WorldWideScience

Sample records for archaeal orfeomes subcellular

  1. CoBaltDB: Complete bacterial and archaeal orfeomes subcellular localization database and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucchetti-Miganeh Céline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of proteins are strongly related to their localization in cell compartments (for example the cytoplasm or membranes but the experimental determination of the sub-cellular localization of proteomes is laborious and expensive. A fast and low-cost alternative approach is in silico prediction, based on features of the protein primary sequences. However, biologists are confronted with a very large number of computational tools that use different methods that address various localization features with diverse specificities and sensitivities. As a result, exploiting these computer resources to predict protein localization accurately involves querying all tools and comparing every prediction output; this is a painstaking task. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive database, called CoBaltDB, that gathers all prediction outputs concerning complete prokaryotic proteomes. Description The current version of CoBaltDB integrates the results of 43 localization predictors for 784 complete bacterial and archaeal proteomes (2.548.292 proteins in total. CoBaltDB supplies a simple user-friendly interface for retrieving and exploring relevant information about predicted features (such as signal peptide cleavage sites and transmembrane segments. Data are organized into three work-sets ("specialized tools", "meta-tools" and "additional tools". The database can be queried using the organism name, a locus tag or a list of locus tags and may be browsed using numerous graphical and text displays. Conclusions With its new functionalities, CoBaltDB is a novel powerful platform that provides easy access to the results of multiple localization tools and support for predicting prokaryotic protein localizations with higher confidence than previously possible. CoBaltDB is available at http://www.umr6026.univ-rennes1.fr/english/home/research/basic/software/cobalten.

  2. Diversity and subcellular distribution of archaeal secreted proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechthild ePohlschroder

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins make up a significant percentage of a prokaryotic proteome and play critical roles in important cellular processes such as polymer degradation, nutrient uptake, signal transduction, cell wall biosynthesis and motility. The majority of archaeal proteins are believed to be secreted either in an unfolded conformation via the universally conserved Sec pathway or in a folded conformation via the Twin arginine transport (Tat pathway. Extensive in vivo and in silico analyses of N-terminal signal peptides that target proteins to these pathways have led to the development of computational tools that not only predict Sec and Tat substrates with high accuracy but also provide information about signal peptide processing and targeting. Predictions therefore include indications as to whether a substrate is a soluble secreted protein, a membrane or cell-wall anchored protein, or a surface structure subunit, and whether it is targeted for post-translational modification such as glycosylation or the addition of a lipid. The use of these in silico tools, in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses of transport pathways and their substrates, has resulted in improved predictions of the subcellular localization of archaeal secreted proteins, allowing for a more accurate annotation of archaeal proteomes, and has led to the identification of potential adaptations to extreme environments, as well as archaeal kingdom-specific pathways. A more comprehensive understanding of the transport pathways and post-translational modifications of secreted archaeal proteins will also generate invaluable insights that will facilitate the identification of commercially valuable archaeal enzymes and the development of heterologous systems in which to efficiently express them.

  3. WormBase as an Integrated Platform for the C. elegans ORFeome

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Nansheng; Lawson, Daniel; Bradnam, Keith; Harris, Todd W.; Stein, Lincoln D.

    2004-01-01

    The ORFeome project has validated and corrected a large number of predicted gene models in the nematode C. elegans, and has provided an enormous resource for proteome-scale studies. To make the resource useful to the research and teaching community, it needs to be integrated with other large-scale data sets, including the C. elegans genome, cell lineage, neurological wiring diagram, transcriptome, and gene expression map. This integration is also critical because the ORFeome data sets, like o...

  4. ViralORFeome: an integrated database to generate a versatile collection of viral ORFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellet, J; Tafforeau, L; Lucas-Hourani, M; Navratil, V; Meyniel, L; Achaz, G; Guironnet-Paquet, A; Aublin-Gex, A; Caignard, G; Cassonnet, P; Chaboud, A; Chantier, T; Deloire, A; Demeret, C; Le Breton, M; Neveu, G; Jacotot, L; Vaglio, P; Delmotte, S; Gautier, C; Combet, C; Deleage, G; Favre, M; Tangy, F; Jacob, Y; Andre, P; Lotteau, V; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Vidalain, P O

    2010-01-01

    Large collections of protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) established in a versatile recombination-based cloning system have been instrumental to study protein functions in high-throughput assays. Such 'ORFeome' resources have been developed for several organisms but in virology, plasmid collections covering a significant fraction of the virosphere are still needed. In this perspective, we present ViralORFeome 1.0 (http://www.viralorfeome.com), an open-access database and management system that provides an integrated set of bioinformatic tools to clone viral ORFs in the Gateway(R) system. ViralORFeome provides a convenient interface to navigate through virus genome sequences, to design ORF-specific cloning primers, to validate the sequence of generated constructs and to browse established collections of virus ORFs. Most importantly, ViralORFeome has been designed to manage all possible variants or mutants of a given ORF so that the cloning procedure can be applied to any emerging virus strain. A subset of plasmid constructs generated with ViralORFeome platform has been tested with success for heterologous protein expression in different expression systems at proteome scale. ViralORFeome should provide our community with a framework to establish a large collection of virus ORF clones, an instrumental resource to determine functions, activities and binding partners of viral proteins.

  5. Genome-wide functional annotation and structural verification of metabolic ORFeome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Changyu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering have been expedited by the availability of genome sequences and metabolic modelling approaches. The complete sequencing of the C. reinhardtii genome has made this unicellular alga a good candidate for metabolic engineering studies; however, the annotation of the relevant genes has not been validated and the much-needed metabolic ORFeome is currently unavailable. We describe our efforts on the functional annotation of the ORF models released by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, prediction of their subcellular localizations, and experimental verification of their structural annotation at the genome scale. Results We assigned enzymatic functions to the translated JGI ORF models of C. reinhardtii by reciprocal BLAST searches of the putative proteome against the UniProt and AraCyc enzyme databases. The best match for each translated ORF was identified and the EC numbers were transferred onto the ORF models. Enzymatic functional assignment was extended to the paralogs of the ORFs by clustering ORFs using BLASTCLUST. In total, we assigned 911 enzymatic functions, including 886 EC numbers, to 1,427 transcripts. We further annotated the enzymatic ORFs by prediction of their subcellular localization. The majority of the ORFs are predicted to be compartmentalized in the cytosol and chloroplast. We verified the structure of the metabolism-related ORF models by reverse transcription-PCR of the functionally annotated ORFs. Following amplification and cloning, we carried out 454FLX and Sanger sequencing of the ORFs. Based on alignment of the 454FLX reads to the ORF predicted sequences, we obtained more than 90% coverage for more than 80% of the ORFs. In total, 1,087 ORF models were verified by 454 and Sanger sequencing methods. We obtained expression evidence for 98% of the metabolic ORFs in the algal cells grown under constant light in the presence of acetate. Conclusions We functionally

  6. Archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spind......SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes...

  7. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  8. Construction of a highly flexible and comprehensive gene collection representing the ORFeome of the human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Christina J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn is the leading intracellular human pathogen responsible for respiratory infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis. Basic and applied research in pathogen biology, especially the elaboration of new mechanism-based anti-pathogen strategies, target discovery and drug development, rely heavily on the availability of the entire set of pathogen open reading frames, the ORFeome. The ORFeome of Cpn will enable genome- and proteome-wide systematic analysis of Cpn, which will improve our understanding of the molecular networks and mechanisms underlying and governing its pathogenesis. Results Here we report the construction of a comprehensive gene collection covering 98.5% of the 1052 predicted and verified ORFs of Cpn (Chlamydia pneumoniae strain CWL029 in Gateway® ‘entry’ vectors. Based on genomic DNA isolated from the vascular chlamydial strain CV-6, we constructed an ORFeome library that contains 869 unique Gateway® entry clones (83% coverage and an additional 168 PCR-verified ‘pooled’ entry clones, reaching an overall coverage of ~98.5% of the predicted CWL029 ORFs. The high quality of the ORFeome library was verified by PCR-gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing, and its functionality was demonstrated by expressing panels of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli and by genome-wide protein interaction analysis for a test set of three Cpn virulence factors in a yeast 2-hybrid system. The ORFeome is available in different configurations of resource stocks, PCR-products, purified plasmid DNA, and living cultures of E. coli harboring the desired entry clone or pooled entry clones. All resources are available in 96-well microtiterplates. Conclusion This first ORFeome library for Cpn provides an essential new tool for this important pathogen. The high coverage of entry clones will enable a systems biology approach for Cpn or host–pathogen analysis. The high yield of

  9. Closing in on the C. elegans ORFeome by cloning TWINSCAN predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Chaochun; Lamesch, Philippe; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan

    2005-01-01

    system has 60% sensitivity and 58% specificity in exact prediction of open reading frames (ORFs), and hence, proteins-the best results we are aware of any multicellular organism. We then attempted to amplify, clone, and sequence 265 TWINSCAN-predicted ORFs that did not overlap WormBase gene annotations....... The success rate was 55%, adding 146 genes that were completely absent from WormBase to the ORF clone collection (ORFeome). The same procedure had a 7% success rate on 90 Worm Base "predicted" genes that do not overlap TWINSCAN predictions. These results indicate that the accuracy of WormBase could...... also suggest that this technology can significantly improve our knowledge of the "parts list" for even the best-studied model organisms....

  10. Serial kinetics of the antibody response against the complete Brucella melitensis ORFeome in focal vertebral brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella, Anthony P; Lin, Jennifer C; Liang, Li; Atluri, Vidya; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Felgner, Philip L; Tsolis, Renee M; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2012-03-01

    Human brucellosis is a common zoonosis worldwide. Here we present a case of focal vertebral brucellosis in a 71-year-old Mexican-American woman who contracted infection from unpasteurized goat milk. Standard agglutination serology was negative; the diagnosis was established by the isolation of Brucella melitensis from abscess fluid. A B. melitensis protein microarray comprised of nearly all proteins encoded by the bacterial genome was used to determine the kinetics of this patient's antibody responses to the complete collection of open reading frames existing in the genome (ORFeome). Three patterns of antibody responses against B. melitensis antigens were seen for serum samples obtained on days 0 (pretreatment), 14, 49, 100, and 180: (i) stable titers over time, (ii) a steady fall in titers, and (iii) an initial rise in titers followed by declining titers. Sera from this patient with chronic brucellosis recognized some of the same B. melitensis proteins as those recognized by sera from acute/subacute, blood culture-positive brucellosis patients but also recognized a distinct set of proteins. This study is the first to determine the kinetics of the human antibody responses to the complete repertoire of proteins encoded by a bacterial genome and demonstrates fundamentally different immunopathogenetic mechanisms between acute human brucellosis and chronic human brucellosis. While an extension of these findings to a larger patient population is necessary, these findings have important clinical and diagnostic implications and lead toward new insights into the fundamental immunopathogenesis of brucellosis.

  11. Shaping the Archaeal Cell Envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert F. Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although archaea have a similar cellular organization as other prokaryotes, the lipid composition of their membranes and their cell surface is unique. Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the archaeal protein secretion mechanisms, the assembly of macromolecular cell surface structures, and the release of S-layer-coated vesicles from the archaeal membrane.

  12. Archaeal viruses of the sulfolobales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environm......Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2...... in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs...

  13. Shaping the Archaeal Cell Envelope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, Albert F.; Zolghadr, Behnam; Driessen, Arnold M. J.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2010-01-01

    Although archaea have a similar cellular organization as other prokaryotes, the lipid composition of their membranes and their cell surface is unique. Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the archaeal protein secretion mechanisms, the assembly of macromolecular cell surface st

  14. Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Viruses as Novel Nanoplatforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch

    of a broad range of genetic and chemical engineering methods, viral research has expanded. Viruses are now emerging as nanoplatforms with applications in materials science and medicine. A great challenge in biomedicine is the targeting of therapeutics to specific locations in the body in order to increase...... nanoplatforms than mammalian viruses because they cannot proliferate in humans and hence are less likely to trigger adverse effects. Another group of viruses that fits this criterion is archaeal viruses yet their potential remains untapped. As a group, archaeal viruses offer distinct advantages such as unique...... hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses, SMV1 and SSV2 and cells of human origin. This chapter provides the first results demonstrating that archaeal viruses can be taken up and internalized by human cells, thus indicating a potential as intracellular delivery agents. Chapter III investigates SMV1 particles as potential...

  15. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  16. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Littlechild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  17. The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser: 2012 update

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Patricia P.; Holmes, Andrew D.; Smith, Andrew M.; Tran, Danny; Lowe, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser (http://archaea.ucsc.edu) offers a graphical web-based resource for exploration and discovery within archaeal and other selected microbial genomes. By bringing together existing gene annotations, gene expression data, multiple-genome alignments, pre-computed sequence comparisons and other specialized analysis tracks, the genome browser is a powerful aggregator of varied genomic information. The genome browser environment maintains the current look-and-feel of ...

  18. The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser: 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patricia P; Holmes, Andrew D; Smith, Andrew M; Tran, Danny; Lowe, Todd M

    2012-01-01

    The UCSC Archaeal Genome Browser (http://archaea.ucsc.edu) offers a graphical web-based resource for exploration and discovery within archaeal and other selected microbial genomes. By bringing together existing gene annotations, gene expression data, multiple-genome alignments, pre-computed sequence comparisons and other specialized analysis tracks, the genome browser is a powerful aggregator of varied genomic information. The genome browser environment maintains the current look-and-feel of the vertebrate UCSC Genome Browser, but also integrates archaeal and bacterial-specific tracks with a few graphic display enhancements. The browser currently contains 115 archaeal genomes, plus 31 genomes of viruses known to infect archaea. Some of the recently developed or enhanced tracks visualize data from published high-throughput RNA-sequencing studies, the NCBI Conserved Domain Database, sequences from pre-genome sequencing studies, predicted gene boundaries from three different protein gene prediction algorithms, tRNAscan-SE gene predictions with RNA secondary structures and CRISPR locus predictions. We have also developed a companion resource, the Archaeal COG Browser, to provide better search and display of arCOG gene function classifications, including their phylogenetic distribution among available archaeal genomes.

  19. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity.

  20. The sub-cellular localization of Sulfolobus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Duggin, Iain G; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja V; Bell, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Analyses of the DNA replication-associated proteins of hyperthermophilic archaea have yielded considerable insight into the structure and biochemical function of these evolutionarily conserved factors. However, little is known about the regulation and progression of DNA replication in the context of archaeal cells. In the current work, we describe the generation of strains of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that allow the incorporation of nucleoside analogues during DNA replication. We employ this technology, in conjunction with immunolocalization analyses of replisomes, to investigate the sub-cellular localization of nascent DNA and replisomes. Our data reveal a peripheral localization of replisomes in the cell. Furthermore, while the two replication forks emerging from any one of the three replication origins in the Sulfolobus chromosome remain in close proximity, the three origin loci are separated.

  1. Archaeal histones: dynamic and versatile genome architects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Henneman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome organization and compaction in Archaea involves different chromatin proteins, among which homologues of eukaryotic histones. Archaeal histones are considered the ancestors of their eukaryotic counterparts, which isreflected in the way they position along the genome and wrap DNA. Evolution from the archaeal modes of action to the prototypical eukaryotic nucleosome may be attributed to altered histone-histone interactions and DNA sequence determinants cooperating to yield stable multimeric structures. The identification of a new candidate phylum, proposed to be a missing link between archaea and eukaryotes, Lokiarchaeaota, may be instrumental in addressing this hypothesis.

  2. Archaeal viruses-novel, diverse and enigmatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Garrett, Roger Antony; She, Qunxin

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed a remarkable diversity of viruses in archaeal-rich environments where spindles, spheres, filaments and rods are common, together with other exceptional morphotypes never recorded previously. Moreover, their double-stranded DNA genomes carry very few genes exhibiting...

  3. Environmental shaping of sponge associated archaeal communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S Turque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archaea are ubiquitous symbionts of marine sponges but their ecological roles and the influence of environmental factors on these associations are still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the diversity and composition of archaea associated with seawater and with the sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila, Paraleucilla magna and Petromica citrina in two distinct environments: Guanabara Bay, a highly impacted estuary in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the nearby Cagarras Archipelago. For this we used metagenomic analyses of 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene libraries. Hymeniacidon heliophila was more abundant inside the bay, while P. magna was more abundant outside and P. citrina was only recorded at the Cagarras Archipelago. Principal Component Analysis plots (PCA generated using pairwise unweighted UniFrac distances showed that the archaeal community structure of inner bay seawater and sponges was different from that of coastal Cagarras Archipelago. Rarefaction analyses showed that inner bay archaeaoplankton were more diverse than those from the Cagarras Archipelago. Only members of Crenarchaeota were found in sponge libraries, while in seawater both Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota were observed. Although most amoA archaeal genes detected in this study seem to be novel, some clones were affiliated to known ammonia oxidizers such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Cenarchaeum symbiosum. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The composition and diversity of archaeal communities associated with pollution-tolerant sponge species can change in a range of few kilometers, probably influenced by eutrophication. The presence of archaeal amoA genes in Porifera suggests that Archaea are involved in the nitrogen cycle within the sponge holobiont, possibly increasing its resistance to anthropogenic impacts. The higher diversity of Crenarchaeota in the polluted area suggests that some marine sponges are able to change the composition

  4. Structure and function of the archaeal exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Hou, Linlin; Glaeser, Stefanie; Klug, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-degrading exosome in archaea is structurally very similar to the nine-subunit core of the essential eukaryotic exosome and to bacterial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). In contrast to the eukaryotic exosome, PNPase and the archaeal exosome exhibit metal ion-dependent, phosphorolytic activities and synthesize heteropolymeric RNA tails in addition to the exoribonucleolytic RNA degradation in 3' → 5' direction. The archaeal nine-subunit exosome consists of four orthologs of eukaryotic exosomal subunits: the RNase PH-domain-containing subunits Rrp41 and Rrp42 form a hexameric ring with three active sites, whereas the S1-domain-containing subunits Rrp4 and Csl4 form an RNA-binding trimeric cap on the top of the ring. In vivo, this cap contains Rrp4 and Csl4 in variable amounts. Rrp4 confers poly(A) specificity to the exosome, whereas Csl4 is involved in the interaction with the archaea-specific subunit of the complex, the homolog of the bacterial primase DnaG. The archaeal DnaG is a highly conserved protein and its gene is present in all sequenced archaeal genomes, although the exosome was lost in halophilic archaea and some methanogens. In exosome-containing archaea, DnaG is tightly associated with the exosome. It functions as an additional RNA-binding subunit with poly(A) specificity in the reconstituted exosome of Sulfolobus solfataricus and enhances the degradation of adenine-rich transcripts in vitro. Not only the RNA-binding cap but also the hexameric Rrp41-Rrp42 ring alone shows substrate selectivity and prefers purines over pyrimidines. This implies a coevolution of the exosome and its RNA substrates resulting in 3'-ends with different affinities to the exosome.

  5. Archaeal CRISPR-based immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger A; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-based immune systems are essentially modular with three primary functions: the excision and integration of new spacers, the processing of CRISPR transcripts to yield mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs), and the targeting and cleavage...... of foreign nucleic acid. The primary target appears to be the DNA of foreign genetic elements, but the CRISPR/Cmr system that is widespread amongst archaea also specifically targets and cleaves RNA in vitro. The archaeal CRISPR systems tend to be both diverse and complex. Here we examine evidence...... of CRISPR loci and the evidence for intergenomic exchange of CRISPR systems....

  6. Unexplored Archaeal Diversity in the Great Ape Gut Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Andrew H.; Goodman, Andrew L.; Ochman, Howard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Archaea are habitual residents of the human gut flora but are detected at substantially lower frequencies than bacteria. Previous studies have indicated that each human harbors very few archaeal species. However, the low diversity of human-associated archaea that has been detected could be due to the preponderance of bacteria in these communities, such that relatively few sequences are classified as Archaea even when microbiomes are sampled deeply. Moreover, the universal prokaryotic primer pair typically used to interrogate microbial diversity has low specificity to the archaeal domain, potentially leaving vast amounts of diversity unobserved. As a result, the prevalence, diversity, and distribution of archaea may be substantially underestimated. Here we evaluate archaeal diversity in gut microbiomes using an approach that targets virtually all known members of this domain. Comparing microbiomes across five great ape species allowed us to examine the dynamics of archaeal lineages over evolutionary time scales. These analyses revealed hundreds of gut-associated archaeal lineages, indicating that upwards of 90% of the archaeal diversity in the human and great ape gut microbiomes has been overlooked. Additionally, these results indicate a progressive reduction in archaeal diversity in the human lineage, paralleling the decline reported for bacteria. IMPORTANCE Our findings show that Archaea are a habitual and vital component of human and great ape gut microbiomes but are largely ignored on account of the failure of previous studies to realize their full diversity. Here we report unprecedented levels of archaeal diversity in great ape gut microbiomes, exceeding that detected by conventional 16S rRNA gene surveys. Paralleling what has been reported for bacteria, there is a vast reduction of archaeal diversity in humans. Our study demonstrates that archaeal diversity in the great ape gut microbiome greatly exceeds that reported previously and provides the basis

  7. The archaeal Ced system imports DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolferen, Marleen; Wagner, Alexander; van der Does, Chris; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2016-01-01

    The intercellular transfer of DNA is a phenomenon that occurs in all domains of life and is a major driving force of evolution. Upon UV-light treatment, cells of the crenarchaeal genus Sulfolobus express Ups pili, which initiate cell aggregate formation. Within these aggregates, chromosomal DNA, which is used for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, is exchanged. Because so far no clear homologs of bacterial DNA transporters have been identified among the genomes of Archaea, the mechanisms of archaeal DNA transport have remained a puzzling and underinvestigated topic. Here we identify saci_0568 and saci_0748, two genes from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that are highly induced upon UV treatment, encoding a transmembrane protein and a membrane-bound VirB4/HerA homolog, respectively. DNA transfer assays showed that both proteins are essential for DNA transfer between Sulfolobus cells and act downstream of the Ups pili system. Our results moreover revealed that the system is involved in the import of DNA rather than the export. We therefore propose that both Saci_0568 and Saci_0748 are part of a previously unidentified DNA importer. Given the fact that we found this transporter system to be widely spread among the Crenarchaeota, we propose to name it the Crenarchaeal system for exchange of DNA (Ced). In this study we have for the first time to our knowledge described an archaeal DNA transporter. PMID:26884154

  8. Sequence conserved for subcellular localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    The more proteins diverged in sequence, the more difficult it becomes for bioinformatics to infer similarities of protein function and structure from sequence. The precise thresholds used in automated genome annotations depend on the particular aspect of protein function transferred by homology. Here, we presented the first large-scale analysis of the relation between sequence similarity and identity in subcellular localization. Three results stood out: (1) The subcellular compartment is generally more conserved than what might have been expected given that short sequence motifs like nuclear localization signals can alter the native compartment; (2) the sequence conservation of localization is similar between different compartments; and (3) it is similar to the conservation of structure and enzymatic activity. In particular, we found the transition between the regions of conserved and nonconserved localization to be very sharp, although the thresholds for conservation were less well defined than for structure and enzymatic activity. We found that a simple measure for sequence similarity accounting for pairwise sequence identity and alignment length, the HSSP distance, distinguished accurately between protein pairs of identical and different localizations. In fact, BLAST expectation values outperformed the HSSP distance only for alignments in the subtwilight zone. We succeeded in slightly improving the accuracy of inferring localization through homology by fine tuning the thresholds. Finally, we applied our results to the entire SWISS-PROT database and five entirely sequenced eukaryotes. PMID:12441382

  9. A Method for Identification of Selenoprotein Genes in Archaeal Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingfeng Li; Yanzhao Huang; Yi Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The genetic codon UGA has a dual function: serving as a terminator and encoding selenocysteine. However, most popular gene annotation programs only take it as a stop signal, resulting in misannotation or completely missing selenoprotein genes. We developed a computational method named Asec-Prediction that is specific for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes. To evaluate its effectiveness, we first applied it to 14 archaeal genomes with previously known selenoprotein genes, and Asec-Prediction identified all reported selenoprotein genes without redundant results. When we applied it to 12 archaeal genomes that had not been researched for selenoprotein genes, Asec-Prediction detected a novel selenoprotein gene in Methanosarcina acetivorans. Further evidence was also collected to support that the predicted gene should be a real selenoprotein gene. The result shows that Asec-Prediction is effective for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes.

  10. 40 Years of archaeal virology: Expanding viral diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Bolduc, Benjamin; Young, Mark J

    2015-05-01

    The first archaeal virus was isolated over 40 years ago prior to the recognition of the three domain structure of life. In the ensuing years, our knowledge of Archaea and their viruses has increased, but they still remain the most mysterious of life's three domains. Currently, over 100 archaeal viruses have been discovered, but few have been described in biochemical or structural detail. However, those that have been characterized have revealed a new world of structural, biochemical and genetic diversity. Several model systems for studying archaeal virus-host interactions have been developed, revealing evolutionary linkages between viruses infecting the three domains of life, new viral lysis systems, and unusual features of host-virus interactions. It is likely that the study of archaeal viruses will continue to provide fertile ground for fundamental discoveries in virus diversity, structure and function.

  11. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  12. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  13. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Voet, M.; Sismeiro, O.; Dillies, M.A.; Jagla, B.; Coppée, J.Y.; Sezonov, G.; Forterre, P.; Oost, van der J.; Lavigne, R.; Prangishvili, D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea

  14. Archaeal lipids in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ann-Christin; Jensen, Sara M; Fricker, Gert;

    2017-01-01

    tetraether lipids. The inherent chemical stability and unique membrane-spanning characteristics of tetraether lipids render them interesting for oral drug delivery purposes. Archaeal lipids form liposomes spontaneously (archaeosomes) and may be incorporated in conventional liposomes (mixed vesicles). Both...... types of liposomes are promising to protect their drug cargo, such as therapeutic peptides, against the acidic environment of the stomach and proteolytic degradation in the intestine. They appear to withstand lipolytic enzymes and bile salts and may thus deliver orally administered therapeutic peptides...... to distant sections of the intestine or to the colon, where they may be absorbed, eventually by the help of absorption enhancers. Archaeal lipids and their semisynthetic derivatives may thus serve as biological source for the next generation oral drug delivery systems. The aim of this review is to present...

  15. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2007-05-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  16. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Abu-Qarn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  17. Spatiotemporal variability in archaeal communities of tropical coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.

    (Woese 1987), have changed our perceptions on their bio- diversity, distribution and function in natural marine ecosys- tems. Meticulous and extensive analyses of ribosomal RNA gene sequences from environmental samples have revealed that archaea.... (2001) concluded that there are 1.3×1028 archaeal cells (of which ∼20 % are thaumarchaeotes) and 3.1×1028 bacterial cells in the world oceans. A combination of in-situ hybrid- ization and micro-autoradiography has shown that marine archaea are active...

  18. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons

    OpenAIRE

    Mehtap Abu-Qarn; Jerry Eichler

    2006-01-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, t...

  19. Polyphasic Analyses of Methanogenic Archaeal Communities in Agricultural Biogas Plants▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nettmann, E.; Bergmann, I.; Pramschüfer, S.; Mundt, K; Plogsties, V.; Herrmann, C.; Klocke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative r...

  20. Global analysis of viral infection in an archaeal model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid S. Maaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin and evolutionary relationship of viruses is poorly understood. This makes archaeal virus-host of particular interest because the hosts generally root near the base of phylogenetic trees, while some of the viruses have clear structural similarities to those that infect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Despite the advantageous position for use in evolutionary studies, little is known about archaeal viruses or how they interact with their hosts, compared to viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, many archaeal viruses have been isolated from extreme environments and present a unique opportunity for elucidating factors that are important for existence at the extremes.. In this article we focus on virus-host interactions using a proteomics approach to study Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2. Using cultures grown from the ATCC cell stock, a single cycle of STIV infection was sampled 6 times over a 72 hr period. More than 700 proteins were identified throughout the course of the experiments. Seventy one host proteins were found to change by nearly two-fold (p<0.05 with 40 becoming more abundant and 31 less abundant. The modulated proteins represent 30 different cell pathways and 14 COG groups. 2D gel analysis showed that changes in post translational modifications were a common feature of the affected proteins. The results from these studies showed that the prokaryotic antiviral adaptive immune system CRISPR associated proteins (CAS proteins were regulated in response to the virus infection. It was found that regulated proteins come from mRNAs with a shorter than average half-life. In addition, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP profiling on 2D gels showed caspase, hydrolase and tyrosine phosphatase enzyme activity labeling at the protein isoform level. Together, this data provides a more detailed global view of archaeal cellular responses to viral infection, demonstrates the

  1. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  2. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yendi E. Navarro-Noya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5, indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  3. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  4. Domains involved in TAF15 subcellular localisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marko, Marija; Vlassis, Arsenios; Guialis, Apostolia

    2012-01-01

    to play important roles in the onset of specific tumours, certain forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). In this study we identified the domains of TAF15 responsible for its subcellular localisation in human (HeLa) cells and experimentally confirmed...... regulated in the HeLa and the neuronal HT22 cell lines and that TAF15 co-localised with a minor subset of RNA granules in the cytoplasm of HT22 cells, supporting a model whereupon TAF15 plays a role in RNA transport and/or local RNA translation....

  5. Novel archaeal adhesion pilins with a conserved N terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Xu, Rachel; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-09-01

    Type IV pili play important roles in a wide array of processes, including surface adhesion and twitching motility. Although archaeal genomes encode a diverse set of type IV pilus subunits, the functions for most remain unknown. We have now characterized six Haloferax volcanii pilins, PilA[1-6], each containing an identical 30-amino-acid N-terminal hydrophobic motif that is part of a larger highly conserved domain of unknown function (Duf1628). Deletion mutants lacking up to five of the six pilin genes display no significant adhesion defects; however, H. volcanii lacking all six pilins (ΔpilA[1-6]) does not adhere to glass or plastic. Consistent with these results, the expression of any one of these pilins in trans is sufficient to produce functional pili in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain. PilA1His and PilA2His only partially rescue this phenotype, whereas ΔpilA[1-6] strains expressing PilA3His or PilA4His adhere even more strongly than the parental strain. Most surprisingly, expressing either PilA5His or PilA6His in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain results in microcolony formation. A hybrid protein in which the conserved N terminus of the mature PilA1His is replaced with the corresponding N domain of FlgA1 is processed by the prepilin peptidase, but it does not assemble functional pili, leading us to conclude that Duf1628 can be annotated as the N terminus of archaeal PilA adhesion pilins. Finally, the pilin prediction program, FlaFind, which was trained primarily on archaeal flagellin sequences, was successfully refined to more accurately predict pilins based on the in vivo verification of PilA[1-6].

  6. Archaeal type IV pili and their involvement in biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rianne eEsquivel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are ancient proteinaceous structures present on the cell surface of species in nearly all bacterial and archaeal phyla. These filaments are involved in a diverse array of critical cellular processes. While the core components of the pilus biosynthesis machinery are highly conserved, type IV pilins, the structural subunits of pili, share little sequence homology. However, the conserved structure of the signal peptides of these pilus subunits has allowed the development of prediction programs that accurately detect the processing sites recognized by bacterial and archaeal prepilin peptidases. Using these programs, the genomes of organisms from both prokaryotic domains have been shown to encode a diverse set of putative type IV pilins. Recently, in vivo studies in model archaea representing the euryarchaeal and crenarchaeal kingdoms confirmed that several of these pilins are incorporated into type IV adhesion pili. In addition to facilitating surface adhesion, these in vivo studies also showed that several predicted pilins are required for additional functions that are critical to biofilm formation. Examples include the subunits of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Ups pili, which are induced by exposure to UV light and promote cell aggregation and conjugation, and a subset of the Haloferax volcanii adhesion pilins, which play a critical role in microcolony formation while other pilins inhibit this process. The recent discovery of novel pilin functions such as the ability of haloarchaeal adhesion pilins to regulate swimming motility rather than being unique to organisms that inhabit high salt environments may point to novel prokaryotic regulatory pathways. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the functional roles played by archaeal type IV adhesion pili and their subunits, with particular emphasis on their involvement in biofilm formation.

  7. Polyphasic analyses of methanogenic archaeal communities in agricultural biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettmann, E; Bergmann, I; Pramschüfer, S; Mundt, K; Plogsties, V; Herrmann, C; Klocke, M

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) was used to support and complete the FISH analysis. Five of the six biogas reactors were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The average values were between 60 to 63% of archaeal cell counts (FISH) and 61 to 99% of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies (Q-PCR). Within this order, Methanoculleus was found to be the predominant genus as determined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. The aceticlastic family Methanosaetaceae was determined to be the dominant methanogenic group in only one biogas reactor, with average values for Q-PCR and FISH between 64% and 72%. Additionally, in three biogas reactors hitherto uncharacterized but potentially methanogenic species were detected. They showed closest accordance with nucleotide sequences of the hitherto unclassified CA-11 (85%) and ARC-I (98%) clusters. These results point to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis as a predominant pathway for methane synthesis in five of the six analyzed biogas plants. In addition, a correlation between the absence of Methanosaetaceae in the biogas reactors and high concentrations of total ammonia (sum of NH(3) and NH(4)(+)) was observed.

  8. Electroporation of archaeal lipid membranes using MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Andraž; Tarek, Mounir; Tomšič, Matija; Valant, Janez; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Jamnik, Andrej; Kramar, Peter; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the electroporation of archaeal lipid bilayers when subjected to high transmembrane voltages induced by a charge imbalance, mimicking therefore millisecond electric pulse experiments. The structural characteristics of the bilayer, a 9:91 mol% 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-myo-inositol (AI) and 2,3-di-O-sesterterpanyl-sn-glicerol-1-phospho-1'(2'-O-α-D-glucosyl)-myo-inositol (AGI) were compared to small angle X-ray scattering data. A rather good agreement of the electron density profiles at temperatures of 298 and 343 K was found assessing therefore the validity of the protocols and force fields used in simulations. Compared to dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the electroporation threshold for the bilayer was found to increase from ~2 V to 4.3 V at 323 K, and to 5.2 V at 298 K. Comparing the electroporation thresholds of the archaeal lipids to those of simple diphytanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers (2.5 V at 323 K) allowed one to trace back the stability of the membranes to the structure of their lipid head groups. Addition of DPPC in amounts of 50 mol% to the archaeal lipid bilayers decreases their stability and lowers the electroporation thresholds to 3.8 V and 4.1 V at respectively 323 and 298 K. The present study therefore shows how membrane compositions can be selected to cover a wide range of responses to electric stimuli. This provides new routes for the design of liposomes that can be efficiently used as drug delivery carriers, as the selection of their composition allows one to tune in their electroporation threshold for subsequent release of their load.

  9. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidun Lillestøl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of regularly spaced direct repeats, separated by unconserved spacer sequences, are ubiquitous in archaeal chromosomes and occur in some plasmids. Some clusters constitute around 1% of chromosomal DNA. Similarly structured clusters, generally smaller, also occur in some bacterial chromosomes. Although early studies implicated these clusters in segregation/partition functions, recent evidence suggests that the spacer sequences derive from extrachromosomal elements, and, primarily, viruses. This has led to the proposal that the clusters provide a defence against viral propagation in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (siRNA and miRNA, which are common in eukarya. Here, we analyze all the current data on archaeal repeat clusters and provide some new insights into their diverse structures, transcriptional properties and mode of structural development. The results are consistent with larger cluster transcripts being processed at the centers of the repeat sequences and being further trimmed by exonucleases to yield a dominant, intracellular RNA species, which corresponds approximately to the size of a spacer. Furthermore, analysis of the extensive clusters of Sulfolobus solfataricus strains P1 and P2B provides support for the presence of a flanking sequence adjoining a cluster being a prerequisite for the incorporation of new spacer-repeat units, which occurs between the flanking sequence and the cluster. An archaeal database summarizing the data will be maintained at http://dac.molbio.ku.dk/dbs/SRSR/.

  10. Factors affecting Archaeal Lipid Compositions of the Sulfolobus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L.; Han, J.; Wei, Y.; Lin, L.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Temperature is the best known variable affecting the distribution of the archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in marine and freshwater systems. Other variables such as pH, ionic strength, or bicarbonate concentration may also affect archaeal GDGTs in terrestrial systems. Studies of pure cultures can help us pinpoint the specific effects these variables may have on archaeal lipid distribution in natural environments. In this study, three Sulfolobus species (HG4, HB5-2, HB9-6) isolated from Tengchong hot springs (pH 2-3, temperature 73-90°C) in China were used to investigate the effects of temperature, pH, substrate, and type of strain on the composition of GDGTs. Results showed that increase in temperature had negative effects on the relative contents of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), GDGT-1 (one cyclopentyl ring), GDGT-2 and GDGT-3 but positive effects on GDGT-4, GDGT-4', GDGT-5 and GDGT-5'. Increase in pH, on the other hand, had negative effects on GDGT-0, GDGT-1, GDGT-4', GDGT-5 and GDGT-5', and positive effects on GDGT-3 and GDGT-4. GDGT-2 remained relatively constant with changing pH. When the HG4 was grown on different substrates, GDGT-5 was five time more abundant in sucrose-grown cultures than in yeast extract- or sulfur- grown cultures, suggesting that carbohydrates may stimulate the production of GDGT-5. For all three species, the ring index (average number of rings) of GDGTs correlated positively with incubation temperature. In HG4, ring index was much lower at optimal pH (3.5) than at other pH values. Ring index of HB5-2 or HB9-6 is higher than that of HG4, suggesting that speciation may affect the degree of cyclization of GDGT of the Sulfolobus. These results indicate that individual archaeal lipids respond differently to changes in environmental variables, which may be also species specific.

  11. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang;

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory...... element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked...

  12. Analyses of in vivo interactions between transcription factors and the archaeal RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2015-09-15

    Transcription factors regulate the activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at each stage of the transcription cycle. Many basal transcription factors with common ancestry are employed in eukaryotic and archaeal systems that directly bind to RNAP and influence intramolecular movements of RNAP and modulate DNA or RNA interactions. We describe and employ a flexible methodology to directly probe and quantify the binding of transcription factors to RNAP in vivo. We demonstrate that binding of the conserved and essential archaeal transcription factor TFE to the archaeal RNAP is directed, in part, by interactions with the RpoE subunit of RNAP. As the surfaces involved are conserved in many eukaryotic and archaeal systems, the identified TFE-RNAP interactions are likely conserved in archaeal-eukaryal systems and represent an important point of contact that can influence the efficiency of transcription initiation.

  13. Structure and cell biology of archaeal virus STIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-yu; Johnson, Johnson E

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of archaeal viruses have revealed novel features of their structures and life cycles when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, yet there are structure-based unifying themes suggesting common ancestral relationships among dsDNA viruses in the three kingdoms of life. Sulfolobus solfataricus and the infecting virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) is one of the well-established model systems to study archaeal virus replication and viral-host interactions. Reliable laboratory conditions to propagate STIV and available genetic tools allowed structural characterization of the virus and viral components that lead to the proposal of common capsid ancestry with PRD1 (bacteriophage), Adenovirus (eukaryotic virus) and PBCV (chlorellavirus). Microarray and proteomics approaches systematically analyzed viral replication and the corresponding host responses. Cellular cryo-electron tomography and thin-section EM studies uncovered the assembly and maturation pathway of STIV and revealed dramatic cellular ultra-structure changes upon infection. The viral-induced pyramid-like protrusions on cell surfaces represent a novel viral release mechanism and previously uncharacterized functions in viral replication.

  14. Archaeal type IV pili and their involvement in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlschroder, Mechthild; Esquivel, Rianne N

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili are ancient proteinaceous structures present on the cell surface of species in nearly all bacterial and archaeal phyla. These filaments, which are required for a diverse array of important cellular processes, are assembled employing a conserved set of core components. While type IV pilins, the structural subunits of pili, share little sequence homology, their signal peptides are structurally conserved allowing for in silico prediction. Recently, in vivo studies in model archaea representing the euryarchaeal and crenarchaeal kingdoms confirmed that several of these pilins are incorporated into type IV adhesion pili. In addition to facilitating surface adhesion, these in vivo studies also showed that several predicted pilins are required for additional functions that are critical to biofilm formation. Examples include the subunits of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Ups pili, which are induced by exposure to UV light and promote cell aggregation and conjugation, and a subset of the Haloferax volcanii adhesion pilins, which play a critical role in microcolony formation while other pilins inhibit this process. The recent discovery of novel pilin functions such as the ability of haloarchaeal adhesion pilins to regulate swimming motility may point to novel regulatory pathways conserved across prokaryotic domains. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the functional roles played by archaeal type IV adhesion pili and their subunits, with particular emphasis on their involvement in biofilm formation.

  15. Archaeal viruses multiply: temporal screening in a solar saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Nina S; Demina, Tatiana A; Buivydas, Andrius; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2015-04-10

    Hypersaline environments around the world are dominated by archaea and their viruses. To date, very little is known about these viruses and their interaction with the host strains when compared to bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. We performed the first culture-dependent temporal screening of haloarchaeal viruses and their hosts in the saltern of Samut Sakhon, Thailand, during two subsequent years (2009, 2010). Altogether we obtained 36 haloarchaeal virus isolates and 36 archaeal strains, significantly increasing the number of known archaeal virus isolates. Interestingly, the morphological distribution of our temporal isolates (head-tailed, pleomorphic, and icosahedral membrane-containing viruses) was similar to the outcome of our previous spatial survey supporting the observations of a global resemblance of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses. Myoviruses represented the most abundant virus morphotype with strikingly broad host ranges. The other viral morphotypes (siphoviruses, as well as pleomorphic and icosahedral internal membrane-containing viruses) were more host-specific. We also identified a group of Halorubrum strains highly susceptible to numerous different viruses (up to 26). This high virus sensitivity, the abundance of broad host range viruses, and the maintenance of infectivity over a period of one year suggest constant interplay of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses within an extreme environment.

  16. Archaeal Viruses Multiply: Temporal Screening in a Solar Saltern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S. Atanasova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline environments around the world are dominated by archaea and their viruses. To date, very little is known about these viruses and their interaction with the host strains when compared to bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. We performed the first culture-dependent temporal screening of haloarchaeal viruses and their hosts in the saltern of Samut Sakhon, Thailand, during two subsequent years (2009, 2010. Altogether we obtained 36 haloarchaeal virus isolates and 36 archaeal strains, significantly increasing the number of known archaeal virus isolates. Interestingly, the morphological distribution of our temporal isolates (head-tailed, pleomorphic, and icosahedral membrane-containing viruses was similar to the outcome of our previous spatial survey supporting the observations of a global resemblance of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses. Myoviruses represented the most abundant virus morphotype with strikingly broad host ranges. The other viral morphotypes (siphoviruses, as well as pleomorphic and icosahedral internal membrane-containing viruses were more host-specific. We also identified a group of Halorubrum strains highly susceptible to numerous different viruses (up to 26. This high virus sensitivity, the abundance of broad host range viruses, and the maintenance of infectivity over a period of one year suggest constant interplay of halophilic microorganisms and their viruses within an extreme environment.

  17. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Chambers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments. We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area.

  18. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  19. DBMLoc: a Database of proteins with multiple subcellular localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yun

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subcellular localization information is one of the key features to protein function research. Locating to a specific subcellular compartment is essential for a protein to function efficiently. Proteins which have multiple localizations will provide more clues. This kind of proteins may take a high proportion, even more than 35%. Description We have developed a database of proteins with multiple subcellular localizations, designated DBMLoc. The initial release contains 10470 multiple subcellular localization-annotated entries. Annotations are collected from primary protein databases, specific subcellular localization databases and literature texts. All the protein entries are cross-referenced to GO annotations and SwissProt. Protein-protein interactions are also annotated. They are classified into 12 large subcellular localization categories based on GO hierarchical architecture and original annotations. Download, search and sequence BLAST tools are also available on the website. Conclusion DBMLoc is a protein database which collects proteins with more than one subcellular localization annotation. It is freely accessed at http://www.bioinfo.tsinghua.edu.cn/DBMLoc/index.htm.

  20. Immunogenic properties of archaeal species found in bioaerosols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Blais Lecours

    Full Text Available The etiology of bioaerosol-related pulmonary diseases remains poorly understood. Recently, archaea emerged as prominent airborne components of agricultural environments, but the consequences of airway exposure to archaea remain unknown. Since subcomponents of archaea can be immunogenic, we used a murine model to study the pulmonary immune responses to two archaeal species found in agricultural facilities: Methanobrevibacter smithii (MBS and Methanosphaera stadtmanae (MSS. Mice were administered intranasally with 6.25, 25 or 100 µg of MBS or MSS, once daily, 3 days a week, for 3 weeks. MSS induced more severe histopathological alterations than MBS with perivascular accumulation of granulocytes, pronounced thickening of the alveolar septa, alveolar macrophages accumulation and increased perivascular mononucleated cell accumulation. Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids revealed up to 3 times greater leukocyte accumulation with MSS compared to MBS. Instillation of 100 µg of MBS or MSS caused predominant accumulation of monocyte/macrophages (4.5×10(5 and 4.8×10(5 cells/ml respectively followed by CD4(+ T cells (1.38×10(5 and 1.94×10(5 cells/ml respectively, B cells (0.73×10(5 and 1.28×10(5 cells/ml respectively, and CD8(+ T cells (0.20×10(5 and 0.31×10(5 cells/ml respectively in the airways. Both archaeal species induced similar titers of antigen-specific IgGs in plasma. MSS but not MBS caused an accumulation of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lungs, which surprisingly, correlated inversely with the size of the inoculum. Stronger immunogenicity of MSS was confirmed by a 3 fold higher accumulation of myeloid dendritic cells in the airways, compared to MBS. Thus, the dose and species of archaea determine the magnitude and nature of the pulmonary immune response. This is the first report of an immunomodulatory role of archaeal species found in bioaerosols.

  1. Magnetic Au Nanoparticles on Archaeal S-Layer Ghosts as Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Selenska-Pobell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell‐ghosts representing empty cells of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, consisting only of their highly ordered and unusually stable outermost proteinaceous surface layer (S‐layer, were used as templates for Au nanoparticles fabrication. The properties of these archaeal Au nanoparticles differ significantly from those produced earlier by us onto bacterial S‐layer sheets. The archaeal Au nanoparticles, with a size of about 2.5 nm, consist exclusively of metallic Au(0, while those produced on the bacterial S‐layer had a size of about 4 nm and represented a mixture of Au(0 and Au(III in the ratio of 40 to 60 %. The most impressive feature of the archaeal Au nanoparticles is that they are strongly paramagnetic, in contrast to the bacterial ones and also to bulk gold. SQUID magnetometry and XMCD measurements demonstrated that the archaeal Au nanoparticles possess a rather large magnetic moment of about 0.1 µB/atom. HR‐ TEM‐EDX analysis revealed that the archaeal Au nanoparticles are linked to the sulfur atoms of the thiol groups of the amino acid cysteine, characteristic only for archaeal S‐layers. This is the first study demonstrating the formation of such unusually strong magnetic Au nanoparticles on a non‐modified archaeal S‐layer.

  2. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  3. Useful scars: Physics of the capsids of archaeal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, L. E.; Dharmavaram, S.; Klug, W. S.; Marian, J.; Rudnick, J.; Bruinsma, R. F.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a physical model for the capsids of tailed archaeal viruses as viscoelastic membranes under tension. The fluidity is generated by thermal motion of scarlike structures that are an intrinsic feature of the ground state of large particle arrays covering surfaces with nonzero Gauss curvature. The tension is generated by a combination of the osmotic pressure of the enclosed genome and an extension force generated by filamentous structure formation that drives the formation of the tails. In continuum theory, the capsid has the shape of a surface of constant mean curvature: an unduloid. Particle arrays covering unduloids are shown to exhibit pronounced subdiffusive and diffusive single-particle transport at temperatures that are well below the melting temperature of defect-free particle arrays on a surface with zero Gauss curvature.

  4. Familial relationships in hyperthermo- and acidophilic archaeal viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Lotta Johanna; Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu;

    2010-01-01

    Archaea often live in extreme, harsh environments such as acidic hot springs and hypersaline waters. To date, only two icosahedrally symmetric, membrane-containing archaeal viruses, SH1 and Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), have been described in detail. We report the sequence and three......-dimensional structure of a third such virus isolated from a hyperthermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, Sulfolobus strain G4ST-2. Characterization of this new isolate revealed it to be similar to STIV on the levels of genome and structural organization. The genome organization indicates that these two viruses have diverged...... from a common ancestor. Interestingly, the prominent surface turrets of the two viruses are strikingly different. By sequencing and mass spectrometry, we mapped several large insertions and deletions in the known structural proteins that could account for these differences and showed that both viruses...

  5. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected.

  6. Drivers of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing communities in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna eZhalnina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are highly abundant and play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. In addition, AOA have a significant impact on soil quality. AOA may cause nitrogen loss from soils, and the nitrate produced by AOA can lead to ground and surface water contamination, water eutrophication, and soil subsidence. The ammonia-oxidizing archaea discovered to date are classified in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Only a few archaeal genomes are available in databases. As a result, AOA genes are not well annotated, and it is difficult to mine and identify archaeal genes within metagenomic libraries. Nevertheless, 16S rRNA and comparative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase sequences show that soils can vary greatly in the relative abundance of AOA. In some soils, AOA can comprise more than 10% of the total prokaryotic community. In other soils, AOA comprise less than 0.5% of the community. Many approaches have been used to measure the abundance and diversity of this group including DGGE, T-RFLP, q-PCR, and DNA sequencing. AOA have been studied across different soil types and various ecosystems from the Antarctic dry valleys to the tropical forests of South America to the soils near Mount Everest. Different studies have identified multiple soil factors that trigger the abundance of AOA. These factors include pH, concentration of available ammonia, organic matter content, moisture content, nitrogen content, clay content, as well as other triggers. Land use management appears to have a major effect on the abundance of AOA in soil, which may be the result of nitrogen fertilizer used in agricultural soils. This review summarizes the published results on this topic and suggests future work that will increase our understanding of how soil management and edaphoclimatic factors influence AOA.

  7. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  8. A formal ontology of subcellular neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Larson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the nervous system requires high-resolution microscopy to resolve the detailed 3D structure of nerve cells and supracellular domains. The analysis of such imaging data to extract cellular surfaces and cell components often requires the combination of expert human knowledge with carefully engineered software tools. In an effort to make better tools to assist humans in this endeavor, create a more accessible and permanent record of their data, and to aid the process of constructing complex and detailed computational models, we have created a core of formalized knowledge about the structure of the nervous system and have integrated that core into several software applications. In this paper, we describe the structure and content of a formal ontology whose scope is the subcellular anatomy of the nervous system (SAO, covering nerve cells, their parts, and interactions between these parts. Many applications of this ontology to image annotation, content-based retrieval of structural data, and integration of shared data across scales and researchers are also described.

  9. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, Jesus, E-mail: javila@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  10. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  11. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on Archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark....... We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken...... at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly...

  12. Unusually High Archaeal Diversity in a Crystallizer Pond, Pomorie Salterns, Bulgaria, Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kambourova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on archaeal diversity in few salterns have revealed heterogeneity between sites and unique structures of separate places that hinder drawing of generalized conclusions. Investigations on the archaeal community composition in P18, the biggest crystallizer pond in Pomorie salterns (PS (34% salinity, demonstrated unusually high number of presented taxa in hypersaline environment. Archaeal clones were grouped in 26 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs assigned to 15 different genera from two orders, Halobacteriales and Haloferacales. All retrieved sequences were related to culturable halophiles or unculturable clones from saline (mostly hypersaline niches. New sequences represented 53.9% of archaeal OTUs. Some of them formed separate branches with 90% similarity to the closest neighbor. Present results significantly differed from the previous investigations in regard to the number of presented genera, the domination of some genera not reported before in such extreme niche, and the identification of previously undiscovered 16S rRNA sequences.

  13. Subcellular localization of transglutaminase. Effect of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juprelle-Soret, M; Wattiaux-De Coninck, S; Wattiaux, R

    1988-01-01

    1. The subcellular distribution of transglutaminase was investigated by using the analytical approach of differential and isopycnic centrifugation as applied to three organs of the rat: liver, kidney and lung. After differential centrifugation by the method of de Duve, Pressman, Gianetto, Wattiaux & Appelmans [(1955) Biochem. J. 63, 604-617], transglutaminase is mostly recovered in the unsedimentable fraction S and the nuclear fraction N. After isopycnic centrifugation of the N fraction in a sucrose density gradient, a high proportion of the enzyme remains at the top of the gradient; a second but minor peak of activity is present in high-density regions, where a small proportion of 5'-nucleotidase, a plasma-membrane marker, is present together with a large proportion of collagen recovered in that fraction. 2. Fractions where a peak of transglutaminase was apparent in the sucrose gradient were examined by electron microscopy. The main components are large membrane sheets with extracellular matrix and free collagen fibers. 3. As these results seem to indicate that some correlation exists between particulate transglutaminase distribution and those of collagen and plasma membranes, the possible binding of transglutaminase by collagen (type I) and by purified rat liver plasma membrane was investigated. 4. The binding studies indicated that collagen is able to bind transglutaminase and to make complexes with plasma-membrane fragments whose density is higher than that of plasma-membrane fragments alone. Transglutaminase cannot be removed from such complexes by 1% Triton X-100, but can be to a relatively large extent by 0.5 M-KCl and by 50% (w/v) glycerol. 5. Such results suggest that the apparent association of transglutaminase with plasma membrane originates from binding in vitro of the cytosolic enzyme to plasma membrane bound to collagen, which takes place during homogenization of the tissue, when the soluble enzyme and extracellular components are brought together

  14. Unique archaeal assemblages in the Arctic Ocean unveiled by massively parallel tag sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galand, Pierre E; Casamayor, Emilio O; Kirchman, David L; Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-07-01

    The Arctic Ocean plays a critical role in controlling nutrient budgets between the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean. Archaea are key players in the nitrogen cycle and in cycling nutrients, but their community composition has been little studied in the Arctic Ocean. Here, we characterize archaeal assemblages from surface and deep Arctic water masses using massively parallel tag sequencing of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. This approach gave a very high coverage of the natural communities, allowing a precise description of archaeal assemblages. This first taxonomic description of archaeal communities by tag sequencing reported so far shows that it is possible to assign an identity below phylum level to most (95%) of the archaeal V6 tags, and shows that tag sequencing is a powerful tool for resolving the diversity and distribution of specific microbes in the environment. Marine group I Crenarchaeota was overall the most abundant group in the Arctic Ocean and comprised between 27% and 63% of all tags. Group III Euryarchaeota were more abundant in deep-water masses and represented the largest archaeal group in the deep Atlantic layer of the central Arctic Ocean. Coastal surface waters, in turn, harbored more group II Euryarchaeota. Moreover, group II sequences that dominated surface waters were different from the group II sequences detected in deep waters, suggesting functional differences in closely related groups. Our results unveiled for the first time an archaeal community dominated by group III Euryarchaeota and show biogeographical traits for marine Arctic Archaea.

