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Sample records for archaean cellular life

  1. A fresh look at the fossil evidence for early Archaean cellular life

    OpenAIRE

    Brasier, Martin; McLoughlin, Nicola; Green, Owen; Wacey, David.

    2006-01-01

    The rock record provides us with unique evidence for testing models as to when and where cellular life first appeared on Earth. Its study, however, requires caution. The biogenicity of stromatolites and ‘microfossils’ older than 3.0 Gyr should not be accepted without critical analysis of morphospace and context, using multiple modern techniques, plus rejection of alternative non-biological (null) hypotheses. The previous view that the co-occurrence of biology-like morphology and carbonaceous ...

  2. Early Archaean collapse basins, a habitat for early bacterial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, W.

    For a better definition of the sedimentary environment in which early life may have flourished during the early Archaean, understanding of the basin geometry in terms of shape, depth, and fill is a prerequisite. The basin fill is the easiest to approach, namely from the well exposed, low-grade metamorphic 3.4 - 3.5 Ga rock successions in the greenstone belts of the east Pilbara (Coppin Gap Greenstone Belt and North Pole Dome) in West Australia and of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (Buck Ridge volcano-sedimentary complex) in South Africa. They consist of mafic to ultramafic volcanic rocks, largely pillow basalts, with distinct intercalations of intermediate to felsic intrusive and volcanic rocks and of silicious sediments. The, partly volcaniclastic, silicious sediments of the Buck Ridge and North Pole volcano-sedimentary complexes form a regressive-transgressive sequence. They were deposited close to base level, and experienced occasional emersion. Both North Pole Chert and the chert of the Kittys Gap volcano-sedimentary complex in the Coppin Gap Greenstone Belt preserve the flat-and-channel architecture of a shallow tidal environment. Thickness and facies distribution appear to be genetically linked to systems, i.e. arrays, of syn-depositionally active, extensional faults. Structures at the rear, front and bottoms of these fault arrays, and the fault vergence from the basin margin towards the centre characterize the basins as due to surficial crustal collapse. Observations in the Pilbara craton point to a non-linear plan view and persistence for the basin-defining fault patterns over up to 50 Ma, during which several of these fault arrays became superposed. The faults linked high-crustal level felsic intrusions within the overall mafic rock suite via porphyry pipes, black chert veins and inferred hydrothermal circulations with the overlying felsic lavas, and more importantly, with the cherty sediments. Where such veins surfaced, high-energy breccias, and in the

  3. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  4. The Origins of Cellular Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schrum, Jason P.; Zhu, Ting F.; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of fun...

  5. The photochemical origins of life and photoreaction of ferrous ion in the archaean oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, David C.

    1990-05-01

    A general argument is made for the photochemical origins of life. A constant flux of free energy is required to maintain the organized state of matter called life. Solar photons are the unique source of the large amounts of energy probably require to initiate this organization and certainly required for the evolution of life to occur. The completion of this argument will require the experimental determination of suitable photochemical reactions. Our work shows that biogenetic porphyrins readily photooxidize substrates and emit hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst. These results are consistent with the Granick hypothesis, which relates a biosynthetic pathway to its evolutionary origin. We have shown that photoexcitation of ferrous ion at neutral pH with near ultraviolet light produces hydrogen with high quantum yield. This same simple system may reduce carbon dioxide to formaldehyde and further products. These reactions offer a solution to the dilemma confronting the Oparin-Urey-Miller model of the chemical origin of life. If carbon dioxide is the main form of carbon on the primitive earth, the ferrous photoreaction may provide the reduced carbon necessary for the formation of amino acids and other biogenic molecules. These results suggest that this progenitor of modern photosynthesis may have contributed to the chemical origins of life.

  6. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean deposits of Northern Karelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafieva, M. M.; Hoover, R. B.; Rozanov, A. Y.; Vrevskiy, A. B.

    2005-01-01

    Newly found biomorphic microstructures from the Upper Archaean (lopian) rocks from Northern Karelia are described. The presence of various microorganisms of bacterial nature and even cyanobacteria (and possibly eukaryotic forms) is suggested. The necessity of employing methods of electron microscopy, as well as traditional methods, while studying the very early manifestations of life in Archaean and Early Proterozoic is noted.

  7. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm’s, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm’s are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV’s but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm’s for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  8. Archaean greenstone belts and associated granitic rocks - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhaeusser, Carl R.

    2014-12-01

    Archaean greenstone belts and associated granitic rocks comprise some of the most diverse rock types on the Earth's surface and were formed during the early stages of the development of the planet from Eoarchaean to Neoarchaean times - a period extending back from about 4000 to 2500 million years ago. Because of their great age, these rocks have received unprecedented attention from a wide spectrum of Earth scientists striving to learn more about the evolution of the Earth, including its crust, hydrosphere, atmosphere, the commencement of life, and the nature and distribution of mineral deposits. The knowledge gained thus far has accumulated incrementally, beginning with solid field-based studies, the latter being supplemented with increasingly advanced technological developments that have enabled scientists to probe fundamental questions of Earth history. Archaean granite-greenstone terranes display considerable variability of lithologies and geotectonic events, yet there are unifying characteristics that distinguish them from other geological environments. Most greenstone belts consist of a wide variety of volcanic and sedimentary rocks that reflect different evolutionary conditions of formation and all have invariably been influenced by subsequent geotectonic factors, including the intrusion of ultramafic, mafic and granitic complexes, resulting in widespread deformation, metamorphism, metasomatism, as well as mineralization. Geochemical and isotopic age determinations have shown how complex these ancient rocks are and efforts at understanding the nature and evolution of the hydrosphere, atmosphere and primitive life have made Archaean terranes exciting environments in which to study. Conflicting views as to the nature, history and origin of many of the rock types and events in Archaean terranes has been ongoing and stimulating. This review attempts to describe the main lithotypes and other characteristics of granite-greenstone belt geology and points to some

  9. Archaean metabolic evolution of microbial mats

    OpenAIRE

    Nisbet, E. G.; Fowler, C. M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Microbial mats of coexisting bacteria and archaea date back to the early Archaean: many of the major steps in early evolution probably took place within them. The earliest mats may have formed as biofilms of cooperative chemolithotrophs in hyperthermophile settings, with microbial exploitation of diversifying niches. Anoxygenic photosynthesis using bacteriochlorophyll could have allowed mats, including green gliding bacteria, to colonize anaerobic shallow-water mesothermophile habitats. Explo...

  10. Membrane-Based Functions in the Origin of Cellular Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipot, Christophe; New, Michael H.; Schweighofer, Karl; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Our objective is to help explain how the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells (protocells) performed their essential functions employing only the molecules available in the protobiological milieu. Our hypothesis is that vesicles, built of amphiphilic, membrane-forming materials, emerged early in protobiological evolution and served as precursors to protocells. We further assume that the cellular functions associated with contemporary membranes, such as capturing and, transducing of energy, signaling, or sequestering organic molecules and ions, evolved in these membrane environments. An alternative hypothesis is that these functions evolved in different environments and were incorporated into membrane-bound structures at some later stage of evolution. We focus on the application of the fundamental principles of physics and chemistry to determine how they apply to the formation of a primitive, functional cell. Rather than attempting to develop specific models for cellular functions and to identify the origin of the molecules which perform these functions, our goal is to define the structural and energetic conditions that any successful model must fulfill, therefore providing physico-chemical boundaries for these models. We do this by carrying out large-scale, molecular level computer simulations on systems of interest.

  11. Hydrothermal Conditions and the Origin of Cellular Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, David W; Georgiou, Christos D

    2015-12-01

    The conditions and properties of hydrothermal vents and hydrothermal fields are compared in terms of their ability to support processes related to the origin of life. The two sites can be considered as alternative hypotheses, and from this comparison we propose a series of experimental tests to distinguish between them, focusing on those that involve concentration of solutes, self-assembly of membranous compartments, and synthesis of polymers. Key Word: Hydrothermal systems. PMID:26684507

  12. Cellular Metabolic Rate Is Influenced by Life-History Traits in Tropical and Temperate Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Van Brocklyn, James; Wortman, Matthew; Williams, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    In general, tropical birds have a “slow pace of life,” lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cel...

  13. Cellular metabolic rate is influenced by life-history traits in tropical and temperate birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Jimenez

    Full Text Available In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR, proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR], using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal's life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  14. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Indrikis KRAMS; Jan(i)na DAUK(S)TE; Inese KIVLENIECE; Ants KAASIK; Tatjana KRAMA; Todd M.FREEBERG; Markus J.RANTALA

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation is a nonspecific,cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens.During this immune reaction,haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object,often consisting of melanized cells.The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species,which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells.In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor.We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span.We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span,suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T.molitor,and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span.However,this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃.As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response,we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells,as the implant,a synthetic parasite,was fully isolated from the host's tissues.

  15. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrikis KRAMS, Janīna DAUKŠTE, Inese KIVLENIECE, Ants KAASIK, Tatjana KRAMA, Todd M. REEBERG, Markus J. RANTALA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation is a nonspecific, cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens. During this immune reaction, haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object, often consisting of melanized cells. The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species, which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells. In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor. We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span. We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span, suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T. molitor, and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span. However, this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃. As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response, we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells, as the implant, a synthetic parasite, was fully isolated from the host’s tissues [Current Zoology 59 (3: 340–346, 2013].

  16. Reconstructing the emergence of cellular life through the synthesis of model protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, S S; Szostak, J W

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of modern biological life has long made it difficult to understand how life could emerge spontaneously from the chemistry of the early earth. The key to resolving this mystery lies in the simplicity of the earliest living cells, together with the ability of the appropriate molecular building blocks to spontaneously self-assemble into larger structures. In our view, the two key components of a primitive cell are not only self-assembling, but also self-replicating, structures: the nucleic acid genome and the cell membrane. Here, we summarize recent experimental progress toward the synthesis of efficient self-replicating nucleic acid and membrane vesicle systems and discuss some of the issues that arise during efforts to integrate these two subsystems into a coherent whole. We have shown that spontaneous nucleic-acid-copying chemistry can take place within membrane vesicles, using externally supplied activated nucleotides as substrates. Thus, membranes need not be a barrier to the uptake of environmentally supplied nutrients. We examine some of the remaining obstacles that must be overcome to enable the synthesis of a complete self-replicating protocell, and we discuss the implications of these experiments for our understanding of the emergence of Darwinian evolution and the origin and early evolution of cellular life. PMID:19734203

  17. Early-life Stress Impacts the Developing Hippocampus and Primes Seizure Occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Tung eHuang

    2014-01-01

    Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures...

  18. Early-life stress impacts the developing hippocampus and primes seizure occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures...

  19. Archaean lode gold deposits of Canada. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper represents a personal and a biased attempt to synthesize quantitative information on Archaean lode gold deposits of Canada. Lode gold deposits of Archaean greenstone belts are hosted by major fracture systems which may have initiated as listric faults and also form submarine scarps. Gold-bearing vein systems formed during multiple episodes of hydrofracturing. The narrow recorded range in δ18O of vein quartz at 12-15 per mil across banded veins, signifies an isotopically uniform fluid reservoir, a fluid-dominated system in the hydrofracture conduits, and a small temperature span over which veins precipitated. Hydrothermal solutions transporting gold were isotopically characterized by δ18O consistent with a metamorphic or magmatic fluid reservoir. Carbon isotope values in carbonate gangue indicate that the carbon may have been derived from mixtures of various possible carbon reservoirs. Gold-bearing vein systems and their immediate wall rocks are characterized by additions of SiO2 and CO2, along with K and the other alkali metals. The ubiquitous gangue carbonate minerals is indigenous to the hydrothermal fluids. The REE appear to behave isochemically at the lowest states of alternation, but significant mobility of the heavy REE occurs at the highest intensities of alteration. It is suggested that rift environments, with high heat fluxes, are appropriate for efficient gold concentration. The Archaean lode gold deposits formed late in the development of greenstone belts

  20. Cellular automata-based artificial life system of horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-xin Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutation and natural selection is the core of Darwin's idea about evolution. Many algorithms and models are based on this idea. However, in the evolution of prokaryotes, more and more researches have indicated that horizontal gene transfer (HGT would be much more important and universal than the authors had imagined. Owing to this mechanism, the prokaryotes not only become adaptable in nearly any environment on Earth, but also form a global genetic bank and a super communication network with all the genes of the prokaryotic world. Under this background, they present a novel cellular automata model general gene transfer to simulate and study the vertical gene transfer and HGT in the prokaryotes. At the same time, they use Schrodinger's life theory to formulate some evaluation indices and to discuss the intelligence and cognition of prokaryotes which is derived from HGT.

  1. Modeling of the competition life cycle using the software complex of cellular automata PyCAlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, D. B.; Beklemishev, K. A.; Medvedev, A. N.; Medvedeva, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a numerical model of the life cycle of competition on the basis of software complex cellular automata PyCAlab. The model is based on the general patterns of growth of various systems in resource-limited settings. At examples it is shown that the period of transition from an unlimited growth of the market agents to the stage of competitive growth takes quite a long time and may be characterized as monotonic. During this period two main strategies of competitive selection coexist: 1) capture of maximum market space with any reasonable costs; 2) saving by reducing costs. The obtained results allow concluding that the competitive strategies of companies must combine two mentioned types of behavior, and this issue needs to be given adequate attention in the academic literature on management. The created numerical model may be used for market research when developing of the strategies for promotion of new goods and services.

  2. Stylized Facts Generated Through Cellular Automata Models. Case of Study: The Game of Life

    CERN Document Server

    Coronel-Brizio, H F; Rodriguez-Achach, M E; Stevens-Ramirez, G A

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, a geometrical method to generate a two dimensional random walk by means of a bidimensional Cellular Automaton is presented. We illustrate it by means of Conway's Game of Life with periodical borders, with a large lattice of 3000 x 3000 cells. The obtained random walk is of character anomalous, and its projection to a one dimensional random walk is analyzed, showing that it presents some statistical properties similar to the so-called stylized facts observed in financial time series. We consider that the procedure presented here is important not only because of its simplicity, but also because it could help us to understand and shed light on the stylized facts formation mechanism.

  3. A general allometric and life-history model for cellular differentiation in the transition to multicellularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    The transition from unicellular, to colonial, to larger multicellular organisms has benefits, costs, and requirements. Here we present a model inspired by the volvocine green algae that explains the dynamics involved in the unicellular-multicellular transition using life-history theory and allometry. We model the two fitness components (fecundity and viability) and compare the fitness of hypothetical colonies of different sizes with varying degrees of cellular differentiation to understand the general principles that underlie the evolution of multicellularity. We argue that germ-soma separation may have evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. The model shows that the cost of investing in soma decreases with size. For lineages such as the Volvocales, as reproduction costs increase with size for undifferentiated colonies, soma specialization benefits the colony indirectly by decreasing such costs and directly by helping reproductive cells acquire resources for their metabolic needs. Germ specialization is favored once soma evolves and takes care of vegetative functions. To illustrate the model, we use some allometric relationships measured in Volvocales. Our analysis shows that the cost of reproducing an increasingly larger group has likely played an important role in the transition to multicellularity and cellular differentiation. PMID:23448886

  4. Early-life Stress Impacts the Developing Hippocampus and Primes Seizure Occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tung eHuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures and an increase in epileptogenesis. This article reviews the cellular and molecular changes encountered during prenatal and postnatal stress, and assesses the possible link between these changes and increases in seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus. In addititon, the priming effect of prenatal and postnatal stress for seizures and epileptogenesis is discussed. Finally, the roles of epigenetic modifications in hippocampus and HPA axis programming, early-life stress, and epilepsy are discussed.

  5. Ocean warming alters cellular metabolism and induces mortality in fish early life stages: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, D; Araújo, J E; Vitorino, R; Capelo, J L; Vinagre, C; Diniz, M S

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has pervasive effects on marine ecosystems, altering biodiversity patterns, abundance and distribution of species, biological interactions, phenology, and organisms' physiology, performance and fitness. Fish early life stages have narrow thermal windows and are thus more vulnerable to further changes in water temperature. The aim of this study was to address the sensitivity and underlying molecular changes of larvae of a key fisheries species, the sea bream Sparus aurata, towards ocean warming. Larvae were exposed to three temperatures: 18°C (control), 24°C (warm) and 30°C (heat wave) for seven days. At the end of the assay, i) survival curves were plotted for each temperature treatment and ii) entire larvae were collected for proteomic analysis via 2D gel electrophoresis, image analysis and mass spectrometry. Survival decreased with increasing temperature, with no larvae surviving at 30°C. Therefore, proteomic analysis was only carried out for 18°C and 24°C. Larvae up-regulated protein folding and degradation, cytoskeletal re-organization, transcriptional regulation and the growth hormone while mostly down-regulating cargo transporting and porphyrin metabolism upon exposure to heat stress. No changes were detected in proteins related to energetic metabolism suggesting that larval fish may not have the energetic plasticity needed to sustain cellular protection in the long-term. These results indicate that despite proteome modulation, S. aurata larvae do not seem able to fully acclimate to higher temperatures as shown by the low survival rates. Consequently, elevated temperatures seem to have bottleneck effects during fish early life stages, and future ocean warming can potentially compromise recruitment's success of key fisheries species. PMID:27062348

  6. Komatiites reveal a hydrous Archaean deep-mantle reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Alexander V; Asafov, Evgeny V; Gurenko, Andrey A; Arndt, Nicholas T; Batanova, Valentina G; Portnyagin, Maxim V; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Krasheninnikov, Stepan P

    2016-03-31

    Archaean komatiites (ultramafic lavas) result from melting under extreme conditions of the Earth's mantle. Their chemical compositions evoke very high eruption temperatures, up to 1,600 degrees Celsius, which suggests even higher temperatures in their mantle source. This message is clouded, however, by uncertainty about the water content in komatiite magmas. One school of thought holds that komatiites were essentially dry and originated in mantle plumes while another argues that these magmas contained several per cent water, which drastically reduced their eruption temperature and links them to subduction processes. Here we report measurements of the content of water and other volatile components, and of major and trace elements in melt inclusions in exceptionally magnesian olivine (up to 94.5 mole per cent forsterite). This information provides direct estimates of the composition and crystallization temperature of the parental melts of Archaean komatiites. We show that the parental melt for 2.7-billion-year-old komatiites from the Abitibi greenstone belt in Canada contained 30 per cent magnesium oxide and 0.6 per cent water by weight, and was depleted in highly incompatible elements. This melt began to crystallize at around 1,530 degrees Celsius at shallow depth and under reducing conditions, and it evolved via fractional crystallization of olivine, accompanied by minor crustal assimilation. As its major- and trace-element composition and low oxygen fugacities are inconsistent with a subduction setting, we propose that its high H2O/Ce ratio (over 6,000) resulted from entrainment into the komatiite source of hydrous material from the mantle transition zone. These results confirm a plume origin for komatiites and high Archaean mantle temperatures, and evoke a hydrous reservoir in the deep mantle early in Earth's history. PMID:27029278

  7. Komatiites reveal a hydrous Archaean deep-mantle reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Alexander V.; Asafov, Evgeny V.; Gurenko, Andrey A.; Arndt, Nicholas T.; Batanova, Valentina G.; Portnyagin, Maxim V.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Krasheninnikov, Stepan P.

    2016-03-01

    Archaean komatiites (ultramafic lavas) result from melting under extreme conditions of the Earth’s mantle. Their chemical compositions evoke very high eruption temperatures, up to 1,600 degrees Celsius, which suggests even higher temperatures in their mantle source. This message is clouded, however, by uncertainty about the water content in komatiite magmas. One school of thought holds that komatiites were essentially dry and originated in mantle plumes while another argues that these magmas contained several per cent water, which drastically reduced their eruption temperature and links them to subduction processes. Here we report measurements of the content of water and other volatile components, and of major and trace elements in melt inclusions in exceptionally magnesian olivine (up to 94.5 mole per cent forsterite). This information provides direct estimates of the composition and crystallization temperature of the parental melts of Archaean komatiites. We show that the parental melt for 2.7-billion-year-old komatiites from the Abitibi greenstone belt in Canada contained 30 per cent magnesium oxide and 0.6 per cent water by weight, and was depleted in highly incompatible elements. This melt began to crystallize at around 1,530 degrees Celsius at shallow depth and under reducing conditions, and it evolved via fractional crystallization of olivine, accompanied by minor crustal assimilation. As its major- and trace-element composition and low oxygen fugacities are inconsistent with a subduction setting, we propose that its high H2O/Ce ratio (over 6,000) resulted from entrainment into the komatiite source of hydrous material from the mantle transition zone. These results confirm a plume origin for komatiites and high Archaean mantle temperatures, and evoke a hydrous reservoir in the deep mantle early in Earth’s history.

  8. Life under Climate Change Scenarios: Sea Urchins’ Cellular Mechanisms for Reproductive Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Bögner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Acidification (OA represents a major field of research and increased efforts are being made to elucidate its repercussions on biota. Species survival is ensured by successful reproduction, which may be threatened under detrimental environmental conditions, such as OA acting in synergy with other climate change related stressors. Achieving successful gametogenesis, fertilization, and the development of larvae into healthy juveniles and adults is crucial for the perpetuation of species and, thus, ecosystems’ functionality. The considerable vulnerability of the abovementioned developmental stages to the adverse conditions that future OA may impose has been shown in many species, including sea urchins which are commonly used due to the feasibility of their maintenance in captivity and the great amount of gametes that a mature adult is able to produce. In the present review, the latest knowledge about the impact of OA on various stages of the life cycle of sea urchins is summarized with remarks on the possible impact of other stressors. The cellular physiology of the gametes before, at fertilization and, at early development, is extensively described with a focus on the complex enzymatic machinery and the intracellular pH (pHi and Ca2+ homeostasis for their vulnerability when facing adverse conditions such as acidification, temperature variations, or hypoxia.

  9. A Field Trip to the Archaean in Search of Darwin’s Warm Little Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Damer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Charles Darwin’s original intuition that life began in a “warm little pond” has for the last three decades been eclipsed by a focus on marine hydrothermal vents as a venue for abiogenesis. However, thermodynamic barriers to polymerization of key molecular building blocks and the difficulty of forming stable membranous compartments in seawater suggest that Darwin’s original insight should be reconsidered. I will introduce the terrestrial origin of life hypothesis, which combines field observations and laboratory results to provide a novel and testable model in which life begins as protocells assembling in inland fresh water hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal fields are associated with volcanic landmasses resembling Hawaii and Iceland today and could plausibly have existed on similar land masses rising out of Earth’s first oceans. I will report on a field trip to the living and ancient stromatolite fossil localities of Western Australia, which provided key insights into how life may have emerged in Archaean, fluctuating fresh water hydrothermal pools, geological evidence for which has recently been discovered. Laboratory experimentation and fieldwork are providing mounting evidence that such sites have properties that are conducive to polymerization reactions and generation of membrane-bounded protocells. I will build on the previously developed coupled phases scenario, unifying the chemical and geological frameworks and proposing that a hydrogel of stable, communally supported protocells will emerge as a candidate Woese progenote, the distant common ancestor of microbial communities so abundant in the earliest fossil record.

  10. Using a Virtual Tissue Culture System to Assist Students in Understanding Life at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauglin, Jacqueline S.; Seaquist, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In every biology course ever taught in the nation's classrooms, and in every biology book ever published, students are taught about the "cell." The cell is as fundamental to biology as the atom is to chemistry. Truly, everything an organism does occurs fundamentally at the cellular level. Beyond memorizing the cellular definition, students are not…

  11. Conway's game of life is a near-critical metastable state in the multiverse of cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Kinouchi, Osame

    2014-05-01

    Conway's cellular automaton Game of Life has been conjectured to be a critical (or quasicritical) dynamical system. This criticality is generally seen as a continuous order-disorder transition in cellular automata (CA) rule space. Life's mean-field return map predicts an absorbing vacuum phase (ρ =0) and an active phase density, with ρ =0.37, which contrasts with Life's absorbing states in a square lattice, which have a stationary density of ρ2D≈0.03. Here, we study and classify mean-field maps for 6144 outer-totalistic CA and compare them with the corresponding behavior found in the square lattice. We show that the single-site mean-field approach gives qualitative (and even quantitative) predictions for most of them. The transition region in rule space seems to correspond to a nonequilibrium discontinuous absorbing phase transition instead of a continuous order-disorder one. We claim that Life is a quasicritical nucleation process where vacuum phase domains invade the alive phase. Therefore, Life is not at the "border of chaos," but thrives on the "border of extinction."

  12. Stable isotope composition and volume of Early Archaean oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    low-δ18O values of Precambrian sedimentary cherts and carbonates are not a consequence of isotope variability of seawater or extreme ocean temperatures [3,4], but rather are due to isotopic exchange with shallow hydrothermal fluids on the ocean floor or during diagenesis [5]. [1] Lécuyer et al. (1998......Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of seawater are controlled by volatile fluxes between mantle, lithospheric (oceanic and continental crust) and atmospheric reservoirs. Throughout geologic time oxygen was likely conserved within these Earth system reservoirs, but hydrogen was not, as it can...... escape to space [1]. Hydrogen isotope ratios of serpentinites from the ~3.8Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt in West Greenland are between -53 and -99‰; the highest values are in antigorite ± lizardite serpentinites from a low-strain lithologic domain where hydrothermal reaction of Archaean seawater with oceanic...

  13. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    OpenAIRE

    Indrikis KRAMS, Janīna DAUKŠTE, Inese KIVLENIECE, Ants KAASIK, Tatjana KRAMA, Todd M. REEBERG, Markus J. RANTALA

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation is a nonspecific, cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens. During this immune reaction, haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object, often consisting of melanized cells. The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species, which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells. In this study we tested whe...

  14. Geodynamic evolution of the West and Central Pilbara Craton in Western Australia : a mid-Archaean active continental margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Archaean era lasted for about one third of the Earth's history, from ca 4.0 until 2.5 billion years ago. Because the Archaean spans such a long time, knowledge about this era is for understanding the evolution of the Earth until the present day, especially because it is the time offormation of m

  15. Motherhood alters the cellular response to estrogens in the hippocampus later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barha, Cindy K; Galea, Liisa A M

    2011-11-01

    Although controversial, estrogen replacement therapy has been implicated as a possible therapeutic agent for ameliorating age-related cognitive decline in postmenopausal women. We have shown previously that different types of estrogen promote hippocampal neurogenesis in a dose-dependent manner in young adult female rats. However, previous studies have not found a beneficial effect of 17β-estradiol in middle-aged female rats. The aim of the present study was to determine the acute effects of 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol, and estrone on hippocampal cell proliferation in middle-aged ovariectomized female rats and to determine whether effects are dependent on previous reproductive experience. Middle-aged multiparous female rats or age-matched virgin female rats were injected subcutaneously with vehicle or 10 μg dose of 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol, or estrone, and then given BrdU 30 min later and perfused 24h later to assess cell proliferation. All estrogens significantly upregulated cell proliferation in the hippocampus in middle-aged multiparous females but none of the estrogens upregulated cell proliferation in the middle-aged virgins. Therefore, previous reproductive experience may make the older brain more responsive to estrogens later in life. We also found that 17α-estradiol upregulated cell proliferation to a greater degree than the other estrogens in the multiparous females. Together these findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic advances in the treatment of symptoms associated with menopause in women. PMID:20034703

  16. Early-Life Stress Perturbs Key Cellular Programs in the Developing Mouse Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Lacher, Richard K; Abbott, Thomas; Chung, Lisa; Colangelo, Christopher M; Kaffman, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting reports are available with regard to the effects of childhood abuse and neglect on hippocampal function in children. While earlier imaging studies and some animal work have suggested that the effects of early-life stress (ELS) manifest only in adulthood, more recent studies have documented impaired hippocampal function in maltreated children and adolescents. Additional work using animal modes is needed to clarify the effects of ELS on hippocampal development. In this regard, genomic, proteomic, and molecular tools uniquely available in the mouse make it a particularly attractive model system to study this issue. However, very little work has been done so far to characterize the effects of ELS on hippocampal development in the mouse. To address this issue, we examined the effects of brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of ELS that impairs hippocampal-dependent memory in adulthood, on hippocampal development in 28-day-old juvenile mice. This age was chosen because it corresponds to the developmental period in which human imaging studies have revealed abnormal hippocampal development in maltreated children. Exposure to BDS caused a significant decrease in the total protein content of synaptosomes harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day-old male and female mice, suggesting that BDS impairs normal synaptic development in the juvenile hippocampus. Using a novel liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) assay, we found decreased expression of many synaptic proteins, as well as proteins involved in axonal growth, myelination, and mitochondrial activity. Golgi staining in 28-day-old BDS mice showed an increase in the number of immature and abnormally shaped spines and a decrease in the number of mature spines in CA1 neurons, consistent with defects in synaptic maturation and synaptic pruning at this age. In 14-day-old pups, BDS deceased the expression of proteins involved in axonal growth and myelination, but did not

  17. Impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on quality of life and cellular immunity changes in patients with digestive tract cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Ling Zhou; Wang-Gang Zhang; Yong-Chang Wei; Kang-Ling Xu; Ling-Yun Hui; Xu-Sheng Wang; Ming-Zhong Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A study was performed to investigate the impact of comorbid anxiety and depression (CAD) on quality of life (QOL) and cellular immunity changes in patients with digestive tract cancers.METHODS: One hundred and fifty-six cases of both sexes with cancers of the digestive tract admitted between March 2001 and February 2004 in the Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University were randomly enrolled in the study. Depressive and anxiety disorder diagnoses were assessed by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-Ⅳ. All adult patients were evaluated with the Hamilton depressive scale (HAMD, the 24-item version), the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAMA, a modified 14-item version), quality of life questionnaire-core 30 (QLQ-C30), social support rating scale (SSRS), simple coping style questionnaire (SCSQ), and other questionnaires, respectively. In terms of HAMD ≥ 20 and HAMA ≥ 14, the patients were categorized, including CAD (n = 31) in group A, anxiety disorder (n = 23) in group B,depressive disorder (n = 37) in group C, and non-disorder (n = 65) in group D. Immunological parameters such as T-lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cell activities in peripheral blood were determined and compared among the four groups.RESULTS: The incidence of CAD was 21.15% in patients with digestive tract cancers. The average scores of social support was 43.67±7.05 for 156 cases, active coping 20.34±7.33, and passive coping 9.55±5.51. Compared with group D, subjective support was enhanced slightly in group A, but social support, objective support, and utilization of support reduced, especially utilization of support with significance (6.16 vs 7.80, P<0.05); total scores of active coping decreased, while passive coping reversed; granulocytes proliferated, monocytes declined,and lymphocytes declined significantly (32.87 vs 34.00,P<0.05); moreover, the percentage of CD3, CD4, CD8and CD56 in T lymphocyte subsets was in lower

  18. Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, Franco

    1998-01-01

    An introduction to cellular automata (both deterministic and probabilistic) with examples. Definition of deterministic automata, dynamical properties, damage spreading and Lyapunov exponents; probabilistic automata and Markov processes, nonequilibrium phase transitions, directed percolation, diffusion; simulation techniques, mean field. Investigation themes: life, epidemics, forest fires, percolation, modeling of ecosystems and speciation. They represent my notes for the school "Dynamical Mod...

  19. Archaean crustal evolution in eastern Finland : New geochronological and geochemical constraints from the Kuhmo terrain and the Nurmes belt

    OpenAIRE

    KÀpyaho, Asko

    2007-01-01

    This thesis summarises the results of four original papers concerning U-Pb geochronology and geochemical evolution of Archaean rocks from the Kuhmo terrain and the Nurmes belt, eastern Finland. The study area belongs to a typical Archaean granite-greenstone terrain, composed of metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks in generally N-S trending greenstone belts as well as a granitoid-gneiss complex with intervening gneissic and migmatised supracrustal and plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on migmatite m...

  20. Ancient micrometeorites suggestive of an oxygen-rich Archaean upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Andrew G.; Bowlt, Lara; Genge, Matthew; Wilson, Siobhan A.; Brand, Helen E. A.; Wykes, Jeremy L.

    2016-05-01

    It is widely accepted that Earth’s early atmosphere contained less than 0.001 per cent of the present-day atmospheric oxygen (O2) level, until the Great Oxidation Event resulted in a major rise in O2 concentration about 2.4 billion years ago. There are multiple lines of evidence for low O2 concentrations on early Earth, but all previous observations relate to the composition of the lower atmosphere in the Archaean era; to date no method has been developed to sample the Archaean upper atmosphere. We have extracted fossil micrometeorites from limestone sedimentary rock that had accumulated slowly 2.7 billion years ago before being preserved in Australia’s Pilbara region. We propose that these micrometeorites formed when sand-sized particles entered Earth’s atmosphere and melted at altitudes of about 75 to 90 kilometres (given an atmospheric density similar to that of today). Here we show that the FeNi metal in the resulting cosmic spherules was oxidized while molten, and quench-crystallized to form spheres of interlocking dendritic crystals primarily of magnetite (Fe3O4), with wüstite (FeO)+metal preserved in a few particles. Our model of atmospheric micrometeorite oxidation suggests that Archaean upper-atmosphere oxygen concentrations may have been close to those of the present-day Earth, and that the ratio of oxygen to carbon monoxide was sufficiently high to prevent noticeable inhibition of oxidation by carbon monoxide. The anomalous sulfur isotope (Δ33S) signature of pyrite (FeS2) in seafloor sediments from this period, which requires an anoxic surface environment, implies that there may have been minimal mixing between the upper and lower atmosphere during the Archaean.

  1. Implications of a reducing and warm (not hot) Archaean ambient mantle for ancient element cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulbach, Sonja

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable uncertainty regarding the oxygen partial pressure (fO2) and potential temperature (TP) of the ambient convecting mantle throughout Earth's history. Rare Archaean eclogite suites have elemental and isotopic compositions indicative of formation of crustal protoliths in oceanic spreading ridges, hence unaffected by continental sources. These include some eclogite xenoliths derived from cratonic mantle lithosphere and orogenic eclogites marking the exhumation of oceanic crust at Pacific-type margins. Their compositions may retain a memory of the thermal and redox state of the Archaean convecting mantle sources that gave rise to their low-pressure protoliths. Archaean eclogites have TiO2-REE relationships consistent with fractional crystallisation of olivine±plagioclase and cpx during formation of picritic protoliths from a melt that separated from a garnet-free peridotite source, implying intersection of the solidus at ≤2.5 to 3.0 GPa [1]. Low melt fractions (Herzberg et al. (2010) Earth Planet Sci Lett 292; [3] Sizova et al. (2010) Lithos 116; [4] Rey&Coltice (2008) Geology 36; [5] Dasgupta (2013) RIMG 75; [6] Magni et al. (2014) G3 15; [7] Li&Lee (2004) EPSL 228; [8] Stagno et al. (2013) Nature 493; [9] Sverjensky et al. (2014) Nat Geosci 7; [10] Evans & Tomkins (2011) Earth Planet Sci Lett 308.

