles is that they are strongly paramagnetic, in contrast to the bacterial ones and also to bulk gold. SQUID magnetometry and XMCD measurements demonstrated that the archaeal Au nanoparticles possess a rather large magnetic moment of about 0.1 µB/atom. HR‐ TEM‐EDX analysis revealed that the archaeal Au nanoparticles are linked to the sulfur atoms of the thiol groups of the amino acid cysteine, characteristic only for archaeal S‐layers. This is the first study demonstrating the formation of such unusually strong magnetic Au nanoparticles on a non‐modified archaeal S‐layer.

  16. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-09-26

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  17. Formylmethanofuran:tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase (Ftr) from the hyperthermophilic Methanopyrus kandleri. Cloning, sequencing and functional expression of the ftr gene and one-step purification of the enzyme overproduced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, S; Weiss, D S; Thauer, R K

    1995-06-15

    Methanopyrus kandleri is a methanogenic Archaeon that grows on H2 and CO2 at a temperature optimum of 98 degrees C. The gene ftr encoding the formylmethanofuran:tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase, an enzyme involved in CO2 reduction to methane, has been cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The overproduced enzyme could be purified in yields above 90% by simply heating the cell extract to 90 degrees C in 1.5 M K2HPO4 pH 8.0 for 30 min. From 1 g wet cells (70 mg protein) approximately 14 mg formyltransferase was obtained. The purified enzyme showed essentially the same catalytic properties as that purified from M. kandleri cells. The primary structure and properties of the formyltransferase are compared with those of the enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (growth temperature optimum 65 degrees C) and Methanothermus fervidus (83 degrees C). Of the three enzymes that from M. kandleri had the lowest isoelectric point (4.2) and the lowest hydrophobicity of the amino acid composition. The enzyme from M. kandleri had the relatively highest content in alanine, glutamate and glutamine and the relatively lowest content in isoleucine, leucine and lysine. These properties, some of which are unusual for enzymes from other hyperthermophilic organisms, may reflect that the formyltransferase from M. kandleri is adapted to both hyperthermophilic and halophilic conditions. PMID:7601152

  18. Haloarchaeal myovirus φCh1 harbours a phase variation system for the production of protein variants with distinct cell surface adhesion specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R; Rössler, N; Iro, M; Scholz, H; Witte, A

    2012-01-01

    The φCh1 myovirus, which infects the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii, contains an invertible region that comprises the convergent open reading frames (ORFs) 34 and 36, which code for the putative tail fibre proteins gp34 and gp36 respectively. The inversion leads to an exchange of the C-termini of these proteins, thereby creating different types of tail fibres. Gene expression experiments revealed that only ORF34 is transcribed, indicating that φCh1 produces tail fibre proteins exclusively from this particular ORF. Only one of the two types of tail fibres encoded by ORF34 is able to bind to Nab. magadii in vitro. This is reflected by the observation that during the early phases of the infection cycle, the lysogenic strain L11 carries its invertible region exclusively in the orientation that produces that specific type of tail fibre. Obviously, Nab. magadii can only be infected by viruses carrying this particular type of tail fibre. By mutational analysis, the binding domain of gp34 was localized to the C-terminal part of the protein, particularly to a galactose-binding domain. The involvement of galactose residues in cell adhesion was supported by the observation that the addition of α-D-galactose to purified gp34 or whole virions prevented their attachment to Nab. magadii. PMID:22111759

  19. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  20. Enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihu; Zeng, Raymond J; Burow, Luke C; Lant, Paul; Keller, Jurg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-10-01

    The microorganisms responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to denitrification have not been clearly elucidated. Three recent publications suggested it can be achieved by a denitrifying bacterium with or without the involvement of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. A key factor limiting the progress in this research field is the shortage of enrichment cultures performing denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO). In this study, DAMO cultures were enriched from mixed inoculum including sediment from a freshwater lake, anaerobic digester sludge and return activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. Two reactors, operated at 35°C and at 22°C, respectively, showed simultaneous methane oxidation and nitrate reduction after several months of operation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the 35°C enrichment showed the presence of an archaeon closely related to other DAMO archaea and a dominated bacterium belonging to the yet uncultivated NC10 phylum. This culture preferred nitrite to nitrate as the electron acceptor. The present study suggests that the archaea are rather methanotrophs than methanogens. The highest denitrification rate achieved was 2.35 mmol NO3 (-) -N gVSS(-1)  day(-1) . The culture enriched at 22°C contained the same NC10 bacterium observed in the culture enriched at 35°C but no archaea. PMID:23765890

  1. Evolution of multi-enzyme complexes: the case of tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopoldseder, Sonja; Hettwer, Stefan; Sterner, Reinhard

    2006-11-28

    The prototypical tryptophan synthase is a stable heterotetrameric alpha-betabeta-alpha complex. The constituting TrpA and TrpB1 subunits, which are encoded by neighboring genes in the trp operon, activate each other in a bi-directional manner. Recently, a novel class of TrpB2 proteins has been identified, whose members contain additional amino acids that might sterically prevent complex formation with TrpA. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the TrpA and TrpB proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus. This hyperthermophilic archaeon does not contain a TrpB1 protein but instead contains two TrpB2 homologues that are encoded within (TrpB2i) and outside (TrpB2o) the trp operon. We find that TrpB2i and TrpA form a weak and transient complex during catalysis, with a uni-directional activation of TrpA by TrpB2i. In contrast, TrpB2o and TrpA do not form a detectable complex. These results suggest a model for the evolution of the tryptophan synthase in which TrpB2o, TrpB2i, and TrpB1 reflect the stepwise increase of TrpB affinity for TrpA and the refinement of functional subunit interaction, concomitant with the co-localization of the encoding genes in the trp operon. PMID:17115706

  2. Hyperthermophilic endoglucanase for in planta lignocellulose conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klose Holger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosic plant biomass into fermentable sugars is a crucial step in the sustainable and environmentally friendly production of biofuels. However, a major drawback of enzymes from mesophilic sources is their suboptimal activity under established pretreatment conditions, e.g. high temperatures, extreme pH values and high salt concentrations. Enzymes from extremophiles are better adapted to these conditions and could be produced by heterologous expression in microbes, or even directly in the plant biomass. Results Here we show that a cellulase gene (sso1354 isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus can be expressed in plants, and that the recombinant enzyme is biologically active and exhibits the same properties as the wild type form. Since the enzyme is inactive under normal plant growth conditions, this potentially allows its expression in plants without negative effects on growth and development, and subsequent heat-inducible activation. Furthermore we demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme acts in high concentrations of ionic liquids and can therefore degrade α-cellulose or even complex cell wall preparations under those pretreatment conditions. Conclusion The hyperthermophilic endoglucanase SSO1354 with its unique features is an excellent tool for advanced biomass conversion. Here we demonstrate its expression in planta and the possibility for post harvest activation. Moreover the enzyme is suitable for combined pretreatment and hydrolysis applications.

  3. Induction of the Sulfolobus shibatae virus SSV1 DNA replication by mitomycin C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The temperate virus SSV1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae provides a useful model system for the study of archaeal DNA replication. Southern hybridization showed that SSV1 existed primarily as a provirus in its host that was grown without shaking. Upon UV or mitomycin C induction, the cellular level of free SSV1 DNA increased drastically whereas that of integrated viral DNA remained unchanged. The results of mitomycin C induction were more reproducible than those of UV induction. We found that, when the cells that had been grown without shaking were shaken, the replication of SSV1 DNA was also induced. Based on our results, we developed a method for the induction of SSV1 DNA replication by mitomycin C. When the S. shibatae virus production was induced using this method, the cellular level of free SSV1 DNA started to increase 10 h after induction, and peaked after 12-15 h. A fully induced S. shibatae cell contained ~50 molecules of free SSV1 DNA. The development of this induction method and the description of the process of SSV1 DNA replication following induction are valuable to the analysis of the origin and mode of replication of the virus.

  4. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production. PMID:26369647

  5. Crystal structures of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin: [4Fe–4S] ↔ [3Fe–4S] cluster conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Martic, Maja; Windahl, Michael S.;

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of [4Fe–4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group C2221 with two types of molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. A and B...... molecules have different crystal packing and intramolecular disulfide bond conformation. The crystal packing reveals a β-sheet interaction between A molecules in adjacent asymmetric units, whereas B molecules are packed as monomers in a less rigid position next to the A–A extended β-sheet dimers. The A...... oxidization and purification are carried out at pH 5.8, only the monomer is obtained. The crystal structure of D14C [3Fe–4S] P. furiosus ferredoxin monomer was determined to 2.8 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P212121 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The molecules resemble...

  6. Diphthamide biosynthesis requires an organic radical generated by an iron-sulphur enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xuling; Torelli, Andrew T; Lee, Michael; Dzikovski, Boris; Koralewski, Rachel M; Wang, Eileen; Freed, Jack; Krebs, Carsten; Ealick, Steve E; Lin, Hening [Cornell; (Penn)

    2010-08-30

    Archaeal and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 contain a unique post-translationally modified histidine residue called diphthamide, which is the target of diphtheria toxin. The biosynthesis of diphthamide was proposed to involve three steps, with the first being the formation of a C-C bond between the histidine residue and the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). However, further details of the biosynthesis remain unknown. Here we present structural and biochemical evidence showing that the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii uses a novel iron-sulphur-cluster enzyme, Dph2. Dph2 is a homodimer and each of its monomers can bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical data suggest that unlike the enzymes in the radical SAM superfamily, Dph2 does not form the canonical 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Instead, it breaks the Cγ,Met-S bond of SAM and generates a 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl radical. Our results suggest that P. horikoshii Dph2 represents a previously unknown, SAM-dependent, [4Fe-4S]-containing enzyme that catalyses unprecedented chemistry.

  7. Crystal structure of the flagellar accessory protein FlaH of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii suggests a regulatory role in archaeal flagellum assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Wolf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Archaeal flagella are unique structures that share functional similarity with bacterial flagella, but are structurally related to bacterial type IV pili. The flagellar accessory protein FlaH is one of the conserved components of the archaeal motility system. However, its function is not clearly understood. Here, we present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of FlaH from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. The protein has a characteristic RecA-like fold, which has been found previously both in archaea and bacteria. We show that FlaH binds to immobilized ATP-however, it lacks ATPase activity. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrates that ATP affects the interaction between FlaH and the archaeal motor protein FlaI. In the presence of ATP, the FlaH-FlaI interaction becomes significantly weaker. A database search revealed similarity between FlaH and several DNA-binding proteins of the RecA superfamily. The closest structural homologs of FlaH are KaiC-like proteins, which are archaeal homologs of the circadian clock protein KaiC from cyanobacteria. We propose that one of the functions of FlaH may be the regulation of archaeal motor complex assembly. PMID:27060465

  8. Rapid evolution of stability and productivity at the origin of a microbial mutualism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesland, Kristina L.; Stahl, David A.

    2009-12-01

    Mutualistic interactions are taxonomically and functionally diverse. Despite their ubiquity, the basic ecological and evolutionary processes underlying their origin and maintenance are poorly understood. A major reason for this has been the lack of an experimentally tractable model system. We examine the evolution of an experimentally imposed obligate mutualism between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms that have no known history of prior interaction. Twenty-four independent pairings (cocultures) of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis were established and followed for 300 community doublings in two environments, one allowing for the development of a heterogeneous distribution of resources and the other not. Evolved cocultures grew up to 80percent faster and were up to 30percent more productive (biomass yield per mole substrate) than the ancestors. The evolutionary process was marked by periods of significant instability leading to extinction of two of the cocultures, but resulted in more stable, efficient, and productive mutualisms for most replicated pairings. Comparisons of evolved cocultures with those assembled from one evolved and one ancestral mutualist showed that evolution of both species contributed to improved productivity. Surprisingly, however, overall improvements in growth rate and yield were less than the sum of individual contributions, suggesting antagonistic interactions between mutations from the coevolved populations. Physical constraints on the transfer of metabolites in the evolution environment affected the evolution of M. maripaludis but not D. vulgaris. Together, these results show that challenges can imperil nascent obligate mutualisms and demonstrate the evolutionary responses that enable their persistence and future evolution.