  15. The biogeography of soil archaeal communities on the eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Adams, Jonathan M.; Ni, Yingying; Yang, Teng; Jing, Xin; Chen, Litong; He, Jin-Sheng; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-12-01

    The biogeographical distribution of soil bacterial communities has been widely investigated. However, there has been little study of the biogeography of soil archaeal communities on a regional scale. Here, using high-throughput sequencing, we characterized the archaeal communities of 94 soil samples across the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Thaumarchaeota was the predominant archael phylum in all the soils, and Halobacteria was dominant only in dry soils. Archaeal community composition was significantly correlated with soil moisture content and C:N ratio, and archaeal phylotype richness was negatively correlated with soil moisture content (r = ‑0.47, P community pattern. These results indicate that soil moisture and C:N ratio are the key factors structuring soil archaeal communities on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Our findings suggest that archaeal communities have adjusted their distributions rapidly enough to reach range equilibrium in relation to past environmental changes e.g. in water availability and soil nutrient status. This responsiveness may allow better prediction of future responses of soil archaea to environmental change in these sensitive ecosystems.

  16. Archaeal S-layer glycoproteins: Post-translational modification in the face of extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry eEichler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding to the sole or basic component of the surface (S-layer surrounding the archaeal cell in most known cases, S-layer glycoproteins are in direct contact with the harsh environments that characterize niches where Archaea can thrive. Accordingly, early work examining archaeal S-layer glycoproteins focused on identifying those properties that allow members of this group of proteins to maintain their structural integrity in the face of extremes of temperature, pH and salinity, as well as other physical challenges. However, with expansion of the list of archaeal strains serving as model systems, as well as growth in the number of molecular tools available for the manipulation of these strains, studies on archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are currently more likely to consider the various post-translational modifications these polypeptides undergo. For instance, archaeal S-layer glycoproteins can undergo proteolytic cleavage, both N- and O-glycosylation, lipid-modification and oligomerization. In this mini-review, recent findings related to the post-translational modification of archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are considered.

  17. Subcellular Proteomics of Soybean under Flooding Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Setsuko Komatsu

    2012-01-01

    Flooding is an environmental stress found worldwide and may increase in frequency due to changes in global climate,and causes significant reductions in the growth and yield of several crops.The application of proteomics techniques to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying crop responses to flooding stress may facilitate the development of flood tolerant crops.To understand the response mechanism of soybean under flooding stress,proteomics analysis was carried out.Especially,subcellular proteomics studies have led to a better understanding of the mechanism of flooding stress tolerance in soybean.The effects of flooding stress on root plasma membrane were analyzed using an aqueous two-phase partitioning method in combination with gel-based and gel-free proteomics techniques.The results led to the following conclusions:proteins located in the cell wall were increased in the plasma membrane of flooded plants,indicating the contribution of plasma membrane to modification of the cell wall; superoxide dismutase was increased,indicating that the antioxidative system may play a crucial role in protecting cells from oxidative damage following exposure to flooding stress; heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein likely plays a significant role in protecting other proteins from denaturation and degradation during flooding stress; and signaling proteins might work cooperatively to regulate plasma membrane H +-ATPase and maintain ion homeostasis.Cell wall proteins were isolated from root of flooding stressed plants via sucrose gradient centrifugation and analyzed using gel-based proteomics technique.Cell wall proteins identified were related to lignification,and these results indicated that a decrease of lignification-related proteins is related to flooding decreased ROS and jasmonate biosynthesis.And also,lignin staining confirmed that lignification was suppressed in the roots of flooding stressed soybeans.Mitochondrial fractions were purified from root of flooding stressed

  18. Identification of an archaeal mercury regulon by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Deepak; Yao, Andrew I; White, Derrick; Pavlik, Benjamin J; Singh, Raghuveer; Facciotti, Marc T; Blum, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Mercury is a heavy metal and toxic to all forms of life. Metal exposure can invoke a response to improve survival. In archaea, several components of a mercury response system have been identified, but it is not known whether metal transport is a member of this system. To identify such missing components, a peptide-tagged MerR transcription factor was used to localize enriched chromosome regions by chromosome immunoprecipitation combined with DNA sequence analysis. Such regions could serve as secondary regulatory binding sites to control the expression of additional genes associated with mercury detoxification. Among the 31 highly enriched loci, a subset of five was pursued as potential candidates based on their current annotations. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of these regions with and without mercury treatment in WT and mutant strains lacking merR indicated significant regulatory responses under these conditions. Of these, a Family 5 extracellular solute-binding protein and the MarR transcription factor shown previously to control responses to oxidation were most strongly affected. Inactivation of the solute-binding protein by gene disruption increased the resistance of mutant cells to mercury challenge. Inductively coupled plasma-MS analysis of the mutant cell line following metal challenge indicated there was less intracellular mercury compared with the isogenic WT strain. Together, these regulated genes comprise new members of the archaeal MerR regulon and reveal a cascade of transcriptional control not previously demonstrated in this model organism.

  19. Comparative structural biology of eubacterial and archaeal oligosaccharyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Nobuo; Nyirenda, James; Igura, Mayumi; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Kohda, Daisuke

    2010-02-12

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid donor to an asparagine residue in nascent polypeptide chains. In the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni, a single-subunit membrane protein, PglB, catalyzes N-glycosylation. We report the 2.8 A resolution crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of PglB and its comparison with the previously determined structure from the archaeon Pyrococcus AglB. The two distantly related oligosaccharyltransferases share unexpected structural similarity beyond that expected from the sequence comparison. The common architecture of the putative catalytic sites revealed a new catalytic motif in PglB. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed the contribution of this motif to the catalytic function. Bacterial PglB and archaeal AglB constitute a protein family of the catalytic subunit of OST along with STT3 from eukaryotes. A structure-aided multiple sequence alignment of the STT3/PglB/AglB protein family revealed three types of OST catalytic centers. This novel classification will provide a useful framework for understanding the enzymatic properties of the OST enzymes from Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria.

  20. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  1. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  2. Feature Fusion Based SVM Classifier for Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Julia; Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Islam, Md Khaled Ben; Hasan, Md Al Mehedi

    2016-12-18

    For the importance of protein subcellular localization in different branches of life science and drug discovery, researchers have focused their attentions on protein subcellular localization prediction. Effective representation of features from protein sequences plays a most vital role in protein subcellular localization prediction specially in case of machine learning techniques. Single feature representation-like pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), physiochemical property models (PPM), and amino acid index distribution (AAID) contains insufficient information from protein sequences. To deal with such problems, we have proposed two feature fusion representations, AAIDPAAC and PPMPAAC, to work with Support Vector Machine classifiers, which fused PseAAC with PPM and AAID accordingly. We have evaluated the performance for both single and fused feature representation of a Gram-negative bacterial dataset. We have got at least 3% more actual accuracy by AAIDPAAC and 2% more locative accuracy by PPMPAAC than single feature representation.

  3. Predicting Protein Subcellular Localization: Past, Present, and Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre D(o)nnes; Annette H(o)glund

    2004-01-01

    Functional characterization of every single protein is a major challenge of the postgenomic era. The large-scale analysis of a cell's proteins, proteomics, seeks to provide these proteins with reliable annotations regarding their interaction partners and functions in the cellular machinery. An important step on this way is to determine the subcellular localization of each protein. Eukaryotic cells are divided into subcellular compartments, or organelles. Transport across the membrane into the organelles is a highly regulated and complex cellular process. Predicting the subcellular localization by computational means has been an area of vivid activity during recent years. The publicly available prediction methods differ mainly in four aspects: the underlying biological motivation, the computational method used, localization coverage, and reliability, which are of importance to the user.This review provides a short description of the main events in the protein sorting process and an overview of the most commonly used methods in this field.

  4. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  5. pH dominates variation in tropical soil archaeal diversity and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Mincheol; Lai-Hoe, Ang; Shukor, Nor A A; Rahim, Raha A; Go, Rusea; Adams, Jonathan M

    2013-11-01

    Little is known of the factors influencing soil archaeal community diversity and composition in the tropics. We sampled soils across a range of forest and nonforest environments in the equatorial tropics of Malaysia, covering a wide range of pH values. DNA was PCR-amplified for the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and 454-pyrosequenced. Soil pH was the best predictor of diversity and community composition of Archaea, being a stronger predictor than land use. Archaeal OTU richness was highest in the most acidic soils. Overall archaeal abundance in tropical soils (determined by qPCR) also decreased at higher pH. This contrasts with the opposite trend previously found in temperate soils. Thaumarcheota group 1.1b was more abundant in alkaline soils, whereas group 1.1c was only detected in acidic soils. These results parallel those found in previous studies in cooler climates, emphasizing niche conservatism among broad archaeal groups. Among the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), there was clear evidence of niche partitioning by pH. No individual OTU occurred across the entire range of pH values. Overall, the results of this study show that pH plays a major role in structuring tropical soil archaeal communities.

  6. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-08-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4 ) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly linked to soil pH. No methanogens were detected at one fen site with soil pH ranging from 3.2 to 4.4. The methanogenic community of the bog (soil pH 3.9-4.6) was dominated by hydrogenotrophs, whereas the second fen site (soil pH 5.0-5.3) comprised both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Overall, there seemed to be a significant coupling between peat type and archaeal community composition, with local hydrology modifying the strength of this coupling.

  7. Abundance and diversity of archaeal accA gene in hot springs in Yunnan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhao-Qi; Wang, Li; Wang, Feng-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Chen, Jin-Quan; Zhou, En-Min; Liang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that archaea carrying the accA gene, encoding the alpha subunit of the acetyl CoA carboxylase, autotrophically fix CO2 using the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway in low-temperature environments (e.g., soils, oceans). However, little new information has come to light regarding the occurrence of archaeal accA genes in high-temperature ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the abundance and diversity of archaeal accA gene in hot springs in Yunnan Province, China, using DNA- and RNA-based phylogenetic analyses and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that archaeal accA genes were present and expressed in the investigated Yunnan hot springs with a wide range of temperatures (66-96 °C) and pH (4.3-9.0). The majority of the amplified archaeal accA gene sequences were affiliated with the ThAOA/HWCG III [thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA)/hot water crenarchaeotic group III]. The archaeal accA gene abundance was very close to that of AOA amoA gene, encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. These data suggest that AOA in terrestrial hot springs might acquire energy from ammonia oxidation coupled with CO2 fixation using the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway.

  8. A Meta-Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity Observed in Wetland Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the bacterial and archaeal diversity from a worldwide range of wetlands soils and sediments using a meta-analysis approach. All available 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from wetlands in public databases were retrieved. In November 2012, a total of 12677 bacterial and 1747 archaeal sequences were collected in GenBank. All the bacterial sequences were assigned into 6383 operational taxonomic units (OTUs 0.03, representing 31 known bacterial phyla, predominant with Proteobacteria (2791 OTUs, Bacteroidetes (868 OTUs, Acidobacteria (731 OTUs, Firmicutes (540 OTUs, and Actinobacteria (418 OTUs. The genus Flavobacterium (11.6% of bacterial sequences was the dominate bacteria in wetlands, followed by Gp1, Nitrosospira, and Nitrosomonas. Archaeal sequences were assigned to 521 OTUs from phyla Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. The dominating archaeal genera were Fervidicoccus and Methanosaeta. Rarefaction analysis indicated that approximately 40% of bacterial and 83% of archaeal diversity in wetland soils and sediments have been presented. Our results should be significant for well-understanding the microbial diversity involved in worldwide wetlands.

  9. Composition of bacterial and archaeal communities during landfill refuse decomposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyan; Wang, Yangqing; Zhao, Heping; Long, David T

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the archaeal and the bacterial diversities in a landfill during different phases of decomposition. In this study, the archaeal and the bacterial diversities of Laogang landfill (Shanghai, China) at two different decomposition phases (i.e., initial methanogenic phase (IMP) and stable methanogenic phase (SMP)), were culture-independently examined using PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 47,753 sequences of 16S rRNA genes were retrieved from 69,954 reads and analyzed to evaluate the diversities of the archaeal and bacterial communities. The most predominant types of archaea were hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, and of bacteria were Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. As might be expected, their abundances varied at decomposition phases. Archaea Methanomicrobiales accounts for 97.6% of total archaeal population abundance in IMP and about 57.6% in SMP. The abundance of archaeal genus Halobacteriale was 0.1% in IMP and was 20.3% in the SMP. The abundance of Firmicutes was 21.3% in IMP and was 4.3% in SMP. The abundance of Bacteroidetes represented 11.5% of total bacterial in IMP and was dominant (49.4%) in SMP. Both the IMP and SMP had unique cellulolytic bacteria compositions. IMP consisted of members of Bacillus, Fibrobacter, and Eubacterium, while SMP harbored groups of Microbacterium. Both phases had Clostridium with different abundance, 4-5 folds higher in SMP.

  10. Virus-mediated archaeal hecatomb in the deep seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Dell’Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Rastelli, Eugenio; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Krupovic, Mart; Noble, Rachel T.; Nunoura, Takuro; Prangishvili, David

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the world’s oceans, and they play a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles. In deep-sea ecosystems, archaea and bacteria drive major nutrient cycles, and viruses are largely responsible for their mortality, thereby exerting important controls on microbial dynamics. However, the relative impact of viruses on archaea compared to bacteria is unknown, limiting our understanding of the factors controlling the functioning of marine systems at a global scale. We evaluate the selectivity of viral infections by using several independent approaches, including an innovative molecular method based on the quantification of archaeal versus bacterial genes released by viral lysis. We provide evidence that, in all oceanic surface sediments (from 1000- to 10,000-m water depth), the impact of viral infection is higher on archaea than on bacteria. We also found that, within deep-sea benthic archaea, the impact of viruses was mainly directed at members of specific clades of Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. Although archaea represent, on average, ~12% of the total cell abundance in the top 50 cm of sediment, virus-induced lysis of archaea accounts for up to one-third of the total microbial biomass killed, resulting in the release of ~0.3 to 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year globally. Our results indicate that viral infection represents a key mechanism controlling the turnover of archaea in surface deep-sea sediments. We conclude that interactions between archaea and their viruses might play a profound, previously underestimated role in the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems and in global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27757416

  11. Liquid but Durable: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Explain the Unique Properties of Archaeal-Like Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0-100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and ``branched'' hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems.

  12. Measurement of endogenous subcellular concentration of steroids in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, J.; Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Helmond-Agema, A.; Thussen, J.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reliable method for the extraction of steroid hormones from human uterine tissue and the subsequent measurement of these hormones in the subcellular compartments by radioimmunoassay is described. Extraction of radioactive steroid hormones from in vivo labelled human uterine tissue by different met

  13. Imaging Subcellular Structures in the Living Zebrafish Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerer, Peter; Plucinska, Gabriela; Thong, Rachel; Trovò, Laura; Paquet, Dominik; Godinho, Leanne

    2016-04-02

    In vivo imaging provides unprecedented access to the dynamic behavior of cellular and subcellular structures in their natural context. Performing such imaging experiments in higher vertebrates such as mammals generally requires surgical access to the system under study. The optical accessibility of embryonic and larval zebrafish allows such invasive procedures to be circumvented and permits imaging in the intact organism. Indeed the zebrafish is now a well-established model to visualize dynamic cellular behaviors using in vivo microscopy in a wide range of developmental contexts from proliferation to migration and differentiation. A more recent development is the increasing use of zebrafish to study subcellular events including mitochondrial trafficking and centrosome dynamics. The relative ease with which these subcellular structures can be genetically labeled by fluorescent proteins and the use of light microscopy techniques to image them is transforming the zebrafish into an in vivo model of cell biology. Here we describe methods to generate genetic constructs that fluorescently label organelles, highlighting mitochondria and centrosomes as specific examples. We use the bipartite Gal4-UAS system in multiple configurations to restrict expression to specific cell-types and provide protocols to generate transiently expressing and stable transgenic fish. Finally, we provide guidelines for choosing light microscopy methods that are most suitable for imaging subcellular dynamics.

  14. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Kwon, Hanna; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A; Phillips, John D; Raven, Emma L; Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-08-30

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models.

  15. Predicting Subcellular Localization of Proteins by Bioinformatic Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    When predicting the subcellular localization of proteins from their amino acid sequences, there are basically three approaches: signal-based, global property-based, and homology-based. Each of these has its advantages and drawbacks, and it is important when comparing methods to know which approach...

  16. Turnover of microbial lipids in the deep biosphere and growth of benthic archaeal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sitan; Lipp, Julius S; Wegener, Gunter; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments host a microbial biosphere with unknown impact on global biogeochemical cycles. This study tests previous evidence based on microbial intact polar lipids (IPLs) as proxies of live biomass, suggesting that Archaea dominate the marine sedimentary biosphere. We devised a sensitive radiotracer assay to measure the decay rate of ([(14)C]glucosyl)-diphytanylglyceroldiether (GlcDGD) as an analog of archaeal IPLs in continental margin sediments. The degradation kinetics were incorporated in model simulations that constrained the fossil fraction of subseafloor IPLs and rates of archaeal turnover. Simulating the top 1 km in a generic continental margin sediment column, we estimated degradation rate constants of GlcDGD being one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of bacterial IPLs, with half-lives of GlcDGD increasing with depth to 310 ky. Given estimated microbial community turnover times of 1.6-73 ky in sediments deeper than 1 m, 50-96% of archaeal IPLs represent fossil signals. Consequently, previous lipid-based estimates of global subseafloor biomass probably are too high, and the widely observed dominance of archaeal IPLs does not rule out a deep biosphere dominated by Bacteria. Reverse modeling of existing concentration profiles suggest that archaeal IPL synthesis rates decline from around 1,000 pg⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1) at the surface to 0.2 pg⋅mL(-1)⋅y(-1) at 1 km depth, equivalent to production of 7 × 10(5) to 140 archaeal cells⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1), respectively. These constraints on microbial growth are an important step toward understanding the relationship between the deep biosphere and the carbon cycle.

  17. Differences in the Composition of Archaeal Communities in Sediments from Contrasting Zones of Lake Taihu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xianfang; Xing, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In shallow lakes, different primary producers might impact the physiochemical characteristics of the sediment and the associated microbial communities. Until now, little was known about the features of sediment Archaea and their variation across different primary producer-dominated ecosystems. Lake Taihu provides a suitable study area with cyanobacteria- and macrophyte-dominated zones co-occurring in one ecosystem. The composition of the sediment archaeal community was assessed using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing technology, based on which the potential variation with respect to the physiochemical characteristics of the sediment was analyzed. Euryarchaeota (30.19% of total archaeal sequences) and Bathyarchaeota (28.00%) were the two most abundant phyla, followed by Crenarchaeota (11.37%), Aigarchaeota (10.24%) and Thaumarchaeota (5.98%). The differences found in the composition of the archaeal communities between the two zones was significant (p = 0.005). Sediment from macrophyte-dominated zones had high TOC and TN content and an abundance of archaeal lineages potentially involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds, such as the order Thermoplasmatales. In the area dominated by Cyanobacteria, archaeal lineages related to sulfur metabolism, for example, Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales, were significantly enriched. Among Bathyarchaeota, subgroups MCG-6 and MCG-15 were significantly accumulated in the sediment of areas dominated by macrophytes whereas MCG-4 was consistently dominant in both type of sediments. The present study contributes to the knowledge of sediment archaeal communities with different primary producers and their possible biogeochemical functions in sediment habitats. PMID:27708641

  18. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Bhatia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  19. Bending elasticity modulus of giant vesicles composed of aeropyrum pernix k1 archaeal lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Julia; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak

    2015-03-26

    Thermally induced shape fluctuations were used to study elastic properties of giant vesicles composed of archaeal lipids C25,25-archetidyl (glucosyl) inositol and C25,25-archetidylinositol isolated from lyophilised Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells. Giant vesicles were created by electroformation in pure water environment. Stroboscopic illumination using a xenon flash lamp was implemented to remove the blur effect due to the finite integration time of the camera and to obtain an instant picture of the fluctuating vesicle shape. The mean weighted value of the bending elasticity modulus kc of the archaeal membrane determined from the measurements meeting the entire set of qualification criteria was (1.89 ± 0.18) × 10-19 J, which is similar to the values obtained for a membrane composed of the eukaryotic phospholipids SOPC (1.88 ± 0.17) × 10-19 J and POPC (2.00 ± 0.21) ´ 10-19 J. We conclude that membranes composed of archaeal lipids isolated from Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells have similar elastic properties as membranes composed of eukaryotic lipids. This fact, together with the importance of the elastic properties for the normal circulation through blood system, provides further evidence in favor of expectations that archaeal lipids could be appropriate for the design of drug delivery systems.

  20. Identification of archaeal proteins that affect the exosome function in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palhano Fernando L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeal exosome is formed by a hexameric RNase PH ring and three RNA binding subunits and has been shown to bind and degrade RNA in vitro. Despite extensive studies on the eukaryotic exosome and on the proteins interacting with this complex, little information is yet available on the identification and function of archaeal exosome regulatory factors. Results Here, we show that the proteins PaSBDS and PaNip7, which bind preferentially to poly-A and AU-rich RNAs, respectively, affect the Pyrococcus abyssi exosome activity in vitro. PaSBDS inhibits slightly degradation of a poly-rA substrate, while PaNip7 strongly inhibits the degradation of poly-A and poly-AU by the exosome. The exosome inhibition by PaNip7 appears to depend at least partially on its interaction with RNA, since mutants of PaNip7 that no longer bind RNA, inhibit the exosome less strongly. We also show that FITC-labeled PaNip7 associates with the exosome in the absence of substrate RNA. Conclusions Given the high structural homology between the archaeal and eukaryotic proteins, the effect of archaeal Nip7 and SBDS on the exosome provides a model for an evolutionarily conserved exosome control mechanism.

  1. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in hot springs on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Dong, Christina Z; Dong, Raymond M; Jiang, Hongchen; Wang, Shang; Wang, Genhou; Fang, Bin; Ding, Xiaoxue; Niu, Lu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Chuanlun; Dong, Hailiang

    2011-09-01

    The diversity of archaea and bacteria was investigated in ten hot springs (elevation >4600 m above sea level) in Central and Central-Eastern Tibet using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The temperature and pH of these hot springs were 26-81°C and close to neutral, respectively. A total of 959 (415 and 544 for bacteria and archaea, respectively) clone sequences were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bacteria were more diverse than archaea and that these clone sequences were classified into 82 bacterial and 41 archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The retrieved bacterial clones were mainly affiliated with four known groups (i.e., Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi), which were similar to those in other neutral-pH hot springs at low elevations. In contrast, most of the archaeal clones from the Tibetan hot springs were affiliated with Thaumarchaeota, a newly proposed archaeal phylum. The dominance of Thaumarchaeota in the archaeal community of the Tibetan hot springs appears to be unique, although the exact reasons are not yet known. Statistical analysis showed that diversity indices of both archaea and bacteria were not statistically correlated with temperature, which is consistent with previous studies.

  2. Metagenomic evaluation of bacterial and archaeal diversity in the geothermal hot springs of manikaran, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Green, Stefan J; Joshi, Amit; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-02-19

    Bacterial and archaeal diversity in geothermal spring water were investigated using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing. This revealed the dominance of Firmicutes, Aquificae, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group in this thermophilic environment. A number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in this unique habitat.

  3. Characterization of archaeal community in contaminated and uncontaminated surface stream sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Iris; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Mosher, Jennifer J; Brandt, Craig C; Yang, Zamin K; Brooks, Scott C; Liang, Liyuan; Drake, Meghan M; Podar, Mircea; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony V

    2010-11-01

    Archaeal communities from mercury and uranium-contaminated freshwater stream sediments were characterized and compared to archaeal communities present in an uncontaminated stream located in the vicinity of Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The distribution of the Archaea was determined by pyrosequencing analysis of the V4 region of 16S rRNA amplified from 12 streambed surface sediments. Crenarchaeota comprised 76% of the 1,670 archaeal sequences and the remaining 24% were from Euryarchaeota. Phylogenetic analysis further classified the Crenarchaeota as a Freshwater Group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota group, Group I3, Rice Cluster VI and IV, Marine Group I and Marine Benthic Group B; and the Euryarchaeota into Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Rice Cluster III, Marine Benthic Group D, Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota 1 and Eury 5. All groups were previously described. Both hydrogen- and acetate-dependent methanogens were found in all samples. Most of the groups (with 60% of the sequences) described in this study were not similar to any cultivated isolates, making it difficult to discern their function in the freshwater microbial community. A significant decrease in the number of sequences, as well as in the diversity of archaeal communities was found in the contaminated sites. The Marine Group I, including the ammonia oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus, was the dominant group in both mercury and uranium/nitrate-contaminated sites. The uranium-contaminated site also contained a high concentration of nitrate, thus Marine Group I may play a role in nitrogen cycle.

  4. Many nonuniversal archaeal ribosomal proteins are found in conserved gene clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The genomic associations of the archaeal ribosomal proteins, (r-proteins, were examined in detail. The archaeal versions of the universal r-protein genes are typically in clusters similar or identical and to those found in bacteria. Of the 35 nonuniversal archaeal r-protein genes examined, the gene encoding L18e was found to be associated with the conserved L13 cluster, whereas the genes for S4e, L32e and L19e were found in the archaeal version of the spc operon. Eleven nonuniversal protein genes were not associated with any common genomic context. Of the remaining 19 protein genes, 17 were convincingly assigned to one of 10 previously unrecognized gene clusters. Examination of the gene content of these clusters revealed multiple associations with genes involved in the initiation of protein synthesis, transcription or other cellular processes. The lack of such associations in the universal clusters suggests that initially the ribosome evolved largely independently of other processes. More recently it likely has evolved in concert with other cellular systems. It was also verified that a second copy of the gene encoding L7ae found in some bacteria is actually a homolog of the gene encoding L30e and should be annotated as such.

  5. Archaeal rRNA operons, intron splicing and homing endonucleases, RNA polymerase operons and phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger Antony; Aagaard, Claus Sindbjerg; Andersen, Morten;

    1994-01-01

    Over the past decade our laboratory has had a strong interest in defining the phylogenetic status of the archaea. This has involved determining and analysing the sequences of operons of both rRNAs and RNA polymerases and it led to the discovery of the first archaeal rRNA intron. What follows...

  6. Archaeal communities associated with roots of the common reed (Phragmites australis) in Beijing Cuihu Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Li, Hong; Liu, Qun Fang; Li, Yan Hong

    2015-05-01

    The richness, phylogeny and composition of archaeal community associated with the roots of common reed (Phragmites australis) growing in the Beijing Cuihu Wetland, China was investigated using a 16S rDNA library. In total, 235 individual sequences were collected, and a phylogenetic analysis revealed that 69.4 and 11.5 % of clones were affiliated with the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota, respectively. In Euryarchaeota, the archaeal community was dominated by species in following genera: Methanobacterium in the order Methanobacteriales (60.7 %); Methanoregula and Methanospirillum in the order Methanomicrobiales (20.2 %), and Methanomethylovorans, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales (17.2 %). Of 27 sequences assigned to uncultured Crenarchaeota, 22 were grouped into Group 1.3, and five grouped into Group 1.1b. Hence, the archaeal communities associated with reed roots are largely involved in methane production, and, to a lesser extent, in ammonia oxidization. Quantification of the archaeal amoA gene indicated that ammonia oxidizing archaea were more numerous in the rhizosphere soil than in the root tissue or surrounding water. A total of 19.1 % of the sequences were unclassified, suggesting that many unidentified archaea are probably involved in the reed wetland ecosystem.

  7. Drying effects on archaeal community composition and methanogenesis in bromeliad tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Franziska B; Martinson, Guntars O; Pommerenke, Bianca; Pump, Judith; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Tank bromeliads are highly abundant epiphytes in neotropical forests and form a unique canopy wetland ecosystem which is involved in the global methane cycle. Although the tropical climate is characterized by high annual precipitation, the plants can face periods of restricted water. Thus, we hypothesized that water is an important controller of the archaeal community composition and the pathway of methane formation in tank bromeliads. Greenhouse experiments were established to investigate the resident and active archaeal community targeting the 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA in the tank slurry of bromeliads at three different moisture levels. Archaeal community composition and abundance were determined using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantitative PCR. Release of methane and its stable carbon isotopic signature were determined in a further incubation experiment under two moisture levels. The relative abundance of aceticlastic Methanosaetaceae increased up to 34% and that of hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales decreased by more than half with decreasing moisture. Furthermore, at low moisture levels, methane production was up to 100-fold lower (≤0.1-1.1 nmol gdw(-1) d(-1)) than under high moisture levels (10-15 nmol gdw(-1) d(-1)). The rapid response of the archaeal community indicates that the pathway of methane formation in bromeliad tanks may indeed be strongly susceptible to periods of drought in neotropical forest canopies.

  8. Nanodiamond Landmarks for Subcellular Multimodal Optical and Electron Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zurbuchen, Mark A; Kohan, Sirus A; Leung, Belinda; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for biolabels that can be used in both optical and electron microscopies, are non-cytotoxic, and do not photobleach. Such biolabels could enable targeted nanoscale imaging of sub-cellular structures, and help to establish correlations between conjugation-delivered biomolecules and function. Here we demonstrate a subcellular multi-modal imaging methodology that enables localization of inert particulate probes, consisting of nanodiamonds having fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers. These are functionalized to target specific structures, and are observable by both optical and electron microscopies. Nanodiamonds targeted to the nuclear pore complex are rapidly localized in electron-microscopy diffraction mode to enable "zooming-in" to regions of interest for detailed structural investigations. Optical microscopies reveal nanodiamonds for in-vitro tracking or uptake-confirmation. The approach is general, works down to the single nanodiamond level, and can leverage the unique capabilities of...

  9. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  10. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shinuo; Shao, Yue; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical homeostasis--a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations--is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths through either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modelling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviours in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight the previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells.

  11. Evaluation and comparison of mammalian subcellular localization prediction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fink J Lynn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of the subcellular location of a protein is essential to understanding its biochemical function. This information can provide insight into the function of hypothetical or novel proteins. These data are difficult to obtain experimentally but have become especially important since many whole genome sequencing projects have been finished and many resulting protein sequences are still lacking detailed functional information. In order to address this paucity of data, many computational prediction methods have been developed. However, these methods have varying levels of accuracy and perform differently based on the sequences that are presented to the underlying algorithm. It is therefore useful to compare these methods and monitor their performance. Results In order to perform a comprehensive survey of prediction methods, we selected only methods that accepted large batches of protein sequences, were publicly available, and were able to predict localization to at least nine of the major subcellular locations (nucleus, cytosol, mitochondrion, extracellular region, plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, peroxisome, and lysosome. The selected methods were CELLO, MultiLoc, Proteome Analyst, pTarget and WoLF PSORT. These methods were evaluated using 3763 mouse proteins from SwissProt that represent the source of the training sets used in development of the individual methods. In addition, an independent evaluation set of 2145 mouse proteins from LOCATE with a bias towards the subcellular localization underrepresented in SwissProt was used. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method and compared to a theoretical value based on what might be observed by random chance. Conclusion No individual method had a sufficient level of sensitivity across both evaluation sets that would enable reliable application to hypothetical proteins. All methods showed lower performance on the LOCATE

  12. Structural determinants of PINK1 topology and dual subcellular distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Un; Lin William

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background PINK1 is a mitochondria-targeted kinase that constitutively localizes to both the mitochondria and the cytosol. The mechanism of how PINK1 achieves cytosolic localization following mitochondrial processing remains unknown. Understanding PINK1 subcellular localization will give us insights into PINK1 functions and how mutations in PINK1 lead to Parkinson's disease. We asked how the mitochondrial localization signal, the transmembrane domain, and the kinase domain participat...

  13. Convolutional LSTM Networks for Subcellular Localization of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Nielsen, Henrik; Winther, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning is widely used to analyze biological sequence data. Non-sequential models such as SVMs or feed-forward neural networks are often used although they have no natural way of handling sequences of varying length. Recurrent neural networks such as the long short term memory (LSTM) model on the other hand are designed to handle sequences. In this study we demonstrate that LSTM networks predict the subcellular location of proteins given only the protein sequence with high accuracy (...

  14. Crude subcellular fractionation of cultured mammalian cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Holden Paul; Horton William A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The expression and study of recombinant proteins in mammalian culture systems can be complicated during the cell lysis procedure by contaminating proteins from cellular compartments distinct from those within which the protein of interest resides and also by solubility issues that may arise from the use of a single lysis buffer. Partial subcellular fractionation using buffers of increasing stringency, rather than whole cell lysis is one way in which to avoid or reduce this...

  15. Temporal changes in soil bacterial and archaeal communities with different fertilizers in tea orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Yang, Shao-hui; Yang, Jing-ping; Lv, Ya-min; Zhao, Xing; Pang, Ji-liang

    2014-11-01

    It is important to understand the effects of temporal changes in microbial communities in the acidic soils of tea orchards with different fertilizers. A field experiment involving organic fertilizer (OF), chemical fertilizer (CF), and unfertilized control (CK) treatments was arranged to analyze the temporal changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities at bimonthly intervals based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling. The abundances of total bacteria, total archaea, and selected functional genes (bacterial and archaeal amoA, bacterial narG, nirK, nirS, and nosZ) were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that the structures of bacterial and archaeal communities varied significantly with time and fertilization based on changes in the relative abundance of dominant T-RFs. The abundancy of the detected genes changed with time. The total bacteria, total archaea, and archaeal amoA were less abundant in July. The bacterial amoA and denitrifying genes were less abundant in September, except the nirK gene. The OF treatment increased the abundance of the observed genes, while the CF treatment had little influence on them. The soil temperature significantly affected the bacterial and archaeal community structures. The soil moisture was significantly correlated with the abundance of denitrifying genes. Of the soil chemical properties, soil organic carbon was the most important factor and was significantly correlated with the abundance of the detected genes, except the nirK gene. Overall, this study demonstrated the effects of both temporal alteration and organic fertilizer on the structures of microbial communities and the abundance of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle.

  16. Structure of the rare archaeal biosphere and seasonal dynamics of active ecotypes in surface coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugoni, Mylène; Taib, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Domaizon, Isabelle; Jouan Dufournel, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Salter, Ian; Agogué, Hélène; Mary, Isabelle; Galand, Pierre E

    2013-04-01

    Marine Archaea are important players among microbial plankton and significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details regarding their community structure and long-term seasonal activity and dynamics remain largely unexplored. In this study, we monitored the interannual archaeal community composition of abundant and rare biospheres in northwestern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by pyrosequencing 16S rDNA and rRNA. A detailed analysis of the rare biosphere structure showed that the rare archaeal community was composed of three distinct fractions. One contained the rare Archaea that became abundant at different times within the same ecosystem; these cells were typically not dormant, and we hypothesize that they represent a local seed bank that is specific and essential for ecosystem functioning through cycling seasonal environmental conditions. The second fraction contained cells that were uncommon in public databases and not active, consisting of aliens to the studied ecosystem and representing a nonlocal seed bank of potential colonizers. The third fraction contained Archaea that were always rare but actively growing; their affiliation and seasonal dynamics were similar to the abundant microbes and could not be considered a seed bank. We also showed that the major archaeal groups, Thaumarchaeota marine group I and Euryarchaeota group II.B in winter and Euryarchaeota group II.A in summer, contained different ecotypes with varying activities. Our findings suggest that archaeal diversity could be associated with distinct metabolisms or life strategies, and that the rare archaeal biosphere is composed of a complex assortment of organisms with distinct histories that affect their potential for growth.

  17. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Archaeal tRNATyr and tRNATrp Identities in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Mukai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The tRNA identity elements for some amino acids are distinct between the bacterial and archaeal domains. Searching in recent genomic and metagenomic sequence data, we found some candidate phyla radiation (CPR bacteria with archaeal tRNA identity for Tyr-tRNA and Trp-tRNA synthesis. These bacteria possess genes for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS predicted to be derived from DPANN superphylum archaea, while the cognate tRNATyr and tRNATrp genes reveal bacterial or archaeal origins. We identified a trace of domain fusion and swapping in the archaeal-type TyrRS gene of a bacterial lineage, suggesting that CPR bacteria may have used this mechanism to create diverse proteins. Archaeal-type TrpRS of bacteria and a few TrpRS species of DPANN archaea represent a new phylogenetic clade (named TrpRS-A. The TrpRS-A open reading frames (ORFs are always associated with another ORF (named ORF1 encoding an unknown protein without global sequence identity to any known protein. However, our protein structure prediction identified a putative HIGH-motif and KMSKS-motif as well as many α-helices that are characteristic of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS homologs. These results provide another example of the diversity of molecular components that implement the genetic code and provide a clue to the early evolution of life and the genetic code.

  18. Subcellular site and nature of intracellular cadmium in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, George J.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying heavy metal accumulation, toxicity and tolerance in higher plants are poorly understood. Since subcellular processes are undoubtedly involved in all these phenomena, it is of interest to study the extent of, subcellular site of and nature of intracellularly accumulated cadmium in higher plants. Whole plants supplied /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ or /sup 112/CdSO/sub 4/ accumulated Cd into roots and aerial tissues. Preparation of protoplasts from aerial tissue followed by subcellular fractionation of the protoplasts to obtain intact vacuoles, chloroplasts and cytosol revealed the presence of Cd in the cytosol but not in vacuoles or chloroplasts. Particulate materials containing other cell components were also labeled. Of the /sup 109/Cd supplied to plants, 2 to 10% was recovered in both cytosol preparations and in particulate materials. Cytosol contained proteinaceous--Cd complexes, free metal and low molecular weight Cd complexes. Labeling of protoplasts gave similar results. No evidence was obtained for the production of volatile Cd complexes in tobacco.

  19. Pathways and Subcellular Compartmentation of NAD Biosynthesis in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    NAD is a vital redox carrier, and its degradation is a key element of important regulatory pathways. NAD-mediated functions are compartmentalized and have to be fueled by specific biosynthetic routes. However, little is known about the different pathways, their subcellular distribution, and regulation in human cells. In particular, the route(s) to generate mitochondrial NAD, the largest subcellular pool, is still unknown. To visualize organellar NAD changes in cells, we targeted poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity into the mitochondrial matrix. This activity synthesized immunodetectable poly(ADP-ribose) depending on mitochondrial NAD availability. Based on this novel detector system, detailed subcellular enzyme localizations, and pharmacological inhibitors, we identified extracellular NAD precursors, their cytosolic conversions, and the pathway of mitochondrial NAD generation. Our results demonstrate that, besides nicotinamide and nicotinic acid, only the corresponding nucleosides readily enter the cells. Nucleotides (e.g. NAD and NMN) undergo extracellular degradation resulting in the formation of permeable precursors. These precursors can all be converted to cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD. For mitochondrial NAD synthesis, precursors are converted to NMN in the cytosol. When taken up into the organelles, NMN (together with ATP) serves as substrate of NMNAT3 to form NAD. NMNAT3 was conclusively localized to the mitochondrial matrix and is the only known enzyme of NAD synthesis residing within these organelles. We thus present a comprehensive dissection of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, the groundwork to understand regulation of NAD-mediated processes, and the organismal homeostasis of this fundamental molecule. PMID:21504897

  20. Structure and genome organization of AFV2, a novel archaeal lipothrixvirus with unusual terminal and core structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häring, Monika; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Brügger, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    A novel filamentous virus, AFV2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus shows structural similarity to lipothrixviruses but differs from them in its unusual terminal and core structures. The double-stranded DNA genome contains 31,787 bp and carries eight open reading frames homologou...... to those of other lipothrixviruses, a single tRNA(Lys) gene containing a 12-bp archaeal intron, and a 1,008-bp repeat-rich region near the center of the genome....

  1. Subcellular characterization of glucose uptake in coronary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, N; Scriven, D R L; Laher, I; Moore, E D W

    2008-01-01

    Despite all the evidence linking glucose toxicity to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, very little is known about the regulation of glucose uptake in endothelial cells. We have previously reported an asymmetric distribution of the GLUTs (1-5) and SGLT-1 in en face preparations of rat coronary artery endothelia [Gaudreault N., Scriven D.R., Moore E.D., 2004. Characterisation of glucose transporters in the intact coronary artery endothelium in rats: GLUT-2 upregulated by long-term hyperglycaemia. Diabetologia 47(12),2081-2092]. We assessed this time, through immunocytochemistry and wide field fluorescence microscopy coupled to deconvolution, the presence and subcellular distribution of glucose transporters in cultures of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). HCAECs express GLUT-1 to 5 and SGLT-1, but their subcellular distribution lacks the luminal/abluminal asymmetry and the proximity to cell-to-cell junctions observed in intact endothelium. To determine the impact of the transporters' distribution on intracellular glucose accumulation, a fluorescent glucose analog (2-NBDG) was used in conjunction with confocal microscopy to monitor uptake in individual cells; the arteries were mounted in an arteriograph chamber with physiological flow rates. The uptake in both preparations was inhibited by cytochalasin-B and d-glucose and stimulated by insulin, but the distribution of the incorporated 2-NBDG mirrored that of the transporters. In HCAEC it was distributed throughout the cell and in the intact arterial endothelium it was restricted to the narrow cytosolic volume adjacent to the cell-to-cell junctions. We suggest that the latter subcellular organization and compartmentalization may facilitate transendothelial transport of glucose in intact coronary artery.

  2. Subcellular localization of ammonium transporters in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carter T

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the exception of vertebrates, most organisms have plasma membrane associated ammonium transporters which primarily serve to import a source of nitrogen for nutritional purposes. Dictyostelium discoideum has three ammonium transporters, Amts A, B and C. Our present work used fluorescent fusion proteins to determine the cellular localization of the Amts and tested the hypothesis that the transporters mediate removal of ammonia generated endogenously from the elevated protein catabolism common to many protists. Results Using RFP and YFP fusion constructs driven by the actin 15 promoter, we found that the three ammonium transporters were localized on the plasma membrane and on the membranes of subcellular organelles. AmtA and AmtB were localized on the membranes of endolysosomes and phagosomes, with AmtB further localized on the membranes of contractile vacuoles. AmtC also was localized on subcellular organelles when it was stabilized by coexpression with either the AmtA or AmtB fusion transporter. The three ammonium transporters exported ammonia linearly with regard to time during the first 18 hours of the developmental program as revealed by reduced export in the null strains. The fluorescently tagged transporters rescued export when expressed in the null strains, and thus they were functional transporters. Conclusion Unlike ammonium transporters in most organisms, which import NH3/NH4+ as a nitrogen source, those of Dictyostelium export ammonia/ammonium as a waste product from extensive catabolism of exogenously derived and endogenous proteins. Localization on proteolytic organelles and on the neutral contractile vacuole suggests that Dictyostelium ammonium transporters may have unique subcellular functions and play a role in the maintenance of intracellular ammonium distribution. A lack of correlation between the null strain phenotypes and ammonia excretion properties of the ammonium transporters suggests that it is not

  3. Convolutional LSTM Networks for Subcellular Localization of Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning is widely used to analyze biological sequence data. Non-sequential models such as SVMs or feed-forward neural networks are often used although they have no natural way of handling sequences of varying length. Recurrent neural networks such as the long short term memory (LSTM) model...... on the other hand are designed to handle sequences. In this study we demonstrate that LSTM networks predict the subcellular location of proteins given only the protein sequence with high accuracy (0.902) outperforming current state of the art algorithms. We further improve the performance by introducing...

  4. Convolutional LSTM Networks for Subcellular Localization of Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Sønderby, Casper Kaae

    Machine learning is widely used to analyze biological sequence data. Non-sequential models such as SVMs or feed-forward neural networks are often used although they have no natural way of handling sequences of varying length. Recurrent neural networks such as the long short term memory (LSTM) model...... on the other hand are designed to handle sequences. In this study we demonstrate that LSTM networks predict the subcellular location of proteins given only the protein sequence with high accuracy (0.902) outperforming current state of the art algorithms. We further improve the performance by introducing...

  5. Dynamic neuroanatomy at subcellular resolution in the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucherre, Adèle; López-Schier, Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Genetic means to visualize and manipulate neuronal circuits in the intact animal have revolutionized neurobiology. "Dynamic neuroanatomy" defines a range of approaches aimed at quantifying the architecture or subcellular organization of neurons over time during their development, regeneration, or degeneration. A general feature of these approaches is their reliance on the optical isolation of defined neurons in toto by genetically expressing markers in one or few cells. Here we use the afferent neurons of the lateral line as an example to describe a simple method for the dynamic neuroanatomical study of axon terminals in the zebrafish by laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

  6. Methane metabolism in the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota revealed by genome-centric metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Chadwick, Grayson L; Robbins, Steven J; Orphan, Victoria J; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2015-10-23

    Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea play important roles in the global flux of methane. Culture-independent approaches are providing deeper insight into the diversity and evolution of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, but, until now, no compelling evidence has existed for methane metabolism in archaea outside the phylum Euryarchaeota. We performed metagenomic sequencing of a deep aquifer, recovering two near-complete genomes belonging to the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota (formerly known as the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group). These genomes contain divergent homologs of the genes necessary for methane metabolism, including those that encode the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) complex. Additional non-euryarchaeotal MCR-encoding genes identified in a range of environments suggest that unrecognized archaeal lineages may also contribute to global methane cycling. These findings indicate that methane metabolism arose before the last common ancestor of the Euryarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota.

  7. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K; Macario, Alberto J L; Robb, Frank T

    2014-10-27

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized.

  8. Methanopyrus kandleri: an archaeal methanogen unrelated to all other known methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S.; Stetter, K. O.; Rouviere, P.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence shows that the newly discovered hyperthermophilic methanogen, Methanopryus kandleri, is phylogenetically unrelated to any other known methanogen. The organism represents a separate lineage originating near the root of the archaeal tree. Although the 16S rRNA sequence of Mp. kandleri resembles euryarchaeal 16S rRNAs more than it does crenarchaeal, it shows more crenarchaeal signature features than any known euryarchaeal rRNA. Attempts to place it in relation to the root of the archaeal tree show that the Mp. kandleri lineage likely arises from the euryarchaeal branch of the tree. While the existence of so deeply branching a methanogenic lineage brings into question the thesis that methanogenesis evolved from an earlier metabolism similar to that seen in Thermococcus, it at the same time reinforces the notion that the aboriginal [correction of aborginal] archaeon was a thermophile.

  9. Evolution of bacterial-like phosphoprotein phosphatases in photosynthetic eukaryotes features ancestral mitochondrial or archaeal origin and possible lateral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, R Glen; Kerk, David; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible regulatory process catalyzed by the opposing reactions of protein kinases and phosphatases, which are central to the proper functioning of the cell. Dysfunction of members in either the protein kinase or phosphatase family can have wide-ranging deleterious effects in both metazoans and plants alike. Previously, three bacterial-like phosphoprotein phosphatase classes were uncovered in eukaryotes and named according to the bacterial sequences with which they have the greatest similarity: Shewanella-like (SLP), Rhizobiales-like (RLPH), and ApaH-like (ALPH) phosphatases. Utilizing the wealth of data resulting from recently sequenced complete eukaryotic genomes, we conducted database searching by hidden Markov models, multiple sequence alignment, and phylogenetic tree inference with Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods to elucidate the pattern of evolution of eukaryotic bacterial-like phosphoprotein phosphatase sequences, which are predominantly distributed in photosynthetic eukaryotes. We uncovered a pattern of ancestral mitochondrial (SLP and RLPH) or archaeal (ALPH) gene entry into eukaryotes, supplemented by possible instances of lateral gene transfer between bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition to the previously known green algal and plant SLP1 and SLP2 protein forms, a more ancestral third form (SLP3) was found in green algae. Data from in silico subcellular localization predictions revealed class-specific differences in plants likely to result in distinct functions, and for SLP sequences, distinctive and possibly functionally significant differences between plants and nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes. Conserved carboxyl-terminal sequence motifs with class-specific patterns of residue substitutions, most prominent in photosynthetic organisms, raise the possibility of complex interactions with regulatory proteins.

  10. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  11. A site-specific endonuclease encoded by a typical archaeal intron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Jacob; Garrett, Roger Antony; Belfort, Malene

    1993-01-01

    The protein encoded by the archaeal intron in the 23S rRNA gene of the hyperthermophile Desulfurococcus mobilis is a double-strand DNase that, like group I intron homing endonucleases, is capable of cleaving an intronless allele of the gene. This enzyme, I-Dmo I, is unusual among the intron...... of endonucleases and intron core elements and are consistent with the invasive potential of endonuclease genes....

  12. Significance of archaeal nitrification in hypoxic waters of the Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread, and their abundance in many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems suggests a prominent role in nitrification. AOA also occur in high numbers in oxygen-deficient marine environments, such as the pelagic redox gradients of the central Baltic Sea; however, data on archaeal nitrification rates are scarce and little is known about the factors, for example sulfide, that regulate nitrification in this system. In the present wo...

  13. Ori-Finder 2, an integrated tool to predict replication origins in the archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eLuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication is one of the most basic processes in all three domains of cellular life. With the advent of the post-genomic era, the increasing number of complete archaeal genomes has created an opportunity for exploration of the molecular mechanisms for initiating cellular DNA replication by in vivo experiments as well as in silico analysis. However, the location of replication origins (oriCs in many sequenced archaeal genomes remains unknown. We present a web-based tool Ori-Finder 2 to predict oriCs in the archaeal genomes automatically, based on the integrated method comprising the analysis of base composition asymmetry using the Z-curve method, the distribution of Origin Recognition Boxes (ORBs identified by FIMO tool, and the occurrence of genes frequently close to oriCs. The web server is also able to analyze the unannotated genome sequences by integrating with gene prediction pipelines and BLAST software for gene identification and function annotation. The result of the predicted oriCs is displayed as an HTML table, which offers an intuitive way to browse the result in graphical and tabular form. The software presented here is accurate for the genomes with single oriC, but it does not necessarily find all the origins of replication for the genomes with multiple oriCs. Ori-Finder 2 aims to become a useful platform for the identification and analysis of oriCs in the archaeal genomes, which would provide insight into the replication mechanisms in archaea. The web server is freely available at http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/Ori-Finder2/.

  14. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production.

  15. Archaeal RibL: a new FAD synthetase that is air sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Xu, Huimin; Grochowski, Laura L; White, Robert H

    2010-10-12

    FAD synthetases catalyze the transfer of the AMP portion of ATP to FMN to produce FAD and pyrophosphate (PP(i)). Monofunctional FAD synthetases exist in eukaryotes, while bacteria have bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both the phosphorylation of riboflavin and adenylation of FMN to produce FAD. Analyses of archaeal genomes did not reveal the presence of genes encoding either group, yet the archaea contain FAD. Our recent identification of a CTP-dependent archaeal riboflavin kinase strongly indicated the presence of a monofunctional FAD synthetase. Here we report the identification and characterization of an archaeal FAD synthetase. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii gene MJ1179 encodes a protein that is classified in the nucleotidyl transferase protein family and was previously annotated as glycerol-3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (GCT). The MJ1179 gene was cloned and its protein product heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting enzyme catalyzes the adenylation of FMN with ATP to produce FAD and PP(i). The MJ1179-derived protein has been designated RibL to indicate that it follows the riboflavin kinase (RibK) step in the archaeal FAD biosynthetic pathway. Aerobically isolated RibL is active only under reducing conditions. RibL was found to require divalent metals for activity, the best activity being observed with Co(2+), where the activity was 4 times greater than that with Mg(2+). Alkylation of the two conserved cysteines in the C-terminus of the protein resulted in complete inactivation. RibL was also found to catalyze cytidylation of FMN with CTP, making the modified FAD, flavin cytidine dinucleotide (FCD). Unlike other FAD synthetases, RibL does not catalyze the reverse reaction to produce FMN and ATP from FAD and PP(i). Also in contrast to other FAD synthetases, PP(i) inhibits the activity of RibL.

  16. A System for Predicting Subcellular Localization of Yeast Genome Using Neural Network

    CERN Document Server

    Thampi, Sabu M

    2007-01-01

    The subcellular location of a protein can provide valuable information about its function. With the rapid increase of sequenced genomic data, the need for an automated and accurate tool to predict subcellular localization becomes increasingly important. Many efforts have been made to predict protein subcellular localization. This paper aims to merge the artificial neural networks and bioinformatics to predict the location of protein in yeast genome. We introduce a new subcellular prediction method based on a backpropagation neural network. The results show that the prediction within an error limit of 5 to 10 percentage can be achieved with the system.

  17. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Domenech Tupinambá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7% were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area. More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  18. Bacterial and archaeal diversities in Yunnan and Tibetan hot springs, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhao-Qi; Wang, Feng-Ping; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Chen, Jin-Quan; Zhou, En-Min; Liang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Tang, Shu-Kun; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Dong, Hailiang; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-04-01

    Thousands of hot springs are located in the north-eastern part of the Yunnan-Tibet geothermal zone, which is one of the most active geothermal areas in the world. However, a comprehensive and detailed understanding of microbial diversity in these hot springs is still lacking. In this study, bacterial and archaeal diversities were investigated in 16 hot springs (pH 3.2-8.6; temperature 47-96°C) in Yunnan Province and Tibet, China by using a barcoded 16S rRNA gene-pyrosequencing approach. Aquificae, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus and Bacteroidetes comprised the large portion of the bacterial communities in acidic hot springs. Non-acidic hot springs harboured more and variable bacterial phyla than acidic springs. Desulfurococcales and unclassified Crenarchaeota were the dominated groups in archaeal populations from most of the non-acidic hot springs; whereas, the archaeal community structure in acidic hot springs was simpler and characterized by Sulfolobales and Thermoplasmata. The phylogenetic analyses showed that Aquificae and Crenarchaeota were predominant in the investigated springs and possessed many phylogenetic lineages that have never been detected in other hot springs in the world. Thus findings from this study significantly improve our understanding of microbial diversity in terrestrial hot springs.