  2. Early tectonic history of the Marymia Inlier and correlation with the Archaean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Archaean granite-greenstone rocks of the Marymia Inlier outcrop within Proterozoic rocks forming the Capricorn Orogen. Five major deformation events are recognised in the rocks of the Plutonic Well and Baumgarten greenstone belts. The first two events were Late Archaean and synchronous with major epithermal gold mineralisation in the belts. Palaeoproterozoic extensional faulting was probably related to the early stages of the Capricorn Orogeny. The fourth event records a compressional phase of the Capricorn Orogeny associated with greenschist-facies metamorphism, whereas the last major event involved wrench faulting associated with minor folding. The Archaean tectonic history, rock types and timing of mineralisation strongly suggest that the Marymia Inlier is part of the Yilgarn Craton, and that each of the provinces in the craton experienced the same geological history since 2.72 Ga. The inlier is now interpreted to include two components, one is the eastern or northern extension of either the Narryer Terrane. Murchison Province or Southern Cross Province, and the other is the northwestern extension of the Eastern Goldfields Province. The Jenkin Fault, which was active in Proterozoic times, separates these two components. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Early tectonic history of the Marymia Inlier and correlation with the Archaean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagas, L. [Geological Survey of Western Australia, Perth, WA (Australia)

    1999-02-01

    The Archaean granite-greenstone rocks of the Marymia Inlier outcrop within Proterozoic rocks forming the Capricorn Orogen. Five major deformation events are recognised in the rocks of the Plutonic Well and Baumgarten greenstone belts. The first two events were Late Archaean and synchronous with major epithermal gold mineralisation in the belts. Palaeoproterozoic extensional faulting was probably related to the early stages of the Capricorn Orogeny. The fourth event records a compressional phase of the Capricorn Orogeny associated with greenschist-facies metamorphism, whereas the last major event involved wrench faulting associated with minor folding. The Archaean tectonic history, rock types and timing of mineralisation strongly suggest that the Marymia Inlier is part of the Yilgarn Craton, and that each of the provinces in the craton experienced the same geological history since 2.72 Ga. The inlier is now interpreted to include two components, one is the eastern or northern extension of either the Narryer Terrane. Murchison Province or Southern Cross Province, and the other is the northwestern extension of the Eastern Goldfields Province. The Jenkin Fault, which was active in Proterozoic times, separates these two components. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 38 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  4. New Rb-Sr age determinations on the Archaean basement of eastern Sierra Leone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Archaean basement of Sierra Leone is a typical example of granite-greenstone terrains found in ancient continental nuclei. Reconnaissance field mapping showed that the area can be subdivided into old gneiss, which predates the greenstone belts, and young granite which is later than the greenstone belts. New Rb-Sr whole-rock age determinations on two suites of old tonalitic gneiss yield ages of 2786 +- 49 Ma and 2770 +- 137 Ma, which either reflect the time of formation of the original tonalites or their metamorphism. Three new Rb-Sr whole-rock age determinations on young granites yield ages of 2786 +- 143 Ma, 2780 +- 79 Ma and 2770 +- 50 Ma, which are interpreted as the time of emplacement. The widespread occurrence of similar young granites, throughout the Archaean of West Africa, suggests that these results date a major event in the evolution of this segment of the crust. A published Pb-Pb age of the old gneiss and the new ages of the young granite bracket the age of the greenstone belts to 3000-2770 Ma. However, if the Rb-Sr ages of the old gneiss reported in this paper reflect the time of their formation, the age of the greenstone belts is tightly bracketed to ca. 2770 Ma. There is no isotopic evidence for rocks substantially older than 3000 Ma in the West African Archaean. (Auth.)

  5. Petrographic and mineragraphic investigations of the archaean gold placer at Mount Robert in the Pietersburg greenstone belt, Northern Transvaal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fossil gold placer on Mount Robert near Potgietersrus, northern Transvaal, occurs in the Uitkyk Formation. This formation consists of arenaceous rocks with interlayered conglomerates and shales, and occurs at the top of the Archaean Pietersburg Sequence which forms the Pietersburg greenstone belt. The host rock of the occurrence consists of conglomerates. Its fragments indicate that the provenance area consisted of acid porphyritic lava, chert, banded iron-formation, quartzite, basic lava, vein quartz, and shale. It is suggested that the Uitkyk sediments were transported over short distances and originated from the erosion of a greenstone terrane. The mineralogy of the ore is relatively simply and resembles that of the much younger Witwatersrand banket. Rounded allogenic and, to a lesser extent, idiomorphic to hypidiomorphic authigenic pyrite form the main constituents. Less abundant but genetically interesting ore minerals that have been found so far are leucoxene-rutile, chromite, molybdenite, zircon, carbonaceous matter, and brannerite. The Mount Robert occurrence can be regarded as a primitive forerunner of the Witwatersrand goldfield. Ineffective sedimentary enrichment processes and an environment unfavourable for life-forms that could have acted as biogenic gold and uranium concentrators are regarded as possible reasons for the low gold content and scarcity of uranium-bearing minerals in the investigated Uitkyk conglomerates

  6. Palaeoproterozoic prograde metasomatic-metamorphic overprint zones in Archaean tonalitic gneisses, eastern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajunen, M.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Several occurrences of coarse-grained kyanite rocks are exposed in the Archaean area of eastern Finland in zones trending predominantly northwest-southeast that crosscut all the Archaean structures and, locally, the Palaeoproterozoic metadiabase dykes, too. Their metamorphic history illustrates vividly Palaeoproterozoic reactivation of the Archaean craton. The early-stage kyanite rocks were formed within the framework of ductile shearing or by penetrative metasomatism in zones of mobile brecciation. Static-state coarse-grained mineral growth during the ongoing fluid activity covered the early foliated fabrics, and metasomatic zoning developed. The early-stage metasomatism was characterized by Si, Ca and alkali leaching. The late-stage structures are dilatational semi-brittle faults and fractures with unstrained, coarse-grained fabrics often formed by metasomatic reactions displaying Mg enrichment along grain boundaries. Metamorphism proceeded from the low-T early-stage Chl-Ms-Qtz, Ky/And-St, eventually leading to the high-T late-stage Crd-Sil assemblages. The thermal peak, at 600-620°C/4-5 kbar, of the process is dated to 1852+2 Ma (U-Pb on xenotime. Al-silicate growth successions in different locations record small variations in the Palaeoproterozoic clockwise P-T paths. Pressure decreased by c. 1 kbar between the early and late stage, i.e. some exhumation had occurred. Fluid composition also changed during the progression, from saline H2O to CO2, rich. Weak retrograde features of high-T phases indicate a rapid cooling stage and termination of fluid activity. The early-stage Ky-St assemblages resemble those described from nearby Palaeoproterozoic metasediments in the Kainuu and North Karelia Schist Belts, where the metamorphic peak was achieved late with respect to Palaeoproterozoic structures. The static Ky-St metamorphism in kyanite rocks was generated by fluid-induced leaching processes at elevated T during the post-orogenic stage after

  7. New isotopic and field evidence for the ages and distribution of Archaean rocks in east Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Precambrian shield of East Antarctica is composed of a number of recognised Archaean cratonic nuclei surrounded by Proterozoic metamorphic complexes. Poor exposure, inaccessibility and the effects of multiple tectonothermal overprints combine to confound the knowledge of the early history of these terranes. Against this, it is shown how recent advances in zircon geochronology allied with new petrological, geochemical and field observations have resulted in major revisions to the chronostratigraphy of several key areas, including Napier Complex of Enderby Land, Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group. 11 refs

  8. Archaean hydrothermal zircon in the Abitibi greenstone belt: Constraints on the timing of gold mineralisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal zircons have been found in Archaean mesothermal Au-veins and altered wallrock selvages at Val d'Or, in the Abitibi greenstone belt of Canada. The zircons are paragenetically associated with vein quartz, tourmaline, mica, carbonate, scheelite, pyrite, and gold. Zirconium mobility, and the consequent occurrence of hydrothermal zircon, may be associated with the intense tourmalinisation characteristic of Archaean gold deposits in this district. The SHRIMP ion-microprobe has been used to analyse hydrothermal zircons from four separate mines spatially associated with the Bourlamaque batholith, and has yieleded ages constraining formation of the Au-bearing vein systems to within 20 Ma of emplacement of the pluton. The ion microprobe data reveal multiple stages of hydrothermal zircon growth in the vein systems, contemporaneous with the regional metamorphic peak and late kinematic activity along regional structures. Younger (including Proterozoic) ages previously obtained for the veins, using other minerals and isotopic schemes, must reflect either alteration or renewed mineral growth during much later reactivation of fluids along the same structures up to 400 Ma after initial formation of the veins. (orig.)

  9. Structural and Metamorphic Evolution of the Archaean High-pressure Granulite in Datong-Huaian Area, North China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Archaean granulite terrain in the Datong-Huaian area, north China, comprises a basement complex of fe lsic and mafic granulite (TTG gneiss), overlain by a sedimentary sequence dominated by metapelite and metapsammite (khondalite series). Both lithological associations are separated by a tectonic

  10. Manganiferous minerals of the epidote group from the Archaean basement of West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katerinopoulou, Anna; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Kolb, Jochen;

    2014-01-01

    The chemical compositions and crystal structures of Mn3+-containing minerals from the epidote group in Greenland rocks are investigated and described in detail. They occur in hydrothermally altered Archaean mafic sequences within the gneissic complex of the North Atlantic craton of West Greenland....... The Mn-containing minerals have a characteristic red to pink colour. A detailed microchemical study shows a significant inter- and intra-sample variation in Mn content. The samples from different parageneses can be classified as Mn-bearing epidote and Mn-bearing clinozoisite. The intra......-sample variation in the content of Al, Fe and Mn is on a very fine scale, but still allows for identification of a negative correlation between Mn and Fe. Textures indicate different stages of growth. Crystal chemical data are compared with literature data and illustrate the basic systematic differences between...

  11. Oxidation state of iron in komatiitic melt inclusions indicates hot Archaean mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatiites are volcanic rocks mainly of Archaean age that formed by unusually high degrees of melting of mantle peridotite. Their origin is controversial and has been attributed to either anhydrous melting of anomalously hot mantle or hydrous melting at temperatures only modestly greater than those found today. Here we determine the original Fe3+/ΣFe ratio of 2.7-Gyr-old komatiitic magma from Belingwe, Zimbabwe, preserved as melt inclusions in olivine, to be 0.10 ± 0.02, using iron K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. This value is consistent with near-anhydrous melting of a source with a similar oxidation state to the source of present-day mid-ocean-ridge basalt. Furthermore, this low Fe3+/ΣFe value, together with a water content of only 0.2--0.3 wt%, excludes the possibility that the trapped melt contained significantly more water that was subsequently lost from the inclusions by reduction to H2 and diffusion. Loss of only 1.5 wt% water by this mechanism would have resulted in complete oxidation of iron (that is, the Fe3+/ΣFe ratio would be ∼1). There is also no petrographic evidence for the loss of molecular water. Our results support the identification of the Belingwe komatiite as a product of high mantle temperatures (∼1,700 C), rather than melting under hydrous conditions (3--5-wt% water), confirming the existence of anomalously hot mantle in the Archaean era.

  12. Radiometric ages and other isotopic data bearing on the evolution of Archaean crust and ores in the Kuhmo-Suomussalmi area, eastern Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Vaasjoki, M.; Taipale, K.; Tuokko, I.

    1999-01-01

    The Archaean greenstone-gneiss terrain in the Kuhmo-Suomussalmi district in eastern Finland has been isotopically studied in connection with regional bedrock mapping and local mineral exploration projects. The studies have aimed at testing correlations of lithologic units in partly poorly exposed areas, determining times of ore formation and obtaining ore genetic information in order to better understand the general evolution of the Archaean formations within the Fennoscandian Shield. Isotopi...

  13. Further Rb-Sr age and isotope data on early and late Archaean rocks from the Rhodesian craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-rock Rb-Sr age measurements are presented which supplement and extend published data from the Rhodesian Archaean craton of southern Africa and demonstrate that (a) the Shabani area gneisses, which form the basement to the ca. 2700-2800 Ma-old Belingwe greenstone belt succession, give an age of 3570+-60 Ma with an initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7000+-0.0005; (b) a suite of gneisses from the so-called Rhodesdale Batholith northeast of Que Que gives an age of 2760+-40 Ma with an initial ratio of 0.7015+-0.0002; (c) the Somabula tonalite pluton, which intrudes gneisses east of Shangani, gives an age of 2650+-40 Ma, with an initial ratio of 0.7012+-0.0001 (all errors at 1 sigma). The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios again demonstrate that Late Archaean granitic (sensu lato) rocks were not produced by reworking of similar rocks of Early Archaean age

  14. Archaean Crustal Growth, Proterozoic Terrane Amalgamation and the Pan-African Orogeny, as Recorded in the NE African Sedimentary Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najman, Y.; Fielding, L.; Millar, I.; Butterworth, P.; Andò, S.; Padoan, M.; Barfod, D. N.; Kneller, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cratons of Central Africa are formed of various blocks of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust, flanked or truncated by Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic orogenic belts. The geology of east Africa has largely been shaped by the events of the Pan-African Orogeny when east and west Gondwana collided to form 'Greater Gondwana' at the end of the Neoproterozoic. The Pan-African orogeny in NE Africa involved the collision of Archaean cratons and the Saharan Metacraton with the Arabian Nubian Shield, a terrane comprising Neoproterozoic juvenile oceanic island arcs. Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, eroded from the Pan-African orogenies, blanket much of NE Africa. Detrital data from these Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, and modern rivers draining both the cover the basement, provide a wealth of information on basement evolution, of particular relevance for regions where the basement itself is poorly exposed due to ancient or modern sedimentary cover. From samples collected in Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt, we provide combined U-Pb and Hf-isotope zircon, U-Pb rutile and Ar-Ar mica datasets, heavy mineral analyses, and bulk trace element data, from Archaean basement, Phanerozoic cover and modern river sediment from the Nile and its tributaries to document the evolution of the North African crust. The data document early crust-forming events in the Congo Craton and Sahara Metacraton, phased development of the Arabian Nubian Shield culminating in the Neoproterozoic assembly of Gondwana during the Pan African Orogeny, and the orogen's subsequent erosion, with deposition of voluminous Phanerozoic cover.

  15. Ion microprobe 207Pb/206Pb zircon ages for gneiss-granitoid rocks from Bundelkhand massif: evidence for Archaean components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometric 207Pb/206Pb ages of individual zircons from the Bundelkhand massif, central India, have been determined by an ion microprobe. Samples from various major litho-units, viz. the granite gneiss, hornblende-, biotite- and leuco-granitoid are included in this study. The results provide evidence for the presence of Archaean crustal components within this massif. Zircons with ages of 3.0 to 3.2 Ga occur as xenocrysts in a sample of granite gneiss from Lalitpur having a minimum formation age of 2.5 Ga. Another sample of a highly deformed gneiss from Babina has a well-defined age of 2.7 Ga. Emplacement of hornblende-granitoid and biotite-granitoid took place in quick succession at ∼ 2.5 Ga. No firm age for the youngest plutonic component, the leuco-granitoid, could be obtained due to poor recovery of zircons suitable for analysis. The geochronological data confirm the suggestion, based on geochemical studies, that the gneisses and the granitoids in this region represent Archaean and post-Archaean components respectively. (author)

  16. Percolation of diagenetic fluids in the Archaean basement of the Franceville basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouélé, Idalina Moubiya; Dudoignon, Patrick; Albani, Abderrazak El; Cuney, Michel; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Gauthier-Lafaye, François

    2014-01-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Franceville basin, Gabon, is mainly known for its high-grade uranium deposits, which are the only ones known to act as natural nuclear fission reactors. Previous work in the Kiéné region investigated the nature of the fluids responsible for these natural nuclear reactors. The present work focuses on the top of the Archaean granitic basement, specifically, to identify and date the successive alteration events that affected this basement just below the unconformity separating it from the Palaeoproterozoic basin. Core from four drill holes crosscutting the basin-basement unconformity have been studied. Dating is based on U-Pb isotopic analyses performed on monazite. The origin of fluids is discussed from the study of fluid inclusion planes (FIP) in quartz from basement granitoids. From the deepest part of the drill holes to the unconformable boundary with the basin, propylitic alteration assemblages are progressively replaced by illite and locally by a phengite + Fe chlorite ± Fe oxide assemblage. Illitic alteration is particularly strong along the sediment-granitoid contact and is associated with quartz dissolution. It was followed by calcite and anhydrite precipitation as fracture fillings. U-Pb isotopic dating outlines three successive events: a 3.0-2.9-Ga primary magmatic event, a 2.6-Ga propylitic alteration and a late 1.9-Ga diagenetic event. Fluid inclusion microthermometry suggests the circulation of three types of fluids: (1) a Na-Ca-rich diagenetic brine, (2) a moderately saline (diagenetic + meteoric) fluid, and (3) a low-salinity fluid of probable meteoric origin. These fluids are similar to those previously identified within the overlying sedimentary rocks of the Franceville basin. Overall, the data collected in this study show that the Proterozoic-Archaean unconformity has operated as a major flow corridor for fluids circulation, around 1.9 Ga. highly saline diagenetic brines; hydrocarbon-rich fluids derived from organic matter

  17. The Archaean Granny Smith gold deposit, western Australia: age and Pb-isotope tracer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Granny Smith gold deposits are situated within a greenstone sequence in the Laverton-Leonora area of the Northeastern Goldfields Province of the Archaean Yilgarn Block, Western Australia. The greenstone sequence (U-Pb zircon age of 2677±6 Ma, felsic pyroclastic rock) was intruded by the Granny Smith Granodiorite at 2665±4 Ma. Gold mineralisation is located along a reactivated N-S Stricking, thrust which wraps around the granitoid intrusion, and within the granitoid intrusion. Initial lead-isotope compositions of the Granny Smith Granodiorite and ore-fluid Pb, estimated from K-feldspar and galena and lead tellurides, respectively, are slightly different. Calculations based on Pb isotope data for the host rocks, and the U-Pb zircon age of the Granny Smith Granodiorite, suggest that ore-fluid Pb was derived from a source with a similar initial lead-isotopic composition to the source of the Granny Smith Granodiorite but about 30 million years after the intrusion of the granitoid. The Pb-isotope data for granitoids of the Northeastern Goldfields fall in a distinct field different to that of the granitoids of the Norseman area and those from Kambalda to Menzies. (authors)

  18. Regional MT survey across an archaean craton in south Australia. Influence of sedimentary basins and plate boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Long-period MT data at more than 200 stations have been collected across the Late Archaean - Early Proterozoic Gawler Craton, South Australia, during numerous field campaigns between 2002 and 2009. The total site coverage spans an area of approximately 800x500 km providing a unique dataset to image one of the oldest cratons in the world. The Gawler Craton is known for its mineral exploration potential, i.e. the IOCG Olympic Dam deposit (Heinson et al, 2006). MT data can help constrain the position of lithospheric structures which could provide clues to the genesis of mineral deposits throughout the region. Moreover, large parts of the craton are covered with sediments ranging from tens to thousands of meters in thickness. The sedimentary basins have a significant influence on the MT responses and if not taken into account can lead to erroneous results in a smooth inversion scheme due to their high conductances. We present 3D inversion models using a subset of sites in the period range of 10-10000s in order to image the subsurface resistivity distribution of the Gawler Craton. Initial 2D and 3D inversions of a subset of MT sites indicates an electrically resistive Archaean core. The thick sedimentary basins surrounding most of the Gawler Craton are taken into account by using starting models with the basins included as a priori information. Together with the inclusion of bathymetry data of the Southern Sea the inverse procedure has more constraints and is able to produce better results than an unconstrained inversion. The results provide additional constrains to the understanding of the evolution of the Archaean-Proterozoic Gawler Craton by imaging the crust and upper mantle. Tectonic models are largely based on limited outcrop due to thick regolith cover and domain boundaries inferred from potential field data. These can now be validated with the use of large-scale MT modelling.

  19. Archaean atmospheric evolution: evidence from the Witwatersrand gold fields, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimmel, Hartwig E.

    2005-04-01

    The Witwatersrand gold fields in South Africa, the world's largest gold-producing province, play a pivotal role in the reconstruction of the Archaean atmosphere and hydrosphere. Past uncertainties on the genetic model for the gold caused confusion in the debate on Archaean palaeoenvironmental conditions. The majority of Witwatersrand gold occurs together with pyrite, uraninite and locally bitumen, on degradational surfaces of fluvial conglomerates that were laid down between 2.90 and 2.84 Ga in the Central Rand Basin. Although most of the gold appears as a precipitate within, or associated with, post-depositional hydrothermal phases and along microfractures, available microtextural, mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic data all indicate that this hydrothermal gold, analogous to some pyrite and uraninite, was derived from the local mobilisation of detrital particles. Some of the key pieces of evidence are a significant correlation of the gold, pyrite and uraninite with other heavy minerals as well as sedimentary lithofacies, local preservation of in-situ gold micronuggets and abundant rounded forms of pyrite and uraninite, compositional heterogeneity on a microscale of the gold as well as the rounded pyrite and uraninte, and radiometric age data that indicate an age of the gold, pyrite and uraninite that is older than the maximum age of deposition for the host sediment. None of these observations/data is compatible with any of the suggested hydrothermal models, in which auriferous fluids were introduced from an external source into the host rock succession after sediment deposition. In contrast, those arguments, used in favour of hydrothermal models, emphasise the microtextural position of most of the gold, which highlights the undisputed hydrothermal nature of that gold in its present position, but does not explain its ultimate source. Furthermore, the macro-scale setting of the stratiform ore deposits is in stark contrast to any known type of epigenetic

  20. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  1. The elusive Hadean enriched reservoir revealed by 142Nd deficits in Isua Archaean rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, Hanika; Boyet, Maud; Blichert-Toft, Janne; O'Neil, Jonathan; Rosing, Minik T; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-01

    The first indisputable evidence for very early differentiation of the silicate Earth came from the extinct (146)Sm-(142)Nd chronometer. (142)Nd excesses measured in 3.7-billion-year (Gyr)-old rocks from Isua (southwest Greenland) relative to modern terrestrial samples imply their derivation from a depleted mantle formed in the Hadean eon (about 4,570-4,000 Gyr ago). As dictated by mass balance, the differentiation event responsible for the formation of the Isua early-depleted reservoir must also have formed a complementary enriched component. However, considerable efforts to find early-enriched mantle components in Isua have so far been unsuccessful. Here we show that the signature of the Hadean enriched reservoir, complementary to the depleted reservoir in Isua, is recorded in 3.4-Gyr-old mafic dykes intruding into the Early Archaean rocks. Five out of seven dykes carry (142)Nd deficits compared to the terrestrial Nd standard, with three samples yielding resolvable deficits down to -10.6 parts per million. The enriched component that we report here could have been a mantle reservoir that differentiated owing to the crystallization of a magma ocean, or could represent a mafic proto-crust that separated from the mantle more than 4.47 Gyr ago. Our results testify to the existence of an enriched component in the Hadean, and may suggest that the southwest Greenland mantle preserved early-formed heterogeneities until at least 3.4 Gyr ago. PMID:23128231

  2. Free energy generation and transfers from Archaean hydrothermal vents to the first metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, E.; Kleidon, A.

    2010-12-01

    Dissipative structures are far from equilibrium systems which self - organize, maintaining a certain internal material order and require free energy in order to be conserved. From a geological point of view, thermal gradients were the most abundant sources of free energy on the early Earth. Here we demonstrate how chemical free energy can be produced by a geological process, serpentinization, associated to the electrochemical potential generation in off - axis hydrothermal vents. The basis for chemical free energy generation is the thermal gradient between the crust and the Archean ocean, which is enhanced by the release of latent heat during serpentinization. Power can be extracted from this thermal gradient to generate motion. The convective motion of heated, chemically reduced fluid produces a redox front when in contact with the acidic Archaean ocean, generating electrical energy to be used in chemical reactions. Further, in the presence of porous inorganic, heterogeneous matrices acting as catalysts, self - sustained reaction chains raised. The free energy thus available could be used to allow the possibility for the establishment of first organic auto - catalytic chains. Molecular evolutionary steps from acetyl CoA to RNA-cleavage gave then rise to the first proto-metabolic processes. We use simple models to calculate the maximum rates of power transfer from the thermal gradient to electric energy to estimate the maximum possible rate of chemical free energy generation by this process. The model also takes into account the heterogeneity of the mineral matrix and its capability to catalyze reactions and to adsorb molecules selectively. In conclusion, non equilibrium thermodynamics in combination with maximum power assumptions help us to determine the fundamental limits of how much chemical free energy can be generated from a geothermal heat flux, providing conditions for the emergence of metabolism.

  3. Evolution of the Gondwanaland Archaean Shield: ion microprobe zircon dating and southwestern Australia/Wilkes Land, Antartica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion microprobe has been used to study 207Pb/206Pb ages on 20μm-sized sites on single zircon grains from coastal rocks on either side of the rift in the Gondwanaland Archaean Shield between southwestern Australia and Wilkes Land, Antarctica. The ages on individual sites on zircon grains from a variety of rock types from southwestern Australia show a range from 1600 m.y. to about 3400 m.y., with an inverse dependence on the uranium abundance at each site. Ages of zircons from rocks from the Antartic region show a range from 1600 m.y. to 3100 m.y

  4. The gold content of some Archaean rocks and their possible relationship to epigenetic gold-quartz vein deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M.; Saager, R.

    1985-10-01

    Gold mineralization in Archaean granite-greenstone environments, especially gold-quartz veins, contributes considerably to the world's gold production. The formation of epigenetic gold mineralization in greenstone belts is generally explained by the metamorphic secretion theory. This theory is based on the assumption that the source of the gold may be komatiitic or tholeiitic lavas, pyritic chemical or clastic sediments and even granitic rocks from which, as a result of regional metamorphic overprinting, gold was extracted and concentrated in suitable structures. It has been shown that in proposed potential source rocks, gold is predominantly associated with sulfide minerals and thus relatively easily accessible to secretion and reconstitution processes. A large number of various rock types originating from granite-greenstone terranes of the Kaapvaal and the Rhodesian cratons were geochemically investigated, and the following ranges for gold determined: volcanic rocks (komatiitic and tholeiitic): 0.1 372 ppb granitic rocks of the basement: 0.3 7.8 ppb iron-rich chemical sediments: 1.0 667 ppb Statistical treatment of the data reveals that volcanic rocks as well as iron-rich chemical sediments are favorable sources for epigenetic gold mineralization formed by metamorphic secretion, while the granitic rocks make less suitable primary gold sources. This finding explains the close spatial relationship which is common between gold-quartz veins and greenstone belts. The conspicuous abundance of epigenetic gold mineralization in the Archaean, however, is attributed to the unique geologic and metamorphic history of the granite-greenstone terranes.

  5. Generation of continental crust in the northern part of the Borborema Province, northeastern Brazil, from Archaean to Neoproterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Zorano Sérgio; Kalsbeek, Feiko; Deng, Xiao-Dong; Frei, Robert; Kokfelt, Thomas Find; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Li, Jian-Wei; Pimentel, Márcio Martins; Galindo, Antonio Carlos

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the origin and evolution of the magmatic rocks in the area north of the Patos Lineament in the Borborema Province (BP). This northeastern segment of NE Brazil is composed of at least six different tectonic blocks with ages varying from late-Archaean to late-Palaeoproterozoic. Archaean rocks cover ca. 5% of the region. They were emplaced over a period of 700 Ma, with at least seven events of magma generation, at 3.41, 3.36, 3.25, 3.18, 3.12, 3.03, and 2.69 Ga. The rocks are subalkaline to slightly alkaline, with affinity to I- and M-type magmas; they follow trondhjemitic or potassium calc-alkaline differentiation trends. They have epsilon Nd(t) of +1.4 to -4.2 and negative anomalies for Ta-Nb, P and Ti, consistent with a convergent tectonic setting. Both subducted oceanic crust and upper mantle (depleted or metasomatised) served as sources of the magmas. After a time lapse of about 350 m y., large-scale emplacement of Paleoproterozoic units took place. These rocks cover about 50% of the region. Their geochemistry indicates juvenile magmatism with a minor contribution from crustal sources. These rocks also exhibit potassic calc-alkaline differentiation trends, again akin to I- and M-type magmas, and show negative anomalies for Ta-Nb, Ti and P. Depleted and metasomatised mantle, resulting from interaction with adakitic or trondhjemitic melts in a subduction zone setting, is interpreted to be the main source of the magmas, predominanting over crustal recycling. U-Pb ages indicate generation of plutonic rocks at 2.24-2.22 Ga (in some places at about 2.4-2.3 Ga) and 2.13-2.11 Ga, and andesitic volcanism at 2.15 Ga. Isotopic evidence indicates juvenile magmatism (epsilon Nd(t) of +2.9 to -2.9). After a time lapse of about 200 m y. a period of within-plate magmatic activity followed, with acidic volcanism (1.79 Ga) in Orós, granitic plutonism (1.74 Ga) in the Seridó region, anorthosites (1.70 Ga) and A-type granites (1.6 Ga) in the Transverse Zone

  6. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Archaean LCT pegmatite deposit Cattlin Creek, Ravensthorpe, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias; Dittrich, Thomas; Seifert, Thomas; Schulz, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The LCT (lithium-cesium-tantalum) pegmatite Cattlin Creek is located about 550 km ESE of Perth, Western Australia. The complex-type, rare-element pegmatite is hosted in metamorphic rocks of the Archaean Ravensthorpe greenstone belt, which constitutes of the southern edge of the Southern Cross Terranes of the Yilgarn Craton. The deposit is currently mined for both lithium and tantalum by Galaxy Resources Limited since 2010. The pegmatitic melt intruded in a weak structural zone of crossing thrust faults and formed several pegmatite sills, of which the surface nearest mineralized pegmatite body is up to 21 m thick. The Cattlin Creek pegmatite is characterized by an extreme fractionation that resulted in the enrichment of rare elements like Li, Cs, Rb, Sn and Ta, as well as the formation of a vertical zonation expressed by distinct mineral assemblages. The border zone comprises a fine-grained mineral assemblage consisting of albite, quartz, muscovite that merges into a medium-grained wall zone and pegmatitic-textured intermediate zones. Those zones are manifested by the occurrence of megacrystic spodumene crystals with grain sizes ranging from a couple of centimeters up to several metres. The core zone represents the most fractionated part of the pegmatite and consists of lepidolite, cleavelandite, and quartz. It also exhibits the highest concentrations of Cs (0.5 wt.%), Li (0.4 wt.%), Rb (3 wt.%), Ta (0.3 wt.%) and F (4 wt.%). This zone was probably formed in the very last crystallization stage of the pegmatite and its minerals replaced earlier crystallized mineral assemblages. Moreover, the core zone hosts subordinate extremely Cs-enriched (up to 13 wt.% Cs2O) mineral species of beryl. The chemical composition of this beryl resamples that of the extreme rare beryl-variety pezzotaite. Other observed subordinate, minor and accessory minerals comprise tourmaline, garnet, cassiterite, apatite, (mangano-) columbite, tantalite, microlite (Bi-bearing), gahnite, fluorite

  7. Electromagnetic mini arrays (EMMA project). 3D modeling/inversion for mantle conductivity in the Archaean of the Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, M. Yu.; Korja, T.; Pedersen, L. B.

    2009-04-01

    Two electromagnetic arrays are used in the EMMA project to study conductivity structure of the Archaean lithosphere in the Fennoscandian Shield. The first array was operated during almost one year, while the second one was running only during the summer time. Twelve 5-components magnetotelluric instruments with fluxgate magnetometers recorded simultaneously time variations of Earth's natural electromagnetic field at the sites separated by c. 30 km. To better control the source field and to obtain galvanic distortion free responses we have applied horizontal spatial gradient (HSG) technique to the data. The study area is highly inhomogeneous, thus classical HSG might give erroneous results. The method was extended to include anomalous field effects by implementing multivariate analysis. The HSG transfer functions were then used to control static shift distortions of apparent resistivities. During the BEAR experiment 1997-2002, the conductance map of entire Fennoscandia was assembled and finally converted into 3D volume resistivity model. We have used the model, refined it to get denser grid around measurement area and calculated MT transfer functions after 3D modeling. We have used trial-and-error method in order to further improve the model. The data set was also inverted using 3D code of Siripunvaraporn (2005). In the first stage we have used homogeneous halfspace as starting model for the inversion. In the next step we have used final 3D forward model as apriori model. The usage of apriori information significantly stabilizes the inverse solution, especially in case of a limited amount of data available. The results show that in the Archaean Domain a conductive layer is found in the upper/middle crust on contrary to previous results from other regions of the Archaean crust in the Fennoscandian Shield. Data also suggest enhanced conductivity at the depth of c. 100 km. Conductivity below the depth of 200-250 km is lower than that of the laboratory based estimates

  8. The origin of late archaean granitoids in the Sukuma land greenstone belt of northern Tanzania: Geochemical and isotopic constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granitoids intruding the late Archaean sequences of the Sukumaland Greenstone Belt of northern Tanzania belong to two distinct geochemical suites. Suite 1 is characterised by Na2O/K2O > 1 (1.04 - 4.67), high Sr/Y (56 - 204) and Ba/Rb ratios (6.1 - 27.1) and low Rb/Sr ratios (0.08 - 0.25). The rocks are enriched in Sr (405 - 1264 ppm) and depleted in Yb (0.17 - 0.93 ppm) and Rb (56 -132 ppm). On chondrite-normalised REE diagrams, the rocks display highly fractionated patterns characterised by relative LREE enrichment ((La/Yb)N = 23 - 128 and (Gd/Yb)N = 3.10- 8.54) and lower concentrations of the HREE (YbN = 0.80 - 4.45). On primitive mantle-normalised spidergrams, Nb and Ti, together with P and Y are depleted relative to adjacent elements. The major and trace element characteristics of Suite 1 are comparable to those of typical Archaean TTG suites and High Silica Adakites (HSA). Suite 2 granitoids are characterised by Na2O/K2O N = 15 -86 and (Gd/Yb)N = 1.73 - 6.74) and are characterised by higher concentrations of the HREE (YbN = 2.1 - 6.5). On primitive mantle-normalised spidergrams, Suite 2 samples, like those of Suite 1, show relative depletion in Th, Nb and Ti, together with P and Y relative to adjacent elements. Sm-Nd mean crustal residence ages for both suites are indistinguishable and range between 2470 and 2720 Ma with a mean of 2610 ± 35 Ma (2 SE), similar to the emplacement age of 2620 ± 40 Ma. The granitoids are interpreted to have formed by partial melting at the base of a late Archaean thickened sub-arc basaltic crust. Melting to form the Suite 1 granitoids occurred in the eclogite stability field whereas Suite 2 formed by melting at shallower depth in the garnet amphibolite stability field. (author)

  9. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  10. Geochemical evidence for subduction in the early Archaean from quartz-carbonate-fuchsite mineralization, Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    systems suggest that ore-forming metasomatic fluids are derived from subduction-related devolitilization reactions, implying that orogenic Au-deposits in Archaean and Proterozoic supracrustal rock suites are related to subduction-style plate tectonics beginning early in Earth history. Justification of...... this metasomatic-tectonic relationship requires that 1) Phanerozoic orogenic Au-deposits form in subduction-zone environments, and 2) the geochemical similarity of Precambrian orogenic deposits to their younger counterparts is the result of having the same petrogenetic origin. Hydrogen and oxygen......-tectonic origin with Phanerozoic orogenic deposits and that this type of metasomatism is a unique result of subduction-related processes. Fuchsite from the ISB has a δ18O and δD of 7.7 to 17.9‰ and -115 to -61‰, respectively. δ18O of quartz from the same rocks is between 10.3 and 18.6‰. Muscovite-quartz oxygen...

