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Sample records for archaeal molecular diversity

  1. Unexplored Archaeal Diversity in the Great Ape Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymann, Kasie; Moeller, Andrew H; Goodman, Andrew L; Ochman, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Archaea are habitual residents of the human gut flora but are detected at substantially lower frequencies than bacteria. Previous studies have indicated that each human harbors very few archaeal species. However, the low diversity of human-associated archaea that has been detected could be due to the preponderance of bacteria in these communities, such that relatively few sequences are classified as Archaea even when microbiomes are sampled deeply. Moreover, the universal prokaryotic primer pair typically used to interrogate microbial diversity has low specificity to the archaeal domain, potentially leaving vast amounts of diversity unobserved. As a result, the prevalence, diversity, and distribution of archaea may be substantially underestimated. Here we evaluate archaeal diversity in gut microbiomes using an approach that targets virtually all known members of this domain. Comparing microbiomes across five great ape species allowed us to examine the dynamics of archaeal lineages over evolutionary time scales. These analyses revealed hundreds of gut-associated archaeal lineages, indicating that upwards of 90% of the archaeal diversity in the human and great ape gut microbiomes has been overlooked. Additionally, these results indicate a progressive reduction in archaeal diversity in the human lineage, paralleling the decline reported for bacteria. IMPORTANCE Our findings show that Archaea are a habitual and vital component of human and great ape gut microbiomes but are largely ignored on account of the failure of previous studies to realize their full diversity. Here we report unprecedented levels of archaeal diversity in great ape gut microbiomes, exceeding that detected by conventional 16S rRNA gene surveys. Paralleling what has been reported for bacteria, there is a vast reduction of archaeal diversity in humans. Our study demonstrates that archaeal diversity in the great ape gut microbiome greatly exceeds that reported previously and provides the basis for

  2. Elevational patterns in archaeal diversity on Mt. Fuji.

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    Dharmesh Singh

    Full Text Available Little is known of how archaeal diversity and community ecology behaves along elevational gradients. We chose to study Mount Fuji of Japan as a geologically and topographically uniform mountain system, with a wide range of elevational zones. PCR-amplified soil DNA for the archaeal 16 S rRNA gene was pyrosequenced and taxonomically classified against EzTaxon-e archaeal database. At a bootstrap cut-off of 80%, most of the archaeal sequences were classified into phylum Thaumarchaeota (96% and Euryarchaeota (3.9%, with no sequences classified into other phyla. Archaeal OTU richness and diversity on Fuji showed a pronounced 'peak' in the mid-elevations, around 1500 masl, within the boreal forest zone, compared to the temperate forest zone below and the alpine fell-field and desert zones above. Diversity decreased towards higher elevations followed by a subtle increase at the summit, mainly due to an increase in the relative abundance of the group I.1b of Thaumarchaeota. Archaeal diversity showed a strong positive correlation with soil NH(4(+, K and NO(3(-. Archaeal diversity does not parallel plant diversity, although it does roughly parallel bacterial diversity. Ecological hypotheses to explain the mid diversity bulge on Fuji include intermediate disturbance effects, and the result of mid elevations combining a mosaic of upper and lower slope environments. Our findings show clearly that archaeal soil communities are highly responsive to soil environmental gradients, in terms of both their diversity and community composition. Distinct communities of archaea specific to each elevational zone suggest that many archaea may be quite finely niche-adapted within the range of soil environments. A further interesting finding is the presence of a mesophilic component of archaea at high altitudes on a mountain that is not volcanically active. This emphasizes the importance of microclimate - in this case solar heating of the black volcanic ash surface--for the

  3. Geochemical Constraints on Archaeal Diversity in the Vulcano Hydrothermal System

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    Rogers, K. L.; Amend, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    The shallow marine hydrothermal system of Vulcano, Italy hosts a wide diversity of cultured thermophilic Archaea, including Palaeococcus helgesonii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to name a few. However, recent studies have revealed a plethora of uncultured archaeal lineages in the Vulcano system. For example, a 16S rRNA gene survey of an onshore geothermal well identified a diverse archaeal community including deeply-branching uncultured Crenarchaeota, Korarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Additionally, culture-independent hybridization techniques suggested that Archaea account for nearly half of the microbial community in the Vulcano system. Furthermore, geochemical characterization of fluids revealed numerous lithotrophic and heterotrophic exergonic reactions that could support as yet uncultured organisms. Archaeal diversity throughout the Vulcano hydrothermal system was investigated using 16S rRNA gene surveys at five submarine vents and an onshore sediment seep. Overall, archaeal diversity was higher (10 groups) at submarine vents with moderate temperatures (59°C) compared with higher temperature (94°C) vents (4 groups). Archaeal communities at the moderately thermal vents were dominated by Thermococcales and also contained Archaeoglobales, Thermoproteales, and uncultured archaea among the Korarchaeota, Marine Group I, and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE). Fluid composition also affects the microbial community structure. At two high-temperature sites variations in archaeal diversity can be attributed to differences in iron and hydrogen concentrations, and pH. Comparing sites with similar temperature and pH conditions suggests that the presence of Desulfurococcales is limited to sites at which metabolic energy yields exceed 10 kJ per mole of electrons transferred. The Vulcano hydrothermal system hosts diverse archaeal communities, containing both cultured and uncultured species, whose distribution appears to be constrained by

  4. Archaeal diversity in Icelandic hot springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Thomas; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Westermann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Whole-cell density gradient extractions from three solfataras (pH 2.5) ranging in temperature from 81 to 90 degrees C and one neutral hot spring (81 degrees C, pH 7) from the thermal active area of Hveragerethi (Iceland) were analysed for genetic diversity and local geographical variation...... of Archaea by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes. In addition to the three solfataras and the neutral hot spring, 10 soil samples in transects of the soil adjacent to the solfataras were analysed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP). The sequence data from the clone libraries...... enzymes AluI and BsuRI. The sequenced clones from this solfatara belonged to Sulfolobales, Thermoproteales or were most closest related to sequences from uncultured Archaea. Sequences related to group I.1b were not found in the neutral hot spring or the hyperthermophilic solfatara (90 degrees C)....

  5. Influence of land use on bacterial and archaeal diversity and community structures in three natural ecosystems and one agricultural soil.

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    Lynn, Tin Mar; Liu, Qiong; Hu, Yajun; Yuan, Hongzhao; Wu, Xiaohong; Khai, Aye Aye; Wu, Jinshui; Ge, Tida

    2017-07-01

    Studying shifts in microbial communities under different land use can help in determining the impact of land use on microbial diversity. In this study, we analyzed four different land-use types to determine their bacterial and archaeal diversity and abundance. Three natural ecosystems, that is, wetland (WL), grassland (GL), and forest (FR) soils, and one agricultural soil, that is, tea plantation (TP) soil, were investigated to determine how land use shapes bacterial and archaeal diversity. For this purpose, molecular analyses, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR), 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), were used. Soil physicochemical properties were determined, and statistical analyses were performed to identify the key factors affecting microbial diversity in these soils. Phylogenetic affiliations determined using the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) database and T-RFLP revealed that the soils had differing bacterial diversity. WL soil was rich in only Proteobacteria, whereas GR soil was rich in Proteobacteria, followed by Actinobacteria. FR soil had higher abundance of Chloroflexi species than these soils. TP soil was rich in Actinobacteria, followed by Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. The archaeal diversity of GL and FR soils was similar in that most of their sequences were closely related to Nitrososphaerales (Thaumarchaeota phylum). In contrast, WL soil, followed by TP soil, had greater archaeal diversity than other soils. Eight different archaeal classes were found in WL soil, and Pacearchaeota class was the richest one. The abundance of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies in WL and GL soils was significantly higher than that in FR and TP soils. Redundancy analysis showed that bacterial diversity was influenced by abiotic factors, e.g., total organic carbon and pH, whereas total nitrogen, pH, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) significantly affected

  6. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

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    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 and January 2009 from Inceptisols under primary tropical rainforest, secondary forest (5-20 year old, agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA (PCR-DGGE using the 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker showed that archaeal community structures in crops and pasture soils are different from those in primary forest soil, which is more similar to the community structure in secondary forest soil. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands indicated the presence of crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal organisms. Based on clone library analysis of the gene coding the subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA of Archaea (306 sequences, the Shannon-Wiener function and Simpson's index showed a greater ammonia-oxidizing archaeal diversity in primary forest soils (H' = 2.1486; D = 0.1366, followed by a lower diversity in soils under pasture (H' = 1.9629; D = 0.1715, crops (H' = 1.4613; D = 0.3309 and secondary forest (H' = 0.8633; D = 0.5405. All cloned inserts were similar to the Crenarchaeota amoA gene clones (identity > 95 % previously found in soils and sediments and distributed primarily in three major phylogenetic clusters. The findings indicate that agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture affect the archaeal community structure and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in western Amazon soils.

  7. Molecular Characterization of the Archaeal Community in an Amazonian Wetland Soil and Culture-Dependent Isolation of Methanogenic Archaea

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    Siu M. Tsai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropical wetlands are the major natural source of methane released into the atmosphere, producing about 60% of all natural emissions. The great wetland areas of the Amazon basin are the largest source of methane in this region, contributing an estimated 5% of the total emissions from the world’s flooded areas. However, despite the important role that methanogenic archaea play in these environments, there have been few studies on the composition of their archaeal communities. In this survey, four 16S rRNA archaeal clone libraries from different depths were constructed to examine the archaeal community in an Amazon wetland soil. A total of 599 clones were used to perform diversity and phylogenetic analyses. A broad, diverse archaeal community was found at the site, with the diversity decreasing as the depth increased (Shannon index range: 2.40–1.94. Phylogenetic analysis revealed sequences belonging to two archaeal phyla, with 65% classified as Crenarchaeota and 35% classified as Euryarchaeota. Within the Euryarchaeota group, most sequences were clustered into the Methanococci and Methanomicrobia classes, two groups of methanogens. Based on the abundance of methanogenic organisms, culture–dependent isolation was used to isolate these organisms. To enhance the growth of methanogenic archaea, a modified atmosphere (H2:CO2 = 80:20 was established combined with an anoxic environment for 18 months. Among the isolates, the genera Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected throughout the anaerobic in vitro cultivation, indicating a possible role for these organisms in methane production. In conclusion, these exploratory molecular and culture–dependent approaches enhance our understanding of the archaeal community and methanogenic archaea living in wetland soils of the eastern Amazon and their role in methane production.

  8. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

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    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  9. Bacterial and archaeal diversity in two hot spring microbial mats from the geothermal region of Tengchong, China.

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    Pagaling, Eulyn; Grant, William D; Cowan, Don A; Jones, Brian E; Ma, Yanhe; Ventosa, Antonio; Heaphy, Shaun

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the bacterial and archaeal diversity in two hot spring microbial mats from the geothermal region of Tengchong in the Yunnan Province, China, using direct molecular analyses. The Langpu (LP) laminated mat was found by the side of a boiling pool with temperature of 60-65 °C and a pH of 8.5, while the Tengchong (TC) streamer mat consisted of white streamers in a slightly acidic (pH 6.5) hot pool outflow with a temperature of 72 °C. Four 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed and restriction enzyme analysis of the inserts was used to identify unique sequences and clone frequencies. From almost 200 clones screened, 55 unique sequences were retrieved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the LP mat consisted of a diverse bacterial population [Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Chlorobia, Nitrospirae, 'Deinococcus-Thermus', Proteobacteria (alpha, beta and delta subdivisions), Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria], while the archaeal population was dominated by methanogenic Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. In contrast, the TC streamer mat consisted of a bacterial population dominated by Aquificae, while the archaeal population also contained Korarchaeota as well as Crenarchaeota and methanogenic Euryarchaeota. These mats harboured clone sequences affiliated to unidentified lineages, suggesting that they are a potential source for discovering novel bacteria and archaea.

  10. Metagenomic evaluation of bacterial and archaeal diversity in the geothermal hot springs of manikaran, India.

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    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Green, Stefan J; Joshi, Amit; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-02-19

    Bacterial and archaeal diversity in geothermal spring water were investigated using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing. This revealed the dominance of Firmicutes, Aquificae, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group in this thermophilic environment. A number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in this unique habitat. Copyright © 2015 Bhatia et al.

  11. Microbial Diversity Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Population in Present Day Stromatolites

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    Ortega, Maya C.

    2011-01-01

    Stromatolites are layered sedimentary structures resulting from microbial mat communities that remove carbon dioxide from their environment and biomineralize it as calcium carbonate. Although prevalent in the fossil record, stromatolites are rare in the modem world and are only found in a few locations including Highbome Cay in the Bahamas. The stromatolites found at this shallow marine site are analogs to ancient microbial mat ecosystems abundant in the Precambrian period on ancient Earth. To understand how stromatolites form and develop, it is important to identify what microorganisms are present in these mats, and how these microbes contribute to geological structure. These results will provide insight into the molecular and geochemical processes of microbial communities that prevailed on ancient Earth. Since stromatolites are formed by lithifying microbial mats that are able to mineralize calcium carbonate, understanding the biological mechanisms involved may lead to the development of carbon sequestration technologies that will be applicable in human spaceflight, as well as improve our understanding of global climate and its sustainability. The objective of my project was to analyze the archaeal and bacterial dIversity in stromatolites from Highborn Cay in the Bahamas. The first step in studying the molecular processes that the microorganisms carry out is to ascertain the microbial complexity within the mats, which includes identifying and estimating the numbers of different microbes that comprise these mats.

  12. Archaeal Diversity and CO2 Fixers in Carbonate-/Siliciclastic-Rock Groundwater Ecosystems

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    Cassandre Sara Lazar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater environments provide habitats for diverse microbial communities, and although Archaea usually represent a minor fraction of communities, they are involved in key biogeochemical cycles. We analysed the archaeal diversity within a mixed carbonate-rock/siliciclastic-rock aquifer system, vertically from surface soils to subsurface groundwater including aquifer and aquitard rocks. Archaeal diversity was also characterized along a monitoring well transect that spanned surface land uses from forest/woodland to grassland and cropland. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that only a few surface soil-inhabiting Archaea were present in the groundwater suggesting a restricted input from the surface. Dominant groups in the groundwater belonged to the marine group I (MG-I Thaumarchaeota and the Woesearchaeota. Most of the groups detected in the aquitard and aquifer rock samples belonged to either cultured or predicted lithoautotrophs (e.g., Thaumarchaeota or Hadesarchaea. Furthermore, to target autotrophs, a series of 13CO2 stable isotope-probing experiments were conducted using filter pieces obtained after filtration of 10,000 L of groundwater to concentrate cells. These incubations identified the SAGMCG Thaumarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota as groundwater autotrophs. Overall, the results suggest that the majority of Archaea on rocks are fixing CO2, while archaeal autotrophy seems to be limited in the groundwater.

  13. Bacterial and archaeal diversities in Yunnan and Tibetan hot springs, China.

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    Song, Zhao-Qi; Wang, Feng-Ping; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Chen, Jin-Quan; Zhou, En-Min; Liang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Tang, Shu-Kun; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Dong, Hailiang; Li, Wen-Jun

    2013-04-01

    Thousands of hot springs are located in the north-eastern part of the Yunnan-Tibet geothermal zone, which is one of the most active geothermal areas in the world. However, a comprehensive and detailed understanding of microbial diversity in these hot springs is still lacking. In this study, bacterial and archaeal diversities were investigated in 16 hot springs (pH 3.2-8.6; temperature 47-96°C) in Yunnan Province and Tibet, China by using a barcoded 16S rRNA gene-pyrosequencing approach. Aquificae, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus and Bacteroidetes comprised the large portion of the bacterial communities in acidic hot springs. Non-acidic hot springs harboured more and variable bacterial phyla than acidic springs. Desulfurococcales and unclassified Crenarchaeota were the dominated groups in archaeal populations from most of the non-acidic hot springs; whereas, the archaeal community structure in acidic hot springs was simpler and characterized by Sulfolobales and Thermoplasmata. The phylogenetic analyses showed that Aquificae and Crenarchaeota were predominant in the investigated springs and possessed many phylogenetic lineages that have never been detected in other hot springs in the world. Thus findings from this study significantly improve our understanding of microbial diversity in terrestrial hot springs. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Archaeal Diversity and CO2 Fixers in Carbonate-/Siliciclastic-Rock Groundwater Ecosystems.

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    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Stoll, Wenke; Lehmann, Robert; Herrmann, Martina; Schwab, Valérie F; Akob, Denise M; Nawaz, Ali; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Totsche, Kai-Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater environments provide habitats for diverse microbial communities, and although Archaea usually represent a minor fraction of communities, they are involved in key biogeochemical cycles. We analysed the archaeal diversity within a mixed carbonate-rock/siliciclastic-rock aquifer system, vertically from surface soils to subsurface groundwater including aquifer and aquitard rocks. Archaeal diversity was also characterized along a monitoring well transect that spanned surface land uses from forest/woodland to grassland and cropland. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that only a few surface soil-inhabiting Archaea were present in the groundwater suggesting a restricted input from the surface. Dominant groups in the groundwater belonged to the marine group I (MG-I) Thaumarchaeota and the Woesearchaeota. Most of the groups detected in the aquitard and aquifer rock samples belonged to either cultured or predicted lithoautotrophs (e.g., Thaumarchaeota or Hadesarchaea). Furthermore, to target autotrophs, a series of 13 CO 2 stable isotope-probing experiments were conducted using filter pieces obtained after filtration of 10,000 L of groundwater to concentrate cells. These incubations identified the SAGMCG Thaumarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota as groundwater autotrophs. Overall, the results suggest that the majority of Archaea on rocks are fixing CO 2 , while archaeal autotrophy seems to be limited in the groundwater.

  15. Archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spind......SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes...

  16. Diversity of thermophilic archaeal isolates from hot springs in Japan

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    Itoh, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Naoto; Takashina, Tomonori

    2005-09-01

    In the light of the significance of extremophiles as model organisms to access possible extraterrestiral life, we provide a short review of the systematics of thermophilic Archaea, and introduce our exploratory research of novel thermophilic Archaea from hot springs in Japan. Up to date, we have isolated 162 strains of the thermophilic Archaea from hot springs in Japan by the enrichment method or the most probable number/PCR method, and the 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined to reveal their phylogenetic diversity. The sequence comparison illustrated that the isolates belonged to the orders Sulfolobales (117 isolates) , Thermoproteales (29 isolates), Desulfurococcales (8 isolates) and Thermoplasmatales (8 isolates), and there were six separate lineages representing new genera, and at least seven new species as predicted by the phylogenetic distance to known species. The collection of isolates not only included novel taxa but would give some implication for a necessity to reevaluate the current taxonomy of the thermophilic Archaea.

  17. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis.

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    Robert J Gruninger

    Full Text Available The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis is the second largest living rodent and an iconic symbol of Canada. The beaver is a semi-aquatic browser whose diet consists of lignocellulose from a variety of plants. The beaver is a hindgut fermenter and has an enlarged ceacum that houses a complex microbiome. There have been few studies examining the microbial diversity in gastrointestinal tract of hindgut fermenting herbivores. To examine the bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of the beaver, the microbiome of the ceacum and feaces was examined using culture-independent methods. DNA from the microbial community of the ceacum and feaces of 4 adult beavers was extracted, and the16S rRNA gene was sequenced using either bacterial or archaeal specific primers. A total of 1447 and 1435 unique bacterial OTUs were sequenced from the ceacum and feaces, respectively. On average, the majority of OTUs within the ceacum were classified as Bacteroidetes (49.2% and Firmicutes (47.6%. The feaces was also dominated by OTUs from Bacteroidetes (36.8% and Firmicutes (58.9%. The composition of bacterial community was not significantly different among animals. The composition of the ceacal and feacal microbiome differed, but this difference is due to changes in the abundance of closely related OTUs, not because of major differences in the taxonomic composition of the communities. Within these communities, known degraders of lignocellulose were identified. In contrast, to the bacterial microbiome, the archaeal community was dominated by a single species of methanogen, Methanosphaera stadtmanae. The data presented here provide the first insight into the microbial community within the hindgut of the beaver.

  18. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis).

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    Gruninger, Robert J; McAllister, Tim A; Forster, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is the second largest living rodent and an iconic symbol of Canada. The beaver is a semi-aquatic browser whose diet consists of lignocellulose from a variety of plants. The beaver is a hindgut fermenter and has an enlarged ceacum that houses a complex microbiome. There have been few studies examining the microbial diversity in gastrointestinal tract of hindgut fermenting herbivores. To examine the bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of the beaver, the microbiome of the ceacum and feaces was examined using culture-independent methods. DNA from the microbial community of the ceacum and feaces of 4 adult beavers was extracted, and the16S rRNA gene was sequenced using either bacterial or archaeal specific primers. A total of 1447 and 1435 unique bacterial OTUs were sequenced from the ceacum and feaces, respectively. On average, the majority of OTUs within the ceacum were classified as Bacteroidetes (49.2%) and Firmicutes (47.6%). The feaces was also dominated by OTUs from Bacteroidetes (36.8%) and Firmicutes (58.9%). The composition of bacterial community was not significantly different among animals. The composition of the ceacal and feacal microbiome differed, but this difference is due to changes in the abundance of closely related OTUs, not because of major differences in the taxonomic composition of the communities. Within these communities, known degraders of lignocellulose were identified. In contrast, to the bacterial microbiome, the archaeal community was dominated by a single species of methanogen, Methanosphaera stadtmanae. The data presented here provide the first insight into the microbial community within the hindgut of the beaver.

  19. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Nitrite Reductase (nirK) Genes in Estuarine Sediments of San Francisco Bay

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    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an integral component of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation, is carried out by two distinct microbial groups: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Molecular ecological studies targeting the amoA gene have revealed the abundance and ubiquity of AOA in terrestrial as well as aquatic environments. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also encode a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). The distribution patterns and functional role of nirK in AOA remain mostly unknown; proposed functions include the indirect involvement in ammonia oxidation through the production of nitric oxide during nitrite reduction, and (2) nitrite detoxification. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. In sediment samples collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, two archaeal nirK variants (AnirKa and AnirKb) were amplified using specific primer sets. Overall, AnirKa was observed to be significantly more abundant than AnirKb in the sediment samples, with variation in relative abundance spanning two to three orders of magnitude between sampling sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a number of unique archaeal nirK sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This study yielded new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  20. The effects of glyphosate, glufosinate, paraquat and paraquat-diquat on soil microbial activity and bacterial, archaeal and nematode diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Paul G.; Kukulies, Tegan; Forstner, Christian; Orton, Thomas G.; Pattison, Anthony B.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of one-off applications of glyphosate, glufosinate, paraquat, and paraquat-diquat on soil microbial diversity and function. All herbicides were added to soil as pure compounds at recommended dose and were incubated under laboratory conditions for 60 days. High-throughput phylogenetic marker gene sequencing revealed that none of the herbicides significantly influenced the richness, evenness and composition of bacterial and archaeal communities. Likewi...

  1. Managing molecular diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Juan J

    2005-02-01

    The present work provides an overview of the different methods used in molecular diversity analysis. Issues like identifying voids in proprietary databases, reducing the number of redundancies present in databases, or designing focused libraries by grouping compounds similar to a template with the aim to fine tune its properties, are potent diversity analysis tools that may be used to optimize molecules based on their properties and specifically, to speed up the process of lead discovery and optimization. The present work describes first methods that are used to describe molecular systems. This is followed by a section devoted to describe different measures of similarity between molecules, to finish with a description of different methods used to select subsets molecules according to the constraints imposed. The final section deals with the validation of these methods, based on different studies available in the literature.

  2. Rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of dairy cows in response to ingestion of lauric or myristic acid.

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    Hristov, A N; Callaway, T R; Lee, C; Dowd, S E

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this experiment, part of a larger study, was to investigate changes in rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity in cows fed medium-chain saturated fatty acids. In the main study, 6 lactating dairy cows were dosed intraruminally with 240 g/(cow · d) of stearic (SA, control), lauric (LA), or myristic (MA) acid in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design trial. Experimental periods were 28 d, and cows were transfaunated between periods. Lauric acid decreased protozoal counts in the rumen by 96% compared with SA and MA (compared with SA, MA had no effect on ruminal protozoa). Whole ruminal contents samples were collected 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 18, and 24 h after the morning feeding on d 23 of each experimental period, stored frozen, and later composited by cow and period for microbial profile analyses, which involved tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing to provide diversity analyses of gastrointestinal bacterial, archaeal, and fungal populations of the cattle. The LA treatment, either directly or through its effect on protozoa, had a profound effect on the microbial ecology of the rumen. Ruminal populations of Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Enterorhabdus were decreased (P = 0.04 to P < 0.001) by more than 2-fold in LA treatments compared with SA, and Clostridium populations were decreased (P = 0.01) in LA- compared with MA-treated cows. The proportion of Ruminococcus was not affected by treatment, although the LA treatment had the least proportion of Ruminococcus. Proportions of Eubacterium, Butyrivibrio, Olsenella, and Lactobacillus genera were increased (P = 0.03 to 0.01) by LA compared with MA or SA. The LA treatment, possibly through its effect on protozoa physically associated with archaea, resulted in an increase (P = 0.01) in the archaeal methanogenic genus Methanosphaera and a decrease (P = 0.01) in Methanobrevibacter. Few changes in fungal populations caused by treatment were detected. Collectively, results indicate that LA

  3. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation study of archaeal leucyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with different mischarged tRNA in editing conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayevsky, A V; Sharifi, M; Tukalo, M A

    2017-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play important roles in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis. Some aaRSs accomplish this via editing mechanisms, among which leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) edits non-cognate amino acid norvaline mainly by post-transfer editing. However, the molecular basis for this pathway for eukaryotic and archaeal LeuRS remain unclear. In this study, a complex of archaeal P. horikoshii LeuRS (PhLeuRS) with misacylated tRNA Leu was modeled wherever tRNA's acceptor stem was oriented directly into the editing site. To understand the distinctive features of organization we reconstructed a complex of PhLeuRS with tRNA and visualize post-transfer editing interactions mode by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. To study molecular basis for substrate selectivity by PhLeuRS's editing site we utilized MD simulation of the entire LeuRS complexes using a diverse charged form of tRNAs, namely norvalyl-tRNA Leu and isoleucyl-tRNA Leu . In general, the editing site organization of LeuRS from P.horikoshii has much in common with bacterial LeuRS. The MD simulation results revealed that the post-transfer editing substrate norvalyl-A76, binds more strongly than isoleucyl-A76. Moreover, the branched side chain of isoleucine prevents water molecules from being closer and hence the hydrolysis reaction slows significantly. To investigate a possible mechanism of the post-transfer editing reaction, by PhLeuRS we have determined that two water molecules (the attacking and assisting water molecules) are localized near the carbonyl group of the amino acid to be cleaved off. These water molecules approach the substrate from the opposite side to that observed for Thermus thermophilus LeuRS (TtLeuRS). Based on the results obtained, it was suggested that the post-transfer editing mechanism of PhLeuRS differs from that of prokaryotic TtLeuRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two hot springs from geothermal regions in Bulgaria as demostrated by 16S rRNA and GH-57 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Katerina; Tomova, Iva; Tomova, Anna; Radchenkova, Nadja; Atanassov, Ivan; Kambourova, Margarita

    2015-12-01

    Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two Bulgarian hot springs, geographically separated with different tectonic origin and different temperature of water was investigated exploring two genes, 16S rRNA and GH-57. Archaeal diversity was significantly higher in the hotter spring Levunovo (LV) (82°C); on the contrary, bacterial diversity was higher in the spring Vetren Dol (VD) (68°C). The analyzed clones from LV library were referred to twenty eight different sequence types belonging to five archaeal groups from Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. A domination of two groups was observed, Candidate Thaumarchaeota and Methanosarcinales. The majority of the clones from VD were referred to HWCG (Hot Water Crenarchaeotic Group). The formation of a group of thermophiles in the order Methanosarcinales was suggested. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high numbers of novel sequences, more than one third of archaeal and half of the bacterial phylotypes displayed similarity lower than 97% with known ones. The retrieved GH-57 gene sequences showed a complex phylogenic distribution. The main part of the retrieved homologous GH-57 sequences affiliated with bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes, Deltaproteobacteria, Candidate Saccharibacteria and affiliation of almost half of the analyzed sequences is not fully resolved. GH-57 gene analysis allows an increased resolution of the biodiversity assessment and in depth analysis of specific taxonomic groups. [Int Microbiol 18(4):217-223 (2015)]. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  5. The archaeal diversity in a cave system and its implications for life on other planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, Stefan; Rettberg, Petra; De Waele, Jo; Bessone, Loredana; Sauro, Francesco; Sanna, Laura

    The quest of exploring and looking for life in new places is a human desire since centuries. Nowadays, we are not only looking on planet Earth any more, but our endeavours focus on nearby planets in our solar system. At this point in time, we are not able to send manned missions to other planets, but to be ready and prepared for the day, training today is pivotal. Developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) since 2008, these CAVES missions (Cooperative Adventure for Valuing and Exercising human behaviour and performance Skills), prepare astronauts to work safely and effectively and solve problems as a multicultural team while exploring uncharted underground natural areas (i.e. caves) using space procedures. The hypogean environment is also of great interest for astrobiological research as cave conditions may resemble those in extra-terrestrial environments. Besides the main focus of exploration and skill training, future astronauts are also trained in taking microbiological samples for analysis during the exploration and for further analysis in the lab. During the 2013 mission, astronauts collected soil samples and employed flocked swaps to sample areas with little or no visible soil. Microscopic analysis back in the lab revealed a diverse spectrum of different cell shapes and sizes. Samples were further analysed employing molecular tools such as RFLP analysis, 16s rRNA clone libraries and sequence analysis. RFLP pattern analysis revealed that the community can be divided in 9 main groups and several single patterns. The largest group (40% of all analysed clones) belong to the clade of ammonia oxidizing archaea Nitrosopumilus spp.. Dividing the results by sampling point, it showed that the highest diversity of organisms was located on the flocked swaps, which is interesting as the sample was taken from a rock surface with no visible organic matter. By analysis low energy systems like a cave, we may be able to find clues for what could be necessary to survive on a

  6. Biotechnological uses of archaeal extremozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, J

    2001-07-01

    Archaea have developed a variety of molecular strategies to survive the often harsh environments in which they exist. Although the rules that allow archaeal enzymes to fulfill their catalytic functions under extremes of salinity, temperature or pressure are not completely understood, the stability of these extremophilic enzymes, or extremozymes, in the face of adverse conditions has led to their use in a variety of biotechnological applications in which such tolerances are advantageous. In the following, examples of commercially important archaeal extremozymes are presented, potentially useful archaeal extremozyme sources are identified and solutions to obstacles currently hindering wider use of archaeal extremozymes are discussed.

  7. The effects of glyphosate, glufosinate, paraquat and paraquat-diquat on soil microbial activity and bacterial, archaeal and nematode diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Paul G; Kukulies, Tegan; Forstner, Christian; Orton, Thomas G; Pattison, Anthony B

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of one-off applications of glyphosate, glufosinate, paraquat, and paraquat-diquat on soil microbial diversity and function. All herbicides were added to soil as pure compounds at recommended dose and were incubated under laboratory conditions for 60 days. High-throughput phylogenetic marker gene sequencing revealed that none of the herbicides significantly influenced the richness, evenness and composition of bacterial and archaeal communities. Likewise, the diversity, composition and size of nematode communities were not significantly influenced by any of the herbicides. From a functional perspective, herbicides did not significantly affect fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA) and beta-glucosidase activities. Furthermore, the ability of soil organisms to utilise 15 substrates was generally unaffected by herbicide application. The only exception to this was a temporary impairment in the ability of soil organisms to utilise three organic acids and an amino acid. Given the global and frequent use of these herbicides, it is important that future studies evaluate their potential impacts on microbial communities in a wider-range of soils and environmental conditions.

  8. Archaeal Diversity in Biofilm Technologies Applied to Treat Urban and Industrial Wastewater: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús González-López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological wastewater treatment (WWT frequently relies on biofilms for the removal of anthropogenic contaminants. The use of inert carrier materials to support biofilm development is often required, although under certain operating conditions microorganisms yield structures called granules, dense aggregates of self-immobilized cells with the characteristics of biofilms maintained in suspension. Molecular techniques have been successfully applied in recent years to identify the prokaryotic communities inhabiting biofilms in WWT plants. Although methanogenic Archaea are widely acknowledged as key players for the degradation of organic matter in anaerobic bioreactors, other biotechnological functions fulfilled by Archaea are less explored, and research on their significance and potential for WWT is largely needed. In addition, the occurrence of biofilms in WWT plants can sometimes be a source of operational problems. This is the case for membrane bioreactors (MBR, an advanced technology that combines conventional biological treatment with membrane filtration, which is strongly limited by biofouling, defined as the undesirable accumulation of microbial biofilms and other materials on membrane surfaces. The prevalence and spatial distribution of archaeal communities in biofilm-based WWT as well as their role in biofouling are reviewed here, in order to illustrate the significance of this prokaryotic cellular lineage in engineered environments devoted to WWT.

  9. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two hot spring microbial mats from a geothermal region in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Cristian; Drugă, Bogdan; Hegedus, Adriana; Sicora, Cosmin; Dragoş, Nicolae

    2013-05-01

    The diversity of archaea and bacteria was investigated in two slightly alkaline, mesophilic hot springs from the Western Plain of Romania. Phylogenetic analysis showed a low diversity of Archaea, only three Euryarchaeota taxa being detected: Methanomethylovorans thermophila, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and Methanococcus aeolicus. Twelve major bacterial groups were identified, both springs being dominated by Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi and Proteobacteria. While at the phylum/class-level the microbial mats share a similar biodiversity; at the species level the geothermal springs investigated seem to be colonized by specific consortia. The dominant taxa were filamentous heterocyst-containing Fischerella, at 45 °C and non-heterocyst Leptolyngbya and Geitlerinema, at 55 °C. Other bacterial taxa (Thauera sp., Methyloversatilis universalis, Pannonibacter phragmitetus, Polymorphum gilvum, Metallibacterium sp. and Spartobacteria) were observed for the first time in association with a geothermal habitat. Based on their bacterial diversity the two mats were clustered together with other similar habitats from Europe and part of Asia, most likely the water temperature playing a major role in the formation of specific microbial communities that colonize the investigated thermal springs.

  10. Bacterial, Archaeal, and Eukaryotic Diversity across Distinct Microhabitats in an Acid Mine Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mesa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainages are characterized by their low pH and the presence of dissolved toxic metallic species. Microorganisms survive in different microhabitats within the ecosystem, namely water, sediments, and biofilms. In this report, we surveyed the microbial diversity within all domains of life in the different microhabitats at Los Rueldos abandoned mercury underground mine (NW Spain, and predicted bacterial function based on community composition. Sediment samples contained higher proportions of soil bacteria (AD3, Acidobacteria, as well as Crenarchaeota and Methanomassiliicoccaceae archaea. Oxic and hypoxic biofilm samples were enriched in bacterial iron oxidizers from the genus Leptospirillum, order Acidithiobacillales, class Betaproteobacteria, and archaea from the class Thermoplasmata. Water samples were enriched in Cyanobacteria and Thermoplasmata archaea at a 3–98% of the sunlight influence, whilst Betaproteobacteria, Thermoplasmata archaea, and Micrarchaea dominated in acid water collected in total darkness. Stalactites hanging from the Fe-rich mine ceiling were dominated by the neutrophilic iron oxidizer Gallionella and other lineages that were absent in the rest of the microhabitats (e.g., Chlorobi, Chloroflexi. Eukaryotes were detected in biofilms and open-air water samples, and belonged mainly to clades SAR (Alveolata and Stramenopiles, and Opisthokonta (Fungi. Oxic and hypoxic biofilms displayed higher proportions of ciliates (Gonostomum, Oxytricha, whereas water samples were enriched in fungi (Paramicrosporidium and unknown microbial Helotiales. Predicted function through bacterial community composition suggested adaptive evolutive convergence of function in heterogeneous communities. Our study showcases a broad description of the microbial diversity across different microhabitats in the same environment and expands the knowledge on the diversity of microbial eukaryotes in AMD habitats.

  11. Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial, Archaeal, and Fungal Communities Along an Altitudinal Gradient in Alpine Forest Soils: What Are the Driving Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, José A; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    Shifts in soil microbial communities over altitudinal gradients and the driving factors are poorly studied. Their elucidation is indispensable to gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of ecosystems to global climate change. Here, we investigated soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities at four Alpine forest sites representing a climosequence, over an altitudinal gradient from 545 to 2000 m above sea level (asl), regarding abundance and diversity by using qPCR and Illumina sequencing, respectively. Archaeal community was dominated by Thaumarchaeota, and no significant shifts were detected in abundance or community composition with altitude. The relative bacterial abundance increased at higher altitudes, which was related to increasing levels of soil organic matter and nutrients with altitude. Shifts in bacterial richness and diversity as well as community structure (comprised basically of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) significantly correlated with several environmental and soil chemical factors, especially soil pH. The site at the lowest altitude harbored the highest bacterial richness and diversity, although richness/diversity community properties did not show a monotonic decrease along the gradient. The relative size of fungal community also increased with altitude and its composition comprised Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Changes in fungal richness/diversity and community structure were mainly governed by pH and C/N, respectively. The variation of the predominant bacterial and fungal classes over the altitudinal gradient was the result of the environmental and soil chemical factors prevailing at each site.

  12. Novel viral genomes identified from six metagenomes reveal wide distribution of archaeal viruses and high viral diversity in terrestrial hot springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islin, Sóley Ruth; Menzel, Peter; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Limited by culture-dependent methods the number of viruses identified from thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria is still very small. In this study we retrieved viral sequences from six hot spring metagenomes isolated worldwide, revealing a wide distribution of four archaeal viral families....... Among the novel genomes, one belongs to a putative thermophilic virus infecting the bacterium Hydrogenobaculum, for which no virus has been reported in the literature. Moreover, a high viral diversity was observed in the metagenomes, especially among the Lipothrixviridae, as indicated by the large...

  13. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anita; Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W; Marsh, Terence L

    2009-08-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H(2), 5.4 nM; CH(4), 2.70 microM) with concentrations of S(2-) (0.03 mM), SO(4)(2-) (14.8 mM), Ca(2+) (15.7 mM), and HCO(3)(-) (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments.

  14. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, A.; Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Marsh, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H2, 5.4 nM; CH4, 2.70 ??M) with concentrations of S2- (0.03 mM), SO42- (14.8 mM), Ca2+ (15.7 mM), and HCO3- (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Archaeal and bacterial communities of Xestospongia testudinaria and sediment differ in diversity, composition and predicted function in an Indonesian coral reef environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polónia, Ana Rita Moura; Cleary, Daniel Francis Richard; Freitas, Rossana; Gomes, Newton Carlos Marcial; de Voogd, Nicole Joy

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the microbial diversity, composition and predicted functional similarities and dissimilarities between prokaryotic kingdoms and among coral reef biotopes located in close spatial proximity to one other. In this study, we compared communities of Archaea and Bacteria in two distinct biotopes, namely, the sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and sediment of the Berau reef system, Indonesia. Using a 16S rRNA gene barcoded pyrosequencing approach and a recently developed predictive metagenomic approach (PICRUSt), we tested to what extent sediment and X. testudinaria host compositionally and functionally distinct communities of Archaea and Bacteria. Although Crenarchaeota (Archaea) and Proteobacteria (Bacteria) were the dominant phyla in the microbial communities of both sediment and sponge, there were significant differences in composition between them. Biotope proved to be the main identifiable factor affecting composition. In line with the compositional differences between sediment and sponge prokaryote communities, there were also differences in predicted functions. The archaeal and bacterial communities of sediment were enriched for functions associated with the Metabolism and Environmental Information Processing categories; those of X. testudinaria were enriched for functions associated with the Genetic Information Processing category. The significant levels of concordance between archaeal and bacterial communities and the similar enrichment of these communities in the same functional categories suggests a certain degree of functional redundancy between Archaea and Bacteria in the studied biotopes, which for the sponge may result in an increased resilience to environmental perturbations.

  16. Archaeal virus-host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis provides novel insights in several aspects of the molecular

    biology of archaea, bacteria and their viruses.

    Three fundamentally different groups of viruses are associated with the three domains of life.

    Archaeal viruses are

  17. Molecular Characterization of the Archaeal Community in an Amazonian Wetland Soil and Culture-Dependent Isolation of Methanogenic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Pazinato, Jeanedy M.; Paulo, Ezio N.; Mendes, Lucas W.; Vazoller, Rosana F.; Tsai, Siu M.

    2010-01-01

    Tropical wetlands are the major natural source of methane released into the atmosphere, producing about 60% of all natural emissions. The great wetland areas of the Amazon basin are the largest source of methane in this region, contributing an estimated 5% of the total emissions from the world’s flooded areas. However, despite the important role that methanogenic archaea play in these environments, there have been few studies on the composition of their archaeal communities. In this survey, f...

  18. Microbial diversity in Tunisian geothermal springs as detected by molecular and culture-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeh, Raja; Birrien, Jean Louis; Alain, Karine; Barbier, Georges; Hamdi, Mokhtar; Prieur, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Prokaryotic diversities of 12 geothermal hot springs located in Northern, Central and Southern Tunisia were investigated by culture-based and molecular approaches. Enrichment cultures for both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms were successfully obtained at temperatures ranging from 50 to 75°C. Fourteen strains including four novel species were cultivated and assigned to the phyla Firmicutes (9), Thermotogae (2), Betaproteobacteria (1), Synergistetes (1) and Bacteroidetes (1). Archaeal or universal oligonucleotide primer sets were used to generate 16S rRNA gene libraries. Representative groups included Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus, Thermotogae, Synergistetes, Bacteroidetes, Aquificae, Chloroflexi, candidate division OP9 in addition to other yet unclassified strains. The archaeal library showed a low diversity of clone sequences belonging to the phyla Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. Furthermore, we confirmed the occurrence of sulfate reducers and methanogens by amplification and sequencing of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) and methyl coenzyme M reductase α-subunit (mcrA) genes. Altogether, we discuss the diverse prokaryotic communities arising from the 12 geothermal hot springs studied and relate these findings to the physico-chemical features of the hot springs.

  19. Environmental Conditions Constrain the Distribution and Diversity of Archaeal merA in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Boyd, E.; Crane, S.; Lu-Irving, P.; Krabbenhoft, D.; King, S.; Dighton, J.; Geesey, G.; Barkay, T.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution and phylogeny of extant protein-encoding genes recovered from geochemically diverse environments can provide insight into the physical and chemical parameters that led to the origin and which constrained the evolution of a functional process. Mercuric reductase (MerA) plays an integral role in mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry by catalyzing the transformation of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Putative merA sequences were amplified from DNA extracts of microbial communities associated with mats and sulfur precipitates from physicochemically diverse Hg-containing springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, using four PCR primer sets that were designed to capture the known diversity of merA. The recovery of novel and deeply rooted MerA lineages from these habitats supports previous evidence that indicates merA originated in a thermophilic environment. Generalized linear models indicate that the distribution of putative archaeal merA lineages was constrained by a combination of pH, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved total mercury and sulfide. The models failed to identify statistically well supported trends for the distribution of putative bacterial merA lineages as a function of these or other measured environmental variables, suggesting that these lineages were either influenced by environmental parameters not considered in the present study, or the bacterial primer sets were designed to target too broad of a class of genes which may have responded differently to environmental stimuli. The widespread occurrence of merA in the geothermal environments implies a prominent role for Hg detoxification in these environments. Moreover, the differences in the distribution of the merA genes amplified with the four merA primer sets suggests that the organisms putatively engaged in this activity have evolved to occupy different ecological niches within the geothermal gradient. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale. E. Santos, M. Matos, P. Silva, A. M. Figueiras, C. Benito and O. Pinto-Carnide. J. Genet. 95, 273–281. Table 1. RAPD and ISSR primers used in this study. Primer. 5 –3. Primer. 5 –3. RAPDs (Operon). A1. CAGGCCCTTC. C5. CATGACCGCC. A4. AATCGGGCTG. C6.

  1. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale. E. Santos, M. Matos, P. Silva, A. M. Figueiras, C. Benito and O. Pinto-Carnide. J. Genet. 95, 273–281. Table 1. RAPD and ISSR primers used in this study. Primer. 5 –3. Primer. 5 –3. RAPDs (Operon). A1. CAGGCCCTTC. C5. CATGACCGCC. A4.

  2. Molecular and pomological diversity among pomegranate ( Punica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular and pomological diversity among pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cultivars in Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey. C Durgaç, M Özgen, Ö Simsek3, YA Kaçar, Y Kiyga, S Çelebi, K Gündüz, S Serçe ...

  3. Molecular and morphological diversity of pezizalean ectomycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedersoo, Leho; Hansen, Karen; Perry, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of molecular research is discovering a high diversity of pezizalean ectomycorrhiza (EcM), yet most remain unidentified at the genus or species level. This study describes EcM-forming taxa within the Pezizales. EcM-forming Pezizales were revealed by morphotyping and sequencing of Ec...

  4. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships amongSecalespp. and among cultivars ofSecale ... Faculty of Sciences, Campo Grande, Lisboa, Portugal; Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Complutense, C/ José Antonio Novais, 12, ...

  5. An integrated study reveals diverse methanogens, Thaumarchaeota, and yet-uncultivated archaeal lineages in Armenian hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Brian P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Cole, Jessica K; Panosyan, Hovik H

    2013-07-01

    Culture-independent and enrichment techniques, with an emphasis on members of the Archaea, were used to determine the composition and structure of microbial communities inhabiting microbial mats in the source pools of two geothermal springs near the towns of Arzakan and Jermuk in Armenia. Amplification of small-subunit rRNA genes using "universal" primers followed by pyrosequencing (pyrotags) revealed highly diverse microbial communities in both springs, with >99 % of pyrosequences corresponding to members of the domain Bacteria. The spring in Arzakan was colonized by a photosynthetic mat dominated by Cyanobacteria, in addition to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Spirochaeta and a diversity of other Bacteria. The spring in Jermuk was colonized by phylotypes related to sulfur, iron, and hydrogen chemolithotrophs in the Betaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, along with a diversity of other Bacteria. Analysis of near full-length small subunit rRNA genes amplified using Archaea-specific primers showed that both springs are inhabited by a diversity of methanogens, including Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales and relatives of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, close relatives of the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (AOA) "Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis", and the yet-uncultivated Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group and Deep Hydrothermal Vent Crenarchaeota group 1. Methanogenic enrichments confirmed the predicted physiological diversity, revealing methylotrophic, acetoclastic, and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at 45 and 55 °C, but not 65 °C. This is one of only a few studies combining cultivation-independent and -dependent approaches to study archaea in moderate-temperature (37-73 °C) terrestrial geothermal environments and suggests important roles for methanogenic archaea and AOA in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles in these environments.

  6. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  7. Status of the Archaeal and Bacterial Census: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Rene A.; Martin, Thomas; Edwards, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A census is typically carried out for people across a range of geographical levels; however, microbial ecologists have implemented a molecular census of bacteria and archaea by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. We assessed how well the census of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences is proceeding in the context of recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies because full-length sequences are typically used as references for classification of the short sequences generated by newer technologies. Among the 1,411,234 and 53,546 full-length bacterial and archaeal sequences, 94.5% and 95.1% of the bacterial and archaeal sequences, respectively, belonged to operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that have been observed more than once. Although these metrics suggest that the census is approaching completion, 29.2% of the bacterial and 38.5% of the archaeal OTUs have been observed more than once. Thus, there is still considerable diversity to be explored. Unfortunately, the rate of new full-length sequences has been declining, and new sequences are primarily being deposited by a small number of studies. Furthermore, sequences from soil and aquatic environments, which are known to be rich in bacterial diversity, represent only 7.8 and 16.5% of the census, while sequences associated with host-associated environments represent 55.0% of the census. Continued use of traditional approaches and new technologies such as single-cell genomics and short-read assembly are likely to improve our ability to sample rare OTUs if it is possible to overcome this sampling bias. The success of ongoing efforts to use short-read sequencing to characterize archaeal and bacterial communities requires that researchers strive to expand the depth and breadth of this census. PMID:27190214

  8. Status of the Archaeal and Bacterial Census: an Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. Schloss

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A census is typically carried out for people across a range of geographical levels; however, microbial ecologists have implemented a molecular census of bacteria and archaea by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. We assessed how well the census of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences is proceeding in the context of recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies because full-length sequences are typically used as references for classification of the short sequences generated by newer technologies. Among the 1,411,234 and 53,546 full-length bacterial and archaeal sequences, 94.5% and 95.1% of the bacterial and archaeal sequences, respectively, belonged to operational taxonomic units (OTUs that have been observed more than once. Although these metrics suggest that the census is approaching completion, 29.2% of the bacterial and 38.5% of the archaeal OTUs have been observed more than once. Thus, there is still considerable diversity to be explored. Unfortunately, the rate of new full-length sequences has been declining, and new sequences are primarily being deposited by a small number of studies. Furthermore, sequences from soil and aquatic environments, which are known to be rich in bacterial diversity, represent only 7.8 and 16.5% of the census, while sequences associated with host-associated environments represent 55.0% of the census. Continued use of traditional approaches and new technologies such as single-cell genomics and short-read assembly are likely to improve our ability to sample rare OTUs if it is possible to overcome this sampling bias. The success of ongoing efforts to use short-read sequencing to characterize archaeal and bacterial communities requires that researchers strive to expand the depth and breadth of this census.

  9. Putative archaeal viruses from the mesopelagic ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean R. Vik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic viruses that infect bacteria, or phages, are known to modulate host diversity, metabolisms, and biogeochemical cycling, while the viruses that infect marine Archaea remain understudied despite the critical ecosystem roles played by their hosts. Here we introduce “MArVD”, for Metagenomic Archaeal Virus Detector, an annotation tool designed to identify putative archaeal virus contigs in metagenomic datasets. MArVD is made publicly available through the online iVirus analytical platform. Benchmarking analysis of MArVD showed it to be >99% accurate and 100% sensitive in identifying the 127 known archaeal viruses among the 12,499 viruses in the VirSorter curated dataset. Application of MArVD to 10 viral metagenomes from two depth profiles in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP oxygen minimum zone revealed 43 new putative archaeal virus genomes and large genome fragments ranging in size from 10 to 31 kb. Network-based classifications, which were consistent with marker gene phylogenies where available, suggested that these putative archaeal virus contigs represented six novel candidate genera. Ecological analyses, via fragment recruitment and ordination, revealed that the diversity and relative abundances of these putative archaeal viruses were correlated with oxygen concentration and temperature along two OMZ-spanning depth profiles, presumably due to structuring of the host Archaea community. Peak viral diversity and abundances were found in surface waters, where Thermoplasmata 16S rRNA genes are prevalent, suggesting these archaea as hosts in the surface habitats. Together these findings provide a baseline for identifying archaeal viruses in sequence datasets, and an initial picture of the ecology of such viruses in non-extreme environments.

  10. [A novel archaeal phylum: thaumarchaeota--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limei; He, Jizheng

    2012-04-04

    Based on the archaeal 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic tree, the archaeal domain is divided into two major phyla, Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. During the past 20 years, diverse groups of archaea have been found to be widely distributed in moderate environments with the rapid development and application of molecular techniques in microbial ecology. Increasing evidence demonstrated that these archaea, especially ammonia-oxidizing archaea, play a major role in biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and carbon elements. These mesophilic archaea were placed initially as a sister group of the Crenarchaeota and named as "non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota". More recently, phylogenetic analyses based on more SSU and SLU rDNA sequences suggested that the non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota constituted a separate phylum of the Archaea that branched off before the separation of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. The Thaumarchaeota (the Greek "Thaumas", meaning wonder) was therefore proposed for a novel phylum, as the third archaeal phylum. More studies based on r-proteins and comparative genomics confirm that the Thaumarchaeota are distinct from Crenarchaeota. In this paper, we gave a translated Chinese name for Thaumarchaeota and reviewed the recent progress on the phylogeny position, genetics, ecology and physiology of the Thaumarchaeota.

  11. Molecular Technique to Understand Deep Microbial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Current sequencing-based and DNA microarray techniques to study microbial diversity are based on an initial PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification step. However, a number of factors are known to bias PCR amplification and jeopardize the true representation of bacterial diversity. PCR amplification of the minor template appears to be suppressed by the exponential amplification of the more abundant template. It is widely acknowledged among environmental molecular microbiologists that genetic biosignatures identified from an environment only represent the most dominant populations. The technological bottleneck has overlooked the presence of the less abundant minority population, and underestimated their role in the ecosystem maintenance. To generate PCR amplicons for subsequent diversity analysis, bacterial l6S rRNA genes are amplified by PCR using universal primers. Two distinct PCR regimes are employed in parallel: one using normal and the other using biotinlabeled universal primers. PCR products obtained with biotin-labeled primers are mixed with streptavidin-labeled magnetic beads and selectively captured in the presence of a magnetic field. Less-abundant DNA templates that fail to amplify in this first round of PCR amplification are subjected to a second round of PCR using normal universal primers. These PCR products are then subjected to downstream diversity analyses such as conventional cloning and sequencing. A second round of PCR amplified the minority population and completed the deep diversity picture of the environmental sample.

  12. Molecular diversity of Scottish Cryptosporidium hominis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, A; Alexander, C L; Coyne, M; Brownlie, S; Smith-Palmer, A; Jones, B L

    2015-04-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis is one of the most prevalent protozoan parasites to infect humans where transmission is via the consumption of infective oocysts. This study describes sporadic cases in addition to the molecular diversity of outbreak cases in Scotland using the glycoprotein-60 subtyping tool. From a total of 187 C. hominis isolates, 65 were subjected to further molecular analysis and 46 were found to be the common IbA10G2 subtype. Unusual subtypes included four isolates belonging to the Ia family (IaA14R3, n = 12; IaA14R2, n = 1; IaA9G3, n = 1; IaA25R3, n = 2), two from the Id family (IdA24, n = 1; IdA17, n = 1) and one belonging to the Ie family, namely IeA11G3T3. These data contribute significantly to our knowledge and understanding of the molecular diversity of C. hominis isolates from outbreak investigations involving Scottish residents which will be beneficial for the management of future outbreaks.

  13. Environmental shaping of sponge associated archaeal communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S Turque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archaea are ubiquitous symbionts of marine sponges but their ecological roles and the influence of environmental factors on these associations are still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the diversity and composition of archaea associated with seawater and with the sponges Hymeniacidon heliophila, Paraleucilla magna and Petromica citrina in two distinct environments: Guanabara Bay, a highly impacted estuary in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the nearby Cagarras Archipelago. For this we used metagenomic analyses of 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA gene libraries. Hymeniacidon heliophila was more abundant inside the bay, while P. magna was more abundant outside and P. citrina was only recorded at the Cagarras Archipelago. Principal Component Analysis plots (PCA generated using pairwise unweighted UniFrac distances showed that the archaeal community structure of inner bay seawater and sponges was different from that of coastal Cagarras Archipelago. Rarefaction analyses showed that inner bay archaeaoplankton were more diverse than those from the Cagarras Archipelago. Only members of Crenarchaeota were found in sponge libraries, while in seawater both Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota were observed. Although most amoA archaeal genes detected in this study seem to be novel, some clones were affiliated to known ammonia oxidizers such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Cenarchaeum symbiosum. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The composition and diversity of archaeal communities associated with pollution-tolerant sponge species can change in a range of few kilometers, probably influenced by eutrophication. The presence of archaeal amoA genes in Porifera suggests that Archaea are involved in the nitrogen cycle within the sponge holobiont, possibly increasing its resistance to anthropogenic impacts. The higher diversity of Crenarchaeota in the polluted area suggests that some marine sponges are able to change the composition

  14. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Archaeal tRNATyr and tRNATrp Identities in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Mukai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The tRNA identity elements for some amino acids are distinct between the bacterial and archaeal domains. Searching in recent genomic and metagenomic sequence data, we found some candidate phyla radiation (CPR bacteria with archaeal tRNA identity for Tyr-tRNA and Trp-tRNA synthesis. These bacteria possess genes for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS predicted to be derived from DPANN superphylum archaea, while the cognate tRNATyr and tRNATrp genes reveal bacterial or archaeal origins. We identified a trace of domain fusion and swapping in the archaeal-type TyrRS gene of a bacterial lineage, suggesting that CPR bacteria may have used this mechanism to create diverse proteins. Archaeal-type TrpRS of bacteria and a few TrpRS species of DPANN archaea represent a new phylogenetic clade (named TrpRS-A. The TrpRS-A open reading frames (ORFs are always associated with another ORF (named ORF1 encoding an unknown protein without global sequence identity to any known protein. However, our protein structure prediction identified a putative HIGH-motif and KMSKS-motif as well as many α-helices that are characteristic of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS homologs. These results provide another example of the diversity of molecular components that implement the genetic code and provide a clue to the early evolution of life and the genetic code.