  9. The gut microbiome of healthy Japanese and its microbial and functional uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Suguru; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Kim, Seok-Won; Hirose, Yuu; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira

    2016-04-01

    The human gut microbiome has profound influences on the host's health largely through its interference with various intestinal functions. As recent studies have suggested diversity in the human gut microbiome among human populations, it will be interesting to analyse how gut microbiome is correlated with geographical, cultural, and traditional differences. The Japanese people are known to have several characteristic features such as eating a variety of traditional foods and exhibiting a low BMI and long life span. In this study, we analysed gut microbiomes of the Japanese by comparing the metagenomic data obtained from 106 Japanese individuals with those from 11 other nations. We found that the composition of the Japanese gut microbiome showed more abundant in the phylum Actinobacteria, in particular in the genusBifidobacterium, than other nations. Regarding the microbial functions, those of carbohydrate metabolism were overrepresented with a concurrent decrease in those for replication and repair, and cell motility. The remarkable low prevalence of genes for methanogenesis with a significant depletion of the archaeonMethanobrevibacter smithiiand enrichment of acetogenesis genes in the Japanese gut microbiome compared with others suggested a difference in the hydrogen metabolism pathway in the gut between them. It thus seems that the gut microbiome of the Japanese is considerably different from those of other populations, which cannot be simply explained by diet alone. We postulate possible existence of hitherto unknown factors contributing to the population-level diversity in human gut microbiomes. PMID:26951067

  10. Bioenergetic studies of coal sulfur oxidation by extremely thermophilic bacteria. Final report, September 15, 1992--August 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.M.; Han, C.J.

    1997-12-31

    Thermoacidophilic microorganisms have been considered for inorganic sulfur removal from coal because of expected improvements in rates of both biotic and abiotic sulfur oxidation reactions with increasing temperature. In this study, the bioenergetic response of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon, Metallosphaera sedula, to environmental changes have been examined in relation to its capacity to catalyze pyrite oxidation in coal. Given an appropriate bioenergetic challenge, the metabolic response was to utilize additional amounts of energy sources (i.e., pyrite) to survive. Of particular interest were the consequences of exposing the organism to various forms of stress (chemical, nutritional, thermal, pH) in the presence of coal pyrite. Several approaches to take advantage of stress response to accelerate pyrite oxidation by this organism were examined, including attempts to promote acquired thermal tolerance to extend its functional range, exposure to chemical uncouplers and decouplers, and manipulation of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic tendencies to optimize biomass concentration and biocatalytic activity. Promising strategies were investigated in a continuous culture system. This study identified environmental conditions that promote better coupling of biotic and abiotic oxidation reactions to improve biosulfurization rates of thermoacidophilic microorganisms.

  11. Formaldehyde as a carbon and electron shuttle between autotroph and heterotroph populations in acidic hydrothermal vents of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, James J.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Romine, Margaret F.; Riha, Krystin M.; Inskeep, William P.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2016-03-19

    The Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains a large number of hydrothermal systems, which host microbial populations supported by primary productivity associated with a suite of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. We demonstrate that Metallosphaera yellowstonesis MK1, a facultative autotrophic archaeon isolated from a hyperthermal acidic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) spring in Norris Geyser Basin, excretes formaldehyde during autotrophic growth. To determine the fate of formaldehyde in this low organic carbon environment, we incubated native microbial mat (containing M. yellowstonensis) from a HFO spring with 13C-formaldehyde. Isotopic analysis of incubation-derived CO2 and biomass showed that formaldehyde was both oxidized and assimilated by members of the community. Autotrophy, formaldehyde oxidation, and formaldehyde assimilation displayed different sensitivities to chemical inhibitors, suggesting that distinct sub-populations in the mat selectively perform these functions. Our results demonstrate that electrons originally resulting from iron oxidation can energetically fuel autotrophic carbon fixation and associated formaldehyde excretion, and that formaldehyde is both oxidized and assimilated by different organisms within the native microbial community. Thus, formaldehyde can effectively act as a carbon and electron shuttle connecting the autotrophic, iron oxidizing members with associated heterotrophic members in the HFO community.

  12. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  13. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  14. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  15. The gut microbiome of healthy Japanese and its microbial and functional uniqueness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Suguru; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Kim, Seok-Won; Hirose, Yuu; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiome has profound influences on the host's health largely through its interference with various intestinal functions. As recent studies have suggested diversity in the human gut microbiome among human populations, it will be interesting to analyse how gut microbiome is correlated with geographical, cultural, and traditional differences. The Japanese people are known to have several characteristic features such as eating a variety of traditional foods and exhibiting a low BMI and long life span. In this study, we analysed gut microbiomes of the Japanese by comparing the metagenomic data obtained from 106 Japanese individuals with those from 11 other nations. We found that the composition of the Japanese gut microbiome showed more abundant in the phylum Actinobacteria, in particular in the genus Bifidobacterium, than other nations. Regarding the microbial functions, those of carbohydrate metabolism were overrepresented with a concurrent decrease in those for replication and repair, and cell motility. The remarkable low prevalence of genes for methanogenesis with a significant depletion of the archaeon Methanobrevibacter smithii and enrichment of acetogenesis genes in the Japanese gut microbiome compared with others suggested a difference in the hydrogen metabolism pathway in the gut between them. It thus seems that the gut microbiome of the Japanese is considerably different from those of other populations, which cannot be simply explained by diet alone. We postulate possible existence of hitherto unknown factors contributing to the population-level diversity in human gut microbiomes. PMID:26951067

  16. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future. PMID:26920159

  17. Differential stability of TATA box binding proteins from archaea with different optimal growth temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitz, Annette; Soppa, Jörg; Krejtschi, Carsten; Hauser, Karin

    2009-09-01

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) is involved in promoter recognition, the first step of transcription initiation. TBP is universally conserved and essential in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, TBPs have to be stable and to function in species that cover an extremely wide range of optimal growth temperatures (OGTs), from below 0 °C to more than 100 °C. Thus, the archaeal TBP family is ideally suited to study the evolutionary adaptation of proteins to an extremely wide range of temperatures. We characterized the thermostability of one mesophilic and one thermophilic TBP by infrared spectroscopy. Transition temperatures ( Tms) of thermal unfolding have been determined using TBPs from Methanosarcina mazei (OGT 37 °C) and from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (OGT 65 °C). Furthermore, the influence of protein and salt concentration on thermostability has been characterized. Together with previous studies, our results reveal that the Tms of archaeal TBPs are closely correlated with the OGTs of the respective species. Noteworthy, this is also true for the TBP from M. mazei representing the first characterized TBP from a mesophilic archaeon. In contrast, the only characterized eukaryotic TBP of the mesophilic plant Arabidopsis thaliana has a Tm more than 40 °C above the OGT.

  18. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    , designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences

  19. Tertiary structure of bacterial selenocysteine tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Suetsugu, Shiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is translationally incorporated into proteins in response to the UGA codon. The tRNA specific to Sec (tRNA(Sec)) is first ligated with serine by seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS). In the present study, we determined the 3.1 Å crystal structure of the tRNA(Sec) from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in complex with the heterologous SerRS from the archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri. The bacterial tRNA(Sec) assumes the L-shaped structure, from which the long extra arm protrudes. Although the D-arm conformation and the extra-arm orientation are similar to those of eukaryal/archaeal tRNA(Sec)s, A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) has unique base triples, G14:C21:U8 and C15:G20a:G48, which occupy the positions corresponding to the U8:A14 and R15:Y48 tertiary base pairs of canonical tRNAs. Methanopyrus kandleri SerRS exhibited serine ligation activity toward A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) in vitro. The SerRS N-terminal domain interacts with the extra-arm stem and the outer corner of tRNA(Sec). Similar interactions exist in the reported tRNA(Ser) and SerRS complex structure from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus. Although the catalytic C-terminal domain of M. kandleri SerRS lacks interactions with A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) in the present complex structure, the conformational flexibility of SerRS is likely to allow the CCA terminal region of tRNA(Sec) to enter the SerRS catalytic site. PMID:23649835

  20. Microbiological Monitoring in Geothermal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, M.; Lerm, S.; Linder, R.; Vetter, A.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Miethling-Graff, R.; Seibt, A.; Wolfgramm, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2010-12-01

    In the scope of the research projects “AquiScreen” and “MiProTherm” we investigated geothermally used groundwater systems under microbial, geochemical, mineralogical and petrological aspects. On one side an enhanced process understanding of engineered geothermal systems is mandatory to optimize plant reliability and economy, on the other side this study provides insights into the microbiology of terrestrial thermal systems. Geothermal systems located in the North German Basin and the Molasse Basin were analyzed by sampling of fluids and solid phases. The investigated sites were characterized by different temperatures, salinities and potential microbial substrates. The microbial population was monitored by the use of genetic fingerprinting techniques and PCR-cloning based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) genes. DNA-sequences of fingerprints and cloned PCR-products were compared to public databases and correlated with metabolic classes to provide information about the biogeochemical processes. In all investigated geothermal plants, covering a temperature range from 5° to 120°C, microorganisms were found. Phylogenetic gene analyses indicate a broad diversity of microorganisms adapted to the specific conditions in the engineered system. Beside characterized bacteria like Thermus scotoductus, Siderooxidans lithoautotrophicus and the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus a high number of so far uncultivated microorganisms was detected. As it is known that - in addition to abiotic factors - microbes like sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the processes of corrosion and scaling in plant components, we identified SRB by specific analyses of DSR genes. The SRB detected are closely related to thermotolerant and thermophilic species of Desulfotomaculum, Thermodesulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfobacterium, respectively. Overall, the detection of microbes known to be involved in biocorrosion and the

  1. Investigating the Effects of Simulated Space conditions on Novel Extremely Halophilic Archaea: Halovarius Luteus gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feshangsaz, Niloofar; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Nazmi, Kamran; Semsarha, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Studying halophiles from different environments of Earth provide new insights into our search for life in the universe. Haloarchaea show some unique characteristics and physiological adaptations like acidic proteins against harsh environments such as natural brine with salt concentration approaching saturation (5 M) and regions with low active water. These properties make haloarchaea interesting candidate for astrobiological studies. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. a novel extremely halophilic archaeon from Urmia salt lake, in Iran has been chosen to explore its resistance against a series of extreme conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the resistance of strain DA50T under the effects of simulated space conditions like simulated microgravity, hypergravity, and desiccation. In this paper we will discuss the results of these studies where we specifically focus on changes in carotenoid pigments production and whole cell proteome. This is the first report of very novel Iranian archaea in response to extreme space conditions. The pigments were extracted by acetone and methanol. Pigments were analyzed by scanning the absorbance spectrum in the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. And they were separated by TLC. Whole protein from cell lysate supernatant was extracted after lysis with Bacterial Protein Extraction Reagent and fractionated by RP-HPLC using C18 column. Proteome analyzed by electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and MALDI-TOF. Carotenoid pigments are formed under different extreme conditions such as dry environment and gravitational changes. Also the protein composition exhibits alterations after exposure to the same conditions. Our conclusion is that pigments and proteins formation depend on the growth circumstances. Halophiles use this as an adaptation to survive under different environmental conditions.

  2. Carbon-dependent control of electron transfer and central carbon pathway genes for methane biosynthesis in the Archaean, Methanosarcina acetivorans strain C2A

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    Gunsalus Robert P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeon, Methanosarcina acetivorans strain C2A forms methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from a variety of one-carbon substrates and acetate. Whereas the biochemical pathways leading to methane formation are well understood, little is known about the expression of the many of the genes that encode proteins needed for carbon flow, electron transfer and/or energy conservation. Quantitative transcript analysis was performed on twenty gene clusters encompassing over one hundred genes in M. acetivorans that encode enzymes/proteins with known or potential roles in substrate conversion to methane. Results The expression of many seemingly "redundant" genes/gene clusters establish substrate dependent control of approximately seventy genes for methane production by the pathways for methanol and acetate utilization. These include genes for soluble-type and membrane-type heterodisulfide reductases (hdr, hydrogenases including genes for a vht-type F420 non-reducing hydrogenase, molybdenum-type (fmd as well as tungsten-type (fwd formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases, genes for rnf and mrp-type electron transfer complexes, for acetate uptake, plus multiple genes for aha- and atp-type ATP synthesis complexes. Analysis of promoters for seven gene clusters reveal UTR leaders of 51-137 nucleotides in length, raising the possibility of both transcriptional and translational levels of control. Conclusions The above findings establish the differential and coordinated expression of two major gene families in M. acetivorans in response to carbon/energy supply. Furthermore, the quantitative mRNA measurements demonstrate the dynamic range for modulating transcript abundance. Since many of these gene clusters in M. acetivorans are also present in other Methanosarcina species including M. mazei, and in M. barkeri, these findings provide a basis for predicting related control in these environmentally significant methanogens.