  11. First record of 1.2 Ga quartz dioritic magmatism in the Archaean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and its significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon dating. Pb-Nd isotope tracer studies and major, trace and rare-earth element analyses have identified, for the first time. a Mesoproterozoic (1.2 Ga) quartz diorite intrusion in the central part of the Archaean Yilgarn Craton. Western Australia The quartz diorite is characterised by intergrowths of quartz and plagioclase, having low A/CNK (0 8). low K2O (0.28 wt%), Ba (54 ppm), Rb (11 ppm), Sr (92 ppm), Pb (13 ppm), U (1.7 ppm) and Th (6 ppm) contents, high Nd (41 ppm), Sm (10.5 ppm), Zr (399 ppm). Nb (18.5 ppm). Y (57.5 ppm) and Sc (19 ppm) contents. a low Pb isotope two-stage model μ value (6.3), and a primitive initial eNd value (+3.4) at 1.2 Ga. It is interpreted that the 1.2 Ga quartz diorite was derived from a predominantly mantle source, with minor crustal contamination, possibly from the surrounding Archaean monzogranites or their source region, during magma ascent. The age (1215 ± 11 Ma) of the intrusion overlaps with the timing of a major continental collisional orogeny in the Albany-Fraser Orogen, about 400km south, and is broadly coeval with the diamond-bearing Argyle lamproites in the east Kimberley Block. This study extends the history of granitoid magmatism in the central craton by more than 1.0 billion years (2.6 to 1.2 Ga), and has implications for isotopic data interpretations of tectonothermal events in the craton. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Cellular resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  13. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  14. Structural observations and U-Pb mineral ages from igneous rocks at the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary in the Salahmi Schist Belt, central Finland: constraints on tectonic evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietikäinen, K.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The study area in Vieremä, central Finland, contains part of Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary. In the east, the area comprises Archaean gneiss and the Salahmi Schist Belt. The rocks of the schist belt are turbiditic metagreywackes, with well-preserved depositional structures, occurring as Proterozoic wedge-shaped blocks, and staurolite schists, the latter representing higher-strained and metamorphosed equivalents of the metagreywackes. In the west of the area there is an Archaean gneiss block, containing strongly elongated structures, and deformed Svecofennian supracrustal rocks, which are cut by deformed granitoids. These are juxtaposed with the schist belt. The boundaries of these tectonometamorphic blocks are narrow, highly strained mylonites and thrust zones. The metamorphic grade of the supracrustal rocks increases from east to west, the increase being stepwise across the mylonitic block boundaries. The rocks are more deformed from east to west with younger structures overprinting. In the staurolite schists of the Salahmi Schist Belt, the most prominent structure is a lineation (L2 that overprints the bedding and axial plane foliation. In Sorronmäki quarry, at the western boundary of the schist belt, this Palaeoproterozoic lineation dominates all the structures in tonalite gneiss, which gives a U-Pb age of 2731±6 Ma. Southeast of the quarry, at the same boundary, the Salahmi schists have been overturned towards the northeast, suggesting that the Archaean gneiss at Sorronmäki has been thrust towards the northeast over these rocks. In the western part of the study area, the Leppikangas granodiorite that intrudes the Svecofennian supracrustal rocks gives a U-Pb age of 1891+6 Ma. In the granodiorite, a strong lineation formed by the intersection of two foliations, which maybe L2 is associated with thrusting towards the northeast. The monazite age of the Archaean Sorronmäki gneiss is 1817+3 Ma, and the titanite age of the Svecofennian

  15. Effects of temperature, CO2/O2 concentrations and light intensity on cellular prolification of microalgae, eugrena gracilis, in aquatic food production of bioregenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Azuma, H.; Kiyota, M.

    Microalgae are likely to play an important role in aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative systems for producing feeds for fish, converting CO_2 to O_2 and remedying water quality as well as aquatic higher plants. In the present study, the effects of culture conditions on the cellular proliferation of microalgae, Eugrena gracilis, was investigated to determine the optimum culture conditions for microalgae production in aquatic food production modules including both microalgae culture and fish culture systems. E. gracilis was cultured under conditions with five levels of temperature (25-33°C), three levels of CO_2 concentration (2-6%), four levels of O_2 concentration (10-25%), and three levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (50-120 μmol m-2 s-1). The number of Eugrena cells in a certain volume of solution was monitored with a microscope under each environment. The multiplication rate of the cells was highest at temperatures of 29°C, 4% CO_2, 20% O_2 and 90 μmol m-2 s-1 PPFD. The results demonstrate that E. gracilis could efficiently produce biomass and convert CO_2 to O_2 under relatively low light intensities in aquatic food production modules.

  16. Failover in cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2010-01-01

    A cellular automata (CA) configuration is constructed that exhibits emergent failover. The configuration is based on standard Game of Life rules. Gliders and glider-guns form the core messaging structure in the configuration. The blinker is represented as the basic computational unit, and it is shown how it can be recreated in case of a failure. Stateless failover using primary-backup mechanism is demonstrated. The details of the CA components used in the configuration and its working are described, and a simulation of the complete configuration is also presented.

  17. Coupled Phases and Combinatorial Selection in Fluctuating Hydrothermal Pools: A Scenario to Guide Experimental Approaches to the Origin of Cellular Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Damer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal fields on the prebiotic Earth are candidate environments for biogenesis. We propose a model in which molecular systems driven by cycles of hydration and dehydration in such sites undergo chemical evolution in dehydrated films on mineral surfaces followed by encapsulation and combinatorial selection in a hydrated bulk phase. The dehydrated phase can consist of concentrated eutectic mixtures or multilamellar liquid crystalline matrices. Both conditions organize and concentrate potential monomers and thereby promote polymerization reactions that are driven by reduced water activity in the dehydrated phase. In the case of multilamellar lipid matrices, polymers that have been synthesized are captured in lipid vesicles upon rehydration to produce a variety of molecular systems. Each vesicle represents a protocell, an “experiment” in a natural version of combinatorial chemistry. Two kinds of selective processes can then occur. The first is a physical process in which relatively stable molecular systems will be preferentially selected. The second is a chemical process in which rare combinations of encapsulated polymers form systems capable of capturing energy and nutrients to undergo growth by catalyzed polymerization. Given continued cycling over extended time spans, such combinatorial processes will give rise to molecular systems having the fundamental properties of life.

  18. Embryonic life and human life.

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, M C

    1985-01-01

    A new human life comes into being not when there is mere cellular life in a human embryo, but when the newly developing body organs and systems begin to function as a whole, the author argues. This is symmetrical with the dealth of an existing human life, which occurs when its organs and systems have permanently ceased to function as a whole. Thus a new human life cannot begin until the development of a functioning brain which has begun to co-ordinate and organise the activities of the body a...

  19. Archaean fluid-assisted crustal cannibalism recorded by low δ18O and negative ɛHf(T) isotopic signatures of West Greenland granite zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiess, Joe; Bennett, Vickie C.; Nutman, Allen P.; Williams, Ian S.

    2011-06-01

    The role of fluids during Archaean intra-crustal magmatism has been investigated via integrated SHRIMP U-Pb, δ18O and LA-MC-ICPMS 176Hf isotopic zircon analysis. Six rock samples studied are all from the Nuuk region (southern West Greenland) including two ~3.69 Ga granitic and trondhjemitic gneisses, a 3.64 Ga granitic augen gneiss, a 2.82 Ga granodioritic Ikkattoq gneiss, a migmatite with late Neoarchaean neosome and a homogeneous granite of the 2.56 Ga Qôrqut Granite Complex (QGC). All zircon grains were thoroughly imaged to facilitate analysis of magmatic growth domains. Within the zircon analysed, there is no evidence for metamictization. Initial ɛHf zircon values ( n = 63) are largely sub-chondritic, indicating the granitic host magmas were generated by the remelting of older, un-radiogenic crustal components. Zircon from some granite samples displays more than one 207Pb/206Pb age, and correlated with 176Hf/177Hf compositions can trace multiple phases of remelting or recrystallization during the Archaean. Model ages calculated using Lu/Hf arrays for each sample indicate that the crustal parental rocks to the granites, granodiorites and trondhjemites segregated from a chondrite-like reservoir at an earlier time during the Archaean, corresponding to known formation periods of more primitive tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses. Zircon from the ~3.69 Ga granite, the migmatite and QGC granite contains Eoarchaean cores with chondritic 176Hf/177Hf and mantle-like δ18O compositions. The age and geochemical signatures from these inherited components are identical to those of surrounding tonalitic gneisses, further suggesting genesis of these granites by remelting of broadly tonalitic protoliths. Zircon oxygen isotopic compositions ( n = 62) over nine age populations (six igneous and three inherited) have weighted mean or mean δ18O values ranging from 5.8 ± 0.6 to 3.7 ± 0.5‰. The 3.64 Ga granitic augen gneiss sample displays the highest δ18O with

  20. Archaean greenstone belt tectonism and basin development: some insights from the Barberton and Pietersburg greenstone belts, Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Maarten J.

    The sediments in two of South Africa's major Archaean greenstone belts, the Barberton and Pietersburg greenstone belts, span an age range of some 800 million years. Both greenstone belts represent remnants of extensive fold and thrust belts with complex, but different polyphase tectonic histories. The oldest sediments were deposited between circa 3470 and 3490 M.a. on oceanic like crust preserved in the Barberton belt, possibly at the same time as sedimentation on similar oceanic crust preserved in the Pietersburg belt. Thereafter, the geologic evolution of these two belts diverged considerably. In the Barberton belt, there is clear evidence that the oceanic crust and sediments were obducted onto an intra-arc basin environment within 50 million years of its formation. The sequence was later further imbricated by northwest directed thrust stacking between 3300-3200 M.a. Basin development during both periods of thrusting took place in close proximity to active "calc-alkaline" arc systems. Deformation of the sediments within these basins took place while the same sediments were being deposited. Sedimentation took place predominantly in subaqueous environments, ranging from submarine mid-fans below the photic zone to tidal flats and deltaic plains. The sediments represent a polyhistory successor-type basin: early basins developed along a complex subduction related plate boundary; these basins later evolved into foreland depositories along and within collisional environments of an accretionary orogen. Late in the history of the Barberton greenstone belt (circa 3100 M.a.), the rocks were in places thermally reactivated and probably subjected to extensional processes; these processes overlapped in time with the main episodes of economic gold mineralization, and are of "early Witwatersrand-basin" age. The oceanic-like crust (including associated sediments) preserved in the Pietersburg belt was not significantly deformed until at least 500 million years after its formation

  1. Archaean tonalitic-trondhjemitic and granitic plutonism in the Gaviao block, Sao Francisco craton, Bahia, Brazil: geochemical and geochronological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The granitic-gneissic terranes of the Gaviao Block in the central-southern Sao Francisco Craton are a Key area to the understanding of the evolution of the South American Platform. The Archaean granitic-gneissic rocks are intimately associated with the Umburanas and Contendas Mirante greenstone belts. The metamorphic grades vary from greenschist to amphibolite facies. These rocks were intensely deformed and intruded by Paleoproterozoic granites. The main evolution of the Gaviao Block is market by the formation of granitoid nuclei during various episodes of TTG plutonism between 3.2 and 3.4 Ga. The TDM Sm-Nd model ages for these granitoids range from 3.2 and 3.6 Ga, indicating involvement of sialic crust in their genesis, in agreement with the εNd(t) values between -4.0 and -1.3. Between 3.1 and 2.5 Ga, the Gaviao Block was affected by volcanic and sedimentary activity associated with the formation of the Umburanas and Contendas Mirante greenstone belts, intruded by granites about 2.75 and 2.5 Ga ago. During the paleoproterozoic, the Gaviao Block was regionally deformed and metamorphosed, and intruded by granites between 2.1 and 1.9 Ga. During the mesoproterozoic, tectonic and metamorphic activity occurred between 1.2 and 1.0 Ga as suggested by resetting of Rb-Sr and K-Ar systematics. Finally, regional tectono-thermal overprints in the areas occurred during the Neoproterozoic. These episodes are accompanied by the intrusion of mafic dikes at about 0.9 Ga K-Ar ages given by biotites fall within the range 0.5-0.7 Ga and mark the end of the cratonization stage. (author)

  2. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  3. The amalgamation of the supercontinent of North China Craton at the end of Neo-Archaean and its breakup during late Palaeoproterozoic and Meso-Proterozoic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟明国; 卞爱国; 赵太平

    2000-01-01

    The most important geological events in the formation and evolution of the North China Craton concentrate at two stages: 2 600-2 400 Ma and 2 000-1 700 Ma (briefly, we call them 2.5 Ga event and 1.8 Ga event respectively in this paper). We propose that the essences of these two events are: Several Archaean micro-continents amalgamated to form one supercontinent according to the plate tectonic principle with a small scale at about 2.5 Ga, and the supercontinent broke down by upwelling of an ancient mantle plume at about 1.8 Ga.

  4. Asteroids and Archaean crustal evolution: Tests of possible genetic links between major mantle/crust melting events and clustered extraterrestrial bombardments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, A. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Since the oldest intact terrestrial rocks of ca. 4.0 Ga and oldest zircon xenocrysts of ca. 4.3 Ga measured to date overlap with the lunar late heavy bombardment, the early Precambrian record requires close reexamination vis a vis the effects of megaimpacts. The identification of microtektite-bearing horizons containing spinals of chondritic chemistry and Ir anomalies in 3.5-3.4-Ga greenstone belts provides the first direct evidence for large-scale Archaean impacts. The Archaean crustal record contains evidence for several major greenstone-granite-forming episodes where deep upwelling and adiabatic fusion of the mantle was accompanied by contemporaneous crustal anatexis. Isotopic age studies suggest evidence for principal age clusters about 3.5, 3.0, and 2.7 (+/- 0.8) Ga, relics of a ca. 3.8-Ga event, and several less well defined episodes. These peak events were accompanied and followed by protracted thermal fluctuations in intracrustal high-grade metamorphic zones. Interpretations of these events in terms of internal dynamics of the Earth are difficult to reconcile with the thermal behavior of silicate rheologies in a continuously convecting mantle regime. A triggering of these episodes by mantle rebound response to intermittent extraterrestrial asteroid impacts is supported by (1) identification of major Archaean impacts from microtektite and distal ejecta horizons marked by Ir anomalies; (2) geochemical and experimental evidence for mantle upwelling, possibly from levels as deep as the transition zone; and (3) catastrophic adiabatic melting required to generate peridotitic komatites. Episodic differentiation/accretion growth of sial consequent on these events is capable of resolving the volume problem that arises from comparisons between modern continental crust and the estimated sial produced by continuous two-stage mantle melting processes. The volume problem is exacerbated by projected high accretion rates under Archaean geotherms. It is suggested that

  5. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  6. The Archaean sanukitoid series of the Baltic Shield: geological setting, geochemical characteristics and implications for their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach-Zhuchenko, S. B.; Rollinson, H. R.; Chekulaev, V. P.; Arestova, N. A.; Kovalenko, A. V.; Ivanikov, V. V.; Guseva, N. S.; Sergeev, S. A.; Matukov, D. I.; Jarvis, K. E.

    2005-01-01

    Archaean high-Mg granitoids (sanukitoids) occur in the Karelian granite-greenstone terrain in the Baltic Shield in two distinct zones. In the west of the Shield sanukitoid intrusions formed between 2700 and 2720 Ma and consist of a single igneous phase that varies in composition from diorite to granite. In the Eastern part of the Shield, sanukitoid intrusions formed between 2730 and 2745 Ma and are strongly differentiated, varying in composition from ultramafic to felsic. All the sanukitoids are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREE: La≤80 ppm, Ce≤150 ppm, La N/Yb N≤30-40), Sr≤2000 ppm, Ba≤2500 ppm, P 2O 5≤1.5%, alkalis (Na 2O+K 2O=5-10%), possess high mg# values (0.50-0.65), and show a negative Nb-Ta anomaly. They are spatially and temporally related to syenite intrusions and lamprophyre dykes. Sanukitoid intrusions in the Western and Eastern zones differ in composition. In the west, they have higher SiO 2 (mainly>60%) and lower alkalis, Sr, Ba, LREE than in the Eastern zone intrusions. The most differentiated intrusion, the Panozero intrusion in the Eastern zone, was formed in two magmatic cycles separated by ductile deformation. In the first cycle, ultramafic to monzonitic rocks formed, whereas, in the second cycle, the magmas were monzodioritic to quartz monzonite. Ultramafic and mafic rocks make up about 10% of the outcrop and occur as enclaves in monzonites and monzodiorites, and, as dykes, implies a number of discrete magmatic events. All rocks of the Panozero intrusion have high K 2O, and the composition of the initial melt, calculated from the weighted average of the first cycle magmas is monzodiorite (SiO 2=52%, mg#=0.55, Na 2O+K 2O˜6%). The presence of magmatic hornblende and biotite, a high carbonate content, widely distributed explosive breccias and evidence of liquid immiscibility are consistent with a high H 2O-CO 2 content in the sanukitoid melt. The geodynamic model which most satisfactorily explains our geological and

  7. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characteri...

  8. Boundaries of life: estimating the life span of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, S.; Bounama, C.; von Bloh, W.

    We present a minimal model for the global carbon cycle of the Earth containing the reservoirs mantle ocean floor continental crust continental biosphere and the Kerogen as well as the aggregated reservoir ocean and atmosphere and obtain reasonable values for the present distribution of carbon in the surface reservoirs of the Earth The Earth system model for the long-term carbon cycle is specified by introducing three different types of biosphere prokaryotes eucaryotes and complex multicellular life They are characterized by different global temperature tolerance windows prokaryotes 2oC 100oC eucaryotes 5oC 45oC complex multicellular life 0oC 30oC From the Archaean to the future there always exists a prokaryotic biosphere 2 Gyr ago eucaryotic life first appears because the global surface temperature reaches the tolerance window for eucaryotes The emergence of complex multicellular life is connected with an explosive increase in biomass and a strong decrease in Cambrian global surface temperature at about 0 54 Gyr ago In the long-term future the three types of biosphere will die out in reverse sequence of their appearance For realistic values of the biotic enhancement of weathering there is no bistability in the future solutions for complex life Therefore complex organisms will not extinct by an implosion in comparison to the Cambrian explosion Eucaryotes and complex life become extinct because of too high surface temperatures in the future The ultimate life span of the biosphere is defined by the extinction of procaryotes in about 1 6 Gyr

  9. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafleva, Marina; Hoover, Richard; Rozanov, Alexei; Vrevskiy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Ancient Archean and Proterozoic rocks are the model objects for investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. The first of Archean fossil microorganisms from Baltic shield have been reported at the last SPIE Conference in 2005. Since this confeence biomorphic structures have been revealed in Archean rocks of Karelia. It was determined that there are 3 types of such bion structures: 1. structures found in situ, in other words microorganisms even-aged with rock matrix, that is real Archean fossils biomorphic structures, that is to say forms inhabited early formed rocks, and 3. younger than Archean-Protherozoic minerali microorganisms, that is later contamination. We made attempt to differentiate these 3 types of findings and tried to understand of burial of microorganisms. The structures belongs (from our point of view) to the first type, or real Archean, forms were under examination. Practical investigation of ancient microorganisms from Green-Stone-Belt of Northern Karelia turns to be very perspective. It shows that even in such ancient time as Archean ancient diverse world existed. Moreover probably such relatively highly organized cyanobacteria and perhaps eukaryotic formes existed in Archean world.

  10. Archaean associations of volcanics, granulites and eclogites of the Belomorian province, Fennoscandian Shield and its geodynamic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabunov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    An assembly of igneous (TTG-granitoids and S-type leucogranites and calc-alkaline-, tholeiite-, kometiite-, boninite- and adakite-series metavolcanics) and metamorphic (eclogite-, moderate-pressure (MP) granulite- and MP amphibolite-facies rocks) complexes, strikingly complete for Archaean structures, is preserved in the Belomorian province of the Fennoscandian Shield. At least four Meso-Neoarchaean different-aged (2.88-2.82; 2.81-2.78; ca. 2.75 and 2.735-2.72 Ga) calc-alkaline and adakitic subduction-type volcanics were identified as part of greenstone belts in the Belomorian province (Slabunov, 2008). 2.88-2.82 and ca. 2.78 Ga fore-arc type graywacke units were identified in this province too (Bibikova et al., 2001; Mil'kevich et al., 2007). Ca.2.7 Ga volcanics were generated in extension structures which arose upon the collapse of an orogen. The occurrence of basalt-komatiite complexes, formed in most greenstone belts in oceanic plateau settings under the influence of mantle plumes, shows the abundance of these rocks in subducting oceanic slabs. Multiple (2.82-2.79; 2.78-2.76; 2.73-2.72; 2.69-2.64 Ga) granulite-facies moderate-pressure metamorphic events were identified in the Belomorian province (Volodichev, 1990; Slabunov et al., 2006). The earliest (2.82-2.79 Ga) event is presumably associated with accretionary processes upon the formation of an old continental crust block. Two other events (2.78-2.76; 2.73-2.72 Ga) are understood as metamorphic processes in suprasubduction setting. Late locally active metamorphism is attributed to the emplacement of mafic intrusions upon orogen collapse. Three groups of crustal eclogites with different age were identified in the Belomorian province: Mesoarchaean (2.88-2.86 and 2.82-2.80 Ga) eclogites formed from MORB and oceanic plateau type basalts and oceanic high-Mg rocks (Mints et al., 2011; Shchipansky at al., 2012); Neoarchaean (2.72 Ga) eclogites formed from MORB and oceanic plateau type basalts. The formation of

  11. On the metamorphic history of an Archaean granitoid greenstone terrane, East Pilbara, Western Australia, using the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Age spectrum analyses of blue-green hornblendes from amphibolites from the Western Shaw Belt, East Pilbara, Western Australia, indicate an age of at least 3200 Ma for early regional metamorphism. Ages on hornblende and muscovite from the narrow contact zone with the adjacent Yule Batholith probably data updoming of the granitoid gneiss terranes at 2950 Ma. Hornblendes from within the Shaw Batholith and from a contact zone of a post-tectonic granitoid yield ages of 2840-2900 Ma, indicating either prolonged high temperatures within the granitoid gneiss terranes or a separate thermal pulse associated with the intrusion of post-tectonic granitoids. The preservation of very old hornblendes in a narrow greenstone belt surrounded by massive granitoid gneiss domes indicates that remarkable contrasts in metamorphic geotherms existed over short distances during the Late Archaean, suggesting that updoming occurred during a period of rapid tectonism. (orig.)

  12. The Archaean gold-telluride-sulphide and gold-telluride mineralisation of a multiple stage hydrothermal vein deposit at the Commoner Mine, Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Commoner Mine is situated on the western edge of the Midlands greenstone belt, 50 km west-southwest of Kadoma, Zimbabwe. Current geological interest in this deposit was initiated by the presence of coarse grained telluride minerals in ore exposed on 21 level in 1978. The deposit is a hydrothermal quartz-calcite vein. It was found that coarse grained gold-silver tellurides fill fractures which transect the telluride breccia. Comparison of the physical and mineralogical characteristics of the Commoner orebody with those of the Tertiary gold-telluride deposits of the Circum Pacific Belt and the Archaean deposits of Canada and Australia indicates that this mineralisation was probably deposited in a near-surface environment. It was found that the gold-telluride ores of the Commoner Mine display features characteristic of both plutonic-hydrothermal and volcanic-hydrothermal styles of telluride mineralisation

  13. Middle Archaean age of Sargur group by single grain zircon dating and geochemical evidence for the clastic origin of metaquartzite from J.C. Pura greenstone belt, Karnataka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Euhedral zircons from J.C. Pura metaquartzite were dated by single grain evaporation technique which yielded a Pb-Pb age of 3230 ± 5Ma. This date representing the maximum age of the Sargur metaquartzite is fully in accord with previous Sm-Nd model ages and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages (ca 3200 Ma) of Sargur rocks from nearby areas. The Sargur group is pervasively intruded by gneisses and granites around 3000 Ma. Still older gneisses seen in the neighbourhood such as the Gorur gneiss of 3300 Ma age may constitute a possible basement to the Sargur supracrustals and represent widespread early Archaean granitic crust of the Dharwar craton. (author). 45 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  14. Rapid development of the late Archaean Hutti schist belt, Northern Karnataka: implications of new field data and SHRIMP U/Pb zircon ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Palkanmardi conglomerate is one of many polymict conglomerates interbedded with greywackes in the NE of the Hutti schist belt. These conglomerates are up to a few metres thick, unsorted, and include rounded to sub-angular clasts of granodiorite, granite, vein quartz and metabasalt in a matrix of coarse- to medium-grained greywacke. Cross-bedding, convolute bedding and grading are well preserved in the interbedded greywackes in spite of deformation and hornfelsing during Late Archaean regional high temperature - low pressure metamorphism. These primary structures and lack of sorting in the conglomerates are consistent with deposition as turbidites and debrites in an unstable submarine environment. This new interpretation contrasts with previous views that the Palkanmardi conglomerate is autoclastic, pyroclastic-detrital or glacio-fluvial. The conglomerate-greywacke sequence occurs low in the lithostratigraphy and is overlain by metabasalts. A clast of granodiorite in the conglomerate bed at Palkanmardi village has yielded a SHRIMP weighted mean 207Pb/206Pb zircon age of 2576±12 Ma which is interpreted as the magmatic age of the erosional provenance. Moreover, SHRIMP zircon geochronology using a sample from the steep elongate wedge of granodiorite that extends for at least 150 km SE of the schist belt has yielded a weighted mean 207Pb/206Pb age of 2561±24 Ma and a concordia upper intercept age of 2580±31 Ma. These ages are indistinguishable within their errors and are interpreted as the age of magmatic crystallisation. Combined with the low stratigraphic position of the Palkanmardi conglomerate, the age data imply that basin development (volcanism and sedimentation) in the Hutti belt was not only rapid, but began very late in the Archaean history of this part of the Dharwar craton. (author)

  15. Directed Percolation arising in Stochastic Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Regnault, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Cellular automata are both seen as a model of computation and as tools to model real life systems. Historically they were studied under synchronous dynamics where all the cells of the system are updated at each time step. Meanwhile the question of probabilistic dynamics emerges: on the one hand, to develop cellular automata which are capable of reliable computation even when some random errors occur; on the other hand, because synchronous dynamics is not a reasonable assumption to simulate re...

  16. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characterized protein and DNA modifications, many RNA modifications are not essential for life. Instead, increasingly more evidence indicates that RNA modifications can play regulatory roles in cells, especially in response to stress conditions. In this Account, we review some known examples of RNA modifications that are dynamically controlled in cells and introduce some contemporary technologies and methods that enhance the studies of cellular dynamics of RNA modifications. Examples of RNA modifications discussed in this Account include (Figure 1): (1) 4-thio uridine (s4U) which can act as a cellular sensor of near UV-light; (2) queuosine (Q) which is a potential biomarker for malignancy; (3) N6-methyl adenine (m6A) which is the prevalent modification in eukaryotic mRNAs; and (4) pseudouridine (ψ) which are inducible by nutrient deprivation. Two recent technical advances that stimulated the studies of cellular dynamics of modified ribonucleosides are also described. First, a genome-wide method combines primer extension and microarray to study N1-methyl adenine (m1A) hypomodification in human tRNA. Second, a quantitative mass spectrometric method investigates dynamic changes of a wide range of tRNA modifications under stress conditions in yeast. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms that control dynamic regulation of RNA modifications, and hypotheses for discovering potential RNA de-modification enzymes. We conclude the Account by highlighting the need to develop new

  17. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  18. Greenland from Archaean to Quaternary, Descriptive text to the 1995 Geological Map of Greenland 1:2 500 000, 2nd edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalsbeek, Feiko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The geological development of Greenland spans a period of nearly 4 Ga, from Eoarchaean to the Quaternary. Greenland is the largest island on Earth with a total area of 2 166 000 km2, but only c. 410 000 km2 are exposed bedrock, the remaining part being covered by a major ice sheet (the Inland Ice reaching over 3 km in thickness. The adjacent offshore areas underlain by continental crust have an area of c. 825 000 km2. Greenland is dominated by crystalline rocks of the Precambrian shield, which formed during a succession of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic orogenic events and stabilised as a part of the Laurentian shield about 1600 Ma ago. The shield area can be divided into three distinct types of basement provinces: (1 Archaean rocks (3200–2600 Ma old, with local older units up to >3800Ma that were almost unaffected by Proterozoic or later orogenic activity; (2 Archaean terrains reworked during the Palaeoproterozoic around 1900–1750 Ma ago; and (3 terrains mainly composed of juvenile Palaeoproterozoic rocks (2000–1750 Ma in age.Subsequent geological developments mainly took place along the margins of the shield. During the Proterozoic and throughout the Phanerozoic major sedimentary basins formed, notably in North and North-East Greenland, in which sedimentary successions locally reaching 18 km in thickness were deposited. Palaeozoic orogenic activity affected parts of these successions in the Ellesmerian fold belt of North Greenland and the East Greenland Caledonides; the latter also incorporates reworked Precambrian crystalline basement complexes. Late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary basins developed along the continent–ocean margins in North, East and West Greenland and are now preserved both onshore and offshore. Their development was closely related to continental break-up with formation of rift basins. Initial rifting in East Greenland in latest Devonian to earliest Carboniferous time and succeeding phases culminated with the

  19. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  20. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  1. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  2. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: A lead isotope study of an Archaean gold prospect in the Attu region, Nagssugtoqidian orogen, West Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stendal, Henrik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a lead isotope investigation of a gold prospect south of the village Attu in the northern part of the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in central West Greenland. The Attu gold prospect is a replacement gold occurrence, related to a shear/mylonite zone along a contact between orthogneissand amphibolite within the Nagssugtoqidian orogenic belt. The mineral occurrence is small, less than 0.5 m wide, and can be followed along strike for several hundred metres. The mineral assemblage is pyrite, chalcopyrite, magnetite and gold. The host rocks to the gold prospect are granulite facies ‘brown gneisses’ and amphibolites. Pb-isotopic data on magnetite from the host rocks yield an isochron in a 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb diagram, giving a date of 3162 ± 43 Ma (MSWD = 0.5. This date is interpreted to represent the age of the rocks in question, and is older than dates obtained from rocks elsewhere within the Nagssugtoqidian orogen. Pb-isotopic data on cataclastic magnetite from the shear zone lie close to this isochron, indicating a similar origin. The Pb-isotopic compositions of the ore minerals are similar to those previously obtained from the close-by ~2650 Ma Rifkol granite, and suggest a genetic link between the emplacement of this granite and the formation of the ore minerals in the shear/mylonite zone. Consequently, the age of the gold mineralisation is interpreted tobe late Archaean.

  3. Chronology of early Archaean granite-greenstone evolution in the Barberton Mountain Land, South Africa, based on precise dating by single zircon evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruener, Alfred; Byerly, Gary R.; Lowe, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Precise Pb-207/Pb-206 single zircon evaporating ages are reported for low-grade felsic metavolcanic rocks within the Onverwacht and Fig Tree Groups of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB), South Africa, as well as for granitoid plutons bordering the belt. Dacitic tuffs of the Hooggenoeg Formation in the upper part of the Onverwacht Group are shown to yield ages between 3445 + or - 3 and 3416 + or - 5 Ma and to contain older crustal components represented by a 3504 + or - 4 Ma old zircon xenocryst. Fig Tree dacitic tuffs and agglomerates have euhedral zircons between 3259 + or - 3 Ma in age which are interpreted to reflect the time of crystallization. The comagmatic relationships between greenstone felsic volcanic units and the surrounding plutonic suites are keynoted. The data adduced show that the Onverwacht and Fig Tree felsic units have distinctly different ages and thus do not constitute a single, tectonically repeated unit as proposed by others. It is argued that conventional multigrain zircon dating may not accurately identify the time of felsic volcanic activity in ancient greenstones, and that the BGB in the Kaapval craton of southern Africa and greenstones in the Pilbara Block of Western Australia may have been part of a larger crustal unit in early Archaean times.

  4. Cellular oncogenes in neoplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, V T; McGee, J O

    1987-01-01

    In recent years cellular homologues of many viral oncogenes have been identified. As these genes are partially homologous to viral oncogenes and are activated in some tumour cell lines they are termed "proto-oncogenes". In tumour cell lines proto-oncogenes are activated by either quantitative or qualitative changes in gene structure: activation of these genes was originally thought to be a necessary primary event in carcinogenesis, but activated cellular oncogenes, unlike viral oncogenes, do ...

  5. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  6. Universal map for cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Morales, V., E-mail: vmorales@ph.tum.de [Institute for Advanced Study – Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2a, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-08-20

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  7. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  8. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  9. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  10. Late Archaean mantle metasomatism below eastern Indian craton: Evidence from trace elements, REE geochemistry and Sr-Nd-O isotope systematics of ultramafic dykes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Roy; A Sarkar; S Jeyakumar; S K Aggrawal; M Ebihara; H Satoh

    2004-12-01

    Trace, rare earth elements (REE), Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and O isotope studies have been carried out on ultramafic (harzburgite and lherzolite) dykes belonging to the newer dolerite dyke swarms of eastern Indian craton. The dyke swarms were earlier considered to be the youngest mafic magmatic activity in this region having ages not older than middle to late Proterozoic. The study indicates that the ultramafic members of these swarms are in fact of late Archaean age (Rb-Sr isochron age 2613 ± 177 Ma, Sri ∼0.702 ± 0.004) which attests that out of all the cratonic blocks of India, eastern Indian craton experienced earliest stabilization event. Primitive mantle normalized trace element plots of these dykes display enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), pronounced Ba, Nb and Sr depletions but very high concentrations of Cr and Ni. Chondrite normalised REE plots exhibit light REE (LREE) enrichment with nearly flat heavy REE (HREE; ( HREE)N ∼ 2-3 times chondrite, (Gd/Yb)N∼1). The Nd(t) values vary from +1.23 to −3.27 whereas 18O values vary from +3.16‰ to +5.29‰ (average +3.97‰ ± 0.75‰) which is lighter than the average mantle value. Isotopic, trace and REE data together indicate that during 2.6 Ga the nearly primitive mantle below the eastern Indian Craton was metasomatised by the fluid (±silicate melt) coming out from the subducting early crust resulting in LILE and LREE enriched, Nb depleted, variable Nd, low Sri(0.702) and low 18O bearing EMI type mantle. Magmatic blobs of this metasomatised mantle were subsequently emplaced in deeper levels of the granitic crust which possibly originated due to the same thermal pulse.

  11. Translating partitioned cellular automata into classical type cellular automata

    OpenAIRE

    Poupet, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Partitioned cellular automata are a variant of cellular automata that was defined in order to make it very simple to create complex automata having strong properties such as number conservation and reversibility (which are often difficult to obtain on cellular automata). In this article we show how a partitioned cellular automaton can be translated into a regular cellular automaton in such a way that these properties are conserved.

  12. What Is Life? What Was Life? What Will Life Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D.

    Our laboratory is exploring self-assembly processes and polymerization reactions of organic compounds in natural geothermal environments and related laboratory simulations. Although the physical environment that fostered primitive cellular life is still largely unconstrained, we can be reasonably confident that liquid water was required, together with a source of organic compounds and energy to drive polymerization reactions. There must also have been a process by which the compounds were sufficiently concentrated to undergo physical and chemical interactions. In earlier work we observed that macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins are readily encapsulated in membranous boundaries during wet-dry cycles such as those that would occur at the edges of geothermal springs or tide pools. The resulting structures are referred to as protocells, in that they exhibit certain properties of living cells and are models of the kinds of encapsulated macromolecular systems that would have led toward the first forms of cellular life. However, the assembly of protocells is markedly inhibited by conditions associated with extreme environments: High temperature, high salt concentrations, and low pH ranges. From a biophysical perspective, it follows that the most plausible planetary environment for the origin of cellular life would be an aqueous phase at moderate temperature ranges and low ionic strength, having a pH value near neutrality and divalent cations at submillimolar concentrations. This suggestion is in marked contrast to the view that life most likely began in a geothermal or marine environment, perhaps even the extreme environment of a hydrothermal vent. A more plausible site for the origin of cellular life would be fresh water pools maintained by rain falling on volcanic land masses resembling present-day Hawaii and Iceland. After the first cellular life was able to establish itself in a relatively benign environment, it would rapidly begin to adapt through

  13. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular phone and be part of a learning community experimenting with this learning. To analyze the building and development stages of the cellular phone learning community, two models of community building stages were used; first the team development model developed by Tuckman (1965, second the life cycle model of a virtual learning community developed by Garber (2004. The research findings indicate that a learning community which is centered on a new technology has five 'life' phases of development: Pre-birth, birth, formation, performing, and maturity. Further, the research finding indicate that the norms that were encouraged by the preservice teachers who initiated the cellular phone learning community resulted in a community which developed, nourished and matured to be similar to a community of experienced applied mathematicians who use mathematical formulae to study everyday phenomena.

  14. Bioinformatics: future of life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vital part of our life or the basic unit of life is the cell. The cellular biomolecules function in a conjugate manner and this system provide us with the necessary elements of life, and the sciences that deals with nature function of the cell and it's molecular components are defined as life sciences. Vital subjects involved in maintaining the identity and functioning of cells are genomics and proteomics. (author)

  15. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  16. Radioactivity of cellular concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of cellular concrete is discussed. Some data on the concentrations of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th in building materials in Poland are given. The results of dose rates measurements in living quarters as well as outside are presented. (A.S.)