  19. Archaeal community structures in the solfataric acidic hot springs with different temperatures and elemental compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tomoko; Watanabe, Keiko; Yamamoto, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Kurosawa, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal 16S rRNA gene compositions and environmental factors of four distinct solfataric acidic hot springs in Kirishima, Japan were compared. The four ponds were selected by differences of temperature and total dissolved elemental concentration as follows: (1) Pond-A: 93°C and 1679 mg L(-1), (2) Pond-B: 66°C and 2248 mg L(-1), (3) Pond-C: 88°C and 198 mg L(-1), and (4) Pond-D: 67°C and 340 mg L(-1). In total, 431 clones of 16S rRNA gene were classified into 26 phylotypes. In Pond-B, the archaeal diversity was the highest among the four, and the members of the order Sulfolobales were dominant. The Pond-D also showed relatively high diversity, and the most frequent group was uncultured thermoacidic spring clone group. In contrast to Pond-B and Pond-D, much less diverse archaeal clones were detected in Pond-A and Pond-C showing higher temperatures. However, dominant groups in these ponds were also different from each other. The members of the order Sulfolobales shared 89% of total clones in Pond-A, and the uncultured crenarchaeal groups shared 99% of total Pond-C clones. Therefore, species compositions and biodiversity were clearly different among the ponds showing different temperatures and dissolved elemental concentrations.

  20. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7%) were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers) were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest) and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area). More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  1. Assessment of Ruminal Bacterial and Archaeal Community Structure in Yak (Bos grunniens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenming; Fang, Lei; Meng, Qingxiang; Li, Shengli; Chai, Shatuo; Liu, Shujie; Schonewille, Jan Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the microbial community composition in the rumen of yaks under different feeding regimes. Microbial communities were assessed by sequencing bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments obtained from yaks (Bos grunniens) from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. Samples were obtained from 14 animals allocated to either pasture grazing (Graze), a grazing and supplementary feeding regime (GSF), or an indoor feeding regime (Feed). The predominant bacterial phyla across feeding regimes were Bacteroidetes (51.06%) and Firmicutes (32.73%). At genus level, 25 genera were shared across all samples. The relative abundance of Prevotella in the graze and GSF regime group were significantly higher than that in the feed regime group. Meanwhile, the relative abundance of Ruminococcus was lower in the graze group than the feed and GSF regime groups. The most abundant archaeal phylum was Euryarchaeota, which accounted for 99.67% of the sequences. Ten genera were detected across feeding regimes, seven genera were shared by all samples, and the most abundant was genus Methanobrevibacter (91.60%). The relative abundance of the most detected genera were similar across feeding regime groups. Our results suggest that the ruminal bacterial community structure differs across yak feeding regimes while the archaeal community structures are largely similar. PMID:28223980

  2. Solution structure of an archaeal DNA binding protein with an eukaryotic zinc finger fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Guillière

    Full Text Available While the basal transcription machinery in archaea is eukaryal-like, transcription factors in archaea and their viruses are usually related to bacterial transcription factors. Nevertheless, some of these organisms show predicted classical zinc fingers motifs of the C2H2 type, which are almost exclusively found in proteins of eukaryotes and most often associated with transcription regulators. In this work, we focused on the protein AFV1p06 from the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus AFV1. The sequence of the protein consists of the classical eukaryotic C2H2 motif with the fourth histidine coordinating zinc missing, as well as of N- and C-terminal extensions. We showed that the protein AFV1p06 binds zinc and solved its solution structure by NMR. AFV1p06 displays a zinc finger fold with a novel structure extension and disordered N- and C-termini. Structure calculations show that a glutamic acid residue that coordinates zinc replaces the fourth histidine of the C2H2 motif. Electromobility gel shift assays indicate that the protein binds to DNA with different affinities depending on the DNA sequence. AFV1p06 is the first experimentally characterised archaeal zinc finger protein with a DNA binding activity. The AFV1p06 protein family has homologues in diverse viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea. A phylogenetic analysis points out a common origin of archaeal and eukaryotic C2H2 zinc fingers.

  3. Subcellular effects of drought stress in Rosmarinus officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, E; Sánchez-Blanco, M J; Ferrández, T; Alarcón, J J

    2007-01-01

    The use of Rosmarinus officinalis, and other wild plant species, in the Mediterranean area is an interesting solution in order to avoid the desertification and rapid soil erosion, because of their good resistance to environmental conditions. Previous articles have described experiments designed to determine the impact of water stress at the plant level in this species, but more knowledge is required at the subcellular and ultrastructural levels. An anatomic and ultrastructural study of the leaves was conducted on Rosmarinus officinalis plants growing under different water treatments. In the leaves of water-stressed plants, the leaf water potential and turgor decreased, and leaf osmotic potential became more negative with respect to control plants. The anatomic investigations showed that both the mesophyll intercellular spaces and the epidermal cell size were reduced significantly under the more intense drought stress conditions. At the subcellular level, chloroplasts accumulated plastoglobuli and lipid bodies, and cuticle thickness was increased under water stress. In our experiment, the anatomic and ultrastructural modifications of Rosmarinus officinalis could be considered an additional adaptation to drought stress together with physiological and biochemical modifications as antioxidant accumulation.

  4. Crude subcellular fractionation of cultured mammalian cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holden Paul

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression and study of recombinant proteins in mammalian culture systems can be complicated during the cell lysis procedure by contaminating proteins from cellular compartments distinct from those within which the protein of interest resides and also by solubility issues that may arise from the use of a single lysis buffer. Partial subcellular fractionation using buffers of increasing stringency, rather than whole cell lysis is one way in which to avoid or reduce this contamination and ensure complete recovery of the target protein. Currently published protocols involve time consuming centrifugation steps which may require expensive equipment and commercially available kits can be prohibitively expensive when handling large or multiple samples. Findings We have established a protocol to sequentially extract proteins from cultured mammalian cells in fractions enriched for cytosolic, membrane bound organellar, nuclear and insoluble proteins. All of the buffers used can be made inexpensively and easily and the protocol requires no costly equipment. While the method was optimized for a specific cell type, we demonstrate that the protocol can be applied to a variety of commonly used cell lines and anticipate that it can be applied to any cell line via simple optimization of the primary extraction step. Conclusion We describe a protocol for the crude subcellular fractionation of cultured mammalian cells that is both straightforward and cost effective and may facilitate the more accurate study of recombinant proteins and the generation of purer preparations of said proteins from cell extracts.

  5. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  6. Characterization of an archaeal two-component system that regulates methanogenesis in Methanosaeta harundinacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs are a major mechanism used by bacteria in response to environmental changes. Although many sequenced archaeal genomes encode TCSs, they remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that a methanogenic archaeon, Methanosaeta harundinacea, encodes FilI, which synthesizes carboxyl-acyl homoserine lactones, to regulate transitions of cellular morphology and carbon metabolic fluxes. Here, we report that filI, the cotranscribed filR2, and the adjacent filR1 constitute an archaeal TCS. FilI possesses a cytoplasmic kinase domain (histidine kinase A and histidine kinase-like ATPase and its cognate response regulator. FilR1 carries a receiver (REC domain coupled with an ArsR-related domain with potential DNA-binding ability, while FilR2 carries only a REC domain. In a phosphorelay assay, FilI was autophosphorylated and specifically transferred the phosphoryl group to FilR1 and FilR2, confirming that the three formed a cognate TCS. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ChIP-qPCR using an anti-FilR1 antibody, FilR1 was shown to form in vivo associations with its own promoter and the promoter of the filI-filR2 operon, demonstrating a regulatory pattern common among TCSs. ChIP-qPCR also detected FilR1 associations with key genes involved in acetoclastic methanogenesis, acs4 and acs1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed the in vitro tight binding of FilR1 to its own promoter and those of filI-filR2, acs4, and mtrABC. This also proves the DNA-binding ability of the ArsR-related domain, which is found primarily in Archaea. The archaeal promoters of acs4, filI, acs1, and mtrABC also initiated FilR1-modulated expression in an Escherichia coli lux reporter system, suggesting that FilR1 can up-regulate both archaeal and bacterial transcription. In conclusion, this work identifies an archaeal FilI/FilRs TCS that regulates the methanogenesis of M. harundinacea.

  7. Functional analysis of archaeal MBF1 by complementation studies in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebers Bettina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiprotein-bridging factor 1 (MBF1 is a transcriptional co-activator that bridges a sequence-specific activator (basic-leucine zipper (bZIP like proteins (e.g. Gcn4 in yeast or steroid/nuclear-hormone receptor family (e.g. FTZ-F1 in insect and the TATA-box binding protein (TBP in Eukaryotes. MBF1 is absent in Bacteria, but is well- conserved in Eukaryotes and Archaea and harbors a C-terminal Cro-like Helix Turn Helix (HTH domain, which is the only highly conserved, classical HTH domain that is vertically inherited in all Eukaryotes and Archaea. The main structural difference between archaeal MBF1 (aMBF1 and eukaryotic MBF1 is the presence of a Zn ribbon motif in aMBF1. In addition MBF1 interacting activators are absent in the archaeal domain. To study the function and therefore the evolutionary conservation of MBF1 and its single domains complementation studies in yeast (mbf1Δ as well as domain swap experiments between aMBF1 and yMbf1 were performed. Results In contrast to previous reports for eukaryotic MBF1 (i.e. Arabidopsis thaliana, insect and human the two archaeal MBF1 orthologs, TMBF1 from the hyperthermophile Thermoproteus tenax and MMBF1 from the mesophile Methanosarcina mazei were not functional for complementation of an Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking Mbf1 (mbf1Δ. Of twelve chimeric proteins representing different combinations of the N-terminal, core domain, and the C-terminal extension from yeast and aMBF1, only the chimeric MBF1 comprising the yeast N-terminal and core domain fused to the archaeal C-terminal part was able to restore full wild-type activity of MBF1. However, as reported previously for Bombyx mori, the C-terminal part of yeast Mbf1 was shown to be not essential for function. In addition phylogenetic analyses revealed a common distribution of MBF1 in all Archaea with available genome sequence, except of two of the three Thaumarchaeota; Cenarchaeum symbiosum A and Nitrosopumilus maritimus

  8. Microscopy with spatial filtering for monitoring subcellular morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing-Yi

    Dynamic alteration in organelle morphology is an important indicator of cellular function and many efforts have been made to monitor the subcellular morphology. Optical scatter imaging (OSI), which combines light scattering spectroscopy with microscopic imaging, was developed to non-invasively track real-time changes in particle morphology in situ. Using a variable diameter iris as a Fourier spatial filter, the technique consisted of collecting images that encoded the intensity ratio of wide-to-narrow angle scatter (OSIR, optical scatter imaging ratio) at each pixel in the full field of view. For spherical particles, the OSIR was shown to decrease monotonically with diameter. In living cells, we reported this technique is able to detect mitochondrial morphological alterations, which were mediated by the Bcl- xL transmembrane domain, but could not be observed by fluorescence or DIC images1. However, the initial design was based on Mie theory of scattering by spheres, and hence only adequate for measuring spherical particles. This limits the applicability of OSI to cellular functional studies involving organelles, which are naturally non-spherical. In this project, we aim to enhance the current capability of the existing optical scatter microscope to assess size and shape information for both spherical and non-spherical particles, and eventually apply this technique for monitoring and quantifying subcellular morphology within living cells. To reach this goal, we developed an improved system, in which the variable diameter iris is replaced with a digital micromirror device and adopted the concept of Gabor filtering to extend our assessment of morphology to the characterization of particle shape and orientation. Using bacteria and polystyrene spheres, we show how this system can be used to assess particle aspect ratio even when imaged at low resolution. We also show the feasibility of detecting alterations in organelle aspect ratio in situ within living cells. This

  9. An image analysis method to quantify CFTR subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Fariello, María Inés; Lepanto, Paola; Aguilar, Pablo S; Kierbel, Arlinet

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant protein subcellular localization caused by mutation is a prominent feature of many human diseases. In Cystic Fibrosis (CF), a recessive lethal disorder that results from dysfunction of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), the most common mutation is a deletion of phenylalanine-508 (pF508del). Such mutation produces a misfolded protein that fails to reach the cell surface. To date, over 1900 mutations have been identified in CFTR gene, but only a minority has been analyzed at the protein level. To establish if a particular CFTR variant alters its subcellular distribution, it is necessary to quantitatively determine protein localization in the appropriate cellular context. To date, most quantitative studies on CFTR localization have been based on immunoprecipitation and western blot. In this work, we developed and validated a confocal microscopy-image analysis method to quantitatively examine CFTR at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Polarized MDCK cells transiently transfected with EGFP-CFTR constructs and stained for an apical marker were used. EGFP-CFTR fluorescence intensity in a region defined by the apical marker was normalized to EGFP-CFTR whole cell fluorescence intensity, rendering "apical CFTR ratio". We obtained an apical CFTR ratio of 0.67 ± 0.05 for wtCFTR and 0.11 ± 0.02 for pF508del. In addition, this image analysis method was able to discriminate intermediate phenotypes: partial rescue of the pF508del by incubation at 27 °C rendered an apical CFTR ratio value of 0.23 ± 0.01. We concluded the method has a good sensitivity and accurately detects milder phenotypes. Improving axial resolution through deconvolution further increased the sensitivity of the system as rendered an apical CFTR ratio of 0.76 ± 0.03 for wild type and 0.05 ± 0.02 for pF508del. The presented procedure is faster and simpler when compared with other available methods and it is therefore suitable as a screening method to identify

  10. Laserspritzer: a simple method for optogenetic investigation with subcellular resolutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Quan Sun

    Full Text Available To build a detailed circuit diagram in the brain, one needs to measure functional synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. A high-resolution circuit diagram should provide detailed information at subcellular levels such as soma, distal and basal dendrites. However, a limitation lies in the difficulty of studying long-range connections between brain areas separated by millimeters. Brain slice preparations have been widely used to help understand circuit wiring within specific brain regions. The challenge exists because long-range connections are likely to be cut in a brain slice. The optogenetic approach overcomes these limitations, as channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2 is efficiently transported to axon terminals that can be stimulated in brain slices. Here, we developed a novel fiber optic based simple method of optogenetic stimulation: the laserspritzer approach. This method facilitates the study of both long-range and local circuits within brain slice preparations. This is a convenient and low cost approach that can be easily integrated with a slice electrophysiology setup, and repeatedly used upon initial validation. Our data with direct ChR2 mediated-current recordings demonstrates that the spatial resolution of the laserspritzer is correlated with the size of the laserspritzer, and the resolution lies within the 30 µm range for the 5 micrometer laserspritzer. Using olfactory cortical slices, we demonstrated that the laserspritzer approach can be applied to selectively activate monosynaptic perisomatic GABAergic basket synapses, or long-range intracortical glutamatergic inputs formed on different subcellular domains within the same cell (e.g. distal and proximal dendrites. We discuss significant advantages of the laserspritzer approach over the widely used collimated LED whole-field illumination method in brain slice electrophysiological research.

  11. Quantitative Dose-Response Curves from Subcellular Lipid Multilayer Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusi-Appiah, A. E.; Lowry, T. W.; Darrow, E. M.; Wilson, K.; Chadwick, B. P.; Davidson, M. W.; Lenhert, S.

    2015-01-01

    The dose-dependent bioactivity of small molecules on cells is a crucial factor in drug discovery and personalized medicine. Although small-molecule microarrays are a promising platform for miniaturized screening, it has been a challenge to use them to obtain quantitative dose-response curves in vitro, especially for lipophilic compounds. Here we establish a small-molecule microarray assay capable of controlling the dosage of small lipophilic molecules delivered to cells by varying the sub-cellular volumes of surface supported lipid micro- and nanostructure arrays fabricated with nanointaglio. Features with sub-cellular lateral dimensions were found necessary to obtain normal cell adhesion with HeLa cells. The volumes of the lipophilic drug-containing nanostructures were determined using a fluorescence microscope calibrated by atomic-force microscopy. We used the surface supported lipid volume information to obtain EC-50 values for the response of HeLa cells to three FDA-approved lipophilic anticancer drugs, docetaxel, imiquimod and triethylenemelamine, which were found to be significantly different from neat lipid controls. No significant toxicity was observed on the control cells surrounding the drug/lipid patterns, indicating lack of interference or leakage from the arrays. Comparison of the microarray data to dose-response curves for the same drugs delivered liposomally from solution revealed quantitative differences in the efficacy values, which we explain in terms of cell-adhesion playing a more important role in the surface-based assay. The assay should be scalable to a density of at least 10,000 dose response curves on the area of a standard microtiter plate. PMID:26167949

  12. Bacterial and archaeal communities in the deep-sea sediments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Xu, Jian; Shuai, Yinjie; Zhou, Xiaojian; Yang, Zhihui; Ma, Kesen

    2016-05-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents harbor abundant thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms. However, microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents have not been well documented. Here, we investigated bacterial and archaeal communities in the two deep-sea sediments (named as TVG4 and TVG11) collected from inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge using the high-throughput sequencing technology of Illumina MiSeq2500 platform. Based on the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, sequence analysis showed that bacterial communities in the two samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Furthermore, archaeal communities in the two samples were dominated by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Comparative analysis showed that (i) TVG4 displayed the higher bacterial richness and lower archaeal richness than TVG11; (ii) the two samples had more divergence in archaeal communities than bacterial communities. Bacteria and archaea that are potentially associated with nitrogen, sulfur metal and methane cycling were detected in the two samples. Overall, we first provided a comparative picture of bacterial and archaeal communities and revealed their potentially ecological roles in the deep-sea environments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest Indian Ridge, augmenting microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents.

  13. Plant genotype-specific archaeal and bacterial endophytes but similar Bacillus antagonists colonize Mediterranean olive trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry eMueller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytes have an intimate and often symbiotic interaction with their hosts. Less is known about the composition and function of endophytes in trees. In order to evaluate our hypothesis that plant genotype and origin have a strong impact on both, endophytes of leaves from 10 Olea europaea L. cultivars from the Mediterranean basin growing at a single agricultural site in Spain and from nine wild olive trees located in natural habitats in Greece, Cyprus and on Madeira Island were studied. The composition of the bacterial endophytic communities as revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and the subsequent PCoA analysis showed a strong correlation to the plant genotypes. The bacterial distribution patterns were congruent with the plant origins in Eastern and Western areas of the Mediterranean basin. Subsequently, the endophytic microbiome of wild olives was shown to be closely related to those of cultivated olives of the corresponding geographic origins. The olive leaf endosphere harbored mostly Proteobacteria, followed by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The detection of a high portion of archaeal taxa belonging to the phyla Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota in the amplicon libraries was an unexpected discovery, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR revealing an archaeal portion of up to 35.8%. Although the function of these Archaea for their host plant remains speculative, this finding suggests a significant relevance of archaeal endophytes for plant-microbe interactions. In addition, the antagonistic potential of culturable endophytes was determined; all isolates with antagonistic activity against the olive-pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. belong to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. In contrast to the specific global structural diversity, BOX-fingerprints of the antagonistic Bacillus isolates were highly similar and independent of the olive genotype from which they were isolated.

  14. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 and January 2009 from Inceptisols under primary tropical rainforest, secondary forest (5-20 year old, agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA (PCR-DGGE using the 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker showed that archaeal community structures in crops and pasture soils are different from those in primary forest soil, which is more similar to the community structure in secondary forest soil. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands indicated the presence of crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal organisms. Based on clone library analysis of the gene coding the subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA of Archaea (306 sequences, the Shannon-Wiener function and Simpson's index showed a greater ammonia-oxidizing archaeal diversity in primary forest soils (H' = 2.1486; D = 0.1366, followed by a lower diversity in soils under pasture (H' = 1.9629; D = 0.1715, crops (H' = 1.4613; D = 0.3309 and secondary forest (H' = 0.8633; D = 0.5405. All cloned inserts were similar to the Crenarchaeota amoA gene clones (identity > 95 % previously found in soils and sediments and distributed primarily in three major phylogenetic clusters. The findings indicate that agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture affect the archaeal community structure and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in western Amazon soils.

  15. Response of Archaeal communities in beach sediments to spilled oil and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röling, Wilfred F M; de Brito Couto, Ivana R; Swannell, Richard P J; Head, Ian M

    2004-05-01

    While the contribution of Bacteria to bioremediation of oil-contaminated shorelines is well established, the response of Archaea to spilled oil and bioremediation treatments is unknown. The relationship between archaeal community structure and oil spill bioremediation was examined in laboratory microcosms and in a bioremediation field trial. 16S rRNA gene-based PCR and denaturing gradient gel analysis revealed that the archaeal community in oil-free laboratory microcosms was stable for 26 days. In contrast, in oil-polluted microcosms a dramatic decrease in the ability to detect Archaea was observed, and it was not possible to amplify fragments of archaeal 16S rRNA genes from samples taken from microcosms treated with oil. This was the case irrespective of whether a bioremediation treatment (addition of inorganic nutrients) was applied. Since rapid oil biodegradation occurred in nutrient-treated microcosms, we concluded that Archaea are unlikely to play a role in oil degradation in beach ecosystems. A clear-cut relationship between the presence of oil and the absence of Archaea was not apparent in the field experiment. This may have been related to continuous inoculation of beach sediments in the field with Archaea from seawater or invertebrates and shows that the reestablishment of Archaea following bioremediation cannot be used as a determinant of ecosystem recovery following bioremediation. Comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the majority of the Archaea detected (94%) belonged to a novel, distinct cluster of group II uncultured Euryarchaeota, which exhibited less than 87% identity to previously described sequences. A minor contribution of group I uncultured Crenarchaeota was observed.

  16. Archaeal remains dominate marine organic matter from the early Albian oceanic anoxic event 1b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, M.M.M.; Blokker, P.; Hopmans, E.C.;

    2002-01-01

    tetraethers) indicates an important contribution of representatives of marine planktonic archaea. The large difference (up to 12 ‰) in C/C ratios between algal biomarkers and the much more abundant planktonic archaea-derived biomarkers indicates that the latter were living chemoautotrophically. This offset......, distinct lamination, C-enrichment of OC) between the black shales of OAE1b and the Cenomanian/Turonian (∼94 Myr) OAE, the origin of the organic matter (archaeal versus phytoplanktonic) and causes for C-enrichment of OC are completely different. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Global occurrence of archaeal amoA genes in terrestrial hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanlun L; Ye, Qi; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Jinquan; Song, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Weidong; Bagwell, Christopher; Inskeep, William P; Ross, Christian; Gao, Lei; Wiegel, Juergen; Romanek, Christopher S; Shock, Everett L; Hedlund, Brian P

    2008-10-01

    Despite the ubiquity of ammonium in geothermal environments and the thermodynamic favorability of aerobic ammonia oxidation, thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms belonging to the crenarchaeota kingdom have only recently been described. In this study, we analyzed microbial mats and surface sediments from 21 hot spring samples (pH 3.4 to 9.0; temperature, 41 to 86 degrees C) from the United States, China, and Russia and obtained 846 putative archaeal ammonia monooxygenase large-subunit (amoA) gene and transcript sequences, representing a total of 41 amoA operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 2% identity. The amoA gene sequences were highly diverse, yet they clustered within two major clades of archaeal amoA sequences known from water columns, sediments, and soils: clusters A and B. Eighty-four percent (711/846) of the sequences belonged to cluster A, which is typically found in water columns and sediments, whereas 16% (135/846) belonged to cluster B, which is typically found in soils and sediments. Although a few amoA OTUs were present in several geothermal regions, most were specific to a single region. In addition, cluster A amoA genes formed geographic groups, while cluster B sequences did not group geographically. With the exception of only one hot spring, principal-component analysis and UPGMA (unweighted-pair group method using average linkages) based on the UniFrac metric derived from cluster A grouped the springs by location, regardless of temperature or bulk water pH, suggesting that geography may play a role in structuring communities of putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). The amoA genes were distinct from those of low-temperature environments; in particular, pair-wise comparisons between hot spring amoA genes and those from sympatric soils showed less than 85% sequence identity, underscoring the distinctness of hot spring archaeal communities from those of the surrounding soil system. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that amoA genes were

  18. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... in the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that formation...

  19. Co-expression and co-purification of archaeal and eukaryal box C/D RNPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Peng

    Full Text Available Box C/D ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs are 2'-O-methylation enzymes required for maturation of ribosomal and small nuclear RNA. Previous biochemical and structural studies of the box C/D RNPs were limited by the unavailability of purified intact RNPs. We developed a bacterial co-expression strategy based on the combined use of a multi-gene expression system and a tRNA-scaffold construct that allowed the expression and purification of homogeneous archaeal and human box C/D RNPs. While the co-expressed and co-purified archaeal box C/D RNP was found to be fully active in a 2'-O-methylation assay, the intact human U14 box C/D RNP showed no detectable catalytic activity, consistent with the earlier findings that assembly of eukaryotic box C/D RNPs is nonspontaneous and requires additional protein factors. Our systems provide a means for further biochemical and structural characterization of box C/D RNPs and their assembly factors.

  20. S-Layer Glycoproteins and Flagellins: Reporters of Archaeal Posttranslational Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken F. Jarrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many archaeal proteins undergo posttranslational modifications. S-layer proteins and flagellins have been used successfully to study a variety of these modifications, including N-linked glycosylation, signal peptide removal and lipid modification. Use of these well-characterized reporter proteins in the genetically tractable model organisms, Haloferax volcanii, Methanococcus voltae and Methanococcus maripaludis, has allowed dissection of the pathways and characterization of many of the enzymes responsible for these modifications. Such studies have identified archaeal-specific variations in signal peptidase activity not found in the other domains of life, as well as the enzymes responsible for assembly and biosynthesis of novel N-linked glycans. In vitro assays for some of these enzymes have already been developed. N-linked glycosylation is not essential for either Hfx. volcanii or the Methanococcus species, an observation that allowed researchers to analyze the role played by glycosylation in the function of both S-layers and flagellins, by generating mutants possessing these reporters with only partial attached glycans or lacking glycan altogether. In future studies, it will be possible to consider questions related to the heterogeneity associated with given modifications, such as differential or modulated glycosylation.

  1. Diversity in prokaryotic glycosylation: an archaeal-derived N-linked glycan contains legionaminic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiba, Lina; Aitio, Olli; Helin, Jari; Guan, Ziqiang; Permi, Perttu; Bamford, Dennis H; Eichler, Jerry; Roine, Elina

    2012-05-01

    VP4, the major structural protein of the haloarchaeal pleomorphic virus, HRPV-1, is glycosylated. To define the glycan structure attached to this protein, oligosaccharides released by β-elimination were analysed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Such analyses showed that the major VP4-derived glycan is a pentasaccharide comprising glucose, glucuronic acid, mannose, sulphated glucuronic acid and a terminal 5-N-formyl-legionaminic acid residue. This is the first observation of legionaminic acid, a sialic acid-like sugar, in an archaeal-derived glycan structure. The importance of this residue for viral infection was demonstrated upon incubation with N-acetylneuraminic acid, a similar monosaccharide. Such treatment reduced progeny virus production by half 4 h post infection. LC-ESI/MS analysis confirmed the presence of pentasaccharide precursors on two different VP4-derived peptides bearing the N-glycosylation signal, NTT. The same sites modified by the native host, Halorubrum sp. strain PV6, were also recognized by the Haloferax volcanii N-glycosylation apparatus, as determined by LC-ESI/MS of heterologously expressed VP4. Here, however, the N-linked pentasaccharide was the same as shown to decorate the S-layer glycoprotein in this species. Hence, N-glycosylation of the haloarchaeal viral protein, VP4, is host-specific. These results thus present additional examples of archaeal N-glycosylation diversity and show the ability of Archaea to modify heterologously expressed proteins.

  2. Archaeal membrane-associated proteases: insights on Haloferax volcanii and other haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, María I; Cerletti, Micaela; De Castro, Rosana E

    2015-01-01

    The function of membrane proteases range from general house-keeping to regulation of cellular processes. Although the biological role of these enzymes in archaea is poorly understood, some of them are implicated in the biogenesis of the archaeal cell envelope and surface structures. The membrane-bound ATP-dependent Lon protease is essential for cell viability and affects membrane carotenoid content in Haloferax volcanii. At least two different proteases are needed in this archaeon to accomplish the posttranslational modifications of the S-layer glycoprotein. The rhomboid protease RhoII is involved in the N-glycosylation of the S-layer protein with a sulfoquinovose-containing oligosaccharide while archaeosortase ArtA mediates the proteolytic processing coupled-lipid modification of this glycoprotein facilitating its attachment to the archaeal cell surface. Interestingly, two different signal peptidase I homologs exist in H. volcanii, Sec11a and Sec11b, which likely play distinct physiological roles. Type IV prepilin peptidase PibD processes flagellin/pilin precursors, being essential for the biogenesis and function of the archaellum and other cell surface structures in H. volcanii.

  3. Archaeal membrane-associated proteases: insights on Haloferax volcanii and other haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ines Giménez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The function of membrane proteases range from general house-keeping to regulation of cellular processes. Although the biological role of these enzymes in archaea is poorly understood, some of them are implicated in the biogenesis of the archaeal cell envelope and surface structures. The membrane-bound ATP-dependent Lon protease is essential for cell viability and affects membrane carotenoid content in Haloferax volcanii. At least two different proteases are needed in this archaeon to accomplish the posttranslational modifications of the S-layer glycoprotein. The rhomboid protease RhoII is involved in the N-glycosylation of the S-layer protein with a sulfoquinovose-containing oligosaccharide while archaeosortase ArtA mediates the proteolytic processing coupled-lipid modification of this glycoprotein facilitating its attachment to the archaeal cell surface. Interestingly, two different signal peptidase I homologs exist in H. volcanii, Sec11a and Sec11b, which likely play distinct physiological roles. Type IV prepilin peptidase PibD processes flagellin/pilin precursors, being essential for the biogenesis and function of the archaellum and other cell surface structures in H. volcanii.

  4. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in acidic to circumneutral hot springs in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Jiang, Hongchen; Briggs, Brandon R; Wang, Shang; Hou, Weiguo; Li, Gaoyuan; Wu, Geng; Solis, Ramonito; Arcilla, Carlo A; Abrajano, Teofilo; Dong, Hailiang

    2013-09-01

    The microbial diversity was investigated in sediments of six acidic to circumneutral hot springs (Temperature: 60-92 °C, pH 3.72-6.58) in the Philippines using an integrated approach that included geochemistry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances were lower in high-temperature springs than in moderate-temperature ones. Overall, the archaeal community consisted of sequence reads that exhibited a high similarity (nucleotide identity > 92%) to phyla Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, and unclassified Archaea. The bacterial community was composed of sequence reads moderately related (nucleotide identity > 90%) to 17 phyla, with Aquificae and Firmicutes being dominant. These phylogenetic groups were correlated with environmental conditions such as temperature, dissolved sulfate and calcium concentrations in spring water, and sediment properties including total nitrogen, pyrite, and elemental sulfur. Based on the phylogenetic inference, sulfur metabolisms appear to be key physiological functions in these hot springs. Sulfobacillus (within phylum Firmicutes) along with members within Sulfolobales were abundant in two high-temperature springs (> 76 °C), and they were hypothesized to play an important role in regulating the sulfur cycling under high-temperature conditions. The results of this study improve our understanding of microbial diversity and community composition in acidic to circumneutral terrestrial hot springs and their relationships with geochemical conditions.

  5. Archaeal diversity and a gene for ammonia oxidation are coupled to oceanic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galand, Pierre E; Lovejoy, Connie; Hamilton, Andrew K; Ingram, R Grant; Pedneault, Estelle; Carmack, Eddy C

    2009-04-01

    Evidence of microbial zonation in the open ocean is rapidly accumulating, but while the distribution of communities is often described according to depth, the other physical factors structuring microbial diversity and function remain poorly understood. Here we identify three different water masses in the North Water (eastern Canadian Arctic), defined by distinct temperature and salinity characteristics, and show that they contained distinct archaeal communities. Moreover, we found that one of the water masses contained an increased abundance of the archaeal alpha-subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) and accounted for 70% of the amoA gene detected overall. This indicates likely differences in putative biogeochemical capacities among different water masses. The ensemble of our results strongly suggest that the widely accepted view of depth stratification did not explain microbial diversity, but rather that parent water masses provide the framework for predicting communities and potential microbial function in an Arctic marine system. Our results emphasize that microbial distributions are strongly influenced by oceanic circulation, implying that shifting currents and water mass boundaries resulting from climate change may well impact patterns of microbial diversity by displacing whole biomes from their historic distributions. This relocation could have the potential to establish a substantially different geography of microbial-driven biogeochemical processes and associated oceanic production.

  6. Phylogeny of bacterial and archaeal genomes using conserved genes: supertrees and supermatrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Morgan Lang

    Full Text Available Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA, as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a "primary concordance" tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes.

  7. Bacterial and archaeal community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qun; LI Chaolun; DONG Yi; ZHANG Wenyan; ZHANG Wuchang; XIAO Tian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sedimentary ecosystem are determined by organic matter input, energy availability, and other environmental factors. However, global warming and earlier ice-cover melting are affecting the microbial diversity. To characterize the Arctic deep-sea sediment microbial diversity and its rela-tionship with environmental factors, we applied Roche 454 sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons from Arctic deep-sea sediment sample. Both bacterial and archaeal communities’ richness, compositions and structures as well as tax-onomic and phylogenetic affiliations of identified clades were characterized. Phylotypes relating to sulfur reduction and chemoorganotrophic lifestyle are major groups in the bacterial groups;while the archaeal community is domi-nated by phylotypes most closely related to the ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (96.66%) and methanogenic Euryarchaeota (3.21%). This study describes the microbial diversity in the Arctic deep marine sediment (>3 500 m) near the North Pole and would lay foundation for future functional analysis on microbial metabolic processes and pathways predictions in similar environments.

  8. Archaeal Life on Tangkuban Perahu- Sampling and Culture Growth in Indonesian Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI HANDAYANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the expedition to Tangkuban Perahu, West Java was to obtain archaeal samples from the solfatara fields located in Domas crater. This was one of the places, where scientists from the University of Regensburg Germany had formerly isolated Indonesian archaea, especially Thermoplasma and Sulfolobus species but not fully characterized. We collected five samples from mud holes with temperatures from 57 to 88 oC and pH of 1.5-2. A portion of each sample was grown at the University of Regensburg in modified Allen’s medium at 80 oC. From four out of five samples enrichment cultures were obtained, autotrophically on elemental sulphur and heterotrophically on sulfur and yeast extract; electron micrographs are presented. In the laboratories of Universitas Indonesia the isolates were cultured at 55-60 oC in order to grow tetraetherlipid synthesizing archaea, both Thermoplasmatales and Sulfolobales. Here, we succeeded to culture the same type of archaeal cells, which had been cultured in Regensburg, probably a Sulfolobus species and in Freundt’s medium, Thermoplasma species. The harvested cells are documented by phase contrast microscope equipped with a digital camera. Our next steps will be to further characterize genetically the cultured cells from Tangkuban Perahu isolates.

  9. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  10. Archaeal Genome Guardians Give Insights into Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Damage Response Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the third domain of life, archaea, like the eukarya and bacteria, must have robust DNA replication and repair complexes to ensure genome fidelity. Archaea moreover display a breadth of unique habitats and characteristics, and structural biologists increasingly appreciate these features. As archaea include extremophiles that can withstand diverse environmental stresses, they provide fundamental systems for understanding enzymes and pathways critical to genome integrity and stress responses. Such archaeal extremophiles provide critical data on the periodic table for life as well as on the biochemical, geochemical, and physical limitations to adaptive strategies allowing organisms to thrive under environmental stress relevant to determining the boundaries for life as we know it. Specifically, archaeal enzyme structures have informed the architecture and mechanisms of key DNA repair proteins and complexes. With added abilities to temperature-trap flexible complexes and reveal core domains of transient and dynamic complexes, these structures provide insights into mechanisms of maintaining genome integrity despite extreme environmental stress. The DNA damage response protein structures noted in this review therefore inform the basis for genome integrity in the face of environmental stress, with implications for all domains of life as well as for biomanufacturing, astrobiology, and medicine.

  11. Spatiotemporal visualization of subcellular dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2012-12-12

    To date, there is no consensus on the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their biological behavior; however, there is growing evidence that the versatile characteristics make their biological fate largely unpredictable and remain an issue of limited knowledge. Here we introduce an experimental methodology for tracking and visualization of postuptake behavior and the intracellular fate of CNTs based on the spatial distribution of diffusion values throughout the plant cell. By using raster scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), we were able to generate highly quantitative spatial maps of CNTs diffusion in different cell compartments. The spatial map of diffusion values revealed that the uptake of CNTs is associated with important subcellular events such as carrier-mediated vacuolar transport and autophagy. These results show that RICS is a useful methodology to elucidate the intracellular behavior mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and potentially other fluorescently labeled nanoparticles, which is of relevance for the important issues related to the environmental impact and health hazards. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Subcellular and in-vivo Nano-Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheemalapati, Surya Venkatasekhar; Winskas, John; Wang, Hao; Konnaiyan, Karthik; Zhdanov, Arseny; Roth, Alison; Adapa, Swamy Rakesh; Deonarine, Andrew; Noble, Mark; Das, Tuhin; Gatenby, Robert; Westerheide, Sandy D.; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Pyayt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of individual cells at the subcellular level is important for understanding diseases and accelerating drug discovery. Nanoscale endoscopes allow minimally invasive probing of individual cell interiors. Several such instruments have been presented previously, but they are either too complex to fabricate or require sophisticated external detectors because of low signal collection efficiency. Here we present a nanoendoscope that can locally excite fluorescence in labelled cell organelles and collect the emitted signal for spectral analysis. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations have shown that with an optimized nanoendoscope taper profile, the light emission and collection was localized within ~100 nm. This allows signal detection to be used for nano-photonic sensing of the proximity of fluorophores. Upon insertion into the individual organelles of living cells, the nanoendoscope was fabricated and resultant fluorescent signals collected. This included the signal collection from the nucleus of Acridine orange labelled human fibroblast cells, the nucleus of Hoechst stained live liver cells and the mitochondria of MitoTracker Red labelled MDA-MB-231 cells. The endoscope was also inserted into a live organism, the yellow fluorescent protein producing nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and a fluorescent signal was collected. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of in vivo, local fluorescence signal collection on the sub-organelle level. PMID:27694854

  13. Subcellular localization of rickettsial invasion protein, InvA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaywee, Jariyanart; Sacci, John B; Radulovic, Suzana; Beier, Magda S; Azad, Abdu F

    2003-01-01

    To understand further the molecular basis of rickettsial host cell invasion, Rickettsia prowazekii invasion gene homolog (invA) has been characterized. Our previous experiments have shown that InvA is an Ap5A pyrophosphatase, a member of the Nudix hydrolase family, which is up-regulated during the internalization, early growth phase, and exit steps during rickettsial mammalian cell infection. In addition to the molecular characterization, subcellular localization of InvA was investigated. InvA-specific antibodies were raised in mice and used for immunoelectron microscopy. The generated antibodies were shown to recognize InvA and by immunogold labeling showed InvA in the cytoplasm of rickettsiae. A cytoplasmic location for InvA would allow for a rapid response to any internal substance and efficient functioning in hydrolysis of toxic metabolic by-products that are accumulated in the rickettsial cytoplasm during host cell invasion. Protecting bacteria from a hazardous environment could enhance their viability and allow them to remain metabolically active, which is a necessary step for the rickettsial obligate intracellular lifestyle.

  14. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane.

  15. Correction: Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Robert A; Lai, Barry; Holmes, William R; Lee, Daewoo

    2015-09-01

    Correction for 'Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics' by Robert A. Colvin et al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 1111-1123.

  16. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    subcellular marker, we will compare the subcellular distribution of activity using two other substrates, inosine diphosphate and thiamine pyrophosphate, also...diphosphatase and its identity with thiamine pyrophosphatase. J. Biol. Chem. 243 2934-2942. -’/ t.~ i B6 .~ 4. jo 4 A IN ie %f I.., Ad~ ,de~M 1. ~A~1’ -. 44,t * ’j " *’ 7A-. lb. Ai

  17. Linking the composition of bacterial and archaeal communities to characteristics of soil and flora composition in the Atlantic rainforest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima-Perim, Julia Elidia; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Durrer, Ademir; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2016-01-01

    The description of microbiomes as intrinsic fractions of any given ecosystem is an important issue, for instance, by linking their compositions and functions with other biotic and abiotic components of natural systems and hosts. Here we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities from soils of t

  18. Structural and genomic properties of the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus ATV with an extracellular stage of the reproductive cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, David; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Häring, Monika;

    2006-01-01

    A novel virus, ATV, of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus has the unique property of undergoing a major morphological development outside of, and independently of, the host cell. Virions are extruded from host cells as lemon-shaped tail-less particles, after which they develop long...

  19. A nested PCR approach for improved recovery of archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments from freshwater samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, E.W.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Laanbroek, R.

    2009-01-01

    In a survey on the presence of archaea in a number of European lakes, it was found that known archaeal primer sets for PCR were not suited for use in freshwater environment, as some lack selectivity, while others were too selective. A nested PCR was developed for denaturing gradient gel electrophore

  20. Detection and analysis of elusive members of a novel and diverse archaeal community within a thermal spring streamer consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Daniel R; Thomas, Raquela; Maas, Kendra R; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D

    2015-03-01

    Recent metagenomic analyses of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) thermal spring communities suggested the presence of minor archaeal populations that simultaneous PCR-based assays using traditional 'universal' 16S rRNA gene primers failed to detect. Here we use metagenomics to identify PCR primers effective at detecting elusive members of the Archaea, assess their efficacy, and describe the diverse and novel archaeal community from a circum-neutral thermal spring from the Bechler region of YNP. We determined that a less commonly used PCR primer, Arch349F, captured more diversity in this spring than the widely used A21F primer. A search of the PCR primers against the RDP 16S rRNA gene database indicated that Arch349F also captured the largest percentage of Archaea, including 41 % more than A21F. Pyrosequencing using the Arch349F primer recovered all of the phylotypes present in the clone-based portion of the study and the metagenome of this spring in addition to several other populations of Archaea, some of which are phylogenetically novel. In contrast to the lack of amplification with traditional 16S rRNA gene primers, our comprehensive analyses suggested a diverse archaeal community in the Bechler spring, with implications for recently discovered groups such as the Geoarchaeota and other undescribed archaeal groups.

  1. Influence of phenylacetic acid pulses on anaerobic digestion performance and archaeal community structure in WWTP sewage sludge digesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrol, L.; Urra, J.; Rosenkranz, F.; Kroff, P.A.; Plugge, C.M.; Lesty, Y.; Chamy, R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phenylacetic acid (PAA) pulses on anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and archaeal community structure was evaluated in anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Four pilot-scale continuous stirred tank reactors were set up at a full-scale mu

  2. Cleavage of model substrates by archaeal RNase P: role of protein cofactors in cleavage-site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinapah, Sylvie; Wu, Shiying; Chen, Yu; Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2011-02-01

    RNase P is a catalytic ribonucleoprotein primarily involved in tRNA biogenesis. Archaeal RNase P comprises a catalytic RNase P RNA (RPR) and at least four protein cofactors (RPPs), which function as two binary complexes (POP5•RPP30 and RPP21• RPP29). Exploiting the ability to assemble a functional Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P in vitro, we examined the role of RPPs in influencing substrate recognition by the RPR. We first demonstrate that Pfu RPR, like its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts, cleaves model hairpin loop substrates albeit at rates 90- to 200-fold lower when compared with cleavage by bacterial RPR, highlighting the functionally comparable catalytic cores in bacterial and archaeal RPRs. By investigating cleavage-site selection exhibited by Pfu RPR (±RPPs) with various model substrates missing consensus-recognition elements, we determined substrate features whose recognition is facilitated by either POP5•RPP30 or RPP21•RPP29 (directly or indirectly via the RPR). Our results also revealed that Pfu RPR + RPP21•RPP29 displays substrate-recognition properties coinciding with those of the bacterial RPR-alone reaction rather than the Pfu RPR, and that this behaviour is attributable to structural differences in the substrate-specificity domains of bacterial and archaeal RPRs. Moreover, our data reveal a hierarchy in recognition elements that dictates cleavage-site selection by archaeal RNase P.

  3. Archaeal ammonia oxidation in volcanic grassland soils of Iceland. Effects of elevated temperature and N availability on processes and organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thaumarchaea are recognized today as the most abundant and ubiquitously dis­tributed archaeal organisms, especially in the oceans and soil. Their phylogenetic placement as a phylum, the capability of all cultivated Thaumarchaea to oxidize ammonia for energy conservation as well as many further aspec

  4. Predicting protein subcellular locations using hierarchical ensemble of Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eils Roland

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subcellular location of a protein is closely related to its function. It would be worthwhile to develop a method to predict the subcellular location for a given protein when only the amino acid sequence of the protein is known. Although many efforts have been made to predict subcellular location from sequence information only, there is the need for further research to improve the accuracy of prediction. Results A novel method called HensBC is introduced to predict protein subcellular location. HensBC is a recursive algorithm which constructs a hierarchical ensemble of classifiers. The classifiers used are Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chain models. We tested our method on six various datasets; among them are Gram-negative bacteria dataset, data for discriminating outer membrane proteins and apoptosis proteins dataset. We observed that our method can predict the subcellular location with high accuracy. Another advantage of the proposed method is that it can improve the accuracy of the prediction of some classes with few sequences in training and is therefore useful for datasets with imbalanced distribution of classes. Conclusion This study introduces an algorithm which uses only the primary sequence of a protein to predict its subcellular location. The proposed recursive scheme represents an interesting methodology for learning and combining classifiers. The method is computationally efficient and competitive with the previously reported approaches in terms of prediction accuracies as empirical results indicate. The code for the software is available upon request.

  5. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  6. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  7. Predicting Protein Subcellular Location Using Digital Signal Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Xi PAN; Da-Wei LI; Yun DUAN; Zhi-Zhou ZHANG; Ming-Qing XU; Guo-Yin FENG; Lin HE

    2005-01-01

    The biological functions of a protein are closely related to its attributes in a cell. With the rapid accumulation of newly found protein sequence data in databanks, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method for predicting the subcellular location of proteins. The establishment of such a predictor will expedite the functional determination of newly found proteins and the process of prioritizing genes and proteins identified by genomic efforts as potential molecular targets for drug design. The traditional algorithms for predicting these attributes were based solely on amino acid composition in which no sequence order effect was taken into account. To improve the prediction quality, it is necessary to incorporate such an effect. However, the number of possible patterns in protein sequences is extremely large, posing a formidable difficulty for realizing this goal. To deal with such difficulty, a well-developed tool in digital signal processing named digital Fourier transform (DFT) [1] was introduced. After being translated to a digital signal according to the hydrophobicity of each amino acid, a protein was analyzed by DFT within the frequency domain. A set of frequency spectrum parameters, thus obtained, were regarded as the factors to represent the sequence order effect. A significant improvement in prediction quality was observed by incorporating the frequency spectrum parameters with the conventional amino acid composition. One of the crucial merits of this approach is that many existing tools in mathematics and engineering can be easily applied in the predicting process. It is anticipated that digital signal processing may serve as a useful vehicle for many other protein science areas.

  8. Predicting protein subcellular location using digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Xi; Li, Da-Wei; Duan, Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Xu, Ming-Qing; Feng, Guo-Yin; He, Lin

    2005-02-01

    The biological functions of a protein are closely related to its attributes in a cell. With the rapid accumulation of newly found protein sequence data in databanks, it is highly desirable to develop an automated method for predicting the subcellular location of proteins. The establishment of such a predictor will expedite the functional determination of newly found proteins and the process of prioritizing genes and proteins identified by genomic efforts as potential molecular targets for drug design. The traditional algorithms for predicting these attributes were based solely on amino acid composition in which no sequence order effect was taken into account. To improve the prediction quality, it is necessary to incorporate such an effect. However, the number of possible patterns in protein sequences is extremely large, posing a formidable difficulty for realizing this goal. To deal with such difficulty, a well-developed tool in digital signal processing named digital Fourier transform (DFT) [1] was introduced. After being translated to a digital signal according to the hydrophobicity of each amino acid, a protein was analyzed by DFT within the frequency domain. A set of frequency spectrum parameters, thus obtained, were regarded as the factors to represent the sequence order effect. A significant improvement in prediction quality was observed by incorporating the frequency spectrum parameters with the conventional amino acid composition. One of the crucial merits of this approach is that many existing tools in mathematics and engineering can be easily applied in the predicting process. It is anticipated that digital signal processing may serve as a useful vehicle for many other protein science areas.

  9. Subcellular distribution and translocation of radionuclides in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouthu, S.; Weginwar, R.; Arie, Tsutomu; Ambe, Shizuko; Ozaki, Takuo; Enomoto, Shuichi; Ambe, Fumitoshi; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1999-09-01

    The subcellular distribution of radionuclides in Glycine max Merr. (soybean) and Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) and translocation of plant absorbed radionuclides with growth in soybean were studied. More than 60% of cellular incorporated Rb{sup {minus}83}, Sr{sup {minus}85}, Mn{sup {minus}54}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, and Se{sup {minus}75} remained in the supernatant fraction; 55% and 20% of Cr{sup {minus}51} was bound to soybean and cucumber cell wall fractions, respectively; 70% or more of Be{sup {minus}7}, Y{sup {minus}88}, and Fe{sup {minus}59} was fixed in the chloroplast fraction; and approx. 10% of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Fe{sup {minus}59}, V{sup {minus}48}, and As were fixed in the mitochondrial fraction. Translocation of nuclides within the soybean plant at different stages of growth has been determined. Vanadium, Y{sup {minus}88}, Be{sup {minus}7}, Se{sup {minus}75}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, Cr{sup {minus}51}, and Zr{sup {minus}88} were predominantly accumulated in the root. Although the total percentage of plant uptake of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Zr{sup {minus}88}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, and Cr{sup {minus}51} was high, because of low mobility and translocation to shoot, their accumulation in the fruit fraction was negligible. The translocation of mobile nuclides in plants was demonstrated clearly by Rb{sup {minus}83}, Zn{sup {minus}65}, and Fe{sup {minus}59}. Data on the nuclide fraction mobilized from vegetative parts into edible parts was used to assess the percentage of accumulated radionuclides in plants that may reach humans through beans.

  10. Comparative survey of bacterial and archaeal communities in high arsenic shallow aquifers using 454 pyrosequencing and traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Li, Bing; Dai, Xinyue; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-12-01

    A survey of bacterial and archaeal community structure was carried out in 10 shallow tube wells in a high arsenic groundwater system located in Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia by 16S rRNA gene based two-step nested PCR-DGGE, clone libraries and 454 pyrosequencing. 12 bacterial and 18 archaeal DGGE bands and 26-136 species-level OTUs were detected for all the samples. 299 bacterial and 283 archaeal 16S rRNA gene clones for two typical samples were identified by phylogenetic analysis. Most of the results from these different methods were consistent with the dominant bacterial populations. But the proportions of the microbial populations were mostly different and the bacterial communities in most of these samples from pyrosequencing were both more abundant and more diverse than those from the traditional methods. Even after quality filtering, pyrosequencing revealed some populations including Alishewanella, Sulfuricurvum, Arthrobacter, Sporosarcina and Algoriphagus which were not detected with traditional techniques. The most dominant bacterial populations in these samples identified as some arsenic, iron, nitrogen and sulfur reducing and oxidizing related populations including Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Massilia, Planococcus, and Aquabacterium and archaeal communities Nitrosophaera and Methanosaeta. Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas were distinctly abundant in most of these samples. Methanogens were found as the dominant archeal population with three methods. From the results of traditional methods, the dominant archaeal populations apparently changed from phylum Thaumarchaeota to Euryarchaeota with the arsenic concentrations increasing. But this structure dynamic change was not revealed with pyrosequencing. Our results imply that an integrated approach combining the traditional methods and next generation sequencing approaches to characterize the microbial communities in high arsenic groundwater is recommended.

  11. Forest strata drive spatial structure of bacterial and archaeal communities and microbial methane cycling in neotropical bromeliad wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Guntars; Brandt, Franziska; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Several thousands of tank bromeliads per hectare of neotropical forest create a unique wetland ecosystem that harbors diverse communities of archaea and bacteria and emit substantial amounts of methane. We studied spatial distribution of archaeal and bacterial communities, microbial methane cycling and their environmental drivers in tank bromeliad wetlands. We selected tank bromeliads of different species and functional types (terrestrial and canopy bromeliads) in a neotropical montane forest of Southern Ecuador and sampled the organic tank slurry. Archaeal and bacterial communities were characterized using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing, respectively, and linked with physico-chemical tank-slurry properties. Additionally, we performed tank-slurry incubations to measure methane production potential, stable carbon isotope fractionation and pathway of methane formation. Archaeal and bacterial community composition in bromeliad wetlands was dominated by methanogens and by Alphaproteobacteria, respectively, and did not differ between species but between functional types. Hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were the dominant methanogens among all bromeliads but the relative abundance of aceticlastic Methanosaetaceae increased in terrestrial bromeliads. Complementary, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway of methane formation but the relative contribution of aceticlastic methanogenesis increased in terrestrial bromeliads and led to a concomitant increase in total methane production. Rhodospirillales were characteristic for canopy bromeliads, Planctomycetales and Actinomycetalis for terrestrial bromeliads. While nitrogen concentration and pH explained 32% of the archaeal community variability, 29% of the bacterial community variability was explained by nitrogen, acetate and propionate concentrations. Our study demonstrates that bromeliad functional types, associated with different forest strata

  12. Archaeal abundance across a pH gradient in an arable soil and its relationship to bacterial and fungal growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Per; Sterngren, Anna E; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abundance related to bacterial and fungal growth rates across the same pH gradient. We identified two distinct and opposite effects of pH on the archaeal abundance. In the lowest pH range (pH 4.0 to 4.7), the abundance of archaea did not seem to correspond to pH. Above this pH range, there was a sharp, almost 4-fold decrease in archaeal abundance, reaching a minimum at pH 5.1 to 5.2. The low abundance of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers at this pH range then sharply increased almost 150-fold with pH, resulting in an increase in the ratio between archaeal and bacterial copy numbers from a minimum of 0.002 to more than 0.07 at pH 8. The nonuniform archaeal response to pH could reflect variation in the archaeal community composition along the gradient, with some archaea adapted to acidic conditions and others to neutral to slightly alkaline conditions. This suggestion is reinforced by observations of contrasting outcomes of the (competitive) interactions between archaea, bacteria, and fungi toward the lower and higher ends of the examined pH gradient.