  3. Cloning, overexpression, purification, and characterization of a polyextremophilic β-galactosidase from the Antarctic haloarchaeon Halorubrum lacusprofundi

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    Karan Ram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Halorubrum lacusprofundi is a cold-adapted halophilic archaeon isolated from Deep Lake, a perennially cold and hypersaline lake in Antarctica. Its genome sequencing project was recently completed, providing access to many genes predicted to encode polyextremophilic enzymes active in both extremely high salinity and cold temperatures. Results Analysis of the genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi showed a gene cluster for carbohydrate utilization containing a glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidase gene, named bga. In order to study the biochemical properties of the β-galactosidase enzyme, the bga gene was PCR amplified, cloned, and expressed in the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 under the control of a cold shock protein (cspD2 gene promoter. The recombinant β-galactosidase protein was produced at 20-fold higher levels compared to H. lacusprofundi, purified using gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and identified by SDS-PAGE, LC-MS/MS, and ONPG hydrolysis activity. The purified enzyme was found to be active over a wide temperature range (−5 to 60°C with an optimum of 50°C, and 10% of its maximum activity at 4°C. The enzyme also exhibited extremely halophilic character, with maximal activity in either 4 M NaCl or KCl. The polyextremophilic β-galactosidase was also stable and active in 10–20% alcohol-aqueous solutions, containing methanol, ethanol, n-butanol, or isoamyl alcohol. Conclusion The H. lacusprofundi β-galactosidase is a polyextremophilic enzyme active in high salt concentrations and low and high temperature. The enzyme is also active in aqueous-organic mixed solvents, with potential applications in synthetic chemistry. H. lacuprofundi proteins represent a significant biotechnology resource and for developing insights into enzyme catalysis under water limiting conditions. This study provides a system for better understanding how H. lacusprofundi is

  4. Hydrogen peroxide detoxification is a key mechanism for growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Geol; Park, Soo-Je; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, So-Jeong; Gwak, Joo-Han; Hong, Heeji; Si, Ok-Ja; Lee, SangHoon; Madsen, Eugene L.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), that is, members of the Thaumarchaeota phylum, occur ubiquitously in the environment and are of major significance for global nitrogen cycling. However, controls on cell growth and organic carbon assimilation by AOA are poorly understood. We isolated an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (designated strain DDS1) from seawater and used this organism to study the physiology of ammonia oxidation. These findings were confirmed using four additional Thaumarchaeota strains from both marine and terrestrial habitats. Ammonia oxidation by strain DDS1 was enhanced in coculture with other bacteria, as well as in artificial seawater media supplemented with α-keto acids (e.g., pyruvate, oxaloacetate). α-Keto acid-enhanced activity of AOA has previously been interpreted as evidence of mixotrophy. However, assays for heterotrophic growth indicated that incorporation of pyruvate into archaeal membrane lipids was negligible. Lipid carbon atoms were, instead, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon, indicating strict autotrophic growth. α-Keto acids spontaneously detoxify H2O2 via a nonenzymatic decarboxylation reaction, suggesting a role of α-keto acids as H2O2 scavengers. Indeed, agents that also scavenge H2O2, such as dimethylthiourea and catalase, replaced the α-keto acid requirement, enhancing growth of strain DDS1. In fact, in the absence of α-keto acids, strain DDS1 and other AOA isolates were shown to endogenously produce H2O2 (up to ∼4.5 μM), which was inhibitory to growth. Genomic analyses indicated catalase genes are largely absent in the AOA. Our results indicate that AOA broadly feature strict autotrophic nutrition and implicate H2O2 as an important factor determining the activity, evolution, and community ecology of AOA ecotypes. PMID:27339136

  5. Integrated biclustering of heterogeneous genome-wide datasets for the inference of global regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baliga Nitin S

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The learning of global genetic regulatory networks from expression data is a severely under-constrained problem that is aided by reducing the dimensionality of the search space by means of clustering genes into putatively co-regulated groups, as opposed to those that are simply co-expressed. Be cause genes may be co-regulated only across a subset of all observed experimental conditions, biclustering (clustering of genes and conditions is more appropriate than standard clustering. Co-regulated genes are also often functionally (physically, spatially, genetically, and/or evolutionarily associated, and such a priori known or pre-computed associations can provide support for appropriately grouping genes. One important association is the presence of one or more common cis-regulatory motifs. In organisms where these motifs are not known, their de novo detection, integrated into the clustering algorithm, can help to guide the process towards more biologically parsimonious solutions. Results We have developed an algorithm, cMonkey, that detects putative co-regulated gene groupings by integrating the biclustering of gene expression data and various functional associations with the de novo detection of sequence motifs. Conclusion We have applied this procedure to the archaeon Halobacterium NRC-1, as part of our efforts to decipher its regulatory network. In addition, we used cMonkey on public data for three organisms in the other two domains of life: Helicobacter pylori, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli. The biclusters detected by cMonkey both recapitulated known biology and enabled novel predictions (some for Halobacterium were subsequently confirmed in the laboratory. For example, it identified the bacteriorhodopsin regulon, assigned additional genes to this regulon with apparently unrelated function, and detected its known promoter motif. We have performed a thorough comparison of cMonkey results against other

  6. Resistance of the Extreme Halophile Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 to Multiple Stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model Archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 is an extreme halophile known for its resistance to multiple stressors, including electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation. It is a well-developed system with a completely sequenced genome and extensive post-genomic tools for the study of a variety of biological processes. To further understand the mechanisms of Halobacterium's, radiation resistance, we previously reported the selection for multiple independent highly resistant mutants using repeated exposure to high doses of 18-20 MeV electrons using a medical S-band Linac. Molecular analysis of the transcriptional profile of several of these mutants revealed a single common change: upregulation of the rfa3 operon. These genes encode proteins homologous to the subunits of eukaryotic Replication Protein A (RPA), a DNA binding protein with major roles in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. This operon has also been implicated in a somewhat lesser role in resistance of wild type Halobacterium to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting common mechanisms for resistance. To further understand the mechanism of radiation resistance in the mutant strains, we measured the survival after exposure to both electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation, UV-A, B, and C All mutant strains showed increased resistance to electrons when compared with the parent. However, the mutant strains do not display increased UV resistance, and in one case is more sensitive than the parent strain. Thus, the protective role of increased RPA expression within a cell may be specific to the DNA damage caused by the different physical effects induced by high energy electron-beam radiation.

  7. Two Strategies for Microbial Production of an Industrial Enzyme-Alpha-Amylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Garriott, Owen; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments including hot springs, soda lakes and arctic water. This ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered extremophiles to be of interest in astrobiology, evolutionary biology as well as in industrial applications. Of particular interest to the biotechnology industry are the biological catalysts of the extremophiles, the extremozymes, whose unique stabilities at extreme conditions make them potential sources of novel enzymes in industrial applications. There are two major approaches to microbial enzyme production. This entails enzyme isolation directly from the natural host or creating a recombinant expression system whereby the targeted enzyme can be overexpressed in a mesophilic host. We are employing both methods in the effort to produce alpha-amylases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus) isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as from alkaliphilic bacteria (Bacillus) isolated from a soda lake in Tanzania. Alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to produce smaller sugars. Thermostable alpha-amylases are used in the liquefaction of starch for production of fructose and glucose syrups, whereas alpha-amylases stable at high pH have potential as detergent additives. The alpha-amylase encoding gene from Thermococcus was PCR amplified using carefully designed primers and analyzed using bioinformatics tools such as BLAST and Multiple Sequence Alignment for cloning and expression in E.coli. Four strains of Bacillus were grown in alkaline starch-enriched medium of which the culture supernatant was used as enzyme source. Amylolytic activity was detected using the starch-iodine method.

  8. DNA microarray analysis of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 reveals adaptation to different methanogenic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Raymond; Lentes, Sabine; Ehrenreich, Armin; Salmon, Kirsty; Saba, Karla; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Gunsalus, Robert P; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2005-05-01

    Methansarcina mazei Gö1 DNA arrays were constructed and used to evaluate the genomic expression patterns of cells grown on either of two alternative methanogenic substrates, acetate or methanol, as sole carbon and energy source. Analysis of differential transcription across the genome revealed two functionally grouped sets of genes that parallel the central biochemical pathways in, and reflect many known features of, acetate and methanol metabolism. These include the acetate-induced genes encoding acetate activating enzymes, acetyl-CoA synthase/CO dehydrogenase, and carbonic anhydrase. Interestingly, additional genes expressed at significantly higher levels during growth on acetate included two energy-conserving complexes (the Ech hydrogenase, and the A1A0-type ATP synthase). Many previously unknown features included the induction by acetate of genes coding for ferredoxins and flavoproteins, an aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, enzymes for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids, and components of iron, cobalt and oligopeptide uptake systems. In contrast, methanol-grown cells exhibited elevated expression of genes assigned to the methylotrophic pathway of methanogenesis. Expression of genes for components of the translation apparatus was also elevated in cells grown in the methanol medium relative to acetate, and was correlated with the faster growth rate observed on the former substrate. These experiments provide the first comprehensive insight into substrate-dependent gene expression in a methanogenic archaeon. This genome-wide approach, coupled with the complementary molecular and biochemical tools, should greatly accelerate the exploration of Methanosarcina cell physiology, given the present modest level of our knowledge of these large archaeal genomes. PMID:15902489

  9. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. I. Microbial Diversity Based on 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons and Metagenomic Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vera; Wood, Jason M; Olsen, Millie T; Tank, Marcus; Klatt, Christian G; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    Microbial-mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park have been studied for nearly 50 years. The emphasis has mostly focused on the chlorophototrophic bacterial organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In contrast, the diversity and metabolic functions of the heterotrophic community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are not well understood. In this study we analyzed the orange-colored undermat of the microbial community of Mushroom Spring using metagenomic and rRNA-amplicon (iTag) analyses. Our analyses disclosed a highly diverse community exhibiting a high degree of unevenness, strongly dominated by a single taxon, the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus spp. The second most abundant organisms belonged to the Thermotogae, which have been hypothesized to be a major source of H2 from fermentation that could enable photomixotrophic metabolism by Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus spp. Other abundant organisms include two members of the Armatimonadetes (OP10); Thermocrinis sp.; and phototrophic and heterotrophic members of the Chloroflexi. Further, an Atribacteria (OP9/JS1) member; a sulfate-reducing Thermodesulfovibrio sp.; a Planctomycetes member; a member of the EM3 group tentatively affiliated with the Thermotogae, as well as a putative member of the Arminicenantes (OP8) represented ≥1% of the reads. Archaea were not abundant in the iTag analysis, and no metagenomic bin representing an archaeon was identified. A high microdiversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences was identified for the dominant taxon, Roseiflexus spp. Previous studies demonstrated that highly similar Synechococcus variants in the upper layer of the mats represent ecological species populations with specific ecological adaptations. This study suggests that similar putative ecotypes specifically adapted to different niches occur within the undermat community, particularly for Roseiflexus

  10. An Uncharacterized Member of the Ribokinase Family in Thermococcus kodakarensis Exhibits myo-Inositol Kinase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Yukika; Kuwata, Keiko; Kusaka, Eriko; Fujita, Haruo; Miki, Kunio; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-01-01