  17. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  18. Cellular Automation of Galactic Habitable Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Branislav

    2010-01-01

    We present a preliminary results of our Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) 2D probabilistic cellular automata models. The relevant time-scales (emergence of life, it's diversification and evolution influenced with the global risk function) are modeled as the probability matrix elements and are chosen in accordance with the Copernican principle to be well-represented by the data inferred from the Earth's fossil record. With Fermi's paradox as a main boundary condition the resulting histories of astrobiological landscape are discussed.

  19. Electromagnetic cellular interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, J. S.; Farhadi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 223-246. ISSN 0079-6107. [36th International Congress of Physiological Sciences (IUPS2009). Kyoto, 27.07.2009-01.08.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/10/P454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : bioelectric phenomena * cellular biophysics Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.203, year: 2011

  20. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  1. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  2. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  3. Quantum cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  4. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  5. Cellular-scale hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Horton, Renita; Smistrup, Kristian; Best-Popescu, Catherine A; Stone, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidic tools are providing many new insights into the chemical, physical and physicochemical responses of cells. Both suspension-level and single-cell measurements have been studied. We review our studies of these kinds of problems for red blood cells with particular focus on the shapes of ...... mechanical effects on suspended cells can be studied systematically in small devices, and how these features can be exploited to develop methods for characterizing physicochemical responses and possibly for the diagnosis of cellular-scale changes to environmental factors....

  6. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  7. Radiolabelled Cellular Blood Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the abstracts of the 5th International Symposion on Radiolabelling of Cellular Blood Elements to be held in Vienna, Austria, September 10-14, 1989. The Meeting is the fifth in a series of meetings designed to discuss the basics and clinical application of radiolabelling techniques. In these days, beside the search for new labelling agents and extending the knowledge in clinical use, the use of monoclonal antibodies is a big new challenge. All reviewed contributions that have been accepted for presentation are contained in this volume. (authors) 58 of them are of INIS scope

  8. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  9. Protocells: At the Interface of Life and Non-Life

    OpenAIRE

    Wentao Ma; Yu Feng

    2015-01-01

    The cellular form, manifesting as a membrane-bounded system (comprising various functional molecules), is essential to life. The ultimate reason for this is that, typically, one functional molecule can only adopt one “correct” structure to perform one special function (e.g., an enzyme), and thus molecular cooperation is inevitable. While this is particularly true for advanced life with complex functions, it should have already been true for life at its outset with only limited functions, whic...

  10. The Enlightened Game of Life

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a special class of cellular automata evolving in a environment filled by an electromagnetic wave. The rules of the Conway's Game of Life are modified to account for the ability to retrieve life-sustenance from the field energy. Light-induced self-structuring and self-healing abilities and various dynamic phases are displayed by the CA. Applications are envisaged in evolutionary biology, artificial life, DNA replication, swarming, optical tweezing and field-driven soft-matter.

  11. Cellular and molecular introduction to brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangning; Nardelli, Jeannette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the study of brain development over the last decades, especially recent findings regarding the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex, and large-scale analyses of the proteome/transcriptome in the human brain, have offered novel insights into the molecular mechanisms guiding neural maturation, and the pathophysiology of multiple forms of neurological disorders. As a preamble to reviews of this issue, we provide an overview of the cellular, molecular and genetic bases of brain development with an emphasis on the major mechanisms associated with landmarks of normal neural development in the embryonic stage and early postnatal life, including neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation, cortical neuronal migration, evolution and folding of the cerebral cortex, synaptogenesis and neural circuit development, gliogenesis and myelination. We will only briefly depict developmental disorders that result from perturbations of these cellular or molecular mechanisms, and the most common perinatal brain injuries that could disturb normal brain development. PMID:26184894

  12. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  13. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  14. Modeling and cellular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing the applicability of mathematical models with carefully designed experiments is a powerful tool in the investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells. The modeling and cellular studies complement each other, for modeling provides guidance for designing critical experiments which must provide definitive results, while the experiments themselves provide new input to the model. Based on previous experimental results the model for the accumulation of damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardi has been extended to include various multiple two-event combinations. Split dose survival experiments have shown that models tested to date predict most but not all the observed behavior. Stationary-phase mammalian cells, required for tests of other aspects of the model, have been shown to be at different points in the cell cycle depending on how they were forced to stop proliferating. These cultures also demonstrate different capacities for repair of sublethal radiation damage

  15. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds......, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  16. Volcanological constraints of Archaean tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, P. C.; Ayres, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanological and trace element geochemical data can be integrated to place some constraints upon the size, character and evolutionary history of Archean volcanic plumbing, and hence indirectly, Archean tectonics. The earliest volcanism in any greenhouse belt is almost universally tholeitic basalt. Archean mafic magma chambers were usually the site of low pressure fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and later Cpx + or - an oxide phase during evolution of tholeitic liquids. Several models suggest basalt becoming more contaminated by sial with time. Data in the Uchi Subprovince shows early felsic volcanics to have fractionated REE patterns followed by flat REE pattern rhyolites. This is interpreted as initial felsic liquids produced by melting of a garnetiferous mafic source followed by large scale melting of LIL-rich sial. Rare andesites in the Uchi Subprovince are produced by basalt fractionation, direct mantle melts and mixing of basaltic and tonalitic liquids. Composite dikes in the Abitibi Subprovince have a basaltic edge with a chill margin, a rhyolitic interior with no basalt-rhyolite chill margin and partially melted sialic inclusions. Ignimbrites in the Uchi and Abitibi Subprovinces have mafic pumice toward the top. Integration of these data suggest initial mantle-derived basaltic liquids pond in a sialic crust, fractionate and melt sial. The inirial melts low in heavy REE are melts of mafic material, subsequently melting of adjacent sial produces a chamber with a felsic upper part underlain by mafic magma.

  17. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  18. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  19. Active Cellular Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  20. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  1. Using Cellular Slime Molds in the High School Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, P. B.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the life cycle of the cellular slime molds Acrasiales. Experiments that can be used to explore the aggregation, migration, and culmination activities of the organism are suggested. Laboratory procedures for culturing these slime molds and listings of biological supply houses and literature references are also given. (MA)

  2. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  3. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 07/ ... treatment become as overwhelming for others in your life as they are for you. Understanding the potential ...

  4. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  5. Performance evaluation of cellular phone network based portable ECG device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joo-Hyun; Cha, Eun-Jong; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, cellular phone network based portable ECG device was developed and three experiments were performed to evaluate the accuracy, reliability and operability, applicability during daily life of the developed device. First, ECG signals were measured using the developed device and Biopac device (reference device) during sitting and marking time and compared to verify the accuracy of R-R intervals. Second, the reliable data transmission to remote server was verified on two types of simulated emergency event using patient simulator. Third, during daily life with five types of motion, accuracy of data transmission to remote server was verified on two types of event occurring. By acquiring and comparing subject's biomedical signal and motion signal, the accuracy, reliability and operability, applicability during daily life of the developed device were verified. Therefore, cellular phone network based portable ECG device can monitor patient with inobtrusive manner. PMID:19162767

  6. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  7. Feeding Behaviors in Cellular Slime Molds: A Microbial System To Study Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a laboratory project for first-year biology students that examines competition among various cellular slime molds. After a brief introduction to the topic of competition and basic life history information about cellular slime molds, students choose a question and design original experiments to seek an answer. (Author/AIM)

  8. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  9. Predictive Modelling of Cellular Load

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Emmett; McLoone, Seamus; Farrell, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the temporal dynamics of cellular load in four Irish regions. Large scale underutilisation of network resources is identified both at the regional level and at the level of individual cells. Cellular load is modeled and prediction intervals are generated. These prediction intervals are used to put an upper bound on usage in a particular cell at a particular time. Opportunities for improvements in network utilization by incorporating these upper bounds on usage are identifie...

  10. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  11. Planets and Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T., III; Baross, John

    2007-09-01

    Foreword; Preface; Contributors; Prologue; Part I. History: 1. History of astrobiological ideas W. T. Sullivan and D. Carney; 2. From exobiology to astrobiology S. J. Dick; Part II. The Physical Stage: 3. Formation of Earth-like habitable planets D. E. Brownlee and M. Kress; 4. Planetary atmospheres and life D. Catling and J. F. Kasting; Part III. The Origin of Life on Earth: 5. Does 'life' have a definition? C.E. Cleland and C. F. Chyba; 6. Origin of life: crucial issues R. Shapiro; 7. Origin of proteins and nucleic acids A. Ricardo and S. A. Benner; 8. The roots of metabolism G.D. Cody and J. H. Scott; 9. Origin of cellular life D. W. Deamer; Part IV. Life on Earth: 10. Evolution: a defining feature of life J. A. Baross; 11. Evolution of metabolism and early microbial communities J. A. Leigh, D. A. Stahl and J. T. Staley; 12. The earliest records of life on Earth R. Buick; 13. The origin and diversification of eukaryotes M. L. Sogin, D. J. Patterson and A. McArthur; 14. Limits of carbon life on Earth and elsewhere J. A. Baross, J. Huber and M. Schrenk; 15. Life in ice J. W. Deming and H. Eicken; 16. The evolution and diversification of life S. Awramik and K. J. McNamara; 17. Mass extinctions P. D. Ward; Part V. Potentially Habitable Worlds: 18. Mars B. M. Jakosky, F. Westall and A. Brack; 19. Europa C. F. Chyba and C. B. Phillips; 20. Titan J. I. Lunine and B. Rizk; 21. Extrasolar planets P. Butler; Part VI. Searching for Extraterrestrial Life: 22. How to search for life on other worlds C. P. McKay; 23. Instruments and strategies for detecting extraterrestrial life P. G. Conrad; 24. Societial and ethical concerns M. S. Race; 25. Planetary protection J. D. Rummel; 26. Searching for extraterrestrial intelligence J. C. Tarter; 27. Alien biochemistries P. D. Ward and S. A. Benner; Part VII. Future of the Field: 28. Disciplinary and educational opportunities L. Wells, J. Armstrong and J. Huber; Epilogue C. F. Chyba; Appendixes: A. Units and usages; B. Planetary

  12. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  13. Game of Life Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Eduardo R.; Kirke, Alexis

    At the time when the first author was post-graduate student, in the evenings he used to entertain himself with the equipment in the electronic music studio at the University of York until dawn. It must have been around three o'clock in the morning of a rather cold winter night in the late 1980s, when he connected his Atari 1040ST computer to a synthesizer to test the first prototype of a system, which he was developing for his thesis. The system, named CAMUS (short for Cellular Automata Music), implemented a method that he invented to render music from the behaviour of the Game of Life (GoL) cellular automata (CA).

  14. Traffic jam dynamics in stochastic cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Schreckenberg, M. [Univ. Duisburg (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Simple models for particles hopping on a grid (cellular automata) are used to simulate (single lane) traffic flow. Despite their simplicity, these models are astonishingly realistic in reproducing start-stop-waves and realistic fundamental diagrams. One can use these models to investigate traffic phenomena near maximum flow. A so-called phase transition at average maximum flow is visible in the life-times of jams. The resulting dynamic picture is consistent with recent fluid-dynamical results by Kuehne/Kerner/Konhaeuser, and with Treiterer`s hysteresis description. This places CA models between car-following models and fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. CA models are tested in projects in Los Alamos (USA) and in NRW (Germany) for large scale microsimulations of network traffic.

  15. Simulating Complex Systems by Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Jiri; Hoekstra, Alfons G

    2010-01-01

    Deeply rooted in fundamental research in Mathematics and Computer Science, Cellular Automata (CA) are recognized as an intuitive modeling paradigm for Complex Systems. Already very basic CA, with extremely simple micro dynamics such as the Game of Life, show an almost endless display of complex emergent behavior. Conversely, CA can also be designed to produce a desired emergent behavior, using either theoretical methodologies or evolutionary techniques. Meanwhile, beyond the original realm of applications - Physics, Computer Science, and Mathematics – CA have also become work horses in very different disciplines such as epidemiology, immunology, sociology, and finance. In this context of fast and impressive progress, spurred further by the enormous attraction these topics have on students, this book emerges as a welcome overview of the field for its practitioners, as well as a good starting point for detailed study on the graduate and post-graduate level. The book contains three parts, two major parts on th...

  16. Cellular Auxin Homeostasis:Gatekeeping Is Housekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel Ruiz Rosquete; Elke Barbez; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is essential for plant development and contributes to nearly every aspect of the plant life cycle.The spatio-temporal distribution of auxin depends on a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and cell-to-cell auxin transport.Auxin metabolism and transport are both crucial for plant development;however,it largely remains to be seen how these processes are integrated to ensure defined cellular auxin levels or even gradients within tissues or organs.In this review,we provide a glance at very diverse topics of auxin biology,such as biosynthesis,conjugation,oxidation,and transport of auxin.This broad,but certainly superficial,overview highlights the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and transport.Moreover,it allows pinpointing how auxin metabolism and transport get integrated to jointly regulate cellular auxin homeostasis.Even though these processes have been so far only separately studied,we assume that the phytohormonal crosstalk integrates and coordinates auxin metabolism and transport.Besides the integrative power of the global hormone signaling,we additionally introduce the hypothetical concept considering auxin transport components as gatekeepers for auxin responses.

  17. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  18. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  19. Protocells: at the interface of life and non-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wentao; Feng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The cellular form, manifesting as a membrane-bounded system (comprising various functional molecules), is essential to life. The ultimate reason for this is that, typically, one functional molecule can only adopt one "correct" structure to perform one special function (e.g., an enzyme), and thus molecular cooperation is inevitable. While this is particularly true for advanced life with complex functions, it should have already been true for life at its outset with only limited functions, which entailed some sort of primitive cellular form-"protocells". At the very beginning, the protocells may have even been unable to intervene in the growth of their own membrane, which can be called "pseudo-protocells". Then, the ability to synthesize membrane components (amphiphiles) may have emerged under selective pressure, leading to "true-protocells". The emergence of a "chromosome" (with genes linked together)-thus avoiding "gene-loss" during the protocell division, was another key event in the evolution of protocells. Such "unitary-protocells", containing a central genetic molecule, may have appeared as a milestone-in principle, since then life could evolve endlessly, "gaining" more and more functions by introducing new genes. To synthesize in laboratory these different types of protocells, which stand at the interface between life and non-life, would greatly enhance our understanding on the essence of life. PMID:25809963

  20. Protocells: At the Interface of Life and Non-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular form, manifesting as a membrane-bounded system (comprising various functional molecules, is essential to life. The ultimate reason for this is that, typically, one functional molecule can only adopt one “correct” structure to perform one special function (e.g., an enzyme, and thus molecular cooperation is inevitable. While this is particularly true for advanced life with complex functions, it should have already been true for life at its outset with only limited functions, which entailed some sort of primitive cellular form—“protocells”. At the very beginning, the protocells may have even been unable to intervene in the growth of their own membrane, which can be called “pseudo-protocells”. Then, the ability to synthesize membrane components (amphiphiles may have emerged under selective pressure, leading to “true-protocells”. The emergence of a “chromosome” (with genes linked together—thus avoiding “gene-loss” during the protocell division, was another key event in the evolution of protocells. Such “unitary-protocells”, containing a central genetic molecule, may have appeared as a milestone—in principle, since then life could evolve endlessly, “gaining” more and more functions by introducing new genes. To synthesize in laboratory these different types of protocells, which stand at the interface between life and non-life, would greatly enhance our understanding on the essence of life.

  1. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  2. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics by...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...... and that offer advantages of functionalization, and conducting polymers were used as electrochemical sensor surface modifications for increasing the sensitivity towards relevant analytes, with focus on the detection of dopamine released from cells via exocytosis. Vertical peptide nanowires were...

  3. Cellular-based preemption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  4. Life's crucible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetsky, P

    1998-02-01

    Research by German chemists Gunter Wachtershauser and Claudia Huber about the origins of life is reviewed. Other theories about the beginning of life on Earth are examined with comments by noted researchers. PMID:11541839

  5. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  6. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  7. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Preetish Ranjan; Prabhat Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequen...

  8. Life insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Topič, Jakub

    2009-01-01

    The topic of this bachelor's project is life insurance. The theoretical part consists of literary research focussed not only on life insurance. The research begins with general introduction to the insurance issue, the basic division of insurance, its rules of law and as well some historical facts. The rest of the theoretical part is focussed on life insurance, where we can find basic division of life insurance, description of particular insurance types and various supplementary insurances. In...

  9. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  10. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  11. Cellular signalling properties in microcircuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Wallén, Peter; Svirskis, Gytis; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Molecules and cells are the signalling elements in microcircuits. Recent studies have uncovered bewildering diversity in postsynaptic signalling properties in all areas of the vertebrate nervous system. Major effort is now being invested in establishing the specialized signalling properties at th...... cellular and molecular levels in microcircuits in specific brain regions. This review is part of the TINS Microcircuits Special Feature....

  12. Quantum Cloning by Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ariano, G. M.; Macchiavello, C.; M. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a quantum cellular automaton that achieves approximate phase-covariant cloning of qubits. The automaton is optimized for 1-to-2N economical cloning. The use of the automaton for cloning allows us to exploit different foliations for improving the performance with given resources.

  13. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van Jan-Kees

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handli

  14. Life Expectancy

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewski, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    We give simple upper and lower bounds on life expectancy. In a life-table population, if e(0) is the life expectancy at birth, M is the median length of life, and e(M) is the expected remaining life at age M, then (M+e(M))/2≤e(0)≤M+e(M)/2. In general, for any age x, if e(x) is the expected remaining life at age x, and ℓ(x) is the fraction of a cohort surviving to age x at least, then (x+e(x))≤l(x)≤e(0)≤x+l(x)∙e(x). For any two ages 0≤w≤x≤ω, (x-w+e(x))∙ℓ(x)/ℓ(w)≤e(w)≤x-w+e(x)∙ℓ(x)/ℓ(w) . These...

  15. Defining Life

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Any definition is intricately connected to a theory that gives it meaning. Accordingly, this article discusses various definitions of life held in the astrobiology community by considering their connected “theories of life.” These include certain “list” definitions and a popular definition that holds that life is a “self-sustaining chemical system capable of Darwinian evolution.” We then act as “anthropologists,” studying what scientists do to determine which definition-theories of life they ...

  16. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  17. Cellular ceramics in combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuessel, Alexander; Boettge, Daniela; Adler, Joerg; Marschallek, Felix; Michaelis, Alexander [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Cellular materials have become increasingly interesting for applications in combustion environments. Improvements like high power efficiency and low emissions are the main targets of technological development in combustion processes. However, despite scientific and technical success in developing new or improved burner concepts over recent years, a lot of problems remain to be solved in the field of materials science: due to the high power density of the burners the materials are subjected to high loads in terms of thermal shock, temperature and corrosion, especially in so-called porous burner technology. This article shows some examples of research and development strategies and results in developing improved cellular ceramics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Designing Underwater Cellular Networks Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Khadivi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance are some of the applications of underwater networks. Underwater networks should send the gathered information to other users or an offshore station via a base station in the sea. Since the available bandwidth in underwater is severely limited, frequency reuse and cellular networks concepts are very important. In this paper, after driving the ratio of signal to interference for underwater acoustic channels, the constraints for the cell radius are determined. One of the important results of this work is that, for special parameters like bandwidth, it may be impossible to provide the required signal to interference ratio and bandwidth for the network users. Furthermore, in this paper, number of supportable users, per-user bandwidth, and the user capacity for a cellular underwater network are determined.

  19. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  20. Xtoys cellular automata on xwindows

    CERN Document Server

    Creutz, M

    1995-01-01

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  1. Cellular reactions to patterned biointerfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Vera Antonie

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to study cellular reactions to topographically, mechanically and biochemically tunable polymeric biomaterials. Different aspects of in vitro cell-biomaterial interactions were systematically studied with the murine fibroblast cell line NIH L929 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Besides a general cytocompatibility assessment of the applied materials and the quantification of cell adhesion per se, cell morphological changes (e.g. cell spreading) and intr...

  2. Signal processing in cellular clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Forger, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(...

  3. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling set-up times as well as transfer and process batch size information of multiple products that flow through the system. It is assumed that two sets of discrete material handling devices are used fo...

  4. CELLULAR FETAL MICROCHIMERISM IN PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gammill, Hilary S; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Nkwopara, Evangelyn C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown elevated concentrations of free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid and erythroblasts in maternal circulation in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Pluripotent and immunocompetent fetal cells also transfer to the maternal circulation during pregnancy, but whether concentrations of fetal mononuclear cells also differed in preeclampsia was unknown. We sought to quantify cellular fetal microchimerism in maternal circulation in women with preeclampsia and healthy con...

  5. Progress of cellular dedifferentiation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hu-xian; HU Da-hai; JIA Chi-yu; FU Xiao-bing

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation, the stepwise specialization of cells, and transdifferentiation, the apparent switching of one cell type into another, capture much of the stem cell spotlight. But dedifferentiation, the developmental reversal of a cell before it reinvents itself, is an important process too. In multicellular organisms, cellular dedifferentiation is the major process underlying totipotency, regeneration and formation of new stem cell lineages. In humans,dedifferentiation is often associated with carcinogenesis.The study of cellular dedifferentiation in animals,particularly early events related to cell fate-switch and determination, is limited by the lack of a suitable,convenient experimental system. The classic example of dedifferentiation is limb and tail regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as salamanders. Recently, several investigators have shown that certain mammalian cell types can be induced to dedifferentiate to progenitor cells when stimulated with the appropriate signals or materials. These discoveries open the possibility that researchers might enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of mammals by inducing cellular dedifferentiation in vivo.

  6. Dynamic properties of cellular neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Slavova

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behavior of a new class of information-processing systems called Cellular Neural Networks is investigated. In this paper we introduce a small parameter in the state equation of a cellular neural network and we seek for periodic phenomena. New approach is used for proving stability of a cellular neural network by constructing Lyapunov's majorizing equations. This algorithm is helpful for finding a map from initial continuous state space of a cellular neural network into discrete output. A comparison between cellular neural networks and cellular automata is made.

  7. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  8. LIFE: bibliography

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, J

    2006-01-01

    The following bibliography came out of the research which formed the first phase of the joint British Library-UCL LIFE (Lifecycle Information for E-Literature) project. The references are not an exhaustive review of digital preservation activities, they are a reflection of the aims of the LIFE project. Any suggestions for additions or comments can be emailed to

  9. Life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  10. Life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs

  11. Defining Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steven A.

    2010-12-01

    Any definition is intricately connected to a theory that gives it meaning. Accordingly, this article discusses various definitions of life held in the astrobiology community by considering their connected "theories of life." These include certain "list" definitions and a popular definition that holds that life is a "self-sustaining chemical system capable of Darwinian evolution." We then act as "anthropologists," studying what scientists do to determine which definition-theories of life they constructively hold as they design missions to seek non-terran life. We also look at how constructive beliefs about biosignatures change as observational data accumulate. And we consider how a definition centered on Darwinian evolution might itself be forced to change as supra-Darwinian species emerge, including in our descendents, and consider the chances of our encountering supra-Darwinian species in our exploration of the Cosmos. Last, we ask what chemical structures might support Darwinian evolution universally; these structures might be universal biosignatures.

  12. Trace element characteristics of mafic and ultramafic meta-igneous rocks from the 3.5 Ga. Warrawoona group: evidence for plume-lithosphere interaction beneath Archaean continental crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnesian- to Fe-rich tholeiitic basalts represent the dominant lithology in the Marble Bar Greenstone Belt, E-Pilbara Craton, and are locally associated with komatiitic basalts and rare komatiitic cumulates. Based on trace element characteristics, the extrusive and intrusive rocks from all three major stratigraphic units can be subdivided into LREE enriched and unfractionated to weakly LREE depleted groups. The former group is characterized by La/Smpm = 1.7-4.6, Gd/Ybpm = 1.23.2 and Nb/Thpm 0.1-0.5, while the latter rocks possess ratios of La/Smpm = 0.5-1.7, Gd/Ybpm = 0.8-1.9 and Nb/Thpm = 0.4-1.3. Nb/La -Nb/Th relationships in the LREE enriched samples indicate 7-28% contamination by crustal material similar in composition to Pilbara granitoids. LREE enrichment and strong negative HFSE anomalies, along with MgO = 2.2-22.0 wt% and SiO2 = 39.2-63.5 wt%, have been observed in numerous Archaean greenstone belts, and can be successfully modeled in this study by AFC processes. In contrast, strong HFSE depletion combined with unfractionated to slightly depleted LREE in rocks of the latter group require different processes. Melting of mantle material previously depleted by melt extraction, enrichment of LILE and LREE relative to the HFSE in an arc-like environment and HFSE fractionation as a result of garnet retention in the melting source cannot account for negative Nb, Ta, Ti, P and strong positive Pb anomalies. Introduction of small amounts of crustal material into a depleted or primitive mantle, as possibly indicated by Nb/Ta ratios between 12 and 18, also fails to reproduce the trace element abundances of the second group of rocks. Recycling of oceanic crust previously processed through a subduction zone (low Th/Nb, La/Nb) and sub-arc lithospheric mantle (high Th/Nb, La/Nb), and subsequent mixing into the Archaean mantle has been recently invoked by several workers (e.g. Kerrich et al., EPSL, 168, 101-115; 1999) to explain the origin of compositionally

  13. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Najbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a 'network' with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a 'pair-wise' manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b high-generation xenografts (fifth passage had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with 'glomerulus-like' microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  14. Mathematical Physics of Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Morales, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA) containing no freely adjustable parameters. The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and its invariances allow to classify all CA rules into equivalence classes. Complexity in 1D systems is then shown to emerge from the weak symmetry breaking of the addition modulo an integer number p. The latter symmetry is possessed by certain rules that produce Pascal simplices in their time evolution. These results elucidate Wolfram's classification of CA dynamics.

  15. Estimation in Cellular Radio Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem to track time-varying parameters in cellular radio systems is studied, and the focus is on estimation based only on the signals that are readily available. Previous work have demonstrated very good performance, but were relying on analog measurement that are not available. Most of the information is lost due to quantization and sampling at a rate that might be as low as 2 Hz (GSM case). For that matter a maximum likelihood estimator have been designed and exemplified in the case o...

  16. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios

  17. Protein accounting in the cellular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. (2014) gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the needs. PMID:24766801

  18. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    OpenAIRE

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release.

  19. Whole-Organism Cellular Pathology: A Systems Approach to Phenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K C; Katz, S R; Lin, A Y; Xin, X; Ding, Y

    2016-01-01

    Phenotype is defined as the state of an organism resulting from interactions between genes, environment, disease, molecular mechanisms, and chance. The purpose of the emerging field of phenomics is to systematically determine and measure phenotypes across biology for the sake of understanding. Phenotypes can affect more than one cell type and life stage, so ideal phenotyping would include the state of every cell type within the context of both tissue architecture and the whole organism at each life stage. In medicine, high-resolution anatomic assessment of phenotype is obtained from histology. Histology's interpretative power, codified by Virchow as cellular pathology, is derived from its ability to discern diagnostic and characteristic cellular changes in diseased tissues. Cellular pathology is observed in every major human disease and relies on the ability of histology to detect cellular change in any cell type due to unbiased pan-cellular staining, even in optically opaque tissues. Our laboratory has shown that histology is far more sensitive than stereomicroscopy for detecting phenotypes in zebrafish mutants. Those studies have also shown that more complete sampling, greater consistency in sample orientation, and the inclusion of phenotypes extending over longer length scales would provide greater coverage of common phenotypes. We are developing technical approaches to achieve an ideal detection of cellular pathology using an improved form of X-ray microtomography that retains the strengths and addresses the weaknesses of histology as a screening tool. We are using zebrafish as a vertebrate model based on the overlaps between zebrafish and mammalian tissue architecture, and a body size small enough to allow whole-organism, volumetric imaging at cellular resolution. Automation of whole-organism phenotyping would greatly increase the value of phenomics. Potential societal benefits would include reduction in the cost of drug development, a reduction in the

  20. Structural and mechanistic insights into the regulation of cellular quiescence by Rb and p130

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschi, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a single cell to grow, replicate its genetic material, and divide into two identical daughter cells is a vital process to ensure the propagation of all life. This process is known as the cell division cycle (cell cycle) and is one of the most highly spatially and temporally regulated cellular processes. Misregulation of the cell cycle, particularly in ways that confer both a proliferative advantage and escape from ultimate growth control mechanisms like cellular senescence or a...

  1. Systematic identification of cellular signals reactivating Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuqu Yu; Harada, Josephine N.; Brown, Helen J.; Hongyu Deng; Moon Jung Song; Ting-Ting Wu; Juran Kato-Stankiewicz; Nelson, Christian G; Jeffrey Vieira; Fuyuhiko Tamanoi; Chanda, Sumit K.; Ren Sun

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary e...

  2. Geodynamic evolution of the West Africa between 2.2 and 2 Ga: the Archaean style of the Birimian greenstone belts and the sedimentary basins in northeastern Ivory-Coast; Evolution de l`Afrique de l`Ouest entre 2,2 Ga et 2 Ga: le style archeen des ceintures vertes et des ensembles sedimentaires birimiens du nord-est de la Cote-d`Ivoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, M.; Pouclet, A. [Orleans Univ., 45 (France); Delor, C. [Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France); Simeon, Y. [ANTEA, 45 - Orleans (France); Alric, G. [Etablissements Binou, 27 - Le Mesnil-Fuguet (France)

    1996-12-31

    The litho-structural features of Palaeo-proterozoic terrains of northeastern Ivory-Coast, greenstones belts and then sedimentary (basin Birimian), are similar to those of Archaean terrains. Their early deformation is only voluminal deformation due to granitoid intrusions, mainly between 2.2 and 2.16 Ga. The shortening deformation (main deformation) is expressed by right folds and transcurrent shear zones ca 2.1 Ga. Neither thrust deformation nor high pressure metamorphic assemblages are known. This pattern of flexible and hot crust, at least between 2.2 and 2.16 Ga, is pole apart to a collisional pattern, proposed for West African Craton by some authors. The Archaean/Palaeo-proterozoic boundary would not represent a drastic change of the geodynamic evolution of the crust. (authors). 60 refs., 5 figs., 6 photos.

  3. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  4. [Cellular replacement strategies and adult neurogenesis in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxreiter, F; Storch, A; Winkler, J

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common age-related movement disorder and characterized by slowly progressive neurodegeneration resulting in motor symptoms, such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor and postural instability. Moreover, non-motor symptoms, such as hyposmia, anxiety and depression reduce the quality of life in PD. Motor symptoms are associated with a distinct striatal dopaminergic deficit resulting from axonal dysfunction and neuronal loss in the substantia nigra (SN). Recent progress in stem cell technology allows the optimization of cellular transplantation strategies in order to alleviate the motor deficit, which potentially leads to a reactivation of this therapeutic strategy. Besides neurodegenerative processes impaired adult neurogenesis and consequentially reduced endogenous cellular plasticity may play an important role in PD. This article discusses the notion that non-motor symptoms in PD may partly be explained by reduced adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus. PMID:27389601

  5. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  6. Discrete geodesics and cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a dynamical notion of discrete geodesics, understood as straightest trajectories in discretized curved spacetime. The notion is generic, as it is formulated in terms of a general deviation function, but readily specializes to metric spaces such as discretized pseudo-riemannian manifolds. It is effective: an algorithm for computing these geodesics naturally follows, which allows numerical validation---as shown by computing the perihelion shift of a Mercury-like planet. It is consistent, in the continuum limit, with the standard notion of timelike geodesics in a pseudo-riemannian manifold. Whether the algorithm fits within the framework of cellular automata is discussed at length. KEYWORDS: Discrete connection, parallel transport, general relativity, Regge calculus.

  7. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  8. Cellular tolerance to pulsed heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovski, Dimitrii; Sarkar, M.; Irani, A.; O'Connell-Rodwell, C.; Contag, C.; Schwettman, H. Alan; Palanker, D.

    2005-04-01

    Many laser therapies involve significant heating of tissue with pulses varying from picoseconds to minutes in duration. In some of the applications heating is a primary goal, while in others it is an undesirable side effect. In both cases, if a hyperthermia is involved, the knowledge about the threshold temperature leading to irreversible cellular damage is critically important. We study the dependence of the threshold temperature on duration of the heat exposure in the range of 0.3 ms to 5 seconds. Thin layer of cells cultured in a Petri dish was exposed to a pulsed CO2 laser radiation. Laser beam was focused onto sample providing Gaussian intensity distribution in the focal plane with a beam diameter (2w) 2-10 mm. Surface temperature in the central part of the focal spot (1mm in diameter) was measured by thermal infrared (IR) emission from the sample, recorded with a fast IR detector. For pulses shorter than 1 s the temperature profile across the focal spot was found to closely correspond to the radial distribution of the laser beam intensity, thus allowing for accurate determination of temperature at any given distance from the center of the spot. Immediate cellular damage was assessed using vital staining with the live/dead fluorescent assay. Threshold temperatures were found to vary from 65 °C at 5 s of heating to 160 °C at pulses of 0.3 ms in duration. The shorter end of this range was limited by vaporization, which occurs during the laser pulse and results in mechanical damage to cells. Dependence of the maximal temperature on pulse duration could be approximated by Arrhenius law with activation energy being about 1 eV.

  9. Biomaterials innovation bundling technologies and life

    CERN Document Server

    Styhre, A

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in the life sciences means that there is now a far more detailed understanding of biological systems on the cellular, molecular and genetic levels. Sited at the intersection between the life sciences, the engineering sciences and the design sciences, innovations in the biomaterials industry are expected to garner increasing attention and play a key role in future development. This book examines the biomaterials innovations taking place in corporations and in academic research settings today.

  10. Common basis for cellular motility

    OpenAIRE

    Zot, Henry G.; Javier E Hasbun; Minh, Nguyen Van

    2015-01-01

    Motility is characteristic of life, but a common basis for movement has remained to be identified. Diverse systems in motion shift between two states depending on interactions that turnover at the rate of an applied cycle of force. Although one phase of the force cycle terminates the decay of the most recent state, continuation of the cycle of force regenerates the original decay process in a recursive cycle. By completing a cycle, kinetic energy is transformed into probability of sustaining ...

  11. Precambrian evolution and cratonization of the Tarim Block, NW China: Petrology, geochemistry, Nd-isotopes and U-Pb zircon geochronology from Archaean gabbro-TTG-potassic granite suite and Paleoproterozoic metamorphic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-Lin; Li, Huai-Kun; Santosh, M.; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Zou, Hai-Bo; Wang, Hongyan; Ye, Haimin

    2012-03-01

    We report field characteristics, petrography, geochemistry and isotopic ages of the Neoarchaean intrusive complex and the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic belt around Quruqtagh in the northern margin of the Tarim Block, NW China in an attempt to evaluate the evolution of the Precambrian basement of the Tarim Block. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate that the tonalite-trondhjemite complex with gabbroic enclaves and the slightly younger potassic granites crystallized at ca. 2.60 Ga and ca. 2.53 Ga respectively, and were metamorphosed at ca.1.85-1.80 Ga. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate that the amphibolite to granulite facies assemblages in the strongly deformed Paleoproterozoic gneiss-schist belt were generated during a major thermal event at 1.85-1.80 Ga, and were again overprinted by late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic metamorphism (1.1-0.95 Ga). Geochemically, the gabbros occurring within the tonalite-trondhjemite suite exhibit arc tholeiite signature and their chemical and Nd isotopic compositions suggest that they were derived from partial melting of a metasomatised and depleted mantle. The tonalites and trondhjemites have varied geochemical compositions but both preserve distinct Archaean TTG (tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) signatures. However, the ca. 2.53 Ga potassic granites have very different geochemical compositions as compared to the tonalite-trondjemite suite and show extreme enrichment of LREE and LILE, as well as a marked depletion of HREE and HFSE. Based on the geochemical and geochronological data presented in this contribution, we suggest that: (1) the gabbro-tonalite-trondhjemite suite and the late potassic granites represent an evolution from an arc system through the final collision and late or post-orogenic extension when the potassic granite was emplaced, thus building the cratonic architecture of the proto-crust of the Tarim Block; (2) the ca.1.9-1.8 Ga metamorphism marks an important orogenic event in the crystalline basement of the Tarim Block

  12. The Flagellum Attachment Zone: 'The Cellular Ruler' of Trypanosome Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-04-01

    A defining feature of Trypanosoma brucei cell shape is the lateral attachment of the flagellum to the cell body, mediated by the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). The FAZ is a complex cytoskeletal structure that connects the flagellum skeleton through two membranes to the cytoskeleton. The FAZ acts as a 'cellular ruler' of morphology by regulating cell length and organelle position and is therefore critical for both cell division and life cycle differentiations. Here we provide an overview of the advances in our understanding of the composition, assembly, and function of the FAZ. PMID:26776656

  13. Evolution of Cellular Inclusions in Bietti’s Crystalline Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiko Furusato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD consists of small, yellow-white, glistening intraretinal crystals in the posterior pole, tapetoretinal degeneration with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and “sclerosis” of the choroid; in addition, sparking yellow crystals in the superficial marginal cornea are also found in many patients. BCD is inherited as an autosomal-recessive trait (4q35-tel and usually has its onset in the third decade of life. This review focuses on the ultrastructure of cellular crystals and lipid inclusions of BCD.