  15. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous goat populations. Halima Hassen, Barbara Rischkowsky, Adnan Termanini, Ghassen Jessry, Aynalem Haile, Michael Baum, Samir Lababidi ...

  16. Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) using the random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methods.

  17. Molecular characterization of a conserved archaeal copper resistance (cop) gene cluster and its copper-responsive regulator in Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, T.J.G.; Brinkman, A.B.; Lamers, P.P.; Kornet, N.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    Using a comparative genomics approach, a copper resistance gene cluster has been identified in multiple archaeal genomes. The cop cluster is predicted to encode a metallochaperone (CopM), a P-type copper-exporting ATPase (CopA) and a novel, archaea-specific transcriptional regulator (CopT) which

  18. 2007 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imke Schroeder

    2008-09-18

    The Archaea are a fascinating and diverse group of prokaryotic organisms with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of this GRC conference, 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology', expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting the evolution and composition of microbial communities and novel archaeal species, their impact on the environment, archaeal metabolism, and research that stems from sequence analysis of archaeal genomes. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple reputable areas with new scientific topics in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  19. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl

    2013-02-27

    specific genetic ... diversity studies, molecular markers have been applied to identify and to select genotypes with ..... Biologia floral e polinização artificial de pinhão-manso no norte de. Minas Gerais. Pesq. Agropec. Bras.

  20. Molecular diversity study of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... Thus, conservation priority should be given for those regions that have low genetic diversity. Key words: Conservation, indigenous, molecular markers, primers. ... This study investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of black cumin germplasms collected from Ethiopia using. ISSR markers.

  1. Molecular diversity among seven Solanum (eggplant and relatives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seven Solanum species (eggplants) were investigated for molecular diversity. Besides its widespread cultivation, nutritional and economic importance, its genome has not been extensively researched. 39 Solanum accessions, a landrace and tomato variety (LBR 48) were molecularly analyzed by simple sequence repeat ...

  2. Genetic diversity of archaea in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, K; Horikoshi, K

    1999-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of naturally occurring archaeal communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments was carried out by PCR-mediated small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) sequencing. As determined through partial sequencing of rDNA clones amplified with archaea-specific primers, the archaeal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments showed a great genetic diversity, and most members of these populations appeared to be uncultivated and unidentified organisms. In the...

  3. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Over the years, there has been much controversy about the taxonomy of the Secale genus. ... have become routine in plant biotechnology, such as genetic diversity studies. ISSR (Zietkiewicz et al. 1994) and ... 1996) were not amplified in the bulk DNA samples. The number of plants used to construct the bulk samples was.

  4. Invertebrate lysozymes: Diversity and distribution, molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This review describes the current knowledge on i-type lysozymes, outlining their distribution, molecular mechanism and in vivo function taking the representative from Venerupis philippinarum (formerly Tapes japonica) (Vp-ilys) as a model. In addition, invertebrate g-type and ch-type (chalaropsis) lysozymes, which have ...

  5. The Effect of Dietary Replacement of Ordinary Rice with Red Yeast Rice on Nutrient Utilization, Enteric Methane Emission and Rumen Archaeal Diversity in Goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L Z; Zhou, M L; Wang, J W; Wu, D; Yan, T

    2016-01-01

    Twenty castrated Boer crossbred goats were used in the present study with two treatments to examine the effect of dietary replacement of ordinary rice with red yeast rice on nutrient utilization, enteric methane emission and ruminal archaea structure and composition. Two treatment diets contained (DM basis) 70.0% of forage, 21.8% of concentrates and 8.2% of either ordinary rice (control) or red yeast rice (RYR). Nutrient utilization was measured and enteric methane emissions were determined in respiration chambers. Results showed that RYR had significantly lower digestibility of N and organic matter compared to control group. However, feeding red yeast rice did not affect N retention as g/d or a proportion of N intake, and reduced heat production as MJ/d or as a proportion of metabolizable energy intake, thus leading to a higher proportion of metabolizable energy intake to be retained in body tissue. RYR also had significantly lower methane emissions either as g/d, or as a proportion of feed intake. Although feeding red yeast rice had no negative effect on any rumen fermentation variables, it decreased serum contents of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. In the present study, 75616 archaeal sequences were generated and clustered into 2364 Operational Taxonomic Units. At the genus level, the predominant archaea in the rumen of goats was Methanobrevibacter, which was significantly inhibited with the supplementation of red yeast rice. In conclusion, red yeast rice is a potential feed ingredient for mitigation of enteric methane emissions of goats. However, caution should be taken when it is used because it may inhibit the digestibility of some nutrients. Further studies are required to evaluate its potential with different diets and animal species, as well as its effects on animal health and food safety.

  6. The Effect of Dietary Replacement of Ordinary Rice with Red Yeast Rice on Nutrient Utilization, Enteric Methane Emission and Rumen Archaeal Diversity in Goats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Z Wang

    Full Text Available Twenty castrated Boer crossbred goats were used in the present study with two treatments to examine the effect of dietary replacement of ordinary rice with red yeast rice on nutrient utilization, enteric methane emission and ruminal archaea structure and composition. Two treatment diets contained (DM basis 70.0% of forage, 21.8% of concentrates and 8.2% of either ordinary rice (control or red yeast rice (RYR. Nutrient utilization was measured and enteric methane emissions were determined in respiration chambers. Results showed that RYR had significantly lower digestibility of N and organic matter compared to control group. However, feeding red yeast rice did not affect N retention as g/d or a proportion of N intake, and reduced heat production as MJ/d or as a proportion of metabolizable energy intake, thus leading to a higher proportion of metabolizable energy intake to be retained in body tissue. RYR also had significantly lower methane emissions either as g/d, or as a proportion of feed intake. Although feeding red yeast rice had no negative effect on any rumen fermentation variables, it decreased serum contents of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. In the present study, 75616 archaeal sequences were generated and clustered into 2364 Operational Taxonomic Units. At the genus level, the predominant archaea in the rumen of goats was Methanobrevibacter, which was significantly inhibited with the supplementation of red yeast rice. In conclusion, red yeast rice is a potential feed ingredient for mitigation of enteric methane emissions of goats. However, caution should be taken when it is used because it may inhibit the digestibility of some nutrients. Further studies are required to evaluate its potential with different diets and animal species, as well as its effects on animal health and food safety.

  7. Molecular diversity techniques for chemical databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available There is much current interest in computer-based methods for selecting structurally diverse subsets of chemical databases, e.g., for inclusion in biological screening programme or for the construction of combinatorial libraries. This paper summarises recent work in Sheffield on dissimilarity-based compound selection, which seeks to identify a maximally-dissimilar subset of the molecules in the database. More realistically, this approach seeks to identify a near maximally dissimilar subset, since the identification of the most dissimilar subset requires the use of a combinatorial algorithm that considers all possible subsets of a given dataset.

  8. Ecological drivers of biogeographic patterns of soil archaeal community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ming Zheng

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the biogeography of organisms has long been a focus in ecological research, including the mechanisms that generate and maintain diversity. In this study, we targeted a microbial group relatively underrepresented in the microbial biogeographic literature, the soil Archaea. We surveyed the archaeal abundance and community composition using real-time quantitative PCR and T-RFLP approaches for 105 soil samples from 2 habitat types to identify the archaeal distribution patterns and factors driving these patterns. Results showed that the soil archaeal community was affected by spatial and environmental variables, and 79% and 51% of the community variation was explained in the non-flooded soil (NS and flooded soil (FS habitat, respectively, showing its possible biogeographic distribution. The diversity patterns of soil Archaea across the landscape were influenced by a combination of stochastic and deterministic processes. The contribution from neutral processes was higher than that from deterministic processes associated with environmental variables. The variables pH, sample depth and longitude played key roles in determining the archaeal distribution in the NS habitat, while sampling depth, longitude and NH4 (+-N were most important in the FS habitat. Overall, there might be similar ecological drivers in the soil archaeal community as in macroorganism communities.

  9. Archaeal CRISPR-based immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger A; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-based immune systems are essentially modular with three primary functions: the excision and integration of new spacers, the processing of CRISPR transcripts to yield mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs), and the targeting and cleavage...... of foreign nucleic acid. The primary target appears to be the DNA of foreign genetic elements, but the CRISPR/Cmr system that is widespread amongst archaea also specifically targets and cleaves RNA in vitro. The archaeal CRISPR systems tend to be both diverse and complex. Here we examine evidence...... of CRISPR loci and the evidence for intergenomic exchange of CRISPR systems....

  10. Molecular markers: a potential resource for ginger genetic diversity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nor Asiah; Rafii, M Y; Mahmud, T M M; Hanafi, M M; Miah, Gous

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is an economically important and valuable plant around the world. Ginger is used as a food, spice, condiment, medicine and ornament. There is available information on biochemical aspects of ginger, but few studies have been reported on its molecular aspects. The main objective of this review is to accumulate the available molecular marker information and its application in diverse ginger studies. This review article was prepared by combing material from published articles and our own research. Molecular markers allow the identification and characterization of plant genotypes through direct access to hereditary material. In crop species, molecular markers are applied in different aspects and are useful in breeding programs. In ginger, molecular markers are commonly used to identify genetic variation and classify the relatedness among varieties, accessions, and species. Consequently, it provides important input in determining resourceful management strategies for ginger improvement programs. Alternatively, a molecular marker could function as a harmonizing tool for documenting species. This review highlights the application of molecular markers (isozyme, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and others such as RFLP, SCAR, NBS and SNP) in genetic diversity studies of ginger species. Some insights on the advantages of the markers are discussed. The detection of genetic variation among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. This update of recent literature will help researchers and students select the appropriate molecular markers for ginger-related research.

  11. Molecular diversity among wild relatives of Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, four wild relatives of pigeonpea were evaluated using 24 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to assess their genetic diversity at molecular level. Each marker, on average, amplified 3.3 alleles with polymorphic information content (PIC) value of 0.53. The dendrogram pattern revealed two distinct ...

  12. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in rice. (Oryza sativa L.) C. Vanniarajan, K. K. Vinod and Andy Pereira. J. Genet. 91, 9–19. Table 1. Chromosome-wise distribution of SSR alleles and their number (k), polymorphic information content (PIC) and allele discrimination index (Dm). Chromosome.

  13. Molecular-based rapid inventories of sympatric diversity: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-15

    Oct 15, 2012 ... Molecular markers offer a universal source of data for quantifying biodiversity. DNA barcoding uses a standardized genetic marker and a curated reference database to identify known species and to reveal cryptic diversity within well- sampled clades. Rapid biological inventories, e.g. rapid assessment ...

  14. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid wheat screened against Barley yellow dwarf virus. Huma Saffdar1 ... The history of cultiva- ted wheat and human .... and viewed under the UV light chamber using the computer pro- gram UVIPhotoMW.

  15. The carboxy-terminal αN helix of the archaeal XerA tyrosine recombinase is a molecular switch to control site-specific recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Serre

    Full Text Available Tyrosine recombinases are conserved in the three kingdoms of life. Here we present the first crystal structure of a full-length archaeal tyrosine recombinase, XerA from Pyrococcus abyssi, at 3.0 Å resolution. In the absence of DNA substrate XerA crystallizes as a dimer where each monomer displays a tertiary structure similar to that of DNA-bound Tyr-recombinases. Active sites are assembled in the absence of dif except for the catalytic Tyr, which is extruded and located equidistant from each active site within the dimer. Using XerA active site mutants we demonstrate that XerA follows the classical cis-cleavage reaction, suggesting rearrangements of the C-terminal domain upon DNA binding. Surprisingly, XerA C-terminal αN helices dock in cis in a groove that, in bacterial tyrosine recombinases, accommodates in trans αN helices of neighbour monomers in the Holliday junction intermediates. Deletion of the XerA C-terminal αN helix does not impair cleavage of suicide substrates but prevents recombination catalysis. We propose that the enzymatic cycle of XerA involves the switch of the αN helix from cis to trans packing, leading to (i repositioning of the catalytic Tyr in the active site in cis and (ii dimer stabilisation via αN contacts in trans between monomers.

  16. Prospects of molecular markers in Fusarium species diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayaka, S. Chandra; Wulff, Ednar Gadelha; Udayashankar, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in genomics have opened up for newer opportunities to study the diversity and classification of fungi. The genus Fusarium contains many plant pathogens that attack diverse agricultural crops. Fusarium spp. are not only pathogenic to plants but are also known as toxin producers...... for generation of probes and their use in phylogeny of Fusarium spp. are also presented. The concluding part emphasizes the value of molecular markers for assessing genetic variability and reveals that molecular tools are indispensable for providing information not only of one Fusarium species but on whole...... that negatively affect animal and human health. The identification of Fusarium species still remains one of the most critical issues in fungal taxonomy, given that the number of species recognized in the genus has been constantly changing in the last century due to the different taxonomic systems. This review...

  17. A Brief Review of Molecular Techniques to Assess Plant Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Arif

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Massive loss of valuable plant species in the past centuries and its adverse impact on environmental and socioeconomic values has triggered the conservation of plant resources. Appropriate identification and characterization of plant materials is essential for the successful conservation of plant resources and to ensure their sustainable use. Molecular tools developed in the past few years provide easy, less laborious means for assigning known and unknown plant taxa. These techniques answer many new evolutionary and taxonomic questions, which were not previously possible with only phenotypic methods. Molecular techniques such as DNA barcoding, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP, microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP have recently been used for plant diversity studies. Each technique has its own advantages and limitations. These techniques differ in their resolving power to detect genetic differences, type of data they generate and their applicability to particular taxonomic levels. This review presents a basic description of different molecular techniques that can be utilized for DNA fingerprinting and molecular diversity analysis of plant species.

  18. A Brief Review of Molecular Techniques to Assess Plant Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Ibrahim A.; Bakir, Mohammad A.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Al Farhan, Ahmad H.; Al Homaidan, Ali A.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Sadoon, Mohammad Al; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Massive loss of valuable plant species in the past centuries and its adverse impact on environmental and socioeconomic values has triggered the conservation of plant resources. Appropriate identification and characterization of plant materials is essential for the successful conservation of plant resources and to ensure their sustainable use. Molecular tools developed in the past few years provide easy, less laborious means for assigning known and unknown plant taxa. These techniques answer many new evolutionary and taxonomic questions, which were not previously possible with only phenotypic methods. Molecular techniques such as DNA barcoding, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have recently been used for plant diversity studies. Each technique has its own advantages and limitations. These techniques differ in their resolving power to detect genetic differences, type of data they generate and their applicability to particular taxonomic levels. This review presents a basic description of different molecular techniques that can be utilized for DNA fingerprinting and molecular diversity analysis of plant species. PMID:20559503

  19. Shaping the Archaeal Cell Envelope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, Albert F.; Zolghadr, Behnam; Driessen, Arnold M. J.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2010-01-01

    Although archaea have a similar cellular organization as other prokaryotes, the lipid composition of their membranes and their cell surface is unique. Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the archaeal protein secretion mechanisms, the assembly of macromolecular cell surface

  20. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  1. MYC Cofactors: Molecular Switches Controlling Diverse Biological Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC has fundamental roles in proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and stem cell pluripotency. Over the last 30 years extensive information has been gathered on the numerous cofactors that interact with MYC and the target genes that are regulated by MYC as a means of understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling its diverse roles. Despite significant advances and perhaps because the amount of information learned about MYC is overwhelming, there has been little consensus on the molecular functions of MYC that mediate its critical biological roles. In this perspective, the major MYC cofactors that regulate the various transcriptional activities of MYC, including canonical and noncanonical transactivation and transcriptional repression, will be reviewed and a model of how these transcriptional mechanisms control MYC-mediated proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis will be presented. The basis of the model is that a variety of cofactors form dynamic MYC transcriptional complexes that can switch the molecular and biological functions of MYC to yield a diverse range of outcomes in a cell-type- and context-dependent fashion. PMID:24939054

  2. Archaeal Distribution in Moonmilk Deposits from Alpine Caves and Their Ecophysiological Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Spötl, Christoph; Hofmann, Katrin; Wagner, Andreas O; Illmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    (Alpine) caves are, in general, windows into the Earth's subsurface. Frequently occurring structures in caves such as moonmilk (secondary calcite deposits) offer the opportunity to study intraterrestrial microbial communities, adapted to oligotrophic and cold conditions. This is an important research field regarding the dimensions of subsurface systems and cold regions on Earth. On a methodological level, moonmilk deposits from 11 caves in the Austrian Alps were collected aseptically and investigated using a molecular (qPCR and DGGE sequencing-based) methodology in order to study the occurrence, abundance, and diversity of the prevailing native Archaea community. Furthermore, these Archaea were enriched in complex media and studied regarding their physiology, with a media selection targeting different physiological requirements, e.g. methanogenesis and ammonia oxidation. The investigation of the environmental samples showed that all moonmilk deposits were characterized by the presence of the same few habitat-specific archaeal species, showing high abundances and constituting about 50 % of the total microbial communities. The largest fraction of these Archaea was ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota, while another abundant group was very distantly related to extremophilic Euryarchaeota (Moonmilk Archaea). The archaeal community showed a depth- and oxygen-dependent stratification. Archaea were much more abundant (around 80 %), compared to bacteria, in the actively forming surface part of moonmilk deposits, decreasing to about 5 % down to the bedrock. Via extensive cultivation efforts, it was possible to enrich the enigmatic Moonmilk Archaea and also AOA significantly above the level of bacteria. The most expedient prerequisites for cultivating Moonmilk Archaea were a cold temperature, oligotrophic conditions, short incubation times, a moonmilk surface inoculum, the application of erythromycin, and anaerobic (microaerophilic) conditions. On a physiological level, it seems

  3. Fidelity in Archaeal Information Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart de Koning

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A key element during the flow of genetic information in living systems is fidelity. The accuracy of DNA replication influences the genome size as well as the rate of genome evolution. The large amount of energy invested in gene expression implies that fidelity plays a major role in fitness. On the other hand, an increase in fidelity generally coincides with a decrease in velocity. Hence, an important determinant of the evolution of life has been the establishment of a delicate balance between fidelity and variability. This paper reviews the current knowledge on quality control in archaeal information processing. While the majority of these processes are homologous in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes, examples are provided of nonorthologous factors and processes operating in the archaeal domain. In some instances, evidence for the existence of certain fidelity mechanisms has been provided, but the factors involved still remain to be identified.

  4. Junctional adhesion molecule-A: functional diversity through molecular promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Tim; Kummer, Daniel; Ebnet, Klaus

    2017-12-14

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) regulate important processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. This activity is primarily due to their ability to initiate intracellular signaling cascades at cell-cell contact sites. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an IgSF-CAM with a short cytoplasmic tail that has no catalytic activity. Nevertheless, JAM-A is involved in a variety of biological processes. The functional diversity of JAM-A resides to a large part in a C-terminal PDZ domain binding motif which directly interacts with nine different PDZ domain-containing proteins. The molecular promiscuity of its PDZ domain motif allows JAM-A to recruit protein scaffolds to specific sites of cell-cell adhesion and to assemble signaling complexes at those sites. Here, we review the molecular characteristics of JAM-A, including its dimerization, its interaction with scaffolding proteins, and the phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, and we describe how these characteristics translate into diverse biological activities.

  5. Revival of Archaeal Methane Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Cornelia U

    2018-01-01

    The methane concentration in the Earth's atmosphere is rising, and, as methane is a potent greenhouse gas, it contributes considerably to climate change. It is produced by methanogenic archaea that thrive in anoxic habitats and can be oxidized by methane-oxidizing bacteria or archaea. In this Perspective , recent innovations and discoveries in archaeal methane microbiology are discussed and a future outlook on how novel methane-metabolizing archaea might be cultivated is provided.

  6. Diversity and stratification of archaea in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles E; Spear, John R; Harris, J Kirk; Pace, Norman R

    2009-04-01

    The Guerrero Negro (GN) hypersaline microbial mats have become one focus for biogeochemical studies of stratified ecosystems. The GN mats are found beneath several of a series of ponds of increasing salinity that make up a solar saltern fed from Pacific Ocean water pumped from the Laguna Ojo de Liebre near GN, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Molecular surveys of the laminated photosynthetic microbial mat below the fourth pond in the series identified an enormous diversity of bacteria in the mat, but archaea have received little attention. To determine the bulk contribution of archaeal phylotypes to the pond 4 study site, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of archaeal rRNA gene sequences in PCR libraries based on nominally universal primers. The ratios of bacterial/archaeal/eukaryotic rRNA genes, 90%/9%/1%, suggest that the archaeal contribution to the metabolic activities of the mat may be significant. To explore the distribution of archaea in the mat, sequences derived using archaeon-specific PCR primers were surveyed in 10 strata of the 6-cm-thick mat. The diversity of archaea overall was substantial albeit less than the diversity observed previously for bacteria. Archaeal diversity, mainly euryarchaeotes, was highest in the uppermost 2 to 3 mm of the mat and decreased rapidly with depth, where crenarchaeotes dominated. Only 3% of the sequences were specifically related to known organisms including methanogens. While some mat archaeal clades corresponded with known chemical gradients, others did not, which is likely explained by heretofore-unrecognized gradients. Some clades did not segregate by depth in the mat, indicating broad metabolic repertoires, undersampling, or both.

  7. Insights into the architecture of the replicative helicase from the structure of an archaeal MCM homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Brian; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Costa, Alessandro; Onesti, Silvia; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Lin, Yuyen; Cann, Isaac K O; Nair, Satish K

    2009-02-13

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins, members of the AAA+ (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) superfamily, are believed to constitute the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal species. Here, we present the 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of a monomeric MCM homolog from Methanopyrus kandleri, the first crystallographic structure of a full-length MCM. We also present an 18 A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the hexameric MCM from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, and fit the atomic resolution crystal structure into the reconstruction in order to generate an atomic model for the oligomeric assembly. These structural data reveal a distinct active site topology consisting of a unique arrangement of critical determinants. The structures also provide a molecular framework for understanding the functional contributions of trans-acting elements that facilitate intersubunit crosstalk in response to DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis.

  8. Implications of molecular diversity of chitin and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faez Iqbal; Rahman, Safikur; Queen, Aarfa; Ahamad, Shahzaib; Ali, Sher; Kim, Jihoe; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-05-01

    Chitin is a long unbranched polysaccharide, made up of β-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine which forms crystalline fiber-like structure. It is present in the fungal cell walls, insect and crustacean cuticles, nematode eggshells, and protozoa cyst. We provide a critical appraisal on the chemical modifications of chitin and its derivatives in the context of their improved efficacy in medical applications without any side effect. Recent advancement in nanobiotechnology has helped to synthesize several chitin derivatives having significant biological applications. Here, we discuss the molecular diversity of chitin and its applications in enzyme immobilization, wound healing, packaging material, controlled drug release, biomedical imaging, gene therapy, agriculture, biosensor, and cosmetics. Also, we highlighted chitin and its derivatives as an antioxidant, antimicrobial agent, anticoagulant material, food additive, and hypocholesterolemic agent. We envisage that chitin and chitosan-based nanomaterials with their potential applications would augment nanobiotechnology and biomedical industries.

  9. Molecular diversity and host specificity of termite-associated Xylaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedegbe, Herbert J; Miambi, Edouard; Pando, Anne; Houngnandan, Pascal; Rouland-Lefevre, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    Studies have revealed that some Xylaria species were closely associated with fungus-growing termite nests. However this relationship rarely had been investigated and the host specificity of termite-associated Xylaria was not yet clearly established. Eighteen Xylaria rDNA-ITS sequences were obtained from fungus combs belonging to 11 Macrotermitinae species from eight regions. Low diversity was found between isolates, and nine sequences were retrieved. Termite-associated Xylaria were shown to be monophyletic, with three main clades, all including strains from various termite hosts and geographical localities. This new molecular study shows no species specificity with respect to fungus-growing termites, which suggests that there might be substrate specialization.

  10. Biases during DNA extraction affect bacterial and archaeal community profile of anaerobic digestion samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarain, Ashira; Mukhuba, Mashudu; Adeleke, Rasheed; Moeletsi, Mokhele

    2017-12-01

    The anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic waste for biogas production has received much attention in recent years due to the increasing need for renewable energy and environmentally friendly waste management systems. Identification of the microbial community involved in AD aids in better understanding and optimising of the process. The choice of DNA extraction method is an integral step in any molecular biodiversity study. In the present study, potential biases introduced by DNA extraction methods were examined by comparing quality, quantity and representability of DNA extracted from AD samples using various extraction methods. In spite of the non-kit based method (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) yielding the largest quantity of DNA (approximately 44 µg DNA per gram dry weight), the extracted DNA contained PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, the quantity of extracted DNA was not proportional to species diversity. Diversity, determined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), was strongly linked to the type of extraction method used. The spin-column filter-based kit that incorporated mechanical and chemical lysis (Macherey-Nagel kit) gave the best results in terms of bacterial and archaeal diversity (Shannon-Wiener indices: average 2.5 and 2.6, respectively). Furthermore, this kit was the most effective at lysing hard-to-lyse bacterial and archaeal cells. The choice of DNA extraction method significantly influences the reliability and comparability of results obtained during AD microbial ecology investigations. Moreover, the careful selection of the DNA extraction method is of particular importance when analysing AD samples since these samples are rich in PCR inhibitors and hard-to-lyse cells such as archaea and gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  12. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yendi E. Navarro-Noya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5, indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  13. Stratification of archaeal membrane lipids in the ocean and implications for adaptation and chemotaxonomy of planktonic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun; Wakeham, Stuart G; Elling, Felix J; Basse, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Versteegh, Gerard J M; Könneke, Martin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-12-01

    Membrane lipids of marine planktonic archaea have provided unique insights into archaeal ecology and paleoceanography. However, past studies of archaeal lipids in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments mainly focused on a small class of fully saturated glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) homologues identified decades ago. The apparent low structural diversity of GDGTs is in strong contrast to the high diversity of metabolism and taxonomy among planktonic archaea. Furthermore, adaptation of archaeal lipids in the deep ocean remains poorly constrained. We report the archaeal lipidome in SPM from diverse oceanic regimes. We extend the known inventory of planktonic archaeal lipids to include numerous unsaturated archaeal ether lipids (uns-AELs). We further reveal (i) different thermal regulations and polar headgroup compositions of membrane lipids between the epipelagic (≤ 100 m) and deep (>100 m) populations of archaea, (ii) stratification of unsaturated GDGTs with varying redox conditions, and (iii) enrichment of tetra-unsaturated archaeol and fully saturated GDGTs in epipelagic and deep oxygenated waters, respectively. Such stratified lipid patterns are consistent with the typical distribution of archaeal phylotypes in marine environments. We, thus, provide an ecological context for GDGT-based paleoclimatology and bring about the potential use of uns-AELs as biomarkers for planktonic Euryarchaeota. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Functional Molecular Diversity of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter Is Reduced during Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mentges

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM is a highly diverse mixture of compounds, accounting for one of the world's largest active carbon pools. The surprising recalcitrance of some DOM compounds to bacterial degradation has recently been associated with its diversity. However, little is known about large-scale patterns of marine DOM diversity and its change through degradation, in particular considering the functional diversity of DOM. Here, we analyze the development of marine DOM diversity during degradation in two data sets comprising DOM of very different ages: a three-year mesocosm experiment and highly-resolved field samples from the Atlantic and Southern Ocean. The DOM molecular composition was determined using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. We quantify DOM diversity using three conceptually different diversity measures, namely richness of molecular formulas, abundance-based diversity, and functional molecular diversity. Using these measures we find stable molecular richness of DOM with age >1 year, systematic changes in the molecules' abundance distribution with degradation state, and increasing homogeneity with respect to chemical properties for more degraded DOM. Coinciding with differences in sea water density, the spatial field data separated clearly into regions of high and low diversity. The joint application of different diversity measures yields a comprehensive overview on temporal and spatial patterns of molecular diversity, valuable for general conclusions on drivers and consequences of marine DOM diversity.

  15. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, A.

    2003-04-01

    A culture-independent molecular approach has been applied to investigate the bacterial diversity in three uranium contaminated sites. The three analysed soil samples have been collected from the uranium waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt (Germany), from the uranium mill tailings in Gunnison, Colorado (USA) and from the uranium mill tailings in Shiprock, New Mexico (USA). The 16S rDNA fragments which has been isolated through direct lysis of the whole-DNA were amplified by the use of the universal primers 16S 43f and 16S 1404r and cloned. With restriction fragment length polymorphismus (RFLP) were the clones screened and one representative of all RFLP types that occurred more than once in the clone library was sequenced and analysed. In spite of the contamination a considerable diversity and significant differences in the composition of the natural bacterial communities in these three sites have been found. In the sample collected from the waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt α-Proteobacteria and representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium were numerically predominant. The distribution of bacteria in the sample collected from uranium mill tailings Gunnison was very similar to those found in the Haberland waste pile, but there were found besides α-Proteobacteria and representatives of Holophaga/Acidobacterium a lot of γ-Proteobacteria. The structure of the bacterial community in the sample collected from the uranium mill tailings Shiprock was significantly different. Only some representatives of the Holophaga/Acidobacterium and α-Proteobacteria were represented. Large populations of Bacilli, γ-Proteobacteria and green non sulfur bacteria were dominant in this sample. (orig.)

  16. Archaeal lipids in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Ann-Christin; Jensen, Sara M; Fricker, Gert; Brandl, Martin; Treusch, Alexander H

    2017-10-15

    Archaea contain membrane lipids that differ from those found in the other domains of life (Eukarya and Bacteria). These lipids consist of isoprenoid chains attached via ether bonds to the glycerol carbons at the sn-2,3 positions. Two types of ether lipids are known, polar diether lipids and bipolar tetraether lipids. The inherent chemical stability and unique membrane-spanning characteristics of tetraether lipids render them interesting for oral drug delivery purposes. Archaeal lipids form liposomes spontaneously (archaeosomes) and may be incorporated in conventional liposomes (mixed vesicles). Both types of liposomes are promising to protect their drug cargo, such as therapeutic peptides, against the acidic environment of the stomach and proteolytic degradation in the intestine. They appear to withstand lipolytic enzymes and bile salts and may thus deliver orally administered therapeutic peptides to distant sections of the intestine or to the colon, where they may be absorbed, eventually by the help of absorption enhancers. Archaeal lipids and their semisynthetic derivatives may thus serve as biological source for the next generation oral drug delivery systems. The aim of this review is to present a systematic overview over existing literature on archaea carrying diether and tetraether lipids, lipid diversity, means of lipid extraction and purification, preparation and in vitro stability studies of archaeal lipid-based liposomal drug carriers and in vivo proof-of concepts studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular characterization and diversity analysis in chilli pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    India is considered to be the secondary center of diversity of chilli pepper, especially of Capsicum annuum. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the most widely used marker system for plant variety characterization and diversity analysis especially in cultivated species which have low levels of polymorphism. The diversity ...

  18. Use of AFLP markers to estimate molecular diversity of Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Maria Lourdes Rocha

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: The study proposed combining a simple collection of urediniospore with a subsequent analysis by AFLP was useful to examine the molecular polymorphism of samples of P. pachyrhizi collected and might have a significant contribution to the knowledge of its genetic diversity. Also, AFLP analysis is an important and potent molecular tool for the study of genetic diversity and could be useful to carry out wider genetic diversity studies.

  19. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:26494981

  20. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Littlechild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  1. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  2. Life in extreme environments: microbial diversity in Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazi, Loubna; Breakwell, Donald P; Harker, Alan R; Crandall, Keith A

    2014-05-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) represents one of the world's most hypersaline environments. In this study, the archaeal and bacterial communities at the North and South arms of the lake were surveyed by cloning and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The sampling locations were chosen for high salt concentration and the presence of unique environmental gradients, such as petroleum seeps and high sulfur content. Molecular techniques have not been systematically applied to this extreme environment, and thus the composition and the genetic diversity of microbial communities at GSL remain mostly unknown. This study led to the identification of 58 archaeal and 42 bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our phylogenetic and statistical analyses displayed a high biodiversity of the microbial communities in this environment. In this survey, we also showed that the majority of the 16S rRNA gene sequences within the clone library were distantly related to previously described environmental halophilic archaeal and bacterial taxa and represent novel phylotypes.

  3. Molecular characterization and assessment of genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R Madhusudhana

    Selecting parents of diverse genetic base with contrasting phenotype is an important step in developing mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection and marker-assisted selection. We studied genetic diversity in 31 sorghum parents using 413 sorghum simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers.

  4. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-04-02

    Apr 2, 2008 ... wider range of diversity but also groups the accessions ac- cording to their field performance for ... minous out group for all studies to test whether our reaction conditions were optimized to resolve it as a ...... Mignouna H. D., Ng N. Q., Ikea J. and Thotapilly G. 1998 Genetic diversity in cowpea as revealed by ...

  5. Phenotypic and molecular evaluation of genetic diversity of rapeseed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The genetic diversity and relationships among rapeseed genotypes were evaluated using quantitative analysis ...... Utility of. AFLP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity within Brassica nigra germplasm. Plant Breed. 123: 13-16. Nyende AB (2008). Biotechnology in plant nutrient management for.

  6. Salinity drives archaeal distribution patterns in high altitude lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongqin; Priscu, John C; Xiong, Jinbo; Conrad, Ralf; Vick-Majors, Trista; Chu, Haiyan; Hou, Juzhi

    2016-03-01

    Archaeal communities and the factors regulating their diversity in high altitude lakes are poorly understood. Here, we provide the first high-throughput sequencing study of Archaea from Tibetan Plateau lake sediments. We analyzed twenty lake sediments from the world's highest and largest plateau and found diverse archaeal assemblages that clustered into groups dominated by methanogenic Euryarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Halobacteria/mixed euryarchaeal phylotypes. Statistical analysis inferred that salinity was the major driver of community composition, and that archaeal diversity increased with salinity. Sediments with the highest salinities were mostly dominated by Halobacteria. Crenarchaeota dominated at intermediate salinities, and methanogens were present in all lake sediments, albeit most abundant at low salinities. The distribution patterns of the three functional types of methanogens (hydrogenotrophic, acetotrophic and methylotrophic) were also related to changes in salinity. Our results show that salinity is a key factor controlling archaeal community diversity and composition in lake sediments on a spatial scale that spans nearly 2000 km on the Tibetan Plateau. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Microbial community diversity in the gut of the South American termite Cornitermes cumulans (Isoptera: Termitidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Maria Angela B; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Cardoso, Alexander M; Vieira, Ricardo P; Machado, Ednildo A; Clementino, Maysa M; Medeiros, Marcelo N; Albano, Rodolpho M; Garcia, Eloi S; de Souza, Wanderley; Constantino, Reginaldo; Martins, Orlando B

    2013-01-01

    Termites inhabit tropical and subtropical areas where they contribute to structure and composition of soils by efficiently degrading biomass with aid of resident gut microbiota. In this study, culture-independent molecular analysis was performed based on bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries to describe the gut microbial communities within Cornitermes cumulans, a South American litter-feeding termite. Our data reveal extensive bacterial diversity, mainly composed of organisms from the phyla Spirochaetes, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Fibrobacteres. In contrast, a low diversity of archaeal 16S rRNA sequences was found, comprising mainly members of the Crenarchaeota phylum. The diversity of archaeal methanogens was further analyzed by sequencing clones from a library for the mcrA gene, which encodes the enzyme methyl coenzyme reductase, responsible for catalyzing the last step in methane production, methane being an important greenhouse gas. The mcrA sequences were diverse and divided phylogenetically into three clades related to uncultured environmental archaea and methanogens found in different termite species. C. cumulans is a litter-feeding, mound-building termite considered a keystone species in natural ecosystems and also a pest in agriculture. Here, we describe the archaeal and bacterial communities within this termite, revealing for the first time its intriguing microbiota.

  8. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Christopher J.; Lewis, Hunter; Trejo, Eric; Winston, Vern; Evilia, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity. PMID:24151449

  9. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity.

  10. [Comparison of bacterial and archaeal community of mangrove soil under different vegetation in Dongzhaigang, Hainan Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian; Yan, Bing; Hong, Kui

    2012-06-04

    We compared bacterial and archaeal diversity and community structure of mangrove soil under different vegetation, and to reveal better understanding of microbial resources. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed and analyzed for soils under Kandelia candel trees, Sonneratia apetala trees, and naked tideland, in Dongzhaigang Mangrove National Nature Reserve of Hainan Island. Template DNA was directly extracted from soil samples. PCR were amplified using primers 27F/1492R (bacterial) and Arch21F/Arch958R (archaeal). A total of 16 phyla dominated by Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were detected in bacterial libraries, and 6 groups of Crenarchaeota and 7 groups of Euryarchaeota, predominated by Marine Benthic Group C and Marine Benthic Group D, respectively were found in archaeal libraries. Shannon-Wiener index (H') and S(chao1) estimator indicated that soil microbial diversity under the introduced species Sonneratia apetala was much lower than indigenous species Kandelia candel, even lower than naked tidal flat sediment near mangrove. Distinct differences in microbial community structure under different vegetation were observed. Soil microbial community structure under Kandelia candel was much similar with that of naked tideland. Mangrove soil contained rich population of bacteria and archaea; there existed distinct differences in mangrove soil microbial community structure and diversity among different vegetation.

  11. Archaeal Nitrification in Hot Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Daims, H.; Reigstad, L.; Wanek, W.; Wagner, M.; Schleper, C.

    2006-12-01

    Biological nitrification, i.e. the aerobic conversion of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is a major component of the global nitrogen cycle. Until recently, it was thought that the ability to aerobically oxidize ammonia was confined to bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria. However, it has recently been shown that Archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota are also capable of ammonia oxidation. As many Crenarchaeota are thermophilic or hyperthermophilic, and at least some of them are capable of ammonia oxidation we speculated on the existence of (hyper)thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Using PCR primers specifically targeting the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene, we were indeed able to confirm the presence of such organisms in several hot springs in Reykjadalur, Iceland. These hot springs exhibited temperatures well above 80 °C and pH values ranging from 2.0 to 4.5. To proof that nitrification actually took place under these extreme conditions, we measured gross nitrification rates by the isotope pool dilution method; we added 15N-labelled nitrate to the mud and followed the dilution of the label by nitrate production from ammonium either in situ (incubation in the hot spring) or under controlled conditions in the laboratory (at 80 °C). The nitrification rates in the hot springs ranged from 0.79 to 2.22 mg nitrate-N per L of mud and day. Controls, in which microorganisms were killed before the incubations, demonstrated that the nitrification was of biological origin. Addition of ammonium increased the gross nitrification rate approximately 3-fold, indicating that the nitrification was ammonium limited under the conditions used. Collectively, our study provides evidence that (1) AOA are present in hot springs and (2) that they are actively nitrifying. These findings have major implications for our understanding of nitrogen cycling of hot environments.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Influencing Genetic Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important food-borne pathogen, causing human bacterial gastroenteritis. Throughout the years several methods have been developed for typing C. jejuni. These methods uncovered the existence of enormous genetic diversity within the species. Stable lineages of C. jejuni are

  13. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we tested rice genotypes that included un(der)exploited landraces of Tamil Nadu along with indica and japonica test cultivars to ascertain their genetic diversity structure. Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were used for generating marker segregation data. A novel measure, allele discrimination ...

  14. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-04-02

    Apr 2, 2008 ... RAPD profiles were used to identify the extent of diversity among 54 accessions of mung bean that included both improved and local land races. Out of the 40 primers screened, seven primers generated 174 amplification products with an average of. 24.85 bands per primer. The RAPD profiles were ...

  15. Molecular genetic diversity study of Lepidium sativum population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    Generally, Tigray and Amhara regions showed moderate to high diversity in ISSR analysis. ... other crops. The main purpose of its cultivation in. Ethiopia is to use it as a medicinal plant. It is used for human abdominal ache and diarrhea. Moreover, L. ... of 10 primers were obtained from the Genetic Research Laboratory.

  16. Molecular characterization of cyanobacterial diversity in a shallow eutrophic lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, G.; Kamst-van Agterveld, M.P.; Van der Werff-Staverman, I.; Hagen, F.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Gons, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the diversity of pelagic cyanobacteria in Lake Loosdrecht, the Netherlands, through recovery and analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences from lake samples and cyanobacterial isolates. We used an adapted protocol for specific amplification of cyanobacterial rDNA for

  17. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in elite II synthetic hexaploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of Elite-II synthetic hexaploid (SH) wheat by genome DNA fingerprinting as revealed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Ten decamer RAPD primers (OPG-1, OPG-2, OPG-3, OPG-4, OPG-5, OPA-3, OPA-4, OPA-5, OPA-8, and OPA-15) ...

  18. Molecular-based rapid inventories of sympatric diversity: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA barcoding uses a standardized genetic marker and a curated reference database to identify known species and to reveal cryptic diversity within ... the use of the ABGD method, which not only performs fairly well under either sampling method, but does so in a few seconds and with a user-friendly Web interface.

  19. Applying Molecular Markers in Coriander Populations with Diverse Geographical Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relationships between patterns of genetic diversity and geographical origins were studied in coriander by using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) to survey coriander accessions. In 2005, 60 coriander accessions from 28 countries, from the USDA-ARS North Central Regional Plant Introduct...

  20. Molecular and functional diversity in Capsicum landraces of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study analyzed the diversity in 26 landraces of Capsicum from Andaman Islands using 20 morphological, 16 biochemical and 10 DNA markers. Significant differences were observed in tested landraces and 16 reference genotypes from mainland India. Biochemical markers grouped all the genotypes into eight ...

  1. Molecular based assessment of genetic diversity of xoconostle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Xoconostle or acidic prickly pear is an important fruit in Mexico; it is produced by a group of Opuntia plants known for their nutritional qualities and adapted to harsh environmental conditions. In this study, we report for the first time the estimation of genetic diversity within a set of 24 xoconostle accessions ...

  2. Preliminary molecular analysis of the genetic diversity of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the arid and semi arid areas, salt bush (Atriplex) represents an important forage resource. The characterization of the genetic diversity of these species is useful for their classification, their conservation and their improvement. In this context, we used the random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction ...

  3. Morphological and molecular based diversity studies of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food crop in many tropical countries in Africa, South America and Asia. However, yields are below the productivity of the crop. This requires breeding and selection for improved varieties. The current study therefore investigated genetic diversity among some Ghanaian ...

  4. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAPD profiles were used to identify the extent of diversity among 54 accessions of mung bean that included both improved and local land races. Out of the 40 primers screened, seven primers generated 174 amplification products with an average of 24.85 bands per primer. The RAPD profiles were analysed for Jaccard's ...

  5. Assessment of morphological and molecular diversity among okra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cophenetic r correlation value was found to be 0.94 suggesting that the cluster analysis strongly represents the similarity matrix. Genetic diversity as assessed by DARwin (based on quantitative morphological data) revealed that grouping of genotypes into different constellations did not follow any specific pattern suggesting ...

  6. Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Arborescent Gossypium Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexico is a center of diversity of Gossypium. As currently circumscribed, arborescent Gossypium species (Section Erioxylum) are widely distributed in dry deciduous forests located from the central state of Sinaloa at the north of its range to the eastern state of Oaxaca in the south. However, extens...

  7. Molecular based assessment of genetic diversity of xoconostle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xoconostle or acidic prickly pear is an important fruit in Mexico; it is produced by a group of Opuntia plants known for their nutritional qualities and adapted to harsh environmental conditions. In this study, we report for the first time the estimation of genetic diversity within a set of 24 xoconostle accessions using inter simple ...

  8. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Syrian indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... Domestic goats in Syria may provide an interesting source of genetic variability due to its proximity to the centers of domestication. This study aimed to assess the morphological variation, genetic diversity and population substructure of the Syrian goat populations. Commonly, three goat genotypes are.

  9. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in cluster bean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pestle in a 1.5 mL conical micro-centrifuge tubes with liquid nitrogen. Dneasy. ® plant mini kit protocols ... products was drawn using unweighted pair group method us- ing arithmetic averages algorithm (UPGMA) .... Mignouna H. D., Ng N. Q., Ikea J. and Thotapilly G. 1998 Genetic diversity in cowpea as revealed by random ...

  10. Molecular microbial diversity in soils from eastern Amazonia: evidence for unusual microorganisms and microbial population shifts associated with deforestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, J; Triplett, E W

    1997-01-01

    Although the Amazon Basin is well known for its diversity of flora and fauna, this report represents the first description of the microbial diversity in Amazonian soils involving a culture-independent approach. Among the 100 sequences of genes coding for small-subunit rRNA obtained by PCR amplification with universal small-subunit rRNA primers, 98 were bacterial and 2 were archaeal. No duplicate sequences were found, and none of the sequences had been previously described. Eighteen percent of the bacterial sequences could not be classified in any known bacterial kingdom. Two sequences may represent a unique branch between the vast majority of bacteria and the deeply branching, predominantly thermophilic bacteria. Five sequences formed a clade that may represent a novel group within the class Proteobacteria. In addition, rRNA intergenic spacer analysis was used to show significant microbial population differences between a mature forest soil and an adjacent pasture soil. PMID:9212415

  11. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, Tatiana A; Pietilä, Maija K; Svirskaitė, Julija; Ravantti, Janne J; Atanasova, Nina S; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-07-19

    viruses. Regardless of the enormous viral sequence diversity, all known viruses can be clustered into a few structure-based viral lineages based on their core virion components. Our description of a new halophilic virus-host system adds significant insights into the largely unstudied field of archaeal viruses and, in general, of life under extreme conditions. Comprehensive molecular characterization of HCIV-1 shows that this icosahedral internal membrane-containing virus exhibits conserved elements responsible for virion organization. This places the virus neatly in the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage. HCIV-1 further highlights the limited diversity of virus morphotypes despite the astronomical number of viruses in the biosphere. The observed high conservation in the core virion elements should be considered in addressing such fundamental issues as the origin and evolution of viruses and their interplay with their hosts. Copyright © 2016 Demina et al.

  12. Temporal change of composition and potential activity of the thermophilic archaeal community during the composting of organic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thummes, Kathrin; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2007-07-01

    To date, composting has been regarded as an aerobic process but it has been shown that composting piles are often sources of atmospheric methane. In order to gain a more comprehensive view on the diversity of methanogenic Archaea in compost, gas chromatographical methods and molecular cloning were used to study relationships of thermophilic archaeal communities and changes in methane production potential during compost maturation. According to the thermophilic methane production potential, wide differences could be detected between differently aged compost materials. In material derived from 3- and 4-week-old piles, low and no thermophilic methane production potential, respectively, was observed at 50 degrees C. Material from a 6-week-old pile showed the maximum methane production. With compost maturation, the production slowly decreased again with 6 weeks, 8 weeks, and mature compost showing an optimum methane production potential at 60 degrees C. At 70 degrees C, only 6-week-old material showed a comparable high production of methane. The 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic surveys revealed an increase of archaeal diversity with compost maturation. In the 6-week-old material, 86% of the sequences in the archaeal 16S rRNA library had the highest sequence similarities to Methanothermobacter spp. and the remaining 14% of the clones were related to Methanosarcina thermophila. Quantification of methanogens in 6-week-old material, on the basis of the methane production rate, resulted in values of about 2x10(7) cells per gram fresh weight. In 8-week-old and mature compost material, the proportion of sequences similar to Methanothermobacter spp. decreased to 34% and 0%, respectively. The mature compost material showed the highest variation in identified sequences, although 33% could be assigned to as yet uncultured Archaea (e.g. Rice cluster I, III, and IV). Our results indicate that compost harbours a diverse community of thermophilic methanogens, with changing composition

  13. Molecular markers to study competition and diversity of Rhizobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessitsch, A.

    1997-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was directed to the development of molecular identification and detection techniques for studying the ecology of Rhizobium, a nitrogen- fixing bacterium of agricultural importance. Competition of inoculant strains with indigenous

  14. Exploring the diversity and molecular evolution of shrews (family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By constructing the most taxonomically inclusive molecular phylogeny for this cosmopolitan family, this study aims to test the utility of the routinely used mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to resolve the higher-level relationships within the Soricidae. Given the life history characteristics of shrews (high metabolic rate in ...

  15. Molecular markers for genetic diversity and phylogeny research of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brazilian sheep descended from several breeds brought to the New World by Portuguese and Spanish colonists, and they have evolved and adapted to local climatic variations and acquired tolerance or resistance to many diseases. Molecular markers are widely used in analyzing genetic variability, and markers such as ...

  16. Nephelium lappaceum L. genetic diversity by morphological and molecular characterization

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Renata Aparecida [UNESP; Wickert, Ester [UNESP; Martins, Antonio Baldo Geraldo [UNESP; De Andrade, Mariana Macedo Costa [UNESP; De Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    The rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) is an exotic fruit with great market potential in Brazil. However, there are few available informations about plants with potential for cultivation, because great morphologic variation is observed among plants and for consequence, little uniformity in the orchards and in the fruits. This research had for objective to evaluate the genetic diversity of a collection of rambutan plants obtained by seeds through morfo-chemical analyses of plants and fruits and by...

  17. Genetic Diversity and Molecular Evolution of Chinese Waxy Maize Germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongjian; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hua; Wu, Jinhong; Shi, Biao; Cai, Run; Xu, Yunbi; Wu, Aizhong; Luo, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Waxy maize (Zea mays L. var. certaina Kulesh), with many excellent characters in terms of starch composition and economic value, has grown in China for a long history and its production has increased dramatically in recent decades. However, the evolution and origin of waxy maize still remains unclear. We studied the genetic diversity of Chinese waxy maize including typical landraces and inbred lines by SSR analysis and the results showed a wide genetic diversity in the Chinese waxy maize germplasm. We analyzed the origin and evolution of waxy maize by sequencing 108 samples, and downloading 52 sequences from GenBank for the waxy locus in a number of accessions from genus Zea. A sharp reduction of nucleotide diversity and significant neutrality tests (Tajima’s D and Fu and Li’s F*) were observed at the waxy locus in Chinese waxy maize but not in nonglutinous maize. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Chinese waxy maize originated from the cultivated flint maize and most of the modern waxy maize inbred lines showed a distinct independent origin and evolution process compared with the germplasm from Southwest China. The results indicated that an agronomic trait can be quickly improved to meet production demand by selection. PMID:23818949

  18. Molecular diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus in uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, L; Puentes, R; Reolón, E; Acuña, P; Riet, F; Rivero, R; Cristina, J; Colina, R

    2016-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) affects bovine production and reproduction causing significant economic losses all over the world. Two viral species has been recognized: BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, both distributed worldwide. Recently, novel specie of BVDV named HoBi-like pestivirus was discovered. The presence of BVDV was confirmed in 1996 in Uruguay, however, does not exist until today a schedule of compulsory vaccination along the country. Serological studies with samples from all Uruguayan herds were performed during 2000 and 2001 demonstrating that all of them were seropositive to BVDV with a mean prevalence of 69%. In addition, there have been no new studies done since those previously described and it is important to mention that the genetic diversity of BVD has never been described in Uruguay. Nowadays, there is strongly suspect that BVDV is one of the most important causes of reproductive failures in our herds. The aim of this study was to describe for the first time in Uruguay the genetic diversity of BVDV with samples collected from different regions along the country. Serological status of 390 non-vaccinated animals against BVDV with reproductive problems from farms of Rivera, Tacuarembó and Florida departments of Uruguay were studied. All herds were seropositive to BVDV and high proportion of animals were positive (298/390), while 4.1% (16/390) of the animals were positive to Antigen Capture ELISA test and Real Time PCR. Phylogenetic analysis performed with concatenated sequences from the 5'UTR and Npro genomic regions revealed that BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 are infecting our herds, being BVDV-1 the most frequently found. The major subtype was BVDV-1a, followed by BVDV-1i and BVDV-2b. This is the first study that describes the genetic diversity of BVDV in Uruguay and it will contribute to the elaboration of sanitization programs.

  19. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  20. A diversity oriented synthesis of natural product inspired molecular libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Jyoti; Luthra, Tania; Gundla, Rambabu; Ferraro, Antonio; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sen, Subhabrata

    2017-11-07

    Natural products are the source of innumerable pharmaceutical drug candidates and also form an important aspect of herbal remedies. They are also a source of various bioactive compounds. Herein we have leveraged the structural attributes of several natural products in building a library of architecturally diverse chiral molecules by harnessing R-tryptophan as the chiral auxiliary. It is converted to its corresponding methyl ester 1 which in turn provided a bevy of 1-aryl-tetrahydro-β-carbolines 2a-d, which were then converted to chiral compounds via a diversity oriented synthetic strategy (DOS). In general, intermolecular and intramolecular ring rearrangements facilitated the formation of the final compounds. Four different classes of molecules with distinct architectures were generated, adding up to nearly twenty-two individual molecules. Phenotypic screening of a representative section of the library revealed two molecules that selectively inhibit MCF7 breast cancer cells with IC 50 of ∼5 μg mL -1 potency.

  1. Molecular bacterial diversity and bioburden of commercial airliner cabin air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Duc, M.T.; Stuecker, T.; Venkateswaran, K. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Biotechnology and Planetary Protection Group

    2007-11-15

    Microorganisms that exist in aircraft air systems are considered to be the primary source of microbial contamination that can lead to illness shortly after flying. More than 600 million passengers board commercial airline flights annually in the United States alone. In this study, culture-independent, biomarker-targeted bacterial enumeration and identification strategies were used to estimate total bacterial burden and diversity within the cabin air of commercial airliners. Air-impingement was used to collect samples of microorganisms from 4 flights on 2 commercial carriers. The total viable microbial population ranged from below detection limits to 4.1 x 10{sup 6} cells/m{sup 3} of air. Microbes were found to gradually accumulate from the time of passenger boarding through mid-flight. A sharp decline in bacterial abundance was then observed. Representatives of the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} Proteobacteria, as well as Gram-positive bacteria, were isolated in varying abundance. Airline A had large abundances of Neisseria meningitidis rRNA gene sequences and Streptococcus oralis/mitis sequences. Airline B was dominated by pseudomonas synxantha sequences as well as N. meningitidis and S. oralis/mitis. The cabin air samples housed low bacterial diversity and were typically dominated by a particular subset of bacteria, notably opportunistic pathogenic inhabitants of the human respiratory tract and oral cavity. The microbes were found largely around the ventilation ducts and gasper conduits that supply cabin air. 45 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  3. Lineage-specific partitions in archaeal transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. R. Coulson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic distribution of the components comprising the transcriptional machinery in the crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal lineages of the Archaea was analyzed in a systematic manner by genome-wide profiling of transcription complements in fifteen complete archaeal genome sequences. Initially, a reference set of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs consisting of sequences functioning in all aspects of the transcriptional process, and originating from the three domains of life, was used to query the genomes. TAP-families were detected by sequence clustering of the TAPs and their archaeal homologues, and through extensive database searching, these families were assigned a function. The phylogenetic origins of archaeal genes matching hidden Markov model profiles of protein domains associated with transcription, and those encoding the TAP-homologues, showed there is extensive lineage-specificity of proteins that function as regulators of transcription: most of these sequences are present solely in the Euryarchaeota, with nearly all of them homologous to bacterial DNA-binding proteins. Strikingly, the hidden Markov model profile searches revealed that archaeal chromatin and histone-modifying enzymes also display extensive taxon-restrictedness, both across and within the two phyla.

  4. Archaeal community of cattle digestive system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Anna; Elhottová, Dana; Gattinger, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, - (2007), s. 233 ISSN 0009-0646. [Kongres Československé společnosti mikrobiologické /24./. 02.10.2007-05.10.2007, Liberec] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : archaeal community * cattle digestive system Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  5. Molecular diversity of avian schistosomes in Danish freshwater snails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anne Ø.; Olsen, Annette; Buchmann, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Avian schistosomes are widespread parasites of snails and waterfowl and may cause cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) in humans, a disease that is frequently reported in European countries. These parasites are known to occur in Denmark, but here, we applied a new approach using molecular tools...... to identify the parasites at species level. In order to do that, 499 pulmonate freshwater snails (Radix sp., Lymnaea stagnalis, Stagnicola sp. and Planorbarius corneus) were sampled from 12 lakes, ponds, and marshes in the greater Copenhagen area. Avian schistosome cercariae were identified by microscopy...