    Here we performed structural and biochemical analyses on the TK2285 gene product, an uncharacterized protein annotated as a member of the ribokinase family, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. The three-dimensional structure of the TK2285 protein resembled those of previously characterized members of the ribokinase family including ribokinase, adenosine kinase, and phosphofructokinase. Conserved residues characteristic of this protein family were located in a cleft of the TK2285 protein as in other members whose structures have been determined. We thus examined the kinase activity of the TK2285 protein toward various sugars recognized by well characterized ribokinase family members. Although activity with sugar phosphates and nucleosides was not detected, kinase activity was observed toward d-allose, d-lyxose, d-tagatose, d-talose, d-xylose, and d-xylulose. Kinetic analyses with the six sugar substrates revealed high Km values, suggesting that they were not the true physiological substrates. By examining activity toward amino sugars, sugar alcohols, and disaccharides, we found that the TK2285 protein exhibited prominent kinase activity toward myo-inositol. Kinetic analyses with myo-inositol revealed a greater kcat and much lower Km value than those obtained with the monosaccharides, resulting in over a 2,000-fold increase in kcat/Km values. TK2285 homologs are distributed among members of Thermococcales, and in most species, the gene is positioned close to a myo-inositol monophosphate synthase gene. Our results suggest the presence of a novel subfamily of the ribokinase family whose members are present in Archaea and recognize myo-inositol as a substrate. PMID:23737529

  11. Structure and Mutational Analysis of the Archaeal GTP:AdoCbi-P Guanylyltransferase (CobY) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Insights into GTP Binding and Dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmister, Sean A.; Otte, Michele M.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2012-02-08

    In archaea and bacteria, the late steps in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) biosynthesis are collectively known as the nucleotide loop assembly (NLA) pathway. In the archaeal and bacterial NLA pathways, two different guanylyltransferases catalyze the activation of the corrinoid. Structural and functional studies of the bifunctional bacterial guanylyltransferase that catalyze both ATP-dependent corrinoid phosphorylation and GTP-dependent guanylylation are available, but similar studies of the monofunctional archaeal enzyme that catalyzes only GTP-dependent guanylylation are not. Herein, the three-dimensional crystal structure of the guanylyltransferase (CobY) enzyme from the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjCobY) in complex with GTP is reported. The model identifies the location of the active site. An extensive mutational analysis was performed, and the functionality of the variant proteins was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Substitutions of residues Gly8, Gly153, or Asn177 resulted in {ge}94% loss of catalytic activity; thus, variant proteins failed to support AdoCbl synthesis in vivo. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that MjCobY{sup G153D} had 10-fold higher affinity for GTP than MjCobY{sup WT} but failed to bind the corrinoid substrate. Results from Western blot analyses suggested that the above-mentioned substitutions render the protein unstable and prone to degradation; possible explanations for the observed instability of the variants are discussed within the framework of the three-dimensional crystal structure of MjCobY{sup G153D} in complex with GTP. The fold of MjCobY is strikingly similar to that of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlmU (MtbGlmU), a bifunctional acetyltransferase/uridyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc).

  12. Characterization and kinetic mechanism of mono- and bifunctional ornithine acetyltransferases from thermophilic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, F; Weigel, P; Legrain, C; Almeras, Y; Santrot, M; Glansdorff, N; Sakanyan, V

    2000-08-01

    The argJ gene coding for N2-acetyl-L-ornithine: L-glutamate N-acetyltransferase, the key enzyme involved in the acetyl cycle of L-arginine biosynthesis, has been cloned from thermophilic procaryotes: the archaeon Methanoccocus jannaschii, and the bacteria Thermotoga neapolitana and Bacillus stearothermophilus. Archaeal argJ only complements an Escherichia coli argE mutant (deficient in acetylornithinase, which catalyzes the fifth step in the linear biosynthetic pathway), whereas bacterial genes additionally complement an argA mutant (deficient in N-acetylglutamate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway). In keeping with these in vivo data the purified His-tagged ArgJ enzyme of M. jannaschii only catalyzes N2-acetylornithine conversion to ornithine, whereas T. neapolitana and B. stearothermophilus ArgJ also catalyze the conversion of glutamate to N-acetylglutamate using acetylCoA as the acetyl donor. M. jannaschii ArgJ is therefore a monofunctional enzyme, whereas T. neapolitana and B. stearothermophilus encoded ArgJ are bifunctional. Kinetic data demonstrate that in all three thermophilic organisms ArgJ-mediated catalysis follows ping-pong bi-bi kinetic mechanism. Acetylated ArgJ intermediates were detected in semireactions using [14C]acetylCoA or [14C]N2-acetyl-L-glutamate as acetyl donors. In this catalysis L-ornithine acts as an inhibitor; this amino acid therefore appears to be a key regulatory molecule in the acetyl cycle of L-arginine synthesis. Thermophilic ArgJ are synthesized as protein precursors undergoing internal cleavage to generate alpha and beta subunits which appear to assemble to alpha2beta2 heterotetramers in E. coli. The cleavage occurs between alanine and threonine residues within the highly conserved PXM-ATML motif detected in all available ArgJ sequences. PMID:10931207

  13. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of two dimeric hyperthermostable thioredoxins isolated from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two thioredoxins (SsTrxA2 and SsTrxA1) isolated from S. solfataricus have been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected from SsTrxA2 and SsTrxA1 to 1.83 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. The structures of both enzymes have been solved by molecular replacement. The thioredoxin system of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus involves a number of different proteins: two thioredoxin reductases (SsTrxRB2 and SsTrxRB3), two distinct thioredoxins (SsTrxA1 and SsTrxA2) and a disulfide oxidoreductase (SsPDO). Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analyses of SsTrxA1 and SsTrxA2, two dimeric proteins endowed with extraordinary thermal stability, are reported. In addition to the functional thioredoxin domain, both SsTrxA1 and SsTrxA2 present an extra N-terminal fragment of approximately 30 residues. Although crystallization trials have been conducted on both forms of the proteins, crystals that were suitable for X-ray crystallographic analyses have only been obtained for their truncated variants. The crystals of SsTrxA2 belonged to space group P2, with unit-cell parameters a = 28.27, b = 27.88, c = 62.06 Å, β = 92.34°, and diffracted to 1.83 Å resolution, whereas the crystals of SsTrxA1 belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.76, b = 75.09, c = 55.35 Å, β = 112.64°, and diffracted to 1.90 Å resolution. The structures of the two proteins have been solved by molecular replacement

  15. Substrate pathways and mechanisms of inhibition in the sulfur oxygenase reductase of Acidianus ambivalens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eVeith

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR is the initial enzyme of the sulfur oxidation pathway in the thermoacidophilic Archaeon Acidianus ambivalens. The SOR catalyzes an oxygen-dependent sulfur disproportionation to H2S, sulfite and thiosulfate. The spherical, hollow, cytoplasmic enzyme is composed of 24 identical subunits with an active site pocket each comprising a mononuclear non-heme iron site and a cysteine persulfide. Substrate access and product exit occur via apolar chimney-like protrusions at the four-fold symmetry axes, via narrow polar pores at the three-fold symmetry axes and via narrow apolar pores within in each subunit. In order to investigate the function of the pores we performed site-directed mutagenesis and inhibitor studies. Results: Truncation of the chimney-like protrusions resulted in an up to seven-fold increase in specific enzyme activity compared to the wild type. Replacement of the salt bridge-forming Arg99 residue by Ala at the three-fold symmetry axes doubled the activity and introduced a bias towards reduced reaction products. Replacement of Met296 and Met297, which form the active site pore, lowered the specific activities by 25-55 % with the exception of an M296V mutant. X-ray crystallography of SOR wild type crystals soaked with inhibitors showed that Hg2+ and iodoacetamide bind to cysteines within the active site, whereas Zn2+ binds to a histidine in a side channel of the enzyme. The Zn2+ inhibition was partially alleviated by mutation of the His residue. Conclusions: The expansion of the pores in the outer shell led to an increased enzyme activity while the integrity of the active site pore seems to be important. Hg2+ and iodoacetamide block cysteines in the active site pocket, while Zn2+ interferes over a distance, possibly by restriction of protein flexibility or substrate access or product exit.

  16. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  17. Superoxide reductase from Nanoarchaeum equitans: expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffraction-quality crystals of N. equitans neelaredoxin have been produced. The expression, purification and crystallization of the protein and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the crystals are reported. Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recent oxygen-detoxification system to be identified in anaerobic and microaerobic bacteria and archaea. SORs are metalloproteins that are characterized by their possession of a catalytic nonhaem iron centre in the ferrous form coordinated by four histidine ligands and one cysteine ligand. Ignicoccus hospitalis, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, is the only organism known to date to serve as a host for Nanoarchaeum equitans, a nanosized hyperthermophilic archaeon isolated from a submarine hot vent which completely depends on the presence of and contact with I. hospitalis cells for growth to occur. Similarly to I. hospitalis, N. equitans has a neelaredoxin (a 1Fe-type SOR) that keeps toxic oxygen species under control, catalysing the one-electron reduction of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Blue crystals of recombinant N. equitans SOR in the oxidized form (12.7 kDa, 109 residues) were obtained using polyethylene glycol (PEG 2000 MME) as precipitant. These crystals diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution at 100 K and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.88, b = 82.01, c = 91.30 Å. Cell-content analysis suggested the presence of four monomers in the asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient (VM) was determined to be 1.9 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to an estimated solvent content of 36%. Self-rotation function and native Patterson calculations suggested a tetramer with 222 point-group symmetry, similar to other 1Fe-SORs. The three-dimensional structure will be determined by the molecular-replacement method

  18. Recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a hyperthermostable α-glucan/maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus

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    Rahman M. Mizanur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucan phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible cleavage of α-1-4-linked glucose polymers into α-D-glucose-1-phosphate. We report the recombinant production of an α-glucan/maltodextrin phosphorylase (PF1535 from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, and the first detailed biochemical characterization of this enzyme from any archaeal source using a mass-spectrometry-based assay. The apparent 98 kDa recombinant enzyme was active over a broad range of temperatures and pH, with optimal activity at 80 °C and pH 6.5–7. This archaeal protein retained its complete activity after 24 h at 80 °C in Tris-HCl buffer. Unlike other previously reported phosphorylases, the Ni-affinity column purified enzyme showed broad substrate specificity in both the synthesis and degradation of maltooligosaccharides. In the synthetic direction of the enzymatic reaction, the lowest oligosaccharide required for the chain elongation was maltose. In the degradative direction, the archaeal enzyme can produce glucose-1-phosphate from maltotriose or longer maltooligosaccharides including both glycogen and starch. The specific activity of the enzyme at 80 °C in the presence of 10 mM maltoheptaose and at 10 mg ml–1 glycogen concentration was 52 U mg–1 and 31 U mg–1, respectively. The apparent Michaelis constant and maximum velocity for inorganic phosphate were 31 ± 2 mM and 0.60 ± 0.02 mM min–1 µg–1, respectively. An initial velocity study of the enzymatic reaction indicated a sequential bi-bi catalytic mechanism. Unlike the more widely studied mammalian glycogen phosphorylase, the Pyrococcus enzyme is active in the absence of added AMP.

  19. Perspectives on the origin of microfilaments, microtubules, the relevant chaperonin system and cytoskeletal motors--a commentary on the spirochaete origin of flagella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING YAN LI; CHUAN FEN WU

    2003-01-01

    The origin of cytoskeleton and the origin of relevant intracellular transportation system are big problems for understanding the emergence of eukaryotic cells. The present article summarized relevant information of evidences and molecular traces on the origin of actin, tubulin, the chaperonin system for folding them,myosins, kinesins, axonemal dyneins and cytoplasmic dyneins. On this basis the authors proposed a series of works, which should be done in the future, and indicated the ways for reaching the targets. Thesetargets are mainly: 1) the reconstruction of evolutionary path from MreB protein of archaeal ancestor of eukaryotic cells to typical actin; 2) the finding of the MreB or MreB-related proteins in crenarchaea and using them to examine J. A. Lake's hypothesis on the origin of eukaryote from "eocytes" crenarchaea);3) the examinations of the existence and distribution of cytoskeleton made of MreB-related protein within coccoid archaea, especially in amoeboid archaeon Thermoplasm acidophilum; 4) using Thermoplasma as a model of archaeal ancestor of eukaryotic cells; 5) the searching for the homolog of ancestral dynein in present-day living archaea. During the writing of this article, Margulis' famous spirochaete hypothesis on the origin of flagella and cilia was unexpectedly involved and analyzed from aspects of tubulins, dyneins and spirochaetes. Actually, spirochaete cannot be reasonably assumed as the ectosymbiotic ancestor of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, since their swing depends upon large amount of bacterial flagella beneath the flexible outer wall, but not depends upon their intracellular tubules and the assumed dyneins. In this case,if they had "evolved" into cilia and lost their bacterial flagella, they would immediately become immobile!In fact, tubulin and dynein-like proteins have not been found in any spirochaete.