  14. Life Wish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJUAN

    2004-01-01

    Three career women playing multiple roles: daughter, wife, mother, colleague and friend, handle everyday pressure and enjoy life to the full. Suddenly one day, their lives change. They become patients, identified with their medical case history rather than business card. Facing death, these three women pool their courage, wisdom and tenacity.

  15. Life Pottery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Zhang Wenzhi creates a rich variety of pottery works by coveringpottery roughcasts of different qualities with a range of coloredglazes,patterns and textures.Her works principally reflect differentsocial and personal themes,are not for practical use but moreendorse her interest in pottery,her feelings on life,and a sense ofmodernity.

  16. Recognising life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    –Marxist traditions. The analysis unfolds as an ideology critique that reconstructs, and seeks ways to overcome, particular forms of recognition that are identifiable in the data and in the field of drug practices, and how these form part of the constitution of singular collectives and participants – in these life...

  17. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  18. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oakes, Samantha R.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and ...

  19. A radiation measurement study on cellular phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will explain the radiation level produced by various selected cellular phone from various models and brands available in the market. The result obtained from this study will also recommend whether a cellular phone is safe for public usage or it might cause any effect on public health. Finally, a database of radiation measurement level produced by selected various cellular phone will also be developed and exhibited in this paper. (Author)

  20. Predicting Cellular Growth from Gene Expression Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, Maitreya J.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Airoldi, Edoardo; Broach, James R.; Caudy, Amy A.; Gresham, David; Botstein, David; Huttenhower, Curtis; Lu, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazo...

  1. Cellular structure in system of interacting particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lev, Bohdan

    2008-01-01

    The general description of formation the cellular structure in the system of interacting particles is proposed. Interactions between particles are presumably well-understood and the phase transition in which can be studied in the scale of particle resolution. We presented analytical results of possible cellular structures for suspension of colloidal particles, in system particles immersed in liquid crystal and gravitational system. We have shown that cellular structure formation can occur in ...

  2. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  3. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  4. The cellular particle swarm optimization algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a variant of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) original algorithm, the Cellular-PSO. Inspired by the cellular Genetic Algorithm (GA), particles in Cellular-PSO are arranged into a matrix of cells interconnected according to a given topology. Such topology defines particle's neighborhood, inside which social adaptation may occur. As a consequence, population diversity is increased and the optimization process becomes more efficient and robust. The proposed Cellular-PSO has been applied to the nuclear reactor core design optimization problem and comparative experiments demonstrated that it is superior to the standard PSO. (author)

  5. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  6. Illuminating cellular physiology: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescent methods are gaining more and more attention among scientists due to their sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity; coupled with the fact that the bioluminescence can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. Since the discovery of bioluminescence in the 19th century, enzymes involved in the bioluminescent process have been isolated and cloned. The bioluminescent reactions in several different organisms have also been fully characterized and used as reporters in a wide variety of biochemical assays. From the 1990s it became clear that bioluminescence can be detected and quantified directly from inside a living cell. This gave rise to numerous possibilities for the in vivo monitoring of intracellular processes non-invasively using bioluminescent molecules as reporters. This review describes recent developments in the area of bioluminescent imaging for cell biology. Newly developed imaging methods allow transcriptional/translational regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interaction, oncogenic transformation, cell and protein trafficking, and target drug action to be monitored in vivo in real-time with high temporal and spatial resolution; thus providing researchers with priceless information on cellular functions. Advantages and limitations of these novel bioluminescent methods are discussed and possible future developments identified. PMID:17725230

  7. Efficiency of cellular information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the E. coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium i...

  8. Systematic Identification of Cellular Signals Reactivating Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fuqu; Harada, Josephine N; Brown, Helen J; Deng, Hongyu; Song, Moon Jung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Nelson, Christian G; Vieira, Jeffrey; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Chanda, Sumit K; Sun, Ren

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma–derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:17397260

  9. Systematic identification of cellular signals reactivating Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma-derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets.

  10. One life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demkova E.E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy to care for a special needs child. Especially, it is easy to understand parents’ worries about their grown up children. Living in one’s own family or supported living in the community are much more preferable than the options the state can offer. The author — a mother of a young woman with autism — contemplates about possibilities for independent living for a person with special needs after their parents are gone. She is confident that teaching a child skills for independent living is not less important than giving them school education. The author illustrates her thoughts with real examples of support for adults with disabilities in their independent life or life in a foster family in a city, as well in rural areas.

  11. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Eguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1, Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs. This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming.

  12. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kuboki, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES) cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming. PMID:27382371

  13. Life: An Introduction to Complex Systems Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2006-01-01

    What is life? Has molecular biology given us a satisfactory answer to this question? And if not, why, and how to carry on from there? This book examines life not from the reductionist point of view, but rather asks the question: what are the universal properties of living systems and how can one construct from there a phenomenological theory of life that leads naturally to complex processes such as reproductive cellular systems, evolution and differentiation? The presentation has been deliberately kept fairly non-technical so as to address a broad spectrum of students and researchers from the natural sciences and informatics.

  14. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  15. Life on Earth is an individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Margarida

    2016-06-01

    Life is a self-maintaining process based on metabolism. Something is said to be alive when it exhibits organization and is actively involved in its own continued existence through carrying out metabolic processes. A life is a spatio-temporally restricted event, which continues while the life processes are occurring in a particular chunk of matter (or, arguably, when they are temporally suspended, but can be restarted at any moment), even though there is continuous replacement of parts. Life is organized in discrete packages, particular cells and multicellular organisms with differing degrees of individuality. Biological species, too, have been shown to be individuals, and not classes, as these collections of organisms are spatio-temporally localized, restricted, continuous, and somewhat cohesive entities, with a definite beginning and end. Assuming that all life on Earth has a common origin, all living organisms, cells, and tissues descending from this origin exhibit continuity of the life processes at the cellular level, as well as many of the features that define the individual character of species: spatio-temporal localization and restriction, continuity, historicity, and cohesiveness. Therefore, life on Earth is an ontological individual. Independent origins of life will have produced other such individuals. These provisionally called 'life-individuals' constitute a category of organization of life which has seldom been recognized. The discovery of at least one independent life-individual would go a long way toward the project of the universality of biology. PMID:26907555

  16. Integrated Molecular and Cellular Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Raicu, Valerica

    2008-01-01

    This book integrates concepts and methods from physics, biology, biochemistry and physical chemistry into a standalone, unitary text of biophysics that aims to provide a quantitative description of structures and processes occurring in living matter. The book introduces graduate physics students and physicists interested in biophysics research to 'classical' as well as emerging areas of biophysics. The advanced undergraduate physics students and the life scientists are also invited to join in, by building on their knowledge of basic physics. Essential notions of biochemistry and biology are introduced, as necessary, throughout the book, while the reader's familiarity with basic knowledge of physics is assumed. Topics covered include interactions between biological molecules, physical chemistry of phospholipids association into bilayer membranes, DNA and protein structure and folding, passive and active electrical properties of the cell membrane, classical as well as fractal aspects of reaction kinetics and di...

  17. Immune cellular response to HPV: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Guimarães Gonçalves

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular immunity is essential for the elimination of human papillomavirus (HPV, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We summarize the main mechanisms involved in cellular immune response to infections caused by HPV. Immunotherapies for HPV-related cancers require the disruption of T-cell response control mechanisms, associated with the stimulation of the Th1 cytokine response.

  18. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene

  19. Recent development of cellular manufacturing systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Arora; A Haleem; M K Singh

    2013-06-01

    Cellular manufacturing system has been proved a vital approach for batch and job shop production systems. Group technology has been an essential tool for developing a cellular manufacturing system. The paper aims to discuss various cell formation techniques and highlights the significant research work done in past over the years and attempts to points out the gap in research.

  20. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunberger, D.; Goff, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene.

  1. LMS filters for cellular CDMA overlay

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper extends and complements previous research we have performed on the performance of nonadaptive narrowband suppression filters when used in cellular CDMA overlay situations. In this paper, an adaptive LMS filter is applied to cellular CDMA overlay situations in order to reject narrowband interference.

  2. From Cnn Dynamics to Cellular Wave Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roska, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Embedded in a historical overview, the development of the Cellular Wave Computing paradigm is presented, starting from the standard CNN dynamics. The theoretical aspects, the physical implementation, the innovation process, as well as the biological relevance are discussed in details. Finally, the latest developments, the physical versus virtual cellular machines, as well as some open questions are presented.

  3. LIFE2 conference: the Life model

    OpenAIRE

    Wheatley, P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary and aims: Summary: Introduction to the LIFE Model and a recap of LIFE Model v1.0; Development of the LIFE Model v1.1; Looking ahead to LIFE Model v2.0; Scope of lifecycle costs and aims of costing; LIFE Methodology; Generic Preservation Model; Future work: LIFE3? Aims: Summarise recent developments in the LIFE approach and costing tools; Provide a foundation for the Case Study discussions later today; Highlight some outstanding issues for discussio...

  4. Mystery of the Toxic Flea Dip: An Interactive Approach to Teaching Aerobic Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, A. T.; McVey, M.; Rybarczyk, B.; Thompson, J. T.; Wilkins, H. R.

    2004-01-01

    We designed an interrupted case study to teach aerobic cellular respiration to major and nonmajor biology students. The case is based loosely on a real-life incident of rotenone poisoning. It places students in the role of a coroner who must determine the cause of death of the victim. The case is presented to the students in four parts. Each part…

  5. Measurements of Electromagnetic Fields Emitted from Cellular Base Stations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Ali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With increasing the usage of mobile communication devices and internet network information, the entry of private telecommunications companies in Iraq has been started since 2003. These companies began to build up cellular towers to accomplish the telecommunication works but they ignore the safety conditions imposed for the health and environment that are considered in random way. These negative health effects which may cause a health risk for life beings and environment pollution. The aim of this work is to determine the safe and unsafe ranges and discuss damage caused by radiation emitted from Asia cell base stations in Shirqat city and discuses the best ways in which can be minimize its exposure level to avoid its negative health effects. Practical measurements of power density around base stations has been accomplished by using a radiation survey meter type (Radio frequency EMF Strength Meter 480846 in two ways. The first way of measurements has been accomplished at a height of 2 meters above ground for different distances from (0-300 meters .The second way is at a distance of 150 meters for different levels from (2-15 meters above ground level. The maximum measured power density is about (3 mW/m2. Results indicate that the levels of power density are far below the RF radiation exposure of USSR safety standards levels. And that means these cellular base station don't cause negative the health effect for life being if the exposure is within the acceptable international standard levels.

  6. The Universe as a Cellular System

    CERN Document Server

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular systems are observed everywhere in nature, from crystal domains in metals, soap froth and cucumber cells to the network of cosmological voids. Surprisingly, despite their disparate scale and origin all cellular systems follow certain scaling laws relating their geometry, topology and dynamics. Using a cosmological N-body simulation we found that the Cosmic Web, the largest known cellular system, follows the same scaling relations seen elsewhere in nature. Our results extend the validity of scaling relations in cellular systems by over 30 orders of magnitude in scale with respect to previous studies. The dynamics of cellular systems can be used to interpret local observations such as the local velocity anomaly as the result of a collapsing void in our cosmic backyard. Moreover, scaling relations depend on the curvature of space, providing an independent measure of geometry.

  7. Live cell tracking based on cellular state recognition from microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y-N; Lin, C-H; Kuo, C-C; Ho, C-L; Lin, C-J

    2009-07-01

    The analysis of cell motion is an essential process in fundamental medical studies because most active cellular functions involve motion. In this paper, a computer-assisted motion analysis system is proposed for cell tracking. In the proposed tracking process, unlike in conventional tracking methods, cellular states referring to the cellular life cycle are defined and appropriate strategies are adopted for cells at different states. The use of cellular state recognition allows detection of possible cell division and hence can improve the robustness of cell tracking. Experimental results show that cells can be successfully segmented and tracked over a long period of time, and the proposed system is found to be as accurate as manual tracking. Various quantitative analyses and visualizations are used to represent cell motion, which demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed system in the study of cell dynamics. PMID:19566631

  8. Floating Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ One in six people in China have left their hometown in search of a better life and the number continues to grow,creating a challenge for host cities,according to a government report.The floating population,or people who live and work outside their permanent home,reached 211 million last year and the number could reach 350 million by 2050 if govemment policies remain unchanged,said the Report on the Development of China's Floating Population issued on June 26 by the National Population and Family Planning Commission (NPFPC).

  9. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  10. Contrasting petrogenesis of Mg-K and Fe-K granitoids and implications for post-collisional magmatism: case study from the late-Archaean Matok pluton (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Rapopo, Mafusi; Stevens, Gary; Moyen, Jean-François; Martin, Hervé; Zeh, Armin; Doucelance, Régis

    2014-05-01

    , and Mg-K suites, such as sanukitoids, the petrogenesis of which only requires metasomatized mantle. We propose that the most adequate geodynamic setting for the involvement of these two mantle sources is a postsubduction, collision-related slab breakoff event. Such a model accounts for (1) the postcollisional nature of both Mg-K (sanukitoids) and Fe-K magmas; (2) their close spatial and temporal relationships in several late-Archaean to Phanerozoic terranes; and (3) their differences in petrography and geochemistry. In addition, such a model also accounts for many other typical features of the late-collisional context, such as high-T metamorphism and large-scale melting of the orogenic crust, in response to thermal stabilization of the lithosphere and intrusion of mafic melts at shallow levels.

  11. Multispectral Imaging Broadens Cellular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Amnis Corporation, a Seattle-based biotechnology company, developed ImageStream to produce sensitive fluorescence images of cells in flow. The company responded to an SBIR solicitation from Ames Research Center, and proposed to evaluate several methods of extending the depth of field for its ImageStream system and implement the best as an upgrade to its commercial products. This would allow users to view whole cells at the same time, rather than just one section of each cell. Through Phase I and II SBIR contracts, Ames provided Amnis the funding the company needed to develop this extended functionality. For NASA, the resulting high-speed image flow cytometry process made its way into Medusa, a life-detection instrument built to collect, store, and analyze sample organisms from erupting hydrothermal vents, and has the potential to benefit space flight health monitoring. On the commercial end, Amnis has implemented the process in ImageStream, combining high-resolution microscopy and flow cytometry in a single instrument, giving researchers the power to conduct quantitative analyses of individual cells and cell populations at the same time, in the same experiment. ImageStream is also built for many other applications, including cell signaling and pathway analysis; classification and characterization of peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations; quantitative morphology; apoptosis (cell death) assays; gene expression analysis; analysis of cell conjugates; molecular distribution; and receptor mapping and distribution.

  12. Estimating cellular network performance during hurricanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular networks serve a critical role during and immediately after a hurricane, allowing citizens to contact emergency services when land-line communication is lost and serving as a backup communication channel for emergency responders. However, due to their ubiquitous deployment and limited design for extreme loading events, basic network elements, such as cellular towers and antennas are prone to failures during adverse weather conditions such as hurricanes. Accordingly, a systematic and computationally feasible approach is required for assessing and improving the reliability of cellular networks during hurricanes. In this paper we develop a new multi-disciplinary approach to efficiently and accurately assess cellular network reliability during hurricanes. We show how the performance of a cellular network during and immediately after future hurricanes can be estimated based on a combination of hurricane wind field models, structural reliability analysis, Monte Carlo simulation, and cellular network models and simulation tools. We then demonstrate the use of this approach for assessing the improvement in system reliability that can be achieved with discrete topological changes in the system. Our results suggest that adding redundancy, particularly through a mesh topology or through the addition of an optical fiber ring around the perimeter of the system can be an effective way to significantly increase the reliability of some cellular systems during hurricanes.

  13. The similarity of life across the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S

    2016-05-15

    Is the hypothesis correct that if life exists elsewhere in the universe, it would have forms and structures unlike anything we could imagine? From the subatomic level in cellular energy acquisition to the assembly and even behavior of organisms at the scale of populations, life on Earth exhibits characteristics that suggest it is a universal norm for life at all levels of hierarchy. These patterns emerge from physical and biochemical limitations. Their potentially universal nature is supported by recent data on the astrophysical abundance and availability of carbon compounds and water. Within these constraints, biochemical and biological variation is certainly possible, but it is limited. If life exists elsewhere, life on Earth, rather than being a contingent product of one specific experiment in biological evolution, is likely to reflect common patterns for the assembly of living matter. PMID:27255694

  14. Macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our studies of the interaction of densely ionizing particles with macromolecules in the living cell may be divided into four parts: characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the unmodified Bragg ionization curve; characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the spread Bragg curve as used in radiation therapy; elucidation of the cellular radiation chemistry characteristic of high vs. low LET radiation qualities; and the introduction of novel techniques designed to give a better understanding of the fundamental properties of induction of lesions and their repair potentials in high LET radiation

  15. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  16. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  17. Nanomechanics of magnetically driven cellular endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Dejneka, A.; Jastrabík, L.; Polyakova, T.; Syrovets, T.; Simmet, Th.

    2011-10-01

    Being essential for many pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic processes and playing a crucial role in regulating substrate detachment that enables cellular locomotion, endocytotic mechanisms in many aspects still remain a mystery and therefore can hardly be controlled. Here, we report on experimental and modeling studies of the magnetically assisted endocytosis of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by prostate cancer cells (PC-3) and characterize the time and force scales of the cellular uptake machinery. The results indicate how the cellular uptake rate could be controlled by applied magnetic field, membrane elasticity, and nanoparticle magnetic moment.

  18. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Their Clinical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ceren Sumer-Turanligil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling pathways have important roles in cellular growth, differentiation, inflammatory response and apoptosis and in regulation of cellular responses under various chemical stimulators. Different proteins which belong to these pathways may be exposed to loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations; this may lead to many clinical phenotypes including primarily cancer. In this review information about basic working principles of these pathways and diseases related to them are included. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 180-191

  19. Imaging in cellular and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hanry

    2013-01-01

    Details on specific imaging modalities for different cellular and tissue engineering applications are scattered throughout articles and chapters in the literature. Gathering this information into a single reference, Imaging in Cellular and Tissue Engineering presents both the fundamentals and state of the art in imaging methods, approaches, and applications in regenerative medicine. The book underscores the broadening scope of imaging applications in cellular and tissue engineering. It covers a wide range of optical and biological applications, including the repair or replacement of whole tiss

  20. Cellular Cell Bifurcation of Cylindrical Detonations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Gui-Lai; JIANG Zong-Lin; WANG Chun; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    Cellular cell pattern evolution of cylindrically-diverging detonations is numerically simulated successfully by solving two-dimensional Euler equations implemented with an improved two-step chemical kinetic model. From the simulation, three cell bifurcation modes are observed during the evolution and referred to as concave front focusing, kinked and wrinkled wave front instability, and self-merging of cellular cells. Numerical research demonstrates that the wave front expansion resulted from detonation front diverging plays a major role in the cellular cell bifurcation, which can disturb the nonlinearly self-sustained mechanism of detonations and finally lead to cell bifurcations.

  1. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  2. Interworking of Wireless LANs and Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The next-generation of wireless communications are envisioned to be supported by heterogeneous networks by using various wireless access technologies. The popular cellular networks and wireless local area networks (WLANs) present perfectly complementary characteristics in terms of service capacity, mobility support, and quality-of-service (QoS) provisioning. The cellular/WLAN interworking is an effective way to promote the evolution of wireless networks. "Interworking of Wireless LANs and Cellular Networks" focuses on three aspects, namely access selection, call admission control and

  3. NAT: perspectives for cellular components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, J A

    1999-12-01

    The introduction of routine testing to detect viral genomes in donated blood was originally driven by requirements for plasma fractionation in relation to exclusion of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA. Nevertheless, it was obvious from the outset that a dual standard for fractionated products and individual blood components would be untenable. In many countries therefore, planning for introduction of nucleic acid testing (NAT) of blood incorporated progression to release of HCV RNA tested components. HCV was singled out because of its long seronegative 'window period', relatively high prevalence and incidence in blood donors, rapid burst time and high genome copy number during seroconversion. The latter properties made HCV particularly suitable for detection in pools of samples. If HCV RNA testing is required for release of labile components such as platelets, rapid provision of NAT results is vital because of short shelf life of platelets and the problems of delays when resolving the infectious unit in a reactive pool. For NAT release of labile components smaller sample pool sizes allow faster resolution of RNA positive units. Smaller pools involve high test throughput, the likely need for more testing laboratories and ensuing increased costs. Single sample testing is the ultimate extrapolation of reducing sample pool size. With reduced pool sizes or single sample testing, the option of testing for other viruses (e.g. HIV or HBV) singly or in multiplex also arises. The cost-benefit and incremental yield of such strategies in the light of 'combo' assays for HIV Ag/Ab and the recently described HCV Ag assay will require careful and objective assessment, together with re-appraisal of anti-HBc screening for detection of HBV infected donors at the "tail-end" of carriage. PMID:10686060

  4. Life Insurance. Universal-Life Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Mike; Hayhoe, Celia Ray

    2009-01-01

    Universal-life insurance was created to address many of the problems associated with whole-life insurance. One problem with whole-life insurance is its lack of flexibility. A second problem with whole life is that it is much like a black box. The owner cannot see exactly how it works. Universal life provides solutions to these problems. To fully understand universal life, refer to "Life Insurance: Whole-Life Insurance", Virginia Cooperative Extension publication 354-145, for some backgroun...

  5. Pumping life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitsel, Oleg; Dach, Ingrid; Hoffmann, Robert Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The name PUMPKIN may suggest a research centre focused on American Halloween traditions or the investigation of the growth of vegetables – however this would be misleading. Researchers at PUMPKIN, short for Centre for Membrane Pumps in Cells and Disease, are in fact interested in a large family of...... membrane proteins: P-type ATPase pumps. This article takes the reader on a tour from Aarhus to Copenhagen, from bacteria to plants and humans, and from ions over protein structures to diseases caused by malfunctioning pump proteins. The magazine Nature once titled work published from PUMPKIN ‘Pumping ions......’. Here we illustrate that the pumping of ions means nothing less than the pumping of life....

  6. The role of sirtuins in cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupis, Wioleta; Pałyga, Jan; Tomal, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent lysine deacylases or ADP-ribosyltransferases. These cellular enzymes are metabolic sensors sensitive to NAD(+) levels that maintain physiological homeostasis in the animal and plant cells. PMID:27154583

  7. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies has developed, produced and tested, as part of the Phase-I SBIR, a new form of composite cellular core material, named Interply...

  8. MILLIMETER-WAVE EMISSIVITY OF CELLULAR SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general analysis has been presented of the millimeter-wave and farinfrared spectroscopic properties of in vivo cellular systems, and of the boson radiative equilibrium with steady-state nonequilibrium molecular systems. The frequency threshhold of spectroscopic properties assoc...

  9. A Matrix Construction of Cellular Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dajing Xiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we give a concrete method to construct cellular algebras from matrix algebras by specifying certain fixed matrices for the data of inflations. In particular,orthogonal matrices can be chosen for such data.

  10. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes such as...

  11. Vectorized multisite coding for hydrodynamic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulating eight lattices for Pomeau's cellular automata simultaneously through bit-per-bit operations, a vectorized Fortran program reached 30 million updates per second and per Cray YMP processor. They authors give the full innermost loops

  12. 47 CFR 22.911 - Cellular geographic service area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular geographic service area. 22.911... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.911 Cellular geographic service area. The Cellular Geographic Service Area (CGSA) of a cellular system is the geographic area considered by the...

  13. Line Complexity Asymptotics of Polynomial Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata are discrete dynamical systems that consist of patterns of symbols on a grid, which change according to a locally determined transition rule. In this paper, we will consider cellular automata that arise from polynomial transition rules, where the symbols in the automaton are integers modulo some prime $p$. We are principally concerned with the asymptotic behavior of the line complexity sequence $a_T(k)$, which counts, for each $k$, the number of coefficient strings of length...

  14. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten Münk; Jörg Zielonka

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating...

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progressi...

  16. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-01-01

    Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular ...

  17. Apoptotic regulation of epithelial cellular extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Daniel,; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2011-01-01

    Cellular extrusion is a mechanism that removes dying cells from epithelial tissues to prevent compromising their barrier function. Extrusion occurs in all observed epithelia in vivo and can be modeled in vitro by inducing apoptosis in cultured epithelial monolayers. We established that actin and myosin form a ring that contracts in the surrounding cells that drives cellular extrusion. It is not clear, however, if all apoptotic pathways lead to extrusion and how apoptosis and extrusion are mol...

  18. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models.

    OpenAIRE

    STORDAL, BRITTA KRISTINA

    2007-01-01

    PUBLISHED Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 ?g/ml. Cisplatin resistance i...

  19. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models

    OpenAIRE

    Stordal, Britta; Davey, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 microg/ml. Cisplatin resistance in these cells correlated...

  20. On the Behavior Characteristics of Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin-cai; ZHANG Jiang-ling; FENG Dan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the inherent relationships between the running regulations and behavior characteristics of cellular automata are presented; an imprecise taxonomy of such systems is put forward; the three extreme cases of stable systems are discussed; and the illogicalness of evolutional strategies of cellular automata is analyzed. The result is suitable for the emulation and prediction of behavior of discrete dynamics systems; especially it can be taken as an important analysis means of dynamic performance of complex networks.

  1. Cellular Hyperproliferation and Cancer as Evolutionary Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in biology have begun to dramatically change the way we think about evolution, development, health and disease. The ability to sequence the genomes of many individuals within a population, and across multiple species, has opened the door to the possibility of answering some long-standing and perplexing questions about our own genetic heritage. One such question revolves around the nature of cellular hyperproliferation. This cellular behavior is used to effect wound heal...

  2. Cellular Scaling Rules of Insectivore Brains

    OpenAIRE

    Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2009-01-01

    Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling rules overla...

  3. Cellular scaling rules of insectivore brains

    OpenAIRE

    Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Kaas, Jon H.; Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2009-01-01

    Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling ...

  4. Cellular scaling rules for primate brains

    OpenAIRE

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Collins, Christine E.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.

    2007-01-01

    Primates are usually found to have richer behavioral repertoires and better cognitive abilities than rodents of similar brain size. This finding raises the possibility that primate brains differ from rodent brains in their cellular composition. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for primate brains and show that brain size increases approximately isometrically as a function of cell numbers, such that an 11× larger brain is built with 10× more neurons and ≈12× more nonneuronal cells of ...

  5. Stochastic Simulations on the Cellular Wave Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Ercsey-Ravasz, M.; Roska, T.; Néda, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The computational paradigm represented by Cellular Neural/nonlinear Networks (CNN) and the CNN Universal Machine (CNN-UM) as a Cellular Wave Computer, gives new perspectives for computational physics. Many numerical problems and simulations can be elegantly addressed on this fully parallelized and analogic architecture. Here we study the possibility of performing stochastic simulations on this chip. First a realistic random number generator is implemented on the CNN-UM, and then as an example...

  6. Weighted Centroid Correction Localization in Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Zheng Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There is a large demand for wireless Location-Based Service (LBS and it is provided by many wireless cellular systems. In process of positioning a Mobile Station (MS, the computing speed is as important as the positioning accuracy and the algorithm should also be resistant to environmental influences. Approach: A new positioning method based on Weighted Centroid Correction Localization (WCCL for wireless cellular systems is introduced in this article. Firstly, referring to the receiving-state of an MS in cellular systems, it computes a weighted centroid of surrounding Base Stations (BSs as a rough approximate position of the MS. Then, according to the distances between the MS and the BSs being less or bigger than the computed distances between the BSs and the weighted centroid, it corrects the coordinate of the weighted centroid towards the directions of the BSs by moving it closer or farther in turn. Results: According to our experiments, WCCL improves the positioning accuracy, as well as to provide a better resistance to environmental influences. Conclusion: As a modified centroid-based localization algorithm, WCCL obtains weighting factors from the receiving-state of MS in multi-cells structured cellular systems and obtains a better positioning result in cellular systems without updating the network equipment. Therefore, for the cellular positioning problem, WCCL algorithm can be an alternate solution.

  7. The association between problematic cellular phone use and risky behaviors and low self-esteem among Taiwanese adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ko Chih-Hung; Yen Ju-Yu; Yang Yuan-Sheng; Cheng Chung-Ping; Yen Cheng-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Cellular phone use (CPU) is an important part of life for many adolescents. However, problematic CPU may complicate physiological and psychological problems. The aim of our study was to examine the associations between problematic CPU and a series of risky behaviors and low self-esteem in Taiwanese adolescents. Methods A total of 11,111 adolescent students in Southern Taiwan were randomly selected into this study. We used the Problematic Cellular Phone Use Questionnaire to...

  8. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. 22.970 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.970 Unacceptable interference to part 90...

  9. Life's Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  10. Optimization of Inter Cellular Movement of Parts in Cellular Manufacturing System Using Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Prasad Darla; C.D. Naiju; Polu Vidya Sagar; B. Venkat Likhit

    2014-01-01

    In the modern manufacturing environment, Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS) have gained greater importance in job shop or batch-type production to gain economic advantage similar to those of mass production. Successful implementation of CMS highly depends on the determination of part families; machine cells and minimizing inter cellular movement. This study considers machine component grouping problems namely inter-cellular movement and cell load variation by developing a mathematical model...

  11. Optimization of Inter Cellular Movement of Parts in Cellular Manufacturing System Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Prasad Darla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern manufacturing environment, Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS have gained greater importance in job shop or batch-type production to gain economic advantage similar to those of mass production. Successful implementation of CMS highly depends on the determination of part families; machine cells and minimizing inter cellular movement. This study considers machine component grouping problems namely inter-cellular movement and cell load variation by developing a mathematical model and optimizing the solution using Genetic Algorithm to arrive at a cell formation to minimize the inter-cellular movement and cell load variation. The results are presented with a numerical example.

  12. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  13. Cellular senescence and tumor promotion: Is aging the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Natalia; Demaria, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The senescence response is a potent tumor suppressor mechanism characterized by an irreversible growth arrest in response to potentially oncogenic signals to prevent the proliferation of damaged cells. Late in life, some of the features of senescent cells seem to mediate the development of age-related pathologies, including cancer. In the present review, we present a summary of the current knowledge regarding the causes, effector pathways and cellular features of senescence. We also discuss how the senescence response, initially a tumor suppressor mechanism, turns into a tumor promoter apparently as a consequence of aging. We argue that three age-related phenomena-senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) dysregulation, decline in the immune system function and genomic instability-could contribute, independently or synergistically, to deteriorate the efficacy of the senescence response in stopping cancer. As a consequence, senescent cells could be considered premalignant cells, and targeting senescent cells could be a preventive and therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:26845683

  14. Cellular Concrete Bricks with Recycled Expanded Polystyrene Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bosco Hernández-Zaragoza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular concrete bricks were obtained by using a lightweight mortar with recycled expanded polystyrene aggregate instead of sandy materials. After determining the block properties (absorption, compressive strength, and tensile stresses, it was found that this brick meets the requirements of the masonry standards used in Mexico. The obtained material is lighter than the commercial ones, which facilitates their rapid elaboration, quality control, and transportation. It is less permeable, which helps prevent moisture formation retaining its strength due to the greater adherence shown with dry polystyrene. It was more flexible, which makes it less vulnerable to cracking walls due to soil displacements. Furthermore, it is economical, because it uses recyclable material and has properties that prevent deterioration increasing its useful life. We recommend the use of the fully dry EP under a dry environment to obtain the best properties of brick.

  15. Crack Propagation in Honeycomb Cellular Materials: A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paggi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Computational models based on the finite element method and linear or nonlinear fracture mechanics are herein proposed to study the mechanical response of functionally designed cellular components. It is demonstrated that, via a suitable tailoring of the properties of interfaces present in the meso- and micro-structures, the tensile strength can be substantially increased as compared to that of a standard polycrystalline material. Moreover, numerical examples regarding the structural response of these components when subjected to loading conditions typical of cutting operations are provided. As a general trend, the occurrence of tortuous crack paths is highly favorable: stable crack propagation can be achieved in case of critical crack growth, whereas an increased fatigue life can be obtained for a sub-critical crack propagation.

  16. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  17. Cellular and Molecular Biological Approaches to Interpreting Ancient Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dianne K.; Neubauer, Cajetan; Ricci, Jessica N.; Wu, Chia-Hung; Pearson, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Our ability to read the molecular fossil record has advanced significantly in the past decade. Improvements in biomarker sampling and quantification methods, expansion of molecular sequence databases, and the application of genetic and cellular biological tools to problems in biomarker research have enabled much of this progress. By way of example, we review how attempts to understand the biological function of 2-methylhopanoids in modern bacteria have changed our interpretation of what their molecular fossils tell us about the early history of life. They were once thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria and hence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but we now believe that 2-methylhopanoid biosynthetic capacity originated in the Alphaproteobacteria, that 2-methylhopanoids are regulated in response to stress, and that hopanoid 2-methylation enhances membrane rigidity. We present a new interpretation of 2-methylhopanes that bridges the gap between studies of the functions of 2-methylhopanoids and their patterns of occurrence in the rock record.

  18. Shape-variable seals for pressure actuated cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramüller, B.; Tempel, A.; Hühne, C.

    2015-09-01

    Sealing concepts that allow a large change of cross-sectional area are investigated. Shape variable seals are indispensable for biologically inspired pressure actuated cellular structures (PACS), which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and adaptive structures for diverse applications. The extensibility, stiffness and load capacity requirements exceed the characteristics of state of the art solutions. This work focuses on the design of seals suitable for extensional deformations of more than 25%. In a first step, a number of concepts are generated. Then the most suitable concept is chosen, based on numerical characterization and experimental examination. The deformation supportive end cap (DSEC) yields satisfying results as it displays a stress optimized shape under maximum load, an energetically inexpensive bending-based deformation mechanism and utilizes the applied forces to support distortion. In the first real-life implementation of a double row PACS demonstrator, which contains the DSEC, the proof of concept is demonstrated.

  19. Cellular mechanisms of cadmium-induced toxicity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Anju; Kumar, Anuj; Lal, Ankita; Pant, Manu

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium is a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern because of its diverse toxic effects: extremely protracted biological half-life (approximately 20-30 years in humans), low rate of excretion from the body and storage predominantly in soft tissues (primarily, liver and kidneys). It is an extremely toxic element of continuing concern because environmental levels have risen steadily due to continued worldwide anthropogenic mobilization. Cadmium is absorbed in significant quantities from cigarette smoke, food, water and air contamination and is known to have numerous undesirable effects in both humans and animals. Cadmium has a diversity of toxic effects including nephrotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine and reproductive toxicities. At the cellular level, cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Most important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanism, generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis. In this article, we have reviewed recent developments and findings on cadmium toxicology. PMID:24117228

  20. Synthetic Biology: Tools to Design, Build, and Optimize Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Young

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The general central dogma frames the emergent properties of life, which make biology both necessary and difficult to engineer. In a process engineering paradigm, each biological process stream and process unit is heavily influenced by regulatory interactions and interactions with the surrounding environment. Synthetic biology is developing the tools and methods that will increase control over these interactions, eventually resulting in an integrative synthetic biology that will allow ground-up cellular optimization. In this review, we attempt to contextualize the areas of synthetic biology into three tiers: (1 the process units and associated streams of the central dogma, (2 the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, and (3 the extrinsic physical and chemical environment. Efforts at each of these three tiers attempt to control cellular systems and take advantage of emerging tools and approaches. Ultimately, it will be possible to integrate these approaches and realize the vision of integrative synthetic biology when cells are completely rewired for biotechnological goals. This review will highlight progress towards this goal as well as areas requiring further research.