  6. Molecular prospecting for European Diplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomidae) reveals cryptic diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Georgieva, Simona; Soldánová, Miroslava; Pérez-Del-Olmo, A.; Dangel, D.R.; Sitko, J.; Sures, B.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2013), s. 57-72 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/10/1562; GA ČR GBP505/12/G112; GA ČR GD206/09/H026 Grant - others:GAJU(CZ) 04-135/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptic species * Digenea * Diplostomum * Barcoding * cox1 * ITS * Europe Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.404, year: 2013

  7. Diverse Molecular Targets for Chalcones with Varied Bioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Xing, Chengguo

    2015-01-01

    Natural or synthetic chalcones with different substituents have revealed a variety of biological activities that may benefit human health. The underlying mechanisms of action, particularly with respect to the direct cellular targets and the modes of interaction with the targets, have not been rigorously characterized, which imposes challenges to structure-guided rational development of therapeutic agents or chemical probes with acceptable target-selectivity profile. This review summarizes literature evidence on chalcones’ direct molecular targets in the context of their biological activities. PMID:26798565

  8. Molecular Diversity through RNA Editing: A Balancing Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahi, Sanaz; Maas, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deamination fuels the generation of RNA and protein diversity in eukaryotes, particularly in higher organisms. This includes the recoding of translated exons, widespread editing of retrotransposon-derived repeat elements and sequence modification of miRNA transcripts. Such changes can bring about specific amino acid substitutions, alternative splicing and changes in gene expression levels. Although the overall prevalence of A-to-I editing and its specific functional impact on many of the affected genes are not yet known, the importance of balancing RNA modification levels across time and space is becoming increasingly evident. In particular, transcriptome instabilities in form of too much or too little RNA editing activity, or misguided editing manifest in several human disease phenotypes which disrupt that balance. PMID:20395010

  9. Historical distribution and molecular diversity of Bacillus anthracis, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikembayev, Alim M; Lukhnova, Larissa; Temiraliyeva, Gulnara; Meka-Mechenko, Tatyana; Pazylov, Yerlan; Zakaryan, Sarkis; Denissov, Georgiy; Easterday, W Ryan; Van Ert, Matthew N; Keim, Paul; Francesconi, Stephen C; Blackburn, Jason K; Hugh-Jones, Martin; Hadfield, Ted

    2010-05-01

    To map the distribution of anthrax outbreaks and strain subtypes in Kazakhstan during 1937-2005, we combined geographic information system technology and genetic analysis by using archived cultures and data. Biochemical and genetic tests confirmed the identity of 93 archived cultures in the Kazakhstan National Culture Collection as Bacillus anthracis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis genotyping identified 12 genotypes. Cluster analysis comparing these genotypes with previously published genotypes indicated that most (n = 78) isolates belonged to the previously described A1.a genetic cluster, 6 isolates belonged to the A3.b cluster, and 2 belonged to the A4 cluster. Two genotypes in the collection appeared to represent novel genetic sublineages; 1 of these isolates was from Krygystan. Our data provide a description of the historical, geographic, and genetic diversity of B. anthracis in this Central Asian region.

  10. Predicting phenotypic diversity and the underlying quantitative molecular transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu A Giurumescu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available During development, signaling networks control the formation of multicellular patterns. To what extent quantitative fluctuations in these complex networks may affect multicellular phenotype remains unclear. Here, we describe a computational approach to predict and analyze the phenotypic diversity that is accessible to a developmental signaling network. Applying this framework to vulval development in C. elegans, we demonstrate that quantitative changes in the regulatory network can render approximately 500 multicellular phenotypes. This phenotypic capacity is an order-of-magnitude below the theoretical upper limit for this system but yet is large enough to demonstrate that the system is not restricted to a select few outcomes. Using metrics to gauge the robustness of these phenotypes to parameter perturbations, we identify a select subset of novel phenotypes that are the most promising for experimental validation. In addition, our model calculations provide a layout of these phenotypes in network parameter space. Analyzing this landscape of multicellular phenotypes yielded two significant insights. First, we show that experimentally well-established mutant phenotypes may be rendered using non-canonical network perturbations. Second, we show that the predicted multicellular patterns include not only those observed in C. elegans, but also those occurring exclusively in other species of the Caenorhabditis genus. This result demonstrates that quantitative diversification of a common regulatory network is indeed demonstrably sufficient to generate the phenotypic differences observed across three major species within the Caenorhabditis genus. Using our computational framework, we systematically identify the quantitative changes that may have occurred in the regulatory network during the evolution of these species. Our model predictions show that significant phenotypic diversity may be sampled through quantitative variations in the regulatory network

  11. [Determining mitochondrial molecular markers suitable for genetic diversity analysis of Cordyceps militaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Guo, Lihong; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Xingzhong

    2015-07-04

    To screen efficient molecular markers suitable for genetic diversity analysis of Cordyceps militaris from mitochondrial DNA. We amplified 12 mitochondrial DNA fragments and 3 nuclear DNA fragments from each of 20 C. militaris isolates and analyzed nucleotide variations on these DNA fragments. We revealed a greatly higher genetic variation in mitochondrial DNA fragments than in nuclear DNA fragments. Specifically, C. militaris isolates exhibited intron presence/absence diversity in some mitochondrial fragments, and more variable sites were found in mitochondrial fragments than in nuclear fragments. The extent of nucleotide variations also varied by mitochondrial fragment, and intronic proteins seemed to be more vulnerable to amino acid changes than exonic proteins. Genetic diversity increased with the number of molecular markers used. We recommended using (in order) nad3-cox2. cox2-nad5, cox2, cox3, cob, and cox1 for future genetic diversity and population genetic studies of C. militaris.

  12. Chemical Space: Big Data Challenge for Molecular Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awale, Mahendra; Visini, Ricardo; Probst, Daniel; Arús-Pous, Josep; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2017-10-25

    Chemical space describes all possible molecules as well as multi-dimensional conceptual spaces representing the structural diversity of these molecules. Part of this chemical space is available in public databases ranging from thousands to billions of compounds. Exploiting these databases for drug discovery represents a typical big data problem limited by computational power, data storage and data access capacity. Here we review recent developments of our laboratory, including progress in the chemical universe databases (GDB) and the fragment subset FDB-17, tools for ligand-based virtual screening by nearest neighbor searches, such as our multi-fingerprint browser for the ZINC database to select purchasable screening compounds, and their application to discover potent and selective inhibitors for calcium channel TRPV6 and Aurora A kinase, the polypharmacology browser (PPB) for predicting off-target effects, and finally interactive 3D-chemical space visualization using our online tools WebDrugCS and WebMolCS. All resources described in this paper are available for public use at www.gdb.unibe.ch.

  13. A Molecular Survey of the Diversity of Microbial Communities in Different Amazonian Agricultural Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio A. Navarrete

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The processes of land conversion and agricultural intensification are a significant cause of biodiversity loss, with consequent negative effects both on the environment and the sustainability of food production.The anthrosols associated with pre-Colombian settlements in the Amazonian region are examples of how anthropogenic activities may sustain the native populations against harsh tropical environments for human establishment, even without a previous intentionality of anthropic soil formation. In a case study (Model I—“Slash-and-Burn” the community structures detected by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA revealed that soil archaeal, bacterial and fungal communities are heterogeneous and each capable of responding differently to environmental characteristics. ARISA data evidenced considerable difference in structure existing between microbial communities in forest and agricultural soils. In a second study (Model II—“Anthropogenic Soil”, the bacterial community structures revealed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP differed among an Amazonian Dark Earth (ADE, black carbon (BC and its adjacent non-anthropogenic oxisoil. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene (OTU richness estimated by pyrosequencing was higher in ADE than BC. The most abundant bacterial phyla in ADE soils and BC were Proteobacteria—24% ADE, 15% BC; Acidobacteria—10% ADE, 21% BC; Actinobacteria—7% ADE, 12% BC; Verrucomicrobia, 8% ADE; 9% BC; Firmicutes—3% ADE, 8% BC. Overall, unclassified bacteria corresponded to 36% ADE, and 26% BC. Regardless of current land uses, our data suggest that soil microbial community structures may be strongly influenced by the historical soil management and that anthrosols in Amazonia, of anthropogenic origins, in addition to their capacity of enhancing crop yields, may also improve microbial diversity, with the support of the black carbon, which may sustain a particular and unique habitat for the

  14. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from winemaking environments

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller, Dorit Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências The principal aim of the present work is to assess the genetic diversity of fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains found in vineyards belonging to the Vinho Verde Region in order to create a strain collection representing the region’s biodiversity wealth as a basis for future strain selection and improvement programs. Validation of molecular techniques for accurate genotyping is an indispensable prerequisite for biogeographical surveys. Molecular ty...

  15. Seroepidemiology and molecular diversity of Leishmania donovani complex in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuadze, Giorgi; Farlow, Jason; de Koning, Harry P; Carrillo, Eugenia; Chakhunashvili, Giorgi; Murskvaladze, Mari; Kekelidze, Merab; Karseladze, Irakli; Kokaia, Nora; Kalandadze, Irine; Tsereteli, David; Markhvashvili, Ivane; Sidamonidze, Ketevan; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Adeishvili, Ekaterine; Imnadze, Paata

    2016-05-13

    Leishmaniasis includes multiple clinical syndromes, most notably visceral, cutaneous, and mucosal forms. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar, is a potentially fatal disease endemic to large parts of Africa and Asia, and in South-Eastern Europe (Greece, Turkey, Georgia). Visceral leishmaniasis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by species of the L. donovani complex. In the classical epidemiological model the main reservoir for VL are canines. The study included a cohort of 513 individuals of both genders (190 males and 323 females) from the ages of 1 to 70 years that were screened in ten villages across two districts in Kakheti using the Kalazar Detect™ rK39 rapid diagnostic test. The phylogenetic diversity patterns of local strains, based on the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, were assessed for samples obtained from patients with suspected L. donovani infection, from canine reservoirs and from Phlebotomus sand flies obtained from different geographical areas of Georgia and from Azerbaijan. Out of a total of 600 domestic dog blood samples 95 (15.8 %) were positive by rK39 rapid diagnostic tests. For symptomatic domestic dogs, the testing of conjunctival swabs or bone marrow aspirates revealed a higher VL incidence in Kvareli District (Kvareli; 19.4 %, n = 329) compared with that observed for Sagarejo District (Sagarejo; 11.4 %, n = 271). A total of 231 sand flies of both genders were collected during the 2-month period; of the 114 females, 1.75 % were PCR positive for the presence of Leishmania spp. VL infection rates remain high in both canines and humans in Georgia, with disease in several known natural foci. The genetic relationships derived from rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence comparisons identified genetic subgroups, revealing preliminary insights into the genetic structure of L. donovani complex members currently circulating in the South Caucasus and demonstrates the utility of ITS-based genotyping

  16. Planktonic Euryarchaeota are a significant source of archaeal tetraether lipids in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Sara A; Wai, Brenner; Eppley, John M; Church, Matthew J; Summons, Roger E; DeLong, Edward F

    2014-07-08

    Archaea are ubiquitous in marine plankton, and fossil forms of archaeal tetraether membrane lipids in sedimentary rocks document their participation in marine biogeochemical cycles for >100 million years. Ribosomal RNA surveys have identified four major clades of planktonic archaea but, to date, tetraether lipids have been characterized in only one, the Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. The membrane lipid composition of the other planktonic archaeal groups--all uncultured Euryarchaeota--is currently unknown. Using integrated nucleic acid and lipid analyses, we found that Marine Group II Euryarchaeota (MG-II) contributed significantly to the tetraether lipid pool in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre at shallow to intermediate depths. Our data strongly suggested that MG-II also synthesize crenarchaeol, a tetraether lipid previously considered to be a unique biomarker for Thaumarchaeota. Metagenomic datasets spanning 5 y indicated that depth stratification of planktonic archaeal groups was a stable feature in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. The consistent prevalence of MG-II at depths where the bulk of exported organic matter originates, together with their ubiquitous distribution over diverse oceanic provinces, suggests that this clade is a significant source of tetraether lipids to marine sediments. Our results are relevant to archaeal lipid biomarker applications in the modern oceans and the interpretation of these compounds in the geologic record.

  17. Morphological and molecular diversity of Unionidae (Mollusca, Bivalvia from Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis, J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater mussels from the family Unionidae are known to exhibit a high level of ecological phenotypic plasticity that is reflected in their shell shape. This variation has caused uncertainty on systematics and taxonomy of the group. Several naiad populations from nine river basins from Portugal were analyzed genetically, using two mitochondrial gene fragments (16SrRNA and Cytochrome Oxidase I and morphologically, using ANOVA analyses of shell dimmensions. Molecular phylogenetic analyses were used to revise the systematics and to infer an evolutionary hypothesis for the family at the western-most Atlantic Iberian Peninsula. Genetic and morphological data were in agreement and supported the occurrence of 5 species in the region: Anodonta anatina, Anodonta cygnea, Potomida littoralis, Unio tumidiformis and Unio delphinus. The differentiation of all these species, except A. cygnea, is thought to have taken place during the isolation of the Iberian Peninsula and formation of the current river basins in the Tertiary. The possibility of A. cygnea being a relatively recent introduction is discussed. Basic morphometric measures of the shell proved to be useful to separate Unio species, but also seem to be strongly affected by environmental conditions. The high intra-specific morphologic variation was partially related to the species’ high level of phenotypic plasticity, but seems to have an important role in evolutionary processes.Las náyades de la familia Unionidae tienen gran plasticidad fenotípica, lo que se refleja en la forma de su concha. Esta variabilidad morfológica ha sido causa de gran confusión en la taxonomía y sistemática del grupo. Se han estudiado, genética y morfológicamente, numerosas poblaciones de náyades provenientes de nueve cuencas hidrográficas portuguesas. Para ello se han analizando dos fragmentos de genes mitocondriales (ARNr 16S y Citocromo Oxidasa I así como diferentes variables morfológicas de la concha. Se

  18. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Domenech Tupinambá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7% were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area. More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  19. An archaeal homolog of proteasome assembly factor functions as a proteasome activator.

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    Kentaro Kumoi

    Full Text Available Assembly of the eukaryotic 20S proteasome is an ordered process involving several proteins operating as proteasome assembly factors including PAC1-PAC2 but archaeal 20S proteasome subunits can spontaneously assemble into an active cylindrical architecture. Recent bioinformatic analysis identified archaeal PAC1-PAC2 homologs PbaA and PbaB. However, it remains unclear whether such assembly factor-like proteins play an indispensable role in orchestration of proteasome subunits in archaea. We revealed that PbaB forms a homotetramer and exerts a dual function as an ATP-independent proteasome activator and a molecular chaperone through its tentacle-like C-terminal segments. Our findings provide insights into molecular evolution relationships between proteasome activators and assembly factors.

  20. Fusarium diversity in soil using a specific molecular approach and a cultural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Gautheron, Nadine; Mounier, Arnaud; Steinberg, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous in soil. They cause plant and human diseases and can produce mycotoxins. Surveys of Fusarium species diversity in environmental samples usually rely on laborious culture-based methods. In the present study, we have developed a molecular method to analyze Fusarium diversity directly from soil DNA. We designed primers targeting the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1α) gene and demonstrated their specificity toward Fusarium using a large collection of fungi. We used the specific primers to construct a clone library from three contrasting soils. Sequence analysis confirmed the specificity of the assay, with 750 clones identified as Fusarium and distributed among eight species or species complexes. The Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) was the most abundant one in the three soils, followed by the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC). We then compared our molecular approach results with those obtained by isolating Fusarium colonies on two culture media and identifying species by sequencing part of the EF-1α gene. The 750 isolates were distributed into eight species or species complexes, with the same dominant species as with the cloning method. Sequence diversity was much higher in the clone library than in the isolate collection. The molecular approach proved to be a valuable tool to assess Fusarium diversity in environmental samples. Combined with high throughput sequencing, it will allow for in-depth analysis of large numbers of samples. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Drivers of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing communities in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna eZhalnina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are highly abundant and play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. In addition, AOA have a significant impact on soil quality. AOA may cause nitrogen loss from soils, and the nitrate produced by AOA can lead to ground and surface water contamination, water eutrophication, and soil subsidence. The ammonia-oxidizing archaea discovered to date are classified in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Only a few archaeal genomes are available in databases. As a result, AOA genes are not well annotated, and it is difficult to mine and identify archaeal genes within metagenomic libraries. Nevertheless, 16S rRNA and comparative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase sequences show that soils can vary greatly in the relative abundance of AOA. In some soils, AOA can comprise more than 10% of the total prokaryotic community. In other soils, AOA comprise less than 0.5% of the community. Many approaches have been used to measure the abundance and diversity of this group including DGGE, T-RFLP, q-PCR, and DNA sequencing. AOA have been studied across different soil types and various ecosystems from the Antarctic dry valleys to the tropical forests of South America to the soils near Mount Everest. Different studies have identified multiple soil factors that trigger the abundance of AOA. These factors include pH, concentration of available ammonia, organic matter content, moisture content, nitrogen content, clay content, as well as other triggers. Land use management appears to have a major effect on the abundance of AOA in soil, which may be the result of nitrogen fertilizer used in agricultural soils. This review summarizes the published results on this topic and suggests future work that will increase our understanding of how soil management and edaphoclimatic factors influence AOA.

  2. Distribution of Archaeal Communities along the Coast of the Gulf of Finland and Their Response to Oil Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lijuan; Yu, Dan; Hui, Nan; Naanuri, Eve; Viggor, Signe; Gafarov, Arslan; Sokolov, Sergei L.; Heinaru, Ain; Romantschuk, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The Baltic Sea is vulnerable to environmental changes. With the increasing shipping activities, the risk of oil spills remains high. Archaea are widely distributed in many environments. However, the distribution and the response of archaeal communities to oil contamination have rarely been investigated in brackish habitats. Hence, we conducted a survey to investigate the distribution, diversity, composition, and species interactions of indigenous archaeal communities at oil-contaminated sites along the coast of the Gulf of Finland (GoF) using high-throughput sequencing. Surface water and littoral sediment samples were collected at presumably oil-contaminated (oil distribution facilities) and clean sites along the coastline of the GoF in the winter 2015 and the summer 2016. Another three samples of open sea surface water were taken as offshore references. Of Archaea, Euryarchaeota dominated in the surface water and the littoral sediment of the coast of the GoF, followed by Crenarchaeota (including Thaumarchaeota, Thermoprotei, and Korarchaeota based on the Greengenes database used). The unclassified sequences accounted for 5.62% of the total archaeal sequences. Our study revealed a strong dependence of the archaeal community composition on environmental variables (e.g., salinity, pH, oil concentration, TOM, electrical conductivity, and total DNA concentration) in both littoral sediment and coastal water in the GoF. The composition of archaeal communities was season and ecosystem dependent. Archaea was highly diverse in the three ecosystems (littoral sediment, coastal water, and open sea water). Littoral sediment harbored the highest diversity of archaea. Oil was often detected in the littoral sediment but rarely detected in water at those presumably contaminated sites. Although the composition of archaeal community in the littoral sediment was sensitive to low-input oil contamination, the unchanged putative functional profiles and increased interconnectivity of the

  3. Characteristics of the molecular diversity of the outer membrane protein A gene of Haemophilus parasuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Yue, Hua; Yang, Falong; Shao, Guoqing; Hai, Quan; Chen, Xiaofei; Guo, Dingqian

    2010-01-01

    The molecular diversity of the gene encoding the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Haemophilus parasuis has been unclear. In this study, the structural characteristics, sequence types, and genetic diversity of ompA were investigated in 15 H. parasuis reference strains of different serovars and 20 field isolates. Three nucleotide lengths of the complete open reading frame (ORF) of ompA were found: 1098 base pairs (bp), 1104 bp, and 1110 bp. The OmpA contained 4 hypervariable domains, mainly encoding the 4 putative surface-exposed loops, which makes it a potential molecular marker for genotyping. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant OmpAs of serovars 4 and 5 could cross-react with antiserum to all 15 serovars. Hence, although ompA of H. parasuis exhibited high variation among serovars, this variation did not seem to affect the strong antigenic characteristics of OmpA. PMID:20885850

  4. United in Diversity : A Physiological and Molecular Characterization of Subpopulations in the Basal Ganglia Circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Viereckel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Basal Ganglia consist of a number of different nuclei that form a diverse circuitry of GABAergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurons. This complex network is further organized in subcircuits that govern limbic and motor functions in humans and other vertebrates. Due to the interconnection of the individual structures, dysfunction in one area or cell population can affect the entire network, leading to synaptic and molecular alterations in the circuitry as a whole. The studies in this ...

  5. Diversity Assessment and Cultivar Identification in Date Palm through Molecular Markers- A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Faqir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Date palm has a long history of cultivation and a valuable germplasm with little knowledge about its genetic makeup and variation among the most cultivated cultivars. Diversity is the variability of a species. Plants show variation in yield, vegetative traits and morphological properties of fruits and seeds in response to environmental changes. Molecular markers or DNA markers have been in use since past three decades. The DNA profiles give information about the genotype, screen the whole genome and show variation in both the coding and noncoding region and hence give information about polymorphism. Since plastid genes are transferred mostly from the mother line, the identification of maternal lines is possible by the sequencing of plastid genes. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs can detect length variation with the help of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR and may be used as highly informative genetic markers. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNPs are the third generation of molecular markers. SNPs are more stable and have high fidelity of inheritance as compared to other marker systems. Molecular markers have been developed but they are not enough for sufficient diversity assessment. Therefore there is a need to increase the number of DNA markers in date palm. Previously, there are several studies to type various commercially important germplasm based on morphological or yield parameters. Morphological and biochemical markers are limited in number and are affected by environmental factors and growth stage of the plant which reduce their reliability in the assessment of diversity and characterization of the germplasm. This necessitates the use of genetic characterization, utilizing DNA markers, gene sequencing or SNP genotyping which can work independent of the plant growth stage and are not affected by environmental factors. A combination of morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization of the date palm cultivars can better assess the

  6. Hidden diversity and evolutionary trends in malacosporean parasites (Cnidaria: Myxozoa) identified using molecular phylogenetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartošová, Pavla; Hrabcová, M.; Pecková, Hana; Patra, Sneha; Kodádková, Alena; Jurajda, Pavel; Tyml, Tomáš; Holzer, Astrid S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 8 (2014), s. 565-577 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP506/11/P724; GA ČR GBP505/12/G112; GA AV ČR(CZ) M200961205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68081766 Keywords : Buddenbrockia * Tetracapsuloides * diversity * phylogeny * Bryozoa * fish * cryptic * worm Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EG - Zoology (UBO-W) Impact factor: 3.872, year: 2014

  7. Non-extremophilic 'extremophiles' - Archaeal dominance in the subsurface and their implication for life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Lins, Philipp; Illmer, Paul

    2014-05-01

    strategies was applied as well as physiological analyses, comprising HPLC and GC analyses, and molecular approaches, covering end-point and quantitative PCRs, DGGE, cloning, and sequencing analyses. Outstanding in the course of this research was that assumed non-extremophilic Archaea clearly outnumbered bacteria within the different moonmilk deposits, while fungi were only of minor importance. Moreover, the Archaeal species formed a constant element within the investigated samples, while bacteria and fungi showed a much more diverse and inhomogeneous community pattern. This indicates that the Archaea might constitute the central element within the microbial communities, holding key positions in nutrient and energy-cycles. Furthermore, it was possible to cultivate the Archaeal community over a certain time period, demonstrating that so far uncultured or as 'not cultivable' regarded organisms are accessible with certain cultivation strategies. On the other hand the vast majority of bacterial and fungal representatives are in close relation to species, which are valuable concerning biotechnological or medical applications. Summing up, further research on cave microbiomes, especially Archaea, might be reasonable with regards to life's evolution, global nutrient cycles, requirements for possible refuges of extraterrestrial life forms and also concerning new technological applications.

  8. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  9. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Peng, Xiaotong; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of ammonia by microbes has been shown to occur in diverse natural environments. However, the link of in situ nitrification activity to taxonomic identities of ammonia oxidizers in high-temperature environments remains poorly understood. Here, we studied in situ ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in surface and bottom sediments at 77 °C in the Gongxiaoshe hot spring, Tengchong, Yunnan, China. The in situ ammonia oxidation rates measured by the 15N-NO3- pool dilution technique in the surface and bottom sediments were 4.80 and 5.30 nmol N g-1 h-1, respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the archaeal 16S rRNA genes and amoA genes were present in the range of 0.128 to 1.96 × 108 and 2.75 to 9.80 × 105 gene copies g-1 sediment, respectively, while bacterial amoA was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed high sequence similarity to thermophilic Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, which represented the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTU) in both surface and bottom sediments. The archaeal predominance was further supported by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) visualization. The cell-specific rate of ammonia oxidation was estimated to range from 0.410 to 0.790 fmol N archaeal cell-1 h-1, higher than those in the two US Great Basin hot springs. These results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  10. Detection of Diverse and High Molecular Weight Nesprin-1 and Nesprin-2 Isoforms Using Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthew, James; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos

    2016-01-01

    Heavily utilized in cell and molecular biology, western blotting is considered a crucial technique for the detection and quantification of proteins within complex mixtures. In particular, the detection of members of the nesprin (nuclear envelope spectrin repeat protein) family has proven difficult to analyze due to their substantial isoform diversity, molecular weight variation, and the sheer size of both nesprin-1 and nesprin-2 giant protein variants (>800 kDa). Nesprin isoforms contain distinct domain signatures, perform differential cytoskeletal associations, occupy different subcellular compartments, and vary in their tissue expression profiles. This structural and functional variance highlights the need to distinguish between the full range of proteins within the nesprin protein family, allowing for greater understanding of their specific roles in cell biology and disease. Herein, we describe a western blotting protocol modified for the detection of low to high molecular weight (50-1000 kDa) nesprin proteins.

  11. Massive Activation of Archaeal Defense Genes during Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Marleen; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Sezonov, Guennadi; Forterre, Patrick; van der Oost, John; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea. It is a lytic virus that exploits a unique egress mechanism based on the formation of remarkable pyramidal structures on the host cell envelope. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we present here a global map defining host and viral gene expression during the infection cycle of SIRV2 in its hyperthermophilic host S. islandicus LAL14/1. This information was used, in combination with a yeast two-hybrid analysis of SIRV2 protein interactions, to advance current understanding of viral gene functions. As a consequence of SIRV2 infection, transcription of more than one-third of S. islandicus genes was differentially regulated. While expression of genes involved in cell division decreased, those genes playing a role in antiviral defense were activated on a large scale. Expression of genes belonging to toxin-antitoxin and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems was specifically pronounced. The observed different degree of activation of various CRISPR-Cas systems highlights the specialized functions they perform. The information on individual gene expression and activation of antiviral defense systems is expected to aid future studies aimed at detailed understanding of the functions and interplay of these systems in vivo. PMID:23698312

  12. Gene Acquisitions from Bacteria at the Origins of Major Archaeal Clades Are Vastly Overestimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussin, Mathieu; Boussau, Bastien; Szöllõsi, Gergely; Eme, Laura; Gouy, Manolo; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Daubin, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    In a recent article, Nelson-Sathi et al. (NS) report that the origins of major archaeal lineages (MAL) correspond to massive group-specific gene acquisitions via HGT from bacteria (Nelson-Sathi et al. 2015. Origins of major archaeal clades correspond to gene acquisitions from bacteria. Nature 517(7532):77-80.). If correct, this would have fundamental implications for the process of diversification in microbes. However, a reexamination of these data and results shows that the methodology used by NS systematically inflates the number of genes acquired at the root of each MAL, and incorrectly assumes bacterial origins for these genes. A reanalysis of their data with appropriate phylogenetic models accounting for the dynamics of gene gain and loss between lineages supports the continuous acquisition of genes over long periods in the evolution of Archaea. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Molecular Insights into the Genetic Diversity of Garcinia cambogia Germplasm Accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Tharachand

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn this work, the genetic relationship among twelveGarcinia cambogia (Gaertn. Desr. accessions were evaluated using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA markers. The samples were part of the germplasm collected and maintained at NBPGR Regional station, Thrissur, India. Out of thirty RAPD primers used for screening, seven primers produced a total of 128 polymorphic markers in twelve accessions. The Polymorphic Information Content (PIC ranged from 0.28 (OPA18 to 0.37 (OPA9 and Marker Index (MI ranged between 3.61 (OPA12 and 5.93 (OPA3 among the primers used. Jaccard's coefficient of genetic similarity ranged between 0.07 and 0.64. The dendrogram constructed based on the similarity matrix generated from the molecular and morphological data showed the genetic relationship among the sampled accessions. Mantel matrix test showed a positive correlation (r = 0.49 between the cluster analysis of RAPD data and morphological data. The clustering pattern in the molecular dendrogram and Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA showed that the genotypes were diverse, which was in congruence with the similarity index values and morphological dendrogram. High frequency of similarity values in the range of 0.11 to 0.17 suggested the existence of high genetic diversity among the accessions. The high level of genetic diversity among the studied accessions ofG.cambogia was also supported by the large variation in the morphological characters observed in the flowers, leaves, fruits and seeds of these sampled accessions. This is the first report for the molecular based genetic diversity studies for these accessions.

  14. Phylodynamic analysis and molecular diversity of the avian infectious bronchitis virus of chickens in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Aline Padilha de; Gräf, Tiago; Pereira, Cleiton Schneider; Ikuta, Nilo; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2018-03-21

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is the etiological agent of a highly contagious disease, which results in severe economic losses to the poultry industry. The spike protein (S1 subunit) is responsible for the molecular diversity of the virus and many sero/genotypes are described around the world. Recently a new standardized classification of the IBV molecular diversity was conducted, based on phylogenetic analysis of the S1 gene sequences sampled worldwide. Brazil is one of the biggest poultry producers in the world and the present study aimed to review the molecular diversity and reconstruct the evolutionary history of IBV in the country. All IBV S1 gene sequences, with local and year of collection information available on GenBank, were retrieved. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out based on a maximum likelihood method for the classification of genotypes occurring in Brazil, according to the new classification. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were performed with the Brazilian clade and related international sequences to determine the evolutionary history of IBV in Brazil. A total of 143 Brazilian sequences were classified as GI-11 and 46 as GI-1 (Mass). Within the GI-11 clade, we have identified a potential recombinant strain circulating in Brazil. Phylodynamic analysis demonstrated that IBV GI-11 lineage was introduced in Brazil in the 1950s (1951, 1917-1975 95% HPD) and population dynamics was mostly constant throughout the time. Despite the national vaccination protocols, our results show the widespread dissemination and maintenance of the IBV GI-11 lineage in Brazil and highlight the importance of continuous surveillance to evaluate the impact of currently used vaccine strains on the observed viral diversity of the country. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biogeography and molecular diversity of coral symbionts in the genus Symbiodinium around the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Ziegler, Maren

    2017-01-02

    Aim: Coral reefs rely on the symbiosis between scleractinian corals and intracellular, photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium making the assessment of symbiont diversity critical to our understanding of ecological resilience of these ecosystems. This study characterizes Symbiodinium diversity around the Arabian Peninsula, which contains some of the most thermally diverse and understudied reefs on Earth. Location: Shallow water coral reefs throughout the Red Sea (RS), Sea of Oman (SO), and Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG). Methods: Next-generation sequencing of the ITS2 marker gene was used to assess Symbiodinium community composition and diversity comprising 892 samples from 46 hard and soft coral genera. Results: Corals were associated with a large diversity of Symbiodinium, which usually consisted of one or two prevalent symbiont types and many types at low abundance. Symbiodinium communities were strongly structured according to geographical region and to a lesser extent by coral host identity. Overall symbiont communities were composed primarily of species from clade A and C in the RS, clade A, C, and D in the SO, and clade C and D in the PAG, representing a gradual shift from C- to D-dominated coral hosts. The analysis of symbiont diversity in an Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU)-based framework allowed the identification of differences in symbiont taxon richness over geographical regions and host genera. Main conclusions: Our study represents a comprehensive overview over biogeography and molecular diversity of Symbiodinium in the Arabian Seas, where coral reefs thrive in one of the most extreme environmental settings on the planet. As such our data will serve as a baseline for further exploration into the effects of environmental change on host-symbiont pairings and the identification and ecological significance of Symbiodinium types from regions already experiencing \\'Future Ocean\\' conditions.

  16. Capturing the diversity of the human gut microbiota through culture-enriched molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jennifer T; Whelan, Fiona J; Herath, Isiri; Lee, Christine H; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl; Surette, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    The human gut microbiota has been implicated in most aspects of health and disease; however, most of the bacteria in this community are considered unculturable, so studies have relied on molecular-based methods. These methods generally do not permit the isolation of organisms, which is required to fully explore the functional roles of bacteria for definitive association with host phenotypes. Using a combination of culture and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, referred to as culture-enriched molecular profiling, we show that the majority of the bacteria identified by 16S sequencing of the human gut microbiota can be cultured. Five fresh, anaerobic fecal samples were cultured using 33 media and incubation of plates anaerobically and aerobically resulted in 66 culture conditions for culture-enriched molecular profiling. The cultivable portion of the fecal microbiota was determined by comparing the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered by 16S sequencing of the culture plates to OTUs from culture-independent sequencing of the fecal sample. Targeted isolation of Lachnospiraceae strains using conditions defined by culture-enriched molecular profiling was carried out on two fresh stool samples. We show that culture-enriched molecular profiling, utilizing 66 culture conditions combined with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, allowed for the culturing of an average of 95 % of the OTUs present at greater than 0.1 % abundance in fecal samples. Uncultured OTUs were low abundance in stool. Importantly, comparing culture-enrichment to culture-independent sequencing revealed that the majority of OTUs were detected only by culture, highlighting the advantage of culture for studying the diversity of the gut microbiota. Applying culture-enriched molecular profiling to target Lachnospiraceae strains resulted in the recovery of 79 isolates, 12 of which are on the Human Microbiome Project's "Most Wanted" list. We show that, through culture-enriched molecular profiling, the majority of the

  17. Physical heterogeneity increases biofilm resource use and its molecular diversity in stream mesocosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Singer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence increasingly shows that stream ecosystems greatly contribute to global carbon fluxes. This involves a tight coupling between biofilms, the dominant form of microbial life in streams, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, a very significant pool of organic carbon on Earth. Yet, the interactions between microbial biodiversity and the molecular diversity of resource use are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using six 40-m-long streamside flumes, we created a gradient of streambed landscapes with increasing spatial flow heterogeneity to assess how physical heterogeneity, inherent to streams, affects biofilm diversity and DOC use. We determined bacterial biodiversity in all six landscapes using 16S-rRNA fingerprinting and measured carbon uptake from glucose and DOC experimentally injected to all six flumes. The diversity of DOC molecules removed from the water was determined from ultrahigh-resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Bacterial beta diversity, glucose and DOC uptake, and the molecular diversity of DOC use all increased with increasing flow heterogeneity. Causal modeling and path analyses of the experimental data revealed that the uptake of glucose was largely driven by physical processes related to flow heterogeneity, whereas biodiversity effects, such as complementarity, most likely contributed to the enhanced uptake of putatively recalcitrant DOC compounds in the streambeds with higher flow heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest biophysical mechanisms, including hydrodynamics and microbial complementarity effects, through which physical heterogeneity induces changes of resource use and carbon fluxes in streams. These findings highlight the importance of fine-scale streambed heterogeneity for microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in streams, where homogenization and loss of habitats increasingly reduce biodiversity.

  18. Physical Heterogeneity Increases Biofilm Resource Use and Its Molecular Diversity in Stream Mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Gabriel; Besemer, Katharina; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hödl, Iris; Battin, Tom J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence increasingly shows that stream ecosystems greatly contribute to global carbon fluxes. This involves a tight coupling between biofilms, the dominant form of microbial life in streams, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a very significant pool of organic carbon on Earth. Yet, the interactions between microbial biodiversity and the molecular diversity of resource use are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Using six 40-m-long streamside flumes, we created a gradient of streambed landscapes with increasing spatial flow heterogeneity to assess how physical heterogeneity, inherent to streams, affects biofilm diversity and DOC use. We determined bacterial biodiversity in all six landscapes using 16S-rRNA fingerprinting and measured carbon uptake from glucose and DOC experimentally injected to all six flumes. The diversity of DOC molecules removed from the water was determined from ultrahigh-resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Bacterial beta diversity, glucose and DOC uptake, and the molecular diversity of DOC use all increased with increasing flow heterogeneity. Causal modeling and path analyses of the experimental data revealed that the uptake of glucose was largely driven by physical processes related to flow heterogeneity, whereas biodiversity effects, such as complementarity, most likely contributed to the enhanced uptake of putatively recalcitrant DOC compounds in the streambeds with higher flow heterogeneity. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest biophysical mechanisms, including hydrodynamics and microbial complementarity effects, through which physical heterogeneity induces changes of resource use and carbon fluxes in streams. These findings highlight the importance of fine-scale streambed heterogeneity for microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in streams, where homogenization and loss of habitats increasingly reduce biodiversity. PMID:20376323

  19. Molecular markers to assess genetic diversity and mutant identifications in Jatropha curcas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Yie Min Kwan; Fatin Mastura Derani; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2010-01-01

    Jatropha curcas (Linnaeus) belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family, is a multipurpose use, drought resistant and perennial plant. It is an economic important crop, which generates wide interest in understanding the genetic diversity of the species towards selection and breeding of superior genotypes. Jatropha accessions are closely related family species. Thus, better understanding of the effectiveness of the different DNA-based markers is an important step towards plant germplasm characterization and evaluation. It is becoming a prerequisite for more effective application of marker techniques in breeding programs. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) has shown rapid, simple, reproducible and inexpensive means in molecular taxonomy, conservation breeding and genetic diversity analysis. These markers were used to understand diversity and differentiate amongst accessions of Jatropha population and mutant lines generated by acute gamma radiation. The ISSR for marker applications are essential to facilitate management, conservation and genetic improvement programs towards improvement of bio-diesel production and medication substances. A total of 62 ISSR primers were optimized for polymorphism evaluations on five foreign accessions (Africa, India, Myanmar, Indonesia, Thailand), nine local accessions and two mutants of Jatropha. Optimization was resulted 54 ISSR primers affirmative for the polymorphism evaluation study, which encountered 12 ISSR primers, showed significance polymorphism amongst the accessions and mutants. Marker derived from ISSR profiling is a powerful method for identification and molecular classification of Jatropha from accession to generated mutant varieties. (author)

  20. Mutagenic influences of colchicine on phenological and molecular diversity of Calendula officinalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nashar, Y I; Ammar, M H

    2016-04-26

    Six different colchicine concentrations: 0, 400, 800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 ppm, in combination with four soaking time treatments (1, 2, 3, and 4 h), were selected to assess the effects on germination, vegetative growth, and flower yield components in calendula plants. The molecular diversity among the treatments was assessed using ten SRAP marker combinations. Seed soaking in colchicine significantly enhanced both the fresh and the dry shoot and root masses, flowering date, number of flowers per plant, and flower diameter. At 1200-ppm colchicine combined with a 4-h soaking time, a superior effect on seed germination was observed, whereas 800 ppm for 4 h produced the highest number of flowers and the largest flower diameter. The earliest flowering time was found at 800 ppm combined with a short soaking time (1 h), while the 4-h soaking time with 800 ppm, is recommended for growing calendula outdoors, since it enhances flower development. At the molecular level, 752 fragments were successfully amplified using the SRAP primers, with 280 genetic loci found throughout the calendula genome. The polymorphism percentage ranged from 79 to 100% and the polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged between 0.85 and 0.97. The high number of detected loci and PIC values suggests a great power of SRAP markers in detecting mutant molecular diversity. Our results clearly show the existence of genetic variation among colchicine treated calendula plants and the clustering of the studied mutants was concordant with the colchicine concentration used.

  1. Exploring microbial dark matter to resolve the deep archaeal ancestry of eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Jimmy H.; Spang, Anja; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Juzokaite, Lina; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Colman, Dan R.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Hedlund, Brian P.; Guy, Lionel; Ettema, Thijs J. G.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of eukaryotes represents an enigmatic puzzle, which is still lacking a number of essential pieces. Whereas it is currently accepted that the process of eukaryogenesis involved an interplay between a host cell and an alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont, we currently lack detailed information regarding the identity and nature of these players. A number of studies have provided increasing support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, displaying a specific affiliation with the archaeal TACK superphylum. Recent studies have shown that genomic exploration of yet-uncultivated archaea, the so-called archaeal ‘dark matter’, is able to provide unprecedented insights into the process of eukaryogenesis. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art cultivation-independent approaches, and demonstrate how these methods were used to obtain draft genome sequences of several novel members of the TACK superphylum, including Lokiarchaeum, two representatives of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (Bathyarchaeota), and a Korarchaeum-related lineage. The maturation of cultivation-independent genomics approaches, as well as future developments in next-generation sequencing technologies, will revolutionize our current view of microbial evolution and diversity, and provide profound new insights into the early evolution of life, including the enigmatic origin of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:26323759

  2. Molecular analysis and genetic diversity of Aedes albopictus (Diptera, Culicidae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiling, Zhang; Peien, Leng; Xuejun, Wang; Zhong, Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Aedes albopictus is one of the most invasive species, which can carry Dengue virus, Yellow fever virus and more than twenty arboviruses. Based on mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and samples collected from 17 populations, we investigated the molecular character and genetic diversity of Ae. albopictus from China. Altogether, 25 haplotypes were detected, including 10 shared haplotypes and 15 private haplotypes. H1 was the dominant haplotype, which is widely distributed in 13 populations. Tajima'D value of most populations was significantly negative, demonstrating that populations experienced rapid range expansion recently. Most haplotypes clustered together both in phylogenetic and median-joining network analysis without clear phylogeographic patterns. However, neutrality tests revealed shallow divergences among Hainan and Guangxi with other populations (0.15599 ≤ F ST ≤ 0.75858), which probably due to interrupted gene flow, caused by geographical isolations. In conclusion, Ae. albopictus populations showed low genetic diversity in China.

  3. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A study of archaeal enzymes involved in polar lipid synthesis linking amino acid sequence information, genomic contexts and lipid composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Daiyasu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular membrane lipids, of which phospholipids are the major constituents, form one of the characteristic features that distinguish Archaea from other organisms. In this study, we focused on the steps in archaeal phospholipid synthetic pathways that generate polar lipids such as archaetidylserine, archaetidylglycerol, and archaetidylinositol. Only archaetidylserine synthase (ASS, from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, has been experimentally identified. Other enzymes have not been fully examined. Through database searching, we detected many archaeal hypothetical proteins that show sequence similarity to members of the CDP alcohol phosphatidyltransferase family, such as phosphatidylserine synthase (PSS, phosphatidylglycerol synthase (PGS and phosphatidylinositol synthase (PIS derived from Bacteria and Eukarya. The archaeal hypothetical proteins were classified into two groups, based on the sequence similarity. Members of the first group, including ASS from M. thermautotrophicus, were closely related to PSS. The rough agreement between PSS homologue distribution within Archaea and the experimentally identified distribution of archaetidylserine suggested that the hypothetical proteins are ASSs. We found that an open reading frame (ORF tends to be adjacent to that of ASS in the genome, and that the order of the two ORFs is conserved. The sequence similarity of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase to the product of the ORF next to the ASS gene, together with the genomic context conservation, suggests that the ORF encodes archaetidylserine decarboxylase, which may transform archaetidylserine to archaetidylethanolamine. The second group of archaeal hypothetical proteins was related to PGS and PIS. The members of this group were subjected to molecular phylogenetic analysis, together with PGSs and PISs and it was found that they formed two distinct clusters in the molecular phylogenetic tree. The distribution of members of each cluster within Archaea

  5. Evaluation of 16S rRNA gene primer pairs for monitoring microbial community structures showed high reproducibility within and low comparability between datasets generated with multiple archaeal and bacterial primer pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Alexander Fischer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community

  6. Molecular Technique to Reduce PCR Bias for Deeper Understanding of Microbial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Current planetary protection policies require that spacecraft targeted to sensitive solar system bodies be assembled and readied for launch in controlled cleanroom environments. A better understanding of the distribution and frequency at which high-risk contaminant microbes are encountered on spacecraft surfaces would significantly aid in assessing the threat of forward contamination. However, despite a growing understanding of the diverse microbial populations present in cleanrooms, less abundant microbial populations are probably not adequately taken into account due to technological limitations. This novel approach encompasses a wide spectrum of microbial species and will represent the true picture of spacecraft cleanroom-associated microbial diversity. All of the current microbial diversity assessment techniques are based on an initial PCR amplification step. However, a number of factors are known to bias PCR amplification and jeopardize the true representation of bacterial diversity. PCR amplification of a minor template appears to be suppressed by the amplification of a more abundant template. It is widely acknowledged among environmental molecular microbiologists that genetic biosignatures identified from an environment only represent the most dominant populations. The technological bottleneck overlooks the presence of the less abundant minority population and may underestimate their role in the ecosystem maintenance. DNA intercalating agents such as propidium monoazide (PMA) covalently bind with DNA molecules upon photolysis using visible light, and make it unavailable for DNA polymerase enzyme during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Environmental DNA samples will be treated with suboptimum PMA concentration, enough to intercalate with 90 99% of the total DNA. The probability of PMA binding with DNA from abundant bacterial species will be much higher than binding with DNA from less abundant species. This will increase the relative DNA concentration of

  7. Tunable Affinity and Molecular Architecture Lead to Diverse Self-Assembled Supramolecular Structures in Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Dong, Xue-Hui; Lin, Zhiwei; Ni, Bo; Lu, Pengtao; Jiang, Zhang; Tian, Ding; Shi, An-Chang; Thomas, Edwin L; Cheng, Stephen Z D

    2016-01-26

    The self-assembly behavior of specifically designed giant surfactants is systematically studied in thin films using grazing incidence X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, focusing on the effects of molecular nanoparticle (MNP) functionalities and molecular architectures on nanostructure formation. Two MNPs with different surface functionalities, i.e., hydrophilic carboxylic acid functionalized [60]fullerene (AC60) and omniphobic fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (FPOSS), are utilized as the head portions of the giant surfactants. By covalently tethering these functional MNPs onto the end point or junction point of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymer, linear and star-like giant surfactants with different molecular architectures are constructed. With fixed length of the PEO block, changing the molecular weight of the PS block leads to the formation of various ordered phases and phase transitions. Due to the distinct affinity, the AC60-based and FPOSS-based giant surfactants form two- or three-component morphologies, respectively. A stretching parameter for the PS block is introduced to characterize the PS chain conformation in the different morphologies. The highly diverse self-assembled nanostructures with high etch resistance between components in small dimensions obtained from the giant surfactant thin films suggest that these macromolecules could provide a promising and robust platform for nanolithography applications.

  8. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers (SSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnaoui, Nejib; Buonamici, Anna; Sebastiani, Federico; Mars, Messaoud; Zhang, Dapeng; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2012-02-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In the present study, we report the development of 4 new polymorphic SSR markers. They have been used in addition to 11 SSRs previously published to investigate molecular diversity of 33 P. granatum ecotypes. Based on the multi-locus profiles, twenty-two distinctive genotypes were identified. Globally, quite low genetic diversity has been revealed, as measured by allele richness (2.83 per locus) and heterozygosity (He=0.245; Ho=0.243), reflecting the narrow genetic background of the plant material. Four synonymous groups could be detected involving 15 accessions. Results of ordination and cluster analysis suggested that almost all the Tunisian cultivars share similar genetic background, and are likely derived from a small number of introductions in ancient times. Results issued from this study provide essential information to project a pomegranate core-collection without plant material duplication and for sustainable management of pomegranate landraces at national and international level. Furthermore, these SSR markers are powerful tool for marker assisted selection (MAS) program and for QTL studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular diversity of Annona species and proximate fruit composition of selected genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuragi, Hirdayesh; Dhaduk, Haresh L; Kumar, Sushil; Dhruve, Jitendra J; Parekh, Mithil J; Sakure, Amar A

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the genetic variation in germplasm is of utmost importance for crop improvement. Therefore, efforts were made to analyse the molecular marker based genetic diversity of 20 Annona genotypes from five different species of family Annonaceae. During analysis, a set of 11 RAPD primers yielded a total of 152 bands with 80.01 % polymorphism and PIC for RAPD ranged from 0.86 to 0.92 with a mean of 0.89. With 93.05 % polymorphism, 12 SSR primers produced 39 amplicons. The PIC for SSRs ranged from 0.169 to 0.694 with of average of 0.339. The dendrogram produced from pooled molecular data of 11 RAPD and 12 SSR primers showed seven clusters at a cutoff value of 0.78. The dendrogram discriminated all the Annona genotypes suggesting that significant genetic diversity was present among the genotypes. Proximate fruit composition study of nine fruiting genotypes of Annona revealed that A. squamosa possessed significantly higher amount of most of studies biochemical which gives an opportunity to fruit breeders to improve the other Annona species. Likewise, A. muricata being rich in seed oil content can be exploited in oil industries.

  10. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Tagetes Species Using PCR Based Molecular Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzadi, I.; Ahmad, R.; Waheed, U.; Shah, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Tagetes is a genus of medicinally important wild and cultivated plants containing several chemical compounds. Lack of information on variation at molecular level present in Tagetes species is paramount to understand the genetic basis of medicinally important compounds. Current study aims at finding genetic variability in Tagetes species using random and specific molecular markers. Two primer systems including 25 RAPD and 3 STS (limonene gene) were used to ascertain genetic diversity of 15 Tagetes genotypes belonging to different species. We found that 20 of the 25 tested RAPD primers generated stable band patterns with 167 loci of amplification products. The proportion of polymorphic bands was 95.21 percent for RAPD primers. Three STS primers generated a total of 29 amplification products, of which 96.55 percent were polymorphic. Homology of genotypes was 53.18 percent and 51.11 percent with RAPD and STS primers respectively. The dendrogram obtained revealed that the range of overall genetic distances estimated was 22 percent to 100 percent through RAPD and 9 percent to 100 percent through STS markers. The findings help to establish that PCR-based assay such as RAPD and STS could be used successfully for estimation of genetic diversity of different genotypes of Tagetes that can be used for selection of parents for improvement of the species. (author)

  11. Molecular evidence shows low species diversity of coral-associated hydroids in Acropora corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Fontana

    Full Text Available A novel symbiosis between scleractinians and hydroids (Zanclea spp. was recently discovered using taxonomic approaches for hydroid species identification. In this study, we address the question whether this is a species-specific symbiosis or a cosmopolitan association between Zanclea and its coral hosts. Three molecular markers, including mitochondrial 16S and nuclear 28S ribosomal genes, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS, were utilized to examine the existence of Zanclea species from 14 Acropora species and 4 other Acroporidae genera including 142 coral samples collected from reefs in Kenting and the Penghu Islands, Taiwan, Togian Island, Indonesia, and Osprey Reef and Orpheus Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the 16S and 28S genes showed that Acropora-associated Zanclea was monophyletic, but the genus Zanclea was not. Analysis of the ITS, and 16S and 28S genes showed either identical or extremely low genetic diversity (with mean pairwise distances of 0.009 and 0.006 base substitutions per site for the 16S and 28S genes, respectively among Zanclea spp. collected from diverse Acropora hosts in different geographic locations, suggesting that a cosmopolitan and probably genus-specific association occurs between Zanclea hydroids and their coral hosts.

  12. Spatiotemporal variability in archaeal communities of tropical coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.

    Spatiotemporal variations in the archaeal community structure from four locations along the central west coast of India were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling and sequencing of prominent bands on the DGGE gels. A...

  13. Diversity and distribution of avian haematozoan parasites in the western Indian Ocean region: a molecular survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, Farah; Beadell, Jon S; Warren, Ben H; Fleischer, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    The genetic diversity of haematozoan parasites in island avifauna has only recently begun to be explored, despite the potential insight that these data can provide into the history of association between hosts and parasites and the possible threat posed to island endemics. We used mitochondrial DNA sequencing to characterize the diversity of 2 genera of vector-mediated parasites (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) in avian blood samples from the western Indian Ocean region and explored their relationship with parasites from continental Africa. We detected infections in 68 out of 150 (45·3%) individuals and cytochrome b sequences identified 9 genetically distinct lineages of Plasmodium spp. and 7 lineages of Haemoproteus spp. We found considerable heterogeneity in parasite lineage composition across islands, although limited sampling may, in part, be responsible for perceived differences. Two lineages of Plasmodium spp. and 2 lineages of Haemoproteus spp. were shared by hosts in the Indian Ocean and also on mainland Africa, suggesting that these lineages may have arrived relatively recently. Polyphyly of island parasites indicated that these parasites were unlikely to constitute an endemic radiation and instead probably represent multiple colonization events. This study represents the first molecular survey of vector-mediated parasites in the western Indian Ocean, and has uncovered a diversity of parasites. Full understanding of parasite community composition and possible threats to endemic avian hosts will require comprehensive surveys across the avifauna of this region.

  14. Molecular diversity of fungal and bacterial communities in the marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarini, Michel R Z; Miqueletto, Paula B; de Oliveira, Valéria M; Sette, Lara D

    2015-02-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the diversity of bacteria and filamentous fungi of southern Atlantic Ocean marine sponge Dragmacidon reticulatum using cultivation-independent approaches. Fungal ITS rDNA and 18S gene analyses (DGGE and direct sequencing approaches) showed the presence of representatives of three order (Polyporales, Malasseziales, and Agaricales) from the phylum Basidiomycota and seven orders belonging to the phylum Ascomycota (Arthoniales, Capnodiales, Dothideales, Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Pleosporales, and Saccharomycetales). On the other hand, bacterial 16S rDNA gene analyses by direct sequencing approach revealed the presence of representatives of seven bacterial phyla (Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Lentisphaerae, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes). Results from statistical analyses (rarefaction curves) suggested that the sampled clones covered the fungal diversity in the sponge samples studied, while for the bacterial community additional sampling would be necessary for saturation. This is the first report related to the molecular analyses of fungal and bacterial communities by cultivation-independent approaches in the marine sponges D. reticulatum. Additionally, the present work broadening the knowledge of microbial diversity associated to marine sponges and reports innovative data on the presence of some fungal genera in marine samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Diversity-dependence brings molecular phylogenies closer to agreement with the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Rampal S; Haegeman, Bart; Stadler, Tanja; Aze, Tracy; Pearson, Paul N; Purvis, Andy; Phillimore, Albert B

    2012-04-07

    The branching times of molecular phylogenies allow us to infer speciation and extinction dynamics even when fossils are absent. Troublingly, phylogenetic approaches usually return estimates of zero extinction, conflicting with fossil evidence. Phylogenies and fossils do agree, however, that there are often limits to diversity. Here, we present a general approach to evaluate the likelihood of a phylogeny under a model that accommodates diversity-dependence and extinction. We find, by likelihood maximization, that extinction is estimated most precisely if the rate of increase in the number of lineages in the phylogeny saturates towards the present or first decreases and then increases. We demonstrate the utility and limits of our approach by applying it to the phylogenies for two cases where a fossil record exists (Cetacea and Cenozoic macroperforate planktonic foraminifera) and to three radiations lacking fossil evidence (Dendroica, Plethodon and Heliconius). We propose that the diversity-dependence model with extinction be used as the standard model for macro-evolutionary dynamics because of its biological realism and flexibility.

  16. A comparative assessment of morphological and molecular diversity among Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw. accessions in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Jyothi Ramesh; Timsina, Bibechana; Satyan, Kumudini Belur; Manohar, Shiragambi Hanumantagouda

    2017-06-01

    Genetic variation of 36 Sechium edule accessions collected across 12 states in India was assessed using morphological traits and DAMD markers. Eighteen fruit morphological traits (both qualitative and quantitative) were evaluated to confirm the variations in the present collection. Quantitative traits showed major variations with respect to fruit weight (7.85-498.33 g/fruit), fruit length (5.8-15 cm/fruit), fruit diameter (6-28 cm/fruit) and length of the spine (0-5 cm). Qualitative traits were also diverse in fruit colour, shape, spine density, reticulation, flexibility of spine and furrow depth. The first six principle components showed 82.88% variation in the principal component analysis. The principal component analysis revealed that fruit weight, fruit width, fruit diameter, fruit shape, length of spine, spine density and furrow depth had a significant contribution to the total variation. The DNA analysis performed using DAMD primers were used for deducing the diversity at DNA level. The collection produced 102 bands out of which 97 were polymorphic and the percentage polymorphism ranged between 66.66 and 100 per primer. Discrete pattern of clustering was obtained using UPGMA method of complete linkage percent disagreement revealing high diversity among the collected accessions. Thus, the present study indicates that molecular and morphological marker map would improve our knowledge of S. edule and would facilitate efforts to breed improved S. edule cultivars.