  20. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. I. Microbial Diversity Based on 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons and Metagenomic Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vera; Wood, Jason M.; Olsen, Millie T.; Tank, Marcus; Klatt, Christian G.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial-mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park have been studied for nearly 50 years. The emphasis has mostly focused on the chlorophototrophic bacterial organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In contrast, the diversity and metabolic functions of the heterotrophic community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are not well understood. In this study we analyzed the orange-colored undermat of the microbial community of Mushroom Spring using metagenomic and rRNA-amplicon (iTag) analyses. Our analyses disclosed a highly diverse community exhibiting a high degree of unevenness, strongly dominated by a single taxon, the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus spp. The second most abundant organisms belonged to the Thermotogae, which have been hypothesized to be a major source of H2 from fermentation that could enable photomixotrophic metabolism by Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus spp. Other abundant organisms include two members of the Armatimonadetes (OP10); Thermocrinis sp.; and phototrophic and heterotrophic members of the Chloroflexi. Further, an Atribacteria (OP9/JS1) member; a sulfate-reducing Thermodesulfovibrio sp.; a Planctomycetes member; a member of the EM3 group tentatively affiliated with the Thermotogae, as well as a putative member of the Arminicenantes (OP8) represented ≥1% of the reads. Archaea were not abundant in the iTag analysis, and no metagenomic bin representing an archaeon was identified. A high microdiversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences was identified for the dominant taxon, Roseiflexus spp. Previous studies demonstrated that highly similar Synechococcus variants in the upper layer of the mats represent ecological species populations with specific ecological adaptations. This study suggests that similar putative ecotypes specifically adapted to different niches occur within the undermat community, particularly for Roseiflexus

  1. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation. PMID:25733873

  2. Preliminary X-ray analysis of twinned crystals of the Q88Y25-Lacpl esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Q88Y25-Lacpl esterase from L. plantarum WCFS1 has been recombinantly expressed, purified and crystallized. A native diffraction data set has been collected to 2.24 Å resolution. Q88Y25-Lacpl is an esterase produced by the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 that shows amino-acid sequence similarity to carboxylesterases from the hormone-sensitive lipase family, in particular the AFEST esterase from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic esterase EstEI isolated from a metagenomic library. N-terminally His6-tagged Q88Y25-Lacpl has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells, purified and crystallized at 291 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Mass spectrometry was used to determine the purity and homogeneity of the enzyme. Crystals of His6-tagged Q88Y25-Lacpl were prepared in a solution containing 2.8 M sodium acetate trihydrate pH 7.0. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.24 Å resolution on beamline ID29 at the ESRF. The apparent crystal point group was 422; however, initial global analysis of the intensity statistics (data processed with high symmetry in space group I422) and subsequent tests on data processed with low symmetry (space group I4) showed that the crystals were almost perfectly merohedrally twinned. Most probably, the true space group is I4, with unit-cell parameters a = 169.05, b = 169.05, c = 183.62 Å

  3. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  4. Purification and characterization of an extracellular halophilic and organic solvent-tolerant amylopullulanase from a haloarchaeon, Halorubrum sp. strain Ha25.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Fazeli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Halophiles, especially haloarchaea are one of the most important groups of extremophiles. Halophilic hydrolases have been studied worldwide and have been considered for biotechnology and industrial technologies. This study is the first report in amylopullulanase production in halophilic microorganisms.Materials and methods: A halophilic archaeon, Halorubrum sp. strain Ha25, produced extracellular halophilic organic solvent-tolerant amylopullulanase. The enzyme was purified using ethanol precipitation and anion exchange chromatography method. Molecular mass of purified enzyme was determined by SDS–PAGE method. After purification, the enzyme was characterized. To study the effects of organic solvents in the stability of the enzyme, the enzyme solution was incubated in the presence of various organic compounds and then, residual enzyme activity was measured. Mode of action of the enzyme was determined by thin-layer chromatography.Results: Molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 140 kDa by SDS–PAGE method. Optimum temperature for amylolitic and pullulytic activities was 50 °C. Optimum pH for amylolitic activity was 7.0 and for pullulytic activity was 7.5. This enzyme was active over a wide range of concentrations (0-4.5 M of NaCl. The effect of organic solvents on the amylolitic and pullulytic activities showed that this enzyme was more stable in the presence of non-polar organic solvents than polar solvents. The enzyme solely hydrolyzed pullulan and soluble starch to glucose.Discussion and conclusion: Halorubrum sp. strain Ha25 produces thermophilic and extremely halophilic amylopullulanase. The catalytic function under multi extreme condition of high temperature, high salinity, and low water activity might possess biotechnological and commercial values such as treatment waste solutions with starch residues, high salt content and solvents.

  5. Identification and characterization of bifunctional proline racemase/hydroxyproline epimerase from archaea: discrimination of substrates and molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Watanabe

    Full Text Available Proline racemase (ProR is a member of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-independent racemase family, and is involved in the Stickland reaction (fermentation in certain clostridia as well as the mechanisms underlying the escape of parasites from host immunity in eukaryotic Trypanosoma. Hydroxyproline epimerase (HypE, which is in the same protein family as ProR, catalyzes the first step of the trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline metabolism of bacteria. Their substrate specificities were previously considered to be very strict, in spite of similarities in their structures and catalytic mechanisms, and no racemase/epimerase from the ProR superfamily has been found in archaea. We here characterized the ProR-like protein (OCC_00372 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis (TlProR. This protein could reversibly catalyze not only the racemization of proline, but also the epimerization of 4-hydroxyproline and 3-hydroxyproline with similar kinetic constants. Among the four (putative ligand binding sites, one amino acid substitution was detected between TlProR (tryptophan at the position of 241 and natural ProR (phenylalanine. The W241F mutant showed a significant preference for proline over hydroxyproline, suggesting that this (hydrophobic and bulky tryptophan residue played an importance role in the recognition of hydroxyproline (more hydrophilic and bulky than proline, and substrate specificity for hydroxyproline was evolutionarily acquired separately between natural HypE and ProR. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that such unique broad substrate specificity was derived from an ancestral enzyme of this superfamily.

  6. A liposomal formulation for the oral application of the investigational hepatitis B drug Myrcludex B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, P; Helm, F; Hofhaus, G; Brings, S; Kaufman, C; Leotta, Karin; Urban, S; Haberkorn, U; Mier, W; Fricker, G

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a liposomal formulation containing specific tetraether lipids for the oral administration of the investigational hepatitis B peptide drug Myrcludex B. For this purpose, tetraether lipids were extracted from the extremophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and purified in order to obtain the desired glycerylcaldityltetraether lipids (GCTE). Myrcludex B was synthesized by solid-phase synthesis and incorporated into liposomes containing 5mol% of GCTE. These liposomes showed a size, polydispersity index and zeta potential comparable to the standard liposomes. Cryo-EM micrographs of both liposomal formulations displayed low lamellarity, the prerequisite for high drug loading capacity. Long term storage of the GCTE-liposomes was achieved by freeze-drying using 100-500mM sucrose or trehalose as lyoprotectors. The lyophilized product showed high stability with a recovery rate of 82.7±1.6% of intact Myrcludex B observed after storage for 3months at -20°C as compared to a recovery rate of 83.3±1.3% directly after the freeze-drying process. In vivo, the GCTE-liposomal formulation led to substantial enhancement of the liver uptake of iodine-131-labeled Myrcludex B in Wistar rats. 3h after oral application, approximately 7% of the initial dose (corresponding to a 3.5-fold increase compared to the free peptide) could be detected in the liver. In summary, the GCTE-liposomes enabled efficient oral administration of Myrcludex B and provided long term storage by freeze-drying. PMID:27049970

  7. Environmental genomics of "Haloquadratum walsbyi" in a saltern crystallizer indicates a large pool of accessory genes in an otherwise coherent species

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    Bolhuis Henk

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mature saturated brine (crystallizers communities are largely dominated (>80% of cells by the square halophilic archaeon "Haloquadratum walsbyi". The recent cultivation of the strain HBSQ001 and thesequencing of its genome allows comparison with the metagenome of this taxonomically simplified environment. Similar studies carried out in other extreme environments have revealed very little diversity in gene content among the cell lineages present. Results The metagenome of the microbial community of a crystallizer pond has been analyzed by end sequencing a 2000 clone fosmid library and comparing the sequences obtained with the genome sequence of "Haloquadratum walsbyi". The genome of the sequenced strain was retrieved nearly complete within this environmental DNA library. However, many ORF's that could be ascribed to the "Haloquadratum" metapopulation by common genome characteristics or scaffolding to the strain genome were not present in the specific sequenced isolate. Particularly, three regions of the sequenced genome were associated with multiple rearrangements and the presence of different genes from the metapopulation. Many transposition and phage related genes were found within this pool which, together with the associated atypical GC content in these areas, supports lateral gene transfer mediated by these elements as the most probable genetic cause of this variability. Additionally, these sequences were highly enriched in putative regulatory and signal transduction functions. Conclusion These results point to a large pan-genome (total gene repertoire of the genus/species even in this highly specialized extremophile and at a single geographic location. The extensive gene repertoire is what might be expected of a population that exploits a diverse nutrient pool, resulting from the degradation of biomass produced at lower salinities.

  8. Systems analysis of bioenergetics and growth of the extreme halophile Halobacterium salinarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orland Gonzalez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Halobacterium salinarum is a bioenergetically flexible, halophilic microorganism that can generate energy by respiration, photosynthesis, and the fermentation of arginine. In a previous study, using a genome-scale metabolic model, we have shown that the archaeon unexpectedly degrades essential amino acids under aerobic conditions, a behavior that can lead to the termination of growth earlier than necessary. Here, we further integratively investigate energy generation, nutrient utilization, and biomass production using an extended methodology that accounts for dynamically changing transport patterns, including those that arise from interactions among the supplied metabolites. Moreover, we widen the scope of our analysis to include phototrophic conditions to explore the interplay between different bioenergetic modes. Surprisingly, we found that cells also degrade essential amino acids even during phototropy, when energy should already be abundant. We also found that under both conditions considerable amounts of nutrients that were taken up were neither incorporated into the biomass nor used as respiratory substrates, implying the considerable production and accumulation of several metabolites in the medium. Some of these are likely the products of forms of overflow metabolism. In addition, our results also show that arginine fermentation, contrary to what is typically assumed, occurs simultaneously with respiration and photosynthesis and can contribute energy in levels that are comparable to the primary bioenergetic modes, if not more. These findings portray a picture that the organism takes an approach toward growth that favors the here and now, even at the cost of longer-term concerns. We believe that the seemingly "greedy" behavior exhibited actually consists of adaptations by the organism to its natural environments, where nutrients are not only irregularly available but may altogether be absent for extended periods that may span several years

  9. Impact of CO2 concentration on autotrophic metabolisms and carbon fate in saline aquifers - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Sebastien; Fabbri, Antonin; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Ménez, Bénédicte; Crouzet, Catherine; Henry, Benoît; Garrido, Francis

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify the fate and speciation of carbon that can occur in mixtures of geological media (crushed rock) and autotrophic microbial communities. A sulfate reducing bacterium (Desulfotomaculum geothermicum) and a methanogenic archaeon (Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus) were both tested separately and together, with and without crushed sedimentary rock (carbonaceous sandstone) for different CO2 partial pressures (0.22, 0.88, 3.52, and 8 bar) at 54 °C in saline artificial groundwater. In order to quantify the respective metabolic activities, the inorganic gases of interest (H2, CH4, H2S and CO2) were measured and the speciation of carbon was assessed by measuring volatile, non-purgeable, total and dissolved organic carbon as well as total and dissolved inorganic carbon. Despite a protective effect of the mineral matrix, the results showed a high sensitivity of autotrophic microorganisms to the stress induced by pressures of CO2 superior to one bar and revealed that a part of this stress was due to direct toxic effects. M. thermolithotrophicus demonstrated a better tolerance to CO2 and was dominating the consortia. This ascendancy was interpreted as resulting from equilibrium displacement due to transport effects of methane between the liquid and gas phases. Abiotic dissolution was observed but some biomineralization processes of carbonates were also identified for D. geothermicum. Both strains displayed very different patterns in their conversion of inorganic carbon: while M. thermolithotrophicus was mainly producing methane, D. geothermicum induced the formation of biomass. The availability of crushed rock increased the proportion of sessile biofilms. All these results were analyzed in correlation with a successful PHREEQC simulation and demonstrate the strong influence of the microbial activities and diversity on the carbon fate in the immediate surroundings of geological CCS storage zones.