  13. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Pineda De Castro

    Full Text Available In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  14. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  15. MED: a new non-supervised gene prediction algorithm for bacterial and archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yi-Fan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a remarkable success in the computational prediction of genes in Bacteria and Archaea, a lack of comprehensive understanding of prokaryotic gene structures prevents from further elucidation of differences among genomes. It continues to be interesting to develop new ab initio algorithms which not only accurately predict genes, but also facilitate comparative studies of prokaryotic genomes. Results This paper describes a new prokaryotic genefinding algorithm based on a comprehensive statistical model of protein coding Open Reading Frames (ORFs and Translation Initiation Sites (TISs. The former is based on a linguistic "Entropy Density Profile" (EDP model of coding DNA sequence and the latter comprises several relevant features related to the translation initiation. They are combined to form a so-called Multivariate Entropy Distance (MED algorithm, MED 2.0, that incorporates several strategies in the iterative program. The iterations enable us to develop a non-supervised learning process and to obtain a set of genome-specific parameters for the gene structure, before making the prediction of genes. Conclusion Results of extensive tests show that MED 2.0 achieves a competitive high performance in the gene prediction for both 5' and 3' end matches, compared to the current best prokaryotic gene finders. The advantage of the MED 2.0 is particularly evident for GC-rich genomes and archaeal genomes. Furthermore, the genome-specific parameters given by MED 2.0 match with the current understanding of prokaryotic genomes and may serve as tools for comparative genomic studies. In particular, MED 2.0 is shown to reveal divergent translation initiation mechanisms in archaeal genomes while making a more accurate prediction of TISs compared to the existing gene finders and the current GenBank annotation.

  16. Seasonality and resource availability control bacterial and archaeal communities in soils of a temperate beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Frank; Knapp, Daniela; Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-03-01

    It was hypothesized that seasonality and resource availability altered through tree girdling were major determinants of the phylogenetic composition of the archaeal and bacterial community in a temperate beech forest soil. During a 2-year field experiment, involving girdling of beech trees to intercept the transfer of easily available carbon (C) from the canopy to roots, members of the dominant phylogenetic microbial phyla residing in top soils under girdled versus untreated control trees were monitored at bimonthly intervals through 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling and quantitative PCR analysis. Effects on nitrifying and denitrifying groups were assessed by measuring the abundances of nirS and nosZ genes as well as bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Seasonal dynamics displayed by key phylogenetic and nitrogen (N) cycling functional groups were found to be tightly coupled with seasonal alterations in labile C and N pools as well as with variation in soil temperature and soil moisture. In particular, archaea and acidobacteria were highly responsive to soil nutritional and soil climatic changes associated with seasonality, indicating their high metabolic versatility and capability to adapt to environmental changes. For these phyla, significant interrelations with soil chemical and microbial process data were found suggesting their potential, but poorly described contribution to nitrification or denitrification in temperate forest soils. In conclusion, our extensive approach allowed us to get novel insights into effects of seasonality and resource availability on the microbial community, in particular on hitherto poorly studied bacterial phyla and functional groups.

  17. Domain structures and inter-domain interactions defining the holoenzyme architecture of archaeal d-family DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ikuo; Matsui, Eriko; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2013-07-05

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD) forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  18. Domain Structures and Inter-Domain Interactions Defining the Holoenzyme Architecture of Archaeal D-Family DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yokoyama

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  19. Fecal pollution source tracking in waters intended for human supply based on archaeal and bacterial genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Kayo; Barreto, Camila; Oliveira, Samara Sant'Anna; Pinto, Leonardo Henriques; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Miranda, Catia Chaia; Clementino, Maysa Mandetta

    2015-12-01

    The determination of fecal pollution sources in aquatic ecosystems is essential to estimate associated health risks. In this study, we evaluate eight microbial source tracking (MST) markers including host-specific Bacteroidales and Methanobrevibacter spp. for discrimination between human, bovine, equine, and swine fecal contamination in waters intended for human supply. Overall, the novel host-specific archaeal and bacterial primers proposed in this study demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. Markers for the Archaea domain were more prevalent in the fecal and water samples studied. We conclude that the investigations regarding the sources of fecal pollution in public water supplies can contribute to improve the quality of human health. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis using both archaeal and bacterial fecal MST markers on tropical water bodies of Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil.

  20. Crystal structure of the S. solfataricus archaeal exosome reveals conformational flexibility in the RNA-binding ring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrui Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exosome complex is an essential RNA 3'-end processing and degradation machinery. In archaeal organisms, the exosome consists of a catalytic ring and an RNA-binding ring, both of which were previously reported to assume three-fold symmetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an asymmetric 2.9 A Sulfolobus solfataricus archaeal exosome structure in which the three-fold symmetry is broken due to combined rigid body and thermal motions mainly within the RNA-binding ring. Since increased conformational flexibility was also observed in the RNA-binding ring of the related bacterial PNPase, we speculate that this may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to accommodate diverse RNA substrates for degradation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study clearly shows the dynamic structures within the RNA-binding domains, which provides additional insights on mechanism of asymmetric RNA binding and processing.

  1. Archaeal phylogeny: reexamination of the phylogenetic position of Archaeoglobus fulgidus in light of certain composition-induced artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, C. R.; Achenbach, L.; Rouviere, P.; Mandelco, L.

    1991-01-01

    A major and too little recognized source of artifact in phylogenetic analysis of molecular sequence data is compositional difference among sequences. The problem becomes particularly acute when alignments contain ribosomal RNAs from both mesophilic and thermophilic species. Among prokaryotes the latter are considerably higher in G + C content than the former, which often results in artificial clustering of thermophilic lineages and their being placed artificially deep in phylogenetic trees. In this communication we review archaeal phylogeny in the light of this consideration, focusing in particular on the phylogenetic position of the sulfate reducing species Archaeoglobus fulgidus, using both 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA sequences. The analysis shows clearly that the previously reported deep branching of the A. fulgidus lineage (very near the base of the euryarchaeal side of the archaeal tree) is incorrect, and that the lineage actually groups with a previously recognized unit that comprises the Methanomicrobiales and extreme halophiles.

  2. Structural diversity of archaeal ether lipid and phylogenetic relationship; Ko saikin eteru shishitsu no tayosei to keito kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Y. [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    Existence of ether lipids is not limited in archaea, however, ether lipids are characteristic market of archaea. Archaeal ether lipids have diverse structures and unusual features not found in other organisms. Archaeal lipids have saturated isoprenoid hydrocarbon chain ether-linked to glycerol. Tetraether type lipids with two polar groups on two sides of hydrocarbon chains are found in archaea widely. Core lipids of non-methanogenic thermophilic archaea are mainly tetraether type lipids containing inositol as a phosphate-containing polar head group. Lipids of extreme halophilic archaea are composed of diether type and glycerophosphate as polar head groups. The feature of methanogenic archaeral lipids is nitrogen-containing polar head groups. Distribution of lipid constituents is used as a chemotaxonomic marker of extreme halophiles and methanogens. The most fundamental phenotypic difference between archaea and Eubacteria is enantiomeric difference at C-2 position of glycerophosphate backbone, that is archaea have G-1-P configuration. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Responses of bacterial and archaeal communities to nitrate stimulation after oil pollution in mangrove sediment revealed by Illumina sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xu; Zheng, Tian-Ling

    2016-08-15

    This study aimed to investigate microbial responses to nitrate stimulation in oiled mangrove mesocosm. Both supplementary oil and nitrate changed the water and sediment chemical properties contributing to the shift of microbial communities. Denitrifying genes nirS and nirK were increased several times by the interaction of oil spiking and nitrate addition. Bacterial chao1 was reduced by oil spiking and further by nitrate stimulation, whereas archaeal chao1 was only inhibited by oil pollution on early time. Sampling depth explained most of variation and significantly impacted bacterial and archaeal communities, while oil pollution only significantly impacted bacterial communities (pmangrove. The findings demonstrate the impacts of environmental factors and their interactions in shaping microbial communities during nitrate stimulation. Our study suggests introducing genera Desulfotignum and Marinobacter into oiled mangrove for bioaugmentation.

  4. Automated identification of subcellular organelles by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Niedieker, Daniel; Petersen, Dennis; Krauss, Sascha D; Freier, Erik; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Mosig, Axel; Hahn, Stephan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-05-06

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is an emerging tool for label-free characterization of living cells. Here, unsupervised multivariate analysis of CARS datasets was used to visualize the subcellular compartments. In addition, a supervised learning algorithm based on the "random forest" ensemble learning method as a classifier, was trained with CARS spectra using immunofluorescence images as a reference. The supervised classifier was then used, to our knowledge for the first time, to automatically identify lipid droplets, nucleus, nucleoli, and endoplasmic reticulum in datasets that are not used for training. These four subcellular components were simultaneously and label-free monitored instead of using several fluorescent labels. These results open new avenues for label-free time-resolved investigation of subcellular components in different cells, especially cancer cells.

  5. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-06-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics.

  6. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics. PMID:27323846

  7. Detrended cross-correlation coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  8. Geary autocorrelation and DCCA coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization via PSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-02-01

    Apoptosis is a fundamental process controlling normal tissue homeostasis by regulating a balance between cell proliferation and death. Predicting subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding its mechanism of programmed cell death. Prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular location is still a challenging and complicated task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we propose a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based model by using Geary autocorrelation function and detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then a 270-dimensional (270D) feature vector is constructed on three widely used datasets: ZD98, ZW225 and CL317, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. The overall prediction accuracies are significantly improved by rigorous jackknife test. The results show that our model offers a reliable and effective PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

  9. Use of correspondence discriminant analysis to predict the subcellular location of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrière, Guy; Thioulouse, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Correspondence discriminant analysis (CDA) is a multivariate statistical method derived from discriminant analysis which can be used on contingency tables. We have used CDA to separate Gram negative bacteria proteins according to their subcellular location. The high resolution of the discrimination obtained makes this method a good tool to predict subcellular location when this information is not known. The main advantage of this technique is its simplicity. Indeed, by computing two linear formulae on amino acid composition, it is possible to classify a protein into one of the three classes of subcellular location we have defined. The CDA itself can be computed with the ADE-4 software package that can be downloaded, as well as the data set used in this study, from the Pôle Bio-Informatique Lyonnais (PBIL) server at http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr.

  10. SIMS ion microscopy as a novel, practical tool for subcellular chemical imaging in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, S

    2003-01-15

    The development of cryogenic sample preparations, subcellular image quantification schemes, and correlative confocal laser scanning microscopy and ion microscopy have made dynamic SIMS a versatile tool in biology and medicine. For example, ion microscopy can provide much needed, novel information on calcium influx and intracellular calcium stores at organelle resolution in normal and transformed cells in order to better understand the altered calcium signaling in malignant cells. 3-D SIMS imaging of cells revealed dynamic gradients of calcium in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis. Studies of subcellular localization of anticancer drugs is another area of research where ion microscopy can provide novel observations in many types of cancers. Ion microscopy is already an essential tool in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer as it can be used to quantitatively image the subcellular location of boron in cells and tissues. This information is critically needed for testing the efficacy of boronated agents and for calculations of radiation dosimetry.

  11. Subcellular localization of frizzled receptors, mediated by their cytoplasmic tails, regulates signaling pathway specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The Frizzled (Fz; called here Fz1 and Fz2 receptors have distinct signaling specificities activating either the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway or Fz/planar cell polarity (PCP signaling in Drosophila. The regulation of signaling specificity remains largely obscure. We show that Fz1 and Fz2 have different subcellular localizations in imaginal disc epithelia, with Fz1 localizing preferentially to apical junctional complexes, and Fz2 being evenly distributed basolaterally. The subcellular localization difference directly contributes to the signaling specificity outcome. Whereas apical localization favors Fz/PCP signaling, it interferes with canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Receptor localization is mediated by sequences in the cytoplasmic tail of Fz2 that appear to block apical accumulation. Based on these data, we propose that subcellular Fz localization, through the association with other membrane proteins, is a critical aspect in regulating the signaling specificity within the Wnt/Fz signaling pathways.

  12. Non-extremophilic 'extremophiles' - Archaeal dominance in the subsurface and their implication for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Lins, Philipp; Illmer, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Archaea - besides bacteria and eukaryota constituting the third big domain of life - were so far regarded as typical inhabitants of extreme environments, as indicated by the name (Archaeon, Greek: 'original', 'primal'). Previous research and cultivation successes were basically carried out in habitats characterized by extreme temperature, pH and salinity regimes. Such extreme conditions, as expected at the beginning of the Earth's evolution, are occasionally also prevalent on extraterrestrial planets and moons and make the Archaeal domain a key group to be studied concerning life's evolution and the most likely pioneer organisms to colonize environments that are regarded as hostile. However, in recent years it became obvious that Archaea, in particular non-extremophilic species, can be found almost ubiquitously in marine, freshwater, terrestrial and also subsurface habitats and occasionally outnumber other microbial domains and hold key positions in globally relevant energy and nutrient cycles. Besides extreme environments - the big question remains how to define a parameter as extreme - subsurface and cave environments present a window to the past, where adaptions to early life's conditions can be studied and how microbiomes may be structured in a habitat that represents a refugium on extraterrestrial celestial bodies, were surface conditions might be at first sight too extreme for life. The lower part of the alpine Hundsalm cave in Tyrol (Austria) offered a unique opportunity to study an almost pristine cave habitat, which is separated from the touristic part of the ice cave. The main focus of our research was laid on the microbial communities that were supposed to be in connection with secondary carbonate precipitations ('moonmilk'). For the ascertainment of these so far poorly evaluated structures a multiple approach assessment was chosen to generate a virtually complete picture of these subsurface microbiomes. Thereby, a combination of different cultivation

  13. Widespread distribution of archaeal reverse gyrase in thermophilic bacteria suggests a complex history of vertical inheritance and lateral gene transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Brochier-Armanet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse gyrase, an enzyme of uncertain funtion, is present in all hyperthermophilic archaea and bacteria. Previous phylogenetic studies have suggested that the gene for reverse gyrase has an archaeal origin and was transferred laterally (LGT to the ancestors of the two bacterial hyperthermophilic phyla, Thermotogales and Aquificales. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of the evolutionary history of reverse gyrase in light of genomic progress. We found genes coding for reverse gyrase in the genomes of several thermophilic bacteria that belong to phyla other than Aquificales and Thermotogales. Several of these bacteria are not, strictly speaking, hyperthermophiles because their reported optimal growth temperatures are below 80 °C. Furthermore, we detected a reverse gyrase gene in the sequence of the large plasmid of Thermus thermophilus strain HB8, suggesting a possible mechanism of transfer to the T. thermophilus strain HB8 involving plasmids and transposases. The archaeal part of the reverse gyrase tree is congruent with recent phylogenies of the archaeal domain based on ribosomal proteins or RNA polymerase subunits. Although poorly resolved, the complete reverse gyrase phylogeny suggests an ancient acquisition of the gene by bacteria via one or two LGT events, followed by its secondary distribution by LGT within bacteria. Finally, several genes of archaeal origin located in proximity to the reverse gyrase gene in bacterial genomes have bacterial homologues mostly in thermophiles or hyperthermophiles, raising the possibility that they were co-transferred with the reverse gyrase gene. Our new analysis of the reverse gyrase history strengthens the hypothesis that the acquisition of reverse gyrase may have been a crucial evolutionary step in the adaptation of bacteria to high-temperature environments. However, it also questions the role of this enzyme in thermophilic bacteria and the selective advantage its presence could provide.

  14. Quantitative and phylogenetic study of the Deep Sea Archaeal Group in sediments of the arctic mid-ocean spreading ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Leth eJørgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In marine sediments archaea often constitute a considerable part of the microbial community, of which the Deep Sea Archaeal Group (DSAG is one of the most predominant. Despite their high abundance no members from this archaeal group have so far been characterized and thus their metabolism is unknown. Here we show that the relative abundance of DSAG marker genes can be correlated with geochemical parameters, allowing prediction of both the potential electron donors and acceptors of these organisms. We estimated the abundance of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea, Bacteria and DSAG in 52 sediment horizons from two cores collected at the slow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge, using qPCR. The results indicate that members of the DSAG make up the entire archaeal population in certain horizons and constitute up to ~ 50% of the total microbial community. The quantitative data were correlated to 30 different geophysical and geochemical parameters obtained from the same sediment horizons. We observed a significant correlation between the relative abundance of DSAG 16S rRNA genes and the content of organic carbon (p < 0.0001. Further, significant co-variation with iron oxide, and dissolved iron and manganese (all p < 0.0000, indicated a direct or indirect link to iron and manganese cycling. Neither of these parameters correlated with the relative abundance of archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA genes, nor did any other major electron donor or acceptor measured. Phylogenetic analysis of DSAG 16S rRNA gene sequences reveals three monophyletic lineages with no apparent habitat-specific distribution. In this study we support the hypothesis that members of the DSAG are tightly linked to the content of organic carbon and directly or indirectly involved in the cycling of iron and/or manganese compounds. Further, we provide a molecular tool to assess their abundance in environmental samples and enrichment cultures.

  15. Revealing the essentiality of multiple archaeal pcna genes using a mutant propagation assay based on an improved knockout method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Changyi; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling;

    2010-01-01

    Organisms belonging to the Crenarchaeota lineage contain three PCNA subunits (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) while those in Euryarchaeota have only one as for Eukarya. To study the mechanism of archaeal sliding clamps, we sought to generate knockouts for each pcna gene in Sulfolobus islandic...... genes are absolutely required for host cell viability. Because the only prerequisite for this assay is to generate a MID transformant, this approach can be applied generally to any microorganisms proficient in homologous recombination....

  16. Identification and genomic analysis of transcription factors in archaeal genomes exemplifies their functional architecture and evolutionary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2010-06-01

    Archaea, which represent a large fraction of the phylogenetic diversity of organisms, are prokaryotes with eukaryote-like basal transcriptional machinery. This organization makes the study of their DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) and their transcriptional regulatory networks particularly interesting. In addition, there are limited experimental data regarding their TFs. In this work, 3,918 TFs were identified and exhaustively analyzed in 52 archaeal genomes. TFs represented less than 5% of the gene products in all the studied species comparable with the number of TFs identified in parasites or intracellular pathogenic bacteria, suggesting a deficit in this class of proteins. A total of 75 families were identified, of which HTH_3, AsnC, TrmB, and ArsR families were universally and abundantly identified in all the archaeal genomes. We found that archaeal TFs are significantly small compared with other protein-coding genes in archaea as well as bacterial TFs, suggesting that a large fraction of these small-sized TFs could supply the probable deficit of TFs in archaea, by possibly forming different combinations of monomers similar to that observed in eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. Our results show that although the DNA-binding domains of archaeal TFs are similar to bacteria, there is an underrepresentation of ligand-binding domains in smaller TFs, which suggests that protein-protein interactions may act as mediators of regulatory feedback, indicating a chimera of bacterial and eukaryotic TFs' functionality. The analysis presented here contributes to the understanding of the details of transcriptional apparatus in archaea and provides a framework for the analysis of regulatory networks in these organisms.

  17. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  18. Subcellular partitioning of metals in Aporrectodea caliginosa along a gradient of metal exposure in 31 field-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumelle, Léa [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Gimbert, Frédéric [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR 6249 University of Franche-Comté/CNRS Usc INRA, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Hedde, Mickaël [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France); Guérin, Annie [INRA, US 0010 LAS Laboratoire d' analyses des sols, 273 rue de Cambrai, 62000 Arras (France); Lamy, Isabelle, E-mail: lamy@versailles.inra.fr [INRA, UR 251 PESSAC, 78026 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Subcellular fractionation of metals in organisms was proposed as a better way to characterize metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the impact of a laboratory exposure to a wide range of field-metal contaminated soils on the subcellular partitioning of metals in the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Soils moderately contaminated were chosen to create a gradient of soil metal availability; covering ranges of both soil metal contents and of several soil parameters. Following exposure, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were determined both in total earthworm body and in three subcellular compartments: cytosolic, granular and debris fractions. Three distinct proxies of soil metal availability were investigated: CaCl{sub 2}-extractable content dissolved content predicted by a semi-mechanistic model and free ion concentration predicted by a geochemical speciation model. Subcellular partitionings of Cd and Pb were modified along the gradient of metal exposure, while stable Zn partitioning reflected regulation processes. Cd subcellular distribution responded more strongly to increasing soil Cd concentration than the total internal content, when Pb subcellular distribution and total internal content were similarly affected. Free ion concentrations were better descriptors of Cd and Pb subcellular distribution than CaCl{sub 2} extractable and dissolved metal concentrations. However, free ion concentrations and soil total metal contents were equivalent descriptors of the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Pb because they were highly correlated. Considering lowly contaminated soils, our results raise the question of the added value of three proxies of metal availability compared to soil total metal content in the assessment of metal bioavailability to earthworm. - Highlights: • Earthworms were exposed to a wide panel of historically contaminated soils • Subcellular partitioning of Cd, Pb and Zn was investigated in earthworms • Three proxies of soil metal availability were

  19. Binding of mescaline with subcellular fractions upon incubation of brain cortex slices with [14C] mescaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1977-01-01

    Incubation of brain cortex slices in the presence of glucose resulted in the permeation of about 65% of [14C] mescaline into slices. Of this, about one-third radioactivity was bound with nuclei, mitochondria, microsomes, and ribosomes. Dialysis of subcellular fractions did not markedly reduce the amounts of radioactivity bound to the fractions. The permeation into slices and the binding of mescaline to subcellular fractions were fairly time-dependent, but were inhibited by the presence of potassium cyanide, or by the absence of glucose and by heating to 80 degrees C for 1 min.

  20. Calculation of the relative metastabilities of proteins in subcellular compartments of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Jeffrey M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein subcellular localization and differences in oxidation state between subcellular compartments are two well-studied features of the the cellular organization of S. cerevisiae (yeast. Theories about the origin of subcellular organization are assisted by computational models that can integrate data from observations of compositional and chemical properties of the system. Presentation and implications of the hypothesis I adopt the hypothesis that the state of yeast subcellular organization is in a local energy minimum. This hypothesis implies that equilibrium thermodynamic models can yield predictions about the interdependence between populations of proteins and their subcellular chemical environments. Testing the hypothesis Three types of tests are proposed. First, there should be correlations between modeled and observed oxidation states for different compartments. Second, there should be a correspondence between the energy requirements of protein formation and the order the appearance of organelles during cellular development. Third, there should be correlations between the predicted and observed relative abundances of interacting proteins within compartments. Results The relative metastability fields of subcellular homologs of glutaredoxin and thioredoxin indicate a trend from less to more oxidizing as mitochondrion – cytoplasm – nucleus. Representing the overall amino acid compositions of proteins in 23 different compartments each with a single reference model protein suggests that the formation reactions for proteins in the vacuole (in relatively oxidizing conditions, ER and early Golgi (in relatively reducing conditions are relatively highly favored, while that for the microtubule is the most costly. The relative abundances of model proteins for each compartment inferred from experimental data were found in some cases to correlate with the predicted abundances, and both positive and negative correlations were

  1. Predicting gram-positive bacterial protein subcellular localization based on localization motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinxia; Li, Tonghua; Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Li, Dapeng; Chen, Guanyan; Cong, Peisheng

    2012-09-07

    The subcellular localization of proteins is closely related to their functions. In this work, we propose a novel approach based on localization motifs to improve the accuracy of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Our approach performed well on a five-fold cross validation with an overall success rate of 89.5%. Besides, the overall success rate of an independent testing dataset was 97.7%. Moreover, our approach was tested using a new experimentally-determined set of Gram-positive bacteria proteins and achieved an overall success rate of 96.3%.

  2. Protein subcellular localization prediction using multiple kernel learning based support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Al Mehedi; Ahmad, Shamim; Molla, Md Khademul Islam

    2017-03-28

    Predicting the subcellular locations of proteins can provide useful hints that reveal their functions, increase our understanding of the mechanisms of some diseases, and finally aid in the development of novel drugs. As the number of newly discovered proteins has been growing exponentially, which in turns, makes the subcellular localization prediction by purely laboratory tests prohibitively laborious and expensive. In this context, to tackle the challenges, computational methods are being developed as an alternative choice to aid biologists in selecting target proteins and designing related experiments. However, the success of protein subcellular localization prediction is still a complicated and challenging issue, particularly, when query proteins have multi-label characteristics, i.e., if they exist simultaneously in more than one subcellular location or if they move between two or more different subcellular locations. To date, to address this problem, several types of subcellular localization prediction methods with different levels of accuracy have been proposed. The support vector machine (SVM) has been employed to provide potential solutions to the protein subcellular localization prediction problem. However, the practicability of an SVM is affected by the challenges of selecting an appropriate kernel and selecting the parameters of the selected kernel. To address this difficulty, in this study, we aimed to develop an efficient multi-label protein subcellular localization prediction system, named as MKLoc, by introducing multiple kernel learning (MKL) based SVM. We evaluated MKLoc using a combined dataset containing 5447 single-localized proteins (originally published as part of the Höglund dataset) and 3056 multi-localized proteins (originally published as part of the DBMLoc set). Note that this dataset was used by Briesemeister et al. in their extensive comparison of multi-localization prediction systems. Finally, our experimental results indicate that

  3. Concentration of 17 Elements in Subcellular Fractions of Beef Heart Tissue Determined by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, P.O.

    1964-12-15

    Subcellular fractions of beef heart tissue are investigated, by means of neutron activation analysis, with respect to their concentration of 17 different elements. A recently developed ion-exchange technique combined with gamma spectrometry is used. The homogeneity of the subcellular fractions is examined electron microscopically. The following elements are determined: As, Ba, Br, Cas Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mo, P, Rb, Se, Sm, W and Zn. The determination of Ag, Au, Cd, Ce, Cr, Sb and Sc is omitted, in view of contamination. Reproducible and characteristic patterns of distribution are obtained for all elements studied.

  4. Simultaneous amplicon sequencing to explore co-occurrence patterns of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic microorganisms in rumen microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Seedorf, Henning; Walters, William A; Clemente, Jose C; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Janssen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Ruminants rely on a complex rumen microbial community to convert dietary plant material to energy-yielding products. Here we developed a method to simultaneously analyze the community's bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, ciliate 18S rRNA genes and anaerobic fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 genes using 12 DNA samples derived from 11 different rumen samples from three host species (Ovis aries, Bos taurus, Cervus elephas) and multiplex 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. We show that the mixing ratio of the group-specific DNA templates before emulsion PCR is crucial to compensate for differences in amplicon length. This method, in contrast to using a non-specific universal primer pair, avoids sequencing non-targeted DNA, such as plant- or endophyte-derived rRNA genes, and allows increased or decreased levels of community structure resolution for each microbial group as needed. Communities analyzed with different primers always grouped by sample origin rather than by the primers used. However, primer choice had a greater impact on apparent archaeal community structure than on bacterial community structure, and biases for certain methanogen groups were detected. Co-occurrence analysis of microbial taxa from all three domains of life suggested strong within- and between-domain correlations between different groups of microorganisms within the rumen. The approach used to simultaneously characterize bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic components of a microbiota should be applicable to other communities occupying diverse habitats.

  5. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Macur, Richard E; Jennings, Ryan deM; Boyd, Eric S; Spear, John R; Roberto, Francisco F

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH). These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high-temperature systems of YNP.

  6. Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Soderberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP, whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP, the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.

  7. Recognition of extremophilic archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells: a promising nanoplatform from the third domain of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Wu, Linping; Hall, Arnaldur; Papathanasiou, Pavlos; Peng, Xu; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-11-28

    Viruses from the third domain of life, Archaea, exhibit unusual features including extreme stability that allow their survival in harsh environments. In addition, these species have never been reported to integrate into human or any other eukaryotic genomes, and could thus serve for exploration of novel medical nanoplatforms. Here, we selected two archaeal viruses Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 (SMV1) and Sulfolobus spindle shaped virus 2 (SSV2) owing to their unique spindle shape, hyperthermostable and acid-resistant nature and studied their interaction with mammalian cells. Accordingly, we followed viral uptake, intracellular trafficking and cell viability in human endothelial cells of brain (hCMEC/D3 cells) and umbilical vein (HUVEC) origin. Whereas SMV1 is efficiently internalized into both types of human cells, SSV2 differentiates between HUVECs and hCMEC/D3 cells, thus opening a path for selective cell targeting. On internalization, both viruses localize to the lysosomal compartments. Neither SMV1, nor SSV2 induced any detrimental effect on cell morphology, plasma membrane and mitochondrial functionality. This is the first study demonstrating recognition of archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells which provides good basis for future exploration of archaeal viruses in bioengineering and development of multifunctional vectors.

  8. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenome sequence from high-temperature archaeal habitats demonstrate linkages between metabolic potential and geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP provide an unparalled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (~40-45 Mbase Sanger sequencing per site was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G+C content and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH. These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high temperature systems of YNP.

  9. Archaeal diversity and abundance within different layers of summer sea-ice and seawater from Prydz Bay, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jifei; DU Zongjun; LUO Wei; YU Yong; ZENG Yixin; CHEN Bo; LI Huirong

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses were used to determine the abundance and diversity of archaea in Prydz Bay, Antarctica. Correlation analysis was also performed to assess links between physicochemical parameters and archaeal abundance and diversity within the sea-ice. Samples of sea-ice and seawater were collected during the 26th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition. The results of FISH showed that archaea were relatively abundant within the top layer of the sea-ice, and correlation analysis suggested that the concentration of 4NH+ might be one of the main factors underlying this distribution pattern. However, using 16S rRNA gene libraries, archaea were not detected in the top and middle layers of the sea-ice. All archaeal clones obtained from the bottom layer of the sea-ice were grouped into the Marine Group I Crenarchaeota while the archaeal clones from seawater were assigned to Marine Group I Crenarchaeota, Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota. Overall, the ifndings of this study showed that the diversity of archaea in the sea-ice in Prydz Bay was low.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the archaeal community in an alkaline-saline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Neria-González, Isabel; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Enríquez-Aragón, J Arturo; Estrada-Alvarado, Isabel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Dendooven, Luc; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2008-03-01

    The soil of the former lake Texcoco is an extreme environment localized in the valley of Mexico City, Mexico. It is highly saline and alkaline, where Na+, Cl(-), HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) are the predominant ions, with a pH ranging from 9.8 to 11.7 and electrolytic conductivities in saturation extracts from 22 to 150 dS m(-1). Metagenomic DNA from the archaeal community was extracted directly from soil and used as template to amplify 16S ribosomal gene by PCR. PCR products were used to construct gene libraries. The ribosomal library showed that the archaeal diversity included Natronococcus sp., Natronolimnobius sp., Natronobacterium sp., Natrinema sp., Natronomonas sp., Halovivax sp., "Halalkalicoccus jeotgali" and novel clades within the family of Halobacteriaceae. Four clones could not be classified. It was found that the archaeal diversity in an alkaline-saline soil of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, was low, but showed yet uncharacterized and unclassified species.

  11. Monitoring bacterial and archaeal community shifts in a mesophilic anaerobic batch reactor treating a high-strength organic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2008-09-01

    Shifts in bacterial and archaeal communities, associated with changes in chemical profiles, were investigated in an anaerobic batch reactor treating dairy-processing wastewater prepared with whey permeate powder. The dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored by quantitative real-time PCR and showed good agreement with the process data. A rapid increase in bacterial populations and a high rate of substrate fermentation were observed during the initial period. Growth and regrowth of archaeal populations occurred with biphasic production of methane, corresponding to the diauxic consumption of acetate and propionate. Bacterial community structure was examined by denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes. An Aeromonas-like organism was suggested to be mainly responsible for the rapid fermentation of carbohydrate during the initial period. Several band sequences closely related to the Clostridium species, capable of carbohydrate fermentation, lactate or ethanol fermentation, and/or homoacetogenesis, were also detected. Statistical analyses of the DGGE profiles showed that the bacterial community structure, as well as the process performance, varied with the incubation time. Our results demonstrated that the bacterial community shifted, reflecting the performance changes and, particularly, that a significant community shift corresponded to a considerable process event. This suggested that the diagnosis of an anaerobic digestion process could be possible by monitoring bacterial community shifts.

  12. Structure of the archaeal pab87 peptidase reveals a novel self-compartmentalizing protease family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Delfosse

    Full Text Available Self-compartmentalizing proteases orchestrate protein turnover through an original architecture characterized by a central catalytic chamber. Here we report the first structure of an archaeal member of a new self-compartmentalizing protease family forming a cubic-shaped octamer with D(4 symmetry and referred to as CubicO. We solved the structure of the Pyrococcus abyssi Pab87 protein at 2.2 A resolution using the anomalous signal of the high-phasing-power lanthanide derivative Lu-HPDO3A. A 20 A wide channel runs through this supramolecular assembly of 0.4 MDa, giving access to a 60 A wide central chamber holding the eight active sites. Surprisingly, activity assays revealed that Pab87 degrades specifically d-amino acid containing peptides, which have never been observed in archaea. Genomic context of the Pab87 gene showed that it is surrounded by genes involved in the amino acid/peptide transport or metabolism. We propose that CubicO proteases are involved in the processing of d-peptides from environmental origins.

  13. Microbial Diversity Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Population in Present Day Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Maya C.

    2011-01-01

    Stromatolites are layered sedimentary structures resulting from microbial mat communities that remove carbon dioxide from their environment and biomineralize it as calcium carbonate. Although prevalent in the fossil record, stromatolites are rare in the modem world and are only found in a few locations including Highbome Cay in the Bahamas. The stromatolites found at this shallow marine site are analogs to ancient microbial mat ecosystems abundant in the Precambrian period on ancient Earth. To understand how stromatolites form and develop, it is important to identify what microorganisms are present in these mats, and how these microbes contribute to geological structure. These results will provide insight into the molecular and geochemical processes of microbial communities that prevailed on ancient Earth. Since stromatolites are formed by lithifying microbial mats that are able to mineralize calcium carbonate, understanding the biological mechanisms involved may lead to the development of carbon sequestration technologies that will be applicable in human spaceflight, as well as improve our understanding of global climate and its sustainability. The objective of my project was to analyze the archaeal and bacterial dIversity in stromatolites from Highborn Cay in the Bahamas. The first step in studying the molecular processes that the microorganisms carry out is to ascertain the microbial complexity within the mats, which includes identifying and estimating the numbers of different microbes that comprise these mats.

  14. Complete architecture of the archaeal RNA polymerase open complex from single-molecule FRET and NPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Julia; Grohmann, Dina; Cheung, Alan C. M.; Schulz, Sarah; Smollett, Katherine; Werner, Finn; Michaelis, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The molecular architecture of RNAP II-like transcription initiation complexes remains opaque due to its conformational flexibility and size. Here we report the three-dimensional architecture of the complete open complex (OC) composed of the promoter DNA, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), transcription factor B (TFB), transcription factor E (TFE) and the 12-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. By combining single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer and the Bayesian parameter estimation-based Nano-Positioning System analysis, we model the entire archaeal OC, which elucidates the path of the non-template DNA (ntDNA) strand and interaction sites of the transcription factors with the RNAP. Compared with models of the eukaryotic OC, the TATA DNA region with TBP and TFB is positioned closer to the surface of the RNAP, likely providing the mechanism by which DNA melting can occur in a minimal factor configuration, without the dedicated translocase/helicase encoding factor TFIIH.

  15. Comparative metagenomic and rRNA microbial diversity characterization using archaeal and bacterial synthetic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Migun; Quince, Christopher; Campbell, James H; Yang, Zamin K; Schadt, Christopher W; Podar, Mircea

    2013-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing has dramatically changed the landscape of microbial ecology, large-scale and in-depth diversity studies being now widely accessible. However, determining the accuracy of taxonomic and quantitative inferences and comparing results obtained with different approaches are complicated by incongruence of experimental and computational data types and also by lack of knowledge of the true ecological diversity. Here we used highly diverse bacterial and archaeal synthetic communities assembled from pure genomic DNAs to compare inferences from metagenomic and SSU rRNA amplicon sequencing. Both Illumina and 454 metagenomic data outperformed amplicon sequencing in quantifying the community composition, but the outcome was dependent on analysis parameters and platform. New approaches in processing and classifying amplicons can reconstruct the taxonomic composition of the community with high reproducibility within primer sets, but all tested primers sets lead to significant taxon-specific biases. Controlled synthetic communities assembled to broadly mimic the phylogenetic richness in target environments can provide important validation for fine-tuning experimental and computational parameters used to characterize natural communities.

  16. Plant nitrogen-use strategy as a driver of rhizosphere archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidiser abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thion, Cécile E; Poirel, Jessica D; Cornulier, Thomas; De Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D; Prosser, James I

    2016-07-01

    The influence of plants on archaeal (AOA) and bacterial (AOB) ammonia oxidisers (AO) is poorly understood. Higher microbial activity in the rhizosphere, including organic nitrogen (N) mineralisation, may stimulate both groups, while ammonia uptake by plants may favour AOA, considered to prefer lower ammonia concentration. We therefore hypothesised (i) higher AOA and AOB abundances in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and (ii) that AOA are favoured over AOB in the rhizosphere of plants with an exploitative strategy and high N demand, especially (iii) during early growth, when plant N uptake is higher. These hypotheses were tested by growing 20 grassland plants, covering a spectrum of resource-use strategies, and determining AOA and AOB amoA gene abundances, rhizosphere and bulk soil characteristics and plant functional traits. Joint Bayesian mixed models indicated no increase in AO in the rhizosphere, but revealed that AOA were more abundant in the rhizosphere of exploitative plants, mostly grasses, and less abundant under conservative plants. In contrast, AOB abundance in the rhizosphere and bulk soil depended on pH, rather than plant traits. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for plant-ammonia oxidiser interactions and for links between plant functional traits and ammonia oxidiser ecology.

  17. An archaeal immune system can detect multiple protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) to target invader DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susan; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stoll, Britta; Brendel, Jutta; Fischer, Eike; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2012-09-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system provides adaptive and heritable immunity against foreign genetic elements in most archaea and many bacteria. Although this system is widespread and diverse with many subtypes, only a few species have been investigated to elucidate the precise mechanisms for the defense of viruses or plasmids. Approximately 90% of all sequenced archaea encode CRISPR/Cas systems, but their molecular details have so far only been examined in three archaeal species: Sulfolobus solfataricus, Sulfolobus islandicus, and Pyrococcus furiosus. Here, we analyzed the CRISPR/Cas system of Haloferax volcanii using a plasmid-based invader assay. Haloferax encodes a type I-B CRISPR/Cas system with eight Cas proteins and three CRISPR loci for which the identity of protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) was unknown until now. We identified six different PAM sequences that are required upstream of the protospacer to permit target DNA recognition. This is only the second archaeon for which PAM sequences have been determined, and the first CRISPR group with such a high number of PAM sequences. Cells could survive the plasmid challenge if their CRISPR/Cas system was altered or defective, e.g. by deletion of the cas gene cassette. Experimental PAM data were supplemented with bioinformatics data on Haloferax and Haloquadratum.

  18. Archaeal populations in two distinct sedimentary facies of the subsurface of the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C; Ionescu, D; Ariztegui, D

    2014-10-01

    Archaeal metabolism was studied in aragonitic and gypsum facies of the Dead Sea subsurface using high-throughput DNA sequencing. We show that the communities are well adapted to the peculiar environment of the Dead Sea subsurface. They harbor the necessary genes to deal with osmotic pressure using high- and low-salt-in strategies, and to cope with unusually high concentrations of heavy metals. Methanogenesis was identified for the first time in the Dead Sea and appears to be an important metabolism in the aragonite sediment. Fermentation of residual organic matter, probably performed by some members of the Halobacteria class is common to both types of sediments. The latter group represents more than 95% of the taxonomically identifiable Archaea in the metagenome of the gypsum sediment. The potential for sulfur reduction has also been revealed and is associated in the sediment with EPS degradation and Fe-S mineralization as revealed by SEM imaging. Overall, we show that distinct communities of Archaea are associated with the two different facies of the Dead Sea, and are adapted to the harsh chemistry of its subsurface, in different ways.

  19. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal succession in the forefield of a receding glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Anita; Luster, Jörg; Göransson, Hans; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Brunner, Ivano; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Zeyer, Josef; Frey, Beat

    2012-04-01

    Glacier forefield chronosequences, initially composed of barren substrate after glacier retreat, are ideal locations to study primary microbial colonization and succession in a natural environment. We characterized the structure and composition of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities in exposed rock substrates along the Damma glacier forefield in central Switzerland. Soil samples were taken along the forefield from sites ranging from fine granite sand devoid of vegetation near the glacier terminus to well-developed soils covered with vegetation. The microbial communities were studied with genetic profiling (T-RFLP) and sequencing of clone libraries. According to the T-RFLP profiles, bacteria showed a high Shannon diversity index (H) (ranging from 2.3 to 3.4) with no trend along the forefield. The major bacterial lineages were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Cyanobacteria. An interesting finding was that Euryarchaeota were predominantly colonizing young soils and Crenarchaeota mainly mature soils. Fungi shifted from an Ascomycota-dominated community in young soils to a more Basidiomycota-dominated community in old soils. Redundancy analysis indicated that base saturation, pH, soil C and N contents and plant coverage, all related to soil age, correlated with the microbial succession along the forefield.

  20. Assembly of the Complex between Archaeal RNase P Proteins RPP30 and Pop5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L. Crowe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNase P is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein enzyme that represents a model complex for understanding macromolecular RNA-protein interactions. Archaeal RNase P consists of one RNA and up to five proteins (Pop5, RPP30, RPP21, RPP29, and RPP38/L7Ae. Four of these proteins function in pairs (Pop5-RPP30 and RPP21–RPP29. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to characterize the interaction between Pop5 and RPP30 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. NMR backbone resonance assignments of free RPP30 (25 kDa indicate that the protein is well structured in solution, with a secondary structure matching that observed in a closely related crystal structure. Chemical shift perturbations upon the addition of Pop5 (14 kDa reveal its binding surface on RPP30. ITC experiments confirm a net 1 : 1 stoichiometry for this tight protein-protein interaction and exhibit complex isotherms, indicative of higher-order binding. Indeed, light scattering and size exclusion chromatography data reveal the complex to exist as a 78 kDa heterotetramer with two copies each of Pop5 and RPP30. These results will inform future efforts to elucidate the functional role of the Pop5-RPP30 complex in RNase P assembly and catalysis.

  1. Archaeal and Bacterial Communities Associated with the Surface Mucus of Caribbean Corals Differ in Their Degree of Host Specificity and Community Turnover Over Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Pedro R; Roll, Katharina; Bergauer, Kristin; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the distribution of archaeal versus bacterial communities associated with the surface mucus layer of corals have rarely taken place. It has therefore remained enigmatic whether mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities exhibit a similar specificity towards coral hosts and whether they vary in the same fashion over spatial gradients and between reef locations. We used microbial community profiling (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, T-RFLP) and clone library sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to compare the diversity and community structure of dominant archaeal and bacterial communities associating with the mucus of three common reef-building coral species (Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Orbicella annularis) over different spatial scales on a Caribbean fringing reef. Sampling locations included three reef sites, three reef patches within each site and two depths. Reference sediment samples and ambient water were also taken for each of the 18 sampling locations resulting in a total of 239 samples. While only 41% of the bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) characterized by T-RFLP were shared between mucus and the ambient water or sediment, for archaeal OTUs this percentage was 2-fold higher (78%). About half of the mucus-associated OTUs (44% and 58% of bacterial and archaeal OTUs, respectively) were shared between the three coral species. Our multivariate statistical analysis (ANOSIM, PERMANOVA and CCA) showed that while the bacterial community composition was determined by habitat (mucus, sediment or seawater), host coral species, location and spatial distance, the archaeal community composition was solely determined by the habitat. This study highlights that mucus-associated archaeal and bacterial communities differ in their degree of community turnover over reefs and in their host-specificity.

  2. Subcellular Localization of Galloylated Catechins in Tea Plants (Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze Assessed via Immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan eXu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Galloylated catechins, as the main secondary metabolites in the tea plant, including (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (--epicatechin-3-gallate, comprise approximately three-quarters of all the tea plant catechins and have stronger effects than non-galloylated catechins, both on the product quality in tea processing and the pharmacological efficacy to human beings. The subcellular localization of galloylated catechins has been the primary focus of studies that assess biosynthesis and physiological functions. Classical histochemical localization staining reagents can not specifically detect galloylated catechins; thus, their subcellular localization remains controversial. In the present study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb against galloylated catechins, which can be used for the subcellular localization of galloylated catechins in the tea plant by immunohistochemistry. Direct ELISA and ForteBio Octet Red 96 System assay indicated the mAb could recognize the galloylated catechins with high specificities and affinities. In addition, tea bud was ascertained as the optimal tissue for freezing microtomic sections for immunohistochemistry. What’s more, the high quality mAbs which exhibited excellent binding capability to galloylated catechins were utilised for the visualization of them via immunohistochemistry. Our findings demonstrated that vacuoles were the primary sites of localization of galloylated catechins at the subcellular level.

  3. Subcellular Localization of Cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck Strain Bt-09

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Lintongan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth response curves of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck strain Bt-09 to sublethal concentrations of cadmium were evaluated. The growth responses of this microalgal isolate was determined through analysis of chlorophyll a levels. Cadmium was effectively taken up by the cells as determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (F-AAS. Subcellular fractionation was undertaken to locate sites that accumulate cadmium.

  4. Subcellular localization and mechanism of secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was examined in skeletal muscle of healthy humans. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from m.v. lateralis before and after a 2 h bout of cycling exercise. VEGF localization was conducted on preparations...

  5. Distribution and Characterization of Antigens Found in Subcellular Fractions of African Trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    development, the use of anti-FPM antibodies as a means of targeting liposome encapsulated trypanocidal drugs would seem to be an additional area worthy of...Diagnostics) either free (5) or complexed to 6- cyclodextrin (6,19). Relative fluorescence was then determined in the various subcellular fractions

  6. Subcellular location of the helper component-proteinase of Cowpea Aphid-Borne Mosaic Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.; Verver, J.; Sithole-Niang, I.; Gopinath, K.; Carette, J.; Kammen, van A.; Wellink, J.

    2002-01-01

    The helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) of Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) was expressed in Escherichia coli and used to obtain HC-Pro antiserum that was used as an analytical tool for HC-Pro studies. The antiserum was used in immunofluorescence assays to study the subcellular location of H

  7. Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    Optical bioimaging methods have a wide range of applications in the life sciences, most notably including the molecular resolution study of subcellular structures, small animal molecular imaging, and structural and functional clinical diagnostics of tissue layers and organs. We review fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent macroscopy, optical coherence tomography, optoacoustic tomography, and optical diffuse spectroscopy and tomography from the standpoint of physical fundamentals, applications, and progress.

  8. MultiLoc2: integrating phylogeny and Gene Ontology terms improves subcellular protein localization prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohlbacher Oliver

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of subcellular localization of proteins is crucial to proteomics, drug target discovery and systems biology since localization and biological function are highly correlated. In recent years, numerous computational prediction methods have been developed. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prediction methods that show more robustness and higher accuracy. Results We extended our previous MultiLoc predictor by incorporating phylogenetic profiles and Gene Ontology terms. Two different datasets were used for training the system, resulting in two versions of this high-accuracy prediction method. One version is specialized for globular proteins and predicts up to five localizations, whereas a second version covers all eleven main eukaryotic subcellular localizations. In a benchmark study with five localizations, MultiLoc2 performs considerably better than other methods for animal and plant proteins and comparably for fungal proteins. Furthermore, MultiLoc2 performs clearly better when using a second dataset that extends the benchmark study to all eleven main eukaryotic subcellular localizations. Conclusion MultiLoc2 is an extensive high-performance subcellular protein localization prediction system. By incorporating phylogenetic profiles and Gene Ontology terms MultiLoc2 yields higher accuracies compared to its previous version. Moreover, it outperforms other prediction systems in two benchmarks studies. MultiLoc2 is available as user-friendly and free web-service, available at: http://www-bs.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/Services/MultiLoc2.

  9. Substrates with patterned extracellular matrix and subcellular stiffness gradients reveal local biomechanical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-02-26

    A substrate fabrication process is developed to pattern both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and rigidity at sub-cellular spatial resolution. When growing cells on these substrates, it is found that cells respond locally in their cytoskeleton assembly. The presented method allows unique insight into the biological interpretation of mechanical signals, whereas photolithography-based fabrication is amenable to integration with complex microfabricated substructures.

  10. Determination of platinum in human subcellular microsamples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björn, Erik; Nygren, Yvonne; Nguyen, Tam T. T. N.

    2007-01-01

    A fast and robust method for the determination of platinum in human subcellular microsamples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was developed, characterized, and validated. Samples of isolated DNA and exosome fractions from human ovarian (2008) and melanoma (T289) cancer cell lines...

  11. A20 Functional Domains Regulate Subcellular Localization and NF-Kappa B Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    coined the term POLKADOTS or punctate and oligomeric killing or activating domains transducing signals to describe these structures (92...signalsome: Three decades of discovery. Cell Cycle 2011;10:2485-96. 94. Rudner DZ, Losick R. Protein Subcellular localization in bacteria . Cold

  12. Of switches and hourglasses: regulation of subcellular traffic in circadian clocks by phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Tataroğlu, Özgür; Schafmeier, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    A major aspect of molecular timekeeping is the daytime-specific nuclear accumulation of circadian clock proteins. The authors discuss recent insights into the regulation of subcellular shuttling and consider the importance of these cycles in regulating circadian period in different organisms.

  13. Different subcellular locations of secretome components of Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Girbe; Ridder, Anja N. J. A.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria contain different types of secretion systems for the transport of proteins into or across the cytoplasmic membrane. Recent studies on subcellular localization of specific components of these secretion systems and their substrates have shown that they can be present at various

  14. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  15. Research and teaching with the AFTOL SBD: an informatics resource for fungal subcellular and biochemical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun Kumar, T K; Blackwell, Meredith; Letcher, Peter M; Roberson, Robert W; McLaughlin, David J

    2013-12-01

    The Structural and Biochemical Database (SBD), developed as part of the US NSF-funded Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life (AFTOL), is a multi-investigator project. It is a major resource to present and manage morphological and biochemical information on Fungi and serves as a phyloinformatics tool for the scientific community. It also is an important resource for teaching mycology. The database, available at http://aftol.umn.edu, includes new and previously published subcellular data on Fungi, supplemented with images and literature links. Datasets automatically combined in NEXUS format from the site permit independent and combined (with molecular data) phylogenetic analyses. Character lists, a major feature of the site, serve as primary reference documents of subcellular and biochemical characters that distinguish taxa across the major fungal lineages. The character lists illustrated with images and drawings are informative for evolutionary and developmental biologists as well as educators, students and the public. Fungal Subcellular Ontology (FSO), developed as part of this effort is a primary initiative to provide a controlled vocabulary describing subcellular structures unique to Fungi. FSO establishes a full complement of terms that provide an operating ontological framework for the database. Examples are provided for using the database for teaching.

  16. X-ray fluorescence imaging reveals subcellular biometal disturbances in a childhood neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubman, A; James, S A; James, J; Duncan, C; Volitakis, I; Hickey, J L; Crouch, P J; Donnelly, P S; Kanninen, K M; Liddell, J R; Cotman, S L; de Jonge; White, A R

    2014-06-01

    Biometals such as zinc, iron, copper and calcium play key roles in diverse physiological processes in the brain, but can be toxic in excess. A hallmark of neurodegeneration is a failure of homeostatic mechanisms controlling the concentration and distribution of these elements, resulting in overload, deficiency or mislocalization. A major roadblock to understanding the impact of altered biometal homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease is the lack of rapid, specific and sensitive techniques capable of providing quantitative subcellular information on biometal homeostasis in situ. Recent advances in X-ray fluorescence detectors have provided an opportunity to rapidly measure biometal content at subcellular resolution in cell populations using X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM). We applied this approach to investigate subcellular biometal homeostasis in a cerebellar cell line isolated from a natural mouse model of a childhood neurodegenerative disorder, the CLN6 form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, commonly known as Batten disease. Despite no global changes to whole cell concentrations of zinc or calcium, XFM revealed significant subcellular mislocalization of these important biological second messengers in cerebellar Cln6(nclf) (CbCln6(nclf) ) cells. XFM revealed that nuclear-to-cytoplasmic trafficking of zinc was severely perturbed in diseased cells and the subcellular distribution of calcium was drastically altered in CbCln6(nclf) cells. Subtle differences in the zinc K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectra of control and CbCln6(nclf) cells suggested that impaired zinc homeostasis may be associated with an altered ligand set in CbCln6(nclf) cells. Importantly, a zinc-complex, Zn(II)(atsm), restored the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic zinc ratios in CbCln6(nclf) cells via nuclear zinc delivery, and restored the relationship between subcellular zinc and calcium levels to that observed in healthy control cells. Zn(II)(atsm) treatment also resulted in a

  17. Fast subcellular localization by cascaded fusion of signal-based and homology-based methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of proteins are closely related to their subcellular locations. In the post-genomics era, the amount of gene and protein data grows exponentially, which necessitates the prediction of subcellular localization by computational means. Results This paper proposes mitigating the computation burden of alignment-based approaches to subcellular localization prediction by a cascaded fusion of cleavage site prediction and profile alignment. Specifically, the informative segments of protein sequences are identified by a cleavage site predictor using the information in their N-terminal shorting signals. Then, the sequences are truncated at the cleavage site positions, and the shortened sequences are passed to PSI-BLAST for computing their profiles. Subcellular localization are subsequently predicted by a profile-to-profile alignment support-vector-machine (SVM classifier. To further reduce the training and recognition time of the classifier, the SVM classifier is replaced by a new kernel method based on the perturbational discriminant analysis (PDA. Conclusions Experimental results on a new dataset based on Swiss-Prot Release 57.5 show that the method can make use of the best property of signal- and homology-based approaches and can attain an accuracy comparable to that achieved by using full-length sequences. Analysis of profile-alignment score matrices suggest that both profile creation time and profile alignment time can be reduced without significant reduction in subcellular localization accuracy. It was found that PDA enjoys a short training time as compared to the conventional SVM. We advocate that the method will be important for biologists to conduct large-scale protein annotation or for bioinformaticians to perform preliminary investigations on new algorithms that involve pairwise alignments.