  17. Novel molecular markers of Chlamydia pecorum genetic diversity in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timms Peter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia pecorum is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of reproductive and ocular disease in several animal hosts including koalas, sheep, cattle and goats. C. pecorum strains detected in koalas are genetically diverse, raising interesting questions about the origin and transmission of this species within koala hosts. While the ompA gene remains the most widely-used target in C. pecorum typing studies, it is generally recognised that surface protein encoding genes are not suited for phylogenetic analysis and it is becoming increasingly apparent that the ompA gene locus is not congruent with the phylogeny of the C. pecorum genome. Using the recently sequenced C. pecorum genome sequence (E58, we analysed 10 genes, including ompA, to evaluate the use of ompA as a molecular marker in the study of koala C. pecorum genetic diversity. Results Three genes (incA, ORF663, tarP were found to contain sufficient nucleotide diversity and discriminatory power for detailed analysis and were used, with ompA, to genotype 24 C. pecorum PCR-positive koala samples from four populations. The most robust representation of the phylogeny of these samples was achieved through concatenation of all four gene sequences, enabling the recreation of a "true" phylogenetic signal. OmpA and incA were of limited value as fine-detailed genetic markers as they were unable to confer accurate phylogenetic distinctions between samples. On the other hand, the tarP and ORF663 genes were identified as useful "neutral" and "contingency" markers respectively, to represent the broad evolutionary history and intra-species genetic diversity of koala C. pecorum. Furthermore, the concatenation of ompA, incA and ORF663 sequences highlighted the monophyletic nature of koala C. pecorum infections by demonstrating a single evolutionary trajectory for koala hosts that is distinct from that seen in non-koala hosts. Conclusions While the continued use of

  18. Novel molecular markers of Chlamydia pecorum genetic diversity in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, James; Kollipara, Avinash; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2011-04-18

    Chlamydia pecorum is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of reproductive and ocular disease in several animal hosts including koalas, sheep, cattle and goats. C. pecorum strains detected in koalas are genetically diverse, raising interesting questions about the origin and transmission of this species within koala hosts. While the ompA gene remains the most widely-used target in C. pecorum typing studies, it is generally recognised that surface protein encoding genes are not suited for phylogenetic analysis and it is becoming increasingly apparent that the ompA gene locus is not congruent with the phylogeny of the C. pecorum genome. Using the recently sequenced C. pecorum genome sequence (E58), we analysed 10 genes, including ompA, to evaluate the use of ompA as a molecular marker in the study of koala C. pecorum genetic diversity. Three genes (incA, ORF663, tarP) were found to contain sufficient nucleotide diversity and discriminatory power for detailed analysis and were used, with ompA, to genotype 24 C. pecorum PCR-positive koala samples from four populations. The most robust representation of the phylogeny of these samples was achieved through concatenation of all four gene sequences, enabling the recreation of a "true" phylogenetic signal. OmpA and incA were of limited value as fine-detailed genetic markers as they were unable to confer accurate phylogenetic distinctions between samples. On the other hand, the tarP and ORF663 genes were identified as useful "neutral" and "contingency" markers respectively, to represent the broad evolutionary history and intra-species genetic diversity of koala C. pecorum. Furthermore, the concatenation of ompA, incA and ORF663 sequences highlighted the monophyletic nature of koala C. pecorum infections by demonstrating a single evolutionary trajectory for koala hosts that is distinct from that seen in non-koala hosts. While the continued use of ompA as a fine-detailed molecular marker for epidemiological

  19. Molecular systematics reveals increased diversity within the South African Laurencia complex (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Caitlynne; Bolton, John J; Mattio, Lydiane; Mandiwana-Neudani, Tshifhiwa G; Anderson, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Previous publications list ten species in the Laurencia complex from South Africa with all ascribed to the genus Laurencia sensu stricto. However, the diversity of the complex in South Africa has not yet been re-assessed following the numerous recent taxonomic changes. This study investigated the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomy of this group in South Africa using recent collections. Methods included molecular phylogenetic analyses of plastid rbcL gene sequences (a total of 146; including eleven outgroup taxa) using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, and the examination of morphological and anatomical characters, including the number of corps en cerise when present. The seven genera of the Laurencia complex formed monophyletic clades with high posterior probabilities. Seventeen morphotypes were identified: 14 in the genus Laurencia sensu stricto, among which eight corresponded to Laurencia species currently recognized from South Africa and one each to species of Palisada, Chondrophycus, and Laurenciella. The six remaining morphotypes in Laurencia sensu stricto did not match any descriptions and are described here as five new species: Laurencia alfredensis sp. nov., Laurencia dichotoma sp. nov., Laurencia digitata sp. nov., Laurencia multiclavata sp. nov. and Laurencia sodwaniensis sp. nov. and a new variety: Laurencia pumila var. dehoopiensis var. nov. Laurencia stegengae nom. nov. is established to replace Laurencia peninsularis Stegenga, Bolton and Anderson nom. illeg. The diversity is likely greater, with six additional unidentified specimens found in this molecular investigation. These findings place South Africa alongside Australia in having one of the most diverse floras of this group in the world. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  20. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production.

  1. Prediction of novel archaeal enzymes from sequence-derived features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Skovgaard, Marie; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    The completely sequenced archaeal genomes potentially encode, among their many functionally uncharacterized genes, novel enzymes of biotechnological interest. We have developed a prediction method for detection and classification of enzymes from sequence alone (available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/......The completely sequenced archaeal genomes potentially encode, among their many functionally uncharacterized genes, novel enzymes of biotechnological interest. We have developed a prediction method for detection and classification of enzymes from sequence alone (available at http...

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinoviruses and Enteroviruses Highlights Their Diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Petty, Tom J; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Hongoa, Philipina; Vieille, Gaël; Turin, Lara; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-12-08

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and enteroviruses (HEVs) belong to the Enterovirus genus and are the most frequent cause of infection worldwide, but data on their molecular epidemiology in Africa are scarce. To understand HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in this setting, we enrolled febrile pediatric patients participating in a large prospective cohort assessing the causes of fever in Tanzanian children. Naso/oropharyngeal swabs were systematically collected and tested by real-time RT-PCR for HRV and HEV. Viruses from positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were then applied to highlight the HRV and HEV types as well as recombinant or divergent strains. Thirty-eight percent (378/1005) of the enrolled children harboured an HRV or HEV infection. Although some types were predominant, many distinct types were co-circulating, including a vaccinal poliovirus, HEV-A71 and HEV-D68. Three HRV-A recombinants were identified: HRV-A36/HRV-A67, HRV-A12/HRV-A67 and HRV-A96/HRV-A61. Four divergent HRV strains were also identified: one HRV-B strain and three HRV-C strains. This is the first prospective study focused on HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. This systematic and thorough large screening with careful clinical data management confirms the wide genomic diversity of these viruses, brings new insights about their evolution and provides data about associated symptoms.

  3. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in a specialized consortium for diesel oil degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao, Douglas Antonio Alvaredo; Accorsini, Fabio Raphael; Vidotti, Maria Benincasa; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias], Emails: douglas_unespfcav@yahoo.com.br, vidotti@netsite.com.bregerle@fcav.unesp.br; Dimitrov, Mauricio Rocha [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)], Email: mau_dimitrov@yahoo.com.br; Pereira, Rodrigo Matheus [EMBRAPARA Soybean - Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA - Soja), Londrina, PR (Brazil)], Email: poetbr@gmail.com

    2010-05-15

    Diesel oil is a compound derived from petroleum, consisting primarily of hydrocarbons. Poor conditions in transportation and storage of this product can contribute significantly to accidental spills causing serious ecological problems in soil and water and affecting the diversity of the microbial environment. The cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is one of the molecular techniques that allows estimation and comparison of the microbial diversity in different environmental samples. The aim of this work was to estimate the diversity of microorganisms from the Bacteria domain in a consortium specialized in diesel oil degradation through partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. After the extraction of DNA metagenomics, the material was amplified by PCR reaction using specific oligonucleotide primers for the 16S rRNA gene. The PCR products were cloned into a pGEM-T-Easy vector (Promega), and Escherichia coli was used as the host cell for recombinant DNAs. The partial clone sequencing was obtained using universal oligonucleotide primers from the vector. The genetic library obtained generated 431 clones. All the sequenced clones presented similarity to phylum Proteobacteria, with Gammaproteobacteria the most present group (49.8 % of the clones), followed by Alphaproteobacteira (44.8 %) and Betaproteobacteria (5.4 %). The Pseudomonas genus was the most abundant in the metagenomics library, followed by the Parvibaculum and the Sphingobium genus, respectively. After partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, the diversity of the bacterial consortium was estimated using DOTUR software. When comparing these sequences to the database from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), a strong correlation was found between the data generated by the software used and the data deposited in NCBI. (author)

  4. Molecular characterization of the Gossypium Diversity Reference Set of the US National Cotton Germplasm Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, Lori L; Fang, David D; Gore, Michael A; Scheffler, Brian E; Yu, John Z; Frelichowski, James; Percy, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    A core marker set containing markers developed to be informative within a single commercial cotton species can elucidate diversity structure within a multi-species subset of the Gossypium germplasm collection. An understanding of the genetic diversity of cotton (Gossypium spp.) as represented in the US National Cotton Germplasm Collection is essential to develop strategies for collecting, conserving, and utilizing these germplasm resources. The US collection is one of the largest world collections and includes not only accessions with improved yield and fiber quality within cultivated species, but also accessions possessing sources of abiotic and biotic stress resistance often found in wild species. We evaluated the genetic diversity of a subset of 272 diploid and 1,984 tetraploid accessions in the collection (designated the Gossypium Diversity Reference Set) using a core set of 105 microsatellite markers. Utility of the core set of markers in differentiating intra-genome variation was much greater in commercial tetraploid genomes (99.7 % polymorphic bands) than in wild diploid genomes (72.7 % polymorphic bands), and may have been influenced by pre-selection of markers for effectiveness in the commercial species. Principal coordinate analyses revealed that the marker set differentiated interspecific variation among tetraploid species, but was only capable of partially differentiating among species and genomes of the wild diploids. Putative species-specific marker bands in G. hirsutum (73) and G. barbadense (81) were identified that could be used for qualitative identification of misclassifications, redundancies, and introgression within commercial tetraploid species. The results of this broad-scale molecular characterization are essential to the management and conservation of the collection and provide insight and guidance in the use of the collection by the cotton research community in their cotton improvement efforts.

  5. Divergent responses of methanogenic archaeal communities in two rice cultivars to elevated ground-level O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianwei; Tang, Haoye; Zhu, Jianguo; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitive effect of elevated ground-level ozone (O3) on paddy methane (CH4) emission varies with rice cultivars. However, little information is available on its microbial mechanism. For this purpose, the responses of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, methanogenic archaea and methanotrophic bacteria to O3 pollution were investigated in the O3-tolerant (YD6) and the O3-sensitive (IIY084) cultivars at two rice growth stages in Free Air Concentration Elevation of O3 (O3-FACE) system of China. It was found that O3 pollution didn't change the abundances of Type I and Type II methanotrophic bacteria at two rice stages. For methanogenic archaea, their abundances in both cultivars were decreased by O3 pollution at the tillering stage. Furthermore, a greater negative influence on methanogenic archaeal community was observed on IIY084 than on YD6: at tillering stage, the alpha diversity indices of methanogenic archaeal community in IIY084 was decreased to a greater extent than in YD6; IIY084 shifted methanogenic archaeal community composition and decreased the abundances and the diversities of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanosaetaceae as well as the abundance of Methanomicrobiales, while the diversity of Methanocellaceae were increased in YD6. These findings indicate that the variations in the responses of paddy CH4 emission to O3 pollution between cultivars could result from the divergent responses of their methanogenic archaea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Zoanthid diversity (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) in the Galapagos Islands: a molecular examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, J. D.; Sinniger, F.; Hickman, C. P.

    2008-09-01

    Although the Galapagos are famous for their unique biodiversity, many groups of marine invertebrates from this isolated archipelago remain understudied or not investigated. One such group is the zoanthids (Order Zoantharia, =Zoanthidea, =Zoanthiniaria), anthozoans (Cnidaria) found in marine ecosystems worldwide. Zoanthid taxonomy has been in a state of disorganization and neglect due in large part to the morphological plasticity within species and questions about the accuracy of traditionally used morphological and ecological characteristics. However, recent studies utilizing molecular methodology combined with morphology have proven to be very useful in understanding zoanthid diversity. The results of a survey of zoanthids from the Galapagos and the east Pacific are reported in this study. Shallow water (zoanthid specimens were identified using the molecular markers mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (mt 16S rDNA), cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, and the internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (ITS-rDNA). From the collected specimens seven putative zoanthid species-level clades from three known genera ( Zoanthus, Palythoa, Parazoanthus) were identified at the molecular level. These identifications were further supported by morphological and ecological data. While almost all specimens belonged to known zoanthid genera, based on unique molecular and ecological data one group of specimens (designated unknown zoanthid sp. “03-103”) is potentially a novel undescribed genus. Additionally, the remaining three azooxanthellate Parazoanthus clades may also be undescribed new species, but due to the overall lack of zoanthid research and descriptions from neighboring areas (East Pacific, west coast of South America) further research is needed to clearly ascertain this. Additionally, notes on the four observed nominal azooxanthellate zoanthid species and a key to all eight nominal (seven from known genera, one from a potentially new genus) shallow water zoanthid

  7. Crystal structure of a mutant of archaeal ribosomal protein L1 from Methanococcus jannaschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarskikh, A. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kostareva, O. S.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Tishchenko, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    The crystal structure of a mutant of archaeal ribosomal protein L1 from Methanococcus jannaschii with the deletion of a nonconserved positively charged cluster consisting of eight C-terminal amino acid residues is determined by the molecular replacement method at 1.75 Å resolution. This mutant is shown to form more stable and ordered crystals belonging to a space group other than that of the wild-type protein crystals. The positively charged C-terminal region has only a slight effect on the interaction between protein L1 and RNA molecules. Hence, this mutant can be used to prepare protein-RNA complexes and obtain their crystals.

  8. Archaeal community changes in Lateglacial lake sediments: Evidence from ancient DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Engy; Parducci, Laura; Unneberg, Per; Ågren, Rasmus; Schenk, Frederik; Rattray, Jayne E.; Han, Lu; Muschitiello, Francesco; Pedersen, Mikkel W.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Yamoah, Kweku Afrifa; Slotte, Tanja; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    The Lateglacial/early Holocene sediments from the ancient lake at Hässeldala Port, southern Sweden provide an important archive for the environmental and climatic shifts at the end of the last ice age and the transition into the present Interglacial. The existing multi-proxy data set highlights the complex interplay of physical and ecological changes in response to climatic shifts and lake status changes. Yet, it remains unclear how microorganisms, such as Archaea, which do not leave microscopic features in the sedimentary record, were affected by these climatic shifts. Here we present the metagenomic data set of Hässeldala Port with a special focus on the abundance and biodiversity of Archaea. This allows reconstructing for the first time the temporal succession of major Archaea groups between 13.9 and 10.8 ka BP by using ancient environmental DNA metagenomics and fossil archaeal cell membrane lipids. We then evaluate to which extent these findings reflect physical changes of the lake system, due to changes in lake-water summer temperature and seasonal lake-ice cover. We show that variations in archaeal composition and diversity were related to a variety of factors (e.g., changes in lake water temperature, duration of lake ice cover, rapid sediment infilling), which influenced bottom water conditions and the sediment-water interface. Methanogenic Archaea dominated during the Allerød and Younger Dryas pollen zones, when the ancient lake was likely stratified and anoxic for large parts of the year. The increase in archaeal diversity at the Younger Dryas/Holocene transition is explained by sediment infilling and formation of a mire/peatbog.

  9. Molecular Diversity of the Antimicrobial Domain of Beta-Defensin 3 and Homologous Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Gerardo M.; Escorcia, Magdalena; Castañeda, M. Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Human β-defensin 3 has received great interest for possible pharmaceutical applications. To characterize the biology of this antimicrobial peptide, the mouse β-defensin 14 has been selected as a prototypical model. This report provides definite evidence of true orthology between these defensins and reveals molecular diversity of a mammalian specific domain responsible for their antimicrobial activity. Specifically, this analysis demonstrates that eleven amino acid residues of the antimicrobial domain have been mutated by positive selection to confer protein niche specialization. These data support the notion that natural selection acts as evolutionary force driving the proliferation and diversification of defensins and introduce a novel strategy for the design of more effective antibiotics. PMID:19888439

  10. Molecular evidence and high genetic diversity of shrew-borne Seewis virus in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resman, Katarina; Korva, Miša; Fajs, Luka; Zidarič, Tanja; Trilar, Tomi; Zupanc, Tatjana Avšič

    2013-10-01

    Seewis virus, the shrew-borne hantavirus from Sorex araneus, has been molecularly detected in reservoir hosts in many different central European countries and Russia. Slovenia is a known endemic country for rodent-borne hantaviruses, therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the presence of shrew-borne hantaviruses in insectivores. Viral L, S and M segment have been recovered only from tissue samples of 7 S. araneus, despite several shrew species were tested. Phylogenetic analysis showed high genetic diversity of SWSV in Slovenia, ranging from 3 to 19.4% for different viral segments. The most divergent were M segment sequences, with 19.4% nucleotide divergence among Slovenian strains. Above that, different SWSV strains from Slovenia do not group into separate geographic clusters. While three separate genetic clades were determined, two of them were simultaneously present in one location at the same time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data

    KAUST Repository

    Montano, Simone

    2015-07-24

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  12. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Montano

    Full Text Available Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII, suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII, each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan. Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII. We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the

  13. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of Jatropha curcas L. in Costa Rica

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    Marcela Vásquez-Mayorga

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the genetic diversity of 50 Jatropha curcas samples from the Costa Rican germplasm bank using 18 EST-SSR, one G-SSR and nrDNA-ITS markers. We also evaluated the phylogenetic relationships among samples using nuclear ribosomal ITS markers. Non-toxicity was evaluated using G-SSRs and SCARs markers. A Neighbor-Joining (NJ tree and a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree were constructed using SSR markers and ITS sequences, respectively. Heterozygosity was moderate (He = 0.346, but considerable compared to worldwide values for J. curcas. The PIC (PIC = 0.274 and inbreeding coefficient (f =  − 0.102 were both low. Clustering was not related to the geographical origin of accessions. International accessions clustered independently of collection sites, suggesting a lack of genetic structure, probably due to the wide distribution of this crop and ample gene flow. Molecular markers identified only one non-toxic accession (JCCR-24 from Mexico. This work is part of a countrywide effort to characterize the genetic diversity of the Jatropha curcas germplasm bank in Costa Rica.

  14. Planarian (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida Diversity and Molecular Markers: A New View of an Old Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Álvarez-Presas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Planarians are a group of free-living platyhelminths (triclads best-known largely due to long-standing regeneration and pattern formation research. However, the group’s diversity and evolutionary history has been mostly overlooked. A few taxonomists have focused on certain groups, resulting in the description of many species and the establishment of higher-level groups within the Tricladida. However, the scarcity of morphological features precludes inference of phylogenetic relationships among these taxa. The incorporation of molecular markers to study their diversity and phylogenetic relationships has facilitated disentangling many conundrums related to planarians and even allowed their use as phylogeographic model organisms. Here, we present some case examples ranging from delimiting species in an integrative style, and barcoding them, to analysing their evolutionary history on a lower scale to infer processes affecting biodiversity origin, or on a higher scale to understand the genus level or even higher relationships. In many cases, these studies have allowed proposing better classifications and resulted in taxonomical changes. We also explain shortcomings resulting in a lack of resolution or power to apply the most up-to-date data analyses. Next-generation sequencing methodologies may help improve this situation and accelerate their use as model organisms.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of Chrysopidae family (Insecta, Neuroptera) via molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Kheirollah; Mirmoayedi, Alinaghi; Marami, Marzieh; Kazemi, Elham; Kahrizi, Danial

    2014-09-01

    In entomology, improvement of molecular methods would be beneficial tools for accurate identification and detecting the genetic diversity of insect species to discover a corroborative evidence for the traditional classification based on morphology. The aim of this study was focused on RAPD-PCR method for distinguishing the genetic diversity between eight species of Chrysopidae family. In current research, many specimens were collected in different locations of Tehran province (Iran), between them 24 specimens were identified. The wing venation, male genitalia and other morphological characters were used for identification and also the sexing of species was recognized with study of external genitalia. Then, the DNA was extracted with CTAB method. The RAPD-PCR method was carried out with twenty random primers. The agarose gel electrophoresis was used for separation of the PCR products. Based on electrophoresis results, 133 bands were amplified and between them, 126 bands were poly-morph and others were mono-morph. Also, among the applied primers, the primers OPA02 with 19 bands and OPA03 with 8 bands were amplified the maximum and minimum of bands, respectively. The results showed that 80.35 and 73.21 % of genetic similarity existed between Chrysopa pallens-Chrysopa dubitans, and between the Chrysoperla kolthoffi and Chrysoperla carnea, respectively. The minimum (45.53 %) of genetic similarity was observed between C. kolthoffi and C. dubitans, and the maximum (0.80 %) was seen between C. pallens and C. dubitans.

  16. Application of molecular techniques for the assessment of microorganism diversity on cultural heritage objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their unpredictable ability to adapt to varying environmental conditions, microorganisms inhabit different types of biological niches on Earth. Owing to the key role of microorganisms in many biogeochemical processes, trends in modern microbiology emphasize the need to know and understand the structure and function of complex microbial communities. This is particularly important if the strategy relates to microbial communities that cause biodeterioration of materials that constitute our cultural heritage. Until recently, the detection and identification of microorganisms inhabiting objects of cultural value was based only on cultivation-dependent methods. In spite of many advantages, these methods provide limited information because they identify only viable organisms capable of growth under standard laboratory conditions. However, in order to carry out proper conservation and renovation, it is necessary to know the complete composition of microbial communities and their activity. This paper presents and characterizes modern techniques such as genetic fingerprinting and clone library construction for the assessment of microbial diversity based on molecular biology. Molecular methods represent a favourable alternative to culture-dependent methods and make it possible to assess the biodiversity of microorganisms inhabiting technical materials and cultural heritage objects.

  17. Exploration of Deinococcus-Thermus molecular diversity by novel group-specific PCR primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Bachar, Dipankar; Christen, Richard; Alain, Karine; Chapon, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    The deeply branching Deinococcus-Thermus lineage is recognized as one of the most extremophilic phylum of bacteria. In previous studies, the presence of Deinococcus-related bacteria in the hot arid Tunisian desert of Tataouine was demonstrated through combined molecular and culture-based approaches. Similarly, Thermus-related bacteria have been detected in Tunisian geothermal springs. The present work was conducted to explore the molecular diversity within the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum in these extreme environments. A set of specific primers was designed in silico on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, validated for the specific detection of reference strains, and used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of metagenomic DNA retrieved from the Tataouine desert sand and Tunisian hot spring water samples. These analyses have revealed the presence of previously undescribed Deinococcus-Thermus bacterial sequences within these extreme environments. The primers designed in this study thus represent a powerful tool for the rapid detection of Deinococcus-Thermus in environmental samples and could also be applicable to clarify the biogeography of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum. PMID:23996915

  18. Assessing diversity among traditional Greek and foreign eggplant cultivars using molecular markers and morphometrical descriptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustinos, A.A.; Petropoulos, C.; Karasoulou, V.; Bletsos, F.; Papasotiropoulos, V.

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant is a widely cultivated vegetable crop of great economic importance. Its long lasting history of domestication, selection and breeding has led to the development of numerous cultivars with variable traits. In the present study, we assessed the diversity levels within and among eleven Greek and foreign cultivars, using 22 morphological descriptors and two different classes of molecular markers (retrotransposon microsatellite amplified polymorphism-REMAP markers and nuclear microsatellites). Our results, in accordance with other studies in the field showed: a) the limited levels of genetic polymorphism within the cultivars; b) the high morphological and genetic divergence existing among them as indicated by the genetic distance values calculated, which could be attributed to selection, inbreeding and bottleneck effects; and c) the lack of concordance among morphological descriptors and molecular markers. Despite these, our analysis showed that the utilization of combinations of markers is an effective method for the characterization of plant material providing also useful diagnostic tools for the identification and authentication of the selected Greek cultivars.

  19. Assessing diversity among traditional Greek and foreign eggplant cultivars using molecular markers and morphometrical descriptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustinos, A.A.; Petropoulos, C.; Karasoulou, V.; Bletsos, F.; Papasotiropoulos, V.

    2016-07-01

    Eggplant is a widely cultivated vegetable crop of great economic importance. Its long lasting history of domestication, selection and breeding has led to the development of numerous cultivars with variable traits. In the present study, we assessed the diversity levels within and among eleven Greek and foreign cultivars, using 22 morphological descriptors and two different classes of molecular markers (retrotransposon microsatellite amplified polymorphism-REMAP markers and nuclear microsatellites). Our results, in accordance with other studies in the field showed: a) the limited levels of genetic polymorphism within the cultivars; b) the high morphological and genetic divergence existing among them as indicated by the genetic distance values calculated, which could be attributed to selection, inbreeding and bottleneck effects; and c) the lack of concordance among morphological descriptors and molecular markers. Despite these, our analysis showed that the utilization of combinations of markers is an effective method for the characterization of plant material providing also useful diagnostic tools for the identification and authentication of the selected Greek cultivars.

  20. Assessing diversity among traditional Greek and foreign eggplant cultivars using molecular markers and morphometrical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios A. Augustinos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eggplant is a widely cultivated vegetable crop of great economic importance. Its long lasting history of domestication, selection and breeding has led to the development of numerous cultivars with variable traits. In the present study, we assessed the diversity levels within and among eleven Greek and foreign cultivars, using 22 morphological descriptors and two different classes of molecular markers (retrotransposon microsatellite amplified polymorphism-REMAP markers and nuclear microsatellites. Our results, in accordance with other studies in the field showed: a the limited levels of genetic polymorphism within the cultivars; b the high morphological and genetic divergence existing among them as indicated by the genetic distance values calculated, which could be attributed to selection, inbreeding and bottleneck effects; and c the lack of concordance among morphological descriptors and molecular markers. Despite these, our analysis showed that the utilization of combinations of markers is an effective method for the characterization of plant material providing also useful diagnostic tools for the identification and authentication of the selected Greek cultivars.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the archaeal community in an alkaline-saline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Neria-González, Isabel; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Enríquez-Aragón, J Arturo; Estrada-Alvarado, Isabel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Dendooven, Luc; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2008-03-01

    The soil of the former lake Texcoco is an extreme environment localized in the valley of Mexico City, Mexico. It is highly saline and alkaline, where Na+, Cl(-), HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) are the predominant ions, with a pH ranging from 9.8 to 11.7 and electrolytic conductivities in saturation extracts from 22 to 150 dS m(-1). Metagenomic DNA from the archaeal community was extracted directly from soil and used as template to amplify 16S ribosomal gene by PCR. PCR products were used to construct gene libraries. The ribosomal library showed that the archaeal diversity included Natronococcus sp., Natronolimnobius sp., Natronobacterium sp., Natrinema sp., Natronomonas sp., Halovivax sp., "Halalkalicoccus jeotgali" and novel clades within the family of Halobacteriaceae. Four clones could not be classified. It was found that the archaeal diversity in an alkaline-saline soil of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, was low, but showed yet uncharacterized and unclassified species.

  2. Mechanism of Archaeal MCM Helicase Recruitment to DNA Replication Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Abeyrathne, Priyanka D.; Bell, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular DNA replication origins direct the recruitment of replicative helicases via the action of initiator proteins belonging to the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. Archaea have a simplified subset of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery proteins and possess initiators that appear ancestral to both eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6. We have reconstituted origin-dependent recruitment of the homohexameric archaeal MCM in vitro with purified recombinant proteins. Using this system, we reveal that archaeal Orc1-1 fulfills both Orc1 and Cdc6 functions by binding to a replication origin and directly recruiting MCM helicase. We identify the interaction interface between these proteins and reveal how ATP binding by Orc1-1 modulates recruitment of MCM. Additionally, we provide evidence that an open-ring form of the archaeal MCM homohexamer is loaded at origins. PMID:26725007

  3. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patzak, J.; Vrba, Lukáš; Matoušek, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2007), s. 15-25 ISSN 0831-2796 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/03/0072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : hop (Humulus lupulus L.) * genetic diversity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.785, year: 2007

  4. Multicomponent domino processes based on the organocatalytic generation of conjugated acetylides: efficient synthetic manifolds for diversity-oriented molecular construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, David; González-Cruz, David; Santos-Expósito, Alicia; Marrero-Tellado, Jose Juan; de Armas, Pedro; García-Tellado, Fernando

    2005-06-06

    The organocatalytic generation of a strong base by the action of a good nucleophile is the base for the in situ catalytic generation of conjugated acetylides in the presence of aldehydes or activated ketones. The method is affordable in a multicomponent, domino format able to generate a chemically diverse set of multifunctionalized adducts that are very well suited for diversity-oriented molecular construction. The domino process involves a nucleophile as catalyst and a terminal conjugated alkyne (H-C[triple chemical bond]C-Z) and an aldehyde or activated ketone as building blocks. The chemical outcome of this process changes dramatically as a function of the nucleophile (tertiary amine or phosphine), temperature, stoichiometry, and solvent. These multicomponent domino processes achieve molecular construction with good atom economy and, very importantly, with an exquisite chemo-differentiating incorporation of identical starting units into the products (nondegenerated chemical output). These properties convert the H-C[triple chemical bond]C-Z unit into a specific building block for diversity-oriented molecular construction. Applications to the modular and diversity-oriented synthesis of relevant heterocycles are discussed. A protocol involving two coupled domino processes linked in a one-pot manner will be discussed as an efficient synthetic manifold for the modular and diversity-oriented construction of multisubstituted nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

  5. Plant genotype-specific archaeal and bacterial endophytes but similar Bacillus antagonists colonize Mediterranean olive trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry eMueller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytes have an intimate and often symbiotic interaction with their hosts. Less is known about the composition and function of endophytes in trees. In order to evaluate our hypothesis that plant genotype and origin have a strong impact on both, endophytes of leaves from 10 Olea europaea L. cultivars from the Mediterranean basin growing at a single agricultural site in Spain and from nine wild olive trees located in natural habitats in Greece, Cyprus and on Madeira Island were studied. The composition of the bacterial endophytic communities as revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and the subsequent PCoA analysis showed a strong correlation to the plant genotypes. The bacterial distribution patterns were congruent with the plant origins in Eastern and Western areas of the Mediterranean basin. Subsequently, the endophytic microbiome of wild olives was shown to be closely related to those of cultivated olives of the corresponding geographic origins. The olive leaf endosphere harbored mostly Proteobacteria, followed by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The detection of a high portion of archaeal taxa belonging to the phyla Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota in the amplicon libraries was an unexpected discovery, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR revealing an archaeal portion of up to 35.8%. Although the function of these Archaea for their host plant remains speculative, this finding suggests a significant relevance of archaeal endophytes for plant-microbe interactions. In addition, the antagonistic potential of culturable endophytes was determined; all isolates with antagonistic activity against the olive-pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. belong to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. In contrast to the specific global structural diversity, BOX-fingerprints of the antagonistic Bacillus isolates were highly similar and independent of the olive genotype from which they were isolated.

  6. Plant genotype-specific archaeal and bacterial endophytes but similar Bacillus antagonists colonize Mediterranean olive trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Henry; Berg, Christian; Landa, Blanca B; Auerbach, Anna; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes have an intimate and often symbiotic interaction with their hosts. Less is known about the composition and function of endophytes in trees. In order to evaluate our hypothesis that plant genotype and origin have a strong impact on both, endophytes of leaves from 10 Olea europaea L. cultivars from the Mediterranean basin growing at a single agricultural site in Spain and from nine wild olive trees located in natural habitats in Greece, Cyprus, and on Madeira Island were studied. The composition of the bacterial endophytic communities as revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and the subsequent PCoA analysis showed a strong correlation to the plant genotypes. The bacterial distribution patterns were congruent with the plant origins in "Eastern" and "Western" areas of the Mediterranean basin. Subsequently, the endophytic microbiome of wild olives was shown to be closely related to those of cultivated olives of the corresponding geographic origins. The olive leaf endosphere harbored mostly Proteobacteria, followed by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The detection of a high portion of archaeal taxa belonging to the phyla Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota in the amplicon libraries was an unexpected discovery, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR revealing an archaeal portion of up to 35.8%. Although the function of these Archaea for their host plant remains speculative, this finding suggests a significant relevance of archaeal endophytes for plant-microbe interactions. In addition, the antagonistic potential of culturable endophytes was determined; all isolates with antagonistic activity against the olive-pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. belong to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. In contrast to the specific global structural diversity, BOX-fingerprints of the antagonistic Bacillus isolates were highly similar and independent of the olive genotype from which they were isolated.

  7. Defense islands in bacterial and archaeal genomes and prediction of novel defense systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Snir, Sagi; Koonin, Eugene V

    2011-11-01

    The arms race between cellular life forms and viruses is a major driving force of evolution. A substantial fraction of bacterial and archaeal genomes is dedicated to antivirus defense. We analyzed the distribution of defense genes and typical mobilome components (such as viral and transposon genes) in bacterial and archaeal genomes and demonstrated statistically significant clustering of antivirus defense systems and mobile genes and elements in genomic islands. The defense islands are enriched in putative operons and contain numerous overrepresented gene families. A detailed sequence analysis of the proteins encoded by genes in these families shows that many of them are diverged variants of known defense system components, whereas others show features, such as characteristic operonic organization, that are suggestive of novel defense systems. Thus, genomic islands provide abundant material for the experimental study of bacterial and archaeal antivirus defense. Except for the CRISPR-Cas systems, different classes of defense systems, in particular toxin-antitoxin and restriction-modification systems, show nonrandom clustering in defense islands. It remains unclear to what extent these associations reflect functional cooperation between different defense systems and to what extent the islands are genomic "sinks" that accumulate diverse nonessential genes, particularly those acquired via horizontal gene transfer. The characteristics of defense islands resemble those of mobilome islands. Defense and mobilome genes are nonrandomly associated in islands, suggesting nonadaptive evolution of the islands via a preferential attachment-like mechanism underpinned by the addictive properties of defense systems such as toxins-antitoxins and an important role of horizontal mobility in the evolution of these islands.

  8. Subtracted Diversity Array Identifies Novel Molecular Markers Including Retrotransposons for Fingerprinting Echinacea Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte, Alexandra; Mantri, Nitin; Nugent, Gregory; Pang, Edwin C. K.

    2013-01-01

    Echinacea, native to the Canadian prairies and the prairie states of the United States, has a long tradition as a folk medicine for the Native Americans. Currently, Echinacea are among the top 10 selling herbal medicines in the U.S. and Europe, due to increasing popularity for the treatment of common cold and ability to stimulate the immune system. However, the genetic relationship within the species of this genus is unclear, making the authentication of the species used for the medicinal industry more difficult. We report the construction of a novel Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA) for Echinacea species and demonstrate the potential of this array for isolating highly polymorphic sequences. In order to selectively isolate Echinacea-specific sequences, a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was performed between a pool of twenty-four Echinacea genotypes and a pool of other angiosperms and non-angiosperms. A total of 283 subtracted genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments were amplified and arrayed. Twenty-seven Echinacea genotypes including four that were not used in the array construction could be successfully discriminated. Interestingly, unknown samples of E. paradoxa and E. purpurea could be unambiguously identified from the cluster analysis. Furthermore, this Echinacea-specific SDA was also able to isolate highly polymorphic retrotransposon sequences. Five out of the eleven most discriminatory features matched to known retrotransposons. This is the first time retrotransposon sequences have been used to fingerprint Echinacea, highlighting the potential of retrotransposons as based molecular markers useful for fingerprinting and studying diversity patterns in Echinacea. PMID:23940565

  9. Molecular and morphological diversity of fungi and the associated functions in three European nearby lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobard, Marlène; Rasconi, Serena; Solinhac, Laurent; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2012-09-01

    This study presents an original rDNA PCR and microscopic survey of pelagic freshwater fungal communities, and was designed to unveil the diversity of true Fungi (i.e. the kingdom Eumycota) in three contrasting lake ecosystems (Lakes Pavin, Aydat and Vassivière) located in the French Massif Central. Three clone libraries were constructed from samples collected in the euphotic layers of the lakes during spring 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined data from the three lakes clustered our sequences into thee divisions: Chytridiomycota (50% of total sequences), Ascomycota (40%) and Basidiomycota (10% in Pavin and Aydat only). Several sequences were assigned to a novel Chytridiomycota clade first recovered in Lake Pavin in 2005. Most of the sequences retrieved in the investigated lakes were affiliated with known fungal species, most of which were apparently well adapted to thrive in the pelagic realm. Their main functions (i.e. parasitism and saprophytism), putatively inferred from the closest relatives of the retrieved molecular sequences, were confirmed by microscopic approaches and by enrichment experiments with pollen grains. The occurrence of three fungal forms (zoosporic, yeast and mycelial) was associated with different trophic modes, establishing fungi as strong potential competitors for various niches in pelagic ecosystems, primarily in relation to the processing of particulate organic matter and the production of propagule food sources for grazers. For the first time, this study provides insight into the diversity and the associated functions of all members of the Kingdom Eumycota investigated in the whole plankton fraction of aquatic ecosystems. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Subtracted diversity array identifies novel molecular markers including retrotransposons for fingerprinting Echinacea species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Olarte

    Full Text Available Echinacea, native to the Canadian prairies and the prairie states of the United States, has a long tradition as a folk medicine for the Native Americans. Currently, Echinacea are among the top 10 selling herbal medicines in the U.S. and Europe, due to increasing popularity for the treatment of common cold and ability to stimulate the immune system. However, the genetic relationship within the species of this genus is unclear, making the authentication of the species used for the medicinal industry more difficult. We report the construction of a novel Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA for Echinacea species and demonstrate the potential of this array for isolating highly polymorphic sequences. In order to selectively isolate Echinacea-specific sequences, a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH was performed between a pool of twenty-four Echinacea genotypes and a pool of other angiosperms and non-angiosperms. A total of 283 subtracted genomic DNA (gDNA fragments were amplified and arrayed. Twenty-seven Echinacea genotypes including four that were not used in the array construction could be successfully discriminated. Interestingly, unknown samples of E. paradoxa and E. purpurea could be unambiguously identified from the cluster analysis. Furthermore, this Echinacea-specific SDA was also able to isolate highly polymorphic retrotransposon sequences. Five out of the eleven most discriminatory features matched to known retrotransposons. This is the first time retrotransposon sequences have been used to fingerprint Echinacea, highlighting the potential of retrotransposons as based molecular markers useful for fingerprinting and studying diversity patterns in Echinacea.

  11. Reconsideration for conservation units of wild Primula sieboldii in Japan based on adaptive diversity and molecular genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuko; Honjo, Masanori; Kitamoto, Naoko; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2009-08-01

    Primula sieboldii E. Morren is a perennial clonal herb that is widely distributed in Japan, but in danger of extinction in the wild. In a previous study, we revealed the genetic diversity of the species using chloroplast and nuclear DNA and used this information to define conservation units. However, we lacked information on adaptive genetic diversity, which is important for long-term survival and, thus, for the definition of conservation units. In order to identify adaptive traits that showed adaptive differentiation among populations, we studied the genetic variation in six quantitative traits within and among populations for 3 years in a common garden using 110 genets from five natural populations from three regions of Japan. The number of days to bud initiation was adaptive quantitative trait for which the degree of genetic differentiation among populations (QST) was considerably larger than that in eight microsatellite markers (FST). The relationship between this trait and environmental factors revealed that the number of days to bud initiation was negatively correlated, with the mean temperature during the growing period at each habitat. This suggests that adaptive differentiation in the delay before bud initiation was caused by selective pressure resulting from temperature differences among habitats. Our results suggest that based on adaptive diversity and neutral genetic diversity, the Saitama population represents a new conservation unit.

  12. Diversity of Molecular Mechanisms Conferring Carbapenem Resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. Al-Agamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study described various molecular and epidemiological characters determining antibiotic resistance patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Methods. A total of 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were isolated from samples collected at a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2011. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, molecular characterization of carbapenem resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were performed. Results. All isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, and more than half were highly resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC > 256 mg/L. Fifteen isolates had MIC values ≥64 mg/L for any of the carbapenems examined. Vietnamese extended-spectrum β-lactamase (VEB-1 (n=16/34 and oxacillinase (OXA-10 (n=14/34 were the most prevalent extended-spectrum β-lactamase and penicillinase, respectively. Verona imipenemase (VIM-1, VIM-2, VIM-4, VIM-11, and VIM-28 and imipenemase (IMP-7 variants were found in metallo-β-lactamase producers. A decrease in outer membrane porin gene (oprD expression was seen in nine isolates, and an increase in efflux pump gene (MexAB expression was detected in five isolates. Six serotypes (O:1, O:4, O:7, O:10, O:11, and O:15 were found among the 34 isolates. The predominant serotype was O:11 (16 isolates, followed by O:15 (nine isolates. PFGE analysis of the 34 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates revealed 14 different pulsotypes. Conclusions. These results revealed diverse mechanisms conferring carbapenem resistance to P. aeruginosa isolates from Saudi Arabia.

  13. Molecular diversity of legume root-nodule bacteria in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Lafay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic relationships between leguminous plants (family Fabaceae and nodule-forming bacteria in Australia native ecosystems remain poorly characterized despite their importance. Most studies have focused on temperate parts of the country, where the use of molecular approaches have already revealed the presence of Bradyrhizobium, Ensifer (formerly Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium and Rhizobium genera of legume root-nodule bacteria. We here provide the first molecular characterization of nodulating bacteria from tropical Australia.45 nodule-forming bacterial strains, isolated from eight native legume hosts at eight locations in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia, were examined for their genetic diversity and phylogenetic position. Using SSU rDNA PCR-RFLPs and phylogenetic analyses, our survey identified nine genospecies, two of which, Bradyrhizobium genospp. B and P, had been previously identified in south-eastern Australia and one, Mesorhizobium genospecies AA, in southern France. Three of the five newly characterized Bradyrhizobium genospecies were more closely related to B. japonicum USDA110, whereas the other two belonged to the B. elkanii group. All five were each more closely related to strains sampled in various tropical areas outside Australia than to strains known to occur in Australia. We also characterized an entirely novel nodule-forming lineage, phylogenetically distant from any previously described rhizobial and non-rhizobial legume-nodulating lineage within the Rhizobiales.Overall, the present results support the hypothesis of tropical areas being centres of biodiversity and diversification for legume root-nodule bacteria and confirm the widespread occurrence of Bradyrhizobium genosp. B in continental Australia.

  14. Molecular diversity and body distribution of saponins in the sea star Asterias rubens by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeyer, Marie; De Winter, Julien; Caulier, Guillaume; Eeckhaut, Igor; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    Saponins are natural molecules that the common sea star Asterias rubens produces in the form of steroid glycosides bearing a sulfate group attached on the aglycone part. In order to highlight the inter-organ and inter-individual variability, the saponin contents of five distinct body components, namely the aboral body wall, the oral body wall, the stomach, the pyloric caeca and the gonads, from different individuals were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry. MALDI-ToF experiments were selected as the primary tool for a rapid screening of the saponin mixtures, whereas LC-MS and LC-MS/MS techniques were used to achieve chromatographic separation of isomers. First of all, our analyses demonstrated that the diversity of saponins is higher than previously reported. Indeed, nine new congeners were observed in addition to the 17 saponins already described in this species. On the basis of all the collected MS/MS data, we also identified collision-induced key-fragmentations that could be used to reconstruct the molecular structure of both known and unknown saponin ions. Secondly, the comparison of the saponin contents from the five different body components revealed that each organ is characterized by a specific mixture of saponins and that between animals there are also qualitative and quantitative variability of the saponin contents which could be linked to the sex or to the collecting season. Therefore, the observed high variability unambiguously confirms that saponins probably fulfill several biological functions in A. rubens. The current results will pave the way for our future studies that will be devoted to the clarification of the biological roles of saponins in A. rubens at a molecular level. © 2013.

  15. Expanding the World of Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin eYilmaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining which microbial taxa are out there, where they live, and what they are doing is a driving approach in marine microbial ecology. The importance of these questions is underlined by concerted, large-scale, and global ocean sampling initiatives, for example the International Census of Marine Microbes, Ocean Sampling Day, or Tara Oceans. Given decades of effort, we know that the large majority of marine Bacteria and Archaea belong to about a dozen phyla. In addition to the classically culturable Bacteria and Archaea, at least 50 clades, at different taxonomic depths, exist. These account for the majority of marine microbial diversity, but there is still an underexplored and less abundant portion remaining. We refer to these hitherto unrecognized clades as unknown, as their boundaries, names, and classifications are not available. In this work, we were able to characterize up to 92 of these unknown clades found within the bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity currently reported for marine water column environments. We mined the SILVA 16S rRNA gene datasets for sequences originating from the marine water column. Instead of the usual subjective taxa delineation and nomenclature methods, we applied the candidate taxonomic unit (CTU circumscription system, along with a standardized nomenclature to the sequences in newly constructed phylogenetic trees. With this new phylogenetic and taxonomic framework, we performed an analysis of ICoMM rRNA gene amplicon datasets to gain insights into the global distribution of the new marine clades, their ecology, biogeography, and interaction with oceanographic variables. Most of the new clades we identified were interspersed by known taxa with cultivated members, whose genome sequences are available. This result encouraged us to perform metabolic predictions for the novel marine clades using the PICRUSt approach. Our work also provides an update on the taxonomy of several phyla and widely known

  16. Endohedral Metallofullerene as Molecular High Spin Qubit: Diverse Rabi Cycles in Gd2@C79N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ziqi; Dong, Bo-Wei; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Jun-Jie; Su, Jie; Yu, Changcheng; Xiong, Jin; Shi, Di-Er; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Bing-Wu; Ardavan, Arzhang; Shi, Zujin; Jiang, Shang-Da; Gao, Song

    2018-01-24

    An anisotropic high-spin qubit with long coherence time could scale the quantum system up. It has been proposed that Grover's algorithm can be implemented in such systems. Dimetallic aza[80]fullerenes M 2 @C 79 N (M = Y or Gd) possess an unpaired electron located between two metal ions, offering an opportunity to manipulate spin(s) protected in the cage for quantum information processing. Herein, we report the crystallographic determination of Gd 2 @C 79 N for the first time. This molecular magnet with a collective high-spin ground state (S = 15/2) generated by strong magnetic coupling (J Gd-Rad = 350 ± 20 cm -1 ) has been unambiguously validated by magnetic susceptibility experiments. Gd 2 @C 79 N has quantum coherence and diverse Rabi cycles, allowing arbitrary superposition state manipulation between each adjacent level. The phase memory time reaches 5 μs at 5 K by dynamic decoupling. This molecule fulfills the requirements of Grover's searching algorithm proposed by Leuenberger and Loss.

  17. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity among vine accessions using DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, A F; Teodoro, P E; Bhering, L L; Tardin, F D; Daher, R F; Campos, W F; Viana, A P; Pereira, M G

    2017-04-13

    Viticulture presents a number of economic and social advantages, such as increasing employment levels and fixing the labor force in rural areas. With the aim of initiating a program of genetic improvement in grapevine from the State University of the state of Rio de Janeiro North Darcy Ribeiro, genetic diversity between 40 genotypes (varieties, rootstock, and species of different subgenera) was evaluated using Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers. We built a matrix of binary data, whereby the presence of a band was assigned as "1" and the absence of a band was assigned as "0." The genetic distance was calculated between pairs of genotypes based on the arithmetic complement from the Jaccard Index. The results revealed the presence of considerable variability in the collection. Analysis of the genetic dissimilarity matrix revealed that the most dissimilar genotypes were Rupestris du Lot and Vitis rotundifolia because they were the most genetically distant (0.5972). The most similar were genotypes 31 (unidentified) and Rupestris du lot, which showed zero distance, confirming the results of field observations. A duplicate was confirmed, consistent with field observations, and a short distance was found between the variety 'Italy' and its mutation, 'Ruby'. The grouping methods used were somewhat concordant.

  18. Diversity and molecular characterization of novel hemoplasmas infecting wild rodents from different Brazilian biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Matos, Carlos Antonio; Fernandes, Simone de Jesus; Olmos, Isabella Delamain Fernandez; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; André, Marcos Rogério

    2015-12-01

    Although hemoplasma infection in domestic animals has been well documented, little is known about the prevalence and genetic diversity of these bacteria in wild rodents. The present work aimed to investigate the occurrence of hemotrophic mycoplasmas in wild rodents from five Brazilian biomes, assessing the 16S rRNA phylogenetic position of hemoplasma species by molecular approach. Spleen tissues were obtained from 500 rodents, comprising 52 different rodent species trapped between 2000 and 2011. DNA samples were submitted to previously described PCR protocols for amplifying Mycoplasma spp. based on 16S rRNA, followed by sequencing and phylogenetic inferences. Among 457 rodent spleen samples showing absence of inhibitors, 100 (21.9%) were PCR positive to Mycoplasma spp. The occurrence of hemotropic mycoplasmas among all sampled rodents was demonstrated in all five biomes and ranged from 9.3% (7/75) to 26.2% (38/145). The Blastn analysis showed that amplified sequences had a percentage of identity ranging from 86 to 99% with other murine hemoplasmas. The ML phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene of 24 positive randomly selected samples showed the presence of ten distinct groups, all clustering within the Mycoplasma haemofelis. The phylogenetic assessment suggests the circulation of novel hemoplasma species in rodents from different biomes in Brazil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic Diversity of Some Tunisian Botrytis cinerea Isolates Using Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. ben Ahmed

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Botrytis cinerea in Tunisia was studied using molecular markers, and the level of resistance to the fungicide fenhexamid was shown. Isolates from different plants (grape, tomato, cucumber, onion, strawberry, gerbera and rose and different parts of the country were analysed in order to determine whether the two groups, transposa and vacuma, that were detected in French vineyards, are also present in Tunisia. A combined PCR and Dot Blot method was developed to identify the transposable elements Boty and Flipper that distinguish between these two B. cinerea groups. Both the transposa and vacuma groups, and isolates containing the transposable element Boty, were found in Tunisia. Moreover, analysis of the Bc-hch locus by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion identified only the B. cinerea group corresponding to one allelic type. Finally, by using the level of resistance shown by B. cinerea to the fungicide fenhexamid as a marker, it was confirmed that this was the only group of B. cinerea in the Tunisian population.

  20. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on molecular diversity of plankton from the Chubut rivers estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, J.M.; Halac, S.; Calvo, A.Y.; Villafane, V.; Jones, L.R.; Helbling, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of a project designed to evaluate the impact of UVR upon estuarine plankton, we present here a molecular analysis of plankton diversity. Water samples were exposed to three radiation treatments (PAR, PAR + UV-A and PAR + UV-A + UV-B) in microcosms for ca 10 days during the Austral summer. At the beginning (t 0 ) and at the end of the experiment samples were filtered 0 through 20, 10, 5 and 0.22 μm pore sizes. The DNA amount retained in each filter indicated that most of the plankton biomass was in the 0.22-5 μm fraction at t0. In contrast, at the end of the experiment this proportion changed according to the radiation treatment and big cells (> 20 μm) dominated. An rDNA library was obtained from the DNA corresponding to the 0.22-5 μm fraction. There was no relationship between treatments and the number and frequency of restriction genotypes. Analyses of 27 clones fraction from t 0 indicated the presence of three genera of Rhodobacteraceae, one genus of Rhodospirillaceae, one SAR11 genus, one genus of Bacillaceae, an unclassified sequences of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Rhodospirillaceae. Also, there were six sequences similar to Ostreococcus tauri (Mamiellales). Even though the sequence analyses are still ongoing, our initial data suggest a big impact of UV-B radiation in the amount and composition of the plankton community towards big cells. (authors)

  1. At Baltic crossroads: a molecular snapshot of Mycobacterium tuberculosis population diversity in Kaliningrad, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrousov, Igor; Otten, Tatiana; Zozio, Thierry; Turkin, Eugeni; Nazemtseva, Vera; Sheremet, Aleksandra; Vishnevsky, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga; Rastogi, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    The Kaliningrad region is the westernmost part of the Russian Federation; it includes an enclave on the Baltic Sea inside the European Union separated from mainland Russia by Lithuania and Poland. The incidence of tuberculosis in Kaliningrad has shown a steady and dramatic increase from 83/100,000 in 2000 to 134/100,000 in 2006; the rate of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-tuberculosis) in the Kaliningrad region was reported to be 30.5% among newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients. This study presents a first molecular snapshot of the population diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in this region. A total of 90 drug-resistant and susceptible M. tuberculosis strains from Kaliningrad were subjected to spoligotyping, 12-locus MIRU typing and mutation analysis of the drug resistance genes rpoB and katG. A comparison with international databases showed that the M. tuberculosis population in this region shares a joint pool of strains with the European part of Russia, and also exhibits a certain affinity with those of its northern European neighbours, such as Poland and Germany. Comparison of the genotyping and drug resistance data emphasized that the high prevalence of the MDR Beijing genotype strains is a major cause of the adverse epidemiological situation of MDR-tuberculosis in the Kaliningrad region.

  2. Molecular Diversity of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles: Impact of Ocean Biology on Particle Composition and Hygroscopicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Laskina, Olga; Trueblood, Jonathan; Estillore, Armando D.; Morris, Holly S.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Sultana, Camile M.; Lee, Christopher; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Dowling, Jackie; Qin, Zhen; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Stone, Elizabeth; Prather, Kimberly; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of sea spray aerosol (SSA) on climate depends on the size and chemical composition of individual particles that make-up the total SSA ensemble. While the organic fraction of SSA has been characterized from a bulk perspective, there remains a lack of understanding as to the composition of individual particles within the SSA ensemble. To better understand the molecular components within SSA particles and how SSA composition changes with ocean biology, simultaneous measurements of seawater and SSA were made during a month-long mesocosm experiment performed in an ocean-atmosphere facility. Herein, we deconvolute the composition of freshly emitted SSA devoid of anthropogenic and terrestrial influences by characterizing classes of organic compounds as well as specific molecules within individual SSA particles. Analysis of SSA particles show that the diversity of molecules within the organic fraction varies between two size fractions (submicron and supermicron) with contributions from fatty acids, monosaccharides, polysaccharides and siliceous material. Significant changes in the distribution of these compounds within individual particles are observed to coincide with the rise and fall of phytoplankton and bacterial populations within the seawater. Furthermore, water uptake is impacted as shown by hygroscopicity measurements of model systems composed of representative organic compounds. Thus, the how changes in the hygroscopic growth of SSA evolves with composition can be elucidated. Overall, this study provides an important connection between biological processes that control the composition of seawater and changes in single particle composition which will enhances our ability to predict the impact of SSA on climate.

  3. Molecular diversity of bacteria in commercially available “Spirulina” food supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Vardaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyanobacterium Arthrospira is among the most well-known food supplements worldwide known as “Spirulina.” While it is a widely recognized health-promoting natural product, there are no reports on the molecular diversity of commercially available brands of “Spirulina” supplements and the occurrence of other cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial microorganisms in these products. In this study, 454-pyrosequencing analysis of the total bacterial occurrence in 31 brands of “Spirulina” dietary supplements from the Greek market was applied for the first time. In all samples, operational taxonomic units (OTUs of Arthrospira platensis were the predominant cyanobacteria. Some products contained additional cyanobacterial OTUs including a few known potentially toxic taxa. Moreover, 469 OTUs were detected in all 31 products collectively, with most of them being related to the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. All samples included heterotrophic bacterial OTUs, ranging from 9–157 per product. Among the most common OTUs were ones closely related to taxa known for causing health issues (i.e., Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Clostridium, Bacillus, Fusobacterium, Enterococcus. The observed high cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial OTUs richness in the final product is a point for further research on the growth and processing of Arthrospira biomass for commercial purposes.