  10. Phylogenetic diversity of nitrogenase (nifH) genes in deep-sea and hydrothermal vent environments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Mausmi P; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2003-02-01

    The subseafloor microbial habitat associated with typical unsedimented mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be limited by the availability of fixed nitrogen, inferred by the low ammonium and nitrate concentrations measured in diffuse hydrothermal fluid. Dissolved N2 gas, the largest reservoir of nitrogen in the ocean, is abundant in deep-sea and hydrothermal vent fluid. In order to test the hypothesis that biological nitrogen fixation plays an important role in nitrogen cycling in the subseafloor associated with unsedimented hydrothermal vents, degenerate PCR primers were designed to amplify the nitrogenase iron protein gene nifH from hydrothermal vent fluid. A total of 120 nifH sequences were obtained from four samples: a nitrogen-poor diffuse vent named marker 33 on Axial Volcano, sampled twice over a period of 1 year as its temperature decreased; a nitrogen-rich diffuse vent near Puffer on Endeavour Segment; and deep seawater with no detectable hydrothermal plume signal. Subseafloor nifH genes from marker 33 and Puffer are related to anaerobic clostridia and sulfate reducers. Other nifH genes unique to the vent samples include proteobacteria and divergent Archaea. All of the nifH genes from the deep-seawater sample are most closely related to the thermophilic, anaerobic archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus (77 to 83% amino acid similarity). These results provide the first genetic evidence of potential nitrogen fixers in hydrothermal vent environments and indicate that at least two sources contribute to the diverse assemblage of nifH genes detected in hydrothermal vent fluid: nifH genes from an anaerobic, hot subseafloor and nifH genes from cold, oxygenated deep seawater. PMID:12571018

  11. Effect of organic loading on the microbiota in a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Abraham, Christopher; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-10-01

    Temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) has gained increasing attention because it provides the flexibility to operate digesters under conditions that enhance overall digester performance. However, research on impact of organic overloading rate (OLR) to microbiota of TPAD systems was limited. In this study, we investigated the composition and successions of the microbiota in both the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a laboratory-scale TPAD system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey before and during organic overloading. The thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters were operated at 50 and 35 °C, respectively, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days for each digester. High OLR (dairy manure with 5 % total solid and waste whey of ≥60.4 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/l/day) resulted in decrease in pH and in biogas production and accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the thermophilic digester, while the mesophilic digester remained unchanged except a transient increase in biogas production. Both denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons showed dramatic change in microbiota composition and profound successions of both bacterial and methanogenic communities. During the overloading, Thermotogae was replaced by Proteobacteria, while Methanobrevibacter and archaeon classified as WCHD3-02 grew in predominance at the expense of Methanoculleus in the thermophilic digester, whereas Methanosarcina dominated the methanogenic community, while Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter became less predominant in the mesophilic digester. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that digester temperature and pH were the most influential environmental factors that explained much of the variations of the microbiota in this TPAD system when it was overloaded. PMID:26084892

  12. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

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    Kateryna V Zhalnina

    Full Text Available The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  13. Functional implication of archaeal homologues of human RNase P protein pair Pop5 and Rpp30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Masato; Hazeyama, Kohsuke; Iwasaki, Fumihiko; Ueda, Toshifumi; Nakashima, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii, homologues of human ribonuclease P (RNase P) proteins hPop5 and Rpp30, respectively, fold into a heterotetramer [PhoRpp30-(PhoPop5)2-PhoRpp30], which plays a crucial role in the activation of RNase P RNA (PhopRNA). Here, we examined the functional implication of PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 in the tetramer. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that the tetramer strongly interacts with an oligonucleotide including the nucleotide sequence of a stem-loop SL3 in PhopRNA. In contrast, PhoPop5 had markedly reduced affinity to SL3, whereas PhoRpp30 had little affinity to SL3. SPR studies of PhoPop5 mutants further revealed that the C-terminal helix (α4) in PhoPop5 functions as a molecular recognition element for SL3. Moreover, gel filtration indicated that PhoRpp30 exists as a monomer, whereas PhoPop5 is an oligomer in solution, suggesting that PhoRpp30 assists PhoPop5 in attaining a functionally active conformation by shielding hydrophobic surfaces of PhoPop5. These results, together with available data, allow us to generate a structural and mechanistic model for the PhopRNA activation by PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30, in which the two C-terminal helices (α4) of PhoPop5 in the tetramer whose formation is assisted by PhoRpp30 act as binding elements and bridge SL3 and SL16 in PhopRNA. PMID:26152732

  14. Status Report on the Microbial Characterization of Halite and Groundwater Samples from the WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    these were most likely introduced into the WIPP as contaminants from above-ground, their survival and potential role in the WIPP (e.g., cellulose degradation) is under investigation. WIPP groundwaters comprise the far-field microbial environment. Bacteria cultivated and identified from the overlying Culebra and nearby borehole groundwater are capable of aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation, metal reduction, and sulfate reduction and are distributed across many different phyla. Two of the Bacteria found in groundwater were also found in WIPP halite (Chromohalobacter sp. and Virgibacillus sp.). Archaea identified in groundwater include Halococcus saccharolyticus, Haloferax sp., and Natrinema sp. The differences in the microbial communities detected thus far in halite and groundwater suggest that there will be significant differences in the associated metabolic potential of the near- and far-field environments. Whereas the near-field is dominated by Archaea with more limited metabolic capabilities, the far-field is dominated by Bacteria with extremely broad capabilities. Because the majority of the repository's lifetime will be anoxic, ongoing and future work focuses on the presence and role of anaerobic organisms in WIPP. Further tasks on biosorption, cellulose degradation, and bioreduction are being performed using organisms obtained from this characterization work.

  15. Status Report on the Microbial Characterization of Halite and Groundwater Samples from the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Norden, Diana [Ohio State University; Simmons, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    these were most likely introduced into the WIPP as contaminants from above-ground, their survival and potential role in the WIPP (e.g., cellulose degradation) is under investigation. WIPP groundwaters comprise the far-field microbial environment. Bacteria cultivated and identified from the overlying Culebra and nearby borehole groundwater are capable of aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation, metal reduction, and sulfate reduction and are distributed across many different phyla. Two of the Bacteria found in groundwater were also found in WIPP halite (Chromohalobacter sp. and Virgibacillus sp.). Archaea identified in groundwater include Halococcus saccharolyticus, Haloferax sp., and Natrinema sp. The differences in the microbial communities detected thus far in halite and groundwater suggest that there will be significant differences in the associated metabolic potential of the near- and far-field environments. Whereas the near-field is dominated by Archaea with more limited metabolic capabilities, the far-field is dominated by Bacteria with extremely broad capabilities. Because the majority of the repository's lifetime will be anoxic, ongoing and future work focuses on the presence and role of anaerobic organisms in WIPP. Further tasks on biosorption, cellulose degradation, and bioreduction are being performed using organisms obtained from this characterization work.

  16. Astrobiological Significance of Microbial Extremophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath and the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The importance of study alkaliphilic microorganisms for astrobiology was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology. The study of halophilic microorganisms was started from work with saline soils and lakes, and one of the record of good growth for Haloferax mediterranei was shown at 30 percent NaC1. Although alkali-tolerant nitrifying bacteria had previously been reported, the first described alkaliphilic microorganism was the bacterium Streptococcus faecalis. Halophilic and alkaliphilic forms are relevant to conditions that might be found in closed impact basins and craters on Mars filled with evaporite deposits. The first obligately acidophilic bacterium described was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxydans (formally Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Later thermophilic lithotrophic acidophiles were found, and the hyperacidophilic moderately thermophilic species of the genus Picrophilus were found to grow at negative p

  17. Ligand-induced formation of a transient tryptophan synthase complex with αββ subunit stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Alexander; Richter, Klaus; Busch, Florian; Reimann, Julia; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Sterner, Reinhard

    2010-12-28

    The prototypical tryptophan synthases form a stable heterotetrameric αββα complex in which the constituting TrpA and TrpB1 subunits activate each other in a bidirectional manner. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus does not contain a TrpB1 protein but instead two members of the phylogenetically distinct family of TrpB2 proteins, which are encoded within (sTrpB2i) and outside (sTrpB2a) the tryptophan operon. It has previously been shown that sTrpB2a does not functionally or structurally interact with sTrpA, whereas sTrpB2i substantially activates sTrpA in a unidirectional manner. However, in the absence of catalysis, no physical complex between sTrpB2i and sTrpA could be detected. In order to elucidate the structural requirements for complex formation, we have analyzed the interaction between sTrpA (α-monomer) and sTrpB2i (ββ-dimer) by means of spectroscopy, analytical gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation, as well as isothermal titration calorimetry. In the presence of the TrpA ligand glycerol 3-phosphate (GP) and the TrpB substrate l-serine, sTrpA and sTrpB2i formed a physical complex with a thermodynamic dissociation constant of about 1 μM, indicating that the affinity between the α- and ββ-subunits is weaker by at least 1 order of magnitude than the affinity between the corresponding subunits of prototypical tryptophan synthases. The observed stoichiometry of the complex was 1 subunit of sTrpA per 2 subunits of sTrpB2i, which corresponds to a αββ quaternary structure and testifies to a strong negative cooperativity for the binding of the α-monomers to the ββ-dimer. The analysis of the interaction between sTrpB2i and sTrpA in the presence of several substrate, transition state, and product analogues suggests that the αββ complex remains stable during the whole catalytic cycle and disintegrates into α- and ββ-subunits upon the release of the reaction product tryptophan. The formation of a transient tryptophan

  18. Detection of Cellulose and Comparative Biopolymeric Analyses of low pH, Sub-aerial Biofilms of the Richmond Mine, Iron Mountain California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Cody, G. D.; Thelen, M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    The low pH (0.5 1.5), metal-rich ecosystem associated with acid mine drainage at the Iron Mountain (IM) site in northern California has served as a case-study for the integrated analysis of geomicrobiological systems. Extensive efforts have been devoted to studying the genomics, proteomics, and geochemistry of this system and following their dynamics in space and time. One of the most obvious characteristics of microbial communities within the drainage outflow of IM are their occurrence as robust macroscopic biofilms at the air- water interface. Community genomic analyses indicate that Leptospirillum group II, the predominant taxon in some of the biofilms at the site, contains and expresses putative cellulose synthase genes and is important in polymer production at IM. On the other hand, proteomic analyses of the biofilms indicate that other organisms at the site, such as Leptospirillum group III and the archaeon Ferroplasma may contribute substantially to carbohydrate synthesis. To verify the presence of cellulose and to more fully characterize the composition and distribution of biopolymers within the IM biofilms, we conducted comparative analyses using complementary spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to identify organic biopolymers within samples from a number of different sites within the mine. Biofilms were fractionated into extracellular, membrane, and cytoplasmic components and analyzed using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physiological state of cells before and after the treatments was determined using epifluorescence microscopy with fluorescent probes. Microscopic analyses validated the efficacy of our extraction protocols and reinforced the overwhelming contribution of exopolymeric substances to the total mass of biofilms. NMR analyses confirmed that cellulose was an important organic biopolymer within the IM biofilms, comprising 5- 25% of the total polysaccharides. In contrast, biofilms dominated by Archaea contained