  18. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  19. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  20. Shifts of tundra bacterial and archaeal communities along a permafrost thaw gradient in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Gu, Yunfu; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Kai; Qin, Yujia; Yuan, Mengting; Yin, Huaqun; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Schuur, Edward A G; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the response of permafrost microbial communities to climate warming is crucial for evaluating ecosystem feedbacks to global change. This study investigated soil bacterial and archaeal communities by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons across a permafrost thaw gradient at different depths in Alaska with thaw progression for over three decades. Over 4.6 million passing 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from a total of 97 samples, corresponding to 61 known classes and 470 genera. Soil depth and the associated soil physical-chemical properties had predominant impacts on the diversity and composition of the microbial communities. Both richness and evenness of the microbial communities decreased with soil depth. Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Alpha- and Gamma-Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities in the upper horizon, whereas abundances of Bacteroidetes, Delta-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased towards deeper soils. Effects of thaw progression were absent in microbial communities in the near-surface organic soil, probably due to greater temperature variation. Thaw progression decreased the abundances of the majority of the associated taxa in the lower organic soil, but increased the abundances of those in the mineral soil, including groups potentially involved in recalcitrant C degradation (Actinomycetales, Chitinophaga, etc.). The changes in microbial communities may be related to altered soil C sources by thaw progression. Collectively, this study revealed different impacts of thaw in the organic and mineral horizons and suggests the importance of studying both the upper and deeper soils while evaluating microbial responses to permafrost thaw.

  1. Archaeal community diversity and abundance changes along a natural salinity gradient in estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Gordon; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Meng, Yiyu; Williams, Angharad S; Sass, Andrea M; Watkins, Andrew J; Parkes, R John; Weightman, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Archaea are widespread in marine sediments, but their occurrence and relationship with natural salinity gradients in estuarine sediments is not well understood. This study investigated the abundance and diversity of Archaea in sediments at three sites [Brightlingsea (BR), Alresford (AR) and Hythe (HY)] along the Colne Estuary, using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of 16S rRNA genes, DNA hybridization, Archaea 16S rRNA and mcrA gene phylogenetic analyses. Total archaeal 16S rRNA abundance in sediments were higher in the low-salinity brackish sediments from HY (2-8 × 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies cm(-3)) than the high-salinity marine sites from BR and AR (2 × 10(4)-2 × 10(7) and 4 × 10(6)-2 × 10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies cm(-3), respectively), although as a proportion of the total prokaryotes Archaea were higher at BR than at AR or HY. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the 'Bathyarchaeota' (MCG), Thaumarchaeota and methanogenic Euryarchaeota were the dominant groups of Archaea. The composition of Thaumarchaeota varied with salinity, as only 'marine' group I.1a was present in marine sediments (BR). Methanogen 16S rRNA genes from low-salinity sediments at HY were dominated by acetotrophic Methanosaeta and putatively hydrogentrophic Methanomicrobiales, whereas the marine site (BR) was dominated by mcrA genes belonging to methylotrophic Methanococcoides, versatile Methanosarcina and methanotrophic ANME-2a. Overall, the results indicate that salinity and associated factors play a role in controlling diversity and distribution of Archaea in estuarine sediments.

  2. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  3. Crystal structure of a novel archaeal AAA+ ATPase SSO1545 from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Rife, Christopher L.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; (Scripps); (SSR); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD)

    2009-08-28

    Signal transduction ATPases with numerous domains (STAND), a large class of P-loop NTPases, belong to AAA+ ATPases. They include AP(apoptotic)-ATPases (e.g., animal apoptosis regulators CED4/Apaf-1, plant disease resistance proteins, and bacterial AfsR-like transcription regulators), NACHT NTPases (e.g. CARD4, NAIP, Het-E-1, TLP1), and several other less well-characterized families. STAND differ from other P-loop NTPases by their unique sequence motifs, which include an hhGRExE (h, hydrophobic; x, any residue) motif at the N-terminal region, a GxP/GxxP motif at the C-terminal region of the NTPase domain, in addition to a C-terminal helical domain and additional domains such as WD40, TPR, LRR or catalytic modules. Despite significant biological interests, structural coverage of STAND proteins is very limited and only two other structures are currently known: the cell death regulators Apaf-1 and CED-4. Here, we report the crystal structure of SSO1545 from Sulfolobus solfataricus, which was determined using the semi-automated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG; http://www.jcsg.org), as part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). SSO1545 (NP-342973.1), a representative of the archaeal STANDs, is a member of Pfam PF01637 and encodes a protein of 356 residues with calculated molecular weight and isoelectric point of 41.7 kD and 8.2, respectively.

  4. Pyrosequencing-derived bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of spacecraft hardware destined for Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T; Vaishampayan, Parag; Nilsson, Henrik R; Torok, Tamas; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2012-08-01

    Spacecraft hardware and assembly cleanroom surfaces (233 m(2) in total) were sampled, total genomic DNA was extracted, hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria and archaea) and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (fungi) were subjected to 454 tag-encoded pyrosequencing PCR amplification, and 203,852 resulting high-quality sequences were analyzed. Bioinformatic analyses revealed correlations between operational taxonomic unit (OTU) abundance and certain sample characteristics, such as source (cleanroom floor, ground support equipment [GSE], or spacecraft hardware), cleaning regimen applied, and location about the facility or spacecraft. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) cleanroom floor and GSE surfaces gave rise to a larger number of diverse bacterial communities (619 OTU; 20 m(2)) than colocated spacecraft hardware (187 OTU; 162 m(2)). In contrast to the results of bacterial pyrosequencing, where at least some sequences were generated from each of the 31 sample sets examined, only 13 and 18 of these sample sets gave rise to archaeal and fungal sequences, respectively. As was the case for bacteria, the abundance of fungal OTU in the GSE surface samples dramatically diminished (9× less) once cleaning protocols had been applied. The presence of OTU representative of actinobacteria, deinococci, acidobacteria, firmicutes, and proteobacteria on spacecraft surfaces suggests that certain bacterial lineages persist even following rigorous quality control and cleaning practices. The majority of bacterial OTU observed as being recurrent belonged to actinobacteria and alphaproteobacteria, supporting the hypothesis that the measures of cleanliness exerted in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms (SAC) inadvertently select for the organisms which are the most fit to survive long journeys in space.

  5. Crystal structure of archaeal photolyase from Sulfolobus tokodaii with two FAD molecules: implication of a novel light-harvesting cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Numoto, Nobutaka; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Mizushima, Akira; Tsujimura, Masanari; Nakamura, Akira; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Miki, Kunio

    2007-01-26

    UV exposure of DNA molecules induces serious DNA lesions. The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase repairs CPD-type - lesions by using the energy of visible light. Two chromophores for different roles have been found in this enzyme family; one catalyzes the CPD repair reaction and the other works as an antenna pigment that harvests photon energy. The catalytic cofactor of all known photolyases is FAD, whereas several light-harvesting cofactors are found. Currently, 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF), 8-hydroxy-5-deaza-riboflavin (8-HDF) and FMN are the known light-harvesting cofactors, and some photolyases lack the chromophore. Three crystal structures of photolyases from Escherichia coli (Ec-photolyase), Anacystis nidulans (An-photolyase), and Thermus thermophilus (Tt-photolyase) have been determined; however, no archaeal photolyase structure is available. A similarity search of archaeal genomic data indicated the presence of a homologous gene, ST0889, on Sulfolobus tokodaii strain7. An enzymatic assay reveals that ST0889 encodes photolyase from S. tokodaii (St-photolyase). We have determined the crystal structure of the St-photolyase protein to confirm its structural features and to investigate the mechanism of the archaeal DNA repair system with light energy. The crystal structure of the St-photolyase is superimposed very well on the three known photolyases including the catalytic cofactor FAD. Surprisingly, another FAD molecule is found at the position of the light-harvesting cofactor. This second FAD molecule is well accommodated in the crystal structure, suggesting that FAD works as a novel light-harvesting cofactor of photolyase. In addition, two of the four CPD recognition residues in the crystal structure of An-photolyase are not found in St-photolyase, which might utilize a different mechanism to recognize the CPD from that of An-photolyase.

  6. Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Bowen De León

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5 hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C. The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44°C and 63°C springs and a hyperthermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

  7. Archaeal and bacterial communities in three alkaline hot springs in Heart Lake Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen De León, Kara; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Fields, Matthew W

    2013-01-01

    The Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB) is remotely located at the base of Mount Sheridan in southern Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA and is situated along Witch Creek and the northwestern shore of Heart Lake. Likely because of its location, little is known about the microbial community structure of springs in the HLGB. Bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored via small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene pyrosequencing over 3 years in 3 alkaline (pH 8.5) hot springs with varying temperatures (44°C, 63°C, 75°C). The bacterial populations were generally stable over time, but varied by temperature. The dominant bacterial community changed from moderately thermophilic and photosynthetic members (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) at 44°C to a mixed photosynthetic and thermophilic community (Deinococcus-Thermus) at 63°C and a non-photosynthetic thermophilic community at 75°C. The archaeal community was more variable across time and was predominantly a methanogenic community in the 44 and 63°C springs and a thermophilic community in the 75°C spring. The 75°C spring demonstrated large shifts in the archaeal populations and was predominantly Candidatus Nitrosocaldus, an ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote, in the 2007 sample, and almost exclusively Thermofilum or Candidatus Caldiarchaeum in the 2009 sample, depending on SSU rRNA gene region examined. The majority of sequences were dissimilar (≥10% different) to any known organisms suggesting that HLGB possesses numerous new phylogenetic groups that warrant cultivation efforts.

  8. Controls on bacterial and archaeal community structure and greenhouse gas production in natural, mined, and restored Canadian peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBasiliko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands are important global C reservoirs, largely because of their slow rates of microbial C mineralization. Particularly in sites that are heavily influenced by anthropogenic disturbances, there is scant information about microbial ecology and whether or not microbial community structure influences greenhouse gas production. This work characterized communities of bacteria and archaea using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and functional genes across eight natural, mined, or restored peatlands in two locations in eastern Canada. Correlations were explored among chemical properties of peat, bacterial and archaeal community structure, and carbon dioxide and methane production rates under oxic and anoxic conditions. Bacteria and archaea similar to those found in other peat soil environments were detected. In contrast to other reports, methanogen diversity was low in our study, with only 2 groups of known or suspected methanogens. Although mining and restoration affected substrate availability and microbial activity, these land-uses did not consistently affect bacterial or archaeal community composition. In fact, larger differences were observed between the two locations and between oxic and anoxic peat samples than between mined and restored sites, with anoxic samples characterized by less detectable bacterial diversity and stronger dominance by members of the phylum Acidobacteria. There were also no apparent strong linkages between prokaryote community structure and methane or carbon dioxide production, suggesting that different organisms exhibit functional redundancy and/or that the same taxa function at very different rates when exposed to different peat substrates. In contrast to other earlier work focusing on fungal communities across similar mined and restored peatlands, bacterial and archaeal communities appeared to be more resistant or resilient to peat substrate changes brought

  9. Archaeal and anaerobic methane oxidizer communities in the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Cold seeps, located along the Sonora Margin transform fault in the Guaymas Basin, were extensively explored during the 'BIG' cruise in June 2010. They present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To investigate this mostly unknown cold and hydrocarbon-rich environment, geochemical and microbiological surveys of the sediments underlying two microbial mats and a surrounding macrofaunal habitat were analyzed in detail. The geochemical measurements suggest biogenic methane production and local advective sulfate-rich fluxes in the sediments. The distributions of archaeal communities, particularly those involved in the methane cycle, were investigated at different depths (surface to 18 cm below the sea floor (cmbsf)) using complementary molecular approaches, such as Automated method of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), 16S rRNA libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction with new specific primer sets targeting methanogenic and anaerobic methanotrophic lineages. Molecular results indicate that metabolically active archaeal communities were dominated by known clades of anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-1, -2 and -3), including a novel 'ANME-2c Sonora' lineage. ANME-2c were found to be dominant, metabolically active and physically associated with syntrophic Bacteria in sulfate-rich shallow sediment layers. In contrast, ANME-1 were more prevalent in the deepest sediment samples and presented a versatile behavior in terms of syntrophic association, depending on the sulfate concentration. ANME-3 were concentrated in small aggregates without bacterial partners in a restricted sediment horizon below the first centimetres. These niche specificities and syntrophic behaviors, depending on biological surface assemblages and environmental availability of electron donors, acceptors and carbon substrates, suggest that ANME could support

  10. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, A.; Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Marsh, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H2, 5.4 nM; CH4, 2.70 ??M) with concentrations of S2- (0.03 mM), SO42- (14.8 mM), Ca2+ (15.7 mM), and HCO3- (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anita; Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W; Marsh, Terence L

    2009-08-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H(2), 5.4 nM; CH(4), 2.70 microM) with concentrations of S(2-) (0.03 mM), SO(4)(2-) (14.8 mM), Ca(2+) (15.7 mM), and HCO(3)(-) (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments.

  12. A sensitive, support-vector-machine method for the detection of horizontal gene transfers in viral, archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In earlier work, we introduced and discussed a generalized computational framework for identifying horizontal transfers. This framework relied on a gene's nucleotide composition, obviated the need for knowledge of codon boundaries and database searches, and was shown to perform very well across a wide range of archaeal and bacterial genomes when compared with previously published approaches, such as Codon Adaptation Index and C + G content. Nonetheless, two considerations remained outstanding: we wanted to further increase the sensitivity of detecting horizontal transfers and also to be able to apply the method to increasingly smaller genomes. In the discussion that follows, we present such a method, Wn-SVM, and show that it exhibits a very significant improvement in sensitivity compared with earlier approaches. Wn-SVM uses a one-class support-vector machine and can learn using rather small training sets. This property makes Wn-SVM particularly suitable for studying small-size genomes, similar to those of viruses, as well as the typically larger archaeal and bacterial genomes. We show experimentally that the new method results in a superior performance across a wide range of organisms and that it improves even upon our own earlier method by an average of 10% across all examined genomes. As a small-genome case study, we analyze the genome of the human cytomegalovirus and demonstrate that Wn-SVM correctly identifies regions that are known to be conserved and prototypical of all beta-herpesvirinae, regions that are known to have been acquired horizontally from the human host and, finally, regions that had not up to now been suspected to be horizontally transferred. Atypical region predictions for many eukaryotic viruses, including the alpha-, beta- and gamma-herpesvirinae, and 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, have been made available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT_SVM/.

  13. Predicting the subcellular location of apoptosis proteins based on recurrence quantification analysis and the Hilbert-Huang transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Guo-Sheng; Yu Zu-Guo; Anh Vo

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis proteins play an important role in the development and homeostasis of an organism.The elucidation of the subcellular locations and functions of these proteins is helpful for understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death.In this paper,the recurrent quantification analysis,Hilbert-Huang transform methods,the maximum relevance and minimum redundancy method and support vector machine are used to predict the subcellular location of apoptosis proteins.The validation of the jackknife test suggests that the proposed method can improve the prediction accuracy of the subcellular location of apoptosis proteins and its application may be promising in other fields.

  14. Rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of dairy cows in response to ingestion of lauric or myristic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; Callaway, T R; Lee, C; Dowd, S E

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this experiment, part of a larger study, was to investigate changes in rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity in cows fed medium-chain saturated fatty acids. In the main study, 6 lactating dairy cows were dosed intraruminally with 240 g/(cow · d) of stearic (SA, control), lauric (LA), or myristic (MA) acid in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design trial. Experimental periods were 28 d, and cows were transfaunated between periods. Lauric acid decreased protozoal counts in the rumen by 96% compared with SA and MA (compared with SA, MA had no effect on ruminal protozoa). Whole ruminal contents samples were collected 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 18, and 24 h after the morning feeding on d 23 of each experimental period, stored frozen, and later composited by cow and period for microbial profile analyses, which involved tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing to provide diversity analyses of gastrointestinal bacterial, archaeal, and fungal populations of the cattle. The LA treatment, either directly or through its effect on protozoa, had a profound effect on the microbial ecology of the rumen. Ruminal populations of Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Enterorhabdus were decreased (P = 0.04 to P < 0.001) by more than 2-fold in LA treatments compared with SA, and Clostridium populations were decreased (P = 0.01) in LA- compared with MA-treated cows. The proportion of Ruminococcus was not affected by treatment, although the LA treatment had the least proportion of Ruminococcus. Proportions of Eubacterium, Butyrivibrio, Olsenella, and Lactobacillus genera were increased (P = 0.03 to 0.01) by LA compared with MA or SA. The LA treatment, possibly through its effect on protozoa physically associated with archaea, resulted in an increase (P = 0.01) in the archaeal methanogenic genus Methanosphaera and a decrease (P = 0.01) in Methanobrevibacter. Few changes in fungal populations caused by treatment were detected. Collectively, results indicate that LA

  15. The archaeal “7 kDa DNA-binding” proteins: extended characterization of an old gifted family

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Kalichuk; Ghislaine Béhar; Axelle Renodon-Cornière; Georgi Danovski; Gonzalo Obal; Jacques Barbet; Barbara Mouratou; Frédéric Pecorari

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The " 7 kDa DNA-binding " family, also known as the Sul7d family, is composed of chromatin proteins from the Sulfolobales archaeal order. Among them, Sac7d and Sso7d have been the focus of several studies with some characterization of their properties. Here, we studied eleven other proteins alongside Sac7d and Sso7d under the same conditions. The dissociation constants of the purified proteins for binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were determined in phosphate-buff...

  16. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  17. Subcellular Imaging of Voltage and Calcium Signals Reveals Neural Processing In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Helen H; St-Pierre, François; Sun, Xulu; Ding, Xiaozhe; Lin, Michael Z; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2016-06-30

    A mechanistic understanding of neural computation requires determining how information is processed as it passes through neurons and across synapses. However, it has been challenging to measure membrane potential changes in axons and dendrites in vivo. We use in vivo, two-photon imaging of novel genetically encoded voltage indicators, as well as calcium imaging, to measure sensory stimulus-evoked signals in the Drosophila visual system with subcellular resolution. Across synapses, we find major transformations in the kinetics, amplitude, and sign of voltage responses to light. We also describe distinct relationships between voltage and calcium signals in different neuronal compartments, a substrate for local computation. Finally, we demonstrate that ON and OFF selectivity, a key feature of visual processing across species, emerges through the transformation of membrane potential into intracellular calcium concentration. By imaging voltage and calcium signals to map information flow with subcellular resolution, we illuminate where and how critical computations arise.

  18. Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong tolerance mechanisms to Cadmium: subcellular distribution, chemical forms and thiol pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Bosen; Xie, Xiangyu; Weiss, Dominik J; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Yan, Chongling

    2012-11-01

    In order to explore the detoxification mechanisms adopted by mangrove under cadmium (Cd) stress, we investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd, in addition to the change of the thiol pools in Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong, which were cultivated in sandy culture medium treated with sequential Cd solution. We found that Cd addition caused a proportional increase of Cd in the organs of K. obovata. The investigation of subcellular distribution verified that most of the Cd was localized in the cell wall, and the lowest was in the membrane. Results showed sodium chloride and acetic acid extractable Cd fractions were dominant. The contents of non-protein thiol compounds, Glutathione and phytochelatins in K. obovata were enhanced by the increasing strength of Cd treatment. Therefore, K. obovata can be defined as Cd tolerant plant, which base on cell wall compartmentalization, as well as protein and organic acids combination.

  19. Fast Fourier Transform-based Support Vector Machine for Subcellular Localization Prediction Using Different Substitution Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There are approximately 109 proteins in a cell. A hotspot in bioinformatics is how to identify a protein's subcellular localization, if its sequence is known. In this paper, a method using fast Fourier transform-based support vector machine is developed to predict the subcellular localization of proteins from their physicochemical properties and structural parameters. The prediction accuracies reached 83% in prokaryotic organisms and 84% in eukaryotic organisms with the substitution model of the c-p-v matrix (c, composition; p, polarity; and v, molecular volume). The overall prediction accuracy was also evaluated using the "leave-one-out" jackknife procedure. The influence of the substitution model on prediction accuracy has also been discussed in the work. The source code of the new program is available on request from the authors.

  20. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  1. Molecular Determinants Responsible for the Subcellular Localization of HSV-1 UL4 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-wei Pan; Jing Long; Jun-ji Xing; Chun-fu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    The function of the herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1)UL4 protein is still elusive. Our objective is to investigate the subcellular transport mechanism of the UL4 protein. In this study,fluorescence microscopy was employed to investigate the subcellular localization of UL4 and characterize the transport mechanism in living cells. By constructing a series of deletion mutants fused with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein(EYFP),the nuclear export signals(NES)of UL4 were for the first time mapped to amino acid residues 178 to 186. In addition,the N-terminal 19 amino acids are identified to be required for the granule-like cytoplasmic pattern of UL4.Furthermore,the UL4 protein was demonstrated to be exported to the cytoplasm through the NES in a chromosomal region maintenance 1(CRM l)-dependent manner involving RanGTP hydrolysis.

  2. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  3. Precise Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer via Subcellular Dynamic Tracing of Dual-loaded Upconversion Nanophotosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yulei; Li, Xiaodan; Zhang, Li; Xia, Lu; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Cuixia; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Xue, Bin; Zhao, Huiying; Zhang, Hong; Kong, Xianggui

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in upconversion nanophotosensitizers (UCNPs-PS) excited by near-infrared (NIR) light have led to substantial progress in improving photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. For a successful PDT, subcellular organelles are promising therapeutic targets for reaching a satisfactory efficacy. It is of vital importance for these nanophotosensitizers to reach specifically the organelles and to perform PDT with precise time control. To do so, we have in this work traced the dynamic subcellular distribution, especially in organelles such as lysosomes and mitochondria, of the poly(allylamine)-modified and dual-loaded nanophotosensitizers. The apoptosis of the cancer cells induced by PDT with the dependence of the distribution status of the nanophotosensitizers in organelles was obtained, which has provided an in-depth picture of intracellular trafficking of organelle-targeted nanophotosensitizers. Our results shall facilitate the improvement of nanotechnology assisted photodynamic therapy of cancers. PMID:28361967

  4. Decision making at a subcellular level determines the outcome of bacteriophage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lanying; Skinner, Samuel O; Zong, Chenghang; Sippy, Jean; Feiss, Michael; Golding, Ido

    2010-05-14

    When the process of cell-fate determination is examined at single-cell resolution, it is often observed that individual cells undergo different fates even when subject to identical conditions. This "noisy" phenotype is usually attributed to the inherent stochasticity of chemical reactions in the cell. Here we demonstrate how the observed single-cell heterogeneity can be explained by a cascade of decisions occurring at the subcellular level. We follow the postinfection decision in bacteriophage lambda at single-virus resolution, and show that a choice between lysis and lysogeny is first made at the level of the individual virus. The decisions by all viruses infecting a single cell are then integrated in a precise (noise-free) way, such that only a unanimous vote by all viruses leads to the establishment of lysogeny. By detecting and integrating over the subcellular "hidden variables," we are able to predict the level of noise measured at the single-cell level.

  5. Subcellular Localization of Galloylated Catechins in Tea Plants [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] Assessed via Immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huanhuan; Wang, Ya; Chen, Yana; Zhang, Pan; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Yewei; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Galloylated catechins, as the main secondary metabolites in the tea plant, including (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, comprise approximately three-quarters of all the tea plant catechins and have stronger effects than non-galloylated catechins, both on the product quality in tea processing and the pharmacological efficacy to human beings. The subcellular localization of galloylated catechins has been the primary focus of studies that assess biosynthesis and physio...

  6. Subcellular localization of the Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, J.; Jallepalli, P; Gabuzda, D H

    1994-01-01

    The Vif (viral infectivity factor) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been shown to dramatically enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virus particles during virus production. The subcellular localization of Vif was examined to elucidate cellular pathways which may be important for Vif function. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of Vif demonstrated a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution and showed that most Vif was not associated with the Golgi complex, a proposed site of lo...

  7. PlantLoc: an accurate web server for predicting plant protein subcellular localization by substantiality motif

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Shengnan; Li, Tonghua; Cong, Peisheng; Xiong, Wenwei; Wang, Zhiheng; Sun, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of subcellular localizations (SCLs) of plant proteins relates to their functions and aids in understanding the regulation of biological processes at the cellular level. We present PlantLoc, a highly accurate and fast webserver for predicting the multi-label SCLs of plant proteins. The PlantLoc server has two innovative characters: building localization motif libraries by a recursive method without alignment and Gene Ontology information; and establishing simple architecture for rapi...

  8. Accumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in marine phytoplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yun [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-10-15

    We examined the accumulation, subcellular distribution, and toxicity of Hg(II) and MeHg in three marine phytoplankton (the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, the green alga Chlorella autotrophica, and the flagellate Isochrysis galbana). For MeHg, the inter-species toxic difference could be best interpreted by the total cellular or intracellular accumulation. For Hg(II), both I. galbana and T. pseudonana exhibited similar sensitivity, but they each accumulated a different level of Hg(II). A higher percentage of Hg(II) was bound to the cellular debris fraction in T. pseudonana than in I. galbana, implying that the cellular debris may play an important role in Hg(II) detoxification. Furthermore, heat-stable proteins were a major binding pool for MeHg, while the cellular debris was an important binding pool for Hg(II). Elucidating the different subcellular fates of Hg(II) and MeHg may help us understand their toxicity in marine phytoplankton at the bottom of aquatic food chains. - Highlights: > The inter-species toxic difference of methylmercury in marine phytoplankton can be explained by its total cellular or intracellular accumulation. > The inter-species toxic difference of inorganic mercury in marine phytoplankton can be explained by its subcellular distribution. > Heat-stable protein was a major binding pool for MeHg, while the cellular debris was an important binding pool for Hg(II). - The inter-species difference in methylmercury and inorganic mercury toxicity in phytoplankton can be explained by cellular accumulation and subcellular distribution.

  9. Regulation of mammalian microRNA processing and function by cellular signaling and subcellular localization

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    For many microRNAs, in many normal tissues and in cancer cells, the cellular levels of mature microRNAs are not simply determined by transcription of microRNA genes. This mini-review will discuss how microRNA biogenesis and function can be regulated by various nuclear and cytoplasmic processing events, including emerging evidence that microRNA pathway components can be selectively regulated by control of their subcellular localization and by modifications that occur during dynamic cellular si...

  10. A novel chloroplastic isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase gene from Jatropha curcas: Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Lei; Yin, Li; Hu,Xiaole; Xu, Ying; Chen,Fang

    2014-01-01

    Background Jatropha curcas is a rich reservoir of pharmaceutically active terpenoids. More than 25 terpenoids have been isolated from this plant, and their activities are anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-cancer, insecticidal, rodenticidal, cytotoxic and molluscicidal. But not much is known about the pathway involved in the biosynthesis of terpenoids. The present investigation describes the cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IPI) gene ...

  11. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Srijana Upadhyay; Xinping Xu; David Lowry; Jennifer C. Jackson; Robert W. Roberson; Xiaorong Lin

    2016-01-01

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs, and how it is deposited as extracellular granules, remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are ...

  12. PhosphoregDB: The tissue and sub-cellular distribution of mammalian protein kinases and phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Harukazu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases and protein phosphatases are the fundamental components of phosphorylation dependent protein regulatory systems. We have created a database for the protein kinase-like and phosphatase-like loci of mouse http://phosphoreg.imb.uq.edu.au that integrates protein sequence, interaction, classification and pathway information with the results of a systematic screen of their sub-cellular localization and tissue specific expression data mined from the GNF tissue atlas of mouse. Results The database lets users query where a specific kinase or phosphatase is expressed at both the tissue and sub-cellular levels. Similarly the interface allows the user to query by tissue, pathway or sub-cellular localization, to reveal which components are co-expressed or co-localized. A review of their expression reveals 30% of these components are detected in all tissues tested while 70% show some level of tissue restriction. Hierarchical clustering of the expression data reveals that expression of these genes can be used to separate the samples into tissues of related lineage, including 3 larger clusters of nervous tissue, developing embryo and cells of the immune system. By overlaying the expression, sub-cellular localization and classification data we examine correlations between class, specificity and tissue restriction and show that tyrosine kinases are more generally expressed in fewer tissues than serine/threonine kinases. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that cell type specific systems exist to regulate protein phosphorylation and that for accurate modelling and for determination of enzyme substrate relationships the co-location of components needs to be considered.

  13. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  14. Cellular and Subcellular Immunohistochemical Localization and Quantification of Cadmium Ions in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Gao; Tiegui Nan; Guiyu Tan; Hongwei Zhao; Weiming Tan; Fanyun Meng; Zhaohu Li; Li, Qing X.; Baomin Wang

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of metallic ions in plant tissues is associated with their toxicity and is important for understanding mechanisms of toxicity tolerance. A quantitative histochemical method can help advance knowledge of cellular and subcellular localization and distribution of heavy metals in plant tissues. An immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging method for cadmium ions (Cd2+) was developed for the first time for the wheat Triticum aestivum grown in Cd2+-fortified soils. Also, 1-(4-Isothiocyanob...

  15. Cdc2/cyclin B1 regulates centrosomal Nlp proteolysis and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuelian; Jin, Shunqian; Song, Yongmei; Zhan, Qimin

    2010-11-01

    The formation of proper mitotic spindles is required for appropriate chromosome segregation during cell division. Aberrant spindle formation often causes aneuploidy and results in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanism of regulating spindle formation and chromosome separation remains to be further defined. Centrosomal Nlp (ninein-like protein) is a recently characterized BRCA1-regulated centrosomal protein and plays an important role in centrosome maturation and spindle formation. In this study, we show that Nlp can be phosphorylated by cell cycle protein kinase Cdc2/cyclin B1. The phosphorylation sites of Nlp are mapped at Ser185 and Ser589. Interestingly, the Cdc2/cyclin B1 phosphorylation site Ser185 of Nlp is required for its recognition by PLK1, which enable Nlp depart from centrosomes to allow the establishment of a mitotic scaffold at the onset of mitosis . PLK1 fails to dissociate the Nlp mutant lacking Ser185 from centrosome, suggesting that Cdc2/cyclin B1 might serve as a primary kinase of PLK1 in regulating Nlp subcellular localization. However, the phosphorylation at the site Ser589 by Cdc2/cyclin B1 plays an important role in Nlp protein stability probably due to its effect on protein degradation. Furthermore, we show that deregulated expression or subcellular localization of Nlp lead to multinuclei in cells, indicating that scheduled levels of Nlp and proper subcellular localization of Nlp are critical for successful completion of normal cell mitosis, These findings demonstrate that Cdc2/cyclin B1 is a key regulator in maintaining appropriate degradation and subcellular localization of Nlp, providing novel insights into understanding on the role of Cdc2/cyclin B1 in mitotic progression.

  16. Hydrophobic profiles of the tail anchors in SLMAP dictate subcellular targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Maysoon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tail anchored (TA membrane proteins target subcellular structures via a C-terminal transmembrane domain and serve prominent roles in membrane fusion and vesicle transport. Sarcolemmal Membrane Associated Protein (SLMAP possesses two alternatively spliced tail anchors (TA1 or TA2 but their specificity of subcellular targeting remains unknown. Results TA1 or TA2 can direct SLMAP to reticular structures including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, whilst TA2 directs SLMAP additionally to the mitochondria. Despite the general structural similarity of SLMAP to other vesicle trafficking proteins, we found no evidence for its localization with the vesicle transport machinery or a role in vesicle transport. The predicted transmembrane region of TA2 is flanked on either side by a positively charged amino acid and is itself less hydrophobic than the transmembrane helix present in TA1. Substitution of the positively charged amino acids, in the regions flanking the transmembrane helix of TA2, with leucine did not alter its subcellular targeting. The targeting of SLMAP to the mitochondria was dependent on the hydrophobic nature of TA2 since targeting of SLMAP-TA2 was prevented by the substitution of leucine (L for moderately hydrophobic amino acid residues within the transmembrane region. The SLMAP-TA2-4L mutant had a hydrophobic profile that was comparable to that of SLMAP-TA1 and had identical targeting properties to SLMAP-TA1. Conclusion Thus the overall hydrophobicity of the two alternatively spliced TAs in SLMAP determines its subcellular targeting and TA2 predominantly directs SLMAP to the mitochondira where it may serve roles in the function of this organelle.

  17. ngLOC: software and web server for predicting protein subcellular localization in prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Brian R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding protein subcellular localization is a necessary component toward understanding the overall function of a protein. Numerous computational methods have been published over the past decade, with varying degrees of success. Despite the large number of published methods in this area, only a small fraction of them are available for researchers to use in their own studies. Of those that are available, many are limited by predicting only a small number of organelles in the cell. Additionally, the majority of methods predict only a single location for a sequence, even though it is known that a large fraction of the proteins in eukaryotic species shuttle between locations to carry out their function. Findings We present a software package and a web server for predicting the subcellular localization of protein sequences based on the ngLOC method. ngLOC is an n-gram-based Bayesian classifier that predicts subcellular localization of proteins both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The overall prediction accuracy varies from 89.8% to 91.4% across species. This program can predict 11 distinct locations each in plant and animal species. ngLOC also predicts 4 and 5 distinct locations on gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial datasets, respectively. Conclusions ngLOC is a generic method that can be trained by data from a variety of species or classes for predicting protein subcellular localization. The standalone software is freely available for academic use under GNU GPL, and the ngLOC web server is also accessible at http://ngloc.unmc.edu.

  18. Influences of calcium silicate on chemical forms and subcellular distribution of cadmium in Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Wu, Jingtao; Shen, Yong; Li, Yingwen; Zou, Bi; Tang, Yetao; Zhuang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in grain amaranths (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Cv. ‘K112’) grown in a Cd contaminated soil. Results showed that the dry weight and the photosynthetic pigments contents in grain amaranths increased significantly with the increasing doses of CS treatments, with the highest value found for the treatment of CS3 (1.65 g/kg). Compared with the control, application of CS4 (3.31 g/kg) significantly reduced Cd concentrations in the roots, stems and leaves of grain amaranths by 68%, 87% and 89%, respectively. At subcellular level, CS treatment resulted in redistribution of Cd, higher percentages of Cd in the chloroplast and soluble fractions in leaves of grain amaranths were found, while lower proportions of Cd were located at the cell wall of the leaves. The application of CS enhanced the proportions of pectate and protein integrated forms of Cd and decreased the percentages of water soluble Cd potentially associated with toxicity in grain amaranths. Changes of free Cd ions into inactive forms sequestered in subcellular compartments may indicate an important mechanism of CS for alleviating Cd toxicity and accumulation in plants.

  19. Asymmetric subcellular distribution of glucose transporters in the endothelium of small contractile arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, N; Scriven, D R L; Moore, E D W

    2006-01-01

    The authors have recently reported the presence and asymmetric distribution of the glucose transporters GLUT-1 to -5 and SGLT-1 in the endothelium of rat coronary artery (Gaudreault et al. 2004, Diabetologica, 47, 2081-2092). In the present study the authors investigate and compare the presence and subcellular distribution of the classic glucose transporter isoforms in endothelial cells of cerebral, renal, and mesenteric arteries. The GLUTs and SGLT-1 were examined with immunohistochemistry and wide-field fluorescence microscopy coupled to deconvolution in en face preparation of intact artery. We identified GLUT-1 to -5 and SGLT-1 in the endothelial cells of all three vascular beds. The relative level of expression for each isoform was found comparable amongst arteries. Clusters of the glucose transporter isoforms were found at a high density in proximity to the cell-to-cell junctions. In addition, a consistent asymmetric distribution of GLUT-1 to -5 was found, predominantly located on the abluminal side of the endothelium in all three vascular beds examined (ranging from 68% to 91%, p<.05). The authors conclude that the expression and subcellular distribution of glucose transporters are similar in endothelial cells from vascular beds of comparable diameter and suggest that their subcellular organization may facilitate transendothelial transport of glucose in small contractile arteries.

  20. A workflow for mathematical modeling of subcellular metabolic pathways in leaf metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eNägele

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade genome sequencing has experienced a rapid technological development resulting in numerous sequencing projects and applications in life science. In plant molecular biology, the availability of sequence data on whole genomes has enabled the reconstruction of metabolic networks. Enzymatic reactions are predicted by the sequence information. Pathways arise due to the participation of chemical compounds as substrates and products in these reactions. Although several of these comprehensive networks have been reconstructed for the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the integration of experimental data is still challenging. Particularly the analysis of subcellular organization of plant cells limits the understanding of regulatory instances in these metabolic networks in vivo. In this study, we develop an approach for the functional integration of experimental high-throughput data into such large-scale networks. We present a subcellular metabolic network model comprising 524 metabolic intermediates and 548 metabolic interactions derived from a total of 2769 reactions. We demonstrate how to link the metabolite covariance matrix of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions with the subcellular metabolic network model for the inverse calculation of the biochemical Jacobian, finally resulting in the calculation of a matrix which satisfies a Lyaponov equation involving a covariance matrix. In this way, differential strategies of metabolite compartmentation and involved reactions were identified in the accessions when exposed to low temperature.

  1. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  2. Parasites modify sub-cellular partitioning of metals in the gut of fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyoo-Okoth, Elijah, E-mail: elijaoyoo2009@gmail.com [Division of Environmental Health, School of Environmental Studies, Moi University, P.O. Box 3900, Eldoret (Kenya); Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 9424/1090 GE (Netherlands); Admiraal, Wim [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 9424/1090 GE (Netherlands); Osano, Odipo [Division of Environmental Health, School of Environmental Studies, Moi University, P.O. Box 3900, Eldoret (Kenya); Kraak, Michiel H.S. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 9424/1090 GE (Netherlands); Gichuki, John; Ogwai, Caleb [Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, P.O. Box 1881, Kisumu (Kenya)

    2012-01-15

    Infestation of fish by parasites may influence metal accumulation patterns in the host. However, the subcellular mechanisms of these processes have rarely been studied. Therefore, this study determined how a cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) partitioned four metals (Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) in the subcellular fractions of the gut in presence of an endoparasite (Ligula intestinalis). The fish were sampled along four sites in Lake Victoria, Kenya differing in metal contamination. Accumulation of Cd, Cr and Zn was higher in the whole body and in the gut of parasitized fish compared to non-parasitized fish, while Cu was depleted in parasitized fish. Generally, for both non-parasitized and parasitized fish, Cd, Cr and Zn partitioned in the cytosolic fractions and Cu in the particulate fraction. Metal concentrations in organelles within the particulate fractions of the non-parasitized fish were statistically similar except for Cd in the lysosome, while in the parasitized fish, Cd, Cr and Zn were accumulated more by the lysosome and microsomes. In the cytosolic fractions, the non-parasitized fish accumulated Cd, Cr and Zn in the heat stable proteins (HSP), while in the parasitized fish the metals were accumulated in the heat denatured proteins (HDP). On the contrary, Cu accumulated in the HSP in parasitized fish. The present study revealed specific binding of metals to potentially sensitive sub-cellular fractions in fish in the presence of parasites, suggesting interference with metal detoxification, and potentially affecting the health status of fish hosts in Lake Victoria.

  3. Inducible control of subcellular RNA localization using a synthetic protein-RNA aptamer interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Belmont

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating in support of the functional importance of subcellular RNA localization in diverse biological contexts. In different cell types, distinct RNA localization patterns are frequently observed, and the available data indicate that this is achieved through a series of highly coordinated events. Classically, cis-elements within the RNA to be localized are recognized by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs, which then direct specific localization of a target RNA. Until now, the precise control of the spatiotemporal parameters inherent to regulating RNA localization has not been experimentally possible. Here, we demonstrate the development and use of a chemically-inducible RNA-protein interaction to regulate subcellular RNA localization. Our system is composed primarily of two parts: (i the Tet Repressor protein (TetR genetically fused to proteins natively involved in localizing endogenous transcripts; and (ii a target transcript containing genetically encoded TetR-binding RNA aptamers. TetR-fusion protein binding to the target RNA and subsequent localization of the latter are directly regulated by doxycycline. Using this platform, we demonstrate that enhanced and controlled subcellular localization of engineered transcripts are achievable. We also analyze rules for forward engineering this RNA localization system in an effort to facilitate its straightforward application to studying RNA localization more generally.

  4. Birth and rapid subcellular adaptation of a hominoid-specific CDC14 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Rosso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication was prevalent during hominoid evolution, yet little is known about the functional fate of new ape gene copies. We characterized the CDC14B cell cycle gene and the functional evolution of its hominoid-specific daughter gene, CDC14Bretro. We found that CDC14B encodes four different splice isoforms that show different subcellular localizations (nucleus or microtubule-associated and functional properties. A microtubular CDC14B variant spawned CDC14Bretro through retroposition in the hominoid ancestor 18-25 million years ago (Mya. CDC14Bretro evolved brain-/testis-specific expression after the duplication event and experienced a short period of intense positive selection in the African ape ancestor 7-12 Mya. Using resurrected ancestral protein variants, we demonstrate that by virtue of amino acid substitutions in distinct protein regions during this time, the subcellular localization of CDC14Bretro progressively shifted from the association with microtubules (stabilizing them to an association with the endoplasmic reticulum. CDC14Bretro evolution represents a paradigm example of rapid, selectively driven subcellular relocalization, thus revealing a novel mode for the emergence of new gene function.

  5. Subcellular localization of class I histone deacetylases in the developing Xenopus tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12 remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  6. Predicting the Subcellular Localization of Human Proteins Using Machine Learning and Exploratory Data Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George K. Acquaah-Mensah; Sonia M. Leach; Chittibabu Guda

    2006-01-01

    Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is particularly helpful in the functional annotation of gene products. In this study, we use Machine Learning and Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) techniques to examine and characterize amino acid sequences of human proteins localized in nine cellular compartments. A dataset of 3,749 protein sequences representing human proteins was extracted from the SWISS-PROT database. Feature vectors were created to capture specific amino acid sequence characteristics. Relative to a Support Vector Machine, a Multi-layer Perceptron, and a Naive Bayes classifier, the C4.5 Decision Tree algorithm was the most consistent performer across all nine compartments in reliably predicting the subcellular localization of proteins based on their amino acid sequences (average Precision=0.88; average Sensitivity=0.86). Furthermore, EDA graphics characterized essential features of proteins in each compartment. As examples,proteins localized to the plasma membrane had higher proportions of hydrophobic amino acids; cytoplasmic proteins had higher proportions of neutral amino acids;and mitochondrial proteins had higher proportions of neutral amino acids and lower proportions of polar amino acids. These data showed that the C4.5 classifier and EDA tools can be effective for characterizing and predicting the subcellular localization of human proteins based on their amino acid sequences.

  7. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  8. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin A; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C; Streit, Wolfgang R; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  9. Combined monitoring of changes in delta13CH4 and archaeal community structure during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xian; Mazéas, Laurent; Vavilin, Vasily A; Epissard, Jonathan; Lemunier, Mélanie; Mouchel, Jean-Marie; He, Pin-jing; Bouchez, Théodore

    2009-05-01

    Reconstituted municipal solid waste (MSW) with varying contents of putrescible and cellulosic waste was incubated anaerobically under mesophilic conditions. Standard physicochemical parameters were monitored, together with stable isotopic signatures of produced CH(4) and CO(2). delta(13)C values for CH(4) indicated a change of methanogenic metabolism with time. CH(4) was predominantly produced from H(2)/CO(2) at the beginning of the incubations. This period was associated with important shifts in archaeal communities monitored by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and FISH of oligonucleotidic probes targeting specifically 16S rRNA gene of various methanogenic groups. The onset of the active methane generation phase was characterized by an increase of CH(4)delta(13)C, indicating a progressive shift toward an aceticlastic metabolism. When the methane production levelled off, a decrease in the isotopic signature was observed toward values characteristics of hydrogenotrophic metabolism. ARISA profiles were, however, found to be stable from the beginning of the active methane generation phase until the end of the experiment. FISH observation indicated that members of the family Methanosarcinaceae were predominant in the archaeal community during this period, suggesting that these methanogens might exhibit a high metabolic versatility during methanization of waste.

  10. Dark matter in archaeal genomes: a rich source of novel mobile elements, defense systems and secretory complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David; Krupovic, Mart; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-09-01

    Microbial genomes encompass a sizable fraction of poorly characterized, narrowly spread fast-evolving genes. Using sensitive methods for sequences comparison and protein structure prediction, we performed a detailed comparative analysis of clusters of such genes, which we denote "dark matter islands", in archaeal genomes. The dark matter islands comprise up to 20% of archaeal genomes and show remarkable heterogeneity and diversity. Nevertheless, three classes of entities are common in these genomic loci: (a) integrated viral genomes and other mobile elements; (b) defense systems, and (c) secretory and other membrane-associated systems. The dark matter islands in the genome of thermophiles and mesophiles show similar general trends of gene content, but thermophiles are substantially enriched in predicted membrane proteins whereas mesophiles have a greater proportion of recognizable mobile elements. Based on this analysis, we predict the existence of several novel groups of viruses and mobile elements, previously unnoticed variants of CRISPR-Cas immune systems, and new secretory systems that might be involved in stress response, intermicrobial conflicts and biogenesis of novel, uncharacterized membrane structures.

  11. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), bot...... for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.......The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both...... encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U...

  12. Subcellular tension fields and mechanical resistance of the lamella front related to the direction of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereiter-Hahn, J; Lüers, H

    1998-01-01

    Keratocytes derived from the epidermis of aquatic vertebrates are now widely used for investigation of the mechanism of cell locomotion. One of the main topics under discussion is the question of driving force development and concomitantly subcellular force distribution. Do cells move by actin polymerization-driven extension of the lamella, or is the lamella edge extended at regions of weakness by a flow of cytoplasm generated by hydrostatic pressure? Thus, elasticity changes were followed and the stiffness of the leading front of the lamella was manipulated by local application of phalloidin and cytochalasin D (CD). In scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), elasticity is revealed from the propagation velocity of longitudinal sound waves (1 GHz). The lateral resolution of SAM is in the micrometer range. Using this method, subcellular tension fields with different stiffnesses (elasticity) can be determined. A typical pattern of subcellular stiffness distribution is related to the direction of migration. Cells forced to change their direction of movement by exposure to DC electric fields of varying polarity alter their pattern of subcellular stiffness in relationship to the new direction. The cells spread into the direction of low stiffness and retract at zones of high stiffness. The pattern of subcellular stiffness distribution reveals force distribution in migrating cells; i.e., if a cell moves exactly in a direction perpendicular to its long axis, then the contractile forces are largest along the long axis and decrease toward the short axis. Locomotion in any angle oblique to this axis requires an asymmetric stiffness distribution. Inhibition of actomyosin contractions by La3+ (2 mM), which inhibits Ca2+ influx, reduces cytoplasmic stiffness accompanied by an immediate cessation of locomotion and a change of cell shape. Local release of CD in front of a progressing lamella activates a cell to follow the CD gradient: The lamella thickens locally and is extended toward

  13. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two hot springs from geothermal regions in Bulgaria as demostrated by 16S rRNA and GH-57 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Katerina; Tomova, Iva; Tomova, Anna; Radchenkova, Nadja; Atanassov, Ivan; Kambourova, Margarita

    2015-12-01

    Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two Bulgarian hot springs, geographically separated with different tectonic origin and different temperature of water was investigated exploring two genes, 16S rRNA and GH-57. Archaeal diversity was significantly higher in the hotter spring Levunovo (LV) (82°C); on the contrary, bacterial diversity was higher in the spring Vetren Dol (VD) (68°C). The analyzed clones from LV library were referred to twenty eight different sequence types belonging to five archaeal groups from Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. A domination of two groups was observed, Candidate Thaumarchaeota and Methanosarcinales. The majority of the clones from VD were referred to HWCG (Hot Water Crenarchaeotic Group). The formation of a group of thermophiles in the order Methanosarcinales was suggested. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high numbers of novel sequences, more than one third of archaeal and half of the bacterial phylotypes displayed similarity lower than 97% with known ones. The retrieved GH-57 gene sequences showed a complex phylogenic distribution. The main part of the retrieved homologous GH-57 sequences affiliated with bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes, Deltaproteobacteria, Candidate Saccharibacteria and affiliation of almost half of the analyzed sequences is not fully resolved. GH-57 gene analysis allows an increased resolution of the biodiversity assessment and in depth analysis of specific taxonomic groups. [Int Microbiol 18(4):217-223 (2015)].

  14. [Archaeal diversity in permafrost deposits of Bunger Hills Oasis and King George Island (Antarctica) according to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaevskaia, E S; Demchenko, L S; Demidov, N É; Rivkina, E M; Bulat, S A; Gilichinskiĭ, D A

    2014-01-01

    Archaeal communities of permafrost deposits of King George Island and Bunger Hills Oasis (Antarctica) differing in the content of biogenic methane were analyzed using clone libraries of two 16S rRNA gene regions. Phylotypes belonging to methanogenic archaea were identified in all horizons.

  15. Comparison of Fecal Methanogenic Archaeal Community Between Erhualian and Landrace Pigs Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Y.; Smidt, H.; Zhu, W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Erhualian and Landrace breeds are typical genetically obese and lean pigs, respectively. To compare the fecal methanogenic Archaeal community between these two pig breeds, fecal samples from different growth phase pigs were collected and used for PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) wi

  16. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panyakaew, P.; Boon, N.; Goel, G.; Yuangklang, C.; Schonewille, J.T.; Hendriks, W.H.; Fievez, V.

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on rum

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of archaeal 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase genes from tropical estuarine sediments on the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.; Verma, P.; Ramaiah, N; Anil, A; Shouche, Y.S.

    Phylogenetic diversity analyses of archaeal 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (AamoA) genes were carried out on sediment samples from the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries, Goa, on the central west coast of India. The 16S rRNA gene libraries...

  18. Segregated Planktonic and Bottom-Dwelling Archaeal Communities in High-Temperature Acidic/Sulfuric Ponds of the Tatun Volcano Group, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Wen Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal environments are characterized by dynamic redox and temperature fluctuations inherited from the exposure of deeply-sourced, hot, reducing fluids to low-temperature, oxidizing ambient environments. To investigate whether microbial assemblages shifted in response to the changes of a redox state within acidic hot ponds, we collected three paired water and sediment samples from the Tatun Volcano Group, assessed metabolic roles of community members, and correlated their functional capabilities with geochemical factors along depth. Molecular analyses revealed that Sulfolobus spp., Acidianus spp. and Vulcanisaeta spp. capable of respiring elemental sulfur under oxic and/or low-oxygen conditions were the major archaeal members in planktonic communities. In contrast, obligate anaerobic Caldisphaera spp. dominated over others in bottom-dwelling communities. Bacteria were only detected in one locality wherein the majority was affiliated with microaerophilic Hydrogenobaculum spp. Cluster analyses indicated that archaeal communities associated with sediments tended to cluster together and branch off those with water. In addition, the quantities of dissolved oxygen within the water column were substantially less than those in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen, indicating a net oxygen consumption most likely catalyzed by microbial processes. These lines of evidence suggest that the segregation of planktonic from bottom-dwelling archaeal assemblages could be accounted for by the oxygen affinities inherited in individual archaeal members. Community assemblages in geothermal ecosystems would be often underrepresented without cautious sampling of both water and sediments.

  19. Comparative analysis of fecal DNA extraction methods with phylogenetic microarray: Effective recovery of bacterial and archaeal DNA using mechanical cell lysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Nikkilä, J.; Jalanka-Tuovinen, J.; Immonen, O.; Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Kekkonen, R.A.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Several different protocols are used for fecal DNA extraction, which is an integral step in all phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches to characterize the highly diverse intestinal ecosystem. We compared four widely used methods, and found their DNA yields to vary up to 35-fold. Bacterial, archaeal

  20. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (<0.05mM), while vacuoles at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM). Moreover, the concentrations and proportions of Cd in inorganic and water-soluble form also reduced by AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice.

  1. Subcellular Accumulation of Cadmium in Corn and Wheat Plants at Different Levels of Phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; ZHENGSHAOJIAN; 等

    1999-01-01

    Corn and wheat plants were grown in a nutrient culture solution at four levels of phosphorus (0,0.12,0.60 and 3.0mmol L-1) and two levels of cadmium(0 and 4.0umol L-1) in greenhouse for a 18-day period.The concentrations of phosphorus and cadmium in cell wall,cytoplasm and vacuoles of roots and leaves were examined by cell fractionation techniques.With increasing phosphorus in medium,the contents of P in cell wall,cytoplasm and vacuoles of corn and wheat roots and leaves increased.The highest content of P was observed in cell wall,next in vacuoles,and the lowest in cytoplasm.The wheat subcellular fractions in both roots and leaves hab higher concentrations of phosphorus than those of corn.Increasing phosphorus in medium significantly inhibited the intracellular Cd accumulation in both species,However,at P concentration up to 3.0mmol L-1,the Cd content in cell wall was increased.Increasing phosphorus resulted in reduction of the subcellular Cd content in cell wall was increased.Increasing phosphorus resulted in reduction of the subcellualr Cd content in corn and wheat leaves.Compared with corn,the wheat roots had a higher Cd content in the cell wall and vacuoles and a lower in cytoplasm,while in leaf subcellular fractions the wheat cell had a higher Cd content in its vacuoles and a lower one in its cytoplasm,The results indicate that phosphorus may be involved in sequestration of Cd ionic activity in both cell wall and vaculoes by forming insoluble Cd phosphate.

  2. Linking sub-cellular biomarkers to embryo aberrations in the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutgard, Martin; Furuhagen, Sara

    2016-04-01

    To adequately assess and monitor environmental status in the aquatic environment a broad approach is needed that integrates physical variables, chemical analyses and biological effects at different levels of the biological organization. Embryo aberrations in the Baltic Sea key species Monoporeia affinis can be induced by both metals and organic substances as well as by hypoxia, increasing temperatures and malnutrition. This amphipod has therefore been used for more than three decades as a biological effect indicator in monitoring and assessment of chemical pollution and environmental stress. However, little is known about the sub-cellular mechanisms underlying embryo aberrations. An improved mechanistic understanding may open up the possibility of including sub-cellular alterations as sensitive warning signals of stress-induced embryo aberrations. In the present study, M. affinis was exposed in microcosms to 4 different sediments from the Baltic Sea. After 88-95 days of exposure, survival and fecundity were determined as well as the frequency and type of embryo aberrations. Moreover, oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) was assayed as a proxy for antioxidant defense, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level as a measure of lipid peroxidation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as an indicator of neurotoxicity. The results show that AChE and ORAC can be linked to the frequency of malformed embryos and arrested embryo development. The occurrence of dead broods was significantly associated with elevated TBARS levels. It can be concluded that these sub-cellular biomarkers are indicative of effects that could affect Darwinian fitness and that oxidative stress is a likely mechanism in the development of aberrant embryos in M. affinis.