  4. Molecular systematics and undescribed diversity of Madagascan scolecophidian snakes (Squamata: Serpentes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltán T; Marion, Angela B; Glaw, Frank; Miralles, Aurélien; Nopper, Joachim; Vences, Miguel; Hedges, S Blair

    2015-11-10

    We provide an updated molecular phylogenetic analysis of global diversity of typhlopid and xenotyphlopid blindsnakes, adding a set of Madagascan samples and sequences of an additional mitochondrial gene to an existing supermatrix of nuclear and mitochondrial gene segments. Our data suggest monophyly of Madagascan typhlopids, exclusive of introduced Indotyphlops braminus. The Madagascar-endemic typhlopid clade includes two species previously assigned to the genus Lemuriatyphlops (in the subfamily Asiatyphlopinae), which were not each others closest relatives. This contradicts a previous study that described Lemuriatyphlops based on a sequence of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene from a single species and found this species not forming a clade with the other Malagasy species included. Based on our novel phylogenetic assessment we include all species in this endemic typhlopid clade in the genus Madatyphlops and in the subfamily Madatyphlopinae and consider Lemuriatyphlops as junior synonym. Within Madatyphlops, we identify several candidate species. For some of these (those in the M. arenarius complex), our preliminary data suggest sympatric occurrence and morphological differentiation, thus the existence of undescribed species. We also comment on the genus-level classification of several non-Madagascan typhlopids. We suggest that African species included in Madatyphlops (Afrotyphlops calabresii, A. cuneirostris, A. platyrhynchus, and Rhinotyphlops leucocephalus) should not be included in this genus. We furthermore argue that recent claims of Sundatyphlops, Antillotyphlops, and Cubatyphlops being "undiagnosable" or "not monophyletic" were based on errors in tree reconstruction and failure to notice diagnostic characters, and thus regard these three genera as valid.

  5. Global occurrence of archaeal amoA genes in terrestrial hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanlun L; Ye, Qi; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Jinquan; Song, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Weidong; Bagwell, Christopher; Inskeep, William P; Ross, Christian; Gao, Lei; Wiegel, Juergen; Romanek, Christopher S; Shock, Everett L; Hedlund, Brian P

    2008-10-01

    Despite the ubiquity of ammonium in geothermal environments and the thermodynamic favorability of aerobic ammonia oxidation, thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms belonging to the crenarchaeota kingdom have only recently been described. In this study, we analyzed microbial mats and surface sediments from 21 hot spring samples (pH 3.4 to 9.0; temperature, 41 to 86 degrees C) from the United States, China, and Russia and obtained 846 putative archaeal ammonia monooxygenase large-subunit (amoA) gene and transcript sequences, representing a total of 41 amoA operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 2% identity. The amoA gene sequences were highly diverse, yet they clustered within two major clades of archaeal amoA sequences known from water columns, sediments, and soils: clusters A and B. Eighty-four percent (711/846) of the sequences belonged to cluster A, which is typically found in water columns and sediments, whereas 16% (135/846) belonged to cluster B, which is typically found in soils and sediments. Although a few amoA OTUs were present in several geothermal regions, most were specific to a single region. In addition, cluster A amoA genes formed geographic groups, while cluster B sequences did not group geographically. With the exception of only one hot spring, principal-component analysis and UPGMA (unweighted-pair group method using average linkages) based on the UniFrac metric derived from cluster A grouped the springs by location, regardless of temperature or bulk water pH, suggesting that geography may play a role in structuring communities of putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). The amoA genes were distinct from those of low-temperature environments; in particular, pair-wise comparisons between hot spring amoA genes and those from sympatric soils showed less than 85% sequence identity, underscoring the distinctness of hot spring archaeal communities from those of the surrounding soil system. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that amoA genes were

  6. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  7. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlow, Julie Maupin- [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  8. Archaeal Genome Guardians Give Insights into Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Damage Response Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the third domain of life, archaea, like the eukarya and bacteria, must have robust DNA replication and repair complexes to ensure genome fidelity. Archaea moreover display a breadth of unique habitats and characteristics, and structural biologists increasingly appreciate these features. As archaea include extremophiles that can withstand diverse environmental stresses, they provide fundamental systems for understanding enzymes and pathways critical to genome integrity and stress responses. Such archaeal extremophiles provide critical data on the periodic table for life as well as on the biochemical, geochemical, and physical limitations to adaptive strategies allowing organisms to thrive under environmental stress relevant to determining the boundaries for life as we know it. Specifically, archaeal enzyme structures have informed the architecture and mechanisms of key DNA repair proteins and complexes. With added abilities to temperature-trap flexible complexes and reveal core domains of transient and dynamic complexes, these structures provide insights into mechanisms of maintaining genome integrity despite extreme environmental stress. The DNA damage response protein structures noted in this review therefore inform the basis for genome integrity in the face of environmental stress, with implications for all domains of life as well as for biomanufacturing, astrobiology, and medicine.

  9. Elevated ground-level O3 negatively influences paddy methanogenic archaeal community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youzhi; Lin, Xiangui; Yu, Yongchang; Zhang, Huayong; Chu, Haiyan; Zhu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge regarding the effect of global climate change on rice-paddy methane (CH4) emissions is incomplete, partly because information is limited concerning the mechanism of the microbial response to elevated ground-level ozone (O3). A field experiment was conducted in the China Ozone Free-Air Concentration Enrichment facility in a rice–wheat rotation system to investigate the responses of methanogenic archaeal communities to elevated ground-level O3 by culture-independent and -reliant approaches. We found that elevated ground-level O3 inhibited methanogenic activity and influenced the composition of paddy methanogenic communities, reducing the abundance and diversity of paddy methanogens by adversely affecting dominant groups, such as aceticlastic Methanosaeta, especially at the rice tillering stage. Our results indicated that continuously elevated ground-level O3 would negatively influence paddy methanogenic archaeal communities and its critical ecological function. These findings will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the responses and feedbacks of paddy ecosystems to global climate change. PMID:24217205

  10. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  11. Archaeal Populations in Hypersaline Sediments Underlying Orange Microbial Mats in the Napoli Mud Volcano▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the “active” archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano. PMID:21335391

  12. Bacterial and archaeal populations at two shallow hydrothermal vents off Panarea Island (Eolian Islands, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Teresa Luciana; Lentini, Valeria; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Italiano, Francesco; Cousin, Sylvie; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial community thriving at two shallow hydrothermal vents off Panarea Island (Italy). Physico-chemical characteristics of thermal waters were examined in order to establish the effect of the vents on biodiversity of both Bacteria and Archaea. Water and adjacent sediment samples were collected at different times from two vents, characterised by different depth and temperature, and analysed to evaluate total microbial abundances, sulphur-oxidising and thermophilic aerobic bacteria. Total microbial abundances were on average of the order of 10(5) cells ml(-1), expressed as picoplanktonic size fraction. Picophytoplanktonic cells accounted for 0.77-3.83% of the total picoplanktonic cells. The contribution of bacterial and archaeal taxa to prokaryotic community diversity was investigated by PCR-DGGE fingerprinting method. The number of bands derived from bacterial DNA was highest in the DGGE profiles of water sample from the warmest and deepest site (site 2). In contrast, archaeal richness was highest in the water of the coldest and shallowest site (site 1). Sulphur-oxidising bacteria were detected by both culture-dependent and -independent methods. The primary production at the shallow hydrothermal system of Panarea is supported by a complex microbial community composed by phototrophs and chemolithotrophs.

  13. A Survey of Protein Structures from Archaeal Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Dellas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that infect the third domain of life, Archaea, are a newly emerging field of interest. To date, all characterized archaeal viruses infect archaea that thrive in extreme conditions, such as halophilic, hyperthermophilic, and methanogenic environments. Viruses in general, especially those replicating in extreme environments, contain highly mosaic genomes with open reading frames (ORFs whose sequences are often dissimilar to all other known ORFs. It has been estimated that approximately 85% of virally encoded ORFs do not match known sequences in the nucleic acid databases, and this percentage is even higher for archaeal viruses (typically 90%–100%. This statistic suggests that either virus genomes represent a larger segment of sequence space and/or that viruses encode genes of novel fold and/or function. Because the overall three-dimensional fold of a protein evolves more slowly than its sequence, efforts have been geared toward structural characterization of proteins encoded by archaeal viruses in order to gain insight into their potential functions. In this short review, we provide multiple examples where structural characterization of archaeal viral proteins has indeed provided significant functional and evolutionary insight.

  14. Familial relationships in hyperthermo- and acidophilic archaeal viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Lotta Johanna; Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Archaea often live in extreme, harsh environments such as acidic hot springs and hypersaline waters. To date, only two icosahedrally symmetric, membrane-containing archaeal viruses, SH1 and Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), have been described in detail. We report the sequence and three...

  15. Phenological, Nutritional and Molecular Diversity Assessment among 35 Introduced Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. Genotypes Grown in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem S. Alghamdi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological, nutritional and molecular analyses were carried out to assess genetic diversity among 35 introduced lentil genotypes (Lens culinaris Medik.. The genotypes exhibited significant differences for their field parameters and some of them showed noticeable superiority. The nutritional and proximate analysis showed that some genotypes were excellent sources of proteins, essential amino acids, minerals, anti-oxidants, total phenolic contents (TPC and total flavonoid contents (TFC and hence, highlights lentil nutritional and medicinal potential. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP and amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP markers were used to estimate the genetic variability at the molecular level. The existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among the tested lentil genotypes was also proven at the molecular level. A total of 2894 polymorphic SRAP and 1625 AFLP loci were successfully amplified using six SRAP and four AFLP primer pair combinations. Polymorphism information content (PIC values for SRAP and AFLP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the power and higher resolution of those marker systems in detecting molecular diversity. UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis based on molecular data revealed large number of sub clusters among genotypes, indicating high diversity levels. The data presented here showed that FLIP2009-64L and FLIP2009-69L could be used as a significant source of yield, total protein, essential amino acids, and antioxidant properties. The results suggest potential lentil cultivation in the central region of Saudi Arabia for its nutritional and medicinal properties, as well as sustainable soil fertility crop.

  16. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shender, Lisa A.; Lewis, Michael D.; Rejmanek, Daniel; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US) may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections. Methodology/Principle Findings We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles) and northern (Vallecito) California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs), revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes) were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans. Conclusions/Significance Triatoma protracta populations

  17. Molecular diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolated from cattle and buffaloes in East Azerbaijan province based on restriction endonuclease analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jalal shayegh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase information about the molecular diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolated from cattle and buffalo, 2 buffalo and 8 cattle isolates were investigated by Restriction Endonuclease Analysis (REA. REA was performed with Hha-I Endonuclease which established 2 distinct profiles: I and II.  Cattle and buffalo isolates fell into both REA profiles. Contrary to previous studies, the genetic diversity of the isolates was negligible. Considering the similarity of cattle and buffalo isolates is the present study, further studies witch larger samples should be carried out to investigate the possibility of inter-species transmission.

  18. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Senia; Pineda-García, Lelany; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Rastogi, Nalin; Hoffner, Sven E

    2010-08-03

    Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster). Of the 44 shared international types (SITs) identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates.The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%), T (16%), X-clade (6%), Unknown signature (5%) and S (1%). Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%).We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3) with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity.

  19. The bladed Bangiales (Rhodophyta) of the South Eastern Pacific: Molecular species delimitation reveals extensive diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Marie-Laure; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto; Ramírez, María Eliana; Macaya, Erasmo C; Contador, Cristian Bulboa; Woods, Helen; Wyatt, Christopher; Brodie, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    A molecular taxonomic study of the bladed Bangiales of the South Eastern Pacific (coast of Chile) was undertaken based on sequence data of the mitochondrial COI and chloroplast rbcL for 193 specimens collected from Arica (18°S) in the north to South Patagonia (53°S) in the south. The results revealed for the first time that four genera, Porphyra, Pyropia, Fuscifolium and Wildemania were present in the region. Species delimitation was determined based on a combination of a General Mixed Yule Coalescence model (GMYC) and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) coupled with detection of monophyly in tree reconstruction. The overall incongruence between the species delimitation methods within each gene was 29%. The GMYC method led to over-splitting groups, whereas the ABGD method had a tendency to lump groups. Taking a conservative approach to the number of putative species, at least 18 were recognized and, with the exception of the recently described Pyropia orbicularis, all were new to the Chilean flora. Porphyra and Pyropia were the most diverse genera with eight 'species' each, whereas only a 'single' species each was found for Fuscifolium and Wildemania. There was also evidence of recently diverging groups: Wildemania sp. was distinct but very closely related to W. amplissima from the Northern Hemisphere and raises questions in relation to such disjunct distributions. Pyropia orbicularis was very closely related to two other species, making species delimitation very difficult but provides evidence of an incipient speciation. The difference between the 'species' discovered and those previously reported for the region is discussed in relation to the difficulty of distinguishing species based on morphological identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular Diversity of Methanogens in Feedlot Cattle from Ontario and Prince Edward Island, Canada▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, André-Denis G.; Auckland, Clare H.; Lynn, Denis H.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular diversity of rumen methanogens in feedlot cattle and the composition of the methanogen populations in these animals from two geographic locations were investigated using 16S rRNA gene libraries prepared from pooled PCR products from 10 animals in Ontario (127 clones) and 10 animals from Prince Edward Island (114 clones). A total of 241 clones were examined, with Methanobrevibacter ruminantium accounting for more than one-third (85 clones) of the clones identified. From these 241 clones, 23 different 16S rRNA phylotypes were identified. Feedlot cattle from Ontario, which were fed a corn-based diet, revealed 11 phylotypes (38 clones) not found in feedlot cattle from Prince Edward Island, whereas the Prince Edward Island cattle, which were fed potato by-products as a finishing diet, had 7 phylotypes (42 clones) not found in cattle from Ontario. Five sequences, representing the remaining 161 clones (67% of the clones), were common in both herds. Of the 23 different sequences, 10 sequences (136 clones) were 89.8 to 100% similar to those from cultivated methanogens belonging to the orders Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales, and the remaining 13 sequences (105 clones) were 74.1 to 75.8% similar to those from Thermoplasma volcanium and Thermoplasma acidophilum. Overall, nine possible new species were identified from the two clone libraries, including two new species belonging to the order Methanobacteriales and a new genus/species within the order Methanosarcinales. From the present survey, it is difficult to conclude whether the geographical isolation between these two herds or differences between the two finishing diets directly influenced community structure in the rumen. Further studies are warranted to properly assess the differences between these two finishing diets. PMID:17483285

  1. Molecular diversity of combined and complex dystonia: insights from diagnostic exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Michael; Jech, Robert; Wagner, Matias; Mantel, Tobias; Boesch, Sylvia; Nocker, Michael; Jochim, Angela; Berutti, Riccardo; Havránková, Petra; Fečíková, Anna; Kemlink, David; Roth, Jan; Strom, Tim M; Poewe, Werner; Růžička, Evžen; Haslinger, Bernhard; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2017-12-01

    Combined and complex dystonias are heterogeneous movement disorders combining dystonia with other motor and/or systemic signs. Although we are beginning to understand the diverse molecular causes of these disease entities, clinical pattern recognition and conventional genetic workup achieve an etiological diagnosis only in a minority of cases. Our goal was to provide a window into the variable genetic origins and distinct clinical patterns of combined/complex dystonia more broadly. Between August 2016 and January 2017, we applied whole-exome sequencing to a cohort of nine patients with varied combined and/or complex dystonic presentations, being on a diagnostic odyssey. Bioinformatics analyses, co-segregation studies, and sequence-interpretation algorithms were employed to detect causative mutations. Comprehensive clinical review was undertaken to define the phenotypic spectra and optimal management strategies. On average, we observed a delay in diagnosis of 23 years before whole-exome analysis enabled determination of each patient's genetic defect. Whereas mutations in ACTB, ATP1A3, ADCY5, and SGCE were associated with particular phenotypic clues, trait manifestations arising from mutations in PINK1, MRE11A, KMT2B, ATM, and SLC6A1 were different from those previously reported in association with these genes. Apart from improving counseling for our entire cohort, genetic findings had actionable consequences on preventative measures and therapeutic interventions for five patients. Our investigation confirms unique genetic diagnoses, highlights key clinical features and phenotypic expansions, and suggests whole-exome sequencing as a first-tier diagnostic for combined/complex dystonia. These results might stimulate independent teams to extend the scope of agnostic genetic screening to this particular phenotypic group that remains poorly characterized through existing studies.

  2. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghebremichael Solomon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster. Of the 44 shared international types (SITs identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%, T (16%, X-clade (6%, Unknown signature (5% and S (1%. Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%. We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3 with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity.

  3. Molecular diversity of Wolbachia in Lepidoptera: Prevalent allelic content and high recombination of MLST genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinsky, Yury; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia are common endosymbiotic bacteria of Arthropoda and Nematoda that are ordinarily transmitted vertically in host lineages through the egg cytoplasm. Despite the great interest in the Wolbachia symbiont, many issues of its biology remain unclear, including its evolutionary history, routes of transfer among species, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the symbiont's effect on its host. In this report, we present data relating to Wolbachia infection in 120 species of 13 Lepidoptera families, mostly butterflies, from West Siberian localities based on Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and the wsp locus and perform a comprehensive survey of the distribution of Wolbachia and its genetic diversity in Lepidoptera worldwide. We observed a high infection incidence in the studied region; this finding is probably also true for other temperate latitude regions because many studied species have broad Palearctic and even Holarctic distribution. Although 40 new MLST alleles and 31 new STs were described, there was no noticeable difference in the MLST allele content in butterflies and probably also in moths worldwide. A genetic analysis of Wolbachia strains revealed the MLST allele core in lepidopteran hosts worldwide, viz. the ST-41 allele content. The key finding of our study was the detection of rampant recombination among MLST haplotypes. High rates of homologous recombination between Wolbachia strains indicate a substantial contribution of genetic exchanges to the generation of new STs. This finding should be considered when discussing issues related to the reconstruction of Wolbachia evolution, divergence time, and the routes of Wolbachia transmission across arthropod hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus in Mar del Plata city, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbini, Luciana; Elizalde, Mercedes; Torres, Carolina; Campos, Rodolfo

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the current molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of HBV in Mar del Plata, an important Argentinean touristic city. The phylogenetic analysis of 29 HBV DNA positive serum samples showed that F1b was the predominant subgenotype (sgt, 62.1%), followed by sgt A2 (13.8%) and sgt F4, gt D and gt G (6.9% each). Among anti-HBc IgM positive samples, 75.0% were sgt F1b, followed by sgt F4 (12.5%), sgt A2 (6.25%) and sgt D (6.25%). Three recombinant full length genomes were found: two G/F1b (some of the first gt G detected in Argentina) and one F4/D2. The circulation of clinical important mutations in the city was described. Mutations at the HBsAg were detected in 34.5% of the analyzed samples, associated with laboratory diagnosis and antiviral treatment failures, immune escape and hepatocellular carcinoma. Most of the samples presented wild type BCP/PC sequences. Coalescence analysis for the most prevalent sgt F1b estimated that the diversification mainly occured during mid '90s and the tMRCA was estimated in 1987. Finally, the high presence of the autochthonous sgt F1b, associated with the anti-HBc IgM positive infection and its present-day diversification process, shows the strong impact of internal human migratory movements into the current population of Mar del Plata. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis persists as a public health problem in Honduras. A better knowledge of the molecular characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains will contribute to understand the transmission dynamics of the disease within the country. The aim of this study was to provide an insight of the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Honduras between 1994 and 2002. Genotyping was performed using spoligotyping and RFLP. The spoligotypes obtained were compared with the SITVIT2 proprietary database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results Spoligotyping grouped 84% of the isolates into 27 clusters (2 to 43 strains per cluster). Of the 44 shared international types (SITs) identified among the Honduran stains, 8 SITs were newly identified either within the present study or after match with an orphan type previously identified in the SITVIT2 database. In addition, 16 patterns corresponded to orphan, previously unreported isolates. The Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage was the most common in this study; 55% of the strains belonged to this family. Other genotypes found were Haarlem (16%), T (16%), X-clade (6%), Unknown signature (5%) and S (1%). Only one Beijing strain was identified (0.5%). We observed a high degree of diversity after characterizing the 43 isolates belonging to the main spoligotyping cluster (SIT 33, LAM3) with IS6110-RFLP. A total of 35 different RFLP-fingerprints were detected, of which 6 patterns corresponded to the same number of clusters comprising 14 strains. Conclusions The findings obtained in this study show that tuberculosis transmission in Honduras is due to modern M. tuberculosis lineages with high level of biodiversity. PMID:20678242

  6. Molecular structure and diversity of PBAN/Pyrokinin family peptides in ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yeon eChoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most well studied physiological function is regulation of moth sex pheromone biosynthesis through the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neurohormone (PBAN, although several developmental functions have also been reported. Over the past years we have extended knowledge of the PBAN/pyrokinin family of peptides to ants, focusing mainly on the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The fire ant is one of the most studied social insects and over the last 60 years a great deal has been learned about many aspects of this ant, including the behaviors and chemistry of pheromone communication. However, virtually nothing is known about the regulation of these pheromone systems. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of PBAN/pyrokinin immunoreactive neurons in the fire ant, and identified and characterized PBAN and additional neuropeptides. We have mapped the fire ant PBAN gene structure and determined the tissue expression level in the central nervous system of the ant. We review here our research to date on the molecular structure and diversity of ant PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in preparation for determining the function of the neuropeptides in ants and other social insects.

  7. Insights into archaeal evolution and symbiosis from the genomes of a Nanoarchaeon and its crenarchaeal host from Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Koonin, Eugene [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Wolf, Yuri [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Makarova, Kira S. [National Center for Biotechnology Information

    2013-01-01

    A hyperthemophilic member of the Nanoarchaeota from Obsidian Pool, a thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park was characterized using single cell isolation and sequencing, together with its putative host, a Sulfolobales archaeon. This first representative of a non-marine Nanoarchaeota (Nst1) resembles Nanoarchaeum equitans by lacking most biosynthetic capabilities, the two forming a deep-branching archaeal lineage. However, the Nst1 genome is over 20% larger, encodes a complete gluconeogenesis pathway and a full complement of archaeal flagellum proteins. Comparison of the two genomes suggests that the marine and terrestrial Nanoarchaeota lineages share a common ancestor that was already a symbiont of another archaeon. With a larger genome, a smaller repertoire of split protein encoding genes and no split non-contiguous tRNAs, Nst1 appears to have experienced less severe genome reduction than N. equitans. The inferred host of Nst1 is potentially autotrophic, with a streamlined genome and simplified central and energetic metabolism as compared to other Sulfolobales. The two distinct Nanoarchaeota-host genomic data sets offer insights into the evolution of archaeal symbiosis and parasitism and will further enable studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these relationships.

  8. Bacterial and Archaeal Lipids Recovered from Subsurface Evaporites of Dalangtan Playa on the Tibetan Plateau and Their Astrobiological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ziye; Xiao, Long; Wang, Hongmei; Yang, Huan; Li, Jingjing; Huang, Ting; Xu, Yi; Ma, Nina

    2017-11-01

    Qaidam Basin (Tibetan Plateau) is considered an applicable analogue to Mars with regard to sustained extreme aridity and abundant evaporites. To investigate the possibility of the preservation of microbial lipids under these Mars analog conditions, we conducted a mineralogical and organic geochemistry study on samples collected from two Quaternary sections in Dalangtan Playa, northwestern Qaidam Basin, which will enhance our understanding of the potential preservation of molecular biomarkers on Mars. Two sedimentary units were identified along two profiles: one salt unit characterized by a predominance of gypsum and halite, and one detrital unit with a decrease of gypsum and halite and enrichment in siliciclastic minerals. Bacterial fatty acids and archaeal acyclic diether and tetraether membrane lipids were detected, and they varied throughout the sections in concentration and abundance. Bacterial and archaeal biomolecules indicate a dominance of Gram-positive bacteria and halophilic archaea in this hypersaline ecosystem that is similar to those in other hypersaline environments. Furthermore, the abundance of bacterial lipids decreases with the increase of salinity, whereas archaeal lipids showed a reverse trend. The detection of microbial lipids in hypersaline environments would indicate, for example on Mars, a high potential for the detection of microbial biomarkers in evaporites over geological timescales.

  9. Reorganization of the bacterial and archaeal populations associated with organic loading conditions in a thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Haruta, Shin; Sasaki, Daisuke; Hanajima, Dai; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ogata, Atsushi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    Organic loading conditions are an important factor influencing reactor performances in methanogenic bioreactors. Yet the underlying microbiological basis of the process stability, deterioration, and recovery remains to be understood. Here, structural responses of the bacterial and archaeal populations to the change of organic loading conditions in a thermophilic anaerobic digester were investigated by process analyses and 16S rRNA gene-based molecular approaches. The biogas was produced stably without the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) at low organic loading rates (OLRs) in the beginning of reactor operation. Increasing OLR in stages disrupted the stable reactor performance, and high OLR conditions continued the deteriorated performance with slight biogas production and high accumulation of VFAs. Thereafter, the gradual decrease of OLR resulted in the recovery from the deterioration, giving rise to the stable performance again. The stable performances before and after the high OLR conditions conducted were associated with compositionally similar but not identical methanogenic consortia. The bacterial and archaeal populations were synchronously changed at both the transient phases toward the deteriorated performance and in recovery process, during which the dynamic shift of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens including the recently identified Methanomassiliicoccus might contribute to the maintenance of the methanogenic activity. The distinctive bacterial population with a high predominance of Methanobacterium formicicum as archaeal member was found for the deteriorated performance. The results in this study indicate the coordinated reorganization of the bacterial and archaeal populations in response to functional states induced by the change of organic loading conditions in the anaerobic digester. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Unlocking the black box of feather louse diversity: A molecular phylogeny of the hyper-diverse genus Brueelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Sarah E; Weckstein, Jason D; Gustafsson, Daniel R; Allen, Julie; DiBlasi, Emily; Shreve, Scott M; Boldt, Rachel; Skeen, Heather R; Johnson, Kevin P

    2016-01-01

    Songbirds host one of the largest, and most poorly understood, groups of lice: the Brueelia-complex. The Brueelia-complex contains nearly one-tenth of all known louse species (Phthiraptera), and the genus Brueelia has over 300 species. To date, revisions have been confounded by extreme morphological variation, convergent evolution, and periodic movement of lice between unrelated hosts. Here we use Bayesian inference based on mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (EF-1α) gene fragments to analyze the phylogenetic relationships among 333 individuals within the Brueelia-complex. We show that the genus Brueelia, as it is currently recognized, is paraphyletic. Many well-supported and morphologically unified clades within our phylogenetic reconstruction of Brueelia were previously described as genera. These genera should be recognized, and the erection of several new genera should be explored. We show that four distinct ecomorphs have evolved repeatedly within the Brueelia-complex, mirroring the evolutionary history of feather-lice across the entire order. We show that lice in the Brueelia-complex, with some notable exceptions, are extremely host specific and that the host family associations and geographic distributions of these lice are significantly correlated with our understanding of their phylogenetic history. Several ecological phenomena, including phoresis, may be responsible for the macroevolutionary patterns in this diverse group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutamate synthase: An archaeal horizontal gene transfer?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (GOGAT) which is a key enzyme in ammonia assimilation in bacteria, algae and plants. It catalyzes the reductive transamidation of amido nitrogen from glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form two molecules of glutamate (Temple et al 1998). Glutamate synthases differ according to their molecular weights, subunit compositions, ...

  12. CRISPR-mediated defense mechanisms in the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Andrea; Schleper, Christa

    2013-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-mediated virus defense based on small RNAs is a hallmark of archaea and also found in many bacteria. Archaeal genomes and, in particular, organisms of the extremely thermoacidophilic genus Sulfolobus, carry extensive CRISPR loci each with dozens of sequence signatures (spacers) able to mediate targeting and degradation of complementary invading nucleic acids. The diversity of CRISPR systems and their associated protein complexes indicates an extensive functional breadth and versatility of this adaptive immune system. Sulfolobus solfataricus and S. islandicus represent two of the best characterized genetic model organisms in the archaea not only with respect to the CRISPR system. Here we address and discuss in a broader context particularly recent progress made in understanding spacer recruitment from foreign DNA, production of small RNAs, in vitro activity of CRISPR-associated protein complexes and attack of viruses and plasmids in in vivo test systems. PMID:23535277

  13. Marine archaea and archaeal viruses under global change [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Danovaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Global change is altering oceanic temperature, salinity, pH, and oxygen concentration, directly and indirectly influencing marine microbial food web structure and function. As microbes represent >90% of the ocean’s biomass and are major drivers of biogeochemical cycles, understanding their responses to such changes is fundamental for predicting the consequences of global change on ecosystem functioning. Recent findings indicate that marine archaea and archaeal viruses are active and relevant components of marine microbial assemblages, far more abundant and diverse than was previously thought. Further research is urgently needed to better understand the impacts of global change on virus–archaea dynamics and how archaea and their viruses can interactively influence the ocean’s feedbacks on global change.

  14. Patient-Derived Gastric Carcinoma Xenograft Mouse Models Faithfully Represent Human Tumor Molecular Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwei Zhang

    Full Text Available Patient-derived cancer xenografts (PDCX generally represent more reliable models of human disease in which to evaluate a potential drugs preclinical efficacy. However to date, only a few patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft (PDGCX models have been reported. In this study, we aimed to establish additional PDGCX models and to evaluate whether these models accurately reflected the histological and genetic diversities of the corresponding patient tumors. By engrafting fresh patient gastric cancer (GC tissues into immune-compromised mice (SCID and/or nude mice, thirty two PDGCX models were established. Histological features were assessed by a qualified pathologist based on H&E staining. Genomic comparison was performed for several biomarkers including ERBB1, ERBB2, ERBB3, FGFR2, MET and PTEN. These biomarkers were profiled to assess gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and/or protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC. All 32 PDGCX models retained the histological features of the corresponding human tumors. Furthermore, among the 32 models, 78% (25/32 highly expressed ERBB1 (EGFR, 22% (7/32 were ERBB2 (HER2 positive, 78% (25/32 showed ERBB3 (HER3 high expression, 66% (21/32 lost PTEN expression, 3% (1/32 harbored FGFR2 amplification, 41% (13/32 were positive for MET expression and 16% (5/32 were MET gene amplified. Between the PDGCX models and their parental tumors, a high degree of similarity was observed for FGFR2 and MET gene amplification, and also for ERBB2 status (agreement rate = 94~100%; kappa value = 0.81~1. Protein expression of PTEN and MET also showed moderate agreement (agreement rate = 78%; kappa value = 0.46~0.56, while ERBB1 and ERBB3 expression showed slight agreement (agreement rate = 59~75%; kappa value = 0.18~0.19. ERBB2 positivity, FGFR2 or MET gene amplification was all maintained until passage 12 in mice. The stability of the molecular profiles observed across subsequent passages within the

  15. Expanding Diversity in Molecular Structures and Functions of the IL-6/IL-12 Heterodimeric Cytokine Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Hasegawa

    2016-11-01

    , promiscuity within the IL-6/IL-12 family cytokines complicates structural and functional clarification and assignment of individual cytokines. A better understanding of the recent advances and expanding diversity in molecular structures and functions of the IL-6/IL-12 family cytokines could allow the creation of novel therapeutic strategies by using them as tools and targeted molecules.

  16. Genetic diversity of archaea in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, K; Horikoshi, K

    1999-08-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of naturally occurring archaeal communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments was carried out by PCR-mediated small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) sequencing. As determined through partial sequencing of rDNA clones amplified with archaea-specific primers, the archaeal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments showed a great genetic diversity, and most members of these populations appeared to be uncultivated and unidentified organisms. In the phylogenetic analysis, a number of rDNA sequences obtained from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were placed in deep lineages of the crenarchaeotic phylum prior to the divergence of cultivated thermophilic members of the crenarchaeota or between thermophilic members of the euryarchaeota and members of the methanogen-halophile clade. Whole cell in situ hybridization analysis suggested that some microorganisms of novel phylotypes predicted by molecular phylogenetic analysis were likely present in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments. These findings expand our view of the genetic diversity of archaea in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments and of the phylogenetic organization of archaea.

  17. Seasonality in molecular and cytometric diversity of marine bacterioplankton: the reshuffling of bacterial taxa by vertical mixing

    KAUST Repository

    García, Francisca C.

    2015-07-17

    The ’cytometric diversity’ of phytoplankton communities has been studied based on single-cell properties, but the applicability of this method to characterize bacterioplankton has been unexplored. Here, we analysed seasonal changes in cytometric diversity of marine bacterioplankton along a decadal time-series at three coastal stations in the Southern Bay of Biscay. Shannon-Weaver diversity estimates and Bray-Curtis similarities obtained by cytometric and molecular (16S rRNA tag sequencing) methods were significantly correlated in samples from a 3.5-year monthly time-series. Both methods showed a consistent cyclical pattern in the diversity of surface bacterial communities with maximal values in winter. The analysis of the highly resolved flow cytometry time-series across the vertical profile showed that water column mixing was a key factor explaining the seasonal changes in bacterial composition and the winter increase in bacterial diversity in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and short processing time as compared to genetic methods, the cytometric diversity approach represents a useful complementary tool in the macroecology of aquatic microbes.

  18. Archaeal lipids in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ann-Christin; Jensen, Sara M; Fricker, Gert

    2017-01-01

    tetraether lipids. The inherent chemical stability and unique membrane-spanning characteristics of tetraether lipids render them interesting for oral drug delivery purposes. Archaeal lipids form liposomes spontaneously (archaeosomes) and may be incorporated in conventional liposomes (mixed vesicles). Both...... types of liposomes are promising to protect their drug cargo, such as therapeutic peptides, against the acidic environment of the stomach and proteolytic degradation in the intestine. They appear to withstand lipolytic enzymes and bile salts and may thus deliver orally administered therapeutic peptides...... to distant sections of the intestine or to the colon, where they may be absorbed, eventually by the help of absorption enhancers. Archaeal lipids and their semisynthetic derivatives may thus serve as biological source for the next generation oral drug delivery systems. The aim of this review is to present...

  19. Cryo-EM Structure of the Archaeal 50S Ribosomal Subunit in Complex with Initiation Factor 6 and Implications for Ribosome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J.; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Crnkovic, Ana; Ibba, Michael; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana; Ban, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into proteins by the ribosome is universally conserved in all cellular life. The composition and complexity of the translation machinery differ markedly between the three domains of life. Organisms from the domain Archaea show an intermediate level of complexity, sharing several additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in complex with archaeal IF6 at 6.6 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy (EM). The structure provides detailed architectural insights into the 50S ribosomal subunit from a methanogenic archaeon through identification of the rRNA expansion segments and ribosomal proteins that are shared between this archaeal ribosome and eukaryotic ribosomes but are mostly absent in bacteria and in some archaeal lineages. Furthermore, the structure reveals that, in spite of highly divergent evolutionary trajectories of the ribosomal particle and the acquisition of novel functions of IF6 in eukaryotes, the molecular binding of IF6 on the ribosome is conserved between eukaryotes and archaea. The structure also provides a snapshot of the reductive evolution of the archaeal ribosome and offers new insights into the evolution of the translation system in archaea. PMID:22306461

  20. Processes Underpinning Development and Maintenance of Diversity in Rice in West Africa: Evidence from Combining Morphological and Molecular Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Harro; Richards, Paul; Struik, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the interplay of artificial and natural selection in rice adaptation in low-input farming systems in West Africa. Using 20 morphological traits and 176 molecular markers, 182 farmer varieties of rice (Oryza spp.) from 6 West African countries were characterized. Principal component analysis showed that the four botanical groups (Oryza sativa ssp. indica, O. sativa ssp. japonica, O. glaberrima, and interspecific farmer hybrids) exhibited different patterns of morphological diversity. Regarding O. glaberrima, morphological and molecular data were in greater conformity than for the other botanical groups. A clear difference in morphological features was observed between O. glaberrima rices from the Togo hills and those from the Upper Guinea Coast, and among O. glaberrima rices from the Upper Guinea Coast. For the other three groups such clear patterns were not observed. We argue that this is because genetic diversity is shaped by different environmental and socio-cultural selection pressures. For O. glaberrima, recent socio-cultural selection pressures seemed to restrict genetic diversity while this was not observed for the other botanical groups. We also show that O. glaberrima still plays an important role in the selection practices of farmers and resulting variety development pathways. This is particularly apparent in the case of interspecific farmer hybrids where a relationship was found between pericarp colour, panicle attitude and genetic diversity. Farmer varieties are the product of long and complex trajectories of selection governed by local human agency. In effect, rice varieties have emerged that are adapted to West African farming conditions through genotype × environment × society interactions. The diversity farmers maintain in their rice varieties is understood to be part of a risk-spreading strategy that also facilitates successful and often serendipitous variety innovations. We advocate, therefore, that farmers and farmer varieties should

  1. Processes underpinning development and maintenance of diversity in rice in West Africa: evidence from combining morphological and molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Mokuwa

    Full Text Available We assessed the interplay of artificial and natural selection in rice adaptation in low-input farming systems in West Africa. Using 20 morphological traits and 176 molecular markers, 182 farmer varieties of rice (Oryza spp. from 6 West African countries were characterized. Principal component analysis showed that the four botanical groups (Oryza sativa ssp. indica, O. sativa ssp. japonica, O. glaberrima, and interspecific farmer hybrids exhibited different patterns of morphological diversity. Regarding O. glaberrima, morphological and molecular data were in greater conformity than for the other botanical groups. A clear difference in morphological features was observed between O. glaberrima rices from the Togo hills and those from the Upper Guinea Coast, and among O. glaberrima rices from the Upper Guinea Coast. For the other three groups such clear patterns were not observed. We argue that this is because genetic diversity is shaped by different environmental and socio-cultural selection pressures. For O. glaberrima, recent socio-cultural selection pressures seemed to restrict genetic diversity while this was not observed for the other botanical groups. We also show that O. glaberrima still plays an important role in the selection practices of farmers and resulting variety development pathways. This is particularly apparent in the case of interspecific farmer hybrids where a relationship was found between pericarp colour, panicle attitude and genetic diversity. Farmer varieties are the product of long and complex trajectories of selection governed by local human agency. In effect, rice varieties have emerged that are adapted to West African farming conditions through genotype × environment × society interactions. The diversity farmers maintain in their rice varieties is understood to be part of a risk-spreading strategy that also facilitates successful and often serendipitous variety innovations. We advocate, therefore, that farmers and

  2. Global analysis of viral infection in an archaeal model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid S. Maaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin and evolutionary relationship of viruses is poorly understood. This makes archaeal virus-host of particular interest because the hosts generally root near the base of phylogenetic trees, while some of the viruses have clear structural similarities to those that infect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Despite the advantageous position for use in evolutionary studies, little is known about archaeal viruses or how they interact with their hosts, compared to viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, many archaeal viruses have been isolated from extreme environments and present a unique opportunity for elucidating factors that are important for existence at the extremes.. In this article we focus on virus-host interactions using a proteomics approach to study Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2. Using cultures grown from the ATCC cell stock, a single cycle of STIV infection was sampled 6 times over a 72 hr period. More than 700 proteins were identified throughout the course of the experiments. Seventy one host proteins were found to change by nearly two-fold (p<0.05 with 40 becoming more abundant and 31 less abundant. The modulated proteins represent 30 different cell pathways and 14 COG groups. 2D gel analysis showed that changes in post translational modifications were a common feature of the affected proteins. The results from these studies showed that the prokaryotic antiviral adaptive immune system CRISPR associated proteins (CAS proteins were regulated in response to the virus infection. It was found that regulated proteins come from mRNAs with a shorter than average half-life. In addition, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP profiling on 2D gels showed caspase, hydrolase and tyrosine phosphatase enzyme activity labeling at the protein isoform level. Together, this data provides a more detailed global view of archaeal cellular responses to viral infection, demonstrates the

  3. Characterizing Novel Archaeal Lineages in Salton Sea Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarn, J.; Valentine, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Biological communities in extreme environments are often dominated by microorganisms of the domain Archaea. Abundant microbial assemblages of this group are found in the hottest, saltiest, and most thermodynamically-limited ecosystems on earth. These taxing surroundings are thought to impose a state of chronic energy stress on resident organisms due to high costs of cellular maintenance relative to resource availability. Even in more temperate settings, Archaea are regularly associated with low-nutrient lifestyles, reflecting their adaptation to extreme, biologically-limiting conditions, which may be an ancestral, domain-wide trait. In this study, we seek to characterize the Archaeal community of the Salton Sea, where members of this domain are novel and highly abundant. Previous work by Swan et al. in 2010 showed that gradients in salinity, sulfate, carbon and nitrogen across sediment horizons of the Salton Sea are linked to changes in Archaeal dominance and community structure. In light of recent taxonomic revisions of the domain, I reclassified the 107 published small subunit rRNA Archaeal sequences from the 2010 study using updated reference databases. The majority of these Euryarchaeal sequences were reassigned to the so-called DPANN superphylum, with Pacearchaeota-related sequences being very abundant in shallow, organic-rich sediments. In deeper, energy-limited strata, several groups of Bathyarchaeota and one divergent DPANN clade were dominant. Ongoing metagenomic work on these sediment communities is being used to assemble genomes of these novel Archaeal groups. These results will help define genomic adaptations of Salton Sea Archaea to varying levels of energy stress as well as inform future cultivation efforts.

  4. Phylogenetic diversity of insecticolous fusaria inferred from multilocus DNA sequence data and their molecular identification via FUSARIUM-ID and Fusarium MLST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donnell, K.; Humber, R.A.; Geiser, D.M.; Kang, S.; Robert, V.; Park, B.; Crous, P.W.; Johnston, P.; Aoki, T.; Rooney, A.P.; Rehner, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    We constructed several multilocus DNA sequence datasets to assess the phylogenetic diversity of insecticolous fusaria, especially focusing on those housed at the Agricultural Research Service Collection of Entomopathogenic Fungi (ARSEF), and to aid molecular identifications of unknowns via the

  5. Phylogenetic diversity of insecticolous fusaria inferred from multilocus DNA sequence data and their molecular identification via FUSARIUM-ID and Fusarium MLST

    Science.gov (United States)

    We constructed several multilocus Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence datasets to assess the phylogenetic diversity of insecticolous fusaria, especially focusing on those housed in the Agricultural Research Service Collection of Entomopathogenic Fungi (ARSEF), and to facilitate molecular identifica...

  6. Structural and genomic properties of the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus ATV with an extracellular stage of the reproductive cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, David; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Häring, Monika

    2006-01-01

    a periodic structure. Tail development produces a one half reduction in the volume of the virion, concurrent with a slight expansion of the virion surface. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome contains 62,730 bp and is exceptional for a crenarchaeal virus in that it carries four putative transposable...... elements as well as genes, which previously have been associated only with archaeal self-transmissable plasmids. In total, it encodes 72 predicted proteins, including 11 structural proteins with molecular masses in the range of 12 to 90 kDa. Several of the larger proteins are rich in coiled coil and/or low...

  7. Controls on bacterial and archaeal community structure and greenhouse gas production in natural, mined, and restored Canadian peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBasiliko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Northern peatlands are important global C reservoirs, largely because of their slow rates of microbial C mineralization. Particularly in sites that are heavily influenced by anthropogenic disturbances, there is scant information about microbial ecology and whether or not microbial community structure influences greenhouse gas production. This work characterized communities of bacteria and archaea using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and functional genes across eight natural, mined, or restored peatlands in two locations in eastern Canada. Correlations were explored among chemical properties of peat, bacterial and archaeal community structure, and carbon dioxide and methane production rates under oxic and anoxic conditions. Bacteria and archaea similar to those found in other peat soil environments were detected. In contrast to other reports, methanogen diversity was low in our study, with only 2 groups of known or suspected methanogens. Although mining and restoration affected substrate availability and microbial activity, these land-uses did not consistently affect bacterial or archaeal community composition. In fact, larger differences were observed between the two locations and between oxic and anoxic peat samples than between mined and restored sites, with anoxic samples characterized by less detectable bacterial diversity and stronger dominance by members of the phylum Acidobacteria. There were also no apparent strong linkages between prokaryote community structure and methane or carbon dioxide production, suggesting that different organisms exhibit functional redundancy and/or that the same taxa function at very different rates when exposed to different peat substrates. In contrast to other earlier work focusing on fungal communities across similar mined and restored peatlands, bacterial and archaeal communities appeared to be more resistant or resilient to peat substrate changes brought

  8. Cultivation Versus Molecular Analysis of Banana (Musa sp.) Shoot-Tip Tissue Reveals Enormous Diversity of Normally Uncultivable Endophytic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pious; Sekhar, Aparna Chandra

    2017-05-01

    The interior of plants constitutes a unique environment for microorganisms with various organisms inhabiting as endophytes. Unlike subterranean plant parts, aboveground parts are relatively less explored for endophytic microbial diversity. We employed a combination of cultivation and molecular approaches to study the endophytic bacterial diversity in banana shoot-tips. Cultivable bacteria from 20 sucker shoot-tips of cv. Grand Naine included 37 strains under 16 genera and three phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes). 16S rRNA gene-ribotyping approach on 799f and 1492r PCR-amplicons to avoid plant organelle sequences was ineffective showing limited bacterial diversity. 16S rRNA metagene profiling targeting the V3-V4 hypervariable region after filtering out the chloroplast (74.2 %), mitochondrial (22.9 %), and unknown sequences (1.1 %) revealed enormous bacterial diversity. Proteobacteria formed the predominant phylum (64 %) succeeded by Firmicutes (12.1 %), Actinobacteria (9.5 %), Bacteroidetes (6.4 %), Planctomycetes, Cyanobacteria, and minor shares (banana shoot-tips (20 phyla, 46 classes) with about 2.6 % of the deciphered 269 genera and 1.5 % of the 656 observed species from the same source of shoot-tips attained through cultivation. The predominant genera included several agriculturally important bacteria. The study reveals an immense ecosystem of endophytic bacteria in banana shoot tissues endorsing the earlier documentation of intracellular "Cytobacts" and "Peribacts" with possible roles in plant holobiome and hologenome.

  9. Fish pathogens near the Arctic Circle: molecular, morphological and ecological evidence for unexpected diversity of Diplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomidae) in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Costa, Isabel; Faltýnková, Anna; Georgieva, Simona; Skírnisson, Karl; Scholz, Tomáš; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2014-09-01

    Host-parasite systems at high latitudes are promising model systems for detecting and predicting the impact of accelerated environmental change. A major challenge is the lack of baselines for the diversity and distribution of parasites in Arctic wildlife, especially in the freshwater environment. Here we present the first known estimates of the species diversity and host associations of Diplostomum spp. in sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystems of the Palaearctic. Our analyses integrating different analytical approaches, phylogenies based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, estimates of genetic divergence, character-based barcoding, morphological examination, precise detection of microhabitat specialisation and host use, led to the discovery of one described and five putative new species that complete their life-cycles within a fairly narrow geographic area in Iceland. This increases the species richness of Diplostomum in Iceland by 200% and raises the number of molecularly characterised species from the Palaearctic to 17 species. Our results suggest that the diversity of Diplostomum spp. is underestimated globally in the high latitude ecosystems and call for a cautionary approach to pathogen identification in developing the much needed baselines of pathogen diversity that may help detect effects of climate change in the freshwater environment of the sub-Arctic. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diversity-dependence brings molecular phylogenies closer to agreement with the fossil record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Haegeman, Bart; Stadler, Tanja; Aze, Tracy; Pearson, Paul N.; Purvis, Andy; Phillimore, Albert B.

    2012-01-01

    The branching times of molecular phylogenies allow us to infer speciation and extinction dynamics even when fossils are absent. Troublingly, phylogenetic approaches usually return estimates of zero extinction, conflicting with fossil evidence. Phylogenies and fossils do agree, however, that there

  11. The evolutionary history of protein fold families and proteomes confirms that the archaeal ancestor is more ancient than the ancestors of other superkingdoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung Mo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The entire evolutionary history of life can be studied using myriad sequences generated by genomic research. This includes the appearance of the first cells and of superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. However, the use of molecular sequence information for deep phylogenetic analyses is limited by mutational saturation, differential evolutionary rates, lack of sequence site independence, and other biological and technical constraints. In contrast, protein structures are evolutionary modules that are highly conserved and diverse enough to enable deep historical exploration. Results Here we build phylogenies that describe the evolution of proteins and proteomes. These phylogenetic trees are derived from a genomic census of protein domains defined at the fold family (FF level of structural classification. Phylogenomic trees of FF structures were reconstructed from genomic abundance levels of 2,397 FFs in 420 proteomes of free-living organisms. These trees defined timelines of domain appearance, with time spanning from the origin of proteins to the present. Timelines are divided into five different evolutionary phases according to patterns of sharing of FFs among superkingdoms: (1 a primordial protein world, (2 reductive evolution and the rise of Archaea, (3 the rise of Bacteria from the common ancestor of Bacteria and Eukarya and early development of the three superkingdoms, (4 the rise of Eukarya and widespread organismal diversification, and (5 eukaryal diversification. The relative ancestry of the FFs shows that reductive evolution by domain loss is dominant in the first three phases and is responsible for both the diversification of life from a universal cellular ancestor and the appearance of superkingdoms. On the other hand, domain gains are predominant in the last two phases and are responsible for organismal diversification, especially in Bacteria and Eukarya. Conclusions The evolution of functions that are

  12. Efficiency of Floristic and Molecular Markers to Determine Diversity in Iranian Populations of T. boeoticum

    OpenAIRE

    M. R. Naghavi; M. Maleki; S. F. Tabatabaei

    2009-01-01

    In order to study floristic and molecular classification of common wild wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.), an analysis was conducted on populations of the Triticum boeoticum collected from different regions of Iran. Considering all floristic compositions of habitats, six floristic groups (syntaxa) within the populations were identified. A high level of variation of T. boeoticum also detected using SSR markers. Our results showed that molecular method confirmed the groupin...

  13. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers...... in 236 samples. All estimated loci were very polymorphic indicated by high values of polymorphism information content (from 0.76 in S0225 to 0.92 in Sw2410). Indigenous populations had very high level of genetic diversity (mean He = 0.75); of all indigenous breeds, Lung Pu showed highest mean number...... of alleles (MNA = 10.1), gene diversity (He = 0.82), allele richness (5.33) and number of private alleles (10). Thirteen percentage of the total genetic variation observed was due to differences among populations. The neighbour-joining dendrogram obtained from Nei's standard genetic distance differentiated...

  14. Diversity of radioprobes targeted to tumor angiogenesis on molecular functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xia; Zhang Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular functional imaging could visualize, characterize, and measure the bio- logical processes including tumor angiogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The molecular probes labeled by a variety of radionuclide used in the field of the nuclear medicine play pivotal roles in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the regulatory role of different probes in tumor angiogenesis has not been systematically illustrated. The current status of tumor angiogenesis imaging with radiolabeled probes of peptide, monoclonal antibody as well as its fragment, especially nanoparticle-based probes to gain insights into the robust tumor angiogenesis development were summarized. It was recognized that only the probes such as nanoparticle-based probes, which truly target the tumor vasculature rather than tumor cells because of poor extravasation, are really tumor angiogenesis imaging agent. The research of molecular probe targeted to angiogenesis would meet its flourish just after the outstanding improvements in the in vivo stability and biocompatibility, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of tumor angiogenesis imaging probes are made. Translation to clinical applications will also be critical for the maximize benefits of these novel agents. The future of tumor angiogenesis imaging lies in liable imaging probes and multiple imaging modalities, imaging of protein-protein interactions, and quantitative molecular imaging. (authors)

  15. Molecular and cytological characterization of the global Musa germplasm collection provides insights into the treasure of banana diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Christelová, Pavla; De Langhe, E.; Hřibová, Eva; Čížková, Jana; Sardos, J.; Hušáková, Markéta; Van den Houwe, I.; Sutanto, A.; Kepler, A.K.; Swennen, R.; Roux, N.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2017), s. 801-824 ISSN 0960-3115 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA MŠk(CZ) LG12021; GA MŠk LG15017 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : genetic-linkage map * aab group * balbisiana colla * acuminata colla * black sigatoka * population-structure * marker analysis * flow-cytometry * plantain musa * aflp markers * Classification * Gene bank * Genetic diversity * ITC collection * Microsatellites * Musa Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.265, year: 2016

  16. Molecular diversity and distribution of marine fungi across 130 European environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Leonard, Guy; Mahé, Frédéric; Del Campo, Javier; Romac, Sarah; Jones, Meredith D M; Maguire, Finlay; Dunthorn, Micah; De Vargas, Colomban; Massana, Ramon; Chambouvet, Aurélie

    2015-11-22

    Environmental DNA and culture-based analyses have suggested that fungi are present in low diversity and in low abundance in many marine environments, especially in the upper water column. Here, we use a dual approach involving high-throughput diversity tag sequencing from both DNA and RNA templates and fluorescent cell counts to evaluate the diversity and relative abundance of fungi across marine samples taken from six European near-shore sites. We removed very rare fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) selecting only OTUs recovered from multiple samples for a detailed analysis. This approach identified a set of 71 fungal 'OTU clusters' that account for 66% of all the sequences assigned to the Fungi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that this diversity includes a significant number of chytrid-like lineages that had not been previously described, indicating that the marine environment encompasses a number of zoosporic fungi that are new to taxonomic inventories. Using the sequence datasets, we identified cases where fungal OTUs were sampled across multiple geographical sites and between different sampling depths. This was especially clear in one relatively abundant and diverse phylogroup tentatively named Novel Chytrid-Like-Clade 1 (NCLC1). For comparison, a subset of the water column samples was also investigated using fluorescent microscopy to examine the abundance of eukaryotes with chitin cell walls. Comparisons of relative abundance of RNA-derived fungal tag sequences and chitin cell-wall counts demonstrate that fungi constitute a low fraction of the eukaryotic community in these water column samples. Taken together, these results demonstrate the phylogenetic position and environmental distribution of 71 lineages, improving our understanding of the diversity and abundance of fungi in marine environments. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Microbial Diversity of Browning Peninsula, Eastern Antarctica Revealed Using Molecular and Cultivation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, Sarita; Wilson, John; Ji, Mukan; van Dorst, Josie; Snape, Ian; Palmer, Anne S; Burns, Brendan P; Ferrari, Belinda C

    2017-01-01

    Browning Peninsula is an ice-free polar desert situated in the Windmill Islands, Eastern Antarctica. The entire site is described as a barren landscape, comprised of frost boils with soils dominated by microbial life. In this study, we explored the microbial diversity and edaphic drivers of community structure across this site using traditional cultivation methods, a novel approach the soil substrate membrane system (SSMS), and culture-independent 454-tag pyrosequencing. The measured soil environmental and microphysical factors of chlorine, phosphate, aspect and elevation were found to be significant drivers of the bacterial community, while none of the soil parameters analyzed were significantly correlated to the fungal community. Overall, Browning Peninsula soil harbored a distinctive microbial community in comparison to other Antarctic soils comprised of a unique bacterial diversity and extremely limited fungal diversity. Tag pyrosequencing data revealed the bacterial community to be dominated by Actinobacteria (36%), followed by Chloroflexi (18%), Cyanobacteria (14%), and Proteobacteria (10%). For fungi, Ascomycota (97%) dominated the soil microbiome, followed by Basidiomycota. As expected the diversity recovered from culture-based techniques was lower than that detected using tag sequencing. However, in the SSMS enrichments, that mimic the natural conditions for cultivating oligophilic "k-selected" bacteria, a larger proportion of rare bacterial taxa (15%), such as Blastococcus, Devosia, Herbaspirillum, Propionibacterium and Methylocella and fungal (11%) taxa, such as Nigrospora, Exophiala, Hortaea , and Penidiella were recovered at the genus level. At phylum level, a comparison of OTU's showed that the SSMS shared 21% of Acidobacteria, 11% of Actinobacteria and 10% of Proteobacteria OTU's with soil. For fungi, the shared OTUs was 4% (Basidiomycota) and <0.5% (Ascomycota). This was the first known attempt to culture microfungi using the SSMS which resulted in

  18. Genetic diversity in wild species of passion fruit (Passiflora trintae) based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Silva, C B M; Cardoso-Silva, C B; Santos, E S L; Conceição, L D H C S; Pereira, A S; Oliveira, A C; Corrêa, R X

    2010-10-26

    In spite of the importance of and the considerable variability observed in Passiflora (Passifloraceae), little is known about the genetic diversity of most of the species of this genus. We evaluated the genetic diversity by RAPD markers in 18 genotypes of Passiflora trintae. The 15 primers generated 112 markers, 84% of which were polymorphic. The genetic distance estimated by the complement of the Dice index (average dissimilarity = 0.30) and genotype grouping based on the UPGMA algorithm showed low variability among genotypes. More attention should be given to the study and conservation of the biodiversity of this economically important genus.