  19. Conversion of 4-Hydroxybutyrate to Acetyl Coenzyme A and Its Anapleurosis in the Metallosphaera sedula 3-Hydroxypropionate/4-Hydroxybutyrate Carbon Fixation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, AB; Adams, MWW; Kelly, RM

    2014-03-25

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera sedula (optimum growth temperature, 73 degrees C, pH 2.0) grows chemolithoautotrophically on metal sulfides or molecular hydrogen by employing the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3HP/4HB) carbon fixation cycle. This cycle adds two CO2 molecules to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to generate 4HB, which is then rearranged and cleaved to form two acetyl-CoA molecules. Previous metabolic flux analysis showed that two-thirds of central carbon precursor molecules are derived from succinyl-CoA, which is oxidized to malate and oxaloacetate. The remaining one-third is apparently derived from acetyl-CoA. As such, the steps beyond succinyl-CoA are essential for completing the carbon fixation cycle and for anapleurosis of acetyl-CoA. Here, the final four enzymes of the 3HP/4HB cycle, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase (AMP forming) (Msed_0406), 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase (Msed_1321), crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (Msed_0399), and acetoacetyl-CoA beta-ketothiolase (Msed_0656), were produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli, combined in vitro, and shown to convert 4HB to acetyl-CoA. Metabolic pathways connecting CO2 fixation and central metabolism were examined using a gas-intensive bioreactor system in which M. sedula was grown under autotrophic (CO2-limited) and heterotrophic conditions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the importance of the 3HP/4HB pathway in supplying acetyl-CoA to anabolic pathways generating intermediates in M. sedula metabolism. The results indicated that flux between the succinate and acetyl-CoA branches in the 3HP/4HB pathway is governed by 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, possibly regulated posttranslationally by the protein acetyltransferase (Pat)/Sir2-dependent system. Taken together, this work confirms the final four steps of the 3HP/4HB pathway, thereby providing the framework for examining connections between CO2 fixation and central metabolism in M. sedula.

  20. Pyrogenic organic matter can alter microbial communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Caroline; Gao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Silberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbes communicate with each other to manage a large range of processes that occur more efficiently when microbes are able to act simultaneously. This coordination occurs through the continuous production of signaling compounds that are easily diffused into and out of cells. As the number of microbes in a localized environment increases, the internal cellular concentration of these signaling compounds increases, and when a threshold concentration is reached, gene expression shifts, leading to altered (and coordinated) microbial behaviors. Many of these coordinated behaviors have biogeochemically important outcomes. For example, methanogenesis, denitrification, biofilm formation, and the development of plant-rhizobial symbioses are all regulated by a simple class of cell-cell signaling molecules known as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Pyrogenic organic matter in soils can act to disrupt microbial communication through multiple pathways. In the case of AHLs, charcoal's very high surface area can sorb these signaling compounds, preventing microbes from detecting each others' presence (Masiello et al., 2014). In addition, the lactone ring in AHLs is vulnerable to pH increases accompanying PyOM inputs, with soil pH values higher than 7-8 leading to ring opening and compound destabilization. Different microbes use different classes of signaling compounds, and not all microbial signaling compounds are pH-vulnerable. This implies that PyOM-driven pH increases may trigger differential outcomes for Gram negative bacteria vs fungi, for example. A charcoal-driven reduction in microbes' ability to detect cell-cell communication compounds may lead to a shift in the ability of microbes to participate in key steps of C and N cycling. For example, an increase in an archaeon-specific AHL has been shown to lead to a cascade of metabolic processes that eventually results in the upregulation of CH4 production (Zhang et al., 2012). Alterations in similar AHL compounds leads to

  1. Characterization of an archaeal two-component system that regulates methanogenesis in Methanosaeta harundinacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs are a major mechanism used by bacteria in response to environmental changes. Although many sequenced archaeal genomes encode TCSs, they remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea, encodes FilI, which synthesizes carboxyl-acyl homoserine lactones, to regulate transitions of cellular morphology and carbon metabolic fluxes. Here, we report that filI, the cotranscribed filR2, and the adjacent filR1 constitute an archaeal TCS. FilI possesses a cytoplasmic kinase domain (histidine kinase A and histidine kinase-like ATPase and its cognate response regulator. FilR1 carries a receiver (REC domain coupled with an ArsR-related domain with potential DNA-binding ability, while FilR2 carries only a REC domain. In a phosphorelay assay, FilI was autophosphorylated and specifically transferred the phosphoryl group to FilR1 and FilR2, confirming that the three formed a cognate TCS. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-qPCR using an anti-FilR1 antibody, FilR1 was shown to form in vivo associations with its own promoter and the promoter of the filI-filR2 operon, demonstrating a regulatory pattern common among TCSs. ChIP-qPCR also detected FilR1 associations with key genes involved in acetoclastic methanogenesis, acs4 and acs1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed the in vitro tight binding of FilR1 to its own promoter and those of filI-filR2, acs4, and mtrABC. This also proves the DNA-binding ability of the ArsR-related domain, which is found primarily in Archaea. The archaeal promoters of acs4, filI, acs1, and mtrABC also initiated FilR1-modulated expression in an Escherichia coli lux reporter system, suggesting that FilR1 can up-regulate both archaeal and bacterial transcription. In conclusion, this work identifies an archaeal FilI/FilRs TCS that regulates the methanogenesis of M. harundinacea.

  2. Identification and characterization of a new gene from Variovorax paradoxus Iso1 encoding N-acyl-D-amino acid amidohydrolase responsible for D-amino acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Hsun; Su, Shiun-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Chia-Yin

    2002-10-01

    An N-acyl-d-amino acid amidohydrolase (N-D-AAase) was identified in cell extracts of a strain, Iso1, isolated from an environment containing N-acetyl-d-methionine. The bacterium was classified as Variovorax paradoxus by phylogenetic analysis. The gene was cloned and sequenced. The gene consisted of a 1467-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 488 amino acids. The V. paradoxusN-D-AAase showed significant amino acid similarity to the N-acyl-d-amino acid amidohydrolases of the two eubacteria Alcaligenes xylosoxydans A-6 (44-56% identity), Alcaligenes facelis DA1 (54% identity) and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi (42% identity). After over-expression of the N-D-AAase protein in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was purified by multistep chromatography. The native molecular mass was 52.8 kDa, which agreed with the predicted molecular mass of 52 798 Da and the enzyme appeared to be a monomer protein by gel-filtration chromatography. A homogenous protein with a specific activity of 516 U.mg-1 was finally obtained. After peptide sequencing by LC/MS/MS, the results were in agreement with the deduced amino acid sequence of the N-D-AAase. The pI of the enzyme was 5.12 and it had an optimal pH and temperature of 7.5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. After 30 min heat treatment at 45 degrees C, between pH 6 and pH 8, 80% activity remained. The N-D-AAase had higher hydrolysing activity against N-acetyl-d-amino acid derivates containing d-methionine, d-leucine and d-alanine and against N-chloroacetyl-d-phenylalanine. Importantly, the enzyme does not act on the N-acetyl-l-amino acid derivatives. The enzyme was inhibited by chelating agents and certain metal ions, but was activated by 1 mm of Co2+ and Mg2+. Thus, the N-D-AAase from V. paradoxus can be considered a chiral specific and metal-dependent enzyme. PMID:12354118

  3. Physiological and molecular studies of the resistance to ionizing radiations of hyper-thermophilic archaea isolated from deep ocean hydrothermal sources; Etudes physiologiques et moleculaires de la resistance aux rayonnements ionisants d'archaea hyperthermophiles isolees de sources hydrothermales oceaniques profondes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolivet, E

    2002-10-15

    In this study, we have first tested in vivo the effect of gamma irradiation on Pyrococcus abyssi, a hyper-thermophilic archaeon, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. We have shown that this strain was as radioresistant as P. furiosus but less than Deinococcus radiodurans. The rates of double stranded breaks provoked into DNA following irradiation were monitored by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis technique (P.F.G.E.) with P. abyssi, P. furiosus, D. radiodurans and Escherichia coli. Results clearly showed that all these rates were similar suggesting that no specific DNA protection system exits in Pyrococcus species. The growth of P. abyssi was efficiently recovered within two hours following the exposure to 2.5 kGy of gamma irradiation. As revealed by P.F.G.E., genomic DNA of P. abyssi totally fragmented after irradiation was efficiently restored within two hours presumably by inter chromosomal homologous recombination. The DNA replication in P. abyssi cells following irradiation at 2.5 kGy was blocked for 90 minutes that corresponds to the decay for repairing damaged DNA. Moreover, following irradiation P. abyssi actively expulse damaged DNA material before DNA replication resumes, preventing the amplification of genetic mutations. We have also showed that at least a subset cf P. abyssi DNA repair and replication proteins, such as RadA, RPA-41 and RFC-S. were constitutively expressed in chromatin bound forms in stationary phase cells. Our results were in agreement with the view that P. abyssi contains a very efficient DNA repair system, which is continuously ready to counteract the DNA damaged caused by the high temperature and/or ionizing radiation. For the first time, three novel hyper-thermophilic archaea species from deep-sea hydrothermal vents more radioresistant than P. abyssi were isolated and characterized, after 'y-irradiation exposures of some enrichment cultures. Thermococcus marinus, Thermococcus radiophilus and Thermococcus

  4. Cultivation and molecular monitoring of halophilic microorganisms inhabiting an extreme environment presented by a salt-attacked monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenauer, Jörg; Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    uncultured archaeons as well as to the cultured genera Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus and Halobacterium. Cultivation and molecular analyses revealed the presence of highly specialized microorganisms that were able to thrive and survive after several desalination and disinfection treatments in the extreme environment presented by the salt-attacked Chapel of St. Virgil.

  5. Enhanced selection of micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol degrading granular sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Yuancai, E-mail: donkey1204@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen, Yuancai, E-mail: chenyc@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Song, Wenzhe, E-mail: songwenzhe007@126.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hu, Yongyou, E-mail: ppyyhu@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: In this work, an aerobic column reactor was placed before the USB to maintain micro-oxygen condition in the reactor and the micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L{sup −1}) was successfully obtained. PCP degradation by the micro-aerobic system was studied and the variance of microbial community was also discussed by using PCR-DGGE analysis. - Highlights: • Micro-aerobic granular sludge was cultivated in column-type combined reactors. • PCP biodegradation, VFA accumulation and biogas production were studied. • The function of Methanogenic archaeon in the system was investigated. • Fluctuation and diversity of microbial community were discussed by DGGE analysis. • The dominated microorganisms were identified by 16S rDNA sequences. - Abstract: Column-type combined reactors were designed to cultivate micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L{sup −1}) over 39-day experimental period. Micro-aerobic granular had both anaerobic activity (SMA: 2.34 mMCH{sub 4}/h g VSS) and aerobic activity (SOUR: 2.21 mMO{sub 2}/h g VSS). Metabolite analysis results revealed that PCP was sequentially dechlorinated to TCP, DCP, and eventually to MCP. Methanogens were not directly involved in the dechlorination of PCP, but might played a vital role in stabilizing the overall structure of the granule sludge. For Eubacteria, the Shannon Index (2.09 in inoculated granular sludge) increased both in micro-aerobic granular sludge (2.61) and PCP-degradation granular sludge (2.55). However, for Archaea, it decreased from 2.53 to 1.85 and 1.84, respectively. Although the Shannon Index demonstrated slight difference between micro-aerobic granular sludge and PCP-degradation granular sludge, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated obvious variance of the microbial composition, revealing significant effect of micro

  6. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  7. The tryptophan synthase β-subunit paralogs TrpB1 and TrpB2 in Thermococcus kodakarensis are both involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and indole salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Takayoshi; Sato, Takaaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-07-01