  1. Computer Modeling of the Earliest Cellular Structures and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-03-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells (the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells), the most direct way to test ourunderstanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models of protocells. Such efforts are currently underway in the NASA Astrobiology Program. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures and developing designs for molecules that perform protocellular functions. Many of these functions, such as import of nutrients, capture and storage of energy, and response to changes in the environment are carried out by proteins bound to membranes. We will discuss a series of large-scale, molecular-level computer simulations which demonstrate (a) how small proteins (peptides)organize themselves into ordered structures at water-membrane interfaces and insert into membranes, (b) how these peptides aggregate to form membrane-spanning structures (e.g. channels), and (c) by what mechanisms such aggregates perform essential protocellular functions, such as proton transport of protons across cell walls, a key step in cellular bioenergetics. The simulations were performed using the molecular dynamics method, in which Newton's equations of motion for each atom in the system are solved iteratively. The problems of interest required simulations on multi-nanosecond time scales, which corresponded to 10^6-10^8 time steps.

  2. Halophilic life on Mars ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Holzinger, Anita; Polacsek, Tatjana K.; Legat, Andrea; Grösbacher, Michael; Weigl, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Background: The search for extraterrestrial life has been declared as a goal for the 21th century by several space agencies. Potential candidates are microorganisms on or in the surface of moons and planets, such as Mars. Extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) are of astrobiological interest since viable strains have been isolated from million years old salt deposits (1) and halite has been found in Martian meteorites and in surface pools. Therefore, haloarchaeal responses to simulated and real space conditions were explored. Immuno assays for a potential Life Marker Chip experiment were developed with antisera against the universal enzyme ATP synthase. Methods: The focus of these studies was on the application of fluorescent probes since they provide strong signals, and detection devices are suitable for miniaturization. Viability of haloarchaeal strains (Halococcus dombrowskii and Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1) was probed with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit and the BacLight™ Bacterial Membrane Potential kit. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the DNA, following exposure to simulated and real space conditions (UV irradiation from 200 - 400 nm; 18 months exposure on the International Space Station [ISS] within the ADAPT experiment by Dr. P. Rettberg), were detected with fluorescent Alexa-Fluor-488-coupled antibodies. Immuno assays with antisera against the A-ATPase subunits from Halorubrum saccharovorum were carried out with the highly sensitive Immun-Star ™ WesternC ™ chemiluminescent kit (Bio-Rad). Results: Using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit, the D37 (dose of 37% survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii and Hbt. salinarum NRC-1, following exposure to UV (200-400 nm) was about 400 kJ/m2, when cells were embedded in halite and about 1 kJ/m2, when cells were in liquid cultures. Fluorescent staining indicated a slightly higher cellular activity than that which was derived from the determination of colony forming units. Assessment of viability with the Bac

  3. DNA Methylation, Behavior and Early Life Adversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moshe Szyf

    2013-01-01

    The impact of early physical and social environments on life-long phenotypes is well known.Moreover,we have documented evidence for gene-enviromnent interactions where identical gene variants are associated with different phenotypes that are dependent on early life adversity.What are the mechanisms that embed these early life experiences in the genome? DNA methylation is an enzymaticallycatalyzed modification of DNA that serves as a mechanism by which similar sequences acquire cell type identity during cellular differentiation and embryogenesis in the same individual.The hypothesis that will be discussed here proposes that the same mechanism confers environmental-exposure specific identity upon DNA providing a mechanism for embedding environmental experiences in the genome,thus affecting long-term phenotypes.Particularly important is the environment early in life including both the prenatal and postnatal social environments.

  4. The Greenlandic Life Script and Life Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaragoza Scherman, Alejandra; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Adults older than 40 years remember a significantly greater amount of personal life events from their 15 - 30 years of age. This phenomenon is known as the reminiscence bump (Rubin, Rahal, & Poon, 1998). The reminiscence bump is highly populated by emotionally positive events (Rubin & Berntsen......, 2003), when cued by requests for important events. This dominance of positive events is not seen when cued by random words. Berntsen and Rubin (2004) presented a cultural explanation for the bump: cultural life script theory. Their theory claims that the bump for the life story can be explained by the...... life script; that is, culturally shared expectations about the order and timing of life events in an typical, idealized life course. According to the cultural life script theory, the life script is used as a guideline for the recall of autobiographical memories, which help construct personal life...

  5. Spin Echo Studies on Cellular Water

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, D C; Nichols, B L; Rorschach, H E

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the physical state of cellular water could be significantly different from pure liquid water. To experimentally investigate this possibility, we conducted a series of spin-echo NMR measurements on water protons in rat skeletal muscle. Our result indicated that the spin-lattice relaxation time and the spin-spin relaxation time of cellular water protons are both significantly shorter than that of pure water (by 4.3-fold and 34-fold, respectively). Furthermore, the spin diffusion coefficient of water proton is almost 1/2 of that of pure water. These data suggest that cellular water is in a more ordered state in comparison to pure water.

  6. Software-Defined Cellular Mobile Network Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong Li; Peng Liu; Hongyan Li

    2014-01-01

    The emergency relating to software-defined networking (SDN), especially in terms of the prototype associated with OpenFlow, pro-vides new possibilities for innovating on network design. Researchers have started to extend SDN to cellular networks. Such new programmable architecture is beneficial to the evolution of mobile networks and allows operators to provide better services. The typical cellular network comprises radio access network (RAN) and core network (CN); hence, the technique roadmap diverges in two ways. In this paper, we investigate SoftRAN, the latest SDN solution for RAN, and SoftCell and MobileFlow, the latest solu-tions for CN. We also define a series of control functions for CROWD. Unlike in the other literature, we emphasize only software-defined cellular network solutions and specifications in order to provide possible research directions.

  7. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In today’s world, three great classes of non-infectious diseases – the metabolic syndromes (such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis), the cancers, and the neurodegenerative disorders – have risen to the fore. These diseases, all associated with increasing age of an individual, have proven to be remarkably complex and difficult to treat. This is because, in large measure, when the cellular signaling pathways responsible for maintaining homeostasis and health of the body become dysregulated, they generate equally stable disease states. As a result the body may respond positively to a drug, but only for a while and then revert back to the disease state. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease summarizes our current understanding of these regulatory networks in the healthy and diseased states, showing which molecular components might be prime targets for drug interventions. This is accomplished by presenting models that explain in mechanistic, molecular detail how a particular part of the cellular sign...

  8. Cellular automatons applied to gas dynamic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lyle N.; Coopersmith, Robert M.; McLachlan, B. G.

    1987-06-01

    This paper compares the results of a relatively new computational fluid dynamics method, cellular automatons, with experimental data and analytical results. This technique has been shown to qualitatively predict fluidlike behavior; however, there have been few published comparisons with experiment or other theories. Comparisons are made for a one-dimensional supersonic piston problem, Stokes first problem, and the flow past a normal flat plate. These comparisons are used to assess the ability of the method to accurately model fluid dynamic behavior and to point out its limitations. Reasonable results were obtained for all three test cases, but the fundamental limitations of cellular automatons are numerous. It may be misleading, at this time, to say that cellular automatons are a computationally efficient technique. Other methods, based on continuum or kinetic theory, would also be very efficient if as little of the physics were included.

  9. Infrared image enhancement using Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-05-01

    Image enhancement is a crucial technique for infrared images. The clear image details are important for improving the quality of infrared images in computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new enhancement method based on two priors via Cellular Automata. First, we directly learn the gradient distribution prior from the images via Cellular Automata. Second, considering the importance of image details, we propose a new gradient distribution error to encode the structure information via Cellular Automata. Finally, an iterative method is applied to remap the original image based on two priors, further improving the quality of enhanced image. Our method is simple in implementation, easy to understand, extensible to accommodate other vision tasks, and produces more accurate results. Experiments show that the proposed method performs better than other methods using qualitative and quantitative measures.

  10. Cellular automatons applied to gas dynamic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lyle N.; Coopersmith, Robert M.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares the results of a relatively new computational fluid dynamics method, cellular automatons, with experimental data and analytical results. This technique has been shown to qualitatively predict fluidlike behavior; however, there have been few published comparisons with experiment or other theories. Comparisons are made for a one-dimensional supersonic piston problem, Stokes first problem, and the flow past a normal flat plate. These comparisons are used to assess the ability of the method to accurately model fluid dynamic behavior and to point out its limitations. Reasonable results were obtained for all three test cases, but the fundamental limitations of cellular automatons are numerous. It may be misleading, at this time, to say that cellular automatons are a computationally efficient technique. Other methods, based on continuum or kinetic theory, would also be very efficient if as little of the physics were included.

  11. Parametric study of double cellular detonation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasainov, B.; Virot, F.; Presles, H.-N.; Desbordes, D.

    2013-05-01

    A parametric numerical study is performed of a detonation cellular structure in a model gaseous explosive mixture whose decomposition occurs in two successive exothermic reaction steps with markedly different characteristic times. Kinetic and energetic parameters of both reactions are varied in a wide range in the case of one-dimensional steady and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-steady self-supported detonations. The range of governing parameters of both exothermic steps is defined where a "marked" double cellular structure exists. It is shown that the two-level cellular structure is completely governed by the kinetic parameters and the local overdrive ratio of the detonation front propagating inside large cells. Furthermore, since it is quite cumbersome to use detailed chemical kinetics in unsteady 2D case, the proposed work should help to identify the mixtures and the domain of their equivalence ratio where double detonation structure could be observed.

  12. Online isolation of defects in cellular nanocomputers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teijiro Isokawa; Shin'ya Kowada; Ferdinand Peper; Naotake Kamiura; Nobuyuki Matsui

    2007-01-01

    Unreliability will be a major issue for computers built from components at nanometer scales.Thus,it's to be expected that such computers will need a high degree of defect-tolerance to overcome components' defects which have arisen during the process of manufacturing.This paper presents a novel approach to defect-tolerance that is especially geared towards nanocomputers based on asynchronous cellular automata.According to this approach,defective cells are detected and isolated by small configurations that move around randomly in cellular space.These configurations,called random flies,will attach to configurations that are static,which is typical for configurations that contain defective cells.On the other hand,dynamic configurations,like those that conduct computations,will not be isolated from the rest of the cellular space by the random flies,and will be able to continue their operations unaffectedly.

  13. Phagocytosis, a cellular immune response in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rosales

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects like many other organisms are exposed to a wide range of infectious agents. Defense against these agents is provided by innate immune systems, which include physical barriers, humoral responses, and cellular responses. The humoral responses are characterized by the production of antimicrobial peptides, while the cellular defense responses include nodulation, encapsulation, melanization and phagocytosis. The phagocytic process, whereby cells ingest large particles, is of fundamental importance for insects’ development and survival. Phagocytic cells recognize foreign particles through a series of receptors on their cell membrane for pathogen-associated molecules. These receptors in turn initiate a series of signaling pathways that instruct the cell to ingest and eventually destroy the foreign particle. This review describes insect innate humoral and cellular immune functions with emphasis on phagocytosis. Recent advances in our understanding of the phagocytic cell types in various insect species; the receptors involved and the signaling pathways activated during phagocytosis are discussed.

  14. Alleviate Cellular Congestion Through Opportunistic Trough Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cellular data service has been skyrocketing since the debut of data-intensive smart phones and touchpads. However, not all data are created equal. Many popular applications on mobile devices, such as email synchronization and social network updates, are delay tolerant. In addition, cellular load varies significantly in both large and small time scales. To alleviate network congestion and improve network performance, we present a set of opportunistic trough filling schemes that leverage the time-variation of network congestion and delay-tolerance of certain traffic in this paper. We consider average delay, deadline, and clearance time as the performance metrics. Simulation results show promising performance improvement over the standard schemes. The work shed lights on addressing the pressing issue of cellular overload.

  15. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  16. About the embedding of one dimensional cellular automata into hyperbolic cellular automata

    OpenAIRE

    Margenstern, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we look at two ways to implement determinisitic one dimensional cellular automata into hyperbolic cellular automata in three contexts: the pentagrid, the heptagrid and the dodecagrid, these tilings being classically denoted by $\\{5,4\\}$, $\\{7,3\\}$ and $\\{5,3,4\\}$ respectively.

  17. Cellularity of certain quantum endomorphism algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Lehrer, Gus; Zhang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    For any ring A˜ such that Z[q±1∕2]⊆A˜⊆Q(q1∕2), let ΔA˜(d) be an A˜-form of the Weyl module of highest weight d∈N of the quantised enveloping algebra UA˜ of sl2. For suitable A˜, we exhibit for all positive integers r an explicit cellular structure for EndUA˜(ΔA˜(d)⊗r). This algebra and its cellul...... we independently recover the weight multiplicities of indecomposable tilting modules for Uζ(sl2) from the decomposition numbers of the endomorphism algebras, which are known through cellular theory....

  18. Rapid Cellular Turnover in Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Rigamonti; Kristen Brennand; Frank Lau; Cowan, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that cellular turnover occurs within the human adipocyte population. Through three independent experimental approaches — dilution of an inducible histone 2B-green fluorescent protein (H2BGFP), labeling with the cell cycle marker Ki67 and incorporation of BrdU — we characterized the degree of cellular turnover in murine adipose tissue. We observed rapid turnover of the adipocyte population, finding that 4.8% of preadipocytes are replicating at any time and that between 1–...

  19. Cellular effects of LRRK2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a relatively common cause of inherited Parkinson's disease (PD) but the mechanism(s) by which mutations lead to disease are poorly understood. Here, I will discuss what is known about LRRK2 in cellular models, focusing on specifically on assays that have been used to tease apart the effects of LRRK2 mutations on cellular phenotypes. LRRK2 expression has been suggested to cause loss of neuronal viability, although because it also has a stro...

  20. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  1. Cellular basis of radiation-induced fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibrosis is a common sequela of both cancer treatment by radiotherapy and accidental irradiation and has been described in many tissues including skin, lung, heart and liver. The underlying mechanisms of the radiation-induced fibrosis still remain to be resolved. In the present review we tried to illustrate the basic cellular mechanisms of radiation-induced fibrosis based on the newest findings arising from molecular radiobiology and cell biology. Based on these findings the cellular mechanism of radiation-induced fibrosis can be seen as a multicellular process involving various interacting cell systems in the target organ resulting in the fibrotic phenotype of the fibroblast/fibrocyte cell system

  2. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Fan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis, respectively. While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells, autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules. Yet in some conditions, autophagy can lead to cell death. Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses. Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways, which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  3. Chaotic behavior in the disorder cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disordered cellular automata (DCA) represent an intermediate class between elementary cellular automata and the Kauffman network. Recently, Rule 126 of DCA has been explicated: the system can be accurately described by a discrete probability function. However, a means of extending to other rules has not been developed. In this investigation, a density map of the dynamical behavior of DCA is formulated based on Rule 22 and other totalistic rules. The numerical results reveal excellent agreement between the model and original automata. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous situation is also discussed

  4. External insulation with cellular plastic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Nielsen, Anker

    2014-01-01

    External thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS) can be used as extra insulation of existing buildings. The system can be made of cellular plastic materials or mineral wool. There is a European Technical guideline, ETAG 004, that describe the tests that shall be conducted on such systems....... This paper gives a comparison of systems with mineral wool and cellular plastic, based on experience from practice and literature. It is important to look at the details in the system and at long time stability of the properties such as thermal insulation, moisture and fire. Investigation of fire properties...

  5. Fat tissue, aging, and cellular senescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Tchkonia, T.; Morbeck, D.E.; Zglinicki, T. von; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Lustgarten, J.; Scrable, H.; Khosla, S.; Jensen, M.D.; Kirkland, J L

    2010-01-01

    Fat tissue, frequently the largest organ in humans, is at the nexus of mechanisms involved in longevity and age-related metabolic dysfunction. Fat distribution and function change dramatically throughout life. Obesity is associated with accelerated onset of diseases common in old age, while fat ablation and certain mutations affecting fat increase life span. Fat cells turn over throughout the life span. Fat cell progenitors, preadipocytes, are abundant, closely related to macrophages, and dys...

  6. On reversibility of cellular automata with periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobe, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-3, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Yura, Fumitaka [Imai Quantum Computing and Information Project, ERATO, JST, Daini Hongo White Bldg 201, 5-28-3 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2004-06-04

    Reversibility of one-dimensional cellular automata with periodic boundary conditions is discussed. It is shown that there exist exactly 16 reversible elementary cellular automaton rules for infinitely many cell sizes by means of a correspondence between elementary cellular automaton and the de Bruijn graph. In addition, a sufficient condition for reversibility of three-valued and two-neighbour cellular automaton is given.

  7. 47 CFR 22.905 - Channels for cellular service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for cellular service. 22.905 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.905 Channels for cellular service. The following frequency bands are allocated for assignment to service providers in the Cellular Radiotelephone Service....

  8. 47 CFR 22.923 - Cellular system configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular system configuration. 22.923 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.923 Cellular system configuration. Mobile stations... directly or through cellular repeaters. Auxiliary test stations may communicate with base or...

  9. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world's looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students' understanding of the cell's position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  10. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F.

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world’s looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students’ understanding of the cell’s position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  11. Cellular automata and self-organized criticality

    OpenAIRE

    Creutz, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems capable of diverse complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and time scales.

  12. Cellular Automata Rules and Linear Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Birendra Kumar; Sahoo, Sudhakar; Biswal, Sagarika

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, linear Cellular Automta (CA) rules are recursively generated using a binary tree rooted at "0". Some mathematical results on linear as well as non-linear CA rules are derived. Integers associated with linear CA rules are defined as linear numbers and the properties of these linear numbers are studied.

  13. Phosphoproteomics: new insights into cellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Mumby, Marc; Brekken, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Developments in the field of phosphoproteomics have been fueled by the need simultaneously to monitor many different phosphoproteins within the signaling networks that coordinate responses to changes in the cellular environment. This article presents a brief review of phosphoproteomics with an emphasis on the biological insights that have been derived so far.

  14. Cellular grafts in management of leucoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular grafting methods constitute important advances in the surgical management of leucoderma. Different methods such as noncultured epidermal suspensions, melanocyte cultures, and melanocyte-keratinocyte cultures have all been shown to be effective. This article reviews these methods.

  15. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  16. Holistic design and implementation of pressure actuated cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramüller, B.; Köke, H.; Hühne, C.

    2015-12-01

    Providing the possibility to develop energy-efficient, lightweight adaptive components, pressure-actuated cellular structures (PACS) are primarily conceived for aeronautics applications. The realization of shape-variable flaps and even airfoils provides the potential to safe weight, increase aerodynamic efficiency and enhance agility. The herein presented holistic design process points out and describes the necessary steps for designing a real-life PACS structure, from the computation of truss geometry to the manufacturing and assembly. The already published methods for the form finding of PACS are adjusted and extended for the exemplary application of a variable-camber wing. The transfer of the form-finding truss model to a cross-sectional design is discussed. The end cap and sealing concept is described together with the implementation of the integral fluid flow. Conceptual limitations due to the manufacturing and assembly processes are discussed. The method’s efficiency is evaluated by finite element method. In order to verify the underlying methods and summarize the presented work a modular real-life demonstrator is experimentally characterized and validates the numerical investigations.

  17. The Cellular Bromodomain Protein Brd4 has Multiple Functions in E2-Mediated Papillomavirus Transcription Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Helfer, Christine M.; Junpeng Yan; Jianxin You

    2014-01-01

    The cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 functions in multiple processes of the papillomavirus life cycle, including viral replication, genome maintenance, and gene transcription through its interaction with the viral protein, E2. However, the mechanisms by which E2 and Brd4 activate viral transcription are still not completely understood. In this study, we show that recruitment of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), a functional interaction partner of Brd4 in transcription act...

  18. Comparison of cellular and tissue transcriptional profiles in canine mammary tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlowski, K.M.; Krol, M.; Majewska, A.; Badowska-Kozakiewicz, A.; Mol, J. A.; Malicka, E.; Motyl, T.

    2009-01-01

    J Physiol Pharmacol. 2009 May;60 Suppl 1:85-94. Comparison of cellular and tissue transcriptional profiles in canine mammary tumor. Pawlowski KM, Krol M, Majewska A, Badowska-Kozakiewicz A, Mol JA, Malicka E, Motyl T. Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland. Tumor-derived cell lines are widely used as in vitro cancer models. Cell lines historically served as the primary experimental model systems for exploration o...

  19. Persistence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Is Determined by a Cellular Cofactor of a Viral Autoprotease

    OpenAIRE

    Lackner, T.; Müller, A.; König, M; Thiel, H.-J.; Tautz, N.

    2005-01-01

    Polyprotein processing control is a crucial step in the life cycle of positive-strand RNA viruses. Recently, a vital autoprotease generating an essential viral replication factor was identified in such a virus, namely, the pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus. Surprisingly, the activity of this protease, which resides in nonstructural protein 2 (NS2), diminishes early after infection, resulting in the limitation of viral RNA replication. Here, we describe that a cellular chaperone termed Ji...

  20. Sodium-Glucose Transporter-2 (SGLT2; SLC5A2) Enhances Cellular Uptake of Aminoglycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Meiyan Jiang; Qi Wang; Takatoshi Karasawa; Ja-Won Koo; Hongzhe Li; Steyger, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, like gentamicin, continue to be clinically essential worldwide to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. Yet, the ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects of these drugs remain serious complications. A major site of gentamicin uptake and toxicity resides within kidney proximal tubules that also heavily express electrogenic sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2; SLC5A2) in vivo. We hypothesized that SGLT2 traffics gentamicin, and promotes cellular toxicity. We conf...

  1. Managing Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duchenne / Managing Daily Life Print Email Managing Daily Life Environmental accessibility As the person with Duchenne starts ... such as wider doorways and ramps, can make life easier once the person with Duchenne cannot climb ...

  2. Cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine imaging: training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides used in nuclear medicine imaging emit not only diagnostically useful photons, but also energy electron emissions, responsible for dose heterogeneity at the cellular level. The mean dose delivered to the cell nucleus by electron emissions of 99mTc, 123I, 111In, 67Ga, and 201Tl, has been calculated, for the cell nucleus, a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distribution of radioactivity. This model takes into account both the self-dose which results from the radionuclide located in the target cell, and the cross-dose, which comes from the surrounding cells. The results obtained by cellular dosimetry (Dcel) have been compared with those obtained with conventional dosimetry (Dconv), by assuming the same amount of radioactivity per cell. Cellular dosimetry shows, for a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, that the main contribution to the dose to the cell nucleus, comes from the surrounding cells. On the other hand, for a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity, the self-dose is not negligible and may be the main contribution. The comparison between cellular and conventional dosimetry shows that Dcel/Dconv ratio ranges from 0.61 and O.89, in case of a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, depending on the radionuclide and cell dimensions. Thus, conventional dosimetry slightly overestimates the mean dose to the cell nucleus. On the other hand, Dcel/Dconv ranges from 1.1 to 75, in case of a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity. Conventional dosimetry may strongly underestimates the absorbed dose to the nucleus, when radioactivity is located in the nucleus. The study indicates that in nuclear medicine imaging, cellular dosimetry may lead to a better understanding of biological effects of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  3. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  4. Cellular glutathione prevents cytolethality of monomethylarsonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenicals are clearly toxicants and carcinogens in humans. In mammals, including humans, inorganic arsenic often undergoes methylation, forming compounds such as monomethylarsonic acid (MMAsV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAsV). However, much less information is available on the in vitro toxic potential or mechanisms of these methylated arsenicals, especially MMAsV. We studied the molecular mechanisms of in vitro cytolethality of MMAsV using a rat liver epithelial cell line (TRL 1215). MMAsV was not cytotoxic in TRL 1215 cells even at concentrations exceeding 10 mM, but it became weakly cytotoxic and induced both necrotic and apoptotic cell death when cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) was depleted with the glutathione synthase inhibitor, L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), or the glutathione reductase inhibitor, carmustine. Similar results were observed in the other mammalian cells, such as human skin TIG-112 cells, chimpanzee skin CRT-1609 cells, and mouse metallothionein (MT) positive and MT negative embryonic cells. Ethacrynic acid (EA), an inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase (GST) that catalyses GSH-substrate conjugation, also enhanced the cytolethality of MMAsV, but aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of β-lyase that catalyses the final breakdown of GSH-substrate conjugates, had no effect. Both the cellular GSH levels and the cellular GST activity were increased by the exposure to MMAsV in TRL 1215 cells. On the other hand, the addition of exogenous extracellular GSH enhanced the cytolethality of MMAsV, although cellular GSH levels actually prevented the cytolethality of combined MMAsV and exogenous GSH. These findings indicate that human arsenic metabolite MMAsV is not a highly toxic compound in mammalian cells, and the level of cellular GSH is critical to its eventual toxic effects

  5. Chance of Necessity: Modeling Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental nature of processes that led to the emergence of life has been a subject of long-standing debate. One view holds that the origin of life is an event governed by chance, and the result of so many random events is unpredictable. This view was eloquently expressed by Jacques Monod in his book Chance or Necessity. In an alternative view, the origin of life is considered a deterministic event. Its details need not be deterministic in every respect, but the overall behavior is predictable. A corollary to the deterministic view is that the emergence of life must have been determined primarily by universal chemistry and biochemistry rather than by subtle details of environmental conditions. In my lecture I will explore two different paradigms for the emergence of life and discuss their implications for predictability and universality of life-forming processes. The dominant approach is that the origin of life was guided by information stored in nucleic acids (the RNA World hypothesis). In this view, selection of improved combinations of nucleic acids obtained through random mutations drove evolution of biological systems from their conception. An alternative hypothesis states that the formation of protocellular metabolism was driven by non-genomic processes. Even though these processes were highly stochastic the outcome was largely deterministic, strongly constrained by laws of chemistry. I will argue that self-replication of macromolecules was not required at the early stages of evolution; the reproduction of cellular functions alone was sufficient for self-maintenance of protocells. In fact, the precise transfer of information between successive generations of the earliest protocells was unnecessary and could have impeded the discovery of cellular metabolism. I will also show that such concepts as speciation and fitness to the environment, developed in the context of genomic evolution also hold in the absence of a genome.

  6. Perspectives for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by cellular regeneration of the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Branco, Mario S; Cabrera, Sonia; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a caused by the loss of the cochlear hair cells with the consequent deafferentation of spiral ganglion neurons. Humans do not show endogenous cellular regeneration in the inner ear and there is no exogenous therapy that allows the replacement of the damaged hair cells. Currently, treatment is based on the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants that present different outcomes, some difficulties in auditory discrimination and a limited useful life. More advanced technology is hindered by the functional capacity of the remaining spiral ganglion neurons. The latest advances with stem cell therapy and cellular reprogramming have developed several possibilities to induce endogenous regeneration or stem cell transplantation to replace damaged inner ear hair cells and restore hearing function. With further knowledge of the cellular and molecular biology of the inner ear and its embryonic development, it will be possible to use induced stem cells as in vitro models of disease and as replacement cellular therapy. Investigation in this area is focused on generating cellular therapy with clinical use for the treatment of profound sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25459416

  7. Patterns, Entropy, and Predictability of Human Mobility and Life

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Meng Qin; Hannu Verkasalo; Mikael Mohtaschemi; Tuomo Hartonen; Mikko Alava

    2012-01-01

    Cellular phones are now offering an ubiquitous means for scientists to observe life: how people act, move and respond to external influences. They can be utilized as measurement devices of individual persons and for groups of people of the social context and the related interactions. The picture of human life that emerges shows complexity, which is manifested in such data in properties of the spatiotemporal tracks of individuals. We extract from smartphone-based data for a set of persons impo...

  8. Cellular toxicity (High-Throughput Cellular Assays for Modeling Toxicity in the Fish Reproductive System)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to adapt cellular in vitro assay systems of the rainbow trout pituitary, liver and ovary for high-throughput screening (HTS) of...

  9. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multi...

  10. Synthesis of New Styrylquinoline Cellular Dyes, Fluorescent Properties, Cellular Localization and Cytotoxic Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Rams-Baron, Marzena; Dulski, Mateusz; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Korzec, Mateusz; Cieslik, Wioleta; Spaczyńska, Ewelina; Bartczak, Piotr; Ratuszna, Alicja; Polanski, Jaroslaw; Musiol, Robert

    2016-01-01

    New styrylquinoline derivatives with their photophysical constants are described. The synthesis was achieved via Sonogashira coupling using the newly developed heterogeneous nano-Pd/Cu catalyst system, which provides an efficient synthesis of high purity products. The compounds were tested in preliminary fluorescent microscopy studies to in order to identify their preferable cellular localization, which appeared to be in the lipid cellular organelles. The spectroscopic properties of the compo...

  11. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  12. Designing beauty the art of cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, Genaro

    2016-01-01

    This fascinating, colourful book offers in-depth insights and first-hand working experiences in the production of art works, using simple computational models with rich morphological behaviour, at the edge of mathematics, computer science, physics and biology. It organically combines ground breaking scientific discoveries in the theory of computation and complex systems with artistic representations of the research results. In this appealing book mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists, and engineers brought together marvelous and esoteric patterns generated by cellular automata, which are arrays of simple machines with complex behavior. Configurations produced by cellular automata uncover mechanics of dynamic patterns formation, their propagation and interaction in natural systems: heart pacemaker, bacterial membrane proteins, chemical rectors, water permeation in soil, compressed gas, cell division, population dynamics, reaction-diffusion media and self-organisation. The book inspires artists to tak...

  13. A Modified Sensitive Driving Cellular Automaton Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Hong-Xia; DAI Shi-Qiang; DONG Li-Yun; LEI Li

    2005-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton model for traffic flow on highway is proposed with a novel concept about the variable security gap. The concept is first introduced into the original Nagel-Schreckenberg model, which is called the non-sensitive driving cellular automaton model. And then it is incorporated with a sensitive driving NaSch model,in which the randomization brake is arranged before the deterministic deceleration. A parameter related to the variable security gap is determined through simulation. Comparison of the simulation results indicates that the variable security gap has different influence on the two models. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation with the modified sensitive driving NaSch model shows that the maximumflow are in good agreement with the observed data, indicating that the presented model is more reasonable and realistic.

  14. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schrödinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of “natural” Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l are obtained, which for l → 0 reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  15. Mobile Node Localization in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Malik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Location information is the major component in location based applications. This information is used in different safety and service oriented applications to provide users with services according to their Geolocation. There are many approaches to locate mobile nodes in indoor and outdoor environments. In thispaper, we are interested in outdoor localization particularly in cellular networks of mobile nodes andpresented a localization method based on cell and user location information. Our localization method is based on hello message delay (sending and receiving time and coordinate information of Base Transceiver Station (BTSs. To validate our method across cellular network, we implemented and simulated our method in two scenarios i.e. maintaining database of base stations in centralize and distributed system. Simulation results show the effectiveness of our approach and its implementation applicability in telecommunication systems.

  16. Cellular automata in image processing and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Sun, Xianfang

    2014-01-01

    The book presents findings, views and ideas on what exact problems of image processing, pattern recognition and generation can be efficiently solved by cellular automata architectures. This volume provides a convenient collection in this area, in which publications are otherwise widely scattered throughout the literature. The topics covered include image compression and resizing; skeletonization, erosion and dilation; convex hull computation, edge detection and segmentation; forgery detection and content based retrieval; and pattern generation. The book advances the theory of image processing, pattern recognition and generation as well as the design of efficient algorithms and hardware for parallel image processing and analysis. It is aimed at computer scientists, software programmers, electronic engineers, mathematicians and physicists, and at everyone who studies or develops cellular automaton algorithms and tools for image processing and analysis, or develops novel architectures and implementations of mass...

  17. SELF-ORGANIZED CRITICALITY AND CELLULAR AUTOMATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems based on very simple rules of evolution yet capable of displaying highly complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and the scales. This article begins with an overview of self-organized criticality. This is followed by a discussion of a few examples of simple cellular automaton systems, some of which may exhibit critical behavior. Finally, some of the fascinating exact mathematical properties of the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sand-pile model [1] are discussed.

  18. Molecular features of cellular reprogramming and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary D; Sindhu, Camille; Meissner, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating somatic cells are progressively restricted to specialized functions during ontogeny, but they can be experimentally directed to form other cell types, including those with complete embryonic potential. Early nuclear reprogramming methods, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and cell fusion, posed significant technical hurdles to precise dissection of the regulatory programmes governing cell identity. However, the discovery of reprogramming by ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors, known as direct reprogramming, provided a tractable platform to uncover molecular characteristics of cellular specification and differentiation, cell type stability and pluripotency. We discuss the control and maintenance of cellular identity during developmental transitions as they have been studied using direct reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. PMID:26883001

  19. Stochastic Simulations on the Cellular Wave Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Ercsey-Ravasz, M; Neda, Z

    2006-01-01

    The computational paradigm represented by Cellular Neural/nonlinear Networks (CNN) and the CNN Universal Machine (CNN-UM) as a Cellular Wave Computer, gives new perspectives for computational physics. Many numerical problems and simulations can be elegantly addressed on this fully parallelized and analogic architecture. Here we study the possibility of performing stochastic simulations on this chip. First a realistic random number generator is implemented on the CNN-UM, and then as an example the two-dimensional Ising model is studied by Monte Carlo type simulations. The results obtained on an experimental version of the CNN-UM with 128 * 128 cells are in good agreement with the results obtained on digital computers. Computational time measurements suggests that the developing trend of the CNN-UM chips - increasing the lattice size and the number of local logic memories - will assure an important advantage for the CNN-UM in the near future.

  20. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  1. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schroedinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of "natural" Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, "deformed" quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale $l$ are obtained, which for $l\\rightarrow 0$ reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form "multipartite" systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce...

  2. Exponential Stability for Delayed Cellular Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-xiang; ZHONG Shou-ming; YAN Ke-yu

    2005-01-01

    The exponential stability of the delayed cellular neural networks (DCNN's) is investigated. By dividing the network state variables into some parts according to the characters of the neural networks, some new sufficient conditions of exponential stability are derived via constructing a Liapunov function. It is shown that the conditions differ from previous ones. The new conditions, which are associated with some initial value, are represented by some blocks of the interconnection matrix.

  3. A framework for understanding cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sílvio Carmo; Alves, Anabela Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Many practical benefits, such as superior quality of products and short manufacturing lead times, are usually associated with Cellular Manufacturing. These and other benefits can lead to important competitive advantages of companies. However, to fully achieve these benefits there is a need for an evolution from the traditional concept of CM to the more comprehensive one, which we call Product Oriented Manufacturing. Here systems are dynamically reconfigured for total manufac...

  4. Spectrum sharing for future mobile cellular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Spectrum sharing has become a high priority research area over the past few years. The motivation behind this lies in the fact that the limited spectrum is currently inefficiently utilized. As recognized by the World radio communication conference (WRC)-07, the amount of identified spectrum is not large enough to support large bandwidths for a substantial number of operators. Therefore, it is paramount for future mobile cellular systems to share the frequency spectrum and coexist ...

  5. Clinical applications of cellular therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Yanbakan

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell types and have usage about lots of regenerative medicine research fields. Especially bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have a wide range of case presentation. New discoveries about stem cell biology will progress new options about cellular therapy products and isolation of different stem cell types will increase hope for treatment of important illness such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, malign brain tumors. It...

  6. Cellular Automata Studies of Vertical Silicon Devices

    OpenAIRE

    M. Saraniti; G. Zandler; G. Formicone; S. Goodnick

    1998-01-01

    We present systematic theoretical Cellular Automata (CA) studies of a novel nanometer scale Si device, namely vertically grown Metal Oxide Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) with channel lengths between 65 and 120 nm. The CA simulations predict drain characteristics and output conductance as a function of gate length. The excellent agreement with available experimental data indicates a high quality oxide/semiconductor interface. Impact ionization is shown to be of minor importance. For inhomog...