  19. Molecular analysis reveals hidden diversity in Zungaro (Siluriformes: Pimelodidade): a genus of giant South American catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Antonio A; Ramirez, Jorge L; Galetti, Pedro M; Troy, Waldo P; Freitas, Patricia D

    2017-06-01

    The genus Zungaro contains some of the largest catfish in South America. Two valid species are currently recognized: Zungaro jahu, inhabiting the Paraná and Paraguay basins, and Zungaro zungaro, occurring in the Amazonas and Orinoco basins. Analysing Zungaro specimens from the Amazonas, Orinoco, Paraguay and Paraná basins, based on the sequencing of COI and D-loop, we found at least three MOTUs, indicating the existence of hidden diversity within this fish group. Considering the ecological and economic values of this fish, our results are surely welcomed for its conservation, disclosing new findings on its diversity and pointing out the necessity for a detailed taxonomic revision.

  20. Archaeal and anaerobic methane oxidizer communities in the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Cold seeps, located along the Sonora Margin transform fault in the Guaymas Basin, were extensively explored during the 'BIG' cruise in June 2010. They present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To investigate this mostly unknown cold and hydrocarbon-rich environment, geochemical and microbiological surveys of the sediments underlying two microbial mats and a surrounding macrofaunal habitat were analyzed in detail. The geochemical measurements suggest biogenic methane production and local advective sulfate-rich fluxes in the sediments. The distributions of archaeal communities, particularly those involved in the methane cycle, were investigated at different depths (surface to 18 cm below the sea floor (cmbsf)) using complementary molecular approaches, such as Automated method of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), 16S rRNA libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction with new specific primer sets targeting methanogenic and anaerobic methanotrophic lineages. Molecular results indicate that metabolically active archaeal communities were dominated by known clades of anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-1, -2 and -3), including a novel 'ANME-2c Sonora' lineage. ANME-2c were found to be dominant, metabolically active and physically associated with syntrophic Bacteria in sulfate-rich shallow sediment layers. In contrast, ANME-1 were more prevalent in the deepest sediment samples and presented a versatile behavior in terms of syntrophic association, depending on the sulfate concentration. ANME-3 were concentrated in small aggregates without bacterial partners in a restricted sediment horizon below the first centimetres. These niche specificities and syntrophic behaviors, depending on biological surface assemblages and environmental availability of electron donors, acceptors and carbon substrates, suggest that ANME could support

  1. Molecular diversity of Theileria parva : a case study of Kilosa district ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theileria parva is an apicomplexan protozoan parasite which causes East Coast fever (ECF) in Eastern and Central Africa. A study was conducted between February and May 2012 in Morogoro region to determine the diversity of the T. Parva parasite circulating in cattle in Kilosa district. Also ECF cases reported between ...

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous turmeric (Curcuma longa) germplasm from India using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sushma; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Suresh; Tewari, S K; Roy, R K; Goel, A K; Rana, T S

    2015-04-01

    Curcuma longa L., commonly known as turmeric, is one of the economically and medicinally important plant species. It is predominantly cultivated in the tropical and sub tropical countries. India is the largest producer, and exporter of turmeric in the world, followed by China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Thailand. In the present study, Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR), methods were used to estimate the genetic variability in indigenous turmeric germplasm. Cumulative data analysis for DAMD (15) and ISSR (13) markers resulted into 478 fragments, out of which 392 fragments were polymorphic, revealing 82 % polymorphism across the turmeric genotypes. Wide range of pairwise genetic distances (0.03-0.59) across the genotypes revealed that these genotypes are genetically quite diverse. The UPGMA dendrogram generated using cumulative data showed significant relationships amongst the genotypes. All 29 genotypes studied grouped into two clusters irrespective of their geographical affiliations with 100 % bootstrap value except few genotypes, suggesting considerable diversity amongst the genotypes. These results suggested that the current collection of turmeric genotypes preserve the vast majority of natural variations. The results further demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of DAMD and ISSR markers in determining the genetic diversity and relationships among the indigenous turmeric germplasm. DAMD and ISSR profiling have identified diverse turmeric genotypes, which could be further utilized in various genetic improvement programmes including conventional as well as marker assisted breeding towards development of new and desirable turmeric genotypes.

  3. Molecular identification of hybrids from a former hot spot of Potamogeton hybrid diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplan, Zdeněk; Fehrer, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 105, Feb 2013 (2013), s. 34-40 ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0291 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : hybridization * taxonomy * diversity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.471, year: 2013

  4. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanxin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC. Results Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I and Nei genetic diversity index (h were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490 when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218. A mini-core collection (MC containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%, low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%, large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%, and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%. For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and

  5. Genetic diversity assessment of sesame core collection in China by phenotype and molecular markers and extraction of a mini-core collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the four major oil crops in China. A sesame core collection (CC) was established in China in 2000, but no complete study on its genetic diversity has been carried out at either the phenotypic or molecular level. To provide technical guidance, a theoretical basis for further collection, effective protection, reasonable application, and a complete analysis of sesame genetic resources, a genetic diversity assessment of the sesame CC in China was conducted using phenotypic and molecular data and by extracting a sesame mini-core collection (MC). Results Results from a genetic diversity assessment of sesame CC in China were significantly inconsistent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. A Mantel test revealed the insignificant correlation between phenotype and molecular marker information (r = 0.0043, t = 0.1320, P = 0.5525). The Shannon-Weaver diversity index (I) and Nei genetic diversity index (h) were higher (I = 0.9537, h = 0.5490) when calculated using phenotypic data from the CC than when using molecular data (I = 0.3467, h = 0.2218). A mini-core collection (MC) containing 184 accessions was extracted based on both phenotypic and molecular data, with a low mean difference percentage (MD, 1.64%), low variance difference percentage (VD, 22.58%), large variable rate of coefficient of variance (VR, 114.86%), and large coincidence rate of range (CR, 95.76%). For molecular data, the diversity indices and the polymorphism information content (PIC) for the MC were significantly higher than for the CC. Compared to an alternative random sampling strategy, the advantages of capturing genetic diversity and validation by extracting a MC using an advanced maximization strategy were proven. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the phenotypic and molecular genetic diversities of the sesame CC in China. A MC was extracted using both phenotypic and molecular data. Low MD% and VD%, and large VR% and CR

  6. Molecular diversity in French bread wheat accessions related to temporal trends and breeding programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, V; Koenig, J; Beckert, M; Balfourier, F

    2004-03-01

    A set of 41 wheat microsatellite markers (WMS), giving 42 polymorphic loci (two loci on each chromosome), was used to describe genetic diversity in a sample of 559 French bread wheat accessions (landraces and registered varieties) cultivated between 1800 and 2000. A total of 609 alleles were detected. Allele number per locus ranged from 3 to 28, with a mean allele number of 14.5. On the average, about 72% of the total number of alleles were observed with a frequency of less than 5% and were considered to be rare alleles. WMS markers used showed different levels of gene diversity: the highest PIC value occurred in the B genome (0.686) compared to 0.641 and 0.659 for the A and D genomes, respectively. When comparing landraces with registered varieties gathered in seven temporal groups, a cluster analysis based on an F(st) matrix provided a clear separation of landraces from the seven variety groups, while a shift was observed between varieties registered before and after 1970. There was a decrease of about 25% in allelic richness between landraces and varieties. In contrast, when considering only registered varieties, changes in diversity related to temporal trends appeared more qualitative than quantitative, except at the end of the 1960s, when a bottleneck might have occurred. New varieties appear to be increasingly similar to each other in relation to allelic composition, while differences between landraces are more and more pronounced over time. Finally, considering a sub-sample of 193 varieties representative of breeding material selected during the twentieth century by the six most important plant breeding companies, few differences in diversity were observed between the different breeding programmes. The observed structure of diversity in French bread wheat collections is discussed in terms of consequences, both for plant breeders and for managers of crop genetic resources.

  7. Genetic Breeding and Diversity of the Genus Passiflora: Progress and Perspectives in Molecular and Genetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bernard M. Cerqueira-Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp., molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit.

  8. Detection of microbial diversity in endocarditis using cultivation-independent molecular techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Tine Y; Moser, Claus Ernst; Bundgaard, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE) could be improved using molecular tools in addition to standard microscopy and cultivation methods. Methods: Cultivation was performed on blood or tissue samples as recommended in the modified...... and all were monomicrobial. Molecular methods showed the presence of DNA from multiple bacterial species in 6 of the samples and indicated a larger variety of bacteria in the different samples than identified by cultivation. For 8 of the patients there was a good correlation between the results...

  9. Archaeal methanogenesis at the onshore serpentinite-hosted Chimaera seeps, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Jennifer; Birgel, Daniel; Bach, Wolfgang; Richoz, Sylvain; Gier, Susanne; Smrzka, Daniel; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Schleper, Christa; Rittmann, Simon; Grasemann, Bernhard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2017-04-01

    Serpentinite-hosted ecosystems have attracted the interest of the scientific community, as they are considered to be likely environments where life first evolved on Earth. Serpentinization reactions produce strongly reducing and highly alkaline fluids that are typified by high concentrations of molecular hydrogen and methane, which can be used as an energy source by chemotrophic microbial communities. Moreover, carbonate formation is a common late-stage alteration process that is induced by the serpentinization of peridotite at the seafloor and on land. It is well established that low-temperature serpentinization at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges provides an ideal environment for rich microbial communities, including anaerobic archaea and bacteria. Recent studies of lipid biomarkers and their isotopic compositions have suggested that some Euryarchaeota are able to perform methanogenesis and methanotrophy, depending on the prevailing environmental conditions. However, no evidence for archaeal methanogenesis or methanotrophy has yet been reported for similar environments on land. This study is the first to present lipid biomarker evidence for archaeal methanogenesis at the terrestrial, peridotite-hosted Chimaera seep in Turkey. The analyzed Chimaera rock samples are serpentinites that are cross-cut by veins composed of brucite and hydromagnesite. Pentamethylicosane and squalane with δ13C values of +10‰ and +14‰, respectively, were identified within the brucite-carbonate veins. Furthermore, archaeol, sn2-hydroxyarchaeol, squalane and squalenes as well as unusual distributions of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids were found. Archaeol and sn2-hydroxyarchaeol also show high compound-specific δ13C values of up to +7‰. These isotope signals combined with the absence of crocetane - a biomarker for methanotrophic archaea - reveals that the microbial communities at the Chimaera Seep performed methanogenesis rather than methanotrophy. Our results

  10. Ultrastructural and molecular characterization of diversity among small araphid diatoms all lacking rimoportulae. I. Five new genera, eight new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun L; Ashworth, Matt P; Witkowski, Andrzej; Lobban, Christopher S; Zgłobicka, Izabela; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J; Qin, Song

    2016-12-01

    Pennate diatoms are important contributors to primary production in freshwater and marine habitats. But the extent of their diversity, ecology, and evolution is still largely unknown. This is particularly evident among the clades of pennate diatoms without raphe slits, whose diversity is likely underestimated due to their small size and features that can be difficult to discern under light microscopy. In this study, we described five new araphid genera with eight new species based on morphological observations (light and electron microscopy) and molecular data (nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal RNA and chloroplast-encoded rbcL and psbC): Serratifera varisterna, Hendeyella rhombica, H. dimeregrammopsis, H. lineata, Psammotaenia lanceolata, Castoridens striata, C. hyalina, and Cratericulifera shandongensis. We also transferred Dimeregramma dubium to Hendeyella dubia. Phylogenetic analysis of the molecular data revealed that all the newly established taxa fell into a monophyletic group, with Fragilariforma virescens located at the base. The group was composed by two subclades: one comprising Castoridens, Cratericulifera, and Plagiostriata, and the larger including also the rest of the new genera plus some of the smallest known diatoms, such as Nanofrustulum, Opephora, Pseudostaurosira, Staurosirella, and Staurosira with a high level of support. This study enhances the general knowledge on the phylogeny and biodiversity of a group of small araphid diatoms that have been generally poorly described both by electron microscopy and DNA sequence data. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  11. Joint analysis of phenotypic and molecular diversity provides new insights on the genetic variability of the Brazilian physic nut germplasm bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alexandre Alonso; Bhering, Leonardo Lopes; Rosado, Tatiana Barbosa; Laviola, Bruno Galvêas; Formighieri, Eduardo Fernandes; Cruz, Cosme Damião

    2013-09-01

    The genetic variability of the Brazilian physic nut (Jatropha curcas) germplasm bank (117 accessions) was assessed using a combination of phenotypic and molecular data. The joint dissimilarity matrix showed moderate correlation with the original matrices of phenotypic and molecular data. However, the correlation between the phenotypic dissimilarity matrix and the genotypic dissimilarity matrix was low. This finding indicated that molecular markers (RAPD and SSR) did not adequately sample the genomic regions that were relevant for phenotypic differentiation of the accessions. The dissimilarity values of the joint dissimilarity matrix were used to measure phenotypic + molecular diversity. This diversity varied from 0 to 1.29 among the 117 accessions, with an average dissimilarity among genotypes of 0.51. Joint analysis of phenotypic and molecular diversity indicated that the genetic diversity of the physic nut germplasm was 156% and 64% higher than the diversity estimated from phenotypic and molecular data, respectively. These results show that Jatropha genetic variability in Brazil is not as limited as previously thought.

  12. Molecular and evolutionary bases of within-patient genotypic and phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli extraintestinal infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Levert

    Full Text Available Although polymicrobial infections, caused by combinations of viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, are being recognised with increasing frequency, little is known about the occurrence of within-species diversity in bacterial infections and the molecular and evolutionary bases of this diversity. We used multiple approaches to study the genomic and phenotypic diversity among 226 Escherichia coli isolates from deep and closed visceral infections occurring in 19 patients. We observed genomic variability among isolates from the same site within 11 patients. This diversity was of two types, as patients were infected either by several distinct E. coli clones (4 patients or by members of a single clone that exhibit micro-heterogeneity (11 patients; both types of diversity were present in 4 patients. A surprisingly wide continuum of antibiotic resistance, outer membrane permeability, growth rate, stress resistance, red dry and rough morphotype characteristics and virulence properties were present within the isolates of single clones in 8 of the 11 patients showing genomic micro-heterogeneity. Many of the observed phenotypic differences within clones affected the trade-off between self-preservation and nutritional competence (SPANC. We showed in 3 patients that this phenotypic variability was associated with distinct levels of RpoS in co-existing isolates. Genome mutational analysis and global proteomic comparisons in isolates from a patient revealed a star-like relationship of changes amongst clonally diverging isolates. A mathematical model demonstrated that multiple genotypes with distinct RpoS levels can co-exist as a result of the SPANC trade-off. In the cases involving infection by a single clone, we present several lines of evidence to suggest diversification during the infectious process rather than an infection by multiple isolates exhibiting a micro-heterogeneity. Our results suggest that bacteria are subject to trade-offs during an infectious

  13. Molecular and evolutionary bases of within-patient genotypic and phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli extraintestinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levert, Maxime; Zamfir, Oana; Clermont, Olivier; Bouvet, Odile; Lespinats, Sylvain; Hipeaux, Marie Claire; Branger, Catherine; Picard, Bertrand; Saint-Ruf, Claude; Norel, Françoise; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Le Nagard, Hervé; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Cruvellier, Stéphane; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Nilsson, Susanna; Gudelj, Ivana; Phan, Katherine; Ferenci, Thomas; Tenaillon, Olivier; Denamur, Erick

    2010-09-30

    Although polymicrobial infections, caused by combinations of viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, are being recognised with increasing frequency, little is known about the occurrence of within-species diversity in bacterial infections and the molecular and evolutionary bases of this diversity. We used multiple approaches to study the genomic and phenotypic diversity among 226 Escherichia coli isolates from deep and closed visceral infections occurring in 19 patients. We observed genomic variability among isolates from the same site within 11 patients. This diversity was of two types, as patients were infected either by several distinct E. coli clones (4 patients) or by members of a single clone that exhibit micro-heterogeneity (11 patients); both types of diversity were present in 4 patients. A surprisingly wide continuum of antibiotic resistance, outer membrane permeability, growth rate, stress resistance, red dry and rough morphotype characteristics and virulence properties were present within the isolates of single clones in 8 of the 11 patients showing genomic micro-heterogeneity. Many of the observed phenotypic differences within clones affected the trade-off between self-preservation and nutritional competence (SPANC). We showed in 3 patients that this phenotypic variability was associated with distinct levels of RpoS in co-existing isolates. Genome mutational analysis and global proteomic comparisons in isolates from a patient revealed a star-like relationship of changes amongst clonally diverging isolates. A mathematical model demonstrated that multiple genotypes with distinct RpoS levels can co-exist as a result of the SPANC trade-off. In the cases involving infection by a single clone, we present several lines of evidence to suggest diversification during the infectious process rather than an infection by multiple isolates exhibiting a micro-heterogeneity. Our results suggest that bacteria are subject to trade-offs during an infectious process and that

  14. Genetic diversity in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: molecular mechanisms and biological consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Gena D; Kerr, Jennifer E; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the human oral cavity. It is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic periodontal disease affecting half of the adult population in the USA. To survive in the oral cavity, these bacteria must colonize dental plaque biofilms in competition with other bacterial species. Long-term survival requires P. gingivalis to evade host immune responses, while simultaneously adapting to the changing physiology of the host and to alterations in the plaque biofilm. In reflection of this highly variable niche, P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species and in this review the authors summarize genetic diversity as it relates to pathogenicity in P. gingivalis. Recent studies revealing a variety of mechanisms by which adaptive changes in genetic content can occur are also reviewed. Understanding the genetic plasticity of P. gingivalis will provide a better framework for understanding the host–microbe interactions associated with periodontal disease. PMID:23642116

  15. An exploratory study of microbial diversity in sinus infections of cystic fibrosis patients by molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Aanaes, Kasper; Wolff, Tine Yding

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the first time microorganisms in CF sinuses are investigated by molecular methods in response to an absence of anaerobes in CF sinus samples during a two-year period at the Copenhagen CF center. METHODS: Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in 19 CF patients. DNA from intact...

  16. Merging molecular data for evaluating cross country genetic diversity of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integration of molecular data generated by microsatellite panels recommended by FAO around the world should be initiated in order to accomplish objectives stated in the Global Plan of Action for Animal Genetic Resources. To that end microsatellite datasets from U.S. (n=179, including imported Chines...

  17. Genetic Diversity of Some Sweet Cherry Cultivars Based on Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Virginia Berindean

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L., originated around the Caspian and Black Sea, is an important fruit tree species of economic interest, and hence, breeding and conservation are requested (. Genetic analysis at the molecular level can be used effectively to study molecular polymorphism existing between intraspecific and interspecific tree species and phylogenetic relationships between them and their hybrids. The purpose of this study was to characterize and determine genetic relationships among the sweet cherry native genotypes belonging to Fruit Research & Development Station Bistrita, Romania, using RAPD markers. To eliminate the existence of possible synonyms from national romanian collection, we collect four Van cultivars, from four different national collection. For molecular analysis of the 16 varieties of sweet cherry were considered 13 RAPD primers selected from the literature. They were later used to determine the genetic variability at the molecular level using PAST program, and the dendrogram was generated based on Jaccard’s genetic distance. The dendrogram constructed by PAST software. The quantity and quality of the DNA obtained was suitable to achieve PCR amplification step. Only seven out of the 13 RAPD primers have generate polymorphic bands. The rest of seven were monomorphics. The most polymorphic primer was OPB10 which generated 11 bands from which 100% were polymorphic.Seven RAPD primers generated a high level of polymorphism which allowed to divide these cherry varieties into two groups according to their genetic geographical origin and the pedigree.

  18. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

  19. Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Opuntia spp. Portuguese Populations Using SSR Molecular Markers

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    Carlos M. G. Reis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Opuntia spp., most likely few individuals, were introduced in the Iberian Peninsula in the beginning of the 16th century, after the discovery of America, spreading afterwards throughout the Mediterranean basin. We analysed, for the first time, the genetic diversity in a set of 19 Portuguese Opuntia spp. populations from the species O. ficus-indica, O. elata, O. dillenii and O. robusta using nuclear microsatellite (nuSSR markers. The Italian cultivars ‘Bianca’, ‘Gialla’ and ‘Rossa’ were included in the study for comparison purposes. The nuSSR amplifications produced from five to 16 alleles, with an average of 9.2 alleles per primer pair, and average polymorphism information content of 0.71. The estimated Dice coefficient among populations varied from 0.26 to 1.0, indicating high interspecific genetic diversity but low genetic diversity at the intraspecific level. The hierarchical clustering analysis revealed four major groups that clearly separated the four Opuntia species. Among the O. ficus-indica populations, two sub-clusters were found, one including the white pulp fruits (with cv. Bianca and the other with the orange pulp ones and including the cv. Gialla, the cv. Rossa, and one pale yellow pulp population. No genetic differences were found between the inermis form, O. ficus-indica f. ficus-indica, and the rewilded spiny one, O. ficus-indica f. amyclaea. The dendrogram indicated that the clustering pattern was unrelated to geographical origin. The results revealed a low level of genetic diversity among the Portuguese populations of O. ficus-indica.

  20. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčová, Jana; Knudsen, R.; Kuhn, J. A.; Henriksen, E. H.; Siwertsson, A.; Shaw, J. C.; Kuris, A. M.; Amundsen, P.-A.; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, K. D.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2017), s. 327-345 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14198S; GA ČR GAP505/10/1562 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trematode diversity * intermediate hosts * phylogeny * mitochondrial DNA * nuclear DNA * Lake Takvatn * Norway * Sub-Arctic Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2016

  1. Molecular phylogeny of mangroves IV. nature and extent of intra-specific genetic variation and species diversity in mangroves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, A.; Parani, M.; Lakshmi, M.; Elango, S.; Ram, N.; Anuratha, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Mangroves occupy estuarine ecosystems in the tropical regions of the world. Despite their highly productive nature and the protective roles they play in the coastal region, the ecosystem as a whole is under severe threat due to various climatic and anthropogenic factors. Therefore, the need for conservation of mangroves is widely emphasised. However, information on existing genetic diversity based on which a strategy for genetic conservation is to be drawn is not available for mangroves. This is primarily because conventional genetic analysis is difficult in these species for various reasons. Therefore, as an aid to our on-going conservation programme, efforts were made to assess the nature and extent of diversity in a number of mangrove species of the Indian coast using molecular markers. The nature and extent of intra-population diversity in sixteen mangrove species and detailed analysis of inter-population genetic polymorphism in four species, Acanthus ilicifolius, Excoecaria agallocha, Avicennia spp and Rhizophora (species and hybrid), is reported in the present communication. (author)

  2. Diverse Molecular Genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates Circulating in the Free State, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Spoel van Dijk, Anneke; Makhoahle, Pakiso M; Rigouts, Leen; Baba, Kamaldeen

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious public health concern especially in Africa and Asia. Studies describing strain diversity are lacking in the Free State region of South Africa. The aim of the study was to describe the diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) strain families in the Free State province of South Africa. A total of 86 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping. A 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs) typing was used to further characterize the resulting spoligotyping clusters. SITVITWEB identified 49 different patterns with allocation to six lineages including Latin-American-Mediterranean (LAM) (18 isolates), T (14 isolates), Beijing (five isolates), S (six isolates), Haarlem (one isolate), and X (five isolates), while 37 (43.0%) orphans were identified. Eight clusters included 37 isolates with identical spoligotypes (2 to 13/cluster). MIRU-VNTR typing further differentiated three spoligotyping clusters: SIT1/Beijing/MIT17, SIT33/LAM3/MIT213, and confirmed one SIT34/S/MIT311. In addition, SpolDB3/RIM assignment of the orphan strains resulted in a further 10 LAM and 13 T families. In total, LAM (28 isolates) and T (27 isolates) cause 63% of the individual cases of MTB in our study. The Free State has a highly diverse TB population with LAM being predominant. Further studies with inclusion of multidrug-resistant strains with larger sample size are warranted.

  3. Diverse Molecular Genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates Circulating in the Free State, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Van der Spoel van Dijk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a serious public health concern especially in Africa and Asia. Studies describing strain diversity are lacking in the Free State region of South Africa. The aim of the study was to describe the diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis strain families in the Free State province of South Africa. A total of 86 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped using spoligotyping. A 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs typing was used to further characterize the resulting spoligotyping clusters. SITVITWEB identified 49 different patterns with allocation to six lineages including Latin-American-Mediterranean (LAM (18 isolates, T (14 isolates, Beijing (five isolates, S (six isolates, Haarlem (one isolate, and X (five isolates, while 37 (43.0% orphans were identified. Eight clusters included 37 isolates with identical spoligotypes (2 to 13/cluster. MIRU-VNTR typing further differentiated three spoligotyping clusters: SIT1/Beijing/MIT17, SIT33/LAM3/MIT213, and confirmed one SIT34/S/MIT311. In addition, SpolDB3/RIM assignment of the orphan strains resulted in a further 10 LAM and 13 T families. In total, LAM (28 isolates and T (27 isolates cause 63% of the individual cases of MTB in our study. The Free State has a highly diverse TB population with LAM being predominant. Further studies with inclusion of multidrug-resistant strains with larger sample size are warranted.

  4. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Iranian Jujube Ecotypes (Ziziphus spp. Using RAPD Molecular Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is a valuable medicinal plant which is important in Iranian traditional medicines. Although the regional plants such as jujube play an important role in our economy, but they are forgotten in research and technology. Considering the economic and medicinal importance of jujube, the first step in breeding programs is determination of the genetic diversity among the individuals. 34 ecotypes of jujube, which have been collected from eight provinces of Iran, were used in this study. The genetic relationships of Iranian jujube ecotypes were analyzed using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD marker. Six out of 15 random decamer primers applied for RAPD analysis, showed an informative polymorphism. According to clustering analysis using UPGMA's methods, the ecotypes were classified into two major groups at the 0.81 level of genetic similarity. The highest value of similarity coefficient (0.92 was detected between Mazandaran and Golestan ecotypes and the most genetic diversity was observed in ecotypes of Khorasan-Jonoubi. The affinity of Khorasan-Jonoubi and Esfahan ecotypes indicated a possible common origin for the variation in these areas. Results indicated that RAPD analysis could be successfully used for the estimation of genetic diversity among Ziziphus ecotypes and it can be useful for further investigations.

  5. Molecular genetic diversity and maternal origin of Chinese black-bone chicken breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W Q; Li, H F; Wang, J Y; Shu, J T; Zhu, C H; Song, W T; Song, C; Ji, G G; Liu, H X

    2014-04-29

    Chinese black-bone chickens are valued for the medicinal properties of their meat in traditional Chinese medicine. We investigated the genetic diversity and systematic evolution of Chinese black-bone chicken breeds. We sequenced the DNA of 520 bp of the mitochondrial cyt b gene of nine Chinese black-bone chicken breeds, including Silky chicken, Jinhu black-bone chicken, Jiangshan black-bone chicken, Yugan black-bone chicken, Wumeng black-bone chicken, Muchuan black-bone chicken, Xingwen black-bone chicken, Dehua black-bone chicken, and Yanjin black-bone chicken. We found 13 haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of the nine black-bone chicken breeds ranged from 0 to 0.78571 and 0.00081 to 0.00399, respectively. Genetic diversity was the richest in Jinhu black-bone chickens and the lowest in Yanjin black-bone chickens. Analysis of phylogenetic trees for all birds constructed based on hyplotypes indicated that the maternal origin of black-bone chickens is predominantly from three subspecies of red jungle fowl. These results provide basic data useful for protection of black-bone chickens and help determine the origin of domestic chickens.

  6. Essential oil diversity and molecular characterization of Ephedra species using RAPD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehtesham-Gharaee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The genus Ephedra (Ephedraceae consists of about 40 species of mostly shrubs and rarely small trees around the world. In the present study, the essential oil (EO diversity and genetic relationships were investigated in six Ephedra species from Iran using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. Methods: Theplants were collected from two different provinces; Azarbayjan (north-west and Khorasan (north-east of Iran. The EOs were obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The DNA was extracted from the aerial parts of the plants using a Qiagen Dneasy Plant Mini Kit. Amplification was performed using decamer RAPD primers. Results: A total of 187 bands were scored and used for the analysis of genetic distances. Genetic distance values ranged from 0.25 to 0.95.The analysis showed the highest genetic diversity (25% between E. foliata with other species. Ephedra foliata formed a distinct group. Ephedra strobilacea was found to be the most similar to E. sarcocarpa (male.Conclusion: High genetic and EO diversity was demonstrated in this genus which should be further studied in order to make more efficient use of the species and considering relevant conservation programs.

  7. A diverse population of Cryptococcus gattii molecular type VGIII in southern Californian HIV/AIDS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond J Byrnes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii infections in southern California have been reported in patients with HIV/AIDS. In this study, we examined the molecular epidemiology, population structure, and virulence attributes of isolates collected from HIV/AIDS patients in Los Angeles County, California. We show that these isolates consist almost exclusively of VGIII molecular type, in contrast to the VGII molecular type isolates causing the North American Pacific Northwest outbreak. The global VGIII population structure can be divided into two molecular groups, VGIIIa and VGIIIb. Isolates from the Californian patients are virulent in murine and macrophage models of infection, with VGIIIa significantly more virulent than VGIIIb. Several VGIII isolates are highly fertile and produce abundant sexual spores that may serve as infectious propagules. The a and α VGIII MAT locus alleles are largely syntenic with limited rearrangements compared to the known VGI (a/α and VGII (α MAT loci, but each has unique characteristics including a distinct deletion flanking the 5' VGIII MATa alleles and the α allele is more heterogeneous than the a allele. Our studies indicate that C. gattii VGIII is endemic in southern California, with other isolates originating from the neighboring regions of Mexico, and in rarer cases from Oregon and Washington state. Given that >1,000,000 cases of cryptococcal infection and >620,000 attributable mortalities occur annually in the context of the global AIDS pandemic, our findings suggest a significant burden of C. gattii may be unrecognized, with potential prognostic and therapeutic implications. These results signify the need to classify pathogenic Cryptococcus cases and highlight possible host differences among the C. gattii molecular types influencing infection of immunocompetent (VGI/VGII vs. immunocompromised (VGIII/VGIV hosts.

  8. A Molecular Epidemiological Study of var Gene Diversity to Characterize the Reservoir of Plasmodium falciparum in Humans in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliwa-Sytek, Aleksandra; Smith, Terry-Ann; Peterson, Ingrid; Brown, Stuart M.; Migot-Nabias, Florence; Deloron, Philippe; Kortok, Moses M.; Marsh, Kevin; Daily, Johanna P.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Sarr, Ousmane; Mboup, Souleymane; Day, Karen P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The reservoir of Plasmodium infection in humans has traditionally been defined by blood slide positivity. This study was designed to characterize the local reservoir of infection in relation to the diverse var genes that encode the major surface antigen of Plasmodium falciparum blood stages and underlie the parasite's ability to establish chronic infection and transmit from human to mosquito. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the molecular epidemiology of the var multigene family at local sites in Gabon, Senegal and Kenya which differ in parasite prevalence and transmission intensity. 1839 distinct var gene types were defined by sequencing DBLα domains in the three sites. Only 76 (4.1%) var types were found in more than one population indicating spatial heterogeneity in var types across the African continent. The majority of var types appeared only once in the population sample. Non-parametric statistical estimators predict in each population at minimum five to seven thousand distinct var types. Similar diversity of var types was seen in sites with different parasite prevalences. Conclusions/Significance Var population genomics provides new insights into the epidemiology of P. falciparum in Africa where malaria has never been conquered. In particular, we have described the extensive reservoir of infection in local African sites and discovered a unique var population structure that can facilitate superinfection through minimal overlap in var repertoires among parasite genomes. Our findings show that var typing as a molecular surveillance system defines the extent of genetic complexity in the reservoir of infection to complement measures of malaria prevalence. The observed small scale spatial diversity of var genes suggests that var genetics could greatly inform current malaria mapping approaches and predict complex malaria population dynamics due to the import of var types to areas where no widespread pre-existing immunity in the population

  9. Studies of archaeal virus-host systems in thermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne

    Since the first organisms were isolated from hot springs, a large number of viruses were found in these geothermal active environments, most of them infecting Archaea. Archaeal viruses form a separate lineage from those of Eukarya and Bacteria often showing exceptional morphologies and genomic...... extensive studies. This work investigates tailed spindle-shaped viruses that we have isolated from different geographical acidothermal, terrestrial hot springs and they primarily infect members of the genus Sulfolobales. The wide distribution of these viruses was established and, moreover, genomic...

  10. Defense Islands in Bacterial and Archaeal Genomes and Prediction of Novel Defense Systems ▿†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Snir, Sagi; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    The arms race between cellular life forms and viruses is a major driving force of evolution. A substantial fraction of bacterial and archaeal genomes is dedicated to antivirus defense. We analyzed the distribution of defense genes and typical mobilome components (such as viral and transposon genes) in bacterial and archaeal genomes and demonstrated statistically significant clustering of antivirus defense systems and mobile genes and elements in genomic islands. The defense islands are enriched in putative operons and contain numerous overrepresented gene families. A detailed sequence analysis of the proteins encoded by genes in these families shows that many of them are diverged variants of known defense system components, whereas others show features, such as characteristic operonic organization, that are suggestive of novel defense systems. Thus, genomic islands provide abundant material for the experimental study of bacterial and archaeal antivirus defense. Except for the CRISPR-Cas systems, different classes of defense systems, in particular toxin-antitoxin and restriction-modification systems, show nonrandom clustering in defense islands. It remains unclear to what extent these associations reflect functional cooperation between different defense systems and to what extent the islands are genomic “sinks” that accumulate diverse nonessential genes, particularly those acquired via horizontal gene transfer. The characteristics of defense islands resemble those of mobilome islands. Defense and mobilome genes are nonrandomly associated in islands, suggesting nonadaptive evolution of the islands via a preferential attachment-like mechanism underpinned by the addictive properties of defense systems such as toxins-antitoxins and an important role of horizontal mobility in the evolution of these islands. PMID:21908672

  11. Nitrite Reductase (nirK) as an Alternative Molecular Marker for Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: Quantification and Characterization of Thaumarchaeal nirK Genes in Estuarine Sediments from San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is a key component of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification is the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Recent molecular ecological studies targeting ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes have identified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as key players in the process. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also possess a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). Despite the notably high abundance and expression of archaeal nirK in various environments, the distribution patterns and functional role of this gene in AOA remain mostly unknown. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. The abundance and phylogeny were compared with that of the conventional marker gene, amoA. Overall, nirK was observed to be significantly more abundant than amoA in the sediment samples, with variation in copy numbers spanning several orders of magnitude between sampling sites. The substantial difference in relative abundance suggests that the conventionally used amoA primers could be underestimating AOA diversity in marine/estuarine sediments. Phylogenetic analysis targeting archaeal nirK revealed a number of unique sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, including Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Nitrosoarchaeaum limnia. The nirK phylogeny was mostly congruent with that of archaeal amoA. Overall, this study provides new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  12. The essence of being extremophilic: the role of the unique archaeal membrane lipids : the role of the unique archaeal membrane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vossenberg, J.L C M; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1998-01-01

    In extreme environments, mainly Archaea are encountered. The archaeal cytoplasmic membrane contains unique ether lipids that cannot easily be degraded, are temperature- and mechanically resistant, and highly salt tolerant. Moreover, thermophilic and extreme acidophilic Archaea possess

  13. Genomic Comparison of Two Family-Level Groups of the Uncultivated NAG1 Archaeal Lineage from Chemically and Geographically Disparate Hot Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Becraft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress based on single-cell genomics and metagenomic investigations of archaea in a variety of extreme environments has led to significant advances in our understanding of the diversity, evolution, and metabolic potential of archaea, yet the vast majority of archaeal diversity remains undersampled. In this work, we coordinated single-cell genomics with metagenomics in order to construct a near-complete genome from a deeply branching uncultivated archaeal lineage sampled from Great Boiling Spring (GBS in the U.S. Great Basin, Nevada. This taxon is distantly related (distinct families to an archaeal genome, designated “Novel Archaeal Group 1” (NAG1, which was extracted from a metagenome recovered from an acidic iron spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. We compared the metabolic predictions of the NAG1 lineage to better understand how these archaea could inhabit such chemically distinct environments. Similar to the NAG1 population previously studied in YNP, the NAG1 population from GBS is predicted to utilize proteins as a primary carbon source, ferment simple carbon sources, and use oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor under oxic conditions. However, GBS NAG1 populations contained distinct genes involved in central carbon metabolism and electron transfer, including nitrite reductase, which could confer the ability to reduce nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Despite inhabiting chemically distinct environments with large variations in pH, GBS NAG1 populations shared many core genomic and metabolic features with the archaeon identified from YNP, yet were able to carve out a distinct niche at GBS.

  14. Morphological and molecular review of the Gekko diversity of Laos with descriptions of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Vinh Quang; Calame, Thomas; Nguyen, Truong Quang; Le, Minh Duc; Ziegler, Thomas

    2015-07-17

    A review of the taxonomy, phylogeny, zoogeography, and ecology of the genus Gekko in Laos is provided based on morphological and molecular datasets. Three new species, which are both morphologically distinctive and molecularly divergent from described congeners, are described from Khammouane Province, central Laos: two members of the G. japonicus group, Gekko bonkowskii sp. nov. and Gekko sengchanthavongi sp. nov., and another member of the G. petricolus group, Gekko boehmei sp. nov. Gekko bonkowskii sp. nov. is closely related to the recently described G. thakekensis, which also occurs in Khammouane Province. Gekko sengchanthavongi sp. nov. is supported as a sister taxon to G. scientiadventura and Gekko boehmei sp. nov. is recovered as a sister species to G. petricolus. In addition, a key to the currently recognized members of the genus Gekko from Laos is provided.

  15. Genetic diversity in Treponema pallidum: implications for pathogenesis, evolution and molecular diagnostics of syphilis and yaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmajs, David; Norris, Steven J.; Weinstock, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic uncultivable treponemes, similar to syphilis-causing Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, include T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, T. pallidum ssp. endemicum and Treponema carateum, which cause yaws, bejel and pinta, respectively. Genetic analyses of these pathogens revealed striking similarity among these bacteria and also a high degree of similarity to the rabbit pathogen, T. paraluiscuniculi, a treponeme not infectious to humans. Genome comparisons between pallidum and non-pallidum treponemes revealed genes with potential involvement in human infectivity, whereas comparisons between pallidum and pertenue treponemes identified genes possibly involved in the high invasivity of syphilis treponemes. Genetic variability within syphilis strains is considered as the basis of syphilis molecular epidemiology with potential to detect more virulent strains, whereas genetic variability within a single strain is related to its ability to elude the immune system of the host. Genome analyses also shed light on treponemal evolution and on chromosomal targets for molecular diagnostics of treponemal infections. PMID:22198325

  16. The diverse and expanding role of mass spectrometry in structural and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lössl, Philip; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Heck, Albert Jr

    2016-12-15

    The emergence of proteomics has led to major technological advances in mass spectrometry (MS). These advancements not only benefitted MS-based high-throughput proteomics but also increased the impact of mass spectrometry on the field of structural and molecular biology. Here, we review how state-of-the-art MS methods, including native MS, top-down protein sequencing, cross-linking-MS, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange-MS, nowadays enable the characterization of biomolecular structures, functions, and interactions. In particular, we focus on the role of mass spectrometry in integrated structural and molecular biology investigations of biological macromolecular complexes and cellular machineries, highlighting work on CRISPR-Cas systems and eukaryotic transcription complexes. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  17. The archaeal TFIIE homologue facilitates transcription initiation by enhancing TATA-box recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, S.D.; Brinkman, A.B.; Oost, van der J.; Jackson, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Transcription from many archaeal promoters can be reconstituted in vitro using recombinant TATA-box binding protein (TBP) and transcription factor B (TFB)—homologues of eukaryal TBP and TFIIB—together with purified RNA polymerase (RNAP). However, all archaeal genomes sequenced to date reveal the

  18. Exploring the diversity and distribution of neotropical avian malaria parasites--a molecular survey from Southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacorte, Gustavo A; Félix, Gabriel M F; Pinheiro, Rafael R B; Chaves, Anderson V; Almeida-Neto, Gilberto; Neves, Frederico S; Leite, Lemuel O; Santos, Fabrício R; Braga, Erika M

    2013-01-01

    Southeast Brazil is a neotropical region composed of a mosaic of different tropical habitats and mountain chains, which allowed for the formation of bird-rich communities with distinct ecological niches. Although this region has the potential to harbor a remarkable variety of avian parasites, there is a lack of information about the diversity of malarial parasites. We used molecular approaches to characterize the lineage diversity of Plasmodium and Haemoproteus in bird communities from three different habitats in southeast Brazil based on the prevalence, richness and composition of lineages. We observed an overall prevalence of 35.3%, with a local prevalence ranging from 17.2% to 54.8%. Moreover, no significant association between prevalence and habitat type could be verified (p>0.05). We identified 89 Plasmodium and 22 Haemoproteus lineages, with 86% of them described for the first time here, including an unusual infection of a non-columbiform host by a Haemoproteus (Haemoproteus) parasite. The composition analyses of the parasite communities showed that the lineage composition from Brazilian savannah and tropical dry forest was similar, but it was different from the lineage composition of Atlantic rainforest, reflecting the greater likeness of the former habitats with respect to seasonality and forest density. No significant effects of habitat type on lineage richness were observed based on GLM analyses. We also found that sites whose samples had a greater diversity of bird species showed a greater diversity of parasite lineages, providing evidence that areas with high bird richness also have high parasite richness. Our findings point to the importance of the neotropical region (southeast Brazil) as a major reservoir of new haemosporidian lineages.

  19. Molecular diversity of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Pasinler hot spring (Erzurum, Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    ADIGÜZEL, Ahmet; İNAN, Kadriye; ŞAHİN, Fikrettin; ARASOĞLU, Tulin; GÜLLÜCE, Medine

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of thermophilic bacteria isolated from Pasinler hot spring, Erzurum, Turkey. Fatty acid profiles, BOX PCR fingerprints, and 16S rDNA sequence data were used for the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of thermophilic bacteria. Totally 9 different bacterial strains were selected based on morphological, physiological, and biochemical tests. These strains were characterized by molecular tests includi...

  20. Molecular microbiology of gut bacteria: genetic diversity and community structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, M; Tepsic, Katarina; Accetto, T; Kostanjsek, R; Ramsak, Andreja; Lipoglavsek, L; Avgustin, G

    2003-01-01

    Recently developed molecular biology approaches make possible the detailed genetic, taxonomic and ecological examination of microorganisms from various habitats. Animal gut represents one of the most complex microbial ecosystems with a large degree of microbial biodiversity present. Bacteria inhabiting the gut usually play important roles in metabolic transformations of substrates and sometimes, e.g. in ruminants, they make the basis for an obligate symbiosis with the host. Here we discuss molecular microbiology as a strategy for examination of gut bacteria, concentrating on a typical and in such environment dominant group of strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria from the phylogenetic group Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides. The bacteria from the genus Prevotella are the most abundant Gram-negative bacteria in the rumen and form a distinctive phylogenetic cluster, clearly separated from prevotellas isolated from other ecological niches. They may represent a good choice for a model organism in genetic manipulation experiments and for studies of gene transfer mechanisms taking place in the gut. The molecular tools for detection and monitoring of ruminal prevotellas are discussed.

  1. Molecular analysis of the diversity of vaginal microbiota associated with bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zongxin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota that affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes including pre-term birth and the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. However, little is known about the overall structure and composition of vaginal microbial communities; most of the earlier studies focused on predominant vaginal bacteria in the process of BV. In the present study, the diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota in 50 BV positive and 50 healthy women from China were investigated using culture-independent PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and barcoded 454 pyrosequencing methods, and validated by quantitative PCR. Results Our data demonstrated that there was a profound shift in the absolute and relative abundances of bacterial species present in the vagina when comparing populations associated with healthy and diseased conditions. In spite of significant interpersonal variations, the diversity of vaginal microbiota in the two groups could be clearly divided into two clusters. A total of 246,359 high quality pyrosequencing reads was obtained for evaluating bacterial diversity and 24,298 unique sequences represented all phylotypes. The most predominant phyla of bacteria identified in the vagina belonged to Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria. The higher number of phylotypes in BV positive women over healthy is consistent with the results of previous studies and a large number of low-abundance taxa which were missed in previous studies were revealed. Although no single bacterium could be identified as a specific marker for healthy over diseased conditions, three phyla - Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria, and eight genera including Gardnerella, Atopobium, Megasphaera, Eggerthella, Aerococcus, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Prevotella and Papillibacter were strongly associated with BV (p

  2. Development of molecular tools for characterization and genetic diversity analysis in Tunisian fig (Ficus carica) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatti, Khaled; Baraket, Ghada; Ben Abdelkrim, Ahmed; Saddoud, Olfa; Mars, Messaoud; Trifi, Mokhtar; Salhi Hannachi, Amel

    2010-10-01

    Fig, Ficus carica L., is a useful genetic resource for commercial cultivation. In this study, RAPD (60), ISSR (48), RAMPO (63), and SSR (34) markers were compared to detect polymorphism and to establish genetic relationships among Tunisian fig tree cultivars. The statistical procedures conducted on the combined data show considerable genetic diversity, and the tested markers discriminated all fig genotypes studied. The identification key established on the basis of SSR permitted the unambiguous discrimination of cultivars and confirmed the reliability of SSR for fingerprinting fig genotypes. The study findings are discussed in relation to the establishment of a national reference collection that will aid in the conservation of Tunisian fig resources.

  3. Molecular diversity of the Planctomycetes in the human gut microbiota in France and Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrou, Caroline; Sambe, Bissoume; Armougom, Fabrice; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Until now, Planctomycetes bacteria were considered as environmental organisms. Nevertheless, some studies detected Planctomycetes DNA from human gut. We therefore explored the human gut Planctomycetes content. Planctomycetes-specific PCR primers were designed to amplify a 240-bp 16S rRNA gene fragment in human stool specimens from individuals in France and in Senegal and from endocarditis patients receiving antibiotics in France. PCR products were then cloned and sequenced. PCR detection revealed a significantly higher prevalence (1.8% vs 0.4%, p = 0.05) and higher diversity (62 vs 6 phylotypes, p = 0.02) of Planctomycetes 16S rRNA gene in stool specimens collected in Senegal than in France. Also, stool specimens from endocarditis patients exhibited non-significantly higher prevalence (0.6% vs 0.4%) and the ratio of phylotypes by positive patient (3 vs 1.5) than those collected from untreated French individuals. Gemmata sp. related sequences were found in 6/12 individuals. Planctomycetes organisms are a part of the human digestive tract microbiota. Their diversity varied by environment including the geographical origin of the individual and antibiotics treatment. © 2013 APMIS Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Elucidation of thermotolerance diversity in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using physio-molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, R M; Khan, S H; Ali, Z; Khan, A I; Khan, I A

    2011-06-14

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is an important cash crop, but high temperature during its growing season is one of the major factors that limit its productivity. This problem compels plant breeders to breed for heat tolerance, which can help to overcome this challenge. It is very important to make a comprehensive screening of heat-tolerant genotypes so that only the best are chosen. Here we report the combined use of several techniques that can help breeders to screen their germplasm. Twelve cultivated cotton genotypes were evaluated for thermotolerance, using assays that included electrolyte leakage, chlorophyll accumulation and protein profiling, as well as RAPDs to assess genetic diversity. Two genotypes (B-557 and NIAB-78) showed tolerant behavior in three thermotolerance assays. RAPD analysis results showed maximum similarity in a range of 86.7-66.7% between the genotypes MNH-554 and CIM-443. We conclude that combined use should be made of relative electrolyte leakage, chlorophyll stability and differential display with SDS-PAGE to aid in screening for stress tolerance. RAPD-based diversity analysis will further help to improve the efficiency of breeding programs.

  5. A molecular study of genetic diversity in shisham (Dalbergia Sissoo) plantation of NWFP, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.; Tabassum, S.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 22 accessions of Dalbergia sissoo that were collected from the canal, road and farmer's field and forest sites of N.W.F.P, Pakistan has been studied, by using a finger printing technique 'RAPD' (Random Amplified Polymorphism DNA). Out of 20 primers OPA-2 was the primer that allows distinguishing the diseased and healthy accessions. The selected primer was used for identification and for establishing a profiling system to estimate genetic relationships and to evaluate the genetic variability among the accessions. A total of 126 DNA bands or fragments were amplified by using the primers. The UPGMA cluster analysis revealed 2 main clusters among 22 accessions of Dalbergia sissoo based on coefficient of similarity and dissimilarity. Overall 72% similarity and 98% dissimilarity were observed. Low level of genetic variation and high level of genetic relatedness occurred among the canal, road, farmer's field and forest sites. The accessions were closely related with each other and showed mix pattern of genetic diversity. Thus RAPD markers have the potential to characterize and establish genetic relationships among the accessions of Dalbergia sissoo. (author)

  6. Assessment of ISSR based molecular genetic diversity of Hassawi rice in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turki, T A; Basahi, Mohammed A

    2015-09-01

    Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis, using 14 primers was performed to estimate genetic diversity among 27 landraces of Hassawi rice growing in Al-Ahsa region of Saudi Arabia and deposited at King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology with KACST IDs. The average polymorphism produced by 11 selected primers was more than 75%. The analysis of ISSR polymorphism divided the examined rice landraces into two groups; In one group (A), one accession (KACST 191) was clearly delimited as a distant landrace from other 12 landraces grouped in two clusters; cluster I of seven landraces of close geographic distributions; four of them grow at close geographic locations (KACST IDs 32, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187 and 188) and cluster II is comprised of five landraces KACST IDs (190, 308, 352, 353 and 355). In group B, the landraces were more closely related to each other as compared to the landraces of group A. In this group a small cluster of two landraces (KACST 305 & KACST 333) was clearly distant from a large group of three clusters comprised of landraces having KACST IDs 189 & 192, landraces 302, 306, 307, 308 & 310 and landraces with KACST IDs 334, 351, 354, 356 & 357 respectively. These results indicate that ISSR fingerprints are efficient in the identification and resolution of genetic diversity between the landraces of the Hassawi rice and will be an efficient method in the authentication of the rice germplasm in the gene bank of Saudi Arabia.

  7. Molecular diversity of human parvovirus B19 during two outbreaks of erythema infectiosum in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Nasser Cubel Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to provide information on the genetic diversity of human parvovirus B19 (B19V circulating in the municipality of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Southeast Brazil during 1996–2006, a period with two distinct outbreaks of B19V infection: 1999–2000 and 2004–2005. A total of 27 sera from patients with erythema infectiosum and five sera from HIV-infected patients that tested positive for B19V DNA during the study period were analyzed. To genotype B19V strains, a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the capsid gene was performed and sequence analysis revealed that 31 sequences belonged to subgenotype 1a (G1a of the main genotype 1 and one sequence was characterized as subgenotype 3b (G3b. The phylogenetic tree supported the division of the G1a into two well-defined clades with 1.3% of divergence. The low diversity of the G1a strains may be explained by the fact that all patients had acute B19V infection and 30/32 sera were collected during two distinct outbreaks. The G3b strain was from an HIV-infected patient who seroconverted to anti-B19 IgG antibodies in September/2005. This is the first report of G3b in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

  8. Genetic diversity, identification, and certification of Chilean rice varieties using molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Becerra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It takes approximately 14 yr to produce a new rice (Oryza sativa L. variety, that is, from initial hybridization to its commercial release. Currently, new varieties are identified based on morphological descriptors, which have been efficient over time. However, due to the main constraints on seed type impose to other breeding objectives and the pressure of continuous release of varieties, high degree of parentage, and genetic and morphological uniformity has been observed in the breeding populations. The objectives of this study were: to determine the genetic variability of Chilean and foreign commercial rice varieties, and determine, identify, and certify the genetic relationships among varieties, using simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. A total of 16 commercial varieties, some of them closely related, were included in the study, which were genétically analyzed using 54 microsatellites. The 54 microsatellite loci allowed the discrimination among the 16 varieties. The number of alleles ranged between 2 and 8 with a mean of 3.54 alleles per locus, while the polymorphism information content (PIC presented a mean of 0.44. The genetic distance and diversity parameters between pairs of varieties indicate a limited diversity among these genotypes. The cluster analysis indicated that varieties were grouped according to their grain type and pedigree. Results demonstrate that the identification and certification of varieties using microsatellite markers could be a good complement to existing agro-morphological data when varieties are closed related.

  9. Molecular diversity in Coffea canephora germplasm conserved and cultivated in Brazil

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    Flávio de França Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to characterize accessions that represent the C. canephora germplasm conserved and cultivated in Brazil. A total of 130 accessions from germplasm banks of IAC (São Paulo, UFV (Minas Gerais and also collected in plantations of the State of Espírito Santo and Rondônia were evaluated with a set of 20 new microsatellite primers. Multivariate methods were used to estimate the relationship among the accessions. High level of polymorphism and two major diversity clusters were identified. First cluster was composed by the accessions conserved in the IAC and UFV collections and the second was formed by accessions collected in areas under cultivation. Accessions from Espírito Santo and Rondônia were clear separated, composing two subclusters. Despite the great polymorphism found in Brazilian plantations, the diversity may be increased, because a new threshold in the genetic gains is expected on breeding programs with the intensification of the use of conserved germplasm.

  10. Molecular analysis for genetic diversity and distance of introduced Grus antigone sharpii L. to Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanee, T; Chaveerach, A; Anuniwat, A; Tanomtong, A; Pinthong, K; Sudmoon, R; Mokkamul, P

    2009-01-15

    The genetic relationship was examined in a population of Grus antigone sharpii L. using DNA markers from the ISSR technique for applying towards breeding purposes for conservation of species. Since their extinction from Thailand, sixteen eastern sarus cranes: Grus antigone sharpii L. provided from Cambodia were fed and bred to sixty individuals at Nakhonratchasima Zoo, Northeastern Thailand to re-exist in Thai natural sites. Their genetic diversity and distance were examined to test their possibility to adapt to environmental variation. Blood samples from 27 individuals of Grus antigone sharpii L. were collected and DNA was extracted. These DNA samples were amplified using the successful fifteen from twenty four primers inter simple sequences repeat markers. A dendrogram was constructed and shows distance values of the species between 12.1 and 53.5. The samples produced 63.96% polymorphic banding profiles. The genetic diversity (H') in this population was estimated using Shannon's index. The high H' value of 0.501 reflected the somewhat wide range of distribution sites, which would adapt to environmental variations. Genetic evenness is 0.152. This value supports that all the studied samples have a small equal genetic abundance.

  11. Study Of Genetic Diversity Between Grasspea Landraces Using Morphological And Molecular Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedehi, Abbasali Vahabi; Lotfi, Asefeh; Solooki, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    Grass pea is a beneficial crop to Iran since it has some major advantageous such as high grain and forage quality, high drought tolerance and medium level of salinity tolerance and a good native germplasm variation which accessible for breeding programs. This study was carried out to evaluate morphological traits of the grass pea landraces using a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at Research Farm of Isfahan University of Technology. To evaluate genetic diversity of 14 grass pea landraces from various locations in Iran were investigated using 32 RAPD & ISJ primers at Biocenter of University of Zabol. Analysis of variance indicated a highly significant differences among 14 grass pea landrace for the morphological traits. Average of polymorphism percentage of RAPD primer was 73.9%. Among used primer, 12 random primers showed polymorphism and a total of 56 different bands were observed in the genotypes. Jafar-abad and Sar-chahan genotypes with similarity coefficient of 66% and Khoram-abad 2 and Khoram-abad 7 genotypes with similarity coefficient of 3% were the most related and the most distinct genotypes, respectively. Fourteen primers out of 17 semi random primers produced 70 polymorphic bands which included 56% of the total 126 produced bands. Genetic relatedness among population was investigated using Jacard coefficient and unweighted pair group mean analysis (UPGMA) algorithm. The result of this research verified possibility of use of RAPD & ISJ markers for estimation of genetic diversity, management of genetic resources and determination of repetitive accessions in grass pea.