  3. Cellular and Subcellular Immunohistochemical Localization and Quantification of Cadmium Ions in Wheat (Triticum aestivum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available The distribution of metallic ions in plant tissues is associated with their toxicity and is important for understanding mechanisms of toxicity tolerance. A quantitative histochemical method can help advance knowledge of cellular and subcellular localization and distribution of heavy metals in plant tissues. An immunohistochemical (IHC imaging method for cadmium ions (Cd2+ was developed for the first time for the wheat Triticum aestivum grown in Cd2+-fortified soils. Also, 1-(4-Isothiocyanobenzyl-ethylenediamine-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (ITCB-EDTA was used to chelate the mobile Cd2+. The ITCB-EDTA/Cd2+ complex was fixed with proteins in situ via the isothiocyano group. A new Cd2+-EDTA specific monoclonal antibody, 4F3B6D9A1, was used to locate the Cd2+-EDTA protein complex. After staining, the fluorescence intensities of sections of Cd2+-positive roots were compared with those of Cd2+-negative roots under a laser confocal scanning microscope, and the location of colloidal gold particles was determined with a transmission electron microscope. The results enable quantification of the Cd2+ content in plant tissues and illustrate Cd2+ translocation and cellular and subcellular responses of T. aestivum to Cd2+ stress. Compared to the conventional metal-S coprecipitation histochemical method, this new IHC method is quantitative, more specific and has less background interference. The subcellular location of Cd2+ was also confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The IHC method is suitable for locating and quantifying Cd2+ in plant tissues and can be extended to other heavy metallic ions.

  4. Clinical significance of subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and metastatic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Guo; Masatoshi Makuuchi; Wei Tang; Yoshinori Inagaki; Yutaka Midorikawa; Norihiro Kokudo; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Munehiro Nakata; Toshiro Konishi; Hirokazu Nagawa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin and its clinicopathological significance in colorectal carcinoma as well as metastatic lymph node and liver tissues.METHODS: Colorectal carcinoma tissues as well as metastatic lymph node and liver tissues were collected from 82 patients who underwent colorectomy or hepatectomy. Tissues were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using KL-6 antibody.RESULTS: Of the 82 colorectal carcinoma patients, 6showed no staining, 29 showed positive staining only in the apical membrane, and 47 showed positive staining in the circumferential membrane and/or cytoplasm.Positive staining was not observed in non-cancerous colorectal epithelial cells surrounding the tumor tissues.The five-year survival rate was significantly lower in cases showing positive staining in the circumferential membrane and/or cytoplasm (63.0%) than those showing positive staining only in the apical membrane (85.7%) and those showing no staining (100%).Statistical analysis between clinicopathological factors and subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin showed that KL-6 localization in the circumferential membrane and/or cytoplasm was significantly associated with the presence of venous invasion (P=0.0003), lymphatic invasion (P<0.0001), lymph node metastasis (P<0.0001),liver metastasis (P=0.058), and advanced histological stage (P<0.0001). Positive staining was observed in all metastatic lesions tested as well as in the primary colorectal carcinoma tissues.CONCLUSION: The subcellular staining pattern of KL-6 in colorectal adenocarcinoma may be an important indicator for unfavorable behaviors such as lymph node and liver metastasis, as well as for the prognosis of patients.

  5. Effect heat stress on subcellular localization of Ca2+ in tomato fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Garbaczewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to compare the fruit cell ultrastructure and subcellular localization of Ca2+ after heat stress with the use of the potassium antimonate method (Slocum and Roux 1982, Tretyn et al. 1992. The tomato plants Robin cv., relatively tolerant to heat stress, were grown under uncontrolled greenhouse conditions to the stage of fruiting. The plants were placed for 20h in two temperature regimes: 23oC (optimal temperature or 40oC (heat stress in darkness, under water vapour saturated atmosphere. Immediately after heat stress the fruits were harvested to estimate water soluble and insoluble calcium contents and subcellular localization of Ca2+. After heating the concentration of calcium in tomato fruits increased about twice. In both temperature treatments the water soluble fractions were lower than insoluble ones at smaller differences between insoluble and soluble fractions after heat stress. The shapes and localization of Ca2+ detected with the use of potassium antimonate method show that in fruits of control plants the precipitates were numerous, small and of oval shape. They were dispersed in cytosol or adjoined to endoplasmic reticulum or to external membrane of chloroplast. In the fruit of heated plants the precipitates were irregular in shape, amorphous and singly dispersed in the cytosol. We observed also some cytological changes in the structure of membranes and organelles of the plants of both experimental treatments. The heat induced increase of calcium content and the changes in subcellular localization of Ca2+ under heat stress suggest that calcium ions may be involved in avoiding heat injury. The problem requires more detailed further investigations.

  6. Brain glycogen – new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linea Frimodt Obel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g. liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies – it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e. synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on i the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP, ii alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and iii a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g. turnover is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology.

  7. Cellular and Subcellular Immunohistochemical Localization and Quantification of Cadmium Ions in Wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Nan, Tiegui; Tan, Guiyu; Zhao, Hongwei; Tan, Weiming; Meng, Fanyun; Li, Zhaohu; Li, Qing X; Wang, Baomin

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of metallic ions in plant tissues is associated with their toxicity and is important for understanding mechanisms of toxicity tolerance. A quantitative histochemical method can help advance knowledge of cellular and subcellular localization and distribution of heavy metals in plant tissues. An immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging method for cadmium ions (Cd2+) was developed for the first time for the wheat Triticum aestivum grown in Cd2+-fortified soils. Also, 1-(4-Isothiocyanobenzyl)-ethylenediamine-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (ITCB-EDTA) was used to chelate the mobile Cd2+. The ITCB-EDTA/Cd2+ complex was fixed with proteins in situ via the isothiocyano group. A new Cd2+-EDTA specific monoclonal antibody, 4F3B6D9A1, was used to locate the Cd2+-EDTA protein complex. After staining, the fluorescence intensities of sections of Cd2+-positive roots were compared with those of Cd2+-negative roots under a laser confocal scanning microscope, and the location of colloidal gold particles was determined with a transmission electron microscope. The results enable quantification of the Cd2+ content in plant tissues and illustrate Cd2+ translocation and cellular and subcellular responses of T. aestivum to Cd2+ stress. Compared to the conventional metal-S coprecipitation histochemical method, this new IHC method is quantitative, more specific and has less background interference. The subcellular location of Cd2+ was also confirmed with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The IHC method is suitable for locating and quantifying Cd2+ in plant tissues and can be extended to other heavy metallic ions.

  8. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.......4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and....../or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed...

  9. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus;

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high......-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.......4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and...

  10. Mapping the Microscale Origins of MRI Contrast with Subcellular NV Diamond Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Hunter C; Bhatnagar, Aadyot; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Barry, John F; Glenn, David R; Walsworth, Ronald L; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used biomedical imaging modality that derives much of its contrast from microscale magnetic field gradients in biological tissues. However, the connection between these sub-voxel field patterns and MRI contrast has not been studied experimentally. Here, we describe a new method to map subcellular magnetic fields in mammalian cells and tissues using nitrogen vacancy diamond magnetometry and connect these maps to voxel-scale MRI contrast, providing insights for in vivo imaging and contrast agent design.

  11. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Subhash [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Snee Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: sc40@cornell.edu

    2008-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O{sub 2}{sup +}) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of {sup 19}(H{sub 3}O){sup +}. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K{sup +} and Na{sup +} in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K

  12. Subcellular Compartmentation of the 4-Aminobutyrate Shunt in Protoplasts from Developing Soybean Cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreuz, K. E.; Shelp, B. J.

    1995-05-01

    The subcellular localization of enzymes involved in the 4-ami-nobutyrate shunt was investigated in protoplasts prepared from developing soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv Maple Arrow] cotyledons. Protoplast lysate was fractionated by differential and continuous Percoll-gradient centrifugation to separate organelle fractions. Glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was found exclusively in the cytosol, whereas 4-aminobutyrate:pyruvate transami-nase (EC 2.6.1.19) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.16) were associated exclusively with the mitochondrial fractions. Mitochondrial fractions also catabolized [U-14C]4-aminobu-tyrate to labeled succinate.

  13. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate;

    2012-01-01

    ,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals...... that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle...

  14. Subcellular localization of YKL-40 in normal and malignant epithelial cells of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roslind, A.; Balslev, E.; Kruse, H.

    2008-01-01

    . YKL-40 protein expression was redistributed in carcinoma versus normal glandular tissue of the breast. A reduced expression of YKL-40 in relation to intermediate filaments and desmosomes was found in tumor cells. Changes in YKL-40 expression suggest that the function of YKL-40 in cells of epithelial......YKL-40 is a new prognostic biomarker in cancer. The biological function is only poorly understood. This study aimed at determining the subcellular localization of YKL-40, using immunogold labeling, in normal epithelial cells and in malignant tumor cells of the breast by immunoelectron microscopy...

  15. Ubiquitous distribution and different subcellular localization of sorbitol dehydrogenase in fruit and leaf of apple

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    NAD+-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (NAD-SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), a key enzyme in sorbitol metabolism, plays an important role in regulating sink strength and determining the quality of apple fruit. Understanding the tissue and subcellular localization of NAD-SDH is helpful for understanding sorbitol metabolism in the apple. In this study, two NAD-SDH cDNA sequences were isolated from apple fruits (Malus domestica Borkh cv. Starkrimson) and named MdSDH5 and MdSDH6. Immunohistochemical analysis re...

  16. A signal separation technique for sub-cellular imaging using dynamic optical coherence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Habib; Shi, Cong

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at imaging the dynamics of metabolic activity of cells. Using dynamic optical coherence tomography, we introduce a new multi-particle dynamical model to simulate the movements of the collagen and the cell metabolic activity and develop an efficient signal separation technique for sub-cellular imaging. We perform a singular-value decomposition of the dynamic optical images to isolate the intensity of the metabolic activity. We prove that the largest eigenvalue of the associated Casorati matrix corresponds to the collagen. We present several numerical simulations to illustrate and validate our approach.

  17. Archaeal diversity and the extent of iron and manganese pyritization in sediments from a tropical mangrove creek (Cardoso Island, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, X. L.; Lucheta, A. R.; Ferreira, T. O.; Huerta-Díaz, M. A.; Lambais, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    Even though several studies on the geochemical processes occurring in mangrove soils and sediments have been performed, information on the diversity of Archaea and their functional roles in these ecosystems, especially in subsurface environments, is scarce. In this study, we have analyzed the depth distribution of Archaea and their possible relationships with the geochemical transformations of Fe and Mn in a sediment core from a tropical mangrove creek, using 16S rRNA gene profiling and sequential extraction of different forms of Fe and Mn. A significant shift in the archaeal community structure was observed in the lower layers (90-100 cm), coinciding with a clear decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) content and an increase in the percentage of sand. The comparison of the archaeal communities showed a dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layers (0-20 cm), whereas Crenarchaeota was the most abundant taxon in the lower layers. The dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layer of the sediment suggests the occurrence of methanogenesis in anoxic microenvironments. The concentrations of Fe-oxyhydroxides in the profile were very low, and showed positive correlation with the concentrations of pyrite and degrees of Fe and Mn pyritization. Additionally, a partial decoupling of pyrite formation from organic matter concentration was observed, suggesting excessive Fe pyritization. This overpyritization of Fe can be explained either by the anoxic oxidation of methane by sulfate and/or by detrital pyrite tidal transportation from the surrounding mangrove soils. The higher pyritization levels observed in deeper layers of the creek sediment were also in agreement with its Pleistocenic origin.

  18. Specific bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities in tidal-flat sediments along a vertical profile of several meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Reinhard; Sass, Henrik; Köpke, Beate; Köster, Jürgen; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2006-04-01

    The subsurface of a tidal-flat sediment was analyzed down to 360 cm in depth by molecular and geochemical methods. A community structure analysis of all three domains of life was performed using domain-specific PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and sequencing of characteristic bands. The sediment column comprised horizons easily distinguishable by lithology that were deposited in intertidal and salt marsh environments. The pore water profile was characterized by a subsurface sulfate peak at a depth of about 250 cm. Methane and sulfate profiles were opposed, showing increased methane concentrations in the sulfate-free layers. The availability of organic carbon appeared to have the most pronounced effect on the bacterial community composition in deeper sediment layers. In general, the bacterial community was dominated by fermenters and syntrophic bacteria. The depth distribution of methanogenic archaea correlated with the sulfate profile and could be explained by electron donor competition with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sequences affiliated with the typically hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were present in sulfate-free layers. Archaea belonging to the Methanosarcinales that utilize noncompetitive substrates were found along the entire anoxic-sediment column. Primers targeting the eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene revealed the presence of a subset of archaeal sequences in the deeper part of the sediment cores. The phylogenetic distance to other archaeal sequences indicates that these organisms represent a new phylogenetic group, proposed as "tidal-flat cluster 1." Eukarya were still detectable at 360 cm, even though their diversity decreased with depth. Most of the eukaryotic sequences were distantly related to those of grazers and deposit feeders.

  19. Distribution of ether lipids and composition of the archaeal community in terrestrial geothermal springs: impact of environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Wang, Jinxiang; Chen, Yufei; Zhu, Yuanqing; de la Torre, José R; Dong, Hailiang; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Hedlund, Brian P; Klotz, Martin G

    2015-05-01

    Archaea can respond to changes in the environment by altering the composition of their membrane lipids, for example, by modification of the abundance and composition of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs). Here, we investigated the abundance and proportions of polar GDGTs (P-GDGTs) and core GDGTs (C-GDGTs) sampled in different seasons from Tengchong hot springs (Yunnan, China), which encompassed a pH range of 2.5-10.1 and a temperature range of 43.7-93.6°C. The phylogenetic composition of the archaeal community (reanalysed from published work) divided the Archaea in spring sediment samples into three major groups that corresponded with spring pH: acidic, circumneutral and alkaline. Cluster analysis showed correlation between spring pH and the composition of P- and C-GDGTs and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, indicating an intimate link between resident Archaea and the distribution of P- and C-GDGTs in Tengchong hot springs. The distribution of GDGTs in Tengchong springs was also significantly affected by temperature; however, the relationship was weaker than with pH. Analysis of published datasets including samples from Tibet, Yellowstone and the US Great Basin hot springs revealed a similar relationship between pH and GDGT content. Specifically, low pH springs had higher concentrations of GDGTs with high numbers of cyclopentyl rings than neutral and alkaline springs, which is consistent with the predominance of high cyclopentyl ring-characterized Sulfolobales and Thermoplasmatales present in some of the low pH springs. Our study suggests that the resident Archaea in these hot springs are acclimated if not adapted to low pH by their genetic capacity to effect the packing density of their membranes by increasing cyclopentyl rings in GDGTs at the rank of community.

  20. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Demina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly—the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase—placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion.

  1. Distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers in different tissue and subcellular fractions of earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Chen, Hao; Sun, Hongwen; Lan, Zhonghui

    2017-05-01

    In this study, earthworms Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were exposed to a soil artificially contaminated with individual hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereoisomers (α-, β- and γ-HBCDs) to investigate the distribution, isomerization and enantiomer selectivity of HBCDs at tissue and subcellular levels. At the tissue level, the concentrations of HBCDs all followed the order of gut>bodyfluid>body wall, which suggested that earthworms accumulated HBCDs mainly via ingesting soil particles. At the subcellular level, the concentrations of HBCDs in an extracellular fraction consisting of granules, tissue fragment, cell membrane and intact cells (fraction A) were higher than those in an intracellular fractions consisting of the microsomal and cytosol (fraction B+C). This confirmed the passive diffusion during the distribution of HBCDs into the intracellular compartment. The distribution proportions of HBCDs varied among different tissue and subcellular fractions, and all changed over time within 14 days. The variable distributions of HBCDs in different fractions were a result of the comprehensive effects of dynamics and thermodynamics processes. The β- and γ-HBCDs were isomerized to α-HBCD in all tissue and subcellular fractions except for fraction C, and the isomerization ratios varied a lot, which seemed to be related to HBCDs residence time. The selective enrichment of (-) α-, (-) β and (-) γ-HBCDs was found in all fractions and this is consistent with that in the whole earthworm. Besides, the extents of enantio-selectivity did not change significantly among different tissue and subcellular fractions.

  2. Altered subcellular distribution of nucleolar protein fibrillarin by actinomycin D in Hep-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min CHEN; Ping JIANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of actinomycin D on subcellular distribution of nucleolar protein fibrillarin in HEp-2(human esophageal epithelial type 2) cells, and molecular mechanisms for maintenance of fibrillarin in nucleolus.METHODS: Indirect immunofiuorescence assay was employed to investigate subcellular distribution of nucleolar protein fibrillarin and immunoblotting analysis was used to detect the total cellular amount of fibrillarin. RESULTS:Control cells with no drug treatment showed bright clumpy nucleolar staining, which indicated that fibrillarin decorated the nucleolus only. Treatment with actinomycin D caused dislocation of fibrillarin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm with numerous stained small nucleoplasmic entities. Immunoblotting showed that neither total cellular amount of fibrillarin nor the integrity of fibrillarin was changed upon the treatment. The dislocation of fibrillarin in cells treated at a lower concentration (0.05 mg/L) of actinomycin D, was totally reversible after removal of the drug from the medium. However, this reversion was not observed at a high drug concentration (1 mg/L). CONCLUSION:Actinomycin D induced dislocation of fibrillarin from nucleoli to nucleoplasm in HEp-2 cells. The retention of fibrillarin within the nucleolus was related to active RNA synthesis.

  3. Slit2 expression and its correlation with subcellular localization of β-catenin in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongliang; Liu, Weiyan; Liu, Bingya; Xu, Ziping; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Ziping

    2013-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. Several signaling pathways are involved in gastric cancer development and progression. Slit2 was recently found to be involved in cancer; however, its expression pattern in gastric cancer has not been discovered yet. In the present study, we investigated the expression of Slit2 in human gastric cancer and its correlation with the expression and subcellular localization of β-catenin. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining revealed that Slit2 was highly expressed in human gastric cancer tissues, while it was low or weakly expressed in normal gastric tissues. The differences in clinicopathological features between different groups were determined using Pearson's χ2 test. Slit2 levels were significantly associated with differentiation, Lauren's classification, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging. Slit2 levels were positively correlated with β-catenin level in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. High levels of Slit2 were correlated with the membrane localization of β-catenin, and low levels of Slit2 were correlated with nuclear translocation of β-catenin in both gastric cancer tissues and cell lines assayed by IHC and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Our data suggest that Slit2 was highly expressed in gastric cancer patients with less advanced clinicopathological features. Slit2 levels were correlated with β-catenin level and subcellular localization.

  4. Mutational analyses of the signals involved in the subcellular location of DSCR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique-Silva Flávio

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome is the most frequent genetic disorder in humans. Rare cases involving partial trisomy of chromosome 21 allowed a small chromosomal region common to all carriers, called Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR, to be determined. The DSCR1 gene was identified in this region and is expressed preferentially in the brain, heart and skeletal muscle. Recent studies have shown that DSCR1 belongs to a family of proteins that binds and inhibits calcineurin, a serine-threonine phosphatase. The work reported on herein consisted of a study of the subcellular location of DSCR1 and DSCR1-mutated forms by fusion with a green fluorescent protein, using various cell lines, including human. Results The protein's location was preferentially nuclear, independently of the isoform, cell line and insertion in the GFP's N- or C-terminal. A segment in the C-terminal, which is important in the location of the protein, was identified by deletion. On the other hand, site-directed mutational analyses have indicated the involvement of some serine and threonine residues in this event. Conclusion In this paper, we discuss the identification of amino acids which can be important for subcellular location of DSCR1. The involvement of residues that are prone to phosphorylation suggests that the location and function of DSCR1 may be regulated by kinases and/or phosphatases.

  5. Regional and subcellular distribution of gold in brain of gold thioglucose obese mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, K; Danbara, H; Sunayashiki, K; Okuno, S; Sorimachi, M; Tanaka, M; Chikamori, K

    1978-01-01

    By employing neutron activation analysis, endogenous content of gold was estimated quantitatively in discrete brain areas and in subcellular fractions of the hypothalamus of gold thioglucose (GTG) induced obese mice. The highest concentration of gold was obtained in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) reaching approximately 100 ng/mg wet tissue. Significantly higher concentrations were observed in other hypothalamic subareas followed by certain limbic areas and the thalamus, while in the cerebral and the cerebellar cortex the gold concentration was very low. Subcellularly, the hypothalamic gold was principally recovered in the supernatant fraction particularly after a hyposmotic shock treatment of the crude mitochondrial fraction. Contrary to GTG, treatment with gold thiomalate (GTM) did not induce obesity in the mouse, although considerable amount of gold was observed in the VMH, a finding suggesting the existence in the VMH of at least a two step mechanisms for inducing GTG obesity. To identify the satiety neuron transmitter, an analysis of certain enzyme activities involved in the synthesis of known transmitters, such as acetylcholine or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), was made in the GTG-obese mice. There were no significant changes in any of the areas functionally related to the VMH.

  6. Differential spatial expression and subcellular localization of CtBP family members in rodent brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hübler

    Full Text Available C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs are well-characterized nuclear transcriptional co-regulators. In addition, cytoplasmic functions were discovered for these ubiquitously expressed proteins. These include the involvement of the isoform CtBP1-S/BARS50 in cellular membrane-trafficking processes and a role of the isoform RIBEYE as molecular scaffolds in ribbons, the presynaptic specializations of sensory synapses. CtBPs were suggested to regulate neuronal differentiation and they were implied in the control of gene expression during epileptogenesis. However, the expression patterns of CtBP family members in specific brain areas and their subcellular localizations in neurons in situ are largely unknown. Here, we performed comprehensive assessment of the expression of CtBP1 and CtBP2 in mouse brain at the microscopic and the ultra-structural levels using specific antibodies. We quantified and compared expression levels of both CtBPs in biochemically isolated brain fractions containing cellular nuclei or synaptic compartment. Our study demonstrates differential regional and subcellular expression patterns for the two CtBP family members in brain and reveals a previously unknown synaptic localization for CtBP2 in particular brain regions. Finally, we propose a mechanism of differential synapto-nuclear targeting of its splice variants CtBP2-S and CtBP2-L in neurons.

  7. Differential spatial expression and subcellular localization of CtBP family members in rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübler, Diana; Rankovic, Marija; Richter, Karin; Lazarevic, Vesna; Altrock, Wilko D; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are well-characterized nuclear transcriptional co-regulators. In addition, cytoplasmic functions were discovered for these ubiquitously expressed proteins. These include the involvement of the isoform CtBP1-S/BARS50 in cellular membrane-trafficking processes and a role of the isoform RIBEYE as molecular scaffolds in ribbons, the presynaptic specializations of sensory synapses. CtBPs were suggested to regulate neuronal differentiation and they were implied in the control of gene expression during epileptogenesis. However, the expression patterns of CtBP family members in specific brain areas and their subcellular localizations in neurons in situ are largely unknown. Here, we performed comprehensive assessment of the expression of CtBP1 and CtBP2 in mouse brain at the microscopic and the ultra-structural levels using specific antibodies. We quantified and compared expression levels of both CtBPs in biochemically isolated brain fractions containing cellular nuclei or synaptic compartment. Our study demonstrates differential regional and subcellular expression patterns for the two CtBP family members in brain and reveals a previously unknown synaptic localization for CtBP2 in particular brain regions. Finally, we propose a mechanism of differential synapto-nuclear targeting of its splice variants CtBP2-S and CtBP2-L in neurons.

  8. An Overview of Sub-Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Action of TTFields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A. Tuszynski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing research on electric and electromagnetic field interactions with biological cells and their subcellular structures has mainly focused on the low- and high-frequency regimes. Biological effects at intermediate frequencies between 100 and 300 kHz have been recently discovered and applied to cancer cells as a therapeutic modality called Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields. TTFields are clinically applied to disrupt cell division, primarily for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. In this review, we provide an assessment of possible physical interactions between 100 kHz range alternating electric fields and biological cells in general and their nano-scale subcellular structures in particular. This is intended to mechanistically elucidate the observed strong disruptive effects in cancer cells. Computational models of isolated cells subject to TTFields predict that for intermediate frequencies the intracellular electric field strength significantly increases and that peak dielectrophoretic forces develop in dividing cells. These findings are in agreement with in vitro observations of TTFields’ disruptive effects on cellular function. We conclude that the most likely candidates to provide a quantitative explanation of these effects are ionic condensation waves around microtubules as well as dielectrophoretic effects on the dipole moments of microtubules. A less likely possibility is the involvement of actin filaments or ion channels.

  9. β-amylase in developing apple fruits: activities, amounts and subcellular localization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Dapeng; (张大鹏); WANG; Yongzhang(王永章)

    2002-01-01

    Starch degradation in cells is closely associated with cereal seed germination, photosynthesis in leaves, carbohydrate storage in tuberous roots, and fleshy fruit development. Based on previously reported in vitro assays, β-amylase is considered one of the key enzymes catalyzing starch breakdown, but up to date its role in starch breakdown in living cells remains unclear because the enzyme was shown often extrachloroplastic in living cells. The present experiment showed that β-amylase activity was progressively increasing concomitantly with decreasing starch concentrations during apple (Malus domestica Borkh cv. Starkrimson) fruit development. The apparent amount of β-amylase assessed by Western blotting also increased during the fruit development, which is consistent with the seasonal changes in the enzyme activity. The subcellular-localization studies via immunogold electron-microscopy technique showed that β-amylase visualized by gold particles was predominantly located in plastids especially at periphery of starch granules, but the gold particles were scarcely found in other subcellular compartments. These data proved for the first time that the enzyme is compartmented in its functional sites in plant living cells. The predominantly plastid-distributed pattern of β-amylase in cells was shown unchanged throughout the fruit development. The density of gold particles (β-amylase) in plastids was increasing during the fruit development, which is consistent with the results of Western blotting. So it is considered that β-amylase is involved in starch hydrolysis in plastids of the fruit cells.

  10. Regulation of the MAPK family members: role of subcellular localization and architectural organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, G R

    1999-07-01

    The members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family are regulated by a diverse array of extracellular cues ranging from cytokines, growth factors and neuropeptides, which activate cell surface receptors, to stresses such as cold, heat, osmolarity changes and irradiation. The MAPK pathways control genetic expression by modifying transcription factor activity and cue important cell fate decisions including survival, proliferation, and programmed cell death (apoptosis). One interesting feature of the MAPK pathways is that the components are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human, and many of the pathways are similarly organized and regulated. Unlike previously imagined, architectural organization or the multimeric organization of signaling proteins into complexes which are localized to distinct subcellular regions is an important mechanism that influences the regulation of these pathways. In addition, extracellular stimuli can induce relocalization of specific signal transduction proteins. The formation of multimeric signaling complexes, as well as the dynamic movement of signaling proteins, contribute to determine signaling specificity and efficacy. This review describes what is currently known about the subcellular localization of MAPK pathway signaling proteins and the relocalization that occurs during events associated with activation of the MAPK family members.

  11. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eKreis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  12. SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF BETA CATENIN IN COLORECTAL NON NEOPLASTIC AND NEOPLASTIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Rini Handjari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC function is typically an early event in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC pathogenesis. The key tumor suppressor function of the APC protein lies in its ability to destabilize free cytoplasmic beta catenin. This lead to the accumulation of nuclear beta catenin, and together with the DNA binding protein Tcf-4, function as a transcriptional activator. Accumulation of stabilized free β-catenin is considered as an early event and perhaps initiating the process in intestinal tumorigenesis. Neoplastic transformation in the CRC associated chronic colitis is considered similar to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence in sporadic CRC. The distinguish feature from the CRC-related colitis is the difference in time and frequency changes. Loss of APC function, regarded as the beginning of a very common event in sporadic CRC, but the CRC associated chronic colitis generally occurs at the end of thedysplasia-carcinoma sequence. This research was conducted to determine the subcellular location of beta catenin expression in chronic colitis, colorectal adenomas and carcinomas that were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. It can be concluded that beta-catenin is a component that plays a role in the development of the CRC and the subcellular location of beta-catenin can describe its oncogenic activity.

  13. Subcellular localization of several heavy metals of Hg,Cd and Pb in human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunying; ZHANG Peiqun; CHAI Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    Liver, as an important metabolic and detoxicological organ of human body, can be used as a good bioindicator for evaluating body burden of environmental pollutants. Its elemental contents and their chemical forms are closely related to the status of human health and disease. In this paper, the liver samples collected from normal subjects were separated to different subcellular fractions of nuclei, mitochondria, lysosome, microsome and cytosol by differential centrifugation. Then their concentrations of heavy metals of As, Pb, Cd, and Hg were determined by atomic absorption and atomic fluorescent spectroscopy. Our results show no significant difference with literature ones when comparing their gross concentrations. In the case of their subcellular distribution, the Hg concentrations are higher in mitochondrial, microsomal and cytosolic fractions; the Cd concentrations are higher in cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, while As highest in nuclear fraction. The highest concentration of Pb is found in microsomal fraction with similarity to Fe. Mercury in liver is mainly in the form of inorganic, and methylmercury ranged from 9% to 50% with the average value of 20.9%(13.3%. These results indicate that the cellular distribution and the accumulated target organelles are quite different among these heavy metals, which suggest their various pathways and toxic mechanism in vivo.

  14. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in a dark septate endophyte (DSE), Exophiala pisciphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Fangdong; He, Yongmei; Li, Yuan; Li, Tao; Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Zhao, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to understand the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mechanisms by investigating the subcellular distribution, chemical forms of Cd and adsorptive groups in the mycelia of Exophiala pisciphila. We grew E. pisciphila in the liquid media with increasing Cd concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg L(-1)). Increased Cd in the media caused a proportional increase in the Cd uptake by E. pisciphila. Subcellular distribution indicated that 81 to 97% of Cd was associated with the cell walls. The largest amount and proportion (45-86%) of Cd was extracted with 2% acetic acid, and a concentration-dependent extraction was observed, both of which suggest that Cd-phosphate complexes were the major chemical form in E. pisciphila. A large distribution of phosphate and Cd on the mycelia surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The precipitates associated with the mycelia were observed to contain Cd by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) identified that hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, and phosphate groups were responsible for binding Cd. We conclude that Cd associated with cell walls and integrated with phosphate might be responsible for the tolerance of E. pisciphila to Cd.

  15. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: exposure to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng-Jiao; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-01-25

    The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the changes in the Cd tolerance of a marine diatom after exposure under different Cd concentrations for various durations and (2) to explore the potential subcellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying these changes. The 72-h toxicity, short-term Cd uptake, subcellular Cd distribution, as well as the synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were measured in a marine diatom Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii after exposure to a range of free Cd ion concentrations ([Cd(2+)], 0.01-84nM) for 1-15 days. Surprisingly, the diatoms did not acquire higher resistance to Cd after exposure; instead their sensitivity to Cd increased with a higher exposed [Cd(2+)] and a longer exposure period. The underlying mechanisms could be traced to the responses of Cd cellular accumulation and the intrinsic detoxification ability of the preconditioned diatoms. Generally, exposure to a higher [Cd(2+)] and for a longer period increased the Cd uptake rate, cellular accumulation, as well as the Cd concentration in metal-sensitive fraction (MSF) in these diatoms. In contrast, although PCs were induced by the environmental Cd stress (with PC(2) being the most affected), the increased intracellular Cd to PC-SH ratio implied that the PCs' detoxification ability had reduced after Cd exposure. All these responses resulted in an elevated Cd sensitivity as exposed [Cd(2+)] and duration increased. This study shows that the physiological/biochemical and kinetic responses of phytoplankton upon metal exposure deserve further investigation.

  16. Role of Glucokinase in the Subcellular Localization of Glucokinase Regulatory Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GCK is the rate-limiting enzyme of liver glucose metabolism. Through protein-protein interactions, glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR post-transcriptionally regulates GCK function in the liver, and causes its nuclear localization. However the role of GCK in regulating GCKR localization is unknown. In the present study, using in vitro and in vivo models, we examined the levels of GCK and GCKR, and their subcellular localization. We found that total cellular levels of GCKR did not vary in the in vivo models, but its subcellular localization did. In animals with normal levels of GCK, GCKR is mainly localized to the nuclei of hepatocytes. In seven-day old rats and liver-specific Gck gene knockout mice (animals that lack or have reduced levels of GCK protein, GCKR was found primarily in the cytoplasm. The interaction of GCK with GCKR was further examined using in vitro models where we varied the levels of GCK and GCKR. Varying the level of GCK protein had no effect on total cellular GCKR protein levels. Taken together, our results indicate that GCK is important for the localization of GCKR to the nucleus and raises the possibility that GCKR may have functions in addition to those regulating GCK activity in the cytoplasm.

  17. Subcellular localization and rearrangement of endoplasmic reticulum by Brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Rao, A L N

    2011-03-01

    Genome packaging in the plant-infecting Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a member of the alphavirus-like superfamily, as well as in other positive-strand RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (e.g., poliovirus) and animals (e.g., Flock House virus), is functionally coupled to replication. Although the subcellular localization site of BMV replication has been identified, that of the capsid protein (CP) has remained elusive. In this study, the application of immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to Nicotiana benthamiana leaves expressing replication-derived BMV CP as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, in conjunction with antibodies to the CP and double-stranded RNA, a presumed marker of RNA replication, revealed that the subcellular localization sites of replication and CP overlap. Our temporal analysis by transmission electron microscopy of ultrastructural modifications induced in BMV-infected N. benthamiana leaves revealed a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) incorporating large assemblies of vesicles derived from ER accumulated in the cytoplasm during BMV infection. Additionally, for the first time, we have found by ectopic expression experiments that BMV CP itself has the intrinsic property of modifying ER to induce vesicles similar to those present in BMV infections. The significance of CP-induced vesicles in relation to CP-organized viral functions that are linked to replication-coupled packaging is discussed.

  18. Top Down Proteomics Reveals Mature Proteoforms Expressed in Subcellular Fractions of the Echinococcus granulosus Preadult Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzatto, Karina R; Kim, Kyunggon; Ntai, Ioanna; Paludo, Gabriela P; Camargo de Lima, Jeferson; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-11-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease, a neglected zoonosis responsible for high morbidity and mortality. Several molecular mechanisms underlying parasite biology remain poorly understood. Here, E. granulosus subcellular fractions were analyzed by top down and bottom up proteomics for protein identification and characterization of co-translational and post-translational modifications (CTMs and PTMs, respectively). Nuclear and cytosolic extracts of E. granulosus protoscoleces were fractionated by 10% GELFrEE and proteins under 30 kDa were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. By top down analysis, 186 proteins and 207 proteoforms were identified, of which 122 and 52 proteoforms were exclusively detected in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, respectively. CTMs were evident as 71% of the proteoforms had methionine excised and 47% were N-terminal acetylated. In addition, in silico internal acetylation prediction coupled with top down MS allowed the characterization of 9 proteins differentially acetylated, including histones. Bottom up analysis increased the overall number of identified proteins in nuclear and cytosolic fractions to 154 and 112, respectively. Overall, our results provided the first description of the low mass proteome of E. granulosus subcellular fractions and highlighted proteoforms with CTMs and PTMS whose characterization may lead to another level of understanding about molecular mechanisms controlling parasitic flatworm biology.

  19. EXPRESSION AND SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF P9-ZFD PROTEIN IN PATIENTS WITH MYASTHENIA GRAVIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-shan Ren; Chuan-zhen Lu; Jian Qiao; Hui-min Ren; Ren Xu; Ren-bao Gan

    2004-01-01

    Objective To express and purify the protein coded by the TRAF-type zinc finger domain ofmyasthenia gravis (MG)-related gene P9 ( P9-ZFD ) and to prepare P9-ZFD antiserum for detecting expression and subcellular distribution of P9-ZFD protein in the skeletal muscles of patient with MG.Methods The cDNA encoding P9-ZFD was amplified by RT-PCR. The cloned P9-ZFD cDNA was ligated into pET-24a, and the P9-ZFD recombinant protein was induced via E. coli. BL21 (DE3) and purified by histidine affinity chromatography. P9-ZFD antiserum was prepared and its fiter and specificity were determined by ELISA and Western blot. Expression and subcellular distribution of P9-ZFD protein in the skeletal muscles of MG and control were studied.Results The molecular weight of purified P9-ZFD protein was about 30 kD. Its purity was more than 95%. Antiserum specific for P9-ZFD was excellent. P9-ZFD protein is fully confined to the cytoplasm membrane of skeletal muscle cell of MG, obvious immunostaining was absent in the A, I, and Z bands of cytoplasm and no immunoreactivity was observed in the skeletal muscle cell of control.Conclusion P9-ZFD protein is expressed as a cytoplasm membrane-bound protein and has obvious distribution difference in the skeletal muscle cells of patient with MG and normal control.

  20. Classification of Subcellular Phenotype Images by Decision Templates for Classifier Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bailing

    2010-01-01

    Subcellular localization is a key functional characteristic of proteins. An automatic, reliable and efficient prediction system for protein subcellular localization is needed for large-scale genome analysis. The automated cell phenotype image classification problem is an interesting "bioimage informatics" application. It can be used for establishing knowledge of the spatial distribution of proteins within living cells and permits to screen systems for drug discovery or for early diagnosis of a disease. In this paper, three well-known texture feature extraction methods including local binary patterns (LBP), Gabor filtering and Gray Level Coocurrence Matrix (GLCM) have been applied to cell phenotype images and the multiple layer perceptron (MLP) method has been used to classify cell phenotype image. After classification of the extracted features, decision-templates ensemble algorithm (DT) is used to combine base classifiers built on the different feature sets. Different texture feature sets can provide sufficient diversity among base classifiers, which is known as a necessary condition for improvement in ensemble performance. For the HeLa cells, the human classification error rate on this task is of 17% as reported in previous publications. We obtain with our method an error rate of 4.8%.

  1. Subcellular proteomic characterization of the high-temperature stress response of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheevadhanarak Supapon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the changes in protein expression in Spirulina platensis upon exposure to high temperature, with the changes in expression analyzed at the subcellular level. In addition, the transcriptional expression level of some differentially expressed proteins, the expression pattern clustering, and the protein-protein interaction network were analyzed. The results obtained from differential expression analysis revealed up-regulation of proteins involved in two-component response systems, DNA damage and repair systems, molecular chaperones, known stress-related proteins, and proteins involved in other biological processes, such as capsule formation and unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. The clustering of all differentially expressed proteins in the three cellular compartments showed: (i the majority of the proteins in all fractions were sustained tolerance proteins, suggesting the roles of these proteins in the tolerance to high temperature stress, (ii the level of resistance proteins in the photosynthetic membrane was 2-fold higher than the level in two other fractions, correlating with the rapid inactivation of the photosynthetic system in response to high temperature. Subcellular communication among the three cellular compartments via protein-protein interactions was clearly shown by the PPI network analysis. Furthermore, this analysis also showed a connection between temperature stress and nitrogen and ammonia assimilation.

  2. Tissue subcellular fractionation and protein extraction for use in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian; Emili, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that sample fractionation is an effective method for increasing the detection coverage of the proteome of complex samples, such as organs, by mass-spectrometric techniques. Further fractionating a sample based on subcellular compartments can generate molecular information on the state of a tissue and the distribution of its protein components. Although many methods exist for fractionating proteins, the method described here can capture the majority of subcellular fractions simultaneously at reasonable purity. The scalability of this method makes it amenable to small samples, such as embryonic tissues, in addition to larger tissues. The protocol described is for the general fractionation and extraction of proteins from organs or tissues for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. It uses differential centrifugation in density gradients to isolate nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial and mixed microsomal (Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, other vesicles and plasma membrane) fractions. Once the fractions are isolated, they are extracted for protein and the samples can then be frozen for processing and analysis at a later date. The procedure can typically be completed in 5 h.

  3. Subcellular distribution of azithromycin and clarithromycin in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM), a 15-membered ring macrolide antimicrobial agent, has an antibacterial spectrum that includes intracellular parasitic pathogens that survive or intracellularly multiply in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The subcellular distribution of AZM in AMs was evaluated in vitro in comparison with clarithromycin (CAM). AZM and CAM (50 µM) were applied to the NR8383 cells, used as an in vitro model of AMs, followed by incubation at 37°C or 4°C. The total amount of AZM in cells and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) was determined after incubation. High level of AZM accumulation was observed in the NR8383 cells at 37°C, and the equilibrium intracellular to extracellular concentration ratio (I/E ratio) was approximately 680, which was remarkably higher than that of CAM (equilibrium I/E ratio=28). The intracellular accumulation of AZM and CAM was temperature dependent. In addition, AZM distributed to the granules fraction including organelles and soluble fraction including cytosol in the NR8383 cells, whereas CAM mainly distributed in soluble fraction. The amount of AZM in the granules fraction was markedly reduced in the presence of ammonium chloride for increase in intracellular pH. These results indicate that AZM is distributed in acidic compartment in AMs. This study suggests that high AZM accumulation in the NR8383 cells is due to the trapping and/or binding in acidic organelles, such as lysosomes.

  4. An improved procedure for subcellular spatial alignment during live-cell CLEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Padman

    Full Text Available Live-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM offers unique insights into the ultrastructure of dynamic cellular processes. A critical and technically challenging part of CLEM is the 3-dimensional relocation of the intracellular region of interest during sample processing. We have developed a simple CLEM procedure that uses toner particles from a laser printer as orientation marks. This facilitates easy tracking of a region of interest even by eye throughout the whole procedure. Combined with subcellular fluorescence markers for the plasma membrane and nucleus, the toner particles allow for precise subcellular spatial alignment of the optical and electron microscopy data sets. The toner-based reference grid is printed and transferred onto a polymer film using a standard office printer and laminator. We have also designed a polymer film holder that is compatible with most inverted microscopes, and have validated our strategy by following the ultrastructure of mitochondria that were selectively photo-irradiated during live-cell microscopy. In summary, our inexpensive and robust CLEM procedure simplifies optical imaging, without limiting the choice of optical microscope.

  5. Zn Accumulation and Subcellular Distribution in the Zn Hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ting-Qiang; YANG Xiao-E; YANG Jin-Yan; HE Zhen-Li

    2006-01-01

    Zn accumulation and subcellular distribution in leaves of the hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii Hance were studied using radiotracer and gradient centrifugation techniques. Leaf Zn accumulation in the HE of S. alfredii was 18.5-26.7 times greater than that in the NHE when the plants were grown at 1-500μmol Zn L-1. Leaf section uptake of 65Zn was highly dependent on external Zn levels. Greater 65Zn uptake in HE was noted only at external Zn levels ≥ 100μmol L-1. Zinc subcellular distribution in the leaves of the two ecotypes of S. alfredii was: cell wall > soluble fraction > cell organelle. However, more Zn was distributed to the leaf cell wall and soluble fractions for HE than for NHE. In the leaf of HE, 91%-94% of the Zn was found in the cell walls and the soluble fraction and only 6%-9% Zn was distributed in the cell organelle fraction. For NHE, about 20%-26% Zn was recovered in the cell organelle fraction. In stems, Zn distribution to the cell wall fraction was approximately two fold greater in the HE than that in the NHE. For the hyperaccumulating ecotype of S. alfredii, the cell wall and the vacuole played a very important role in Zn tolerance and hyperaccumulation.

  6. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, Carlisle S; Wu, Shu-Zon; Nelson, Katherine; Oakey, John; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time.

  7. Subcellular distribution of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in the rat duodenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petra Talapka; Nikolett Bódi; Izabella Battonyai; (E)va Fekete; Mária Bagyánszki

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To study the cell-type specific subcellular distribution of the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the rat duodenum. METHODS:Postembedding immunoelectronmicroscopy was performed,in which primary antibodies for neuronal NOS (nNOS),endothelial NOS (eNOS),and inducible NOS (iNOS),were visualized with protein A-gold-conjugated secondary antibodies.Stained ultrathin sections were examined and photographed with a Philips CM10 electron microscope equipped with a MEGAVIEW II camera.The specificity of the immunoreaction in all cases was assessed by omitting the primary antibodies in the labeling protocol and incubating the sections only in the protein A-gold conjugated secondary antibodies. RESULTS:Postembedding immunoelectronmicroscopy revealed the presence of nNOS,eNOS,and iNOS immunoreactivity in the myenteric neurons,the enteric smooth muscle cells,and the endothelium of capillaries running in the vicinity of the myenteric plexus of the rat duodenum.The cell type-specific distributions of the immunogold particles labeling the three different NOS isozymes were revealed.In the control experiments,in which the primary antiserum was omitted,virtually no postembedding gold particles were observed. CONCLUSION:This postembedding immunoelectronmicroscopic study provided the first evidence of celltype- specific differences in the subcellular distributions of NOS isoforms.

  8. Ubiquitous distribution and different subcellular localization of sorbitol dehydrogenase in fruit and leaf of apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Yan-Hong; Peng, Chang-Cao; Fan, Ren-Chun; Gao, Xin-Qi

    2009-01-01

    NAD(+)-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (NAD-SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), a key enzyme in sorbitol metabolism, plays an important role in regulating sink strength and determining the quality of apple fruit. Understanding the tissue and subcellular localization of NAD-SDH is helpful for understanding sorbitol metabolism in the apple. In this study, two NAD-SDH cDNA sequences were isolated from apple fruits (Malus domestica Borkh cv. Starkrimson) and named MdSDH5 and MdSDH6. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that NAD-SDH is distributed in both the flesh and the vascular tissue of the fruit, and the vascular tissue and mesophyll tissue in the young and old leaves, indicating that it is a ubiquitous protein expressed in both sink and source organs. Immunogold electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that NAD-SDH is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and chloroplast of the fruit and leaves. The chloroplast localization of NAD-SDH was confirmed by the transient expression of MdSDH5-GFP and MdSDH6-GFP in the mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis. NAD-SDH was also found in electron opaque deposits of vacuoles in young and mature leaves. These data show that NAD-SDH has different subcellular localizations in fruit and leaves, indicating that it might play a different role in sorbitol metabolism in different tissues of apple.

  9. Organelle-Targeted H2S Probes Enable Visualization of the Subcellular Distribution of H2S Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pluth, Michael D

    2016-06-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an essential biological signaling molecule in diverse biological regulatory pathways. To provide new chemical tools for H2S imaging, we report here a fluorescent H2S detection platform (HSN2-BG) that is compatible with subcellular localization SNAP-tag fusion protein methodologies and use appropriate fusion protein constructs to demonstrate mitochondrial and lysosomal localization. We also demonstrate the efficacy of this detection platform to image endogenous H2S in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and use the developed constructs to report on the subcellular H2S distributions provided by common H2S donor molecules AP39, ADT-OH, GYY4137, and diallyltrisulfide (DATS). The developed constructs provide a platform poised to provide new insights into the subcellular distribution of common H2S donors and a useful tool for investigating H2S biochemistry.

  10. Visualization of subcellular NAD pools and intra-organellar protein localization by poly-ADP-ribose formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Lohndal, Emilia; Ziegler, Mathias

    2010-02-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) use NAD(+) as substrate to generate polymers of ADP-ribose. We targeted the catalytic domain of human PARP1 as molecular NAD(+) detector into cellular organelles. Immunochemical detection of polymers demonstrated distinct subcellular NAD(+) pools in mitochondria, peroxisomes and, surprisingly, in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. Polymers did not accumulate within the mitochondrial intermembrane space or the cytosol. We demonstrate the suitability of this compartment-specific NAD(+) and poly-ADP-ribose turnover to establish intra-organellar protein localization. For overexpressed proteins, genetically endowed with PARP activity, detection of polymers indicates segregation from the cytosol and consequently intra-organellar residence. In mitochondria, polymer build-up reveals matrix localization of the PARP fusion protein. Compared to presently used fusion tags for subcellular protein localization, these are substantial improvements in resolution. We thus established a novel molecular tool applicable for studies of subcellular NAD metabolism and protein localization.

  11. Proteomics reveals the importance of the dynamic redistribution of the subcellular location of proteins in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriella; Alhaiek, Abdulrab Ahmed M; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2015-02-01

    At the molecular level, living cells are enormously complicated complex adaptive systems in which intertwined genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic networks all play a crucial role. At the same time, cells are spatially heterogeneous systems in which subcellular compartmentalization of different functions is ubiquitous and requires efficient cross-compartmental communication. Dynamic redistribution of multitudinous proteins to different subcellular locations in response to cellular functional state is increasingly recognized as a crucial characteristic of cellular function that seems to be at least as important as overall changes in protein abundance. Characterization of the subcellular spatial dynamics of protein distribution is a major challenge for proteomics and recent results with MCF7 breast cancer cells suggest that this may be of particular importance for cancer cells.

  12. Community Composition and Abundance of Bacterial, Archaeal and Nitrifying Populations in Savanna Soils on Contrasting Bedrock Material in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughöft, Saskia; Herrmann, Martina; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Cesarz, Simone; Levick, Shaun R.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Savannas cover at least 13% of the global terrestrial surface and are often nutrient limited, especially by nitrogen. To gain a better understanding of their microbial diversity and the microbial nitrogen cycling in savanna soils, soil samples were collected along a granitic and a basaltic catena in Kruger National Park (South Africa) to characterize their bacterial and archaeal composition and the genetic potential for nitrification. Although the basaltic soils were on average 5 times more nutrient rich than the granitic soils, all investigated savanna soil samples showed typically low nutrient availabilities, i.e., up to 38 times lower soil N or C contents than temperate grasslands. Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing revealed a unique soil bacterial community dominated by Actinobacteria (20–66%), Chloroflexi (9–29%), and Firmicutes (7–42%) and an increase in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria with increasing soil nutrient content. The archaeal community reached up to 14% of the total soil microbial community and was dominated by the thaumarchaeal Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (43–99.8%), with a high fraction of sequences related to the ammonia-oxidizing genus Nitrosopshaera sp. Quantitative PCR targeting amoA genes encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase also revealed a high genetic potential for ammonia oxidation dominated by archaea (~5 × 107 archaeal amoA gene copies g−1 soil vs. mostly < 7 × 104 bacterial amoA gene copies g−1 soil). Abundances of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes were positively correlated with soil nitrate, N and C contents. Nitrospira sp. was detected as the most abundant group of nitrite oxidizing bacteria. The specific geochemical conditions and particle transport dynamics at the granitic catena were found to affect soil microbial communities through clay and nutrient relocation along the hill slope, causing a shift to different, less diverse bacterial and archaeal communities at the footslope. Overall, our

  13. How a (subcellular coincidence detection mechanism featuring layer-5 pyramidal cells may help produce various visual phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talis eBachmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual phenomena such as spatio-temporal illusions and masking are typically explained by psychological (cognitive processing theories or large-scale neural theories involving inter-areal connectivity and neural circuits comprising of hundreds or more interconnected single cells. Subcellular mechanisms are hardly used for such purpose. Here a mechanistic theoretical view is presented on how a subcellular brain mechanism of integration of presynaptic signals that arrive at different compartments of layer-5 pyramidal neurons could explain a couple of spatiotemporal visual-phenomenal effects unfolding along very brief time intervals within the range of sub-second temporal scale.

  14. Metabolism of the environmental toxicant benzo(a)pyrene by subcellular fractions of human ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhadevi, P V; Diggs, D L; Huderson, A C; Harris, K L; Archibong, A E; Ramesh, A

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of the ability of the female reproductive system to metabolize environmental chemicals is critical not only from the standpoint of toxicity but also from infertility risk assessment. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a toxicant that is released into the environment from automobile exhausts, cigarette smoke, burning of refuse, industrial emissions, and hazardous waste sites. In exposed animals, BaP becomes activated to reactive metabolites that interfere with target organ function and as a consequence cause toxicity. Studies on animal models conducted in our laboratories and those of others have shown that BaP possess endocrine disrupting properties. Thus, this chemical has the potential to cause infertility and cancers in the female genital tract. An understanding of BaP metabolism in the female reproductive system will be of importance in the diagnosis and management of female fertility as well as cancers in the reproductive tissues. Therefore, the objective of our study was to examine the metabolism of BaP by human ovarian subcellular fractions. Human ovary samples (eight individuals) were obtained from postoperative tissue removed from subjects with uterine tumors. Subcellular fractions (nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal) were prepared by differential centrifugation. BaP (1 μM and 3 μM) was individually incubated with individual subcellular fractions for 15 min and the products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the different fractions tested, microsomal BaP metabolism was higher than the rest of the fractions. The BaP metabolites identified were as follows: BaP-9,10-diol, BaP-4,5-diol, BaP-7,8-diol, 9(OH) BaP, 3(OH) BaP, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, and BaP-6,12-dione. Of interest was the presence of DNA-reactive metabolites such as BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-6,12-dione, and BaP 7,8-diol, which have been implicated in the causation of infertility and cancer. Our results indicate that women who are exposed to BaP via

  15. Archaeal community structure in leachate and solid waste is correlated to methane generation and volume reduction during biodegradation of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xunchang; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2015-02-01

    Duplicate carefully-characterized municipal solid waste (MSW) specimens were reconstituted with waste constituents obtained from a MSW landfill and biodegraded in large-scale landfill simulators for about a year. Repeatability and relationships between changes in physical, chemical, and microbial characteristics taking place during the biodegradation process were evaluated. Parameters such as rate of change of soluble chemical oxygen demand in the leachate (rsCOD), rate of methane generation (rCH4), rate of specimen volume reduction (rVt), DNA concentration in the leachate, and archaeal community structures in the leachate and solid waste were monitored during operation. The DNA concentration in the leachate was correlated to rCH4 and rVt. The rCH4 was related to rsCOD and rVt when waste biodegradation was intensive. The structures of archaeal communities in the leachate and solid waste of both simulators were very similar and Methanobacteriaceae were the dominant archaeal family throughout the testing period. Monitoring the chemical and microbial characteristics of the leachate was informative of the biodegradation process and volume reduction in the simulators, suggesting that leachate monitoring could be informative of the extent of biodegradation in a full-scale landfill.

  16. Novel archaeal macrocyclic diether core membrane lipids in a methane-derived carbonate crust from a mud volcano in the Sorokin Trough, NE Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Stadnitskaia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A methane-derived carbonate crust was collected from the recently discovered NIOZ mud volcano in the Sorokin Trough, NE Black Sea during the 11th Training-through-Research cruise of the R/V Professor Logachev. Among several specific bacterial and archaeal membrane lipids present in this crust, two novel macrocyclic diphytanyl glycerol diethers, containing one or two cyclopentane rings, were detected. Their structures were tentatively identified based on the interpretation of mass spectra, comparison with previously reported mass spectral data, and a hydrogenation experiment. This macrocyclic type of archaeal core membrane diether lipid has so far been identified only in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent methanogen Methanococcus jannaschii. Here, we provide the first evidence that these macrocyclic diethers can also contain internal cyclopentane rings. The molecular structure of the novel diethers resembles that of dibiphytanyl tetraethers in which biphytane chains, containing one and two pentacyclic rings, also occur. Such tetraethers were abundant in the crust. Compound-specific isotope measurements revealed δ13C values of –104 to –111‰ for these new archaeal lipids, indicating that they are derived from methanotrophic archaea acting within anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia, which subsequently induce authigenic carbonate formation.