  7. Mapping functional connectivity in cellular networks

    OpenAIRE

    Buibas, Marius

    2011-01-01

    My thesis is a collection of theoretical and practical techniques for mapping functional or effective connectivity in cellular neuronal networks, at the cell scale. This is a challenging scale to work with, primarily because of the difficulty in labeling and measuring the activities of networks of cells. It is also important as it underlies behavior, function, and complex diseases. I present methods to measure and quantify the dynamic activities of cells using the optical flow technique, whic...

  8. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Dennerlein Sven, S.; Rehling, P

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial- encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisin...

  9. Stability of Stochastic Neutral Cellular Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong

    In this paper, we study a class of stochastic neutral cellular neural networks. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and employing the nonnegative semi-martingale convergence theorem we give some sufficient conditions ensuring the almost sure exponential stability of the networks. The results obtained are helpful to design stability of networks when stochastic noise is taken into consideration. Finally, two examples are provided to show the correctness of our analysis.

  10. Cognitive resource management for heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yongkang

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on cognitive resource management in heterogeneous cellular networks (Het Net) with small cell deployment for the LTE-Advanced system. It introduces the Het Net features, presents practical approaches using cognitive radio technology in accommodating small cell data relay and optimizing resource allocation and examines the effectiveness of resource management among small cells given limited coordination bandwidth and wireless channel uncertainty. The authors introduce different network characteristics of small cell, investigate the mesh of small cell access points in

  11. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  12. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  13. Empirical multiscale networks of cellular regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin de Bivort

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouping genes by similarity of expression across multiple cellular conditions enables the identification of cellular modules. The known functions of genes enable the characterization of the aggregate biological functions of these modules. In this paper, we use a high-throughput approach to identify the effective mutual regulatory interactions between modules composed of mouse genes from the Alliance for Cell Signaling (AfCS murine B-lymphocyte database which tracks the response of approximately 15,000 genes following chemokine perturbation. This analysis reveals principles of cellular organization that we discuss along four conceptual axes. (1 Regulatory implications: the derived collection of influences between any two modules quantifies intuitive as well as unexpected regulatory interactions. (2 Behavior across scales: trends across global networks of varying resolution (composed of various numbers of modules reveal principles of assembly of high-level behaviors from smaller components. (3 Temporal behavior: tracking the mutual module influences over different time intervals provides features of regulation dynamics such as duration, persistence, and periodicity. (4 Gene Ontology correspondence: the association of modules to known biological roles of individual genes describes the organization of functions within coexpressed modules of various sizes. We present key specific results in each of these four areas, as well as derive general principles of cellular organization. At the coarsest scale, the entire transcriptional network contains five divisions: two divisions devoted to ATP production/biosynthesis and DNA replication that activate all other divisions, an "extracellular interaction" division that represses all other divisions, and two divisions (proliferation/differentiation and membrane infrastructure that activate and repress other divisions in specific ways consistent with cell cycle control.

  14. Sumo and the cellular stress response

    OpenAIRE

    Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin family member Sumo has important functions in many cellular processes including DNA repair, transcription and cell division. Numerous studies have shown that Sumo is essential for maintaining cell homeostasis when the cell encounters endogenous or environmental stress, such as osmotic stress, hypoxia, heat shock, genotoxic stress, and nutrient stress. Regulation of transcription is a key component of the Sumo stress response, and multiple mechanisms have been described by which ...

  15. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants

    OpenAIRE

    Soti, Csaba; Csermely, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which have among their functions to sequester and repair damaged protein. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of t...

  16. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Dahir Ramos de; Andrade Júnior Dahir Ramos de

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a) Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b) The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein) A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c) The function of ...

  17. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology o...

  18. Introduction to Tissular and Cellular Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JF; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    Most human tissues do not regenerate spontaneously, which is why cellular therapies and tissular engineering are promising alternatives. The principle is simple: cells are sampled in a patient and introduced in the damaged tissue or in a tridimentional porous support and cultivated in a bioreactor in which the physico-chemical and mechanical parameters are controlled. Once the tissues (or the cells) are mature they may be implanted. In parallel, the development of biotherapies with stem cells is a field of ...

  19. Cellular mechanisms of nociception in the frog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuffler, D. P.; Lyfenko, Alla; Vyklický st., Ladislav; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2002), s. 1843-1850. ISSN 0022-3077 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1639; GA MŠk LN00B122 Grant ostatní: NATO(XX) Grant 977062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cellular mechanisms of nociception * frog Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.743, year: 2002

  20. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the fo...

  1. Cellular and synaptic network defects in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Peça, João; Feng, Guoping

    2012-01-01

    Many candidate genes are now thought to confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Here we review four interrelated complexes, each composed of multiple families of genes that functionally coalesce on common cellular pathways. We illustrate a common thread in the organization of glutamatergic synapses and suggest a link between genes involved in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome and several synaptic ASD candidate genes. When viewed in this conte...

  2. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Jumaat Mohd Yussof; Effat Omar; Pai, Dinker R.; Suneet Sood

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth f...

  3. Cellular factors required for papillomavirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Melendy, T; Sedman, J; Stenlund, A

    1995-01-01

    In vitro replication of papillomavirus DNA has been carried out with a combination of purified proteins and partially purified extracts made from human cells. DNA synthesis requires the viral E1 protein and the papillomavirus origin of replication. The E2 protein stimulates DNA synthesis in a binding site-independent manner. Papillomavirus DNA replication is also dependent on the cellular factors replication protein A, replication factor C, and proliferating-cell nuclear antigen as well as a ...

  4. Image processing with a cellular nonlinear network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular nonlinear network (CNN) based on uncoupled nonlinear oscillators is proposed for image processing purposes. It is shown theoretically and numerically that the contrast of an image loaded at the nodes of the CNN is strongly enhanced, even if this one is initially weak. An image inversion can be also obtained without reconfiguration of the network whereas a gray levels extraction can be performed with an additional threshold filtering. Lastly, an electronic implementation of this CNN is presented

  5. Animal and cellular models of human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arends, Mark; White, Eric; Whitelaw, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this eighteenth (2016) Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology, we present a collection of 19 invited review articles that cover different aspects of cellular and animal models of disease. These include genetically-engineered models, chemically-induced models, naturally-occurring models, and combinations thereof, with the focus on recent methodological and conceptual developments across a wide range of human diseases.

  6. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    OpenAIRE

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira; João Paulo Ferreira Schoffen

    2010-01-01

    Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the fac...

  7. Cellular Signaling in the Bovine Antral Follicles

    OpenAIRE

    Juan F. Vásquez - Cano; Martha Olivera - A.

    2010-01-01

    Antral follicle development in the ovary of female cattle is the product of a complex of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine relationships. The interactions of the pituitary gonadotropins over granulosa and theca cells prepare the follicle to produce estradiol and for the final stages of maturation of the oocyte and its potencial ovulation or atresia inside subordinate follicles. It is a dynamic event where cellular signaling patterns changes sequentiallyand quickly at different stages of foll...

  8. Cellular-based sea level gauge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.

    treaties with greater transparency. Among the various communication technologies used for real-time transmission of sea-level data are the wired telephone connection, VHF/UHF transceivers, satellite transmit terminals and cellular connectivity. Wired... telephone connections are severely susceptible to loss of connectivity during natural disasters such as storm surges, primarily because of telephone line breakage. Communication via VHF/UHF transceivers is limited by line-of-sight distance between...

  9. The flow of forces through cellular materials

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Mitchell A.

    2012-01-01

    Describing and measuring the elastic properties of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams can be a difficult problem when the cell structure is disordered. This paper suggests that tracking the flow of forces through the material can help in visualizing and understanding how the geometry of the cell structure affects the elastic behaviour. The mean strain tensor for a sample of material can be calculated by summing over the force paths, weighted by the strengths of the paths. This me...

  10. Dynamic Channel Allocation in Sectored Cellular Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is known that dynamic channel assignment(DCA) strategy outperforms the fixed channel assignment(FCA) strategy in omni-directional antenna cellular systems. One of the most important methods used in DCA was channel borrowing. But with the emergence of cell sectorization and spatial division multiple access(SDMA) which are used to increase the capacity of cellular systems, the channel assignment faces a series of new problems. In this paper, a dynamic channel allocation scheme based on sectored cellular systems is proposed. By introducing intra-cell channel borrowing (borrowing channels from neighboring sectors) and inter-cell channel borrowing (borrowing channels from neighboring cells) methods, previous DCA strategies, including compact pattern based channel borrowing(CPCB) and greedy based dynamic channel assignment(GDCA) schemes proposed by the author, are improved significantly. The computer simulation shows that either intra-cell borrowing scheme or inter-cell borrowing scheme is efficient enough to uniform and non-uniform traffic service distributions.

  11. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  12. Cellular cardiomyoplasty: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Race L; Browder, William; Li, Chuanfu

    2009-01-01

    Restoring blood flow, improving perfusion, reducing clinical symptoms, and augmenting ventricular function are the goals after acute myocardial infarction. Other than cardiac transplantation, no standard clinical procedure is available to restore damaged myocardium. Since we first reported cellular cardiomyoplasty in 1989, successful outcomes have been confirmed by experimental and clinical studies, but definitive long-term efficacy requires large-scale placebo-controlled double-blind randomized trials. On meta-analysis, stem cell-treated groups had significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction, reduced infarct scar size, and decreased left ventricular end-systolic volume. Fewer myocardial infarctions, deaths, readmissions for heart failure, and repeat revascularizations were additional benefits. Encouraging clinical findings have been reported using satellite or bone marrow stem cells, but understanding of the benefit mechanisms demands additional studies. Adult mammalian ventricular myocardium lacks adequate regeneration capability, and cellular cardiomyoplasty offers a new way to overcome this; the poor retention and engraftment rate and high apoptotic rate of the implanted stem cells limit outcomes. The ideal type and number of cells, optimal timing of cell therapy, and ideal cell delivery method depend on determining the beneficial mechanisms. Cellular cardiomyoplasty has progressed rapidly in the last decade. A critical review may help us to better plan the future direction. PMID:19515892

  13. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  14. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  15. Cellular vs. organ approaches to dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular distribution of tissue-incorporated radionuclides has generally been neglected in the dosimetry of internal emitters. Traditional dosimetry assumes homogeneous distribution of radionuclides in organs of interest, while presuming that the ranges of particulate radiations are large relative to typical cell diameters. The macroscopic distribution of dose thus calculated has generally served as a sufficient approximation for the energy deposited within radiosensitive sites. However, with the increasing utilization of intracellular agents, such as thallium-201, it has become necessary to examine the microscopic distribution of energy at the cellular level. This is particularly important in the instance of radionuclides that decay by electron capture or by internal conversion with the release of Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons. In many instances, these electrons are released as a dense shower of low-energy particles with ranges of subcellular dimensions. The high electron density in the immediate vicinity of the decaying atom produces a focal deposition of energy that far exceeds the average dose taken over several cell diameters. These studies point out the increasing need to take into account the microscopic distribution of dose on the cellular level as radionuclides distributed in cells become more commonplace, especially if the decay involves electron capture or internal conversion. As radiotracers are developed for the measurement of intracellular functions these factors should be given greater consideration. 16 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  16. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  17. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  18. ISBT 128 coding and labeling for cellular therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the ISBT 128 coding and labeling for cellular therapy products. It is published on behalf of the international Cellular Therapy Coding and Labeling Advisory Group (see www.ICCBBA.org)

  19. Cellular Particle Dynamics simulation of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is a theoretical-computational-experimental framework for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems, such as fusion, sorting and compression. In CPD, cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through numerical integration of their equations of motion. Here we present CPD simulation results for the fusion of both spherical and cylindrical multi-cellular aggregates. First, we calibrate the relevant CPD model parameters for a given cell type by comparing the CPD simulation results for the fusion of two spherical aggregates to the corresponding experimental results. Next, CPD simulations are used to predict the time evolution of the fusion of cylindrical aggregates. The latter is relevant for the formation of tubular multi-cellular structures (i.e., primitive blood vessels) created by the novel bioprinting technology. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  20. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  1. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multiple levels of compartments and static obstacles can be used to create a dense environment to mimic cellular boundaries and the intracellular space. The CDS algorithm takes into account volume exclusion and molecular crowding that may impact signaling cascades in small sub-cellular compartments such as dendritic spines. With the CDS, we can simulate simple enzyme reactions; aggregation, channel transport, as well as highly complicated chemical reaction networks of both freely diffusing and membrane bound multi-protein complexes. Components of the CDS are generally defined such that the simulator can be applied to a wide range of environments in terms of scale and level of detail. Through an initialization GUI, a simple simulation environment can be created and populated within minutes yet is powerful enough to design complex 3D cellular architecture. The initialization tool allows visual confirmation of the environment construction prior to execution by the simulator. This paper describes the CDS algorithm, design implementation, and provides an overview of the types of features available and the utility of those features are highlighted in demonstrations. PMID:20361275

  2. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    OpenAIRE

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-01-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiothera...

  3. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a heavy metal, which is widely used in industry, affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In mammals, it exerts multiple toxic effects and has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Cd2+ does not catalyze Fenton-type reactions because it does not accept or donate electrons under physiological conditions, and it is only weakly genotoxic. Hence, indirect mechanisms are implicated in the carcinogenicity of cadmium. In this review multiple mechanisms are discussed, such as modulation of gene expression and signal transduction, interference with enzymes of the cellular antioxidant system and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibition of DNA repair and DNA methylation, role in apoptosis and disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cadmium affects both gene transcription and translation. The major mechanisms of gene induction by cadmium known so far are modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways by enhancement of protein phosphorylation and activation of transcription and translation factors. Cadmium interferes with antioxidant defense mechanisms and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species, which may act as signaling molecules in the induction of gene expression and apoptosis. The inhibition of DNA repair processes by cadmium represents a mechanism by which cadmium enhances the genotoxicity of other agents and may contribute to the tumor initiation by this metal. The disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by cadmium probably further stimulates the development of tumors. It becomes clear that there exist multiple mechanisms which contribute to the carcinogenicity of cadmium, although the relative weights of these contributions are difficult to estimate

  4. From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a lecture I presented as the recipient of the 2009 Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in October 2009. Here, I review more than thirty years of research from my laboratory, beginning with studies designed to test the theory that cells use tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture to stabilize their shape and sense mechanical signals, which I believed to be critical for control of cell function and tissue development. Although I was trained as a cell biologist, I found that the tools I had at my disposal were insufficient to experimentally test these theories, and thus I ventured into engineering to find critical solutions. This path has been extremely fruitful as it has led to confirmation of the critical role that physical forces play in developmental control, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical signals at the molecular level through a process known as cellular mechanotransduction. Many of the predictions of the cellular tensegrity model relating to cell mechanical behaviors have been shown to be valid, and this vision of cell structure led to discovery of the central role that transmembrane adhesion receptors, such as integrins, and the cytoskeleton play in mechanosensing and mechanochemical conversion. In addition, these fundamental studies have led to significant unexpected technology fallout, including development of micromagnetic actuators for non-invasive control of cellular signaling, microfluidic systems as therapeutic extracorporeal devices for sepsis therapy, and new DNA-based nanobiotechnology approaches that permit construction of artificial tensegrities that mimic properties of living materials for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20140519

  5. Cellular proteins in influenza virus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Shaw

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Virions are thought to contain all the essential proteins that govern virus egress from the host cell and initiation of replication in the target cell. It has been known for some time that influenza virions contain nine viral proteins; however, analyses of other enveloped viruses have revealed that proteins from the host cell can also be detected in virions. To address whether the same is true for influenza virus, we used two complementary mass spectrometry approaches to perform a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified influenza virus particles. In addition to the aforementioned nine virus-encoded proteins, we detected the presence of 36 host-encoded proteins. These include both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound proteins that can be grouped into several functional categories, such as cytoskeletal proteins, annexins, glycolytic enzymes, and tetraspanins. Interestingly, a significant number of these have also been reported to be present in virions of other virus families. Protease treatment of virions combined with immunoblot analysis was used to verify the presence of the cellular protein and also to determine whether it is located in the core of the influenza virus particle. Immunogold labeling confirmed the presence of membrane-bound host proteins on the influenza virus envelope. The identification of cellular constituents of influenza virions has important implications for understanding the interactions of influenza virus with its host and brings us a step closer to defining the cellular requirements for influenza virus replication. While not all of the host proteins are necessarily incorporated specifically, those that are and are found to have an essential role represent novel targets for antiviral drugs and for attenuation of viruses for vaccine purposes.

  6. Probing cellular behaviors through nanopatterned chitosan membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a high-throughput method for developing physically modified chitosan membranes to probe the cellular behavior of MDCK epithelial cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts adhered onto these modified membranes. To prepare chitosan membranes with micro/nanoscaled features, we have demonstrated an easy-to-handle, facile approach that could be easily integrated with IC-based manufacturing processes with mass production potential. These physically modified chitosan membranes were observed by scanning electron microscopy to gain a better understanding of chitosan membrane surface morphology. After MDCK cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts were cultured on these modified chitosan membranes for various culture durations (i.e. 1, 2, 4, 12 and 24 h), they were investigated to decipher cellular behavior. We found that both cells preferred to adhere onto a flat surface rather than on a nanopatterned surface. However, most (> 80%) of the MDCK cells showed rounded morphology and would suspend in the cultured medium instead of adhering onto the planar surface of negatively nanopatterned chitosan membranes. This means different cell types (e.g. fibroblasts versus epithelia) showed distinct capabilities/preferences of adherence for materials of varying surface roughness. We also showed that chitosan membranes could be re-used at least nine times without significant contamination and would provide us consistency for probing cell–material interactions by permitting reuse of the same substrate. We believe these results would provide us better insight into cellular behavior, specifically, microscopic properties and characteristics of cells grown under unique, nanopatterned cell-interface conditions. (paper)

  7. Multiple origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D. M.; Valentine, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    There is some indication that life may have originated readily under primitive earth conditions. If there were multiple origins of life, the result could have been a polyphyletic biota today. Using simple stochastic models for diversification and extinction, we conclude: (1) the probability of survival of life is low unless there are multiple origins, and (2) given survival of life and given as many as 10 independent origins of life, the odds are that all but one would have gone extinct, yielding the monophyletic biota we have now. The fact of the survival of our particular form of life does not imply that it was unique or superior.

  8. Turing machine universality of the game of life

    CERN Document Server

    Rendell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a proof of universal computation in the Game of Life cellular automaton by using a Turing machine construction. It provides an introduction including background information and an extended review of the literature for Turing Machines, Counter Machines and the relevant patterns in Conway's Game of Life so that the subject matter is accessibly to non specialists.   The book contains a description of the author’s Turing machine in Conway’s Game of Life including an unlimited storage tape provided by growing stack structures and it also presents a fast universal Turing machine designed to allow the working to be demonstrated in a convenient period of time.  .

  9. Traffic Engineering of Cellular Wireless Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2002-01-01

    In mobile communications an efficient utilisation of the channels is of great importance. In this paper we describe the basic principles for obtaining the maximum utilisation and study strategies for obtaining these limits. In general a high degree of sharing is efficient, but requires service...... protection mechanisms to guarantee the Quality of Service for all services. We study cellular systems with hierarchical cells, and the effect of overlapping cells, and we show that by call packing we obtain a very high utilisation. The models are generalisations of the Erlang-B formula, and include general...

  10. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  11. Imaging Cellular Architecture with X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Larabell, Carolyn A.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray imaging of biological samples is progressing rapidly. In this paper we review the progress to date in high resolution imaging of cellular architecture. In particular we survey the progress in soft X-ray tomography and argue that the field is coming of age and that important biological insights are starting to emerge. We then review the new ideas based on coherent diffraction. These methods are at a much earlier stage of development but, as they eliminate the need for X-ray optics, have ...

  12. Single spin measurement using cellular automata techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Delgado, C A; Cory, D G; Mosca, M; Cappellaro, Paola; Cory, David G.; Mosca, Michele; Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an approach for single spin measurement. Our method uses techniques from the theory of quantum cellular automata to correlate a large amount of ancillary spins to the one to be measured. It has the distinct advantage of being efficient, and to a certain extent fault-tolerant. Under ideal conditions, it requires the application of only order of cube root of N steps (each requiring a constant number of rf pulses) to create a system of N correlated spins. It is also fairly robust against pulse errors, imperfect initial polarization of the ancilla spin system, and does not rely on entanglement. We study the scalability of our scheme through numerical simulation.

  13. Single spin measurement using cellular automata techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Mosca, Michele; Cappellaro, Paola; Cory, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an approach for single spin measurement. Our method uses techniques from the theory of quantum cellular automata to correlate a large amount of ancillary spins to the one to be measured. It has the distinct advantage of being efficient, and to a certain extent fault-tolerant. Under ideal conditions, it requires the application of only order of cube root of N steps (each requiring a constant number of rf pulses) to create a system of N correlated spins. It is also fairly robust agai...

  14. Wireless communications, cellular phones and relay antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireless communications using radiofrequency fields (RF) have seen an increasing use with the massive deployment of cellular systems GSM, UMTS and now LTE. In parallel, public concerns have been raised about possible health effects. During the last decade, about 10 million Euros per year have been dedicated to research. In vivo, in vitro, animal and human studies have been carried out. This paper gives an overview of the subject. The applicable limits and regulation as well as the typical human exposure are presented. The state of knowledge on biological and health effect is summarized. The recent classification of RF by the IARC and some sociological aspects are also discussed. (authors)

  15. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.

  16. Cellular regulation of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. DAT and its trafficking...... single-membrane spanning protein Tac, thereby creating an extracellular antibody epitope. Upon expression in HEK293 cells this TacDAT fusion protein displayed functional properties similar to the wild type transporter. In an ELISA based internalization assay, TacDAT intracellular accumulation was...

  17. Cellular spaces, null spaces and homotopy localization

    CERN Document Server

    Farjoun, Emmanuel Dror

    1996-01-01

    In this monograph we give an exposition of some recent development in homotopy theory. It relates to advances in periodicity in homotopy localization and in cellular spaces. The notion of homotopy localization is treated quite generally and encompasses all the known idempotent homotopy functors. It is applied to K-theory localizations, to Morava-theories, to Hopkins-Smith theory of types. The method of homotopy colimits is used heavily. It is written with an advanced graduate student in topology and research homotopy theorist in mind.

  18. Cellular automata modelling of hantarvirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantaviruses are a group of viruses which have been identified as being responsible for the outbreak of diseases such as the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. In an effort to understand the characteristics and dynamics of hantavirus infection, mathematical models based on differential equations have been developed and widely studied. However, such models neglect the local characteristics of the spreading process and do not include variable susceptibility of individuals. In this paper, we develop an alternative approach based on cellular automata to analyze and study the spatiotemporal patterns of hantavirus infection.

  19. Cellular automata modelling of hantarvirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Karim, Mohamad Faisal [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: faisal@usm.my; Md Ismail, Ahmad Izani [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: izani@cs.usm.my; Ching, Hoe Bee [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: Bee_Ching_Janice_Hoe@dell.com

    2009-09-15

    Hantaviruses are a group of viruses which have been identified as being responsible for the outbreak of diseases such as the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. In an effort to understand the characteristics and dynamics of hantavirus infection, mathematical models based on differential equations have been developed and widely studied. However, such models neglect the local characteristics of the spreading process and do not include variable susceptibility of individuals. In this paper, we develop an alternative approach based on cellular automata to analyze and study the spatiotemporal patterns of hantavirus infection.

  20. Rapid Cellular Identification by Dynamic Electromechanical Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Reukov, Vladimir V [ORNL; Vertegel, Alexey [ORNL; Thompson, Gary L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is ubiquitous in living systems. Here, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Principal component analysis of the dynamic electromechanical response spectra bundled with neural network based recognition provides a robust identification algorithm based on their electromechanical signature, and allows unambiguous differentiation of model Micrococcus Lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas Fluorescens system. This methodology provides a universal pathway for biological identification obviating the need for well-defined analytical models of Scanning Probe Microscopy response.

  1. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  2. Quantumness of discrete Hamiltonian cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elze Hans-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize a recent study of discrete (integer-valued Hamiltonian cellular automata (CA showing that their dynamics can only be consistently defined, if it is linear in the same sense as unitary evolution described by the Schrödinger equation. This allows to construct an invertible map between such CA and continuous quantum mechanical models, which incorporate a fundamental scale. Presently, we emphasize general aspects of these findings, the construction of admissible CA observables, and the existence of solutions of the modified dispersion relation for stationary states.

  3. Conference on radionuclide labelled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South African Medical Research Council presented this conference on radionuclide labelled cellular blood elements with application in atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The conference was held in Bloemfontein from 3-6 February 1986. This work only consists of the abstracts of the seminars that were delivered on the conference. The radioisotopes that occur most of the time in the abstracts include Indium 111, Indium 114, Chromium 51, Iodine 125, Iodine 131 and Carbon 14. Especially Indium 111 seems to be the method of choice for all labelling

  4. Cellular Scaling Rules for Primate Spinal Cords

    OpenAIRE

    Burish, Mark J.; Peebles, J. Klint; Baldwin, Mary K.; Tavares, Luciano; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    The spinal cord can be considered a major sensorimotor interface between the body and the brain. How does the spinal cord scale with body and brain mass, and how are its numbers of neurons related to the number of neurons in the brain across species of different body and brain sizes? Here we determine the cellular composition of the spinal cord in eight primate species and find that its number of neurons varies as a linear function of cord length, and accompanies body mass raised to an expone...

  5. Giant viruses coexisted with the cellular ancestors and represent a distinct supergroup along with superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Arshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of giant viruses with genome and physical size comparable to cellular organisms, remnants of protein translation machinery and virus-specific parasites (virophages have raised intriguing questions about their origin. Evidence advocates for their inclusion into global phylogenomic studies and their consideration as a distinct and ancient form of life. Results Here we reconstruct phylogenies describing the evolution of proteomes and protein domain structures of cellular organisms and double-stranded DNA viruses with medium-to-very-large proteomes (giant viruses. Trees of proteomes define viruses as a ‘fourth supergroup’ along with superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Trees of domains indicate they have evolved via massive and primordial reductive evolutionary processes. The distribution of domain structures suggests giant viruses harbor a significant number of protein domains including those with no cellular representation. The genomic and structural diversity embedded in the viral proteomes is comparable to the cellular proteomes of organisms with parasitic lifestyles. Since viral domains are widespread among cellular species, we propose that viruses mediate gene transfer between cells and crucially enhance biodiversity. Conclusions Results call for a change in the way viruses are perceived. They likely represent a distinct form of life that either predated or coexisted with the last universal common ancestor (LUCA and constitute a very crucial part of our planet’s biosphere.

  6. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003 Cellular mobile revenue. This account shall include message revenue derived from cellular...

  7. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of the standard may be purchased from Global... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular service requirements and limitations... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements...

  8. 47 CFR 22.917 - Emission limitations for cellular equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission limitations for cellular equipment. 22... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.917 Emission limitations for cellular equipment. The rules in this section govern the spectral characteristics of emissions in the...

  9. Cellular automaton model of crowd evacuation inspired by slime mould

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeiton, V. S.; Papadopoulos, D. P.; Georgilas, I. P.; Sirakoulis, G. Ch.; Adamatzky, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    In all the living organisms, the self-preservation behaviour is almost universal. Even the most simple of living organisms, like slime mould, is typically under intense selective pressure to evolve a response to ensure their evolution and safety in the best possible way. On the other hand, evacuation of a place can be easily characterized as one of the most stressful situations for the individuals taking part on it. Taking inspiration from the slime mould behaviour, we are introducing a computational bio-inspired model crowd evacuation model. Cellular Automata (CA) were selected as a fully parallel advanced computation tool able to mimic the Physarum's behaviour. In particular, the proposed CA model takes into account while mimicking the Physarum foraging process, the food diffusion, the organism's growth, the creation of tubes for each organism, the selection of optimum tube for each human in correspondence to the crowd evacuation under study and finally, the movement of all humans at each time step towards near exit. To test the model's efficiency and robustness, several simulation scenarios were proposed both in virtual and real-life indoor environments (namely, the first floor of office building B of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Democritus University of Thrace). The proposed model is further evaluated in a purely quantitative way by comparing the simulation results with the corresponding ones from the bibliography taken by real data. The examined fundamental diagrams of velocity-density and flow-density are found in full agreement with many of the already published corresponding results proving the adequacy, the fitness and the resulting dynamics of the model. Finally, several real Physarum experiments were conducted in an archetype of the aforementioned real-life environment proving at last that the proposed model succeeded in reproducing sufficiently the Physarum's recorded behaviour derived from observation of the aforementioned

  10. Voluntary accreditation of cellular therapies: Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, P I

    2003-01-01

    Voluntary accreditation of cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products intended for human transplantation is an important mechanism for improving quality in cellular therapy. The Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) has developed and implemented programs of voluntary inspection and accreditation for hematopoietic cellular therapy, and for cord blood banking. These programs are based on the standards of the clinical and laboratory professionals of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT), the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT), and NETCORD. FACT has collaborated with European colleagues in the development of the Joint Accreditation Committee in Europe (jACIE). FACT has published standards documents, a guidance manual, accreditation checklists, and inspection documents; and has trained as inspectors over 300 professionals active in the field. All inspectors have a minimum of 5 years' experience in the area they inspect. Since the incorporation of FACT in 1996, 215 hematopoietic progenitor cell facilities have applied for FACT accreditation. Of these facilities, 113 are fully accredited; the others are in the process of document submission or inspection. Significant opportunities and challenges exist for FACT in the future, including keeping standards and guidance materials current and relevant, recruiting and retaining expert inspectors, and establishing collaborations to develop standards and accreditation systems for new cellular products. The continuing dialogue with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is also important to ensure that they are aware of the accomplishments of voluntary accreditation, and keep FACT membership alerted to FDA intentions for the future. Other potential avenues of communication and cooperation with FDA and other regulatory agencies are being investigated and evaluated. PMID:12944235

  11. Complex Systems in APL: Fractals, Evolving Cellular Automata and Artificial Life

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonseca, Manuel; Ortega, Alfonso; Cruz Echeandía, Marina de la

    2002-01-01

    This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in APL Quote Quad 32.4 (2002): 17 – 26, http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/604444.602233 We have been working for several years on the representation, study and simulation of complex systems by means of formal methods. APL2 and other programming languages have been used to develop our tools and experiments. This paper summarizes our APL2 works on ...

  12. Am I Halfway? Life Lived = Expected Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Zarulli, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    “Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita, Mi ritrovai per una selva oscura, Ché la diritta via era smarrita. [In the middle of the journey of our life, I came to myself in a dark wood, for the straight way was lost.]” (Dante 1308-1320) We have reached halfway in life when our age equals our remaining...... life expectancy at that age. This relationship in stable population models between life lived and life left has captured the attention of mathematical demographers since Lotka. Our paper aims to contribute to the halfway-age debate by showing its time trends under mortality models and with current data...... from high longevity countries. We further contrast the halfway-age results by sex, and between period and cohort perspectives. We find that in 1850 life expectancy at birth was higher than halfway-age by around ten years (HMD-mean halfway-age of 33.3 and 32.2 against HMD-mean life expectancy of 44...

  13. Engineering Cellular Photocomposite Materials Using Convective Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin D. Velev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fabricating industrial-scale photoreactive composite materials containing living cells, requires a deposition strategy that unifies colloid science and cell biology. Convective assembly can rapidly deposit suspended particles, including whole cells and waterborne latex polymer particles into thin (<10 µm thick, organized films with engineered adhesion, composition, thickness, and particle packing. These highly ordered composites can stabilize the diverse functions of photosynthetic cells for use as biophotoabsorbers, as artificial leaves for hydrogen or oxygen evolution, carbon dioxide assimilation, and add self-cleaning capabilities for releasing or digesting surface contaminants. This paper reviews the non-biological convective assembly literature, with an emphasis on how the method can be modified to deposit living cells starting from a batch process to its current state as a continuous process capable of fabricating larger multi-layer biocomposite coatings from diverse particle suspensions. Further development of this method will help solve the challenges of engineering multi-layered cellular photocomposite materials with high reactivity, stability, and robustness by clarifying how process, substrate, and particle parameters affect coating microstructure. We also describe how these methods can be used to selectively immobilize photosynthetic cells to create biomimetic leaves and compare these biocomposite coatings to other cellular encapsulation systems.

  14. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  15. A new description of cellular quiescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary A Coller

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular quiescence, defined as reversible growth/proliferation arrest, is thought to represent a homogenous state induced by diverse anti-mitogenic signals. We used transcriptional profiling to characterize human diploid fibroblasts that exited the cell cycle after exposure to three independent signals--mitogen withdrawal, contact inhibition, and loss of adhesion. We show here that each signal caused regulation of a unique set of genes known to be important for cessation of growth and division. Therefore, contrary to expectation, cells enter different quiescent states that are determined by the initiating signal. However, underlying this diversity we discovered a set of genes whose specific expression in non-dividing cells was signal-independent, and therefore representative of quiescence per se, rather than the signal that induced it. This fibroblast "quiescence program" contained genes that enforced the non-dividing state, and ensured the reversibility of the cell cycle arrest. We further demonstrate that one mechanism by which the reversibility of quiescence is insured is the suppression of terminal differentiation. Expression of the quiescence program was not simply a downstream consequence of exit from the cell cycle, because key parts, including those involved in suppressing differentiation, were not recapitulated during the cell cycle arrest caused by direct inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These studies form a basis for understanding the normal biology of cellular quiescence.

  16. Huntington's disease: implications of associated cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation sensitivity was studied in a series of Huntington's Disease (HD) patients and controls by measurement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes and by clonogenic survival of lymphoblastoid cell lines. As a group, HD patients were found to be significantly more radioisensitive than controls (p<0.001), but there was an overlap between values for the two groups such that an absolute distinction is not possible. These data are consistent with an association between HD and radiosensitivity but not with identity between HD and a radiosensitive phenotype, so that cellular radiosensitivity cannot be used for individual diagnosis. Analysis of three families including 5 HD patients and 11 first-degree relatives confirmed this conclusion and demonstrated that even within a given family presymptomatic diagnosis cannot be based on measurement of radiosensitivity. However, the common association of cellular radiosensitivity with HD probands and their families provides a potential lead to the identification of HD gene(s) and so to an eventual understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of this disease at the molecular level. (author)

  17. Impaired nonspecific cellular immunity in experimental cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughneen, P T; Drath, D B; Kulkarni, A D; Rowlands, B J

    1987-11-01

    The abilities of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), to demonstrate chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and superoxide release after bile duct ligation in the rat were investigated to determine the effect of cholestasis on nonspecific cellular immune mechanisms. Chemotactic response to C5a and FMLP, phagocytosis of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus, and zymosan-induced superoxide release were evaluated 21 days after bile duct ligation (BDL), sham operation, or in normal controls. Serum total bilirubin level was elevated after BDL (p less than 0.01). Chemotactic ability was similar to each group. PMN phagocytic uptake of 14C labeled Staphylococcus aureus was depressed in BDL (p less than 0.05). BDL rats exhibited impaired PAM phagocytic indices and improved PMN superoxide release (p less than 0.03). PAM superoxide release was similar in each study group. Alterations in phagocytic function with cholestasis are important deficits in nonspecific cellular immunity that may contribute to the high incidence of infective complications associated with obstructive jaundice. PMID:2823730

  18. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3 and apoptosis (Bax. Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration.

  19. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  20. A Mathematical Model for Cisplatin Cellular Pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardith W. El-Kareh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model for the cellular pharmacodynamics of cisplatin is presented. The model, which takes into account the kinetics of cisplatin uptake by cells and the intracellular binding of the drug, can be used to predict the dependence of survival (relative to controls on the time course of extracellular exposure. Cellular pharmacokinetic parameters are derived from uptake data for human ovarian and head and neck cancer cell lines. Survival relative to controls is assumed to depend on the peak concentration of DNA-bound intracellular platinum. Model predictions agree well with published data on cisplatin cytotoxicity for three different cancer cell lines, over a wide range of exposure times. In comparison with previously published mathematical models for anticancer drug pharmacodynamics, the present model provides a better fit to experimental data sets including long exposure times (∼100 hours. The model provides a possible explanation for the fact that cell kill correlates well with area under the extracellular concentration-time curve in some data sets, but not in others. The model may be useful for optimizing delivery schedules and for the dosing of cisplatin for cancer therapy.