  12. Thermal Adaptation of the Archaeal and Bacterial Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Koga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological characteristics that distinguish archaeal and bacterial lipids, as well as those that define thermophilic lipids, are discussed from three points of view that (1 the role of the chemical stability of lipids in the heat tolerance of thermophilic organisms: (2 the relevance of the increase in the proportion of certain lipids as the growth temperature increases: (3 the lipid bilayer membrane properties that enable membranes to function at high temperatures. It is concluded that no single, chemically stable lipid by itself was responsible for the adaptation of surviving at high temperatures. Lipid membranes that function effectively require the two properties of a high permeability barrier and a liquid crystalline state. Archaeal membranes realize these two properties throughout the whole biological temperature range by means of their isoprenoid chains. Bacterial membranes meet these requirements only at or just above the phase-transition temperature, and therefore their fatty acid composition must be elaborately regulated. A recent hypothesis sketched a scenario of the evolution of lipids in which the “lipid divide” emerged concomitantly with the differentiation of archaea and bacteria. The two modes of thermal adaptation were established concurrently with the “lipid divide.”

  13. Thermal Adaptation of the Archaeal and Bacterial Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    The physiological characteristics that distinguish archaeal and bacterial lipids, as well as those that define thermophilic lipids, are discussed from three points of view that (1) the role of the chemical stability of lipids in the heat tolerance of thermophilic organisms: (2) the relevance of the increase in the proportion of certain lipids as the growth temperature increases: (3) the lipid bilayer membrane properties that enable membranes to function at high temperatures. It is concluded that no single, chemically stable lipid by itself was responsible for the adaptation of surviving at high temperatures. Lipid membranes that function effectively require the two properties of a high permeability barrier and a liquid crystalline state. Archaeal membranes realize these two properties throughout the whole biological temperature range by means of their isoprenoid chains. Bacterial membranes meet these requirements only at or just above the phase-transition temperature, and therefore their fatty acid composition must be elaborately regulated. A recent hypothesis sketched a scenario of the evolution of lipids in which the “lipid divide” emerged concomitantly with the differentiation of archaea and bacteria. The two modes of thermal adaptation were established concurrently with the “lipid divide.” PMID:22927779

  14. Specificity and Function of Archaeal DNA Replication Initiator Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Y. Samson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7 via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the single chromosome of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus are specified by distinct initiation factors. While two origins are dependent on archaeal homologs of eukaryal Orc1 and Cdc6, the third origin is instead reliant on an archaeal Cdt1 homolog. We exploit the nonessential nature of the orc1-1 gene to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels the protein’s structure rather than that of the DNA template.

  15. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the si......Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins...... in the single chromosome of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus are specified by distinct initiation factors. While two origins are dependent on archaeal homologs of eukaryal Orc1 and Cdc6, the third origin is instead reliant on an archaeal Cdt1 homolog. We exploit the nonessential nature of the orc1-1 gene...... to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels...

  16. Data supporting a molecular phylogeny of the hyper-diverse genus Brueelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Bush

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data is presented in support of a phylogenetic reconstruction of one of the largest, and most poorly understood, groups of lice: the Brueelia-complex (Bush et al., 2015 [1]. Presented data include the voucher information and molecular data (GenBank accession numbers of 333 ingroup taxa within the Brueelia-complex and 30 outgroup taxa selected from across the order Phthiraptera. Also included are phylogenetic reconstructions based on Bayesian inference analyses of combined COI and EF-1α sequences for Brueelia-complex species and outgroup taxa.

  17. Molecular diversity of Pakistani mango (Mangifera indica L.) varieties based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazish, T; Shabbir, G; Ali, A; Sami-Ul-Allah, S; Naeem, M; Javed, M; Batool, S; Arshad, H; Hussain, S B; Aslam, K; Seher, R; Tahir, M; Baber, M

    2017-04-05

    Understanding the genetic diversity of different Pakistani mango varieties is important for germplasm management and varietal characterization. Microsatellites are efficient and highly polymorphic markers for comparative genome mapping, and were used in the present study to determine the genetic relatedness and variability among 15 indigenous mango cultivars (Mangifera indica L.). Overall, 181 bands were produced using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. Out of the 12 primers used, 10 were polymorphic and two were monomorphic. Genetic relatedness among cultivars was assessed by constructing a dendrogram using the unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means. The accessions exhibited coefficients of similarity ranging from 75 to 100%, indicating the frequent use of only a few parent cultivars and the presence of inbreeding. The primers used in the present study were found to be valuable for identifying genetic relationships among mango cultivars.

  18. Genetic molecular diversity, production and resistance to witches’ broom in cacao clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Pires

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The 32 cacao clones selected as being resistant following the witches’ broom epidemic and for having distinct productivitywere characterized according to their genetic diversity and were submitted to a new selection. These plants were assessed for eightyears at the Oceania Farm (FO in Itagibá, Bahia, Brazil. The 13 microsatellite primers generated an average of 11.7 amplicons perlocus, and based on them it was demonstrated that the 32 clones distribute themselves in groups apart from the nine clones used ascontrols. The 32 materials displayed significant differences in relation to the characters assessed in the field. Two criteria were formedfrom the classification of the most productive and resistant plants, and then used to select plants within the clusters. The selected plantsdisplayed potential for the cacao improvement program, that they have a high production and high resistance to witches’ broom.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic diversity of the bacterial community in the gut of the termite Coptotermes formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Naoya; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Matsui, Toru; Watanabe, Yoshio

    2005-06-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the bacterial community in the gut of the termite Coptotermes formosanus was investigated using a 16S rRNA gene clone library constructed by PCR. After screening by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 49 out of 261 clones with unique RFLP patterns were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Many of the clones (94%) were derived from Bacteroidales, Spirochaetes, and low G + C content gram-positive bacteria consisting of Clostridiales, Mycoplasmatales, Bacillales, and Lactobacillales. In addition, a few clones derived from Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and the candidate phylum "Synergistes" were also found. The most frequently identified RFLP type, BCf1-03, was assigned to the order Bacteroideales, and it constituted about 70% of the analyzed clones. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the representative clones found in this study tended to form some clusters with the sequences cloned from the termite gut in several other studies, suggesting the existence of termite-specific bacterial lineages.

  20. Genetic diversity in Treponema pallidum: implications for pathogenesis, evolution and molecular diagnostics of syphilis and yaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajs, David; Norris, Steven J; Weinstock, George M

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic uncultivable treponemes, similar to syphilis-causing Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, include T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, T. pallidum ssp. endemicum and Treponema carateum, which cause yaws, bejel and pinta, respectively. Genetic analyses of these pathogens revealed striking similarity among these bacteria and also a high degree of similarity to the rabbit pathogen, Treponema paraluiscuniculi, a treponeme not infectious to humans. Genome comparisons between pallidum and non-pallidum treponemes revealed genes with potential involvement in human infectivity, whereas comparisons between pallidum and pertenue treponemes identified genes possibly involved in the high invasivity of syphilis treponemes. Genetic variability within syphilis strains is considered as the basis of syphilis molecular epidemiology with potential to detect more virulent strains, whereas genetic variability within a single strain is related to its ability to elude the immune system of the host. Genome analyses also shed light on treponemal evolution and on chromosomal targets for molecular diagnostics of treponemal infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Genetic Diversity of Date (Phoenix dactylifera) Germplasm in Qatar based on Microsatellite Markers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Talaat

    2016-01-25

    Depending on morphological traits alone, studying the genetic diversity of date palm is a very difficult task since morphological characteristics are highly affected by the environment. DNA markers are excellent option that can help and enhance the discriminatory power of morphological characteristics. To study the genetic diversity among date palm cultivars grown in Qatar, fifteen Date palm samples were collected from Qatar University Experimental Farm. DNAs were extracted from fresh leaves by using commercial DNeasy Plant System Kit (Qiagen, Inc., Valencia, CA). Total of 18 (Inter Simple Sequence Repeat) ISSR single primers were used to amplify DNA fragments using genomic DNA of the 15 samples. First screening was done to test the ability of these primers to amplify clear bands using Date palm genomic DNA. All 18 ISSR primers successfully produced clear bands in the first screening. Then, each primer was used separately to genotype the whole set of 15 Date palm samples. Total of 4794 bands were generated using 18 ISSR primers for the 15 Date palm samples. On average, each primer generated 400 bands. The Number of amplified bands varied from cultivar to cultivar. The highest number of bands was obtained using Primers 2, 5 and 12 for the 15 (470 bands), while the lowest number of bands were obtained by Primers 1, 7 and 8 where they produced only 329 bands. Markers were scored for the presence and absence of the corresponding band among the different cultivars. Data were subjected to cluster analysis. A similarity matrix was constructed and the similarity values were used for cluster analysis.

  2. Diversity and molecular phylogeny of mitochondrial DNA of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2014-11-01

    While studies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the eastern (e.g., China) and western (e.g., India) parts of their geographic range have revealed major genetic differences that warrant the recognition of two different subspecies, little is known about genetic characteristics of rhesus macaques in the transitional zone extending from eastern India and Bangladesh through the northern part of Indo-China, the probable original homeland of the species. We analyzed genetic variation of 762 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 86 fecal swab samples and 19 blood samples from 25 local populations of rhesus macaque in Bangladesh collected from January 2010 to August 2012. These sequences were compared with those of rhesus macaques from India, China, and Myanmar. Forty-six haplotypes defined by 200 (26%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected. Estimates of gene diversity, expected heterozygosity, and nucleotide diversity for the total population were 0.9599 ± 0.0097, 0.0193 ± 0.0582, and 0.0196 ± 0.0098, respectively. A mismatch distribution of paired nucleotide differences yielded a statistically significantly negative value of Tajima's D, reflecting a population that rapidly expanded after the terminal Pleistocene. Most haplotypes throughout regions of Bangladesh, including an isolated region in the southwestern area (Sundarbans), clustered with haplotypes assigned to the minor haplogroup Ind-2 from India reflecting an east to west dispersal of rhesus macaques to India. Haplotypes from the southeast region of Bangladesh formed a cluster with those from Myanmar, and represent the oldest rhesus macaque haplotypes of Bangladesh. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus macaques first entered Bangladesh from the southeast, probably from Indo-China, then dispersed westward throughout eastern and central India. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Assessing molecular and morpho-agronomical diversity and identification of ISSR markers associated with fruit traits in quince (Cydonia oblonga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganopoulos, I; Merkouropoulos, G; Pantazis, S; Tsipouridis, C; Tsaftaris, A

    2011-11-04

    Quince is a deciduous tree known to the countries around the Mediterranean since antiquity. Nowadays, quince is used as an ornamental plant, and as a rootstock for pear trees, with its fruit being appreciated mainly for production of jam and sweets rather than for raw consumption. Quince leaves contain compounds with antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancerous properties that have been the focus of recent research on pharmaceutical and medical uses as well as for food preservatives. An orchard has been established in Greece, composed of quince varieties (Cydonia oblonga, N = 49) collected from different sites of the country (mainly from home gardens), constituting a unique quince gene bank collection for southeast Europe. We made a phenotypic analysis using 26 morphological plus seven agronomical descriptors coupled with molecular techniques in order to examine the genetic diversity within the collection. Principal component analysis using the 33 descriptors identified 10 components explaining the existence of more than 70% of the total variation. Subsequent cluster analysis classified most of the previously identified productive varieties of the quince orchard in the same clade of a dendrogram. Molecular analysis generated by 13 inter-simple sequence repeat primers amplified 139 bands, including 109 polymorphic bands, indicating a level of polymorphism of 79%; mean gene diversity was calculated to be 0.309. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, a number of markers significantly associated with fire blight susceptibility, yield, mean fruit weight, citric acid content, soluble solid content, and fruit drop were identified. Hence, data extracted by multiple regression analysis could be useful in marker-assisted breeding programs, especially when no previous genetic information is available.

  4. The response of archaeal species to seasonal variables in a subtropical aerated soil: insight into the low abundant methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Jiao, Na; Ma, Cenling; Fang, Sa; Phelps, Tommy J; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhang, Chuanlun

    2017-08-01

    Archaea are cosmopolitan in aerated soils around the world. While the dominance of Thaumarchaeota has been reported in most soils, the methanogens are recently found to be ubiquitous but with low abundances in the aerated soil globally. However, the seasonal changes of Archaea community in the aerated soils are still in the mist. In this study, we investigated the change of Archaea in the context of environmental variables over a period of 12 months in a subtropical soil on the Chongming Island, China. The results showed that Nitrososphaera spp. were the dominant archaeal population while the methanogens were in low proportions but highly diverse (including five genera: Methanobacterium, Methanocella, Methanosaeta, Methanosarcina, and Methanomassiliicoccus) in the aerated soil samples determined by high throughput sequencing. A total of 126 LSA correlations were found in the dataset including all the 72 archaeal OTUs and 8 environmental factors. A significance index defined as the pagerank score of each OTU divided by its relative abundance was used to evaluate the significance of each OTU. The results showed that five out of 17 methanogen OTUs were significantly positively correlated with temperature, suggesting those methanogens might increase with temperature rather than being dormant in the aerated soils. Given the metabolic response of methanogens to temperature under aerated soil conditions, their contribution to the global methane cycle warrants evaluation.

  5. Genetic diversity of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (l.) Millsp.) based on molecular characterization using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoiriyah, N.; Yuniastuti, E.; Purnomo, D.

    2018-03-01

    Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) is an annual leguminous crop (perennial) which has advantages over other local leguminous crops as drought resistant, hold collapsed and strong pods. The research on drought resistance plant is very important to adapt to climate change adverse impact to support food security. The potential of pigeon pie has not been supported by accurate data. To explore the potential of pigeon pea, it is necessary to record the important properties by characterization, one of which is molecular. Increasing genetic diversity can be done through mutation which widely used gamma ray for the induction. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic diversity of pigeon pea of black, white and brown seeds type resulted by gamma-ray irradiation with a wavelength of 100, 200 and 300 grays by using RAPD method. The experiment resulted 14 bands, 12 of them are polymorphic bands and 2 of them are monomorphic with size varied from 300 bp to 1.3 kbp. The dendrogram showed from 30 accessions are divided into two main clusters, B shows clear genetical divergence from other clusters and some others split randomly. The range of similarity coefficient is from 0.43 to 1.00

  6. Molecular detection and diversity of novel diterpenoid dioxygenase DitA1 genes from proteobacterial strains and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Robert; Aly, Hamdy A H; Strömpl, Carsten; Wray, Victor; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2007-05-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic diterpenoids naturally synthesized by trees that are released from wood during pulping processes. Using a newly designed primer set, genes similar to that encoding the DitA1 catalytic alpha-subunit of the diterpenoid dioxygenase, a key enzyme in abietane resin acid degradation by Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9, could be amplified from different Pseudomonas strains, whereas ditA1 gene sequence types representing distinct branches in the evolutionary tree were amplified from Burkholderia and Cupriavidus isolates. All isolates harbouring a ditA1-homologue were capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid as the sole source of carbon and energy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in three strains confirmed that ditA1 was expressed constitutively or in response to DhA, demonstrating its involvement in DhA-degradation. Evolutionary analyses indicate that gyrB (as a phylogenetic marker) and ditA1 genes have coevolved under purifying selection from their ancestral variants present in the most recent common ancestor of the genera Pseudomonas, Cupriavidus and Burkholderia. A polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation poylmorphism fingerprinting method was established to monitor the diversity of ditA1 genes in environmental samples. The molecular fingerprints indicated the presence ofa broad, previously unrecognized diversity of diterpenoid dioxygenase genes in soils, and suggest that other bacterial phyla may also harbour the genetic potential for DhA-degradation.

  7. New STS molecular markers for assessment of genetic diversity and DNA fingerprinting in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzak, Josef; Vrba, Lukás; Matousek, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers have been increasingly used in genetic studies of crop species for their applicability in breeding programs. In this work, we report on the development of new sequence-tagged site (STS) markers based on sequence information from several identified hop (Humulus lupulus L.) genes. We demonstrate the usefulness of these STS markers and compare them to SSRs for identifying hop genotypes and estimating genetic diversity in a collection of 68 hop cultivars from around the world. We found 3 individual gene variants (A, B, C) of the chs_H1 gene in this collection. The most frequent gene variant, B (AJ304877), was not detected in Mt. Hood, Glacier, and Horizon (US) cultivars. Gene variant A came from an American germplasm through wild hops. We found length polymorphism in intron 1 of the chs2 gene, and 4 different amplified markers were detected in PCRs. The chs3 gene was found in only one third of the cultivars. None of the variants of the studied CHS genes were found in Humulus japonicus. We detected 5 major gene variants of DNA-binding protein in the collection of H. lupulus cultivars and 2 others in H. japonicus. We also found 3 individual gene variants of an endochitinase gene. The distribution of gene variants did not correlate with any resistance. We proved that developed STS markers can be successfully used for the analysis of genetic diversity and can substitute and supplement SSR markers in hop.

  8. Characterization by culture and molecular analysis of the microbial diversity of a deep subsurface gas storage aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Odile; Lascourreges, Jean-François; Le Borgne, François; Le Goff, Cyril; Magot, Michel

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity of a subsurface water sample collected from a gas storage aquifer in an Upper Jurassic calcareous formation was investigated by culture of microorganisms and construction of a 16S rRNA gene library. Both culture and molecular techniques showed that members of the phyla Firmicutes and class delta-proteobacteria dominated the bacterial community. The presence of hydrogen-utilizing autotrophic bacteria including sulfate reducers (e.g. Desulfovibrio aespoeensis) and homoacetogens (e.g. Acetobacterium carbinolicum) suggested that CO(2) and H(2) are the main carbon and energy sources sustaining a nutrient-limited subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem (SLiME). Gram-positive SRB belonging to the genus Desulfotomaculum, frequently observed in subsurface environments, represented 25% of the clone library and 4 distinct phylotypes. No Archaea were detected by both experimental approaches. Water samples were collected in an area of the rauracian geological formation located outside the maximum seasonal extension of underground gas storage. Considering the observed microbial diversity, there is no evidence of any influence on the microbial ecology of the aquifer in the surroundings of maximum extension reached by the gas bubble of the underground storage, which should have resulted from the introduction of exogenous carbon and energy sources in a nutrient-limited ecosystem.

  9. Diversity of the genus Ocimum (Lamiaceae through morpho-molecular (RAPD and chemical (GC–MS analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay Chowdhury

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, we have described the diversity of nine Ocimum genotypes naturally grown in the Dakshin Dinajpur district of West Bengal, India. Their diversity was determined on the basis of morphological, chemical and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD to determine the level of variation present in the genus Ocimum. Among nine Ocimum genotypes six (O. americanum, O. × africanum, O. basilicum, O. gratissimum, O. kilimandscharicum and O. tenuiflorum are found to be different Ocimum species and the rest are as varieties. A total of 18 qualitative and 17 quantitative morphological traits and chemical compositions were evaluated. Significant variations were observed in the morphological traits except O. × africanum and O. basilicum species. Cluster generated from the morphological data showed two different groups viz. basilicum group and sanctum group. Chemical analysis did not show much variation between morphologically similar species viz. O. × africanum and O. basilicum. However, RAPD analyses clearly showed that O. × africanum and O. basilicum are different species. Thus the combined analyses of morphological traits, chemical and molecular markers represent the best possible approach to confirm taxonomic delineation. Moreover, we are reporting O. × africanum for the first time from this region as well as from West Bengal, India.

  10. Molecular identification of cryptic diversity in species of cis-Andean Mylossoma (Characiformes: Serrasalmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateussi, Nadayca T B; Pavanelli, Carla Simone; Oliveira, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    Mylossoma is a Serrasalmidae genus with only two current valid species in the cis-Andean region but with several available names, today considered as junior synonymous. Morphological information combined with single-locus DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase I gene analysed by Barcode Index Number and General Mixed Yule Coalescent model were used in the present study to help the recognition of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in cis-Andean Mylossoma and discuss species boundaries within the genus. Five OTUs were recognized based on both morphological and molecular approaches. The analysis using the Barcode Index Number resulted in five OTUs, with M. duriventre being split in one unity in the Amazon, one in the Orinoco, one in Paraná-Paraguay and one in Tocantins-Araguaia which is coherent with our morphological results.

  11. Selection of a seed orchard of Eucalyptus dunnii based on genetic diversity criteria calculated using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci Poltri, S N; Zelener, N; Rodriguez Traverso, J; Gelid, P; Hopp, H E

    2003-06-01

    A Eucalyptus dunnii Maiden breeding population of 46 accessions originated in Australia and selected for fitness to subtropical and cold environments was screened by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite markers to obtain quantitative estimates of genetic diversity. A randomly chosen group of AFLP primers generated 205 AFLP bands that were used to fingerprint the genotypes and to evaluate genetic relationships among accessions. Sixty-eight percent (140) of the bands were polymorphic markers. The mean diversity index (DI) was 0.33 and about 52% of the loci had values greater than 0.4. Cluster analysis derived from similarity indices (SI) revealed no particular grouping among accessions suggesting the absence of closely related genotypes, except for five pairs of genotypes. Bootstrap analysis results confirmed the suitability of AFLP to describe genetic relationships in this breeding population. In addition, four highly informative microsatellites were used to construct an identification matrix that discriminated nearly all of the genotypes. Mean values for the number of alleles per locus, DI and SI among accessions were 13, 0.78 and 0.19, respectively, indicating that the breeding population has high genetic diversity. However, several genotypes showed the presence of single microsatellite bands suggesting a putatively important degree of homozygosity. Molecular data were used to design a clonal seed orchard. To achieve this aim, the nine most divergent pairs of genotypes were chosen, thereby retaining 95.2% of the total number of alleles from the 140 polymorphic AFLP loci and the four microsatellite loci analyzed. Mean DI and SI for AFLP and microsatellites showed no significant differences between the original breeding population and the selected seed orchard, confirming that a seed orchard can be designed with a limited number of individuals, which allows similar accessions to be discarded and avoids inbreeding.

  12. Molecular diversity and phylogeny of Triticum-Aegilops species possessing D genome revealed by SSR and ISSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradkhani Hoda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is investigation the applicability of SSR and ISSR markers in evaluating the genetic relationships in twenty accessions of Aegilops and Triticum species with D genome in different ploidy levels. Totally, 119 bands and 46 alleles were detected using ten primers for ISSR and SSR markers, respectively. Polymorphism Information Content values for all primers ranged from 0.345 to 0.375 with an average of 0.367 for SSR, and varied from 0.29 to 0.44 with the average 0.37 for ISSR marker. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 81% (ISSR and 84% (SSR of variability was partitioned among individuals within populations. Comparing the genetic diversity of Aegilops and Triticum accessions, based on genetic parameters, shows that genetic variation of Ae. crassa and Ae. tauschii species are higher than other species, especially in terms of Nei’s gene diversity. Cluster analysis, based on both markers, separated total accessions in three groups. However, classification based on SSR marker data was not conformed to classification according to ISSR marker data. Principal co-ordinate analysis (PCoA for SSR and ISSR data showed that, the first two components clarified 53.48% and 49.91% of the total variation, respectively. This analysis (PCoA, also, indicated consistent patterns of genetic relationships for ISSR data sets, however, the grouping of accessions was not completely accorded to their own geographical origins. Consequently, a high level of genetic diversity was revealed from the accessions sampled from different eco-geographical regions of Iran.

  13. Molecular diversity and predictability of Vibrio parahaemolyticus along the Georgian coastal zone of the Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Bradd J; Kokashvili, Tamar; Tskshvediani, Ana; Janelidze, Nino; Mitaishvili, Nino; Grim, Christopher J; Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Chen, Arlene J; Taviani, Elisa; Eliashvili, Tamar; Tediashvili, Marina; Whitehouse, Chris A; Colwell, Rita R; Huq, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-related gastroenteritis and is also an autochthonous member of marine and estuarine environments worldwide. One-hundred seventy strains of V. parahaemolyticus were isolated from water and plankton samples collected along the Georgian coast of the Black Sea during 28 months of sample collection. All isolated strains were tested for presence of tlh, trh, and tdh. A subset of strains were serotyped and tested for additional factors and markers of pandemicity. Twenty-six serotypes, five of which are clinically relevant, were identified. Although all 170 isolates were negative for tdh, trh, and the Kanagawa Phenomenon, 7 possessed the GS-PCR sequence and 27 the 850 bp sequence of V. parahaemolyticus pandemic strains. The V. parahaemolyticus population in the Black Sea was estimated to be genomically heterogeneous by rep-PCR and the serodiversity observed did not correlate with rep-PCR genomic diversity. Statistical modeling was used to predict presence of V. parahaemolyticus as a function of water temperature, with strongest concordance observed for Green Cape site samples (Percent of total variance = 70, P Black Sea, some of which carry pandemic markers, with increased water temperature correlated to an increase in abundance of V. parahaemolyticus.

  14. Genetic diversity and molecular markers in introduced and Thai native apple snails (Pomacea and Pila).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaewnon-ngiw, Bungorn; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Phanwichien, Kantimanee; Sangduen, Nitsri; Lauhachinda, Nitaya; Menasveta, Piamsak

    2004-07-31

    The genetic diversity and species-diagnostic markers in the introduced apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata and in the native Thai apple snails; Pila ampullacea, P. angelica, P. pesmei, and P. polita, were investigated by restriction analysis of COI and are reported for the first time. Twenty-one composite haplotypes showing non-overlapping distributions among species were found. Genetic heterogeneity analysis indicated significant differences between species (P Pomacea canaliculata (P > 0.0036 as modified by the Bonferroni procedure), P. ampullacea (P = 0.0824-1.000) and P. polita (P = 1.0000). A neighbor-joining tree based on genetic distance between pairs of composite haplotypes differentiated all species and indicated that P. angelica and P. pesmei are closely related phylogenetically. In addition, the 16S rDNA of these species was cloned and sequenced. A species-specific PCR for P. canaliculata was successfully developed with a sensitivity of detection of approximately 50 pg of the target DNA template. The amplification of genomic DNA (50 pg and 25 ng) isolated from the fertilized eggs, and juveniles (1, 7, and 15 d after hatching) of Pomacea canaliculata was also successful, and suggested that Pomacea canaliculata and Pila species can be discriminated from the early stages of development.

  15. Molecular diversity of rhizobia nodulating the invasive legume Cytisus scoparius in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafay, B; Burdon, J J

    2006-06-01

    To contribute to the understanding of Cytisus scoparius success at invading and establishing itself in Australia. Root-nodule bacteria isolated from C. scoparius, growing on five different sites and originally introduced to Australia, were compared with isolates from indigenous plants growing in France and isolates from native legumes growing on the same Australian sites as C. scoparius. Small-subunit rDNA from 251 isolates were analysed by PCR-RFLP and representatives from different genospecies were selected for sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a great diversity of lineages belonging to Bradyrhizobium, with one genospecies being specific for Cytisus both in Australia and in France, Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium and one falling outside the described genera of legume-nodulating bacteria. Principal component analysis showed that the Cytisus Australian rhizobial communities are more similar to each other than to their co-occurring native partners. Early established rhizobial symbionts may have an increased probability to contribute inoculum for the development of further nodules. This is a first report comparing rhizobia nodulating C. scoparius in its native and exotic environments. Cytisus scoparius symbionts were identified outside the Bradyrhizobium genus and a new lineage of legume-nodulating bacteria was identified.

  16. Identification of EST–SSRs and molecular diversity analysis in Mentha piperita

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    Birendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available EST sequences of Mentha piperita available in the public domain (NCBI were exploited to develop SSR markers. A total of 1316 ESTs were assembled into 155 contigs and 653 singletons and of these, 110 sequences were found to contain 130 SSRs, with a frequency of 1 SSR/3.4 kb. Dinucleotide repeat SSRs were most frequent (72.3% with the AG/CT (43.8% repeat motif followed by AT/AT (16.2%. Primers were successfully designed for 68 SSR-containing sequences (62.0%. The 68 primers amplified 13 accessions of M. piperita and 54 produced clear amplicons of the expected size. Of these 54, 33 (61% were found to be polymorphic among M. piperita accessions, showing from 2 to 4 alleles with an average of 2.33 alleles/SSR, and the polymorphic information content (PIC value varied between 0.13 and 0.51 (average 0.25. All the amplified SSRs showed transferability among four different species of Mentha, with a highest in Mentha arvensis (87.0% and minimum in Mentha citrata (37.0%. The newly developed SSRs markers were found to be useful for diversity analysis, as they successfully differentiated among species and accessions of Mentha.

  17. Magnetic Au Nanoparticles on Archaeal S-Layer Ghosts as Templates

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    Sonja Selenska-Pobell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell‐ghosts representing empty cells of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, consisting only of their highly ordered and unusually stable outermost proteinaceous surface layer (S‐layer, were used as templates for Au nanoparticles fabrication. The properties of these archaeal Au nanoparticles differ significantly from those produced earlier by us onto bacterial S‐layer sheets. The archaeal Au nanoparticles, with a size of about 2.5 nm, consist exclusively of metallic Au(0, while those produced on the bacterial S‐layer had a size of about 4 nm and represented a mixture of Au(0 and Au(III in the ratio of 40 to 60 %. The most impressive feature of the archaeal Au nanoparticles is that they are strongly paramagnetic, in contrast to the bacterial ones and also to bulk gold. SQUID magnetometry and XMCD measurements demonstrated that the archaeal Au nanoparticles possess a rather large magnetic moment of about 0.1 µB/atom. HR‐ TEM‐EDX analysis revealed that the archaeal Au nanoparticles are linked to the sulfur atoms of the thiol groups of the amino acid cysteine, characteristic only for archaeal S‐layers. This is the first study demonstrating the formation of such unusually strong magnetic Au nanoparticles on a non‐modified archaeal S‐layer.

  18. Shifts in bacterial and archaeal community structures during the batch biomethanation of Ulva biomass under mesophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaai; Jung, Heejung; Lee, Changsoo

    2014-10-01

    Mesophilic biomethanation of Ulva biomass was performed in a batch bioreactor, and a high organic removal of 77% was obtained on the basis of chemical oxygen demand (COD) after a month of operation. The estimated methane yield was 0.43 ± 0.02 L CH4/g COD(removed) which is close to the theoretical methane potential. Transitions of bacterial and archaeal community structures, associated with process performance data, were investigated using a combination of molecular fingerprinting and biostatistical tools. During the operation, archaeal community structure had no significant changes while bacterial community structure shifted continuously and dynamically. The reactor completely stabilized volatile fatty acids (primarily acetate and propionate) accumulated from the acidogenesis phase, with Methanosaeta- and Methanolinea-related microbes respectively being the main aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Methanolinea- and Syntrophobacter-related populations were likely the key members to form a syntrophic propionate-degrading consortium. A Methanolinea-related population was likely the dominant methane producer in the experimental reactor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular properties of Zic4 and Zic5 proteins: functional diversity within Zic family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Akira; Inoue, Takashi; Mikoshiba, Katuhiko; Aruga, Jun

    2004-01-01

    The Zic-family proteins control various developmental processes. Previous studies have shown that Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 can act as transcriptional regulators, and that their functions are repressed by I-mfa, which has been identified as a repressor for basic helix-loop-helix-type transcriptional factors. Here, we investigated the molecular properties of the Zic4 and Zic5 proteins. Zic4/Zic5 showed DNA-binding activity to the Gli-binding sequence, similar to Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 proteins. However, Zic4/Zic5 did not exhibit any significant transcriptional activation ability nor they bind to I-mfa differently from Zic1/Zic2/Zic3. The nuclear localization of Zic4/Zic5 was not affected by the presence of the I-mfa protein, whereas the Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 proteins were translocated to the cytoplasmic compartment in the presence of I-mfa. The difference may be attributable to the dissimilarity of the N-terminal region between the Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 and Zic4/Zic5 proteins, since the binding of the Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 proteins to I-mfa occurs through their N-terminal regions

  20. Diverse developmental disorders from The One Ring: distinct molecular pathways underlie the cohesinopathies

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    Julia eHorsfield

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit protein complex, cohesin, is responsible for sister chromatid cohesion during cell division. The interaction of cohesin with DNA is controlled by a number of additional regulatory proteins. Mutations in cohesin, or its regulators, cause a spectrum of human developmental syndromes known as the ‘cohesinopathies’. Cohesinopathy disorders include Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Roberts Syndrome. The discovery of novel roles for chromatid cohesion proteins in regulating gene expression led to the idea that cohesinopathies are caused by dysregulation of multiple genes downstream of mutations in cohesion proteins. Consistent with this idea, Drosophila, mouse and zebrafish cohesinopathy models all show altered expression of developmental genes. However, there appears to be incomplete overlap among dysregulated genes downstream of mutations in different components of the cohesion apparatus. This is surprising because mutations in all cohesion proteins would be predicted to affect cohesin’s roles in cell division and gene expression in similar ways. Here we review the differences and similarities between genetic pathways downstream of components of the cohesion apparatus, and discuss how such differences might arise, and contribute to the spectrum of cohesinopathy disorders. We propose that mutations in different elements of the cohesion apparatus have distinct developmental outcomes that can be explained by sometimes subtly different molecular effects.

  1. Optical properties and molecular diversity of dissolved organic matter in the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Michael; Luek, Jenna; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Cooper, Lee W.

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its light absorbing chromophoric component (CDOM) are of particular interest in the Arctic region because of climate change effects that lead to warmer sea surface temperatures and longer exposure to sunlight. We used continuous UV-vis (UV-vis) spectroscopy, excitation emission matrix fluorescence and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry during a transect from the Aleutian Islands in the Bering Sea to the Chukchi Sea ice edge through Bering Strait to determine the variability of DOM and CDOM. These data were combined with discrete sampling for stable oxygen isotopes of seawater, in order to evaluate the contributions of melted sea ice versus runoff to the DOM and CDOM components. This study demonstrated that high geographical resolution of optical properties in conjunction with stable oxygen ratios and non-targeted ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry was able to distinguish between different DOM sources in the Arctic, including identification of labile DOM sources in Bering Strait associated with high algal blooms and sampling locations influenced by terrestrially-derived DOM, such as the terrestrial DOM signal originating from Arctic rivers and dirty/anchor sea ice. Results of this study also revealed the overall variability and chemodiversity of Arctic DOM present in the Bering and Chukchi Seas.

  2. Molecular detection and genetic diversity of Babesia gibsoni in dogs in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Masashi; Akter, Shirin; Yasin, Md Golam; Nakao, Ryo; Kato, Hirotomo; Alam, Mohammad Zahangir; Katakura, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne hemoprotozoan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic illness. Detection of B. gibsoni has been predominantly reported in Asian countries, including Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Bangladesh and India. The present study shows the first molecular characterization of B. gibsoni detected from dogs in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected on FTA® Elute cards from 50 stray dogs in Mymensingh District in Bangladesh. DNA eluted from the cards was subjected to nested PCR for the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia species. Approximately 800bp PCR products were detected in 15 of 50 dogs (30%). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and direct sequencing of the PCR products, all parasite isolates were identified as B. gibsoni. Furthermore, the BgTRAP (B. gibsoni thrombospondin-related adhesive protein) gene fragments were detected in 13 of 15 18S rRNA gene PCR positive blood samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the BgTRAP gene revealed that B. gibsoni parasites in Bangladesh formed a cluster, which was genetically different from other Asian B. gibsoni isolates. In addition, tandem repeat analysis of the BgTRAP gene clearly showed considerable genetic variation among Bangladeshi isolates. These results suggested that B. gibsoni parasites in a different genetic clade are endemic in dogs in Bangladesh. Further studies are required to elucidate the origin, distribution, vector and pathogenesis of B. gibsoni parasites circulating in dogs in Bangladesh. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Forensic molecular genetic diversity analysis of Chinese Hui ethnic group based on a novel STR panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yating; Guo, Yuxin; Xie, Tong; Jin, Xiaoye; Lan, Qiong; Zhou, Yongsong; Zhu, Bofeng

    2018-03-26

    In present study, the genetic polymorphisms of 22 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci were analyzed in 496 unrelated Chinese Xinjiang Hui individuals. These autosomal STR loci were multiplex amplified and genotyped based on a novel STR panel. There were 246 observed alleles with the allele frequencies ranging from 0.0010 to 0.3609. All polymorphic information content values were higher than 0.7. The combined power of discrimination and the combined probability of exclusion were 0.999999999999999999999999999426766 and 0.999999999860491, respectively. Based on analysis of molecular variance method, genetic differentiation analysis between the Xinjiang Hui and other reported groups were conducted at these 22 loci. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in statistics between Hui group and Northern Han group (including Han groups from Hebei, Henan, Shaanxi provinces), and significant deviations with Southern Han group (including those from Guangdong, Guangxi provinces) at 7 loci, and Uygur group at 10 loci. To sum up, these 22 autosomal STR loci were high genetic polymorphic in Xinjiang Hui group.

  4. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Plum bark necrosis stem pitting-associated virus from China.

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    Linning Qu

    Full Text Available Plum bark necrosis stem pitting-associated virus (PBNSPaV, a member of the genus Ampelovirus in the family Closteroviridae, infects different Prunus species and has a worldwide distribution. Yet the population structure and genetic diversity of the virus is still unclear. In this study, sequence analyses of a partial heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h gene and coat protein (CP gene of PBNSPaV isolates from seven Prunus species grown in China revealed a highly divergent Chinese PBNSPaV population, sharing nucleotide similarities of 73.1-100% with HSP70h gene, and 83.9-98.6% with CP gene. Phylogenetic analysis of HSP70h and CP sequences revealed segregation of global PBNSPaV isolates into four phylo-groups (I-IV, of which two newly identified groups, II and IV, solely comprised Chinese isolates. Complete genome sequences of three PBNSPaV isolates, Pch-WH-1 and Pch-GS-3 from peaches, and Plm-WH-3 from a plum tree, were determined. The three isolates showed overall nucleotide identities of 90.0% (Pch-GS-3 and 96.4% (Pch-WH-1 with the type isolate PL186, and the lowest identity of 70.2-71.2% with isolate Nanjing. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we report evidence of significant recombination in the HSP70h gene of PBNSPaV variant Pch2 by using five programs implemented in RDP3; in addition, five codon positions in its CP gene (3, 8, 44, 57, and 88 were identified that appeared to be under positive selection. Collectively, these results indicate a divergent Chinese PBNSPaV population. In addition, our findings provide a foundation for elucidating the epidemiological characteristics of virus population.

  5. The molecular diversity of freshwater picoeukaryotes reveals high occurrence of putative parasitoids in the plankton.

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    Emilie Lefèvre

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic microorganisms have been undersampled in biodiversity studies in freshwater environments. We present an original 18S rDNA survey of freshwater picoeukaryotes sampled during spring/summer 2005, complementing an earlier study conducted in autumn 2004 in Lake Pavin (France. These studies were designed to detect the small unidentified heterotrophic flagellates (HF, 0.6-5 microm which are considered the main bacterivores in aquatic systems. Alveolates, Fungi and Stramenopiles represented 65% of the total diversity and differed from the dominant groups known from microscopic studies. Fungi and Telonemia taxa were restricted to the oxic zone which displayed two fold more operational taxonomic units (OTUs than the oxycline. Temporal forcing also appeared as a driving force in the diversification within targeted organisms. Several sequences were not similar to those in databases and were considered as new or unsampled taxa, some of which may be typical of freshwater environments. Two taxa known from marine systems, the genera Telonema and Amoebophrya, were retrieved for the first time in our freshwater study. The analysis of potential trophic strategies displayed among the targeted HF highlighted the dominance of parasites and saprotrophs, and provided indications that these organisms have probably been wrongfully regarded as bacterivores in previous studies. A theoretical exercise based on a new 'parasite/saprotroph-dominated HF hypothesis' demonstrates that the inclusion of parasites and saprotrophs may increase the functional role of the microbial loop as a link for carbon flows in pelagic ecosystems. New interesting perspectives in aquatic microbial ecology are thus opened.

  6. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of Entamoeba species in a chelonian collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gabriela; Ramos, Fernando; Pérez, Rodrigo Gutiérrez; Yañez, Jorge; Estrada, Mónica Salmerón; Mendoza, Lilian Hernández; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando; Gaytán, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Veterinary medicine has focused recently on reptiles, due to the existence of captive collections in zoos and an increase in the acquisition of reptiles as pets. The protozoan parasite, Entamoeba can cause amoebiasis in various animal species and humans. Although amoebiasis disease is remarkably rare in most species of chelonians and crocodiles, these species may serve as Entamoeba species carriers that transmit parasites to susceptible reptile species, such as snakes and lizards, which can become sick and die. In this study, we identified the Entamoeba species in a population of healthy (disease-free) chelonians, and evaluated their diversity through the amplification and sequencing of a small subunit rDNA region. Using this procedure, three Entamoeba species were identified: Entamoeba invadens in 4.76 % of chelonians, Entamoeba moshkovskii in 3.96 % and Entamoeba terrapinae in 50 %. We did not detect mixed Entamoeba infections. Comparative analysis of the amplified region allowed us to determine the intra-species variations. The E. invadens and E. moshkovskii strains isolated in this study did not exhibit marked differences with respect to the sequences reported in GenBank. The analysis of the E. terrapinae isolates revealed three different subgroups (A, B and C). Although subgroups A and C were very similar, subgroup B showed a relatively marked difference with respect to subgroups A and C (Fst = 0.984 and Fst = 1.000, respectively; 10-14 % nucleotide variation, as determined by blast) and with respect to the sequences reported in GenBank. These results suggested that E. terrapinae subgroup B may be either in a process of speciation or belong to a different lineage. However, additional research is necessary to support this statement conclusively.

  7. Molecular characterization of norovirus variants and genetic diversity of noroviruses and sapoviruses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Khamrin, Pattara; Malasao, Rungnapa; Thongprachum, Aksara; Kongsricharoern, Tipachan; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) and Sapovirus (SaV) have been reported as a common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. For a decade, surveillances of NoV and SaV have been conducted continually in Thailand. To monitor the epidemiological situation and to determine the genetic variation of NoV and SaV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 567 samples collected from pediatric patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis were examined during 2007, and 2010-2011 by semi-nested RT-PCR and nucleotide sequencing methods. NoV was detected at 15.9%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multiple NoV genotypes, GI/14 (1.1%), GII/1 (1.1%), GII/2 (1.1%), GII/3 (4.4%), GII/4 (65.6%), GII/6 (10.0%), GII/7 (2.2%), GII/12 (4.4%), GII/13 (3.3%), GII/16 (5.7%), and unclassified genotype (1.1%), circulating in this area. Among these, NoV GII/4 was the most prevalent genotype with a predominance of GII/4 2009 over other variants, 1996, 2006a, and 2006b. For SaV, the prevalence was 1.2% which was much lower than those of NoV and only SaV GI/1 was detected. This study highlights the epidemiology of NoV and SaV and genetic diversity of viruses circulating in pediatric patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pooja; Jayasinghe, Manori; Stan, George

    2009-03-01

    Chaperonins are double ring-shaped biological nanomachines that assist protein folding. Spectacular conformational changes take place within each chaperonin ring using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. These changes result in transitions from the open to the closed ring. Substrate proteins bind to the open ring and are encapsulated within the closed ring cavity. We focus on the substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins. We predict substrate protein binding sites using structural and bioinformatic analyses of functional states during the chaperonin cycle. Based on large changes in solvent accessible surface area and contact maps we glean the functional role of chaperonin amino acids. During the transition between open to closed chaperonin ring, the largest change in accessible surface area of amino acids is found in helical protrusion and two helices located at the cavity opening. Our calculations suggest that the helical protrusion and two helices constitute the substrate protein binding site.

  9. Molecular Diversity Analysis and Genetic Mapping of Pod Shatter Resistance Loci in Brassica carinata L.

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    Rosy Raman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed lost due to easy pod dehiscence at maturity (pod shatter is a major problem in several members of Brassicaceae family. We investigated the level of pod shatter resistance in Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata and identified quantitative trait loci (QTL for targeted introgression of this trait in Ethiopian mustard and its close relatives of the genus Brassica. A set of 83 accessions of B. carinata, collected from the Australian Grains Genebank, was evaluated for pod shatter resistance based on pod rupture energy (RE. In comparison to B. napus (RE = 2.16 mJ, B. carinata accessions had higher RE values (2.53 to 20.82 mJ. A genetic linkage map of an F2 population from two contrasting B. carinata selections, BC73526 (shatter resistant with high RE and BC73524 (shatter prone with low RE comprising 300 individuals, was constructed using a set of 6,464 high quality DArTseq markers and subsequently used for QTL analysis. Genetic analysis of the F2 and F2:3 derived lines revealed five statistically significant QTL (LOD ≥ 3 that are linked with pod shatter resistance on chromosomes B1, B3, B8, and C5. Herein, we report for the first time, identification of genetic loci associated with pod shatter resistance in B. carinata. These characterized accessions would be useful in Brassica breeding programs for introgression of pod shatter resistance alleles in to elite breeding lines. Molecular markers would assist marker-assisted selection for tracing the introgression of resistant alleles. Our results suggest that the value of the germplasm collections can be harnessed through genetic and genomics tools.

  10. Structure of Pfu Pop5, an archaeal RNase P protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ross C; Bohlen, Christopher J; Foster, Mark P; Bell, Charles E

    2006-01-24

    We have used NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of PF1378 (Pfu Pop5), one of four protein subunits of archaeal RNase P that shares a homolog in the eukaryotic enzyme. RNase P is an essential and ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein enzyme required for maturation of tRNA. In bacteria, the enzyme's RNA subunit is responsible for cleaving the single-stranded 5' leader sequence of precursor tRNA molecules (pre-tRNA), whereas the protein subunit assists in substrate binding. Although in bacteria the RNase P holoenzyme consists of one large catalytic RNA and one small protein subunit, in archaea and eukarya the enzyme contains several (> or =4) protein subunits, each of which lacks sequence similarity to the bacterial protein. The functional role of the proteins is poorly understood, as is the increased complexity in comparison to the bacterial enzyme. Pfu Pop5 has been directly implicated in catalysis by the observation that it pairs with PF1914 (Pfu Rpp30) to functionally reconstitute the catalytic domain of the RNA subunit. The protein adopts an alpha-beta sandwich fold highly homologous to the single-stranded RNA binding RRM domain. Furthermore, the three-dimensional arrangement of Pfu Pop5's structural elements is remarkably similar to that of the bacterial protein subunit. NMR spectra have been used to map the interaction of Pop5 with Pfu Rpp30. The data presented permit tantalizing hypotheses regarding the role of this protein subunit shared by archaeal and eukaryotic RNase P.

  11. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected.

  12. Characterization of Olkiluoto bacterial and archaeal communities by 454 pyrosequencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M.

    2012-06-01

    Recent advancement in sequencing technologies, 'Next Generation Sequencing', such as FLX 454 pyrosequencing has made it possible to obtain large amounts of sequence data where previously only few sequences could be obtained. This technique is especially useful for the study of community composition of uncultured microbial populations in environmental samples. In this project, the FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to obtain up to 20 000 16S rRNA sequences or 10 000 mRNA sequences from each sample for identification of the microbial species composition as well as for comparison of the microbial communities between different samples. This project focused on the characterization of active microbial communities in the groundwater at the final disposal site of high radioactive wastes in Olkiluoto by FLX 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA as well as of the mRNA transcripts of the dsrB gene and mcrA gene of sulphate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea, respectively. Specific emphasis was put on studying the relationship of active and latent sulphate reducers and methanogens by qPCR due to their important roles in deep geobiochemical processes connected to copper corrosion. Seven packered boreholes were sampled anaerobically in Olkiluoto during 2009-2010. Groundwater was pumped from specific depths and the microbial cells werecollected by filtration on a membrane. Active microbial communities were studied based on RNA extracted from the membranes and translated to copy DNA, followed by sequencing by 454 Tag pyrosequencing. A total of 27 different bacterial and 17 archaeal taxonomic groups were detected

  13. Characterization of Unexplored Deadwood Mycobiome in Highly Diverse Subtropical Forests Using Culture-independent Molecular Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Pietsch, Katherina A; Lentendu, Guillaume; Schöps, Ricardo; Bruelheide, Helge; Wirth, Christian; Buscot, François; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2017-01-01

    The deadwood mycobiome, also known as wood-inhabiting fungi (WIF), are among the key players in wood decomposition, having a large impact on nutrient cycling in forest soils. However, our knowledge of WIF richness and distribution patterns in different forest biomes is limited. Here, we used pyrotag sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region to characterize the deadwood mycobiome of two tree species with greatly different wood characteristics ( Schima superba and Pinus massoniana ) in a Chinese subtropical forest ecosystem. Specifically, we tested (i) the effects of tree species and wood quality properties on WIF OTU richness and community composition; (ii) the role of biotic and abiotic factors in shaping the WIF communities; and (iii) the relationship between WIF OTU richness, community composition and decomposition rates. Due to different wood chemical properties, we hypothesized that the WIF communities derived from the two tree species would be correlated differently with biotic and abiotic factors. Our results show that deadwood in subtropical forests harbors diverse fungal communities comprising six ecological functional groups. We found interesting colonization patterns for this subtropical biome, where Resinicium spp. were highly detected in both broadleaved and coniferous deadwood. In addition, the members of Xylariales were frequently found in Schima . The two deadwood species differed significantly in WIF OTU richness ( Pinus > Schima ) and community composition ( P < 0.001). Variations in WIF community composition of both tree species were significantly explained by wood pH and ecological factors (biotic: deadwood species, basal area and abiotic: soil pH), but the WIF communities derived from each tree species correlated differently with abiotic factors. Interestingly, we found that deadwood decomposition rate significantly correlated with WIF communities and negatively correlated with WIF OTU richness. We conclude that the

  14. Novel archaeal macrocyclic diether core membrane lipids in a methane-derived carbonate crust from a mud volcano in the Sorokin Trough, NE Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Stadnitskaia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A methane-derived carbonate crust was collected from the recently discovered NIOZ mud volcano in the Sorokin Trough, NE Black Sea during the 11th Training-through-Research cruise of the R/V Professor Logachev. Among several specific bacterial and archaeal membrane lipids present in this crust, two novel macrocyclic diphytanyl glycerol diethers, containing one or two cyclopentane rings, were detected. Their structures were tentatively identified based on the interpretation of mass spectra, comparison with previously reported mass spectral data, and a hydrogenation experiment. This macrocyclic type of archaeal core membrane diether lipid has so far been identified only in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent methanogen Methanococcus jannaschii. Here, we provide the first evidence that these macrocyclic diethers can also contain internal cyclopentane rings. The molecular structure of the novel diethers resembles that of dibiphytanyl tetraethers in which biphytane chains, containing one and two pentacyclic rings, also occur. Such tetraethers were abundant in the crust. Compound-specific isotope measurements revealed δ13C values of –104 to –111‰ for these new archaeal lipids, indicating that they are derived from methanotrophic archaea acting within anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia, which subsequently induce authigenic carbonate formation.

  15. 454 pyrosequencing analyses of bacterial and archaeal richness in 21 full-scale biogas digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Carina; Al-Soud, Waleed A; Larsson, Madeleine; Alm, Erik; Yekta, Sepehr S; Svensson, Bo H; Sørensen, Søren J; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-09-01

    The microbial community of 21 full-scale biogas reactors was examined using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These reactors included seven (six mesophilic and one thermophilic) digesting sewage sludge (SS) and 14 (ten mesophilic and four thermophilic) codigesting (CD) various combinations of wastes from slaughterhouses, restaurants, households, etc. The pyrosequencing generated more than 160,000 sequences representing 11 phyla, 23 classes, and 95 genera of Bacteria and Archaea. The bacterial community was always both more abundant and more diverse than the archaeal community. At the phylum level, the foremost populations in the SS reactors included Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Spirochetes, and Euryarchaeota, while Firmicutes was the most prevalent in the CD reactors. The main bacterial class in all reactors was Clostridia. Acetoclastic methanogens were detected in the SS, but not in the CD reactors. Their absence suggests that methane formation from acetate takes place mainly via syntrophic acetate oxidation in the CD reactors. A principal component analysis of the communities at genus level revealed three clusters: SS reactors, mesophilic CD reactors (including one thermophilic CD and one SS), and thermophilic CD reactors. Thus, the microbial composition was mainly governed by the substrate differences and the process temperature. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tracing the Repertoire of Promiscuous Enzymes along the Metabolic Pathways in Archaeal Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic pathways that carry out the biochemical transformations sustaining life depend on the efficiency of their associated enzymes. In recent years, it has become clear that promiscuous enzymes have played an important role in the function and evolution of metabolism. In this work we analyze the repertoire of promiscuous enzymes in 89 non-redundant genomes of the Archaea cellular domain. Promiscuous enzymes are defined as those proteins with two or more different Enzyme Commission (E.C.) numbers, according the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. From this analysis, it was found that the fraction of promiscuous enzymes is lower in Archaea than in Bacteria. A greater diversity of superfamily domains is associated with promiscuous enzymes compared to specialized enzymes, both in Archaea and Bacteria, and there is an enrichment of substrate promiscuity rather than catalytic promiscuity in the archaeal enzymes. Finally, the presence of promiscuous enzymes in the metabolic pathways was found to be heterogeneously distributed at the domain level and in the phyla that make up the Archaea. These analyses increase our understanding of promiscuous enzymes and provide additional clues to the evolution of metabolism in Archaea. PMID:28703743

  17. A dimeric Rep protein initiates replication of a linear archaeal virus genome: implications for the Rep mechanism and viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting

    2011-01-01

    that a protein encoded in the 34-kbp genome of the rudivirus SIRV1 is a member of the replication initiator (Rep) superfamily of proteins, which initiate rolling-circle replication (RCR) of diverse viruses and plasmids. We show that SIRV Rep nicks the viral hairpin terminus, forming a covalent adduct between...... positioned active sites, each with a single tyrosine residue, work in tandem to catalyze DNA nicking and joining. We propose a novel mechanism for rudivirus DNA replication, incorporating the first known example of a Rep protein that is not linked to RCR. The implications for Rep protein function and viral......The Rudiviridae are a family of rod-shaped archaeal viruses with covalently closed, linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Their replication mechanisms remain obscure, although parallels have been drawn to the Poxviridae and other large cytoplasmic eukaryotic viruses. Here we report...

  18. Molecular genetics and diversity of primary biogenic aerosol particles in urban, rural, and high-alpine air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, V.; Nowoisky, J.; Klose, M.; Conrad, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2007-02-01

    This study explores the applicability of molecular methods for the characterization of primary biogenic aerosol (PBA) particles in the atmosphere. Samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and total suspended particulates (TSP) have been collected on different types of filter materials at urban, rural, and high-alpine locations along an altitude transect in the south of Germany (Munich, Hohenpeissenberg, Mt. Zugspitze). From filter aliquots loaded with about one milligram of air particulate matter, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences could be determined for bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Sequence analyses were used to determine the identity of biological organisms, and terminal restriction length polymorphism analyses (T-RFLP) were applied to estimate diversities and relative abundances of bacteria. Investigations of blank and background samples showed that filter materials have to be decontaminated prior to use, and that the sampling and handling procedures have to be carefully controlled to avoid artifacts in the analyses. Mass fractions of DNA in PM2.5 were found to be around 0.05% in urban, rural, and high alpine aerosols. The average concentration of DNA determined for urban air was on the order of ~7 ng m-3, indicating that human adults may inhale about one microgram of DNA per day (corresponding to ~105 haploid human genomes). Most of the bacterial sequences found in PM2.5 were from Proteobacteria (42) and some from Actinobacteria (10) and Firmicutes (1). The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota (3) and Basidiomycetes (1), which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be attributed to green plants (2) and moss spores (2), while animal DNA was found only for one unicellular eukaryote (protist). Over 80% of the 53 bacterial sequences could be matched with about 40% of the 19 T-RF peaks (58 to 494 base pair length) found in the investigated PM2.5 samples. The results demonstrate that the T

  19. ENERGY-TRANSDUCING PROPERTIES OF PRIMARY PROTON PUMPS RECONSTITUTED INTO ARCHAEAL BIPOLAR LIPID VESICLES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ELFERINK, MGL; DEWIT, JG; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN; Elferink, Marieke G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Archaeal lipids differ considerably from eubacterial and eukaryotic lipids in their structure and physical properties. From the membranes of the extreme thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a tetraether lipid fraction was isolated, which can form closed and stable monolayer liposomes in

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the archaeal virus resolvase SIRV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennifar, Eric [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Meyerhofstrasse 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); UPR9002 CNRS, associated with the Université Louis Pasteur, 15 Rue René Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Basquin, Jerôme [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Meyerhofstrasse 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Birkenbihl, Rainer [MPI für Züchtungsforschung, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829 Köln (Germany); Suck, Dietrich, E-mail: suck@embl.de [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Meyerhofstrasse 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The Holliday junction resolvase of the archaeal virus SIRV2 infecting the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus has been crystallized and a full data set has been collected at 3.4 Å resolution. Analysis of the self-rotation function suggests the presence of two dimers in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 77%. The Holliday junction (or four-way junction) is the universal DNA intermediate whose interaction with resolving proteins is one of the major events in the recombinational process. These proteins, called DNA junction-resolving enzymes or resolvases, bind to the junction and catalyse DNA cleavage, promoting the release of two DNA duplexes. SIRV2 Hjc, a viral resolvase infecting a thermophylic archaeon, has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals have been obtained in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 147.8, b = 99.9, c = 87.6, β = 109.46°, and a full data set has been collected at 3.4 Å resolution. The self-rotation function indicates the presence of two dimers in the asymmetric unit and a high solvent content (77%). Molecular-replacement trials using known similar resolvase structures have so far been unsuccessful, indicating possible significant structural rearrangements.