  17. Effects of oxytetracycline on archaeal community, and tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Pan, Hongjia; Gu, Jie; Qian, Xun; Gao, Hua; Qin, Qingjun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the effects of different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) on biogas production, archaeal community structure, and the levels of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) were investigated in the anaerobic co-digestion products of pig manure and wheat straw. PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) (PCR) were used to detect the archaeal community structure and the levels of four TRGs: tet(M), tet(Q), tet(W), and tet(C). The results showed that anaerobic co-digestion with OTC at concentrations of 60, 100, and 140 mg/kg (dry weight of pig manure) reduced the cumulative biogas production levels by 9.9%, 10.4%, and 14.1%, respectively, compared with that produced by the control, which lacked the antibiotic. The addition of OTC substantially modified the structure of the archaeal community. Two orders were identified by phylogenetic analysis, that is, Pseudomonadales and Methanomicrobiales, and the methanogen present during anaerobic co-digestion with OTC may have been resistant to OTC. The abundances of tet(Q) and tet(W) genes increased as the OTC concentration increased, whereas the abundances of tet(M) and tet(C) genes decreased as the OTC concentration increased.

  18. Expression and subcellular localization of mechano-growth factor in osteoblasts under mechanical stretch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG BingBing; XIAN ChengYu; LUO YanFeng; WANG YuanLiang

    2009-01-01

    Mechano-growth factor (MGF) is a stretch sensitive factor in myocytes, and it might also be produced by other mechanocytes under mechanical stimulation. In this study, both the mRNA and protein expression of MGF were detected in stretched osteoblasts. Quantitative analysis showed that a cyclic stretching stimulation caused a quick and sharp increase of MGF mRNA and protein expression from a low basal level under no stretch; the mRNA and protein levels respectively peaked in 6 and 12 h to 5 and 5.2 fold over the basal level and returned to normal by 24 h. The subcellular distribution of MGF protein was revealed by immunofluorescence analysis to be restricted to the nucleus. We concluded that cyclic stretching stimulation could induce MGF expression in osteoblasts in a pulsing fashion; and the nuclear distribution of MGF suggested that MGF might act in mechanocytes as an autocrine growth factor.

  19. Analytical model of ionization and energy deposition by proton beams in subcellular compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vera, Pablo; Surdutovich, Eugene; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical model to evaluate in a fast, simple and effective manner the energy delivered by proton beams moving through a cell model made of nucleus and cytoplasm, taking into account the energy carried by the secondary electrons generated along the proton tracks. The electronic excitation spectra of these subcellular compartments have been modelled by means of an empirical parameterization of their dielectric properties. The energy loss rate and target ionization probability induced by swift protons are evaluated by means of the dielectric formalism. With the present model we have quantified the energy delivered, the specific energy, and the number of ionizations produced per incoming ion in a typical human cell by a typical hadrontherapy proton beam having energies usually reached around the Bragg peak (below 20 MeV). We find that the specific energy per incoming ion delivered in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm are rather similar for all the proton energy range analyzed.

  20. Subcellular control of Rac-GTPase signalling by magnetogenetic manipulation inside living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etoc, F.; Lisse, D.; Bellaiche, Y.; Piehler, J.; Coppey, M.; Dahan, M.

    2013-03-01

    Many cell functions rely on the coordinated activity of signalling pathways at a subcellular scale. However, there are few tools capable of probing and perturbing signalling networks with a spatial resolution matching the intracellular dimensions of their activity patterns. Here we present a generic magnetogenetic approach based on the self-assembly of signalling complexes on the surface of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles inside living cells. The nanoparticles act as nanoscopic hot spots that can be displaced by magnetic forces and trigger signal transduction pathways that bring about a cell response. We applied this strategy to Rho-GTPases, a set of molecular switches known to regulate cell morphology via complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle-mediated activation of signalling pathways leads to local remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and to morphological changes.

  1. Optically-controlled platforms for transfection and single- and sub-cellular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Casey, Duncan; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    , unpredictable failures or mutations in individual cells can lead to serious downstream conditions across the whole organism. The traditional tools of biochemistry struggle to observe such processes: the vast majority are based upon ensemble approaches analysing the properties of bulk populations, which means...... and specificity of optical trapping in conjunction with other modalities to perform single and sub-cellular surgery. These tools form highly tuneable platforms for the delivery or removal of material from cells of interest, but can simultaneously excite fluorescent probes for imaging purposes or plasmonic...... structures for very local heating. We discuss both the history and recent applications of the field, highlighting the key findings and developments over the last 40 years of biophotonics research....

  2. Inheritance and subcellular localization of triose-phosphate isomerase in dwarf mountain pine (Pinus mugo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odrzykoski, I J

    2001-01-01

    Several trees with expected heterozygous phenotype for triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) were discovered in a population of dwarf mountain pine (Pinus mugo Turra) from southern Poland. As the inheritance of this enzyme in pines has not been reported, segregation of allelic variants was tested in eight trees with putative heterozygous phenotypes for two loci, TpiA and TPIB: Linkage between these and some other isozyme loci were studied and evidence for linkage has been found between TpiA and PgdA (r = 0.10) and between TpiB and DiaD (r = 0.36), but in single trees only. The subcellular localization of TPI isozymes was determined by comparing isoenzymes from the total extract with those found in fraction enriched in plastids, prepared by differential gradient centrifugation of cellular organelles. The more slowly migrating TPI-B isozyme is located in plastids.

  3. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  4. Sub-cellular structure studied by combined atomic force-fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea

    2009-03-01

    A novel experimental technique that integrates atomic force microscopy (AFM) with fluorescence imaging was used to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins in cellular organization. To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, we developed a new technology able to investigate cellular behavior at sub-cellular level that integrates an AFM with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy. Live smooth muscle cells exhibited differences in focal adhesions and actin pattern depending on the extracellular matrix used for substrate coating. Data obtained by using the AFM-optical imaging integrated technique offer novel quantitative information that allows understanding the fundamental processes of cellular reorganization in response to extracellular matrix modulation. The integrated microscope presented here is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells.

  5. Cellular and subcellular localization of flavin-monooxygenases involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jing; Kristiansen, Kim A.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram;

    2011-01-01

    Glucosinolates are amino acid-derived secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities dependent on chemical modifications of the side chain. Five flavin-monooxygenases FMO(GS-OX1-5) have recently been identified as aliphatic glucosinolate side chain modification enzymes in Arabidopsis...... thaliana that catalyse the generation of methylsulphinylalkyl glucosinolates, which can be hydrolysed to products with distinctive benefits for human health and plant defence. Though the localization of most aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthetic enzymes has been determined, little is known about where...... and therefore affects the glucosinolate profile. FMO(GS-OX1)-YFP fusion protein analysis identified FMO(GS-OX1) as a cytosolic protein. Together with the subcellular locations of the other biosynthetic enzymes, an integrated map of the multicompartmentalized aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway...

  6. Immunogold quantification of amino acids and proteins in complex subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergersen, Linda H; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Gundersen, Vidar

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of imaging techniques are in use to study the localization of molecules involved in cell-to-cell signaling. Here we describe the use of immunogold procedures to detect and quantify molecules on electron micrographs. To measure the areas of the subcellular compartments under investigation, the protocol uses an overlay screen with an array of regularly spaced points. On the basis of this, the densities of the gold-labeled molecules can be calculated. Despite the limited lateral resolution of the immunogold method as used by many investigators ( approximately 30 nm), it is possible to measure the content of molecules associated with tiny tissue compartments, e.g., synaptic vesicles and different types of membrane, such as plasma membranes and vesicle membranes. The quantification protocol can be carried out without using computer programs. The entire protocol can be completed in approximately 15 d.

  7. MECHANISMS OF DAMAGING EFFECT OF MANGENESE IN TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS ON CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko A. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of subtoxic concentration of manganese chloride in dose equal to LD 50 on condition of plasmatic membranes (model: erythrocytes and functional activity of cell power (model: the isolated liver mitochondrion of rats was studied. It was established that manganese chloride in fixed concentration caused authentic augmentation of sorption capacity of erythrocytes towards alcian blue, influenced increasing of their spontaneous haemolysis and activation of peroxide oxidation of lipids. In experiment on the isolated mitochondrion it was proved that manganese chloride caused dissociation of an oxidizing phosphorusling and complete inhibition of respiration in concentrations of 3 and 4,5mM. These dependences testify that subtoxic concentration of manganese can damage the cell energy. Thus, this pilot research indicated damaging effect of manganese on cellular (erythrocytes and subcellular (mitochondrion levels which are realized through external functioning of membrane structures and deprived them from restoration.

  8. The subcellular distribution and properties of hexokinases in the guinea-pig cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H S

    1967-07-01

    1. Hexokinase activities were estimated in primary subcellular fractions from guinea-pig cerebral cortex and in sucrose-density-gradient subfractions of the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. 2. Appreciable activities were observed in mitochondrial, microsomal and soluble fractions. The activity in the mitochondrial fraction was associated with the mitochondria rather than with myelin or nerve endings and that in the microsomal fraction was associated with membrane fragments. 3. Most of the mitochondrial activity was extracted in soluble form by osmotic ;shock'. The activity of the mitochondrial extract differed from the soluble activity in kinetic properties and in electrophoretic behaviour. 4. No evidence was obtained for the presence of a high-K(m) glucokinase in the brain. 5. The results are discussed in terms of relevance to considerations of glucose utilization by the brain.

  9. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-15

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK{sub 1} kidney cells at mass 28 ({sup 13}C{sup 15}N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of {sup 39}K, {sup 23}Na and {sup 40}Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  10. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  11. Identification and subcellular localization of molecular complexes of Gq/11α protein in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2012-08-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins localized in the plasma membrane convey the signals from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to different effectors. At least some types of G-protein α subunits have been shown to be partly released from plasma membranes and to move into the cytosol after receptor activation by the agonists. However, the mechanism underlying subcellular redistribution of trimeric G-proteins is not well understood and no definitive conclusions have been reached regarding the translocation of Gα subunits between membranes and cytosol. Here we used subcellular fractionation and clear-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to identify molecular complexes of G(q/11)α protein and to determine their localization in isolated fractions and stability in naïve and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-treated HEK293 cells expressing high levels of TRH receptor and G(11)α protein. We identified two high-molecular-weight complexes of 300 and 140 kDa in size comprising the G(q/11) protein, which were found to be membrane-bound. Both of these complexes dissociated after prolonged treatment with TRH. Still other G(q/11)α protein complexes of lower molecular weight were determined in the cytosol. These 70 kDa protein complexes were barely detectable under control conditions but their levels markedly increased after prolonged (4-16 h) hormone treatment. These results support the notion that a portion of G(q/11)α can undergo translocation from the membrane fraction into soluble fraction after a long-term activation of TRH receptor. At the same time, these findings indicate that the redistribution of G(q/11)α is brought about by the dissociation of high-molecular-weight complexes and concomitant formation of low-molecular-weight complexes containing the G(q/11)α protein.

  12. Identification and subcellular localization of molecular complexes of Gq/11α protein in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zdenka Drastichova; Jiri Novotny

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins localized in the plasma membrane convey the signals from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to different effectors.At least some types of Gprotein o subunits have been shown to be partly released from plasma membranes and to move into the cytosol after receptor activation by the agonists.However,the mechanism underlying subcellular redistribution of trimeric G-proteins is not well understood and no definitive conclusions have been reached regarding the translocation of Gα subunits between membranes and cytosol.Here we used subcellular fractionation and clear-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to identify molecular complexes of Gq/1 1α protein and to determine their localization in isolated fractions and stability in naive and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-treated HEK293 cells expressing high levels of TRH receptor and G11α protein.We identified two high-molecular-weight complexes of 300 and 140 kDa in size comprising the Gq/11 protein,which were found to be membrane-bound.Both of these complexes dissociated after prolonged treatment with TRH.Still other Gq/11α protein complexes of lower molecular weight were determined in the cytosol.These 70 kDa protein complexes were barely detectable under control conditions but their levels markedly increased after prolonged (4-16 h)hormone treatment.These results support the notion that a portion of Gq/11α can undergo translocation from the membrane fraction into soluble fraction after a long-term activation of TRH receptor.At the same time,these findings indicate that the redistribution of Gq/11α is broughtabout by the dissociation of high-molecular-weight complexes and concomitant formation of low-molecular-weight complexes containing the Gq/11α protein.

  13. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  14. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Exposure to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mengjiao [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-25

    The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the changes in the Cd tolerance of a marine diatom after exposure under different Cd concentrations for various durations and (2) to explore the potential subcellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying these changes. The 72-h toxicity, short-term Cd uptake, subcellular Cd distribution, as well as the synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were measured in a marine diatom Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii after exposure to a range of free Cd ion concentrations ([Cd{sup 2+}], 0.01-84 nM) for 1-15 days. Surprisingly, the diatoms did not acquire higher resistance to Cd after exposure; instead their sensitivity to Cd increased with a higher exposed [Cd{sup 2+}] and a longer exposure period. The underlying mechanisms could be traced to the responses of Cd cellular accumulation and the intrinsic detoxification ability of the preconditioned diatoms. Generally, exposure to a higher [Cd{sup 2+}] and for a longer period increased the Cd uptake rate, cellular accumulation, as well as the Cd concentration in metal-sensitive fraction (MSF) in these diatoms. In contrast, although PCs were induced by the environmental Cd stress (with PC{sub 2} being the most affected), the increased intracellular Cd to PC-SH ratio implied that the PCs' detoxification ability had reduced after Cd exposure. All these responses resulted in an elevated Cd sensitivity as exposed [Cd{sup 2+}] and duration increased. This study shows that the physiological/biochemical and kinetic responses of phytoplankton upon metal exposure deserve further investigation.

  15. Osmotic stress changes the expression and subcellular localization of the Batten disease protein CLN3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Getty

    Full Text Available Juvenile CLN3 disease (formerly known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the CLN3 gene. CLN3 encodes a putative lysosomal transmembrane protein with unknown function. Previous cell culture studies using CLN3-overexpressing vectors and/or anti-CLN3 antibodies with questionable specificity have also localized CLN3 in cellular structures other than lysosomes. Osmoregulation of the mouse Cln3 mRNA level in kidney cells was recently reported. To clarify the subcellular localization of the CLN3 protein and to investigate if human CLN3 expression and localization is affected by osmotic changes we generated a stably transfected BHK (baby hamster kidney cell line that expresses a moderate level of myc-tagged human CLN3 under the control of the human ubiquitin C promoter. Hyperosmolarity (800 mOsm, achieved by either NaCl/urea or sucrose, dramatically increased the mRNA and protein levels of CLN3 as determined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Under isotonic conditions (300 mOsm, human CLN3 was found in a punctate vesicular pattern surrounding the nucleus with prominent Golgi and lysosomal localizations. CLN3-positive early endosomes, late endosomes and cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae were also observed. Increasing the osmolarity of the culture medium to 800 mOsm extended CLN3 distribution away from the perinuclear region and enhanced the lysosomal localization of CLN3. Our results reveal that CLN3 has multiple subcellular localizations within the cell, which, together with its expression, prominently change following osmotic stress. These data suggest that CLN3 is involved in the response and adaptation to cellular stress.

  16. ESLpred2: improved method for predicting subcellular localization of eukaryotic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expansion of raw protein sequence databases in the post genomic era and availability of fresh annotated sequences for major localizations particularly motivated us to introduce a new improved version of our previously forged eukaryotic subcellular localizations prediction method namely "ESLpred". Since, subcellular localization of a protein offers essential clues about its functioning, hence, availability of localization predictor would definitely aid and expedite the protein deciphering studies. However, robustness of a predictor is highly dependent on the superiority of dataset and extracted protein attributes; hence, it becomes imperative to improve the performance of presently available method using latest dataset and crucial input features. Results Here, we describe augmentation in the prediction performance obtained for our most popular ESLpred method using new crucial features as an input to Support Vector Machine (SVM. In addition, recently available, highly non-redundant dataset encompassing three kingdoms specific protein sequence sets; 1198 fungi sequences, 2597 from animal and 491 plant sequences were also included in the present study. First, using the evolutionary information in the form of profile composition along with whole and N-terminal sequence composition as an input feature vector of 440 dimensions, overall accuracies of 72.7, 75.8 and 74.5% were achieved respectively after five-fold cross-validation. Further, enhancement in performance was observed when similarity search based results were coupled with whole and N-terminal sequence composition along with profile composition by yielding overall accuracies of 75.9, 80.8, 76.6% respectively; best accuracies reported till date on the same datasets. Conclusion These results provide confidence about the reliability and accurate prediction of SVM modules generated in the present study using sequence and profile compositions along with similarity search

  17. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Riskin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. Objective: To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC in culture. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC. To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM, or exposed to secretion medium (SM, containing prolactin. Results: GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90–110 minutes. Conclusions: Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  18. Subcellular location and molecular mobility of human cytosolic sulfotransferase 1C1 in living human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jonathan J; Acquaah-Mensah, George K

    2011-08-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases were first isolated from the hepatic cytosol, and they have been localized in the cytoplasm of formaldehyde-fixed human cell samples. The current work was carried out to determine the subcellular localization and molecular mobility of cytosolic sulfotransferases in living human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In this work, the subcellular location of human cytosolic sulfotransferase 1C1 (SULT1C1) was studied in cultured HEK293 cells using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged SULT1C1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of living HEK293 cells. This is consistent with results from previous studies on several other cytosolic sulfotransferase isoforms. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching microscopy was performed to assess the molecular mobility of the expressed GFP-SULT1C1 molecules. The results suggested that the expressed recombinant GFP-SULT1C1 molecules in living HEK293 cells may include both mobile and immobile populations. To obtain additional insights into the subcellular location of SULT1C1, two machine learning algorithms, Sequential Minimal Optimization and Multilayer Perceptron, were used to compute the probability distribution for the localization of SULT1C1 in nine selected cellular compartments. The resulting probability distribution suggested that the most likely subcellular location of SULT1C1 is the cytosol.

  19. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, G.D.; Gur, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Pines, O.; Vardimon, L.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS

  20. Subcellular localization of the delayed rectifier K(+) channels KCNQ1 and ERG1 in the rat heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Møller, Morten; Knaus, Hans-Günther

    2003-01-01

    In the heart, several K(+) channels are responsible for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential, including transient outward and delayed rectifier K(+) currents. In the present study, the cellular and subcellular localization of the two delayed rectifier K(+) channels, KCNQ1 and ether...

  1. Zn subcellular distribution in liver of goldfish (carassius auratus) with exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles and mechanism of hepatic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiuping; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have attracted increasing concerns because of their widespread use and toxic potential. In this study, Zn accumulations in different tissues (gills, liver, muscle, and gut) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) after exposure to ZnO NPs were studied in comparison with bulk ZnO and Zn(2+). And the technique of subcellular partitioning was firstly used on the liver of goldfish to study the hepatic accumulation of ZnO NPs. The results showed that at sublethal Zn concentration (2 mg/L), bioaccumulation in goldfish was tissue-specific and dependent on the exposure materials. Compared with Zn(2+), the particles of bulk ZnO and the ZnO NPs appeared to aggregate in the environmentally contacted tissues (gills and gut), rather than transport to the internal tissues (liver and muscle). The subcellular distributions of liver differed for the three exposure treatments. After ZnO NPs exposure, Zn percentage in metal-rich granule (MRG) increased significantly, and after Zn(2+) exposure, it increased significantly in the organelles. Metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) were the main target for Zn(2+), while MRG played dominant role for ZnO NPs. The different results of subcellular distributions revealed that metal detoxification mechanisms of liver for ZnO NPs, bulk ZnO, and Zn(2+) were different. Overall, subcellular partitioning provided an interesting start to better understanding of the toxicity of nano- and conventional materials.

  2. A multiple information fusion method for predicting subcellular locations of two different types of bacterial protein simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Huimin; He, Ping-An; Dai, Qi; Yao, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization prediction of bacterial protein is an important component of bioinformatics, which has great importance for drug design and other applications. For the prediction of protein subcellular localization, as we all know, lots of computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. In this study, we firstly introduce three kinds of protein sequences encoding schemes: physicochemical-based, evolutionary-based, and GO-based. The original and consensus sequences were combined with physicochemical properties. And elements information of different rows and columns in position-specific scoring matrix were taken into consideration simultaneously for more core and essence information. Computational methods based on gene ontology (GO) have been demonstrated to be superior to methods based on other features. Then principal component analysis (PCA) is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to predict protein subcellular localization. The proposed method can achieve a prediction accuracy of 98.28% and 97.87% on a stringent Gram-positive (Gpos) and Gram-negative (Gneg) dataset with Jackknife test, respectively. At last, we calculate "absolute true overall accuracy (ATOA)", which is stricter than overall accuracy. The ATOA obtained from the proposed method is also up to 97.32% and 93.06% for Gpos and Gneg. From both the rationality of testing procedure and the success rates of test results, the current method can improve the prediction quality of protein subcellular localization.

  3. Prion subcellular fractionation reveals infectivity spectrum, with a high titre-low PrPres level disparity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Victoria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion disease transmission and pathogenesis are linked to misfolded, typically protease resistant (PrPres conformers of the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC, with the former posited to be the principal constituent of the infectious 'prion'. Unexplained discrepancies observed between detectable PrPres and infectivity levels exemplify the complexity in deciphering the exact biophysical nature of prions and those host cell factors, if any, which contribute to transmission efficiency. In order to improve our understanding of these important issues, this study utilized a bioassay validated cell culture model of prion infection to investigate discordance between PrPres levels and infectivity titres at a subcellular resolution. Findings Subcellular fractions enriched in lipid rafts or endoplasmic reticulum/mitochondrial marker proteins were equally highly efficient at prion transmission, despite lipid raft fractions containing up to eight times the levels of detectable PrPres. Brain homogenate infectivity was not differentially enhanced by subcellular fraction-specific co-factors, and proteinase K pre-treatment of selected fractions modestly, but equally reduced infectivity. Only lipid raft associated infectivity was enhanced by sonication. Conclusions This study authenticates a subcellular disparity in PrPres and infectivity levels, and eliminates simultaneous divergence of prion strains as the explanation for this phenomenon. On balance, the results align best with the concept that transmission efficiency is influenced more by intrinsic characteristics of the infectious prion, rather than cellular microenvironment conditions or absolute PrPres levels.

  4. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  5. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  6. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakaew, P; Boon, N; Goel, G; Yuangklang, C; Schonewille, J Th; Hendriks, W H; Fievez, V

    2013-12-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on rumen fermentation, protozoal counts and archaeal abundance, as well as their diversity and functional organization. KO contains similar amounts of C12:0 as CO (420 and 458 g/kg FA, respectively), but has a higher proportion of C14:0 (464 v. 205 g/kg FA, respectively). Treatments contained 35 g supplemental fat per kg DM: a control diet with tallow (T); a diet with supplemental CO; and a diet with supplemental KO. A 4th treatment consisted of a diet with similar amounts of MCFA (i.e. C10:0+C12:0+C14:0) from CO and KO. To ensure isolipidic diets, extra tallow was supplied in the latter treatment (KO+T). Eight fistulated bulls (two bulls per treatment), fed a total mixed ration predominantly based on cassava chips, rice straw, tomato pomace, rice bran and soybean meal (1.5% of BW), were used. Both KO and CO increased the rumen volatile fatty acids, in particular propionate and decreased acetate proportions. Protozoal numbers were reduced through the supplementation of an MCFA source (CO, KO and KO+T), with the strongest reduction by KO. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays based on archaeal primers showed a decrease in abundance of Archaea when supplementing with KO and KO+T compared with T and CO. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the rumen archaeal population did not result in a grouping of treatments. Richness indices were calculated from the number of DGGE bands, whereas community organization was assessed from the Pareto-Lorenz evenness curves on the basis of DGGE band intensities. KO supplementation (KO and KO+T treatments) increased richness and evenness within the archaeal community. Further research including methane

  7. Pyrosequencing reveals the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the composition of archaeal communities in the rhizosphere of C3 and C4 crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. M.; Cann, I. K.; Mackie, R. I.

    2008-12-01

    The projected increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations throughout the 21st century is likely to increase aboveground and belowground plant productivity and cause changes in the quantity and quality of plant root exudates, although plants using C4 photosynthesis are likely to be only affected during times of drought (Leakey et al., 2006, Plant Physiology, 140, 779). Evidence is emerging from molecular tools that these changes may influence the abundance and composition of soil microbial communities that regulate key soil processes, such as nitrogen cycling (Lesaulnier et al., 2008, Environmental Microbiology, 10, 926). However, most molecular tools are not well-suited for comparing multiple samples at great sequencing depth, which is critical when considering soil microbial communities of high diversity. To overcome these limitations we used pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of two genes (the V3 region of 16S rDNA and the amoA gene) to examine intra- and inter-treatment variability in the abundance and composition of microbial communities in the rhizosphere of soybean (C3) and maize (C4) grown in field conditions under ambient (~380 ppm) and elevated (~550 ppm) CO2 using FACE (free-air concentration enrichment) technology during the 2006 growing season in central Illinois. We specifically focused on archaeal communities because of their key role in nitrification (Leininger et al., 2006, Nature, 442, 806). The majority (>97%) of recovered sequences were from members of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Principle component analysis of sequence results from the V3 and amoA genes indicated significant (p<0.05) differences in the composition of rhizosphere archaeal communities between ambient and elevated CO2 beneath soybean, but not maize. qPCR suggested no significant difference in the abundance of archaea between treatments for soybean and maize. The lack of response of archaeal community composition beneath maize to elevated CO2 is consistent with relatively high

  8. Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Kristina

    2014-07-09

    In spite of considerable insights into the microbial diversity of marine sponges, quantitative information on microbial abundances and community composition remains scarce. Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. We could show that the 16S rRNA gene numbers of Archaea, Chloroflexi, and the candidate phylum Poribacteria were 4-6 orders of magnitude higher in high microbial abundance (HMA) than in low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges and that actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene numbers were 1-2 orders higher in HMA over LMA sponges, while those for Cyanobacteria were stable between HMA and LMA sponges. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of Aplysina aerophoba tissue sections confirmed the numerical dominance of Chloroflexi, which was followed by Poribacteria. Archaeal and actinobacterial cells were detected in much lower numbers. By use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a primer- and probe-independent approach, the dominance of Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Poribacteria in A. aerophoba was confirmed. Our study provides new quantitative insights into the microbiology of sponges and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA/LMA dichotomy. The authors quantified sponge symbionts in eight sponge species from three different locations by real time PCR targetting 16S rRNA genes. Additionally, FISH was performed and diversity and abundance of singularized microbial symbionts from Aplysina aerophoba was determined for a comprehensive quantification work. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  9. Strangers in the archaeal world: osmostress-responsive biosynthesis of ectoine and hydroxyectoine by the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Czech, Laura; Elling, Felix J; Könneke, Martin; Stöveken, Nadine; Pittelkow, Marco; Riclea, Ramona; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-04-01

    Ectoine and hydroxyectoine are compatible solutes widely synthesized by members of the Bacteria to cope with high osmolarity surroundings. Inspection of 557 archaeal genomes revealed that only 12 strains affiliated with the Nitrosopumilus, Methanothrix or Methanobacterium genera harbour ectoine/hydroxyectoine gene clusters. Phylogenetic considerations suggest that these Archaea have acquired these genes through horizontal gene transfer events. Using the Thaumarchaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus' as an example, we demonstrate that the transcription of its ectABCD genes is osmotically induced and functional since it leads to the production of both ectoine and hydroxyectoine. The ectoine synthase and the ectoine hydroxylase were biochemically characterized, and their properties resemble those of their counterparts from Bacteria. Transcriptional analysis of osmotically stressed 'Ca. N. maritimus' cells demonstrated that they possess an ectoine/hydroxyectoine gene cluster (hyp-ectABCD-mscS) different from those recognized previously since it contains a gene for an MscS-type mechanosensitive channel. Complementation experiments with an Escherichia coli mutant lacking all known mechanosensitive channel proteins demonstrated that the (Nm)MscS protein is functional. Hence, 'Ca. N. maritimus' cells cope with high salinity not only through enhanced synthesis of osmostress-protective ectoines but they already prepare themselves simultaneously for an eventually occurring osmotic down-shock by enhancing the production of a safety-valve (NmMscS).

  10. Archaeal signal transduction: impact of protein phosphatase deletions on cell size, motility, and energy metabolism in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Julia; Esser, Dominik; Orell, Alvaro; Amman, Fabian; Pham, Trong Khoa; Noirel, Josselin; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Wright, Phillip C; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo functions of the only two identified protein phosphatases, Saci-PTP and Saci-PP2A, in the crenarchaeal model organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were investigated. Biochemical characterization revealed that Saci-PTP is a dual-specific phosphatase (against pSer/pThr and pTyr), whereas Saci-PP2A exhibited specific pSer/pThr activity and inhibition by okadaic acid. Deletion of saci_pp2a resulted in pronounced alterations in growth, cell shape and cell size, which could be partially complemented. Transcriptome analysis of the three strains (Δsaci_ptp, Δsaci_pp2a and the MW001 parental strain) revealed 155 genes that were differentially expressed in the deletion mutants, and showed significant changes in expression of genes encoding the archaella (archaeal motility structure), components of the respiratory chain and transcriptional regulators. Phosphoproteome studies revealed 801 unique phosphoproteins in total, with an increase in identified phosphopeptides in the deletion mutants. Proteins from most functional categories were affected by phosphorylation, including components of the motility system, the respiratory chain, and regulatory proteins. In the saci_pp2a deletion mutant the up-regulation at the transcript level, as well as the observed phosphorylation pattern, resembled starvation stress responses. Hypermotility was also observed in the saci_pp2a deletion mutant. The results highlight the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulating essential cellular processes in the crenarchaeon S. acidocaldarius.

  11. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kristin Perras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The uncultivated Ca. Altiarchaeum hamiconexum (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks (hami on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal phylum at their N-terminal region (47-44% identity. Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  12. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami) resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perras, Alexandra K; Daum, Bertram; Ziegler, Christine; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Ahmed, Musahid; Wanner, Gerhard; Klingl, Andreas; Leitinger, Gerd; Kolb-Lenz, Dagmar; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Auerbach, Anna; Mora, Maximilian; Probst, Alexander J; Bellack, Annett; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The uncultivated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum" (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon) carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks ("hami") on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal domain at their N-terminal region (44-47% identity). Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  13. Substrate promiscuity: AglB, the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase, can process a variety of lipid-linked glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Guan, Ziqiang; Shaanan, Boaz; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Across evolution, N-glycosylation involves oligosaccharyltransferases that transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected Asn residues of target proteins. While these enzymes catalyze similar reactions in each domain, differences exist in terms of the chemical composition, length and degree of phosphorylation of the lipid glycan carrier, the sugar linking the glycan to the lipid carrier, and the composition and structure of the transferred glycan. To gain insight into how oligosaccharyltransferases cope with such substrate diversity, the present study analyzed the archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase AglB from four haloarchaeal species. Accordingly, it was shown that despite processing distinct lipid-linked glycans in their native hosts, AglB from Haloarcula marismortui, Halobacterium salinarum, and Haloferax mediterranei could readily replace their counterpart from Haloferax volcanii when introduced into Hfx. volcanii cells deleted of aglB. As the four enzymes show significant sequence and apparently structural homology, it appears that the functional similarity of the four AglB proteins reflects the relaxed substrate specificity of these enzymes. Such demonstration of AglB substrate promiscuity is important not only for better understanding of N-glycosylation in Archaea and elsewhere but also for efforts aimed at transforming Hfx. volcanii into a glycoengineering platform.

  14. Impacts of temperature and pH on the distribution of archaeal lipids in Yunnan hot springs, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiyan; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Wang, Huanye; He, Liu; Li, Wenjun; Dong, Hailiang

    2013-01-01

    In culture experiments and many low temperature environments, the distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) commonly shows a strong correlation with temperature; however, this is often not the case in hot springs. We studied 26 hot springs in Yunnan, China, in order to determine whether temperature or other factors control the distribution of GDGTs in these environments. The hot springs ranged in temperature from 39.0 to 94.0°C, and in pH from 2.35 to 9.11. Water chemistry including nitrogen-, sulfur-, and iron species was also determined. Lipids from the samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Distributions of GDGTs in these hot springs were examined using cluster analysis, which resulted in two major groups. Group 1 was characterized by the lack of dominance of any individual GDGTs, while Group 2 was defined by the dominance of GDGT-0 or thaumarchaeol. Temperature was the main control on GDGT distribution in Group 1, whereas pH played an important role in the distribution of GDGTs in Group 2. However, no correlations were found between the distribution of GDGTs and any of the nitrogen-, sulfur-, or iron species. Results of this study indicate the dominance of temperature or pH control on archaeal lipid distribution, which can be better evaluated in the context of lipid classification.

  15. Impacts of temperature and pH on the distribution of archaeal lipids in Yunnan hot springs, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyan eWu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In culture experiments and many low temperature environments, the distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs commonly shows a strong correlation with temperature; however, this is often not the case in hot springs. We studied 26 hot springs in Yunnan, China, in order to determine whether temperature or other factors control the distribution of GDGTs in these environments. The hot springs ranged in temperature from 39°C to 94°C, and in pH from 2.35 to 9.11. Water chemistry including nitrogen-, sulfur- and iron species was also determined. Lipids from the samples were analyzed using LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Distributions of GDGTs in these hot springs were examined using cluster analysis, which resulted in two major groups. Group 1 was characterized by the lack of dominance of any individual GDGTs, while Group 2 was defined by the dominance of GDGT-0 or thaumarchaeol. Temperature was the main control on GDGT distribution in Group 1, whereas pH played an important role in the distribution of GDGTs in Group 2. However, no correlations were found between the distribution of GDGTs and any of the nitrogen-, sulfur- or iron species. Results of this study indicate the predominance of temperature or pH control on archaeal lipid distribution, which can be better evaluated in the context of lipid classification.

  16. Structure and regulatory role of the C-terminal winged helix domain of the archaeal minichromosome maintenance complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Szambowska, Anna; Häfner, Sabine; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Görlach, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) represents the replicative DNA helicase both in eukaryotes and archaea. Here, we describe the solution structure of the C-terminal domains of the archaeal MCMs of Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Those domains consist of a structurally conserved truncated winged helix (WH) domain lacking the two typical ‘wings’ of canonical WH domains. A less conserved N-terminal extension links this WH module to the MCM AAA+ domain forming the ATPase center. In the Sso MCM this linker contains a short α-helical element. Using Sso MCM mutants, including chimeric constructs containing Mth C-terminal domain elements, we show that the ATPase and helicase activity of the Sso MCM is significantly modulated by the short α-helical linker element and by N-terminal residues of the first α-helix of the truncated WH module. Finally, based on our structural and functional data, we present a docking-derived model of the Sso MCM, which implies an allosteric control of the ATPase center by the C-terminal domain. PMID:25712103

  17. Archaeal Diversity in Biofilm Technologies Applied to Treat Urban and Industrial Wastewater: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús González-López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological wastewater treatment (WWT frequently relies on biofilms for the removal of anthropogenic contaminants. The use of inert carrier materials to support biofilm development is often required, although under certain operating conditions microorganisms yield structures called granules, dense aggregates of self-immobilized cells with the characteristics of biofilms maintained in suspension. Molecular techniques have been successfully applied in recent years to identify the prokaryotic communities inhabiting biofilms in WWT plants. Although methanogenic Archaea are widely acknowledged as key players for the degradation of organic matter in anaerobic bioreactors, other biotechnological functions fulfilled by Archaea are less explored, and research on their significance and potential for WWT is largely needed. In addition, the occurrence of biofilms in WWT plants can sometimes be a source of operational problems. This is the case for membrane bioreactors (MBR, an advanced technology that combines conventional biological treatment with membrane filtration, which is strongly limited by biofouling, defined as the undesirable accumulation of microbial biofilms and other materials on membrane surfaces. The prevalence and spatial distribution of archaeal communities in biofilm-based WWT as well as their role in biofouling are reviewed here, in order to illustrate the significance of this prokaryotic cellular lineage in engineered environments devoted to WWT.

  18. Human settlement as driver of bacterial, but not of archaeal, ammonia oxidizers abundance and community structure in tropical stream sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana De Paula Reis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms.

  19. Response of the rumen archaeal and bacterial populations to anti-methanogenic organosulphur compounds in continuous-culture fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Gonzalo; Abecia, Leticia; Martín-García, A Ignacio; Ramos-Morales, Eva; Denman, Stuart E; Newbold, Charles J; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Yáñez-Ruiz, David R

    2015-08-01

    Study of the efficacy of methanogenesis inhibitors in the rumen has given inconsistent results, mainly due to poorly understood effects on the key microbial groups involved in pathways for methane (CH4) synthesis. The experiment described in this report was designed to assess the effect of propyl propane thiosulfinate (PTS), diallyl disulfide (DDS) and bromochloromethane (BCM) on rumen fermentation, methane production and microbial populations in continuous culture fermenters. No effects on total volatile fatty acids (VFA) were observed with PTS or DDS, but VFA were decreased with BCM. Amylase activity increased with BCM as compared with the other treatments. A decrease in methane production was observed with PTS (48%) and BCM (94%) as compared with control values. The concentration of methanogenic archaea decreased with BCM from day 4 onward and with PTS on days 4 and 8. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that PTS and BCM decreased the relative abundance of Methanomicrobiales and increased that of Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. The total concentration of bacteria was not modified by any treatment, although treatment with BCM increased the relative abundance of Prevotella and decreased that of Ruminococcus. These results suggest that the inhibition of methane production in the rumen by PTS and BCM is associated with a shift in archaeal biodiversity and changes in the bacterial community with BCM.

  20. Construction of higher-ordered monolayer membranes derived from archaeal membrane lipid-inspired cyclic lipids with longer alkyl chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Goto, Rie; Tadokoro, Toshio; Shibakami, Motonari

    2007-06-15

    A series of artificial cyclic lipids that mimic archaeal membrane ones has been synthesized. The structural features of these molecules include a longer cyclic framework, in which the alkyl chain length ranges from 24 to 32 in carbon number, which is longer than our first analogous molecule with 20-carbon long alkyl chains [K. Miyawaki, T. Takagi, M. Shibakami, Synlett 8 (2002) 1326]. Microscopic observation reveals that these molecules have a self-assembling ability: hydration of the lipids yields multilamellar vesicles in aqueous solution and monolayer sheets on solid supports. High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (24- and 28-carbon alkyl chain lipids) indicates that (i) the alkyl chain length affects their phase behavior and (ii) the enthalpies of endothermic peaks accompanied by phase transition were considerably lower than those of their monomeric phospholipid analogs. Fluorescence polarization measurements suggest that the membranes made from the 24-carbon alkyl chain lipid have a higher polarization factor than membranes composed of DMPC and DMPC plus cholesterol. These findings imply that the cyclic lipids containing 24- and 28-carbon alkyl chain construct well-organized monolayer membranes and, in particular, that the molecular order of the 24-carbon alkyl chain lipid is higher than that of bilayer membranes in the liquid-ordered phase.

  1. Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Kristina; Kamke, Janine; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-09-01

    In spite of considerable insights into the microbial diversity of marine sponges, quantitative information on microbial abundances and community composition remains scarce. Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. We could show that the 16S rRNA gene numbers of Archaea, Chloroflexi, and the candidate phylum Poribacteria were 4-6 orders of magnitude higher in high microbial abundance (HMA) than in low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges and that actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene numbers were 1-2 orders higher in HMA over LMA sponges, while those for Cyanobacteria were stable between HMA and LMA sponges. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of Aplysina aerophoba tissue sections confirmed the numerical dominance of Chloroflexi, which was followed by Poribacteria. Archaeal and actinobacterial cells were detected in much lower numbers. By use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a primer- and probe-independent approach, the dominance of Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Poribacteria in A. aerophoba was confirmed. Our study provides new quantitative insights into the microbiology of sponges and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA/LMA dichotomy.

  2. Mathematical modeling of sub-cellular asymmetry of fat-dachsous heterodimer for generation of planar cell polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Kumar Jolly

    Full Text Available Planar Cell Polarity (PCP is an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of animal tissues marked by coordinated polarization of cells or structures in the plane of a tissue. In insect wing epithelium, for instance, PCP is characterized by en masse orientation of hairs orthogonal to its apical-basal axis and pointing along the proximal-distal axis of the organ. Directional cue for PCP has been proposed to be generated by complex sets of interactions amongst three proteins - Fat (Ft, Dachsous (Ds and Four-jointed (Fj. Ft and Ds are two atypical cadherins, which are phosphorylated by Fj, a Golgi kinase. Ft and Ds from adjacent cells bind heterophilically via their tandem cadherin repeats, and their binding affinities are regulated by Fj. Further, in the wing epithelium, sub-cellular levels of Ft-Ds heterodimers are seen to be elevated at the distal edges of individual cells, prefiguring their PCP. Mechanisms generating this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer in proximal and distal edges of cells, however, have not been resolved yet. Using a mathematical modeling approach, here we provide a framework for generation of this sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. First, we explain how the known interactions within Ft-Ds-Fj system translate into sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Second, we show that this asymmetric localization of Ft-Ds heterodimer is lost when tissue-level gradient of Fj is flattened, or when phosphorylation of Ft by Fj is abolished, but not when tissue-level gradient of Ds is flattened or when phosphorylation of Ds is abrogated. Finally, we show that distal enrichment of Ds also amplifies Ft-Ds asymmetry. These observations reveal that gradient of Fj expression, phosphorylation of Ft by Fj and sub-cellular distal accumulation of Ds are three critical elements required for generating sub-cellular asymmetry of Ft-Ds heterodimer. Our model integrates the known experimental data and presents testable predictions

  3. Detection and subcellular localization of dehydrin-like proteins in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carjuzaa, P; Castellión, M; Distéfano, A J; del Vas, M; Maldonado, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the dehydrin content in mature embryos of two quinoa cultivars, Sajama and Baer La Unión. Cultivar Sajama grows at 3600-4000 m altitude and is adapted to the very arid conditions characteristic of the salty soils of the Bolivian Altiplano, with less than 250 mm of annual rain and a minimum temperature of -1 degrees C. Cultivar Baer La Unión grows at sea-level regions of central Chile and is adapted to more humid conditions (800 to 1500 mm of annual rain), fertile soils, and temperatures above 5 degrees C. Western blot analysis of embryo tissues from plants growing under controlled greenhouse conditions clearly revealed the presence of several dehydrin bands (at molecular masses of approximately 30, 32, 50, and 55 kDa), which were common to both cultivars, although the amount of the 30 and 32 kDa bands differed. Nevertheless, when grains originated from their respective natural environments, three extra bands (at molecular masses of approximately 34, 38, and 40 kDa), which were hardly visible in Sajama, and another weak band (at a molecular mass of approximately 28 kDa) were evident in Baer La Unión. In situ immunolocalization microscopy detected dehydrin-like proteins in all axis and cotyledon tissues. At the subcellular level, dehydrins were detected in the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus. In the cytoplasm, dehydrins were found associated with mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, and proplastid membranes. The presence of dehydrins was also recognized in the matrix of protein bodies. In the nucleus, dehydrins were associated with the euchromatin. Upon examining dehydrin composition and subcellular localization in two quinoa cultivars belonging to highly contrasting environments, we conclude that most dehydrins detected here were constitutive components of the quinoa seed developmental program, but some of them (specially the 34, 38, and 40 kDa bands) may reflect quantitative molecular differences

  4. Beyond co-localization: inferring spatial interactions between sub-cellular structures from microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grégory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-cellular structures interact in numerous direct and indirect ways in order to fulfill cellular functions. While direct molecular interactions crucially depend on spatial proximity, other interactions typically result in spatial correlations between the interacting structures. Such correlations are the target of microscopy-based co-localization analysis, which can provide hints of potential interactions. Two complementary approaches to co-localization analysis can be distinguished: intensity correlation methods capitalize on pattern discovery, whereas object-based methods emphasize detection power. Results We first reinvestigate the classical co-localization measure in the context of spatial point pattern analysis. This allows us to unravel the set of implicit assumptions inherent to this measure and to identify potential confounding factors commonly ignored. We generalize object-based co-localization analysis to a statistical framework involving spatial point processes. In this framework, interactions are understood as position co-dependencies in the observed localization patterns. The framework is based on a model of effective pairwise interaction potentials and the specification of a null hypothesis for the expected pattern in the absence of interaction. Inferred interaction potentials thus reflect all significant effects that are not explained by the null hypothesis. Our model enables the use of a wealth of well-known statistical methods for analyzing experimental data, as demonstrated on synthetic data and in a case study considering virus entry into live cells. We show that the classical co-localization measure typically under-exploits the information contained in our data. Conclusions We establish a connection between co-localization and spatial interaction of sub-cellular structures by formulating the object-based interaction analysis problem in a spatial statistics framework based on nearest-neighbor distance

  5. Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Robert A; Lai, Barry; Holmes, William R; Lee, Daewoo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how single cell quantitative and subcellular metallomics inform us about both the spatial distribution and cellular mechanisms of metal buffering and homeostasis in primary cultured neurons from embryonic rat brain, which are often used as models of human disease involving metal dyshomeostasis. The present studies utilized synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and focused primarily on zinc and iron, two abundant metals in neurons that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Total single cell contents for calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and nickel were determined. Resting steady state zinc showed a diffuse distribution in both soma and processes, best defined by the mass profile of the neuron with an enrichment in the nucleus compared with the cytoplasm. Zinc buffering and homeostasis was studied using two modes of cellular zinc loading - transporter and ionophore (pyrithione) mediated. Single neuron zinc contents were shown to statistically significantly increase by either loading method - ionophore: 160 million to 7 billion; transporter 160 million to 280 million atoms per neuronal soma. The newly acquired and buffered zinc still showed a diffuse distribution. Soma and processes have about equal abilities to take up zinc via transporter mediated pathways. Copper levels are distributed diffusely as well, but are relatively higher in the processes relative to zinc levels. Prior studies have observed iron puncta in certain cell types, but others have not. In the present study, iron puncta were characterized in several primary neuronal types. The results show that iron puncta could be found in all neuronal types studied and can account for up to 50% of the total steady state content of iron in neuronal soma. Although other metals can be present in iron puncta, they are predominantly iron containing and do not appear to be

  6. Movies of cellular and sub-cellular motion by digital holographic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lingfeng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological specimens, such as living cells and their intracellular components, often exhibit very little amplitude contrast, making it difficult for conventional bright field microscopes to distinguish them from their surroundings. To overcome this problem phase contrast techniques such as Zernike, Normarsky and dark-field microscopies have been developed to improve specimen visibility without chemically or physically altering them by the process of staining. These techniques have proven to be invaluable tools for studying living cells and furthering scientific understanding of fundamental cellular processes such as mitosis. However a drawback of these techniques is that direct quantitative phase imaging is not possible. Quantitative phase imaging is important because it enables determination of either the refractive index or optical thickness variations from the measured optical path length with sub-wavelength accuracy. Digital holography is an emergent phase contrast technique that offers an excellent approach in obtaining both qualitative and quantitative phase information from the hologram. A CCD camera is used to record a hologram onto a computer and numerical methods are subsequently applied to reconstruct the hologram to enable direct access to both phase and amplitude information. Another attractive feature of digital holography is the ability to focus on multiple focal planes from a single hologram, emulating the focusing control of a conventional microscope. Methods A modified Mach-Zender off-axis setup in transmission is used to record and reconstruct a number of holographic amplitude and phase images of cellular and sub-cellular features. Results Both cellular and sub-cellular features are imaged with sub-micron, diffraction-limited resolution. Movies of holographic amplitude and phase images of living microbes and cells are created from a series of holograms and reconstructed with numerically adjustable

  7. Subcellular localization of total and activated Src kinase in African American and Caucasian breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidharan Anbalagan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Src, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase is elevated in cancer with expression and activity correlated with cell proliferation, adhesion, survival, motility, metastasis and angiogenesis. There is limited data on Src expression and subcellular localization in breast cancer and no information about expression in racial/ethnic groups. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study evaluated Src expression, activity, and subcellular localization in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC and ERα positive breast cancer (ER+BC, cancer tissue and adjacent normal epithelial ducts, and Caucasian and African American cases. 79 paraffin embedded breast carcinoma cases were obtained from Tulane University Hospital between 2007-2009. 39 cases represented TNBC (33-African Americans, 4-Caucasians, 2-unknowns and 40 cases represented ER+BC (21-African Americans, 16-Caucasians, 3-unknowns. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure staining distribution and intensity of total Src and activated phospho-SrcY416 (p-Y416Src in carcinoma tissue and adjacent normal mammary ducts. In TNBC and ER+BC, total Src was significantly higher in cancer compared to adjacent normal ducts (P<0.0001 in both cell membrane and cytoplasm. In membranes, p-Y416Src was elevated in cancer compared to normal ducts. Total Src in the tumor cytoplasm was significantly higher in TNBC compared to ER+BC (P = 0.0028; conversely, p-Y416Src in the tumor cell membranes was higher in TNBC compared to ER+BC (P = 0.0106. Comparison between African American (n = 21 and Caucasian ER+BC (n = 16 revealed no significant difference in expression and localization of total Src and p-Y416Src. TNBC cases positive for lymph node metastasis showed elevated membrane p-Y416Src compared to lymph node negative TNBC (P = 0.027. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Total Src and p-Y416Src were expressed higher in cancer compared to adjacent normal ducts. Cytoplasmic total Src and membrane p-Y416Src were

  8. Protein subcellular localization prediction based on compartment-specific features and structure conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Allan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein subcellular localization is crucial for genome annotation, protein function prediction, and drug discovery. Determination of subcellular localization using experimental approaches is time-consuming; thus, computational approaches become highly desirable. Extensive studies of localization prediction have led to the development of several methods including composition-based and homology-based methods. However, their performance might be significantly degraded if homologous sequences are not detected. Moreover, methods that integrate various features could suffer from the problem of low coverage in high-throughput proteomic analyses due to the lack of information to characterize unknown proteins. Results We propose a hybrid prediction method for Gram-negative bacteria that combines a one-versus-one support vector machines (SVM model and a structural homology approach. The SVM model comprises a number of binary classifiers, in which biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways are incorporated. In the structural homology approach, we employ secondary structure alignment for structural similarity comparison and assign the known localization of the top-ranked protein as the predicted localization of a query protein. The hybrid method achieves overall accuracy of 93.7% and 93.2% using ten-fold cross-validation on the benchmark data sets. In the assessment of the evaluation data sets, our method also attains accurate prediction accuracy of 84.0%, especially when testing on sequences with a low level of homology to the training data. A three-way data split procedure is also incorporated to prevent overestimation of the predictive performance. In addition, we show that the prediction accuracy should be approximately 85% for non-redundant data sets of sequence identity less than 30%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation

  9. Cadmium uptake, chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and accumulation in Echinodorus osiris Rataj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaolan; Zhang, Peng; Mo, Chuangrong; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Qinfeng; Pan, Liping; Lee, D K

    2013-07-01

    Phytoremediation is a technology for extracting or inactivating pollutants in soil. Echinodorus osiris (E. osiris) is a fast growing perennial wetland plant that is common in tropical and subtropical areas and has a high tolerance to cadmium (Cd). However, the absorption dynamics, subcellular distribution and accumulation of Cd by E. osiris had not been investigated. In this paper, hydroponic experiments with different levels of Cd(2+) (0, 5.0, 15.0 mg L(-1)) were carried out to determine these characteristics of E. osiris. The results indicated that the Cd absorption rate of Echinodorus osiris decreased over time, and the absorption rate within 0.5-1.0 h was faster than after 1.0 h. In a 6.0 hour time period, the rate of Cd uptake fit a quadratic polynomial curve when E. osiris was grown under the 5 mg L(-1) Cd treatment. However, the rate of Cd uptake by E. osiris fit a cubic polynomial model with the 15 mg L(-1) Cd treatment. In the roots, the ethanol-extractable Cd, water-extractable Cd, and NaCl-extractable Cd were the largest proportions of the total Cd. The HAc-extractable Cd, HCl-extractable Cd, and residual-Cd represented a larger proportion of the total Cd in the leaves which was combined with phosphate including CdHPO4, Cd3 (PO4)2, and oxalic acid. When analyzing the subcellular distribution of Cd in the plant, the soluble fraction containing Cd accounted for the largest part (69.49-88.39%) followed by the Cd bound to the cell wall (8.44-25.62%). Both the lower and the higher Cd treatments demonstrated that compartmentation by the vacuole and cell wall binding were two effective defense mechanisms of the plant. However, the vacuole became the main site for Cd accumulation in the leaves under the 15 mg L(-1) Cd treatment. E. osiris was able to accumulate high concentrations of Cd in both the roots and the leaves. The Cd concentration reached 502.97 mg kg(-1) and 2742.95 mg kg(-1) in the shoots and roots, respectively, after 27 days of cultivation. It was

  10. Archaeal Viruses Contribute to the Novel Viral Assemblage Inhabiting Oceanic, Basalt-Hosted Deep Subsurface Crustal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, O. D.; Rappe, M. S.; Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Steward, G.