  1. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Dahir Ramos de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila. The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge.

  2. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Dahir Ramos; de Andrade Júnior, Dahir Ramos

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a) Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b) The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein) A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c) The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila). The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d) The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e) The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge. PMID:14502344

  3. Cellular Prion Protein: From Physiology to Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kikuchi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular prion protein (PrPC is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored membrane glycoprotein with two N-glycosylation sites at residues 181 and 197. This protein migrates in several bands by Western blot analysis (WB. Interestingly, PNGase F treatment of human brain homogenates prior to the WB, which is known to remove the N-glycosylations, unexpectedly gives rise to two dominant bands, which are now known as C-terminal (C1 and N-terminal (N1 fragments. This resembles the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP in Alzheimer disease (AD, which can be physiologically processed by α-, β-, and γ-secretases. The processing of APP has been extensively studied, while the identity of the cellular proteases involved in the proteolysis of PrPC and their possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the neurotoxicity caused by prion proteins and the blockade of their normal proteolysis. For example, expression of non-cleavable PrPC mutants in transgenic mice generates neurotoxicity, even in the absence of infectious prions, suggesting that PrPC proteolysis is physiologically and pathologically important. As many mouse models of prion diseases have recently been developed and the knowledge about the proteases responsible for the PrPC proteolysis is accumulating, we examine the historical experimental evidence and highlight recent studies that shed new light on this issue.

  4. Tension and robustness in multitasking cellular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V Wong

    Full Text Available Cellular networks multitask by exhibiting distinct, context-dependent dynamics. However, network states (parameters that generate a particular dynamic are often sub-optimal for others, defining a source of "tension" between them. Though multitasking is pervasive, it is not clear where tension arises, what consequences it has, and how it is resolved. We developed a generic computational framework to examine the source and consequences of tension between pairs of dynamics exhibited by the well-studied RB-E2F switch regulating cell cycle entry. We found that tension arose from task-dependent shifts in parameters associated with network modules. Although parameter sets common to distinct dynamics did exist, tension reduced both their accessibility and resilience to perturbation, indicating a trade-off between "one-size-fits-all" solutions and robustness. With high tension, robustness can be preserved by dynamic shifting of modules, enabling the network to toggle between tasks, and by increasing network complexity, in this case by gene duplication. We propose that tension is a general constraint on the architecture and operation of multitasking biological networks. To this end, our work provides a framework to quantify the extent of tension between any network dynamics and how it affects network robustness. Such analysis would suggest new ways to interfere with network elements to elucidate the design principles of cellular networks.

  5. Cellular factors implicated in filovirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics. PMID:23365575

  6. Cellular Factors Implicated in Filovirus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1 and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1 as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics.

  7. Life Options Rehabilitation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Using the KDQOL-36™ to Improve Quality of Life (and Meet Surveyor Expectations) Presented on August 8, ... this article at our CE credit website . Free Life Options Materials Download our free print materials, research- ...

  8. Life with Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Life With Lupus KidsHealth > For Kids > Life With Lupus Print A ... the symptoms often go away. continue What Causes Lupus? No one really knows what causes lupus, but ...

  9. Donate Life America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us News You Have the Power to Donate Life. Register as an Organ, Eye and Tissue Donor ... reach 30K milestone, thanks to increased donations Donate Life America Announces 2015 James S. Wolf, M.D., Courage ...

  10. Life cycle assessment (LCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel; Schmidt, Jannick Andresen

    2004-01-01

    The chapter introduces Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its application according to the ISO 1404043 standards.......The chapter introduces Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its application according to the ISO 1404043 standards....

  11. YOUR LIFE@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Guinot, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Balancing work and home life, getting support for your family and thriving in an inclusive and respectful workplace: find out more about the support structures in place to enhance your working life@CERN!

  12. Sexuality in Later Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raquo Sexuality in Later Life Heath and Aging Sexuality in Later Life What Are Normal Changes? What ... Depression can be treated. What Else May Cause Sexuality Problems? Surgery. Many of us worry about having ...

  13. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.; Wang, Ning; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2014-01-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life — from individual molecules to whole living organisms — to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level. PMID:24695087

  14. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ViktóriaJeney

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis”, iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endothelial activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and macrophage activation; all of these processes are considered to be proatherogenic. On the other hand, the observation that hemochromatotic patients, affected by life-long iron overload, do not show any increased incidence of atherosclerosis is perceived as the most convincing evidence against the “iron hypothesis”. Epidemiological studies and data from animal models provided conflicting evidences about the role of iron in atherogenesis. Therefore more careful studies are needed in which issues like the source and the compartmentalization of iron will be addressed. This review article summarizes what we have learnt about iron and atherosclerosis from epidemiological studies, animal models and cellular systems and highlights the rather contributory than innocent role of iron in atherogenesis.

  15. Biofabrication and testing of a fully cellular nerve graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupture of a nerve is a debilitating injury with devastating consequences for the individual's quality of life. The gold standard of repair is the use of an autologous graft to bridge the severed nerve ends. Such repair however involves risks due to secondary surgery at the donor site and may result in morbidity and infection. Thus the clinical approach to repair often involves non-cellular solutions, grafts composed of synthetic or natural materials. Here we report on a novel approach to biofabricate fully biological grafts composed exclusively of cells and cell secreted material. To reproducibly and reliably build such grafts of composite geometry we use bioprinting. We test our grafts in a rat sciatic nerve injury model for both motor and sensory function. In particular we compare the regenerative capacity of the biofabricated grafts with that of autologous grafts and grafts made of hollow collagen tubes by measuring the compound action potential (for motor function) and the change in mean arterial blood pressure as consequence of electrically eliciting the somatic pressor reflex. Our results provide evidence that bioprinting is a promising approach to nerve graft fabrication and as a consequence to nerve regeneration. (paper)

  16. Two Phase Flow Simulation Using Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical mathematical treatment of two-phase flows is based on the average of the conservation equations for each phase.In this work, a complementary approach to the modeling of these systems based on statistical population balances of aut omata sets is presented.Automata are entities defined by mathematical states that change following iterative rules representing interactions with the neighborhood.A model of automata for two-phase flow simulation is presented.This model consists of fie lds of virtual spheres that change their volumes and move around a certain environment.The model is more general than the classical cellular automata in two respects: the grid of cellular automata is dismissed in favor of a trajectory generator, and the rules of interaction involve parameters representing the actual physical interactions between phases.Automata simulation was used to study unsolved two-phase flow problems involving high heat flux rates. One system described in this work consists of a vertical channel with saturated water at normal pressure heated from the lower surface.The heater causes water to boil and starts the bubble production.We used cellular automata to describe two-phase flows and the interaction with the heater.General rule s for such cellular automata representing bubbles moving in stagnant liquid were used, with special attention to correct modeling of different mechanisms of heat transfer.The results of the model were compared to previous experiments and correlations finding good agreement.One of the most important findings is the confirmation of Kutateladze's idea about a close relation between the start of critical heat flux and a change in the flow's topology.This was analyzed using a control volume located in the upper surface of the heater.A strong decrease in the interfacial surface just before the CHF start was encountered.The automata describe quite well some characteristic parameters such as the shape of the local void fraction in the

  17. What Is Life? - Reconsidered

    OpenAIRE

    Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    1999-01-01

    The problem of the origin of life is very old one. While there have been some distinguished supporters for theories suggesting extra-terrestrial origin and subsequent transport of life to earth, the remaining scientific community has built up progreesively more convincing, if more complex , reconstruction of the possible events leading to the origin of life on primitive earth. As it happens so often, our present beliefs about the origin of life on earth go to Charles Darwin in whose inmitable...

  18. Recursive definition of global cellular-automata mappings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldberg, Rasmus; Knudsen, Carsten; Rasmussen, Steen

    1994-01-01

    as the number of lattice sites is incremented. A proof of lattice size invariance of global cellular-automata mappings is derived from an approximation to the exact recursive definition. The recursive definitions are applied to calculate the fractal dimension of the set of reachable states and of the set......A method for a recursive definition of global cellular-automata mappings is presented. The method is based on a graphical representation of global cellular-automata mappings. For a given cellular-automaton rule the recursive algorithm defines the change of the global cellular-automaton mapping...

  19. Fat tissue, aging, and cellular senescence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tchkonia, T.; Morbeck, D.E.; Zglinicki, T. von; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Lustgarten, J.; Scrable, H.; Khosla, S.; Jensen, M.D.; Kirkland, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Fat tissue, frequently the largest organ in humans, is at the nexus of mechanisms involved in longevity and age-related metabolic dysfunction. Fat distribution and function change dramatically throughout life. Obesity is associated with accelerated onset of diseases common in old age, while fat abla

  20. HIV Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/22/2015; last reviewed 9/22/2015) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  1. First Day of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy The First Day of Life KidsHealth > For Parents > The First Day of Life Print A A A Text Size What's in ... usually begin within the first few hours of life. previous continue Your Feelings Having a baby is ...

  2. End of Life Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planning for the end of life can be difficult. But by deciding what end-of-life care best suits your needs when you are healthy, you can ... right choices when the time comes. End-of-life planning usually includes making choices about the following: ...

  3. Life Skills Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jan P.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, Bates, the Inmate Programs Manager of the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office in Tampa, Florida, describes her office's Life Skills Project, a comprehensive program that has significantly enhanced three existing programs by adding extensive life skills components. The added life skills modules reinforce the importance of…

  4. Go4Life

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Go4Life Exercises — Stretching Play all Try some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your flexibility! 2:48 ... Exercises — Building Strength Play all Try some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your strength! Stronger muscles ...

  5. Life in other planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speculations of life on other planets in space are discussed. The life history of a star in terms of the high temperature fusion reactions taking place in it, is outlined. The phenomenon of gases escaping from planetary atmospheres which destroys life on them is explained. Solar radiation effects, pulsar detection etc. are briefly touched upon. (K.B.)

  6. Keeping it together: Pulmonary alveoli are maintained by a hierarchy of cellular programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Catriona Y; Desai, Tushar J

    2015-09-01

    The application of in vivo genetic lineage tracing has advanced our understanding of cellular mechanisms for tissue renewal in organs with slow turnover, like the lung. These studies have identified an adult stem cell with very different properties than classically understood ones that maintain continuously cycling tissues such as the intestine. A portrait has emerged of an ensemble of cellular programs that replenish the cells that line the gas exchange (alveolar) surface, enabling a response tailored to the extent of cell loss. A capacity for differentiated cells to undergo direct lineage transitions allows for local restoration of proper cell balance at sites of injury. We present these recent findings as a paradigm for how a relatively quiescent tissue compartment can maintain homeostasis throughout a lifetime punctuated by injuries ranging from mild to life-threatening, and discuss how dysfunction or insufficiency of alveolar repair programs produce serious health consequences like cancer and fibrosis. PMID:26201286

  7. A Health Services Research Agenda for Cellular, Molecular and Genomic Technologies in Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideroff, Louise; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Ambs, Anita; Armstrong, Katrina; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Martin L.; Donaldson, Molla S.; Follen, Michele; Goldie, Sue J.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Khoury, Muin J.; Lewis, Graham; McLeod, Howard L.; Piper, Margaret; Powell, Isaac; Schrag, Deborah; Schulman, Kevin A.; Scott, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent decades, extensive resources have been invested to develop cellular, molecular and genomic technologies with clinical applications that span the continuum of cancer care. Methods In December 2006, the National Cancer Institute sponsored the first workshop to uniquely examine the state of health services research on cancer-related cellular, molecular and genomic technologies and identify challenges and priorities for expanding the evidence base on their effectiveness in routine care. Results This article summarizes the workshop outcomes, which included development of a comprehensive research agenda that incorporates health and safety endpoints, utilization patterns, patient and provider preferences, quality of care and access, disparities, economics and decision modeling, trends in cancer outcomes, and health-related quality of life among target populations. Conclusions Ultimately, the successful adoption of useful technologies will depend on understanding and influencing the patient, provider, health care system and societal factors that contribute to their uptake and effectiveness in ‘real-world’ settings. PMID:19367091

  8. SIMPLE LIFE AND RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIRIM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals in terms of the economy in which we live is one of the most important phenomenon of the century. This phenomenon present itself as the only determinant of people's lives by entering almost makes itself felt. The mo st obvious objective needs of the economy by triggering motive is to induce people to consume . Consumer culture pervades all aspects of the situation are people . Therefore, these people have the blessing of culture , beauty and value all in the name of w hatever is consumed. This is way out of the siege of moral and religious values we have is to go back again . Referred by local cultural and religious values, based on today increasingly come to the fore and the Muslim way of life appears to be close to th e plain / lean preferred by many people life has been a way of life. Even the simple life , a way of life in the Western world , a conception of life , a philosophy, a movement as it has become widely accepted. Here in determining the Muslim way of life Pr ophet. Prophet (sa lived the kind of life a very important model, sample, and determining which direction is known. Religious values, which is the carrier of the prophets, sent to the society they have always been examples and models. Because every aspect of human life, his life style and the surrounding area has a feature. We also value his life that he has unknowingly and without learning and skills and to understand it is not possible to live our religion . We also our presentation, we mainly of Islam o utlook on life and predicted life - style, including the Prophet of Islam 's (sa simple life to scrutinize and lifestyle issues related to reveal , in short Islam's how life has embraced and the Prophet. Prophet's will try to find answers to questions reg arding how to live.

  9. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the factors such as cellular oxidative damage, its consequences and the main protective measures taken to prevent or delay this process. Tests with antioxidants: vitamins A, E and C, flavonoids, carotenoids and minerals, the practice of caloric restriction and physical exercise, seeking the beneficial effects on human health, increasing longevity, reducing the level of oxidative stress, slowing the cellular senescence and origin of certain diseases, are discussed.Diferentes teorias tentam explicar o envelhecimento biológico através da alteração das funções e estrutura dos sistemas orgânicos e células. Ao longo da vida, os radicais livres presentes no estresse oxidativo conduzem à peroxidação dos lipídios das membranas celulares, desequilíbrio da homeostase, formação de resíduos químicos, mutações gênicas no DNA, disfunção de certas organelas, bem como ao surgimento de doenças devido à lesão e/ou morte celular. Nesta revisão descreve-se a ação do estresse oxidativo no processo de envelhecimento das células, enfatizando fatores como os danos oxidativos celulares, suas conseqüências e as principais medidas protetoras adotadas para se prevenir ou retardar este processo. Testes com antioxidantes: vitaminas A, E e C, flavonóides, carotenóides e minerais; a prática de restrição calórica e exercícios físicos, que buscam efeitos benéficos sobre a saúde humana, aumentando a longevidade, reduzindo o nível de estresse oxidativo

  10. Gene-expression signatures of Atlantic salmon's plastic life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin-Horth, N.; Letcher, B.H.; Hofmann, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    How genomic expression differs as a function of life history variation is largely unknown. Atlantic salmon exhibits extreme alternative life histories. We defined the gene-expression signatures of wild-caught salmon at two different life stages by comparing the brain expression profiles of mature sneaker males and immature males, and early migrants and late migrants. In addition to life-stage-specific signatures, we discovered a surprisingly large gene set that was differentially regulated-at similar magnitudes, yet in opposite direction-in both life history transitions. We suggest that this co-variation is not a consequence of many independent cellular and molecular switches in the same direction but rather represents the molecular equivalent of a physiological shift orchestrated by one or very few master regulators. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial game in cellular automaton evacuation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schantz, Anton; Ehtamo, Harri

    2015-11-01

    For numerical simulations of crowd dynamics in an evacuation we need a computationally light environment, such as the cellular automaton model (CA). By choosing the right model parameters, different types of crowd behavior and collective effects can be produced. But the CA does not answer why, when, and how these different behaviors and collective effects occur. In this article, we present a model, where we couple a spatial evacuation game to the CA. In the game, an agent chooses its strategy by observing its neighbors' strategies. The game matrix changes with the distance to the exit as the evacuation conditions develop. In the resulting model, an agent's strategy choice alters the parameters that govern its behavior in the CA. Thus, with our model, we are able to simulate how evacuation conditions affect the behavior of the crowd. Also, we show that some of the collective effects observed in evacuations are a result of the simple game the agents play.

  12. Graviperception and graviresponse at the cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräucker, Richard; Cogoli, Augusto; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    Studies under varied acceleration conditions demonstrated that free living cells such as protists are able to perceive changes of the acceleration conditions. Recent studies favorite the hypothesis that in these systems gravity is perceived either by intracellular receptors (statocyst-like organelles), heavy cell organelles (such as nucleus) and/or by sensing the cell mass by means of ion channels located in the cell membrane. Mammalian cells in microgravity were profoundly influenced. Alteration in the cellular mechanisms and structures in mammalian cells like signal transduction and the cytoskeleton were detected. It can be speculated that the depression of the immune system may become a serious health issue on flights to and from Mars.

  13. Commercialization of cellular immunotherapies for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anthony; Johnson, Robert

    2016-04-15

    Successful commercialization of a cell therapy requires more than proving safety and efficacy to the regulators. The inherent complexity of cellular products delivers particular manufacturing, logistical and reimbursement hurdles that threaten commercial viability for any therapy with a less than spectacular clinical profile that truly changes the standard of care. This is particularly acute for autologous cell therapies where patients receive bespoke treatments manufactured from a sample of their own cells and where economies of scale, which play an important role in containing the production costs for small molecule and antibody therapeutics, are highly limited. Nevertheless, the promise of 'game-changing' efficacy, as exemplified by very high levels of complete responses in refractory haematological malignancies, has attracted capital investments on a vast scale, and the attendant pace of technology development provides promising indicators for future clinical and commercial success. PMID:27068936

  14. Environment Aware Location Estimation in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna Tugcu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel mobile positioning algorithm for cellular networks based on the estimation of the radio propagation environment. Since radio propagation characteristics vary in different environments, knowing the environment of the mobile user is essential for accurate Received Signal Strength- (RSS- based location estimation. The key feature of our method is its capability to estimate the environment of the mobile user using machine learning techniques and to utilize this information for enhancing RSS-based distance calculations. The proposed algorithm, namely, EARBALE, has been evaluated using field measurements collected from a GSM network in diverse geographic locations. Our approach turns out to be significantly beneficial, enhancing estimation accuracy, and thereby enabling high-performance mobile positioning in a practical and cost-effective manner. Additionally, it is computationally light-wei

  15. Stochastic properties of disturbed Elementary Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular automata are class of simple mathematical systems that generate diverse, often complicated behaviour. Evolution of such a system is given by set of local and deterministic rules. However, in spite of simplicity of 'interactions' it's global behaviour can't be, in general, simply predicted or even can not be predicted in time shorter that time of it's strict evolution. We get as, a systems well known 1-dimensional, Wolfram class automata, and connect it into the reservoir consists of some random source (noise). In our experiment we are interested in: a) numeric verification of ergodicity for such a coupled system. b) finding it's probability distribution and evolution. c) finding some analogous for 'real' quantities and behaviour. d) using the dynamical systems and Markov chains theory to describe the system, and to make any predictions of it's behaviour. (author)

  16. Wireless traffic steering for green cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shan; Zhou, Sheng; Niu, Zhisheng; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces wireless traffic steering as a paradigm to realize green communication in multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks. By matching network resources and dynamic mobile traffic demand, traffic steering helps to reduce on-grid power consumption with on-demand services provided. This book reviews existing solutions from the perspectives of energy consumption reduction and renewable energy harvesting. Specifically, it explains how traffic steering can improve energy efficiency through intelligent traffic-resource matching. Several promising traffic steering approaches for dynamic network planning and renewable energy demand-supply balancing are discussed. This book presents an energy-aware traffic steering method for networks with energy harvesting, which optimizes the traffic allocated to each cell based on the renewable energy status. Renewable energy demand-supply balancing is a key factor in energy dynamics, aimed at enhancing renewable energy sustainability to reduce on-grid energy consum...

  17. Simulation of earthquakes with cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Akishin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between cellular automata (CA models of earthquakes and the Burridge–Knopoff (BK model is studied. It is shown that the CA proposed by P. Bak and C. Tang,although they have rather realistic power spectra, do not correspond to the BK model. We present a modification of the CA which establishes the correspondence with the BK model.An analytical method of studying the evolution of the BK-like CA is proposed. By this method a functional quadratic in stress release, which can be regarded as an analog of the event energy, is constructed. The distribution of seismic events with respect to this “energy” shows rather realistic behavior, even in two dimensions. Special attention is paid to two-dimensional automata; the physical restrictions on compression and shear stiffnesses are imposed.

  18. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  19. Microsystems for cellular force measurement: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microsystems are providing key advances in studying single cell mechanical behavior. The mechanical interaction of cells with their extracellular matrix is fundamentally important for cell migration, division, phagocytosis and aptoptosis. This review reports the development of microsystems on studying cell forces. Microsystems provide advantages of studying single cells since the scale of cells is on the micron level. The components of microsystems provide culture, loading, guiding, trapping and on chip analysis of cellular mechanical forces. This paper gives overviews on how MEMS are advancing in the field of cell biomechno sensory systems. It presents different materials, and mode of studying cell mechanics. Finally, we comment on the future directions and challenges on the state of art techniques

  20. From cellular doses to average lung dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitive basal and secretory cells receive a wide range of doses in human bronchial and bronchiolar airways. Variations of cellular doses arise from the location of target cells in the bronchial epithelium of a given airway and the asymmetry and variability of airway dimensions of the lung among airways in a given airway generation and among bronchial and bronchiolar airway generations. To derive a single value for the average lung dose which can be related to epidemiologically observed lung cancer risk, appropriate weighting scenarios have to be applied. Potential biological weighting parameters are the relative frequency of target cells, the number of progenitor cells, the contribution of dose enhancement at airway bifurcations, the promotional effect of cigarette smoking and, finally, the application of appropriate regional apportionment factors. Depending on the choice of weighting parameters, detriment-weighted average lung doses can vary by a factor of up to 4 for given radon progeny exposure conditions. (authors)

  1. Computing by Temporal Order: Asynchronous Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vielhaber

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our concern is the behaviour of the elementary cellular automata with state set 0,1 over the cell set Z/nZ (one-dimensional finite wrap-around case, under all possible update rules (asynchronicity. Over the torus Z/nZ (n<= 11,we will see that the ECA with Wolfram rule 57 maps any v in F_2^n to any w in F_2^n, varying the update rule. We furthermore show that all even (element of the alternating group bijective functions on the set F_2^n = 0,...,2^n-1, can be computed by ECA57, by iterating it a sufficient number of times with varying update rules, at least for n <= 10. We characterize the non-bijective functions computable by asynchronous rules.

  2. Particles and Patterns in Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective has been to develop tools for studying particle interactions in a class of dynamical systems characterized by discreteness, determinism, local interaction, and an inherently parallel form of evolution. These systems can be described by cellular automata (CA) and the behavior we studied has improved our understanding of the nature of patterns generated by CAs, their ability to perform global computations, and their relationship to continuous dynamical systems. We have also developed a rule-table mathematics that enables one to custom-design CA rule tables to generate patterns of specified types, or to perform specified computational tasks

  3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When considering and analyzing experimental material concerning cellular aspects of the problem of radiation carcinogenesis, the following conclusions can be made: neoplastic transformation of cells in a culture is caused already by small radiation doses, under the effect of which the level of DNA injury is quite insignificant; the frequency of cell transformation depends on the type of radiation, it is particularly pronounced under the effect of radiations with a high linear energy transfer; a correlation between the processes of postradiation recovery and radiogenic transformation of cells is detected, nonrepairable injures of DNA playing the most important role in radiation carcinogenesis; tumour promoters and anticarcinogenic agens produce a modifying effect on the transformation of irradiated cells. Molecular mechanisms of oncogene activation are thoroughly studied using the model of virus carcinogenesis, the problem of the nature of chemical and, in particular, radiation cell transformation remains scantily investigated

  4. A cellular automata model for ant trails

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sibel Gokce; Ozhan Kayacan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the unidirectional ant traffic flow with U-turn in an ant trail was investigated using one-dimensional cellular automata model. It is known that ants communicate with each other by dropping a chemical, called pheromone, on the substrate. Apart from the studies in the literature, it was considered in the model that (i) ant colony consists of two kinds of ants, goodand poor-smelling ants, (ii) ants might make U-turn for some special reasons. For some values of densities of good- and poor-smelling ants, the flux and mean velocity of the colony were studied as a function of density and evaporation rate of pheromone.

  5. Call Admission Control in Mobile Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sanchita

    2013-01-01

    Call Admission Control (CAC) and Dynamic Channel Assignments (DCA) are important decision-making problems in mobile cellular communication systems. Current research in mobile communication considers them as two independent problems, although the former greatly depends on the resulting free channels obtained as the outcome of the latter. This book provides a solution to the CAC problem, considering DCA as an integral part of decision-making for call admission. Further, current technical resources ignore movement issues of mobile stations and fluctuation in network load (incoming calls) in the control strategy used for call admission. In addition, the present techniques on call admission offers solution globally for the entire network, instead of considering the cells independently.      CAC here has been formulated by two alternative approaches. The first approach aimed at handling the uncertainty in the CAC problem by employing fuzzy comparators.  The second approach is concerned with formulation of CAC ...

  6. Determining Lineage Pathways from Cellular Barcoding Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leïla Perié

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular barcoding and other single-cell lineage-tracing strategies form experimental methodologies for analysis of in vivo cell fate that have been instrumental in several significant recent discoveries. Due to the highly nonlinear nature of proliferation and differentiation, interrogation of the resulting data for evaluation of potential lineage pathways requires a new quantitative framework complete with appropriate statistical tests. Here, we develop such a framework, illustrating its utility by analyzing data from barcoded multipotent cells of the blood system. This application demonstrates that the data require additional paths beyond those found in the classical model, which leads us to propose that hematopoietic differentiation follows a loss of potential mechanism and to suggest further experiments to test this deduction. Our quantitative framework can evaluate the compatibility of lineage trees with barcoded data from any proliferating and differentiating cell system.

  7. Knowledge discovery for geographical cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xia; Anthony; Gar-On; Yeh

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for geographical simulation by applying data mining techniques to cellular automata. CA has strong capabilities in simulating complex systems. The core of CA is how to define transition rules. There are no good methods for defining these transition rules. They are usually defined by using heuristic methods and thus subject to uncertainties. Mathematical equations are used to represent transition rules implicitly and have limitations in capturing complex relationships. This paper demonstrates that the explicit transition rules of CA can be automatically reconstructed through the rule induction procedure of data mining. The proposed method can reduce the influences of individual knowledge and preferences in defining transition rules and generate more reliable simulation results. It can efficiently discover knowledge from a vast volume of spatial data.

  8. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  9. Mathematical analysis of complex cellular activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Richard; Teka, Wondimu; Vo, Theodore; Wechselberger, Martin; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on mathematical physiology that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. The first article reviews the basic theory of calcium oscillations (common to almost all cell types), including spatio-temporal behaviors such as waves. The second article uses, and expands on, much of this basic theory to show how the interaction of cytosolic calcium oscillators with membrane ion channels can result in highly complex patterns of electrical spiking. Through these examples one can see clearly how multiple oscillatory processes interact within a cell, and how mathematical methods can be used to understand such interactions better. The two reviews provide excellent examples of how mathematics and physiology can learn from each other, and work jointly towards a better understanding of complex cellular processes. Review 1: Richard Bertram, Joel Tabak, Wondimu Teka, Theodore Vo, Martin Wechselberger: Geometric Singular Perturbation Analysis of Burst...

  10. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.; D' Surney, S.J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  11. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO6-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O6-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP

  12. Cellular proliferation after experimental glaucoma filtration surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used light microscopic autoradiography to determine the time course of cellular incorporation of tritiated thymidine (a correlate of cell division) following glaucoma filtration surgery in seven eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys with experimental glaucoma. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was detected as early as 24 hours postoperatively. Peak incorporation occurred five days postoperatively and had returned to baseline levels by day 11. Cells incorporating tritiated thymidine included keratocytes, episcleral cells, corneal and capillary endothelial cells, and conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy was correlated with the autoradiographic results to demonstrate that fibroblasts were dividing on the corneoscleral margin. These findings have potential clinical implications for the use of antiproliferative agents after filtration surgery

  13. Molecular and cellular constraints on proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortemme, Tanja

    Engineering proteins with new sequences, structures and functions has many exciting practical applications, and provides new ways to dissect design principles for function. Recent successes in computational protein design provide a cause for optimism. Yet many functions are currently too complex to engineer predictively, and successful design of new biological activities also requires an understanding of the functional pressures acting on proteins in the context of cells and organisms. I will present two vignettes describing our progress with dissecting both molecular and cellular constraints on protein function. In the first, we characterized the cost and benefit of protein production upon sequence perturbations in a classic system for gene regulation, the lac operon. Our results were unexpected in light of the common assumption that the dominant fitness costs are due to protein expression. Instead, we discovered a direct linear relationship between cost and lacpermease activity, not protein or mRNA production. The magnitude of the cost of permease activity, relative to protein production, has consequences for regulation. Our model predicts an advantage of direct regulation of protein activity (not just expression), providing a new explanation for the long-known mechanism of ``inducer exclusion'' that inhibits transport through the permease. Similar pressures and cost/benefit tradeoffs may be key to engineering synthetic systems with improved fitness. In the second vignette, I will describe our recent efforts to develop computational approaches that predict protein sequences consistent with multiple functional conformations. We expect such ``multi-constraint'' models to improve predictions of functional sequences determined by deep mutational scanning in bacteria, to provide insights into how the balance between functional conformations shapes sequence space, and to highlight molecular and cellular constraints that cannot be captured by the model.

  14. Cellular scaling rules of insectivore brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K Sarko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling rules overlap somewhat with those for rodents and primates such that the insectivore cortex shares scaling rules with rodents (increasing faster in size than in numbers of neurons, but the insectivore cerebellum shares scaling rules with primates (increasing isometrically. Brain structures pooled as “remaining areas” appear to scale similarly across all three mammalian orders with respect to numbers of neurons, and the numbers of non-neurons appear to scale similarly across all brain structures for all three orders. Therefore, common scaling rules exist, to different extents, between insectivore, rodent and primate brain regions, and it is hypothesized that insectivores represent the common aspects of each order. The olfactory bulbs of insectivores, however, offer a noteworthy exception in that neuronal density increases linearly with increasing structure mass. This implies that the average neuronal cell size decreases with increasing olfactory bulb mass in order to accommodate greater neuronal density, and represents the first documentation of a brain structure gaining neurons at a greater rate than mass. This might allow insectivore brains to concentrate more neurons within the olfactory bulbs without a prohibitively large and metabolically costly increase in structure mass.

  15. Cellular cardiomyoplasty A preliminary clinical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cellular cardiomyoplasty is the method of transplanting myogenic cells into injured myocardium to restore the lost heart muscle cells and to improve ventricular function. Method: Three patients, all with a history of coronary heart disease, underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and implantation of autologous satellite cells. A muscle biopsy of 2-4 g from the right vastus lateralis muscle was obtained for satellite cell (myogenic stem cell from skeletal muscle) isolation and proliferation before implanted into the donor's heart. The cells were suspended in serum-free medium and injected into 30-40 sites at and around the ischemic areas just before reversing the hypothermic cardioplegia to eliminate arrhythmia and to improve retention. After recovery, each patient was maintained at the intensive care unit for 3-4 days with ECG monitoring before transferring to the patient floor. Results: All patients survived the procedure with an uneventful recovery and were discharged from the hospital. At 3-4 months follow-up examination, increased left ventricular ejection fraction of 11% (35-46%), 5.4% (40-45.4%) and 1% (40-41%) and decreased left ventricular diastolic diameter of 4, 2 and 9 mm were observed for the patients, respectively. Arrhythmia was not detected during the follow-up evaluation by ECG. Improved perfusion (99mTC-MIBI) and increased metabolic activity (18F-deoxyglucose) were found at the sites of satellite cell implantation. Significant increase of wall thickness and movement at the areas of cell injection was also observed using 2D-echo. Conclusion: Cellular cardiomyoplasty using autologous satellite cells is a safe procedure with encouraging beneficial outcomes in patients

  16. Proceedings of the symposium on 'radiation research in life science'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the collection of the papers presented at the title symposium on radiation research in life science. The themes included in this report are as follows: (1) cellular aging process, (2) senescence gene and cellular immortalization, (3) molecular mechanism of replicative senescence, (4) programmed cell death during differentiation, (5) thymocyte apoptosis, (6) neuronal death, (7) apoptosis by HIV infection, (8) apoptosis and immunology, (9) radiation induced apoptosis, and so on. Separate abstract was prepared for 1 of the papers in this report. The remaining 10 papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  17. Looked at Life from Both Sides Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian E. Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As the molecular top–down causality emerging through comparative genomics is combined with the bottom–up dynamic chemical networks of biochemistry, the molecular symbiotic relationships driving growth of the tree of life becomes strikingly apparent. These symbioses can be mutualistic or parasitic across many levels, but most foundational is the complex and intricate mutualism of nucleic acids and proteins known as the central dogma of biological information flow. This unification of digital and analog molecular information within a common chemical network enables processing of the vast amounts of information necessary for cellular life. Here we consider the molecular information pathways of these dynamic biopolymer networks from the perspective of their evolution and use that perspective to inform and constrain pathways for the construction of mutualistic polymers.

  18. Looked at life from both sides now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jillian E; Mowles, Allisandra K; Mehta, Anil K; Lynn, David G

    2014-01-01

    As the molecular top-down causality emerging through comparative genomics is combined with the bottom-up dynamic chemical networks of biochemistry, the molecular symbiotic relationships driving growth of the tree of life becomes strikingly apparent. These symbioses can be mutualistic or parasitic across many levels, but most foundational is the complex and intricate mutualism of nucleic acids and proteins known as the central dogma of biological information flow. This unification of digital and analog molecular information within a common chemical network enables processing of the vast amounts of information necessary for cellular life. Here we consider the molecular information pathways of these dynamic biopolymer networks from the perspective of their evolution and use that perspective to inform and constrain pathways for the construction of mutualistic polymers. PMID:25513758

  19. Cellular Mechanisms of Multiple Myeloma Bone Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Oranger; Claudia Carbone; Maddalena Izzo; Maria Grano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of differentiated plasma cells that accumulates and proliferates in the bone marrow. MM patients often develop bone disease that results in severe bone pain, osteolytic lesions, and pathologic fractures. These skeletal complications have not only a negative impact on quality of life but also a possible effect in overall survival. MM osteolytic bone lesions arise from the altered bone remodeling due to both increased osteoclast activation and d...

  20. Determining the effect of oxidative damage on the degradation of cellular membranes by phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative damage to cellular membranes, proteins and DNA is a consequence of life in the presence of oxygen. The degree of oxidative damage is determined by the balance between the production of oxidising species in the body and their removal by antioxidants. Oxidative damage to cellular membranes has been linked to ageing as well as neurodegenerative diseases, atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes and arthritis. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a surface-active enzyme that catalyses the degradation of cellular membranes through the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester bond of phospholipids. It was initially speculated that PLA2 could preferentially remove oxidised phospholipids from damaged cellular membranes due to the decreased packing density of the oxidised membrane allowing easier access of PLA2 to the sn-2 ester bond of the phospholipids. Although the rate of PLA2 degradation of cellular membranes has been reported to increase with oxidised membranes it has not been conclusively shown that the oxidised phospholipids are preferentially removed from the membrane. On the contrary, it has also been reported that PLA2 preferentially removes the non-oxidised phospholipids from the membrane. The structure and composition of oxidised model membranes (tethered phospholipid bilayers) measured using neutron reflectometry both before and after PLA2 mediated membrane degradation will be discussed. Oxidation was achieved using iron(II) and ascorbate, a common initiator of lipid oxidation. Bilayers containing 5, 10 and 3Omol% 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, a synthetic oxidised phospholipid, were also employed, to bench mark the effect of manual oxidation and the subsequent effect on PLA2 degradation of the bilayer.