    The last two steps of l-tryptophan (Trp) biosynthesis are catalyzed by Trp synthase, a heterotetramer composed of TrpA and TrpB. TrpB catalyzes the condensation of indole, synthesized by TrpA, and serine to Trp. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, trpA and trpB (trpB1) are located adjacently in the trpCDEGFB1A operon. Interestingly, several organisms possess a second trpB gene (trpB2) encoding TrpB2, located outside of the trp operon in T. kodakarensis. Until now, the physiological function of trpB2 has not been examined genetically. In the present study, we report the biochemical and physiological analyses of TrpB2 from T. kodakarensis. Kinetic analysis indicated that TrpB2 catalyzed the TrpB reaction but did not interact with TrpA as in the case of TrpB1. When growth phenotypes were examined for gene disruption strains, the double-deletion mutant (ΔtrpB1ΔtrpB2) displayed Trp auxotrophy, whereas individual single mutants (ΔtrpB1 and ΔtrpB2 strains) did not. It has been proposed previously that, in Thermotoga maritima, TrpB2 provides an alternate route to generate Trp from serine and free indole (indole salvage). To accurately examine the capacity of TrpB1 and TrpB2 in Trp synthesis via indole salvage, we constructed ΔtrpEB1 and ΔtrpEB2 strains using strain KUW1 (ΔpyrFΔtrpE) as a host, eliminating the route for endogenous indole synthesis. Indole complemented the Trp auxotrophies of ΔtrpEB1 (ΔpyrFΔtrpEΔtrpB1) and ΔtrpEB2 (ΔpyrFΔtrpEΔtrpB2) to similar levels. The results indicate that TrpB1 and TrpB2 both contribute to Trp biosynthesis in T. kodakarensis and can utilize free indole, and that indole salvage does not necessarily rely on TrpB2 to a greater extent. PMID:24835339

  8. A comparative genomics perspective on the genetic content of the alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Natrialba magadii ATCC 43099T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaramappa Shivakumara

    2012-05-01

    sources to sustain growth. Nab. magadii has the genetic potential to adapt to its milieu by intracellular accumulation of inorganic cations and/or neutral organic compounds. The identification of Nab. magadii genes involved in coenzyme biosynthesis is a necessary step toward further reconstruction of the metabolic pathways in halophilic archaea and other extremophiles. The knowledge gained from the genome sequence of this haloalkaliphilic archaeon is highly valuable in advancing the applications of extremophiles and their enzymes.

  9. Enhanced selection of micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol degrading granular sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In this work, an aerobic column reactor was placed before the USB to maintain micro-oxygen condition in the reactor and the micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L−1) was successfully obtained. PCP degradation by the micro-aerobic system was studied and the variance of microbial community was also discussed by using PCR-DGGE analysis. - Highlights: • Micro-aerobic granular sludge was cultivated in column-type combined reactors. • PCP biodegradation, VFA accumulation and biogas production were studied. • The function of Methanogenic archaeon in the system was investigated. • Fluctuation and diversity of microbial community were discussed by DGGE analysis. • The dominated microorganisms were identified by 16S rDNA sequences. - Abstract: Column-type combined reactors were designed to cultivate micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1–0.2 mg L−1) over 39-day experimental period. Micro-aerobic granular had both anaerobic activity (SMA: 2.34 mMCH4/h g VSS) and aerobic activity (SOUR: 2.21 mMO2/h g VSS). Metabolite analysis results revealed that PCP was sequentially dechlorinated to TCP, DCP, and eventually to MCP. Methanogens were not directly involved in the dechlorination of PCP, but might played a vital role in stabilizing the overall structure of the granule sludge. For Eubacteria, the Shannon Index (2.09 in inoculated granular sludge) increased both in micro-aerobic granular sludge (2.61) and PCP-degradation granular sludge (2.55). However, for Archaea, it decreased from 2.53 to 1.85 and 1.84, respectively. Although the Shannon Index demonstrated slight difference between micro-aerobic granular sludge and PCP-degradation granular sludge, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated obvious variance of the microbial composition, revealing significant effect of micro-aerobic condition and PCP on

  10. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of

  11. Autotrophic Ecosystems on the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, M.

    2003-01-01

    resulting from aqueous alteration of olivine resides in veins that are see to cross cut the primary mineral grains. There are several generations of alteration products, comprised mostly of serpentines that are magnesium rich, with magnetite, brucite and carbonates observed as accessory minerals. The formation of carbonates can be taken to indicate the presence of CO2 in the altering fluids. We collected samples from a spring in the Coast Range Ophiolite in order to determine whether the geochemical environment serves as a habitat for chemotrophic microorganisms. DNA was extracted from the sediment samples and the 16s rRNA gene was PCR amplified using universal Archaeal primers. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to determine the community of Archaea thriving in these samples. Our results indicate that there were 8 different genera of Archaea from a single sample. A sequence was obtained from one of these eight. The sequence is of an organism similar to Halorubrum tibetense, and alkalophilic Archaeon. This result suggests that these environments are likely hosts for communities of organisms that are adapted for the unique chemistry provided by the alkaline spring.

  12. Non-extremophilic 'extremophiles' - Archaeal dominance in the subsurface and their implication for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Lins, Philipp; Illmer, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Archaea - besides bacteria and eukaryota constituting the third big domain of life - were so far regarded as typical inhabitants of extreme environments, as indicated by the name (Archaeon, Greek: 'original', 'primal'). Previous research and cultivation successes were basically carried out in habitats characterized by extreme temperature, pH and salinity regimes. Such extreme conditions, as expected at the beginning of the Earth's evolution, are occasionally also prevalent on extraterrestrial planets and moons and make the Archaeal domain a key group to be studied concerning life's evolution and the most likely pioneer organisms to colonize environments that are regarded as hostile. However, in recent years it became obvious that Archaea, in particular non-extremophilic species, can be found almost ubiquitously in marine, freshwater, terrestrial and also subsurface habitats and occasionally outnumber other microbial domains and hold key positions in globally relevant energy and nutrient cycles. Besides extreme environments - the big question remains how to define a parameter as extreme - subsurface and cave environments present a window to the past, where adaptions to early life's conditions can be studied and how microbiomes may be structured in a habitat that represents a refugium on extraterrestrial celestial bodies, were surface conditions might be at first sight too extreme for life. The lower part of the alpine Hundsalm cave in Tyrol (Austria) offered a unique opportunity to study an almost pristine cave habitat, which is separated from the touristic part of the ice cave. The main focus of our research was laid on the microbial communities that were supposed to be in connection with secondary carbonate precipitations ('moonmilk'). For the ascertainment of these so far poorly evaluated structures a multiple approach assessment was chosen to generate a virtually complete picture of these subsurface microbiomes. Thereby, a combination of different cultivation

  13. Analysis of Microbial Community Composition in Obturating Acid Mine Drainage%封闭环境下酸性矿坑水中微生物生态多样性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍强; 刘晰; 刘文斌; 谢建平; 刘新星

    2009-01-01

    Tong Lushan Copper Mine has the longest exploitation time span in the world. Many disused mines produce a large amount of environmental detrimental acid mine drainage (AMD). The microbial community in obturating AMD samples,which collected from Tong Lushan Copper Mine,was identified by the technology of the restriction fragment length polymorphisma (RFLP) analysis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA clone libraries. The bacterial and archaeal richness of acidophilic communities in this acidic and high-ion-concentration AMD were lower when compared with other extremophile and non-extremophile assemblages. The result of RFLP analysis and phylogenetic anlysis show that the majority of the bacterial clones were A. ferrooxidans belonging to the gamma-Proteobacteria and L. ferrooxidans belonging to the Nitospira while the majority of the archaeal clones were affiliated with Thermoplasma.Archaeal clones related to uncultured methanogenic archaeon were first found in obturating AMD environment and accounted for more than a quarter of the total archaeal clones. This microbial community structure composed by both bacteria and archaea contributed much to the generation of AMD.%铜绿山铜矿是世界开采时间最长的矿井之一,在开采过程中有许多矿井被废弃,许多废弃的矿井内产生了大量的对环境有害的酸性矿坑水.酸性矿坑水取自铜绿山铜矿某废弃矿井,利用限制性酶切片断多样性分析(RFLP分析)对酸性矿坑水中的微生物生态多样性进行了研究.研究表明,酸性矿坑水呈酸性,相对于其他极端与非极端生态环境,酸性矿坑水中的细菌与古菌的群落多样性较低.RFLP分析与系统发育分析表明,酸性矿坑水中细菌主要由A.fcrrooxidans(属于gamma-Proteobacteria)和L.ferrooxidans(属于Nitospira)成;古菌主要由Thermoplasma相关古菌组成.在这种封闭环境的酸性矿坑水中首次发现了类似于产甲烷古菌的克隆片断,其占古菌种群的四分

  14. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of

  15. Joint project. Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems. Subproject 2. Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the presence of repository-relevant organics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, Katja; Fritsch, Katharina; Lippold, Holger [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Ressource Ecology; and others

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide - organics - clay - aquifer. For this purpose, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg{sup -1}) and the background electrolyte. The U(VI) complexation by propionate was studied in dependence on ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg{sup -1} NaClO{sub 4}) by TRLFS, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. An influence of ionic strength on stability constants was detected, depending on the charge of the respective complexes. The conditional stability constants, determined for 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 complexes at specific ionic strengths, were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. The interaction of the bacteria Sporomusa sp. MT-2.99 and Paenibacillus sp. MT-2.2 cells, isolated from Opalinus Clay, with Pu was studied. The experiments can be divided into such without an electron donor where biosorption is favored and such with addition of Na-pyruvate as an electron donor stimulating also bioreduction processes. Moreover, experiments were performed to study the interactions of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 with U(VI), Eu(III), and Cm(III) in 3 M NaCl solutions. Research for improving process understanding with respect to the mobility of multivalent metals in systems containing humic matter was focused on the reversibility of elementary processes and on their interaction. Kinetic stabilization processes in the dynamics of humate complexation equilibria were quantified in isotope exchange studies. The influence of high salinity on the mobilizing potential of humic-like clay organics was systematically investigated and was described by modeling. The sorption of Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) onto the iron(II)-containing minerals magnetite and siderite was studied by means of batch sorption experiments, ATR FT-IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The strong Tc

  16. 湿地松和马尾松人工林土壤甲烷代谢微生物群落的结构特征%Research of methane metabolic microbial community in soils of slash pine plantation and Masson pine plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芸; 郑华; 陈法霖; 曾静; 陈圣宾; Jizhong Zhou; 欧阳志云

    2012-01-01

    of methane metabolic microorganisms. Functional gene microarray is quantitative and it can link structure to function of soil microbial community. Thus it is a good way to reveal the soil microbial community involved in methane metabolism. Using the third generation functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0) , this research studied structure of methane metabolic soil microbial community in Masson pine and slash pine plantations in red soil. For each type of forest plantation, we randomly selected 5 plots on independent stands in Yanshan District and Lingui County located in Guilin city in Guangxi Province, Southern China. In each plot, three subsamples within the area of 10 m × 10 m were randomly chosen. For each subsample, five 0 to 10 cm depth soil cores were extracted using a 3.5 cm diameter auger and were composite into one subsample.The results showed that, (1) there was no significant difference among forest types in the normalized signal intensity or diversity of either the whole methane metabolic microbial community, methanogenus or methanotrophs. (2) there was significant difference in methane metabolized microbial community (P=0.007). Forest type explained 34.9% variation of soil methane metabolic microbial community. (3 ) there was significant difference in methanogenus ( microorganisms include pmoA genes) community (P = 0. 015) , forest type explained 45. 5% variation of methanogenus community in soil. The dominant species of methanogenus differed between forest types. The dominant species of methanogenus in the slash pine plantations was Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z. While the dominant species in the Masson pine plantations also included uncultured methanogenic archaeon and Methanosarcina mazei Gol in addition to Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z. (4) There was also a strong trend that Masson pine plantation and slash pine plantation differed in methanotrophs (microorganisms include pmoA genes) {P= 0.068). Among methanotrophs, 4 genes from uncultured