    2015-12-01

    Fluids contained in the basalt-hosted deep subsurface of the world's oceans represent one of the most inaccessible and understudied biospheres on earth. Recent improvements in sampling infrastructure have allowed us to collect large volumes of crustal fluids (~104 L) from Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits (CORKs) placed in boreholes located on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). We detected viruses within these fluids by TEM and epifluorescence microscopy in samples collected from 2010 to 2014. Viral abundance, determined by epifluorescence counts, indicated that concentrations of viruses in subsurface basement fluids (~105 ml-1) are lower than the overlying seawater, but are higher in abundance than microbial cells in the same samples. Analysis of TEM images revealed distinct viral morphologies (rod and spindle-shaped) that resemble the morphologies of viral families infecting archaea. There are very few, if any, direct observations of these viral morphologies in marine samples, although they have been observed in enrichment cultures and their signature genes detected in metagenomic studies from hydrothermal vents and marine sediments. Analysis of metagenomes from the JdFR crustal fluids revealed sequences with homology to archaeal viruses from the rudiviridae, bicaudaviridae and fuselloviridae. Prokaryotic communities in fluids percolating through the basaltic basement rock of the JdFR flank are distinct from those inhabiting the overlying sediments and seawater. Similarly, our data support the idea that the viral assemblage in these fluids is distinct from viral assemblages in other marine and terrestrial aquatic environments. Our data also suggest that viruses contribute to the mortality of deep subsurface prokaryotes through cell lysis, and viruses may alter the genetic potential of their hosts through the processes of lysogenic conversion and horizontal gene transfer.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  12. Bacterial CS2 hydrolases from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains are homologous to the archaeal catenane CS2 hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeulders, Marjan J; Pol, Arjan; Venselaar, Hanka; Barends, Thomas R M; Hermans, John; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2013-09-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS(2)) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) are important in the global sulfur cycle, and CS(2) is used as a solvent in the viscose industry. These compounds can be converted by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans species, to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a property used in industrial biofiltration of CS(2)-polluted airstreams. We report on the mechanism of bacterial CS(2) conversion in the extremely acidophilic A. thiooxidans strains S1p and G8. The bacterial CS(2) hydrolases were highly abundant. They were purified and found to be homologous to the only other described (archaeal) CS(2) hydrolase from Acidianus strain A1-3, which forms a catenane of two interlocked rings. The enzymes cluster in a group of β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) homologues that may comprise a subclass of CS(2) hydrolases within the β-CA family. Unlike CAs, the CS(2) hydrolases did not hydrate CO(2) but converted CS(2) and COS with H(2)O to H(2)S and CO(2). The CS(2) hydrolases of A. thiooxidans strains G8, 2Bp, Sts 4-3, and BBW1, like the CS(2) hydrolase of Acidianus strain A1-3, exist as both octamers and hexadecamers in solution. The CS(2) hydrolase of A. thiooxidans strain S1p forms only octamers. Structure models of the A. thiooxidans CS(2) hydrolases based on the structure of Acidianus strain A1-3 CS(2) hydrolase suggest that the A. thiooxidans strain G8 CS(2) hydrolase may also form a catenane. In the A. thiooxidans strain S1p enzyme, two insertions (positions 26 and 27 [PD] and positions 56 to 61 [TPAGGG]) and a nine-amino-acid-longer C-terminal tail may prevent catenane formation.

  13. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe B; White, Malcolm F; Peng, Xu

    2015-06-19

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5' → 3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition to the previously demonstrated ssDNA endonuclease activity. Further, in vitro pull-down assay demonstrated interactions between gp17 and gp18 and between gp18 and gp19 with the former being mediated by the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of gp17. The strand-displacement replication mode proposed previously for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.

  14. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich shallow-sea hydrothermal system undergoing phase separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Edward Price

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase separation is a ubiquitous process in seafloor hydrothermal vents, creating a large range of salinities. Toxic elements (e.g., arsenic partition into the vapor phase, and thus can be enriched in both high and low salinity fluids. However, investigations of microbial diversity at sites associated with phase separation are rare. We evaluated prokaryotic diversity in arsenic-rich shallow-sea vents off Milos Island (Greece by comparative analysis of 16S rRNA clone sequences from two vent sites with similar pH and temperature but marked differences in salinity. Clone sequences were also obtained for aioA-like functional genes (AFGs. Bacteria in the surface sediments (0 to 1.5 cm at the high salinity site consisted of mainly Epsilonproteobacteria (Arcobacter sp., which transitioned to almost exclusively Firmicutes (Bacillus sp. at ~10 cm depth. However, the low salinity site consisted of Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteria in the surface and Epsilonproteobacteria (Arcobacter sp. at ~10 cm depth. Archaea in the high salinity surface sediments were dominated by the orders Archaeoglobales and Thermococcales, transitioning to Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales (Staphylothermus sp. in the deeper sediments. In contrast, the low salinity site was dominated by Thermoplasmatales in the surface and Thermoproteales at depth. Similarities in gas and redox chemistry suggest that salinity and/or arsenic concentrations may select for microbial communities that can tolerate these parameters. Many of the archaeal 16S rRNA sequences contained inserts, possibly introns, including members of the Euryarchaeota. Clones containing AFGs affiliated with either Alpha- or Betaproteobacteria, although most were only distantly related to published representatives. Most clones (89% originated from the deeper layer of the low salinity, highest arsenic site. This is the only sample with overlap in 16S rRNA data, suggesting arsenotrophy as an important metabolism in similar

  15. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications.

  16. Subcellular metabolite and lipid analysis of Xenopus laevis eggs by LAESI mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindesh Shrestha

    Full Text Available Xenopus laevis eggs are used as a biological model system for studying fertilization and early embryonic development in vertebrates. Most methods used for their molecular analysis require elaborate sample preparation including separate protocols for the water soluble and lipid components. In this study, laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI, an ambient ionization technique, was used for direct mass spectrometric analysis of X. laevis eggs and early stage embryos up to five cleavage cycles. Single unfertilized and fertilized eggs, their animal and vegetal poles, and embryos through the 32-cell stage were analyzed. Fifty two small metabolite ions, including glutathione, GABA and amino acids, as well as numerous lipids including 14 fatty acids, 13 lysophosphatidylcholines, 36 phosphatidylcholines and 29 triacylglycerols were putatively identified. Additionally, some proteins, for example thymosin β4 (Xen, were also detected. On the subcellular level, the lipid profiles were found to differ between the animal and vegetal poles of the eggs. Radial profiling revealed profound compositional differences between the jelly coat vitelline/plasma membrane and egg cytoplasm. Changes in the metabolic profile of the egg following fertilization, e.g., the decline of polyamine content with the development of the embryo were observed using LAESI-MS. This approach enables the exploration of metabolic and lipid changes during the early stages of embryogenesis.

  17. Dynamic full field OCT: metabolic contrast at subcellular level (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    Cells shape or density is an important marker of tissues pathology. However, individual cells are difficult to observe in thick tissues frequently presenting highly scattering structures such as collagen fibers. Endogenous techniques struggle to image cells in these conditions. Moreover, exogenous contrast agents like dyes, fluorophores or nanoparticles cannot always be used, especially if non-invasive imaging is required. Scatterers motion happening down to the millisecond scale, much faster than the still and highly scattering structures (global motion of the tissue), allowed us to develop a new approach based on the time dependence of the FF-OCT signals. This method reveals hidden cells after a spatiotemporal analysis based on singular value decomposition and wavelet analysis concepts. It does also give us access to local dynamics of imaged scatterers. This dynamic information is linked with the local metabolic activity that drives these scatterers. Our technique can explore subcellular scales with micrometric resolution and dynamics ranging from the millisecond to seconds. By this mean we studied a wide range of tissues, animal and human in both normal and pathological conditions (cancer, ischemia, osmotic shock…) in different organs such as liver, kidney, and brain among others. Different cells, undetectable with FF-OCT, were identified (erythrocytes, hepatocytes…). Different scatterers clusters express different characteristic times and thus can be related to different mechanisms that we identify with metabolic functions. We are confident that the D-FFOCT, by accessing to a new spatiotemporal metabolic contrast, will be a leading technique on tissue imaging and for better medical diagnosis.

  18. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC AUTORADIOGRAPHIC STUDY ON SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF FISSION PRODUCT 147Pm IN TISSUE CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱寿彭; 汪源长

    1994-01-01

    The early risk of internal contaminated accumualtion of 147Pm is in blood cells and endothelial cells,especially in red blood cells.Then 147Pm is selectively deposited in ultrastructure of liver cells,such as in nucleus,nucleolus,rough endoplasmic reticulum,mitochondria and microbodies,Dense tracks also appear in mitochondria and lysosome of pedal cells within renal corpuscle,and so dose in nucleus as well as in mitochondria and microbodies of epicyte of kidney near-convoluted tubule.With the prolongation of observing time,147Pm is selectively and steadily depostied in subcellular level of organic ocmponent for bone.Substantial amount of 147Pm is taken up into the nuclear fraction of osteoclasts and osteoblasts.Particularly,in organelles 147Pm is mainly accumulated in rough endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria.Autoradiographic tracks especially localize in combined point between Golgi complex and transitive vesicle of rough endoplasmic reticulum.In addition,numerous 147Pm deposited in collagenous fibre within interstitial of bone cells is hardly excreted.

  19. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of thorium in Brassica juncea var. foliosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sai; Kai, Hailu; Zha, Zhongyong; Fang, Zhendong; Wang, Dingna; Du, Liang; Zhang, Dong; Feng, Xiaojie; Jin, Yongdong; Xia, Chuanqin

    2016-06-01

    Brassica juncea var. foliosa (B. juncea var. foliosa) is a promising species for thorium (Th) phytoextraction due to its large biomass, fast growth rate and high tolerance toward Th. To further understand the mechanisms of Th tolerance, the present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Th found in B. juncea var. foliosa Our results indicated that in both roots and leaves, Th contents in different parts of the cells follow the order of cell wall > membranes and soluble fraction > organelles. In particular, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Th was abundantly located in cell walls of the roots. Additionally, when plants were exposed to different concentrations of Th, we have found that Th existed in B. juncea var. foliosa with different chemical forms. Much of the Th extracted by 2% acetic acid (HAc), 1 M NaCl and HCl in roots with the percentage distribution varied from 47.2% to 62.5%, while in leaves, most of the Th was in the form of residue and the subdominant amount of Th was extracted by HCl, followed by 2% HAc. This suggested that Th compartmentation in cytosol and integration with phosphate or proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the tolerance of B. juncea var. foliosa to the stress of Th.

  20. Analyses of the spatiotemporal expression and subcellular localization of liprin-α proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürner, Magdalena; Mittelstaedt, Tobias; tom Dieck, Susanne; Becker, Albert; Schoch, Susanne

    2011-10-15

    The members of the Liprin-α protein family, Liprin-α1-4, are scaffolding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of synapse assembly and maturation, vesicular trafficking, and cell motility. Recent evidence suggests that despite their high degree of homology, the four isoforms can be differentially regulated and fulfill diverging functions. However, to date their precise regional and subcellular distribution has remained elusive. Here, we examine the spatiotemporal expression patterns of Liprins-α in the rodent by using in situ hybridization, immunoblotting, and immunochemistry of primary cells as well as brain and retina sections. We show that Liprin-α1-4 mRNA and protein are widely expressed throughout the developing and adult central nervous system, with Liprin-α2 and -α3 being the major Liprin-α isoforms in the brain. Our data show that the four Liprin-α proteins differ in their regional distribution, in particular in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, and the olfactory bulb. Liprin-α1 exhibits a unique spatiotemporal expression pattern as its levels decrease during synaptogenesis, and it is the only Liprin-α with substantial non-neuronal expression. Immunocytochemistry of cultured primary neurons with pre- and postsynaptic marker proteins shows all four Liprins-α to be present at synapses and nonsynaptic sites to varying degrees. Together, these results show that neurons in different brain regions express a distinct complement of Liprin-α proteins.

  1. Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin, and Kiteplatin Subcellular Effects Compared in a Plant Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paride Papadia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The immediate visual comparison of platinum chemotherapeutics’ effects in eukaryotic cells using accessible plant models of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana is reported. The leading anticancer drug cisplatin, a third generation drug used for colon cancer, oxaliplatin and kiteplatin, promising Pt-based anticancer drugs effective against resistant lines, were administered to transgenic A. thaliana plants monitoring their effects on cells from different tissues. The transgenic plants’ cell cytoskeletons were labelled by the green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged microtubule-protein TUA6 (TUA6-GFP, while the vacuolar organization was evidenced by two soluble chimerical GFPs (GFPChi and AleuGFP and one transmembrane GFP-tagged tonoplast intrinsic protein 1-1 (TIP1.1-GFP. The three drugs showed easily recognizable effects on plant subcellular organization, thereby providing evidence for a differentiated drug targeting. Genetically modified A. thaliana are confirmed as a possible rapid and low-cost screening tool for better understanding the mechanism of action of human anticancer drugs.

  2. Subcellular clearance and accumulation of Huntington disease protein: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting eZhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the N-terminal region of mutant huntingtin (mHtt. As a result, mHtt forms aggregates that are abundant in the nuclei and processes of neuronal cells. Although the roles of mHtt aggregates are still debated, the formation of aggregates points to deficient clearance of mHtt in brain cells. Since the accumulation of mHtt is a prerequisite for its neurotoxicity, exploring the mechanisms for mHtt accumulation and clearance would advance our understanding of HD pathogenesis and help us develop treatments for HD. We know that the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy play important roles in clearing mHtt; however, how mHtt preferentially accumulates in neuronal nuclei and processes remains unclear. Studying the clearance of mHtt in neuronal cells is a challenge because neurons are morphologically and functionally polarized, which means the turnover of mHtt may be distinct in different cellular compartments. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge about the clearance and accumulation of mHtt and strategies of examining mHtt clearance and accumulation in different subcellular regions

  3. Functional domains and sub-cellular distribution of the Hedgehog transducing protein Smoothened in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y; Nystedt, S; Shivdasani, A A; Strutt, H; Thomas, C; Ingham, P W

    2004-06-01

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway is deployed repeatedly during normal animal development and its inappropriate activity is associated with various tumours in human. The serpentine protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for cells to respond to the Hedeghog (Hh) signal; oncogenic forms of Smo have been isolated from human basal cell carcinomas. Despite similarities with ligand binding G-protein coupled receptors, the molecular basis of Smo activity and its regulation remains unclear. In non-responding cells, Smo is suppressed by the activity of another multipass membrane spanning protein Ptc, which acts as the Hh receptor. In Drosophila, binding of Hh to Ptc has been shown to cause an accumulation of phosphorylated Smo protein and a concomitant stabilisation of the activated form of the Ci transcription factor. Here, we identify domains essential for Smo activity and investigate the sub-cellular distribution of the wild type protein in vivo. We find that deletion of the amino terminus and the juxtamembrane region of the carboxy terminus of the protein result in the loss of normal Smo activity. Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and horseradish peroxidase fusion proteins we show that Smo accumulates in the plasma membrane of cells in which Ptc activity is abrogated by Hh but is targeted to the degradative pathway in cells where Ptc is active. We further demonstrate that Smo accumulation is likely to be a cause, rather than a consequence, of Hh signal transduction.

  4. Subcellular localization of APE1/Ref-1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma: possible prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maso, Vittorio; Avellini, Claudio; Crocè, Lory Saveria; Rosso, Natalia; Quadrifoglio, Franco; Cesaratto, Laura; Codarin, Erika; Bedogni, Giorgio; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Tell, Gianluca; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    APE1/Ref-1, normally localized in the nucleus, is a regulator of the cellular response to oxidative stress. Cytoplasmic localization has been observed in several tumors and correlates with a poor prognosis. Because no data are available on liver tumors, we investigated APE1/Ref-1 subcellular localization and its correlation with survival in 47 consecutive patients undergoing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) resection. APE1/Ref-1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in HCC and surrounding liver cirrhosis (SLC) and compared with normal liver tissue. Survival probability was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves (log-rank test) and Cox regression. Cytoplasmic expression of APE1/Ref-1 was significantly higher in HCC than in SLC (P = 0.00001); normal liver showed only nuclear reactivity. Patients with poorly differentiated HCC showed a cytoplasmic expression three times higher than those with well-differentiated HCC (P = 0.03). Cytoplasmic localization was associated with a median survival time shorter than those with negative cytoplasmic reactivity (0.44 compared with 1.64 years, P = 0.003), and multivariable analysis confirmed that cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 localization is a predictor of survival. Cytoplasmic expression of APE1/Ref-1 is increased in HCC and is associated with a lower degree of differentiation and a shorter survival time, pointing to the use of the cytoplasmic localization of APE1/Ref-1 as a prognostic marker for HCC.

  5. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  6. Subcellular localization of regulator of G protein signaling RGS7 complex in neurons and transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Evangelos; Sandiford, Simone; Wang, Qiang; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Motti, Dario; Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2012-08-01

    The R7 family of regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) is involved in many functions of the nervous system. This family includes RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11 gene products and is defined by the presence of the characteristic first found in Disheveled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin (DEP), DEP helical extension (DHEX), Gγ-like, and RGS domains. Herein, we examined the subcellular localization of RGS7, the most broadly expressed R7 member. Our immunofluorescence studies of retinal and dorsal root ganglion neurons showed that RGS7 concentrated at the plasma membrane of cell bodies, in structures resembling lamellipodia or filopodia along the processes, and at the dendritic tips. At the plasma membrane of dorsal root ganglia neurons, RGS7 co-localized with its known binding partners R7 RGS binding protein (R7BP), Gαo, and Gαq. More than 50% of total RGS7-specific immunofluorescence was present in the cytoplasm, primarily within numerous small puncta that did not co-localize with R7BP. No specific RGS7 or R7BP immunoreactivity was detected in the nuclei. In transfected cell lines, ectopic RGS7 had both diffuse cytosolic and punctate localization patterns. RGS7 also localized in centrosomes. Structure-function analysis showed that the punctate localization was mediated by the DEP/DHEX domains, and centrosomal localization was dependent on the DHEX domain.

  7. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Impatiens walleriana in relation to its phytoextraction potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) has been shown to be a potential cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, but its mechanisms in accumulation and detoxification have not been reported. Rooted cuttings of Impatiens were planted in artificially Cd-contaminated soils for 50 days with total target concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 120 mg/kg. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in the different organs were analyzed after the pot experiment. Compared with the control group, various Cd treatments affected the growth exhibitions of Impatiens, but most of them were not statistically significant. The Cd accumulation of different organs increased with an increase in the soil Cd concentrations for most of the treatments, and it was in the decreasing order of root>stem>leaf. In the roots of Impatiens, Cd was mainly compartmentalized in the soluble fraction (Fs), which has a high migration capacity and will further translocate to the shoot. The Cd was mainly compartmentalized in the cell wall fraction (Fcw) in the shoots as a mechanism of tolerance. Most of the Cd in the various organs of Impatiens was mainly in the forms of pectate and protein-integrated (FNaCl), whereas a minor portion was a water soluble fraction (FW). The experimental results show that the Cd in the Fs, FW, and FNaCl in the roots of Impatiens had a high mobility and will further translocate to the shoot. They could be used to estimate the Cd accumulated in the shoots of Impatiens.

  8. Immature dendritic cell-derived exosomes: a promise subcellular vaccine for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weifan; Ouyang, Song; Li, Yi; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Huan

    2013-02-01

    Exosomes, 60-90-nm-sized vesicles, are produced by a large number of cell types, including tumor cells, neurons, astrocytes, hemocytes, intestinal epithelial cells, and so on. Dendritic cell (DC), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cell in the immune system, produces exosomes in the course of maturation. Mature DCs produce exosomes with the ability to elicit potent immunoactivation, resulting in tumor eradication and bacterial or virus elimination. Given the notion that exosomes are stable and easy to be modified artificially, autologous mature DC-derived exosomes have been vaccinated into patients with malignant diseases. In clinical trials utilizing exosomes as therapeutic approaches, researchers observed considerable curative effect with little side effect. However, immature or suppressive DC-derived exosomes harbor anti-inflammatory properties distinct from mature DC-derived exosomes. In murine models of autoimmune disease and transplantation, immature DC-derived exosomes reduced T cell-dependent immunoactivation, relieved clinical manifestation of autoimmune disease, and prolonged survival time of transplantation. Although the exact mechanism of how immature DC-derived exosomes function in vivo is still unclear, and there are no clinical trials regarding application of exosome vaccine into patients with autoimmune disease, we will analyze the promise of immature DC-derived exosomes as a subcellular vaccine in autoimmunity in this review.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Sites in Rat Tissues Reveals Organ Specificity and Subcellular Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lundby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.

  10. Organ, cellular, and subcellular localization of brain-specific anion transporter BSAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklaushev, V P; Kardashova, K Sh; Gurina, O I; Yusubaliyeva, G M; Zorkina, Ya A; Chekhonin, V P

    2013-08-01

    Organ, cellular, and subcellular localization of brain-specific anion transporter BSAT1 was studied in rats using antibodies to the extracellular fragment (451-557 a.a). The antibodies were shown to recognize the antigen predominantly localized in the nervous tissue, tumors of glial origin, and primordial ovarian follicles. The absence of BSAT1 immunofluorescence signal in kidney and liver sections and accumulation of (125)I labeled antibodies to BSAT1 in these organs indicate that these antibodies do not cross-react with the most common isoforms of OATP expressed in these organs. Analysis of the cellular localization suggests that in the brain, BSAT1 is localized predominantly in astrocytes, but not in endothelial cells, as was previously reported. Laser scanning confocal microscopy with a set of relevant trackers revealed membrane localization of BSAT1. Taking into account the data on the of localization, we can conclude that antibodies to BSAT1 451-557 can be used for basic research of the transport of thyroxin and prostaglandins across the blood brain barrier and for testing the systems for targeted transport of diagnostic preparations and drugs across the blood brain barrier, e.g. to astroglial tumors.

  11. High-Content Microscopy Analysis of Subcellular Structures: Assay Development and Application to Focal Adhesion Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Torsten; Schmidt, David; Schwanitz, Georg; Ahmad, Mubashir; Hamann, Jana; Schlosser, Corinne; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Böhm, Konrad J; Tuckermann, Jan; Ploubidou, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) converts raw light microscopy images to quantitative data through the automated extraction, multiparametric analysis, and classification of the relevant information content. Combined with automated high-throughput image acquisition, HCA applied to the screening of chemicals or RNAi-reagents is termed high-content screening (HCS). Its power in quantifying cell phenotypes makes HCA applicable also to routine microscopy. However, developing effective HCA and bioinformatic analysis pipelines for acquisition of biologically meaningful data in HCS is challenging. Here, the step-by-step development of an HCA assay protocol and an HCS bioinformatics analysis pipeline are described. The protocol's power is demonstrated by application to focal adhesion (FA) detection, quantitative analysis of multiple FA features, and functional annotation of signaling pathways regulating FA size, using primary data of a published RNAi screen. The assay and the underlying strategy are aimed at researchers performing microscopy-based quantitative analysis of subcellular features, on a small scale or in large HCS experiments. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Proteome-wide identification of predominant subcellular protein localizations in a bacterial model organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stekhoven, Daniel J. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Omasits, Ulrich [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Quebatte, Maxime [Univ. of Basel (Switzerland); Dehio, Christoph [Univ. of Basel (Switzerland); Ahrens, Christian H. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-01

    Proteomics data provide unique insights into biological systems, including the predominant subcellular localization (SCL) of proteins, which can reveal important clues about their functions. Here we analyzed data of a complete prokaryotic proteome expressed under two conditions mimicking interaction of the emerging pathogen Bartonella henselae with its mammalian host. Normalized spectral count data from cytoplasmic, total membrane, inner and outer membrane fractions allowed us to identify the predominant SCL for 82% of the identified proteins. The spectral count proportion of total membrane versus cytoplasmic fractions indicated the propensity of cytoplasmic proteins to co-fractionate with the inner membrane, and enabled us to distinguish cytoplasmic, peripheral innermembrane and bona fide inner membrane proteins. Principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbor classification training on selected marker proteins or predominantly localized proteins, allowed us to determine an extensive catalog of at least 74 expressed outer membrane proteins, and to extend the SCL assignment to 94% of the identified proteins, including 18% where in silico methods gave no prediction. Suitable experimental proteomics data combined with straightforward computational approaches can thus identify the predominant SCL on a proteome-wide scale. Finally, we present a conceptual approach to identify proteins potentially changing their SCL in a condition-dependent fashion.

  13. Protein-protein interaction network and subcellular localization of the Arabidopsis thaliana ESCRT machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn eRichardson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT consists of several multi-protein subcomplexes which assemble sequentially at the endosomal surface and function in multivesicular body (MVB biogenesis. While ESCRT has been relatively well characterized in yeasts and mammals, comparably little is known about ESCRT in plants. Here we explored the yeast two-hybrid protein interaction network and subcellular localization of the Arabidopsis thaliana ESCRT machinery. We show that Arabidopsis ESCRT interactome possess a number of protein-protein interactions that are either conserved in yeasts and mammals or distinct to plants. We show also that most of the Arabidopsis ESCRT proteins examined at least partially localize to MVBs in plant cells when ectopically expressed on their own or co-expressed with other interacting ESCRT proteins, and some also induce abnormal MVB phenotypes, consistent with their proposed functional roles in MVB biogenesis. Overall, our results help define the plant ESCRT machinery by highlighting both conserved and unique features when compared to ESCRT in other evolutionarily diverse organisms, providing a foundation for further exploration of ESCRT in plants.

  14. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  15. Cellular and subcellular localization of Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Vallée, A; Mechawar, N; Dower, N A; Stone, J C; Richardson, P M; Dunn, R J

    2001-01-01

    Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein (RasGRP) is a recently discovered Ras guanyl nucleotide exchange factor that is expressed in selected regions of the rodent CNS, with high levels of expression in the hippocampus. Biochemical studies suggest that RasGRP can activate the Ras signal pathway in response to changes in diacylglycerol and possibly calcium. To investigate potential sites for RasGRP signaling, we have determined the cellular and subcellular localization of RasGRP protein in adult rat hippocampus, and have also examined the appearance of RasGRP mRNA and protein during hippocampal development. RasGRP immunoreactivity is predominately localized to those neurons participating in the direct cortico-hippocampo-cortical loop. In both hippocampal and entorhinal neurons, RasGRP protein appeared to be localized to both dendrites and somata, but not to axons. Electron microscopy of hippocampal pyramidal cells confirmed RasGRP immunoreactivity in neuronal cell bodies and dendrites, where it appeared to be associated with microtubules. The localization of RasGRP to dendrites suggests a role for this pathway in the regulation of dendritic function. Examination of developing hippocampal structures indicated that RasGRP mRNA and protein appear synchronously during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development as these neurons become fully mature. This result indicates that the RasGRP signal transduction pathway is not required during early hippocampal development, but is a feature of mature neurons during the later stages of development.

  16. Subcellular potassium and sodium distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuolar mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Rito; Álvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José

    2013-09-15

    Living cells accumulate potassium (K⁺) to fulfil multiple functions. It is well documented that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows at very different concentrations of external alkali cations and keeps high and low intracellular concentrations of K⁺ and sodium (Na⁺) respectively. However less attention has been paid to the study of the intracellular distribution of these cations. The most widely used experimental approach, plasma membrane permeabilization, produces incomplete results, since it usually considers only cytoplasm and vacuoles as compartments where the cations are present in significant amounts. By isolating and analysing the main yeast organelles, we have determined the subcellular location of K⁺ and Na⁺ in S. cerevisiae. We show that while vacuoles accumulate most of the intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, the cytosol contains relatively low amounts, which is especially relevant in the case of Na⁺. However K⁺ concentrations in the cytosol are kept rather constant during the K⁺-starvation process and we conclude that, for that purpose, vacuolar K⁺ has to be rapidly mobilized. We also show that this intracellular distribution is altered in four different mutants with impaired vacuolar physiology. Finally, we show that both in wild-type and vacuolar mutants, nuclei contain and keep a relatively constant and important percentage of total intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, which most probably is involved in the neutralization of negative charges.

  17. Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction and Genomic Polymorphism Analysis of the SARS Coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季星来; 柳树群; 李岭; 孙之荣

    2004-01-01

    The cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new coronavirus (CoV).Several sequences of the complete genome of SARS-CoV have been determined.The subcellular localization (SubLocation) of annotated open-reading frames of the SARS-CoV genome was predicted using a support vector machine.Several gene products were predicted to locate in the Golgi body and cell nucleus.The SubLocation information was combined with predicted transmembrane information to develop a model of the viral life cycle.The results show that this information can be used to predict the functions of genes and even the virus pathogenesis.In addition,the entire SARS viral genome sequences currently available in GenBank were compared to identify the sequence variations among different isolates.Some variations in the Hong Kong strains may be related to the special clinical manifestations and provide clues for understanding the relationship between gene functions and evolution.These variations reflect the evolution of the SARS virus in human populations and may help development of a vaccine.

  18. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  19. Alterations in the protein pattern of subcellular fractions isolated from Paramecium cells suppressed in phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacz, L; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and quantitative densitometric analysis revealed alterations in the protein pattern of subcellular fractions (100,000 x g) isolated from Paramecium aurelia (299s axenic) cells suppressed in phagocytosis as compared with the control. Two different agents were used to block phagocytosis: the beta-adrenergic antagonist-1-propranolol (200 microM) and inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent processes--trifluoperazine (20 microM). More than 40 polypeptides were identified in the cytosolic (soluble) fractions S1 and S2. A considerable decrease in band intensity was found for three polypeptides: by 60% for 87 kDa band, 52% for 75 kDa and 37% for 42 kDa in comparison to the control, when S2 fractions from propranolol-treated cells of equal load were quantified. TFP treatment evoked only a small decrease in the intensity of the same bands: 9%, 10% and 6%, respectively. The 42 kDa band was identified by Western blot analysis and chemiluminiscent detection to be actin. This result suggests that actin may be a primary target of pharmacological agents used in this study to inhibit Paramecium phagocytic activity.

  20. Progesterone Receptor Subcellular Localization and Gene Expression Profile in Human Astrocytoma Cells Are Modified by Progesterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliesha González-Arenas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular progesterone receptor (PR has been identified in human astrocytomas, the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors in humans. It has been reported that PR cell distribution affects their transcriptional activity and turnover. In this work we studied by immunofluorescence the effects of estradiol and progesterone on the subcellular localization of PR in a grade III human astrocytoma derived cell line (U373. We observed that total PR was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm without hormonal treatment. Estradiol (10 nM increased PR presence in the cytoplasm of U373 cells, whereas progesterone (10 nM and RU486 (PR antagonist, 1 μM blocked this effect. To investigate the role of PR activity in the regulation of gene expression pattern of U373 cells, we evaluated by microarray analysis the profile of genes regulated by progesterone, RU486, or both steroids. We found different genes regulated by steroid treatments that encode for proteins involved in metabolism, transport, cell cycle, proliferation, metastasis, apoptosis, processing of nucleic acids and proteins, adhesion, pathogenesis, immune response, cytoskeleton, and membrane receptors. We determined that 30 genes were regulated by progesterone, 41 genes by RU486 alone, and 13 genes by the cotreatment of progesterone+RU486, suggesting that there are many genes regulated by intracellular PR or through other signaling pathways modulated by progesterone. All these data suggest that PR distribution and activity should modify astrocytomas growth.

  1. Changes of DHN1 expression and subcellular distribution in A. delicisoa cells under osmotic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU; Quansheng; (邱全胜); WANG; Zezhou(王泽宙); CAI; Qigui(蔡起贵); JIANG; Rongxi(姜荣锡)

    2002-01-01

    The changes of DHN1 expression and subcellular distribution in A. delicisoa cells under osmotic stress were studied by using GFP as a reporter molecule. Through creating the Xba I and BamH I restriction sites at the ends of dhn1 by PCR, the expression vector for the fusion protein DHN1-mGFP4 was constructed by cloning dhn1 into plasmid pBIN-35SmGFP4. Then the DHN1-mGFP4 expression vector was transformed into A. delicisoa suspension cells by microprojectile bombardment method. Bright green fluorescence of GFP which shows the high-level expression of DHN1-mGFP4 was visualized after culture for 10 h. However, the green fluorescence was only located within the nucleus. By increasing the culture medium osmotic potential, the green fluorescence was visualized in the cytoplasm (mainly around the plasma membranes). The generation of GFP fluorescence in the cytoplasm was also promoted by increasing the medium osmotic potential. Moreover, GFP green fluorescence was abolished by protein synthesis inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimid, indicating that the cytoplasmic DHN1 was newly synthesized under osmotic stress. Furthermore, ABA promoted the presence of green fluorescence in the cytoplasm, and the GFP fluorescence was visualized within a shorter time under a higher osmotic potential.

  2. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-11-10

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes.

  3. Substrate uptake and subcellular compartmentation of anoxic cholesterol catabolism in Sterolibacterium denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Yu-Wen; El Nayal, Ashraf; Yang, Chia-Ying; Yang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2015-01-09

    Cholesterol catabolism by actinobacteria has been extensively studied. In contrast, the uptake and catabolism of cholesterol by Gram-negative species are poorly understood. Here, we investigated microbial cholesterol catabolism at the subcellular level. (13)C metabolomic analysis revealed that anaerobically grown Sterolibacterium denitrificans, a β-proteobacterium, adopts an oxygenase-independent pathway to degrade cholesterol. S. denitrificans cells did not produce biosurfactants upon growth on cholesterol and exhibited high cell surface hydrophobicity. Moreover, S. denitrificans did not produce extracellular catabolic enzymes to transform cholesterol. Accordingly, S. denitrificans accessed cholesterol by direction adhesion. Cholesterol is imported through the outer membrane via a putative FadL-like transport system, which is induced by neutral sterols. The outer membrane steroid transporter is able to selectively import various C27 sterols into the periplasm. S. denitrificans spheroplasts exhibited a significantly higher efficiency in cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid uptake than in cholesterol uptake. We separated S. denitrificans proteins into four fractions, namely the outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm, and we observed the individual catabolic reactions within them. Our data indicated that, in the periplasm, various periplasmic and peripheral membrane enzymes transform cholesterol into cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid. The C27 acidic steroid is then transported into the cytoplasm, in which side-chain degradation and the subsequent sterane cleavage occur. This study sheds light into microbial cholesterol metabolism under anoxic conditions.

  4. Subcellular tracking reveals the location of dimethylsulfoniopropionate in microalgae and visualises its uptake by marine bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Clode, Peta L; Cheong, Soshan; Bougoure, Jeremy; Kilburn, Matt R; Reeder, Anthony; Forêt, Sylvain; Stat, Michael; Beltran, Victor; Thomas-Hall, Peter; Tapiolas, Dianne; Motti, Cherie M; Gong, Bill; Pernice, Mathieu; Marjo, Christopher E; Seymour, Justin R; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplankton-bacteria interactions drive the surface ocean sulfur cycle and local climatic processes through the production and exchange of a key compound: dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Despite their large-scale implications, these interactions remain unquantified at the cellular-scale. Here we use secondary-ion mass spectrometry to provide the first visualization of DMSP at sub-cellular levels, tracking the fate of a stable sulfur isotope (34S) from its incorporation by microalgae as inorganic sulfate to its biosynthesis and exudation as DMSP, and finally its uptake and degradation by bacteria. Our results identify for the first time the storage locations of DMSP in microalgae, with high enrichments present in vacuoles, cytoplasm and chloroplasts. In addition, we quantify DMSP incorporation at the single-cell level, with DMSP-degrading bacteria containing seven times more 34S than the control strain. This study provides an unprecedented methodology to label, retain, and image small diffusible molecules, which can be transposable to other symbiotic systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23008.001 PMID:28371617

  5. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, S Andrea; Nava, Mayerly

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF) of T. b. brucei: (i) fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme) in glycosomes, (ii) enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes) and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii) malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv) glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  6. Using distant supervised learning to identify protein subcellular localizations from full-text scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wu; Blake, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Databases of curated biomedical knowledge, such as the protein-locations reflected in the UniProtKB database, provide an accurate and useful resource to researchers and decision makers. Our goal is to augment the manual efforts currently used to curate knowledge bases with automated approaches that leverage the increased availability of full-text scientific articles. This paper describes experiments that use distant supervised learning to identify protein subcellular localizations, which are important to understand protein function and to identify candidate drug targets. Experiments consider Swiss-Prot, the manually annotated subset of the UniProtKB protein knowledge base, and 43,000 full-text articles from the Journal of Biological Chemistry that contain just under 11.5 million sentences. The system achieves 0.81 precision and 0.49 recall at sentence level and an accuracy of 57% on held-out instances in a test set. Moreover, the approach identifies 8210 instances that are not in the UniProtKB knowledge base. Manual inspection of the 50 most likely relations showed that 41 (82%) were valid. These results have immediate benefit to researchers interested in protein function, and suggest that distant supervision should be explored to complement other manual data curation efforts.

  7. Subcellular localization of human heparanase and its alternative splice variant in COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mayumi; Amemiya, Kana; Hayakawa, Sumio; Munakata, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Heparanase, the enzyme that degrades heparan sulfate, has been implicated to play important and characteristic roles in organogenesis, tissue organization, cell migration, and tumor metastasis. Clarification of its expression, its intracellular sorting, and its secretion is, therefore, of much importance to understand its role in cell biology. In addition to the 1.7 Kb transcript previously reported, we detected a 1.5 Kb transcript of human heparanase by RT-PCR. The smaller transcript was shown to be an alternatively spliced variant lacking exon 5, which contains the essential glutamic acid residue required for enzyme activity. When expressed in COS-7 cells this variant did not show any heparanase activity. Full-length heparanase and the exon 5-deleted splice variant were expressed in COS-7 cells and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both proteins co-localized with calnexin, a marker protein for the endoplasmic reticulum, and they co-immunoprecipitated with calnexin. Both proteins were postulated to be precursors based upon the results of SDS-PAGE analyses. Treatment with endoglycosidases revealed that all potential N-glycosylation sites in the proteins were glycosylated. Tunicamycin treatment of transfected COS-7 cells inhibited N-glycosylation but did not change the subcellular localization. These results indicate that overexpressed heparanase and its splice variant localize to the endoplasmic reticulum independent of glycosylation in COS-7 cells.

  8. Lesion profiling and subcellular prion localization of cervid chronic wasting disease in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, D M; Nalls, A V; Flasik, M; Frank, V; Eaton, S; Mathiason, C K; Hoover, E A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an efficiently transmitted, fatal, and progressive prion disease of cervids with an as yet to be fully clarified host range. While outbred domestic cats (Felis catus) have recently been shown to be susceptible to experimental CWD infection, the neuropathologic features of the infection are lacking. Such information is vital to provide diagnostic power in the event of natural interspecies transmission and insights into host and strain interactions in interspecies prion infection. Using light microscopy and immunohistochemistry, we detail the topographic pattern of neural spongiosis (the "lesion profile") and the distribution of misfolded prion protein in the primary and secondary passage of feline CWD (Fel(CWD)). We also evaluated cellular and subcellular associations between misfolded prion protein (PrP(D)) and central nervous system neurons and glial cell populations. From these studies, we (1) describe the novel neuropathologic profile of Fel(CWD), which is distinct from either cervid CWD or feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), and (2) provide evidence of serial passage-associated interspecies prion adaptation. In addition, we demonstrate through confocal analysis the successful co-localization of PrP(D) with neurons, astrocytes, microglia, lysosomes, and synaptophysin, which, in part, implicates each of these in the neuropathology of Fel(CWD). In conclusion, this work illustrates the simultaneous role of both host and strain in the development of a unique Fel(CWD) neuropathologic profile and that such a profile can be used to discriminate between Fel(CWD) and FSE.

  9. Self-organization of the MinE ring in subcellular Min oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Julien; Hopper, Jason T.; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2009-03-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the mid-cell positioning of division is achieved by the sub-cellular oscillation of Min proteins. MinD interacts with the membrane and polymerizes into filaments. MinE binds to membrane bound MinD leading to the depolymerization of the MinD filaments. It has been observed experimentally that MinE forms a ring, known as the E-ring, near the end of the MinD polymers. We model and solve the self-organization of the E-ring. Rebinding of MinE to depolymerizing MinD filament tips controls MinE ring formation. We find two types of E-ring profiles near the filament tip: a strong plateau-like E-ring as seen in vivo, controlled by 1D diffusion along the bacterial length, or a weak cusp-like E-ring controlled by 3D diffusion near the filament tip. We discuss the initial instability that leads to MinD filament depolymerization and the formation of the E-ring. We also discuss the duration of transients leading towards strong or weak E-rings. We compare with experiment both in vivo and in vitro.

  10. The subcellular distribution of [3H]-CGS 21680 binding sites in the rat striatum: copurification with cholinergic nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S; Richardson, P J

    1993-08-01

    The subcellular distribution of the adenosine A2a receptor in rat striatum has been investigated using specific binding of the A2a-selective ligand [3H]-CGS 21680. After subcellular fractionation, the distribution of [3H]-CGS 21680 binding was similar to that of the cholinergic nerve terminal marker acetylcholinesterase rather than the more general membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase, with 42% of binding associated with the synaptosomal sub-fraction and 19% with a light membrane fraction. Binding of [3H]-CGS 21680 was also found to co-purify with the cholinergic nerve terminal marker choline acetyltransferase during immunoaffinity purification of striatal cholinergic nerve terminals. These results demonstrate that some adenosine A2a receptors are present on cholinergic nerve terminals in rat striatum.

  11. Model-based segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in 2D and 3D fluorescent microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörz, Stefan; Heinzer, Stephan; Weiss, Matthias; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for segmenting and quantifying GFP-tagged subcellular structures of the Golgi apparatus in 2D and 3D microscopy images. The approach is based on 2D and 3D intensity models, which are directly fitted to an image within 2D circular or 3D spherical regions-of-interest (ROIs). We also propose automatic approaches for the detection of candidates, for the initialization of the model parameters, and for adapting the size of the ROI used for model fitting. Based on the fitting results, we determine statistical information about the spatial distribution and the total amount of intensity (fluorescence) of the subcellular structures. We demonstrate the applicability of our new approach based on 2D and 3D microscopy images.

  12. The subcellular localization of periwinkle farnesyl diphosphate synthase provides insight into the role of peroxisome in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Insaf; Guirimand, Grégory; Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas; Godet, Stéphanie; Dutilleul, Christelle; Bouzid, Sadok; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Clastre, Marc; Simkin, Andrew J

    2011-11-15

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase (FPS: EC.2.5.1.1, EC.2.5.1.10) catalyzes the formation of FPP from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate via two successive condensation reactions. A cDNA designated CrFPS, encoding a protein showing high similarities with trans-type short FPS isoforms, was isolated from the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). This cDNA was shown to functionally complement the lethal FPS deletion mutant in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At the subcellular level, while short FPS isoforms are usually described as cytosolic proteins, we showed, using transient transformations of C. roseus cells with yellow fluorescent protein-fused constructs, that CrFPS is targeted to peroxisomes. This finding is discussed in relation to the subcellular distribution of FPS isoforms in plants and animals and opens new perspectives towards the understanding of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  13. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen...... content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies...... in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular...

  14. Influence of protein or cystein deficiency on hepatic subcellular distribution of methyl mercury in two rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beije, B; Arrhenius, E

    1978-02-01

    The influence of protein deprivation and cystein deficiency on the distribution of methyl mercury between 4 subcellular fractions of liver was studied in 2 rat strains (Wistar, strain R and Sprague-Dawley). Kept on a standard diet, the 2 strains showed a similar distribution pattern, with the highest mercury level found in the cytosol, followed by the mitochondrial, microsomal and nuclei fractions. The protein free diet caused on increase in the total amount of bound mercury in both strains, the greatest increase, being found in livers from strain R rats. The cystein deficient diet, on the other hand, gave rise to diverging results. Whereas the level of mercury bound to the subcellular fractions was increased in livers from strain R rats, it was markedly reduced in livers from Sprague-Dawley rats.

  15. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Youri I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We

  16. Patterns of plant subcellular responses to successful oomycete infections reveal differences in host cell reprogramming and endocytic trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Ju; Schornack, Sebastian; Spallek, Thomas; Geldner, Niko; Chory, Joanne; Schellmann, Swen; Schumacher, Karin; Kamoun, Sophien; Robatzek, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adapted filamentous pathogens such as the oomycetes Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) and Phytophthora infestans (Pi) project specialized hyphae, the haustoria, inside living host cells for the suppression of host defence and acquisition of nutrients. Accommodation of haustoria requires reorganization of the host cell and the biogenesis of a novel host cell membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which envelops the haustorium separating the host cell from the pathogen. Here, we applied live-cell imaging of fluorescent-tagged proteins labelling a variety of membrane compartments and investigated the subcellular changes associated with accommodating oomycete haustoria in Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana. Plasma membrane-resident proteins differentially localized to the EHM. Likewise, secretory vesicles and endosomal compartments surrounded Hpa and Pi haustoria revealing differences between these two oomycetes, and suggesting a role for vesicle trafficking pathways for the pathogen-controlled biogenesis of the EHM. The latter is supported by enhanced susceptibility of mutants in endosome-mediated trafficking regulators. These observations point at host subcellular defences and specialization of the EHM in a pathogen-specific manner. Defence-associated haustorial encasements, a double-layered membrane that grows around mature haustoria, were frequently observed in Hpa interactions. Intriguingly, all tested plant proteins accumulated at Hpa haustorial encasements suggesting the general recruitment of default vesicle trafficking pathways to defend pathogen access. Altogether, our results show common requirements of subcellular changes associated with oomycete biotrophy, and highlight differences between two oomycete pathogens in reprogramming host cell vesicle trafficking for haustoria accommodation. This provides a framework for further dissection of the pathogen-triggered reprogramming of host subcellular changes. PMID:22233428

  17. Effects of carbohydrate supplements on exercise-induced menstrual dysfunction and ovarian subcellular structural changes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Female adult rats with 9-week continuous exercise can cause menstrual dysregulation as a model for EAMD. Post-EAMD intervention with glucose and oligosaccharide intake can normalize the menstrual cycle, restore the follicular subcellular structure, and reverse the exercise-induced reduction of ovary sex hormones. It suggests a positive feedback of hypothalamus–pituitary–ovary axis might be involved in the molecular mechanisms of energy intake in treating EAMD.

  18. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-09-29

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions.

  19. Effects of Diets Supplemented with Ensiled Mulberry Leaves and Sun-Dried Mulberry Fruit Pomace on the Ruminal Bacterial and Archaeal Community Composition of Finishing Steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuhong; Meng, Qingxiang; Li, Shengli; Ren, Liping; Zhou, Bo; Schonewille, Thomas; Zhou, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of ensiled mulberry leaves (EML) and sun-dried mulberry fruit pomace (SMFP) on the ruminal bacterial and archaeal community composition of finishing steers. Corn grain- and cotton meal-based concentrate was partially replaced with EML or SMFP. The diets had similar crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and metabolizable energy. Following the feeding trial, the steers were slaughtered and ruminal liquid samples were collected to study the ruminal microbiome. Extraction of DNA, amplification of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene, and Illumina MiSeq pyrosequencing were performed for each sample. Following sequence de-noising, chimera checking, and quality trimming, an average of 209,610 sequences were generated per sample. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to examine the selected bacterial species in the rumen. Our results showed that the predominant phyla were Bacteroidetes (43.90%), Firmicutes (39.06%), Proteobacteria (4.31%), and Tenericutes (2.04%), and the predominant genera included Prevotella (13.82%), Ruminococcus (2.51%), Butyrivibrio (2.38%), and Succiniclasticum (2.26%). Compared to the control group, EML and SMFP groups had a higher abundance of total bacteria (p composition was similar among the three groups. At the phylum level, there were no significant differences in Firmicutes (p = 0.7932), Bacteroidetes (p = 0.2330), Tenericutes (p = 0.2811), or Proteobacteria (p = 0.0680) levels among the three groups; however, Fibrobacteres decreased in EML (p = 0.0431). At the genus level, there were no differences in Prevotella (p = 0.4280), Ruminococcus (p = 0.2639), Butyrivibrio (p = 0.4433), or Succiniclasticum (p = 0.0431) levels among the groups. Additionally, the dietary treatments had no significant effects on the archaeal community composition in the rumen. Therefore, EML and SMFP supplementation had no significant effects on the ruminal bacterial or archaeal community composition of finishing steers.

  20. Spatial variations in archaeal lipids of surface water and core-top sediments in the South china sea and their implications for paleoclimate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuli; Wang, Jinxiang; Liu, Jie; Dong, Liang; Li, Li; Wang, Hui; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Meixun; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2011-11-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean, yet little is known about archaeal distributions and TEX₈₆-based temperatures in this unique oceanic setting. Here we report findings of abundances in both core lipids (CL) and intact polar lipids (IPL) of Archaea from surface water (CL only) and core-top sediments from different regions of the SCS. TEX₈₆-derived temperatures were also calculated for these samples. The surface water had extremely low abundances of CL (average of 0.05 ± 0.13 ng/liter; n = 75), with higher values present in regions where upwelling is known to occur. The core-top sediments had CL values of 0.1 to 0.9 μg/g, which are on the low end of CL concentrations reported for other marine sediments and may reflect the oligotrophic nature of the open SCS. The IPL of Archaea accounted for 6 to 36.4% of total lipids (CL plus IPL), indicating that the majority of archaeal lipids in core-top sediments were derived from nonliving cells. The TEX₈₆-based temperatures of surface water were overall lower than satellite-based sea surface temperatures or CTD-measured in situ temperatures. The core-top sediment samples, however, had TEX₈₆ temperatures very close to the mean annual sea surface temperatures, except for samples with water depths of less than 100 m. Our results demonstrated low and heterogeneous distributions of archaeal lipids in surface water and core-top sediments of the SCS, which may reflect local or regional differences in productivity of Archaea. While TEX₈₆-based temperatures for core-top marine sediments at deep water depths (>100 m) generally reflected mean annual sea surface temperatures, TEX₈₆ temperatures in surface water varied basin wide and underestimated sea surface temperatures in most locations for the season when surface water samples were collected.

  1. Coupling genetic and chemical microbiome profiling reveals heterogeneity of archaeome and bacteriome in subsurface biofilms that are dominated by the same archaeal species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available Earth harbors an enormous portion of subsurface microbial life, whose microbiome flux across geographical locations remains mainly unexplored due to difficult access to samples. Here, we investigated the microbiome relatedness of subsurface biofilms of two sulfidic springs in southeast Germany that have similar physical and chemical parameters and are fed by one deep groundwater current. Due to their unique hydrogeological setting these springs provide accessible windows to subsurface biofilms dominated by the same uncultivated archaeal species, called SM1 Euryarchaeon. Comparative analysis of infrared imaging spectra demonstrated great variations in archaeal membrane composition between biofilms of the two springs, suggesting different SM1 euryarchaeal strains of the same species at both aquifer outlets. This strain variation was supported by ultrastructural and metagenomic analyses of the archaeal biofilms, which included intergenic spacer region sequencing of the rRNA gene operon. At 16S rRNA gene level, PhyloChip G3 DNA microarray detected similar biofilm communities for archaea, but site-specific communities for bacteria. Both biofilms showed an enrichment of different deltaproteobacterial operational taxonomic units, whose families were, however, congruent as were their lipid spectra. Consequently, the function of the major proportion of the bacteriome appeared to be conserved across the geographic locations studied, which was confirmed by dsrB-directed quantitative PCR. Consequently, microbiome differences of these subsurface biofilms exist at subtle nuances for archaea (strain level variation and at higher taxonomic levels for predominant bacteria without a substantial perturbation in bacteriome function. The results of this communication provide deep insight into the dynamics of subsurface microbial life and warrant its future investigation with regard to metabolic and genomic analyses.

  2. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions.

  3. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  4. An Organelle Correlation-Guided Feature Selection Approach for Classifying Multi-Label Subcellular Bio-images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Mingxia; Xu, Ying-Ying; Shen, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2017-03-03

    Nowadays, with the advances in microscopic imaging, accurate classification of bioimage-based protein subcellular location pattern has attracted as much attention as ever. One of the basic challenging problems is how to select the useful feature components among thousands of potential features to describe the images. This is not an easy task especially considering there is a high ratio of multi-location proteins. Existing feature selection methods seldom take the correlation among different cellular compartments into consideration, and thus may miss some features that will be co-important for several subcellular locations. To deal with this problem, we make use of the important structural correlation among different cellular compartments and propose an organelle structural correlation regularized feature selection method CSF (Common-Sets of Features) in this paper. We formulate the multi-label classification problem by adopting a group-sparsity regularizer to select common subsets of relevant features from different cellular compartments. In addition, we also add a cell structural correlation regularized Laplacian term, which utilizes the prior biological structural information to capture the intrinsic dependency among different cellular compartments. The CSF provides a new feature selection strategy for multi-label bio-image subcellular pattern classifications, and the experimental results also show its superiority when comparing with several existing algorithms.

  5. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-07

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods.

  6. Subcellular distribution of trace elements and liver histology of landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) sampled along a mercury contamination gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barst, Benjamin D; Rosabal, Maikel; Campbell, Peter G C; Muir, Derek G C; Wang, Xioawa; Köck, Günter; Drevnick, Paul E

    2016-05-01

    We sampled landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) from four lakes (Small, 9-Mile, North, Amituk) in the Canadian High Arctic that span a gradient of mercury contamination. Metals (Hg, Se, Tl, and Fe) were measured in char tissues to determine their relationships with health indices (relative condition factor and hepatosomatic index), stable nitrogen isotope ratios, and liver histology. A subcellular partitioning procedure was employed to determine how metals were distributed between potentially sensitive and detoxified compartments of Arctic char livers from a low- and high-mercury lake (Small Lake and Amituk Lake, respectively). Differences in health indices and metal concentrations among char populations were likely related to differences in feeding ecology. Concentrations of Hg, Se, and Tl were highest in the livers of Amituk char, whereas concentrations of Fe were highest in Small and 9-Mile char. At the subcellular level we found that although Amituk char had higher concentrations of Tl in whole liver than Small Lake char, they maintained a greater proportion of this metal in detoxified fractions, suggesting an attempt at detoxification. Mercury was found mainly in potentially sensitive fractions of both Small and Amituk Lake char, indicating that Arctic char are not effectively detoxifying this metal. Histological changes in char livers, mainly in the form of melano-macrophage aggregates and hepatic fibrosis, could be linked to the concentrations and subcellular distributions of essential or non-essential metals.

  7. Systematic analysis of protein subcellular localization and interaction using high-throughput transient transformation of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jessica; Bach, Lien; Bellec, Yannick; Meyer, Christian; Gissot, Lionel; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2008-10-01

    The functional genomics approach requires systematic analysis of protein subcellular distribution and interaction networks, preferably by optimizing experimental simplicity and physiological significance. Here, we present an efficient in planta transient transformation system that allows single or multiple expression of constructs containing various fluorescent protein tags in Arabidopsis cotyledons. The optimized protocol is based on vacuum infiltration of agrobacteria directly into young Arabidopsis seedlings. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis epidermal cells show a subcellular distribution of reference markers similar to that in tobacco epidermal cells, and can be used for co-localization or bi-molecular fluorescent complementation studies. We then used this new system to investigate the subcellular distribution of enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism. In contrast to transformation systems using tobacco epidermal cells or cultured Arabidopsis cells, our system provides the opportunity to take advantage of the extensive collections of mutant and transgenic lines available in Arabidopsis. The fact that this assay uses conventional binary vectors and a conventional Agrobacterium strain, and is compatible with a large variety of fluorescent tags, makes it a versatile tool for construct screening and characterization before stable transformation. Transient expression in Arabidopsis seedlings is thus a fast and simple method that requires minimum handling and potentially allows medium- to high-throughput analyses of fusion proteins harboring fluorescent tags in a whole-plant cellular context.

  8. PredSL: A Tool for the N-terminal Sequence-based Prediction of Protein Subcellular Localization

    Institute of Scientific