  1. Phylogeography and molecular diversity analysis of Jatropha curcas L. and the dispersal route revealed by RAPD, AFLP and nrDNA-ITS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer Pamidimarri, D V N; Reddy, Muppala P

    2014-05-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) has acquired a great importance as a renewable source of energy with a number of environmental benefits. Very few attempts were made to understand the extent of genetic diversity and its distribution. This study was aimed to study the diversity and deduce the phylogeography of Jatropha curcas L. which is said to be the most primitive species of the genus Jatropha. Here we studied the intraspecific genetic diversity of the species distributed in different parts of the globe. The study also focused to understand the molecular diversity at reported probable center of origin (Mexico), and to reveal the dispersal route to other regions based on random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism and nrDNA-ITS sequences data. The overall genetic diversity of J. curcas found in the present study was narrow. The highest genetic diversity was observed in the germplasm collected from Mexico and supports the earlier hypothesis based on morphological data and natural distribution, it is the center for origin of the species. Least genetic diversity found in the Indian germplasm and clustering results revealed that the species was introduced simultaneously by two distinct germplasm and subsequently distributed in different parts of India. The present molecular data further revealed that J. curcas might have spread from the center of the origin to Cape Verde, than to Spain, Portuguese to other neighboring countries and simultaneously to Africa. The molecular evidence supports the Burkill et al. (A dictionary of the economic products of the Malay Peninsula, Governments of Malaysia and Singapore by the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 1966) view of Portuguese might have introduced the species to India. The clustering pattern suggests that the distribution was interfered by human activity.

  2. Phylogeography and molecular diversity analysis of Jatropha curcas L. and the dispersal route revealed by RAPD, AFLP and nrDNA-ITS analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sudheer Pamidimarri, D. V N

    2014-01-29

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) has acquired a great importance as a renewable source of energy with a number of environmental benefits. Very few attempts were made to understand the extent of genetic diversity and its distribution. This study was aimed to study the diversity and deduce the phylogeography of Jatropha curcas L. which is said to be the most primitive species of the genus Jatropha. Here we studied the intraspecific genetic diversity of the species distributed in different parts of the globe. The study also focused to understand the molecular diversity at reported probable center of origin (Mexico), and to reveal the dispersal route to other regions based on random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism and nrDNA-ITS sequences data. The overall genetic diversity of J. curcas found in the present study was narrow. The highest genetic diversity was observed in the germplasm collected from Mexico and supports the earlier hypothesis based on morphological data and natural distribution, it is the center for origin of the species. Least genetic diversity found in the Indian germplasm and clustering results revealed that the species was introduced simultaneously by two distinct germplasm and subsequently distributed in different parts of India. The present molecular data further revealed that J. curcas might have spread from the center of the origin to Cape Verde, than to Spain, Portuguese to other neighboring countries and simultaneously to Africa. The molecular evidence supports the Burkill et al. (A dictionary of the economic products of the Malay Peninsula, Governments of Malaysia and Singapore by the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 1966) view of Portuguese might have introduced the species to India. The clustering pattern suggests that the distribution was interfered by human activity. © Springer Science+Business Media 2014.

  3. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on Archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark........ Overall, there seemed to be a significant coupling between peat type and archaeal community composition, with local hydrology modifying the strength of this coupling....

  4. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Sarah; Nia, Yacine; Botteldoorn, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS). Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA), and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) investigations are presented. PMID:29261162

  5. A high-throughput peptidomic strategy to decipher the molecular diversity of cyclic cysteine-rich peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Aida; Hemu, Xinya; Nguyen, Giang K T; Nguyen, Ngan T K; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tam, James P

    2016-03-11

    Cyclotides are plant cyclic cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). The cyclic nature is reported to be gene-determined with a precursor containing a cyclization-competent domain which contains an essential C-terminal Asn/Asp (Asx) processing signal recognized by a cyclase. Linear forms of cyclotides are rare and are likely uncyclizable because they lack this essential C-terminal Asx signal (uncyclotide). Here we show that in the cyclotide-producing plant Clitoria ternatea, both cyclic and acyclic products, collectively named cliotides, can be bioprocessed from the same cyclization-competent precursor. Using an improved peptidomic strategy coupled with the novel Asx-specific endopeptidase butelase 2 to linearize cliotides at a biosynthetic ligation site for transcriptomic analysis, we characterized 272 cliotides derived from 38 genes. Several types of post-translational modifications of the processed cyclotides were observed, including deamidation, oxidation, hydroxylation, dehydration, glycosylation, methylation, and truncation. Taken together, our results suggest that cyclotide biosynthesis involves 'fuzzy' processing of precursors into both cyclic and linear forms as well as post-translational modifications to achieve molecular diversity, which is a commonly found trait of natural product biosynthesis.

  6. Diversity and Phylogeny of Gymnodiniales (Dinophyceae) from the NW Mediterranean Sea Revealed by a Morphological and Molecular Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reñé, Albert; Camp, Jordi; Garcés, Esther

    2015-05-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of dinoflagellates belonging to the Gymnodiniales were studied during a 3-year period at several coastal stations along the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean) by combining analyses of their morphological features with rDNA sequencing. This approach resulted in the detection of 59 different morphospecies, 13 of which were observed for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. Fifteen of the detected species were HAB producers; four represented novel detections on the Catalan coast and two in the Mediterranean Sea. Partial rDNA sequences were obtained for 50 different morphospecies, including novel LSU rDNA sequences for 27 species, highlighting the current scarcity of molecular information for this group of dinoflagellates. The combination of morphology and genetics allowed the first determinations of the phylogenetic position of several genera, i.e., Torodinium and many Gyrodinium and Warnowiacean species. The results also suggested that among the specimens belonging to the genera Gymnodinium, Apicoporus, and Cochlodinium were those representing as yet undescribed species. Furthermore, the phylogenetic data suggested taxonomic incongruences for some species, i.e., Gyrodinium undulans and Gymnodinium agaricoides. Although a species complex related to G. spirale was detected, the partial LSU rDNA sequences lacked sufficient resolution to discriminate between various other Gyrodinium morphospecies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphological and molecular diversity and abundance of tomentelloid ectomycorrhizae in broad-leaved forests of the Hungarian Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakucs, Erzsébet; Kovács, Gábor M; Szedlay, Gyöngyi; Eros-Honti, Zsolt

    2005-09-01

    The most common representatives of tomentelloid ectomycorrhizae (EM) collected in broad-leaved forests (Populus and Quercus) of the Hungarian Plain during a 4-year project are demonstrated. Eighteen specimens of nine tomentelloid EM morphotypes were investigated. Five of these, introduced here for the first time, were characterized by microscopical-morphological and anatomical methods. Molecular identification was carried out using sequence analysis of the nrDNA ITS region. Altogether, 54 ITS sequences (6 previously published and 12 new sequences from our mycorrhizae and 36 from GenBank derived from fruitbodies) were compared by phylogenetic analyses using neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. Identification to species level was successful in the case of six EM morphotypes (Tomentella galzinii, T. subtestacea, T. sublilacina, T. pilosa, T. ferruginea and T. stuposa), and the possible taxonomic position of the remaining three was approached. These results are supported by morphology, as compared with literature data. Relative abundance of the EM morphotypes within the soil samples was estimated. Our results confirm that tomentelloid EM are constant, diverse and abundant members of the EM communities in temperate-continental broad-leaved forests.

  8. Molecular Techniques Revealed Highly Diverse Microbial Communities in Natural Marine Biofilms on Polystyrene Dishes for Invertebrate Larval Settlement

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, On On

    2014-01-09

    Biofilm microbial communities play an important role in the larval settlement response of marine invertebrates. However, the underlying mechanism has yet to be resolved, mainly because of the uncertainties in characterizing members in the communities using traditional 16S rRNA gene-based molecular methods and in identifying the chemical signals involved. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to characterize the bacterial communities in intertidal and subtidal marine biofilms developed during two seasons. We revealed highly diverse biofilm bacterial communities that varied with season and tidal level. Over 3,000 operational taxonomic units with estimates of up to 8,000 species were recovered in a biofilm sample, which is by far the highest number recorded in subtropical marine biofilms. Nineteen phyla were found, of which Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria were the most dominant one in the intertidal and subtidal biofilms, respectively. Apart from these, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes were the major groups recovered in both intertidal and subtidal biofilms, although their relative abundance varied among samples. Full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed for the four biofilm samples and showed similar bacterial compositions at the phylum level to those revealed by pyrosequencing. Laboratory assays confirmed that cyrids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite preferred to settle on the intertidal rather than subtidal biofilms. This preference was independent of the biofilm bacterial density or biomass but was probably related to the biofilm community structure, particularly, the Proteobacterial and Cyanobacterial groups. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  9. Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of the Cuban cave-fishes of the genus Lucifuga: evidence for cryptic allopatric diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Machado, Erik; Hernández, Damir; García-Debrás, Alfredo; Chevalier-Monteagudo, Pedro; Metcalfe, Cushla; Bernatchez, Louis; Casane, Didier

    2011-11-01

    Underground environments are increasingly recognized as reservoirs of faunal diversity. Extreme environmental conditions and limited dispersal ability of underground organisms have been acknowledged as important factors promoting divergence between species and conspecific populations. However, in many instances, there is no correlation between genetic divergence and morphological differentiation. Lucifuga Poey is a stygobiotic fish genus that lives in Cuban and Bahamian caves. In Cuba, it offers a unique opportunity to study the influence of habitat fragmentation on the genetic divergence of stygobiotic species and populations. The genus includes four species and one morphological variant that have contrasting geographical distributions. In this study, we first performed a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Lucifuga Cuban species using mitochondrial and nuclear markers. The mitochondrial phylogeny revealed three deeply divergent clades that were supported by nuclear and morphological characters. Within two of these main clades, we identified five lineages that are candidate cryptic species and a taxonomical synonymy between Lucifuga subterranea and Lucifuga teresinarum. Secondly, phylogeographic analysis using a fragment of the cytochrome b gene was performed for Lucifuga dentata, the most widely distributed species. We found strong geographical organization of the haplotype clades at different geographic scales that can be explained by episodes of dispersal and population expansion followed by population fragmentation and restricted gene flow. At a larger temporal scale, these processes could also explain the diversification and the distribution of the different species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Evaluation of Molecular Genetic Diversity of Wild Apple Malus sieversii Populations from Zailiysky Alatau by Microsatellite Markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omasheva, M E; Chekalin, S V; Galiakparov, N N

    2015-07-01

    The territory of Kazakhstan is part of the distribution range of Malus sieversii, which is one of the ancestors of cultivated apple tree varieties. The collected samples of Sievers apple leaves from five populations growing in the Zailiysky Alatau region served as a source not only for the creation of a bank of genomic DNA but also for determination ofthe wild apple genetic polymorphism. The seven microsatellite markers used in this study revealed 86 alleles with different frequencies, as well as the characteristic pools of rare alleles for each of the populations. Molecular genetic analysis showed a high level of genetic diversity (H(o) = 0.704; PIC = 0.752; I = 1.617). Moreover, interpopulation variability accounted only for 7.5% of total variability, confirming the genetic closeness of the populations examined. Based on phylogenetic analysis, it was demonstrated that the Bel'bulak and Almaty Reserve populations were closest to each other, while the most distant were the Ketmen and Great Almaty gorge populations, which suggests the dependence of genetic distance on the geographical.

  11. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Sarah; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Nia, Yacine; Botteldoorn, Nadine

    2017-12-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS). Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA), and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) investigations are presented.

  12. Food-Borne Outbreak Investigation and Molecular Typing: High Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains and Importance of Toxin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Denayer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important aetiological agent of food intoxications in the European Union as it can cause gastro-enteritis through the production of various staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs in foods. Reported enterotoxin dose levels causing food-borne illness are scarce and varying. Three food poisoning outbreaks due to enterotoxin-producing S. aureus strains which occurred in 2013 in Belgium are described. The outbreaks occurred in an elderly home, at a barbecue event and in a kindergarten and involved 28, 18, and six cases, respectively. Various food leftovers contained coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS. Low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxins ranging between 0.015 ng/g and 0.019 ng/g for enterotoxin A (SEA, and corresponding to 0.132 ng/g for SEC were quantified in the food leftovers for two of the reported outbreaks. Molecular typing of human and food isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and enterotoxin gene typing, confirmed the link between patients and the suspected foodstuffs. This also demonstrated the high diversity of CPS isolates both in the cases and in healthy persons carrying enterotoxin genes encoding emetic SEs for which no detection methods currently exist. For one outbreak, the investigation pointed out to the food handler who transmitted the outbreak strain to the food. Tools to improve staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP investigations are presented.

  13. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  14. Host Specificity for Bacterial, Archaeal and Fungal Communities Determined for High- and Low-Microbial Abundance Sponge Species in Two Genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Chaib De Mares

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sponges are engaged in intimate symbioses with a diversity of microorganisms from all three domains of life, namely Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Sponges have been well studied and categorized for their bacterial communities, some displaying a high microbial abundance (HMA, while others show low microbial abundance (LMA. However, the associated Archaea and Eukarya have remained relatively understudied. We assessed the bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic diversities in the LMA sponge species Dysidea avara and Dysidea etheria by deep amplicon sequencing, and compared the results to those in the HMA sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Aplysina cauliformis. D. avara and A. aerophoba are sympatric in the Mediterranean Sea, while D. etheria and A. cauliformis are sympatric in the Caribbean Sea. The bacterial communities followed a host-specific pattern, with host species identity explaining most of the variation among samples. We identified OTUs shared by the Aplysina species that support a more ancient association of these microbes, before the split of the two species studied here. These shared OTUs are suitable targets for future studies of the microbial traits that mediate interactions with their hosts. Even though the archaeal communities were not as rich as the bacterial ones, we found a remarkable diversification and specificity of OTUs of the family Cenarchaeaceae and the genus Nitrosopumilus in all four sponge species studied. Similarly, the differences in fungal communities were driven by sponge identity. The structures of the communities of small eukaryotes such as dinophytes and ciliophores (alveolates, and stramenopiles, could not be explained by either sponge host, sponge genus or geographic location. Our analyses suggest that the host specificity that was previously described for sponge bacterial communities also extends to the archaeal and fungal communities, but not to other microbial eukaryotes.

  15. Microbial diversity of hydrothermal sediments in the Guaymas Basin: evidence for anaerobic methanotrophic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Edgcomb, Virginia; de Vera Gomez, Alvin; Kysela, David; Sylva, Sean P; Sogin, Mitchell L; Jannasch, Holger W

    2002-04-01

    Microbial communities in hydrothermally active sediments of the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) were studied by using 16S rRNA sequencing and carbon isotopic analysis of archaeal and bacterial lipids. The Guaymas sediments harbored uncultured euryarchaeota of two distinct phylogenetic lineages within the anaerobic methane oxidation 1 (ANME-1) group, ANME-1a and ANME-1b, and of the ANME-2c lineage within the Methanosarcinales, both previously assigned to the methanotrophic archaea. The archaeal lipids in the Guaymas Basin sediments included archaeol, diagnostic for nonthermophilic euryarchaeota, and sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol, with the latter compound being particularly abundant in cultured members of the Methanosarcinales. The concentrations of these compounds were among the highest observed so far in studies of methane seep environments. The delta-(13)C values of these lipids (delta-(13)C = -89 to -58 per thousand) indicate an origin from anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. This molecular-isotopic signature was found not only in samples that yielded predominantly ANME-2 clones but also in samples that yielded exclusively ANME-1 clones. ANME-1 archaea therefore remain strong candidates for mediation of the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Based on 16S rRNA data, the Guaymas sediments harbor phylogenetically diverse bacterial populations, which show considerable overlap with bacterial populations of geothermal habitats and natural or anthropogenic hydrocarbon-rich sites. Consistent with earlier observations, our combined evidence from bacterial phylogeny and molecular-isotopic data indicates an important role of some novel deeply branching bacteria in anaerobic methanotrophy. Anaerobic methane oxidation likely represents a significant and widely occurring process in the trophic ecology of methane-rich hydrothermal vents. This study stresses a high diversity among communities capable of anaerobic oxidation of methane.

  16. Effect of Pre-weaning Diet on the Ruminal Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Communities of Dairy Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Juliana; Marcondes, Marcos I; Noronha, Melline F; Resende, Rafael T; Machado, Fernanda S; Mantovani, Hilário C; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A; Suen, Garret

    2017-01-01

    At birth, calves display an underdeveloped rumen that eventually matures into a fully functional rumen as a result of solid food intake and microbial activity. However, little is known regarding the gradual impact of pre-weaning diet on the establishment of the rumen microbiota. Here, we employed next-generation sequencing to investigate the effects of the inclusion of starter concentrate (M: milk-fed vs. MC: milk plus starter concentrate fed) on archaeal, bacterial and anaerobic fungal communities in the rumens of 45 crossbred dairy calves across pre-weaning development (7, 28, 49, and 63 days). Our results show that archaeal, bacterial, and fungal taxa commonly found in the mature rumen were already established in the rumens of calves at 7 days old, regardless of diet. This confirms that microbiota colonization occurs in the absence of solid substrate. However, diet did significantly impact some microbial taxa. In the bacterial community, feeding starter concentrate promoted greater diversity of bacterial taxa known to degrade readily fermentable carbohydrates in the rumen (e.g., Megasphaera, Sharpea , and Succinivribrio ). Shifts in the ruminal bacterial community also correlated to changes in fermentation patterns that favored the colonization of Methanosphaera sp. A4 in the rumen of MC calves. In contrast, M calves displayed a bacterial community dominated by taxa able to utilize milk nutrients (e.g., Lactobacillus, Bacteroides , and Parabacteroides ). In both diet groups, the dominance of these milk-associated taxa decreased with age, suggesting that diet and age simultaneously drive changes in the structure and abundance of bacterial communities in the developing rumen. Changes in the composition and abundance of archaeal communities were attributed exclusively to diet, with more highly abundant Methanosphaera and less abundant Methanobrevibacter in MC calves. Finally, the fungal community was dominated by members of the genus SK3 and Caecomyces . Relative

  17. Effect of Pre-weaning Diet on the Ruminal Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Communities of Dairy Calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Juliana; Marcondes, Marcos I.; Noronha, Melline F.; Resende, Rafael T.; Machado, Fernanda S.; Mantovani, Hilário C.; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A.; Suen, Garret

    2017-01-01

    At birth, calves display an underdeveloped rumen that eventually matures into a fully functional rumen as a result of solid food intake and microbial activity. However, little is known regarding the gradual impact of pre-weaning diet on the establishment of the rumen microbiota. Here, we employed next-generation sequencing to investigate the effects of the inclusion of starter concentrate (M: milk-fed vs. MC: milk plus starter concentrate fed) on archaeal, bacterial and anaerobic fungal communities in the rumens of 45 crossbred dairy calves across pre-weaning development (7, 28, 49, and 63 days). Our results show that archaeal, bacterial, and fungal taxa commonly found in the mature rumen were already established in the rumens of calves at 7 days old, regardless of diet. This confirms that microbiota colonization occurs in the absence of solid substrate. However, diet did significantly impact some microbial taxa. In the bacterial community, feeding starter concentrate promoted greater diversity of bacterial taxa known to degrade readily fermentable carbohydrates in the rumen (e.g., Megasphaera, Sharpea, and Succinivribrio). Shifts in the ruminal bacterial community also correlated to changes in fermentation patterns that favored the colonization of Methanosphaera sp. A4 in the rumen of MC calves. In contrast, M calves displayed a bacterial community dominated by taxa able to utilize milk nutrients (e.g., Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Parabacteroides). In both diet groups, the dominance of these milk-associated taxa decreased with age, suggesting that diet and age simultaneously drive changes in the structure and abundance of bacterial communities in the developing rumen. Changes in the composition and abundance of archaeal communities were attributed exclusively to diet, with more highly abundant Methanosphaera and less abundant Methanobrevibacter in MC calves. Finally, the fungal community was dominated by members of the genus SK3 and Caecomyces. Relative

  18. Molecular diversity in rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta makes it highly effective against dynamic population of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, S; Gupta, Y K; Singh, P K; Rathour, R; Variar, M; Prashanthi, S K; Singh, A K; Singh, U D; Chand, D; Rana, J C; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2013-08-01

    Rice blast is one of the important diseases of rice which can be effectively managed by the deployment of resistance genes. Pi-ta is one of the major blast resistant genes effective against pathogen populations in different parts of India. We analysed allelic variants of Pi-ta from 48 rice lines selected after phenotyping of 529 rice landraces across three eco-geographical blast hot spot regions. Besides, Pi-ta orthologue sequences of 220 rice accessions belonging to wild and cultivated species of rice were also included in the study for a better evo-devo perspective of the diversity present in the gene and the selection pressures acting on this locus. We obtained high nucleotide variations (SNPs and insertion-deletions) in the intronic region. We also identified 64 haplotypes based on nucleotide polymorphism in these alleles. Pi-ta orthologues of Indian landraces were scattered in eight major haplotypes indicating its heterogenous nature. We identified a total of 47 different Pi-ta protein variants on the basis of deduced amino acid residues amongst the orthologues. Five unique and novel Pi-ta variants were identified for the first time in rice landraces exhibiting different reaction types against the Magnaporthe oryzae population. A high value of Pi(non/syn) was observed only in the leucine-rich domain of the alleles cloned from Indian landraces, indicating strong selective forces acting on this region. The detailed molecular analysis of the Pi-ta orthologues provides insights to a high degree of inter- and intraspecific relationships amongst the Oryza species. We identified rice landraces possessing the effective alleles of this resistance gene which can be used in future blast resistance breeding programmes.

  19. Unravelling the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Diversity among Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates from South India Using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellapragada, Chaitanya; Kamthan, Aayushi; Shaw, Tushar; Ke, Vandana; Kumar, Subodh; Bhat, Vinod; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    There is a slow but steady rise in the case detection rates of melioidosis from various parts of the Indian sub-continent in the past two decades. However, the epidemiology of the disease in India and the surrounding South Asian countries remains far from well elucidated. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) is a useful epidemiological tool to study the genetic relatedness of bacterial isolates both with-in and across the countries. With this background, we studied the molecular epidemiology of 32 Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates (31 clinical and 1 soil isolate) obtained during 2006-2015 from various parts of south India using multi-locus sequencing typing and analysis. Of the 32 isolates included in the analysis, 30 (93.7%) had novel allelic profiles that were not reported previously. Sequence type (ST) 1368 (n = 15, 46.8%) with allelic profile (1, 4, 6, 4, 1, 1, 3) was the most common genotype observed. We did not observe a genotypic association of STs with geographical location, type of infection and year of isolation in the present study. Measure of genetic differentiation (FST) between Indian and the rest of world isolates was 0.14413. Occurrence of the same ST across three adjacent states of south India suggest the dispersion of B.pseudomallei across the south western coastal part of India with limited geographical clustering. However, majority of the STs reported from the present study remained as "outliers" on the eBURST "Population snapshot", suggesting the genetic diversity of Indian isolates from the Australasian and Southeast Asian isolates.

  20. Molecular recognition in a diverse set of protein-ligand interactions studied with molecular dynamics simulations and end-point free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Liwei; Hurley, Thomas D; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-10-28

    End-point free energy calculations using MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA provide a detailed understanding of molecular recognition in protein-ligand interactions. The binding free energy can be used to rank-order protein-ligand structures in virtual screening for compound or target identification. Here, we carry out free energy calculations for a diverse set of 11 proteins bound to 14 small molecules using extensive explicit-solvent MD simulations. The structure of these complexes was previously solved by crystallography and their binding studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data enabling direct comparison to the MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA calculations. Four MM-GBSA and three MM-PBSA calculations reproduced the ITC free energy within 1 kcal·mol(-1) highlighting the challenges in reproducing the absolute free energy from end-point free energy calculations. MM-GBSA exhibited better rank-ordering with a Spearman ρ of 0.68 compared to 0.40 for MM-PBSA with dielectric constant (ε = 1). An increase in ε resulted in significantly better rank-ordering for MM-PBSA (ρ = 0.91 for ε = 10), but larger ε significantly reduced the contributions of electrostatics, suggesting that the improvement is due to the nonpolar and entropy components, rather than a better representation of the electrostatics. The SVRKB scoring function applied to MD snapshots resulted in excellent rank-ordering (ρ = 0.81). Calculations of the configurational entropy using normal-mode analysis led to free energies that correlated significantly better to the ITC free energy than the MD-based quasi-harmonic approach, but the computed entropies showed no correlation with the ITC entropy. When the adaptation energy is taken into consideration by running separate simulations for complex, apo, and ligand (MM-PBSAADAPT), there is less agreement with the ITC data for the individual free energies, but remarkably good rank-ordering is observed (ρ = 0.89). Interestingly, filtering MD snapshots by prescoring

  1. Spatial distribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers in the littoral buffer zone of a nitrogen-rich lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Guibing; Ye, Lei; Feng, Xiaojuan; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Yin, Chengqing

    2012-01-01

    The spatial distribution and diversity of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB) were evaluated targeting amoA genes in the gradient of a littoral buffer zone which has been identified as a hot spot for N cycling. Here we found high spatial heterogeneity in the nitrification rate and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in the five sampling sites. The bacterial amoA gene was numerically dominant in most of the surface soil but decreased dramatically in deep layers. Higher nitrification potentials were detected in two sites near the land/water interface at 4.4-6.1 microg NO(2-)-N/(g dry weight soil x hr), while only 1.0-1.7 microg NO(2-)-N/(g dry weight soil x hr) was measured at other sites. The potential nitrification rates were proportional to the amoA gene abundance for AOB, but with no significant correlation with AOA. The NH4+ concentration was the most determinative parameter for the abundance of AOB and potential nitrification rates in this study. Higher richness in the surface layer was found in the analysis of biodiversity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the bacterial amoA sequences in surface soil were affiliated with the genus of Nitrosopira while the archaeal sequences were almost equally affiliated with Candidatus 'Nitrososphaera gargensis' and Candidatus 'Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii'. The spatial distribution of AOA and AOB indicated that bacteria may play a more important role in nitrification in the littoral buffer zone of a N-rich lake.

  2. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Demina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly—the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase—placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion.

  3. Geomicrobiology of Archaeal Communities Isolated from an Off-axis Abyssal Hill Fault Scarp on the East Pacific Rise Flank at 9° 27'N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, C. J.; Haymon, R.; Holden, P.; Lamontagne, M.

    2003-12-01

    Although heat flow studies suggest that ~70% of the hydrothermal heat loss in the oceans occurs in the abyssal hill terrain on the flanks of mid-ocean ridges, very few off-axis hydrothermal sites have been discovered. In May 2002, sedimentary blowout structures of probable hydrothermal origin were discovered along East Pacific Rise at 9° 27'N on an off-axis abyssal hill bounded by a fault scarp covered with orange-brown microbial flocculations. Recovered samples of these flocculations have presented an opportunity to study the unknown nature and role of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microbial communities on the ridge flanks. Furthermore, the archaeal communities that we have identified in the samples are useful "microbial tracers" which can be used to locate off-axis areas of moderate-to-high temperature fluid flow (>50° C). In this study, we used molecular techniques to isolate, amplify, and sequence community archaeal RNA sequences from fault scarp flocculations collected with a slurp pump system mounted in the Alvin basket. Molecular phylogenies based on 16S rRNA were constructed. Phylogenetic relationships of isolated clones were used to infer temperature preferences of archaeal communities. We identified 12 clones that clustered within thermophilic or hyperthermophilic clades within Archaea suggesting that moderately high temperature fluid (>50° C) exited the seafloor along this abyssal hill fault scarp. Our studies also suggest that these communities mediate the formation of Fe-sulfide mineral phases. Analysis of the samples with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDS) revealed unique iron sulfide mineral phases with anomalously low Fe/S ratios in direct association with microbial communities.

  4. CoBaltDB: Complete bacterial and archaeal orfeomes subcellular localization database and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucchetti-Miganeh Céline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of proteins are strongly related to their localization in cell compartments (for example the cytoplasm or membranes but the experimental determination of the sub-cellular localization of proteomes is laborious and expensive. A fast and low-cost alternative approach is in silico prediction, based on features of the protein primary sequences. However, biologists are confronted with a very large number of computational tools that use different methods that address various localization features with diverse specificities and sensitivities. As a result, exploiting these computer resources to predict protein localization accurately involves querying all tools and comparing every prediction output; this is a painstaking task. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive database, called CoBaltDB, that gathers all prediction outputs concerning complete prokaryotic proteomes. Description The current version of CoBaltDB integrates the results of 43 localization predictors for 784 complete bacterial and archaeal proteomes (2.548.292 proteins in total. CoBaltDB supplies a simple user-friendly interface for retrieving and exploring relevant information about predicted features (such as signal peptide cleavage sites and transmembrane segments. Data are organized into three work-sets ("specialized tools", "meta-tools" and "additional tools". The database can be queried using the organism name, a locus tag or a list of locus tags and may be browsed using numerous graphical and text displays. Conclusions With its new functionalities, CoBaltDB is a novel powerful platform that provides easy access to the results of multiple localization tools and support for predicting prokaryotic protein localizations with higher confidence than previously possible. CoBaltDB is available at http://www.umr6026.univ-rennes1.fr/english/home/research/basic/software/cobalten.

  5. Shifts of tundra bacterial and archaeal communities along a permafrost thaw gradient in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Gu, Yunfu; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Kai; Qin, Yujia; Yuan, Mengting; Yin, Huaqun; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Schuur, Edward A G; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the response of permafrost microbial communities to climate warming is crucial for evaluating ecosystem feedbacks to global change. This study investigated soil bacterial and archaeal communities by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons across a permafrost thaw gradient at different depths in Alaska with thaw progression for over three decades. Over 4.6 million passing 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from a total of 97 samples, corresponding to 61 known classes and 470 genera. Soil depth and the associated soil physical-chemical properties had predominant impacts on the diversity and composition of the microbial communities. Both richness and evenness of the microbial communities decreased with soil depth. Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Alpha- and Gamma-Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities in the upper horizon, whereas abundances of Bacteroidetes, Delta-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased towards deeper soils. Effects of thaw progression were absent in microbial communities in the near-surface organic soil, probably due to greater temperature variation. Thaw progression decreased the abundances of the majority of the associated taxa in the lower organic soil, but increased the abundances of those in the mineral soil, including groups potentially involved in recalcitrant C degradation (Actinomycetales, Chitinophaga, etc.). The changes in microbial communities may be related to altered soil C sources by thaw progression. Collectively, this study revealed different impacts of thaw in the organic and mineral horizons and suggests the importance of studying both the upper and deeper soils while evaluating microbial responses to permafrost thaw. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Genotype diversity and molecular evolution of noroviruses: A 30-year (1982-2011) comprehensive study with children from Northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Renato da Silva; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; dos Santos, Liann Filiphe Pereira; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2017-01-01

    A chronologically comprehensive 30-year study was conducted that involved children living in Belém, in the Amazon region of Northern Brazil, who participated in eight different studies from October 1982 to April 2011. The children were followed either in the community or in health units and hospitals in order to identify the norovirus genotypes involved in infections during this time. A total of 2,520 fecal specimens were obtained and subjected to RT-PCR and nucleotide sequencing for regions A, B, C, D and P2 of the viral genome. An overall positivity of 16.9% (n = 426) was observed, and 49% of the positive samples were genotyped (208/426), evidencing the presence of several genotypes as follows: Polymerase gene (GI.P4, GII.Pa, GII.Pc, GII.Pe, GII.Pg, GII.Pj, GII.P3, GII.P4, GII.P6, GII.P7, GII.P8, GII.P12, GII.P13, GII.P14, GII.P21, GII.P22), and VP1 gene (GI.3, GI.7, GII.1, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, GII.6, GII.7, GII.8, GII.10, GII.12, GII.14, GII.17, GII.23). The GII.P4/GII.4 genotype determined by both open reading frames (ORFs) (partial polymerase and VP1 genes) was found for 83 samples, and analyses of the subdomain P2 region showed 10 different variants: CHDC (1970s), Tokyo (1980s), Bristol_1993, US_95/96, Kaiso_2003, Asia_2003, Hunter_2004, Yerseke_2006a, Den Haag_2006b (subcluster “O”) and New Orleans_2009. Recombination events were confirmed in 47.6% (n = 20) of the 42 samples with divergent genotyping by ORF1 and ORF2 and with probable different breakpoints within the viral genome. The evolutionary analyses estimated a rate of evolution of 1.02 x 10−2 and 9.05 x 10−3 subs./site/year using regions C and D from the VP1 gene, respectively. The present research shows the broad genetic diversity of the norovirus that infected children for 30 years in Belém. These findings contribute to our understanding of noroviruses molecular epidemiology and viral evolution and provide a baseline for vaccine design. PMID:28604828

  7. Detection and molecular diversity of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in sheltered dogs and cats in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Horacio; Cano, Lourdes; de Lucio, Aida; Bailo, Begoña; de Mingo, Marta Hernández; Cardona, Guillermo A; Fernández-Basterra, José A; Aramburu-Aguirre, Juan; López-Molina, Nuria; Carmena, David

    2017-06-01

    Domestic dogs and cats may act as natural reservoirs of a large number of zoonotic pathogens, including the enteric parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp., the most relevant protozoan species causing gastrointestinal disease worldwide. A cross-sectional epidemiological study aiming to assess the prevalence and molecular diversity of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. was conducted in an animal rescue centre in the province of Álava (Northern Spain). A total of 194 and 65 faecal dropping samples from individual dogs and cats, respectively, were collected between November 2013 and June 2016. G. duodenalis cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by direct fluorescence microscopy and PCR-based methods targeting the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of these parasites. Overall, G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 33% (63/194) and 4.1% (8/194) of dogs, and 9.2% (6/65) and 4.6% (3/65) of cats, respectively. G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium co-infections were observed in 1.5% (3/194) of dogs, but not in cats. No significant differences in infection rates could be demonstrated among dogs or cats according to their sex, age group, status, or geographical origin. Multi-locus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of G. duodenalis allowed the characterization of 19 canine isolates that were unambiguously assigned to sub-assemblages AII (n=7), BIII (n=1), and BIV (n=7), and assemblages C (n=3) and D (n=1). Two feline isolates were genotyped as assemblages A and F, respectively. No mixed assemblage or sub-assemblage infections were identified. C. canis (n=5) and C. hominis (n=1) were the Cryptosporidium species found in dogs, whereas C. felis (n=1) was identified in cats. The finding of G. duodenalis sub-assemblages AII, BIII, and BIV circulating in dogs (but not cats) may have zoonotic potential, although most of the AII and BIV isolates sub-genotyped corresponded to genetic variants not

  8. No Genetic Diversity at Molecular Markers and Strong Phenotypic Plasticity in Populations of Ranunculus nodiflorus, an Endangered Plant Species in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Florence; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Although conservation biology has long focused on population dynamics and genetics, phenotypic plasticity is likely to play a significant role in population viability. Here, an investigation is made into the relative contribution of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity to the phenotypic variation in natural populations of Ranunculus nodiflorus, a rare annual plant inhabiting temporary puddles in the Fontainebleau forest (Paris region, France) and exhibiting metapopulation dynamics. Methods The genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of quantitative traits (morphological and fitness components) were measured in five populations, using a combination of field measurements, common garden experiments and genotyping at microsatellite loci. Key Results It is shown that populations exhibit almost undetectable genetic diversity at molecular markers, and that the variation in quantitative traits observed among populations is due to a high level of phenotypic plasticity. Despite the lack of genetic diversity, the natural population of R. nodiflorus exhibits large population sizes and does not appear threatened by extinction; this may be attributable to large phenotypic plasticity, enabling the production of numerous seeds under a wide range of environmental conditions. Conclusions Efficient conservation of the populations can only be based on habitat management, to favour the maintenance of microenvironmental variation and the resulting strong phenotypic plasticity. In contrast, classical actions aiming to improve genetic diversity are useless in the present case. PMID:17468109

  9. Plant diversity predicts beta but not alpha diversity of soil microbes across grasslands worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prober, Suzanne M.; Leff, Jonathan W.; Bates, Scott T.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Firn, Jennifer; Harpole, W. Stanley; Lind, Eric M.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Adler, Peter B.; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Cleland, Elsa E.; DeCrappeo, Nicole; DeLorenze, Elizabeth; Hagenah, Nicole; Hautier, Yann; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Knops, Johannes M. H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Mitchell, Charles E.; Risch, Anita C.; Schuetz, Martin; Stevens, Carly J.; Williams, Ryan J.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Aboveground–belowground interactions exert critical controls on the composition and function of terrestrial ecosystems, yet the fundamental relationships between plant diversity and soil microbial diversity remain elusive. Theory predicts predominantly positive associations but tests within single sites have shown variable relationships, and associations between plant and microbial diversity across broad spatial scales remain largely unexplored. We compared the diversity of plant, bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities in one hundred and forty-five 1 m2 plots across 25 temperate grassland sites from four continents. Across sites, the plant alpha diversity patterns were poorly related to those observed for any soil microbial group. However, plant beta diversity (compositional dissimilarity between sites) was significantly correlated with the beta diversity of bacterial and fungal communities, even after controlling for environmental factors. Thus, across a global range of temperate grasslands, plant diversity can predict patterns in the composition of soil microbial communities, but not patterns in alpha diversity.

  10. Biosynthetic machinery for C25,C25-diether archaeal lipids from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryo; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2018-02-26

    Archaea that thrive in harsh environments usually produce membrane lipids with specific structures such as bipolar tetraether lipids. Only a few genera of archaea, which are hyperthermophiles or halophiles, are known to utilize diether lipids with extended, C 25 isoprenoid hydrocarbon chains. In the present study, we identify two prenyltransferases and a prenyl reductase responsible for the biosynthesis of C 25 ,C 25 -diether lipids in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix. These enzymes are more specific to C 25 isoprenoid chains than to C 20 chains, which are used for the biosynthesis of ordinary C 20 ,C 20 -diether archaeal lipids. The recombinant expression of these enzymes with two known archaeal enzymes allows the production of C 25 ,C 25 -diether archaeal lipids in the cells of Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Archaeal ribonuclease P proteins have potential for biotechnological applications where precise hybridization of nucleic acids is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanoshita, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay showed that archaeal ribonuclease P (RNase P) proteins significantly promoted DNA annealing and strand displacement. Moreover, we found that archaeal RNase P proteins could discriminate nucleotide exchanges in DNA chains via their activity accelerating DNA strand displacement, suggesting that they have potential for biotechnological application to genetic diagnosis.

  12. Turnover of microbial lipids in the deep biosphere and growth of benthic archaeal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sitan; Lipp, Julius S; Wegener, Gunter; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2013-04-09

    Deep subseafloor sediments host a microbial biosphere with unknown impact on global biogeochemical cycles. This study tests previous evidence based on microbial intact polar lipids (IPLs) as proxies of live biomass, suggesting that Archaea dominate the marine sedimentary biosphere. We devised a sensitive radiotracer assay to measure the decay rate of ([(14)C]glucosyl)-diphytanylglyceroldiether (GlcDGD) as an analog of archaeal IPLs in continental margin sediments. The degradation kinetics were incorporated in model simulations that constrained the fossil fraction of subseafloor IPLs and rates of archaeal turnover. Simulating the top 1 km in a generic continental margin sediment column, we estimated degradation rate constants of GlcDGD being one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of bacterial IPLs, with half-lives of GlcDGD increasing with depth to 310 ky. Given estimated microbial community turnover times of 1.6-73 ky in sediments deeper than 1 m, 50-96% of archaeal IPLs represent fossil signals. Consequently, previous lipid-based estimates of global subseafloor biomass probably are too high, and the widely observed dominance of archaeal IPLs does not rule out a deep biosphere dominated by Bacteria. Reverse modeling of existing concentration profiles suggest that archaeal IPL synthesis rates decline from around 1,000 pg⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1) at the surface to 0.2 pg⋅mL(-1)⋅y(-1) at 1 km depth, equivalent to production of 7 × 10(5) to 140 archaeal cells⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1), respectively. These constraints on microbial growth are an important step toward understanding the relationship between the deep biosphere and the carbon cycle.

  13. Diverse archaeal community of a bat guano pile in Domica Cave (Slovak Karst, Slovakia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chroňáková, Alica; Horák, Aleš; Elhottová, Dana; Krištůfek, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2009), s. 436-446 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : archaea l community * bat guano pile * Domica Cave Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.978, year: 2009

  14. Clusters of orthologous genes for 41 archaeal genomes and implications for evolutionary genomics of archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An evolutionary classification of genes from sequenced genomes that distinguishes between orthologs and paralogs is indispensable for genome annotation and evolutionary reconstruction. Shortly after multiple genome sequences of bacteria, archaea, and unicellular eukaryotes became available, an attempt on such a classification was implemented in Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs. Rapid accumulation of genome sequences creates opportunities for refining COGs but also represents a challenge because of error amplification. One of the practical strategies involves construction of refined COGs for phylogenetically compact subsets of genomes. Results New Archaeal Clusters of Orthologous Genes (arCOGs were constructed for 41 archaeal genomes (13 Crenarchaeota, 27 Euryarchaeota and one Nanoarchaeon using an improved procedure that employs a similarity tree between smaller, group-specific clusters, semi-automatically partitions orthology domains in multidomain proteins, and uses profile searches for identification of remote orthologs. The annotation of arCOGs is a consensus between three assignments based on the COGs, the CDD database, and the annotations of homologs in the NR database. The 7538 arCOGs, on average, cover ~88% of the genes in a genome compared to a ~76% coverage in COGs. The finer granularity of ortholog identification in the arCOGs is apparent from the fact that 4538 arCOGs correspond to 2362 COGs; ~40% of the arCOGs are new. The archaeal gene core (protein-coding genes found in all 41 genome consists of 166 arCOGs. The arCOGs were used to reconstruct gene loss and gene gain events during archaeal evolution and gene sets of ancestral forms. The Last Archaeal Common Ancestor (LACA is conservatively estimated to possess 996 genes compared to 1245 and 1335 genes for the last common ancestors of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, respectively. It is inferred that LACA was a chemoautotrophic hyperthermophile

  15. Human settlement as driver of bacterial, but not of archaeal, ammonia oxidizers abundance and community structure in tropical stream sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana De Paula Reis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms.

  16. Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Kristina

    2014-07-09

    In spite of considerable insights into the microbial diversity of marine sponges, quantitative information on microbial abundances and community composition remains scarce. Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. We could show that the 16S rRNA gene numbers of Archaea, Chloroflexi, and the candidate phylum Poribacteria were 4-6 orders of magnitude higher in high microbial abundance (HMA) than in low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges and that actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene numbers were 1-2 orders higher in HMA over LMA sponges, while those for Cyanobacteria were stable between HMA and LMA sponges. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of Aplysina aerophoba tissue sections confirmed the numerical dominance of Chloroflexi, which was followed by Poribacteria. Archaeal and actinobacterial cells were detected in much lower numbers. By use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a primer- and probe-independent approach, the dominance of Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Poribacteria in A. aerophoba was confirmed. Our study provides new quantitative insights into the microbiology of sponges and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA/LMA dichotomy. The authors quantified sponge symbionts in eight sponge species from three different locations by real time PCR targetting 16S rRNA genes. Additionally, FISH was performed and diversity and abundance of singularized microbial symbionts from Aplysina aerophoba was determined for a comprehensive quantification work. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  17. Molecular Identification and Genetic Diversity of Acropora hyacinthus from Boo and Deer Island, Raja Ampat, West Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti, DP; Indrayanti, E.; Nuryadi, H.; Dewi, RA; Sabdono, A.

    2018-02-01

    Indonesia lies at the centre of biodiversity for corals. However, the reefs suffered from extensive human exploitation. Marine Protected Areas is thought to be best solution to protect coral reefs ecosystem. Understanding genetic diversity is crucial for effective management of the MPAs, however genetic diversity is rarely been corporate in designing an MPA. Moreover, many MPAs are uneffectively manage due to poor designated and demarcated.Raja Ampat which is located in western tip of West Papua, was designated as a park to mitigatethreatsand protect the valuable marine resources.Scleractinian corals in the genus Acropora are among the most dominant distributed in Raja Ampat waters, including the species of Acroporahyacinthus. The research aimed to analyze genetic diversity and to describe the kinship relationship of Acroporahyacinthus between 2 populations: Boo Island and Deer Island, Raja Ampat. Genetic marker Cytochrome Oxidase I (CO I) of the mitochondrial genome DNA (mtDNA) was used to analyze genetic diversity. Reconstruction of phylogenetic tree and genetic diversity were made by usingsoftware MEGA 5.05 (Moleculer Evolutionary Genetics Analysis). The results of this research indicatecorals A. hyacinthus from Boo Island and Deer Island Raja Ampat are in the low category of genetic diversity and overall had a close genetic relationship of kinship. This is likely due to the small size of the population and few numbers of samples that may not represent the population.

  18. The putative functional ecology and distribution of archaeal communities in sponges, sediment and seawater in a coral reef environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polónia, Ana R M; Cleary, Daniel F R; Freitas, Rossana; de Voogd, Nicole J; Gomes, Newton C M

    2015-01-01

    Archaea play crucial roles in a number of key ecological processes including nitrification and methanogenesis. Although several studies have been conducted on these organisms, the roles and dynamics of coral reef archaeal communities are still poorly understood, particularly in host and nonhost biotopes and in high (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges. Here, archaeal communities detected in six distinct biotopes, namely, sediment, seawater and four different sponge species Stylissa carteri, Stylissa massa, Xestospongia testudinaria and Hyrtios erectus from the Spermonde Archipelago, SW Sulawesi, Indonesia were investigated using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes (OTU cut-off 97%). Archaeal communities from sediment and sponges were dominated by Crenarchaeota, while the seawater community was dominated by Euryarchaeota. The biotope explained almost 75% of the variation in archaeal composition, with clear separation between microbial assemblages from sediment, X. testudinaria and H. erectus (HMA). In contrast, samples from seawater and both Stylissa species (LMA) showed considerable overlap in the ordination and, furthermore, shared most abundant OTUs with the exception of a single dominant OTU specifically enriched in both Stylissa species. Predicted functional gene content in archaeal assemblages also revealed significant differences among biotopes. Different ammonia assimilation strategies were exhibited by the archaeal communities: X. testudinaria, H. erectus and sediment archaeal communities were enriched for glutamate dehydrogenase with mixed specificity (NAD(P)(+) ) pathways, while archaeal planktonic communities were enriched for specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP(+) ) and glutamate synthase pathways. Archaeal communities in Stylissa had intermediate levels of enrichment. Our results indicate that archaeal communities in different biotopes have distinct ecophysiological roles. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Respons of archaeal communities in beach sediments to spilled oil and bioremediation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roling, W.F.M.; Couo de Brito, I.R.; Swannell, R.P.J.; Head, I.M.

    2004-01-01

    While the contribution of Bacteria to bioremediation of oil-contaminated shorelines is well established, the response of Archaea to spilled oil and bioremediation treatments is unknown. The relationship between archaeal community structure and oil spill bioremediation was examined in laboratory

  20. Archaeal Lipid Genes: Clues to Life in Acid and the Evolution of Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalady, J. L.; Croft, L.; Vestling, M. M.; Harms, A. C.; Zheng, L.; Baumler, D. J.; Kaspar, C. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Microorganisms living in acid mine drainage environments face extraordinary challenges. Acid-loving archaea such as Ferroplasma acidarmanus maintain pH gradients of 4 to 5 pH units across their membranes and thrive in hot, extremely low pH (0-1), metal-rich, solutions. New lipid analyses for two extremely acidophilic archaea, F. acidarmanus and F. acidiphilum, reveal that all known archaeal acidophiles have cell membranes composed primarily of tetraether-linked lipids. Because tetraether lipids assemble in rigid monolayers that exclude protons and metals, we suggest that tetraether synthesis genes are essential for archaeal survival in acid. Fusion of two diether-linked lipids to form a tetraether-linked lipid is a distinctive biochemical reaction with no analogy in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition to archaeal acidophiles, tetraethers are present in members of every archaeal lineage except halophiles. Genes responsible for tetraether synthesis and subsequent biochemical steps which "tune" membrane lipid properties in response to environmental changes have not been identified to date. Comparative genomic analyses using the newly completed genome of F. acidarmanus and available genomes from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya have generated candidate tetraether synthase genes found only in archaea. Because tetraether-linked lipids are advantageous for acid-loving and possibly also for heat-loving archaea, the phylogeny of these genes has the potential to shed new light on role of hot, acid environments in early evolution.

  1. Archaeal rRNA operons, intron splicing and homing endonucleases, RNA polymerase operons and phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger Antony; Aagaard, Claus Sindbjerg; Andersen, Morten

    1994-01-01

    Over the past decade our laboratory has had a strong interest in defining the phylogenetic status of the archaea. This has involved determining and analysing the sequences of operons of both rRNAs and RNA polymerases and it led to the discovery of the first archaeal rRNA intron. What follows...

  2. Origins of major archaeal clades correspond to gene acquisitions from bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Sousa, Filipa L; Roettger, Mayo; Lozada-Chávez, Nabor; Thiergart, Thorsten; Janssen, Arnold; Bryant, David; Landan, Giddy; Schönheit, Peter; Siebers, Bettina; McInerney, James O; Martin, William F

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the origin of major prokaryotic groups are poorly understood. In principle, the origin of both species and higher taxa among prokaryotes should entail similar mechanisms--ecological interactions with the environment paired with natural genetic variation involving lineage-specific gene innovations and lineage-specific gene acquisitions. To investigate the origin of higher taxa in archaea, we have determined gene distributions and gene phylogenies for the 267,568 protein-coding genes of 134 sequenced archaeal genomes in the context of their homologues from 1,847 reference bacterial genomes. Archaeal-specific gene families define 13 traditionally recognized archaeal higher taxa in our sample. Here we report that the origins of these 13 groups unexpectedly correspond to 2,264 group-specific gene acquisitions from bacteria. Interdomain gene transfer is highly asymmetric, transfers from bacteria to archaea are more than fivefold more frequent than vice versa. Gene transfers identified at major evolutionary transitions among prokaryotes specifically implicate gene acquisitions for metabolic functions from bacteria as key innovations in the origin of higher archaeal taxa.

  3. Interaction of extremophilic archaeal viruses with human and mouse complement system and viral biodistribution in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Chen, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    is a necessary prerequisite if their potential for biomedical applications to be realized. Here we show complement activation through lectin (via direct binding of MBL/MASPs) and alternative pathways by two extremophilic archaeal viruses (Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 and Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 2...

  4. Assessment of Ruminal Bacterial and Archaeal Community Structure in Yak (Bos grunniens)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Zhenming; Fang, Lei; Meng, Qingxiang; Li, Shengli; Chai, Shatuo; Liu, Shujie; Schonewille, Jan Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the microbial community composition in the rumen of yaks under different feeding regimes. Microbial communities were assessed by sequencing bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments obtained from yaks (Bos grunniens) from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau,

  5. Fossilization and degradation of archaeal intact polar tetraether lipids in deeply buried marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lengger, S.K.; Hopmans, E.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids are part of the cellular membranes of Thaumarchaeota, an archaeal phylum composed of aerobic ammonia oxidizers, and are used in the paleotemperature proxy TEX86. GDGTs in live cells possess polar head groups and are called intact polar lipids

  6. Dividing the Archaeal Way : The Ancient Cdv Cell-Division Machinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caspi, Y.; Dekker, C.

    2018-01-01

    Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by the well-studied fts genes, with FtsZ as the principal player. In many archaeal species, however, division is orchestrated differently. The Crenarchaeota phylum of archaea features the action of the three proteins, CdvABC. This Cdv system is a unique

  7. Taxonomy of prokaryotic viruses : 2016 update from the ICTV bacterial and archaeal viruses subcommittee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaenssens, Evelien M.; Krupovic, Mart; Knezevic, Petar; Ackermann, Hans Wolfgang; Barylski, Jakub; Brister, J. Rodney; Clokie, Martha R C; Duffy, Siobain; Dutilh, Bas E.; Edwards, Robert A; Enault, Francois; Jang, Ho Bin; Klumpp, Jochen; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Lavigne, Rob; Poranen, Minna M.; Prangishvili, David; Rumnieks, Janis; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Wittmann, Johannes; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Gillis, Annika; Kuhn, Jens H.

    The prokaryotic virus community is represented at the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) by the Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses Subcommittee. Since our last report [8], the committee composition has changed, and a large number of taxonomic proposals (TaxoProps) were submitted to

  8. The effect of various atomic partial charge schemes to elucidate consensus activity-correlating molecular regions: a test case of diverse QSAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Jha, Prakash C; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of atomic partial charges of the small molecules to calculate molecular interaction fields (MIFs) is an important process in field-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). Several studies showed the influence of partial charge schemes that drastically affects the prediction accuracy of the QSAR model and focused on the selection of appropriate charge models that provide highest cross-validated correlation coefficient ([Formula: see text] or q(2)) to explain the variation in chemical structures against biological endpoints. This study shift this focus in a direction to understand the molecular regions deemed to explain SAR in various charge models and recognize a consensus picture of activity-correlating molecular regions. We selected eleven diverse dataset and developed MIF-based QSAR models using various charge schemes including Gasteiger-Marsili, Del Re, Merck Molecular Force Field, Hückel, Gasteiger-Hückel, and Pullman. The generalized resultant QSAR models were then compared with Open3DQSAR model to interpret the MIF descriptors decisively. We suggest the regions of activity contribution or optimization can be effectively determined by studying various charge-based models to understand SAR precisely.

  9. Use of molecular markers aids in the development of diverse inbred backcross lines in Beit Alpha cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beit Alpha cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a Mediterranean fresh-market type with a relatively narrow genetic base. To broaden its base for plant improvement, 42 diverse accessions were compared employing a previously defined standard marker array to choose wide-based parental lines for use in bac...

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase PH0037 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokanath, Neratur K.; Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2006-08-01

    The archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase PH0037 from P. horikoshii OT3 has been crystallized in space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = 155.62, c = 230.35 Å. A 2.2 Å resolution data was collected at SPring-8 beamline BL26B1. Phosphoglycerate mutases catalyze the interconversion of 2-phosphoglycerate and 3-phosphoglycerate in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. The archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase PH0037 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained using the oil-microbatch method at 291 K. A native data set extending to a resolution of 2.2 Å has been collected and processed in space group R32. Assuming the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the V{sub M} value is calculated to be 3.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, consistent with the dynamic light-scattering experiment result, which shows a dimeric state of the protein in solution. Molecular-replacement trials using the crystal structure of Bacilllus stearothermophilus phosphoglycerate mutase as a search model did not provide a satisfactory solution, indicating substantially different structures of these two phophoglycerate mutases.

  11. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: antigenic and molecular diversity of British isolates and implications for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Fearnley, Catherine; Naidu, Brindha; Errington, Jane; Westcott, David G; Drew, Trevor W

    2012-08-17

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an endemic disease of pigs, caused by PRRS virus, a member of the Arteriviridae family. First seen in Britain in 1991, the disease continues to be a significant economic and welfare problem for pig producers. To date, only PRRSV genotype 1 has been found in Britain. At the genetic level, a considerable increase has been reported in the diversity of PRRS viruses isolated in Britain between 2003 and 2007, versus the early 1990 s. In this study, the diversity has been shown to extend to the antigenic level too, with potential consequences for diagnostic methods. Antigenic diversity was assessed using a panel of twelve monoclonal antibodies, only one of which reacted with all isolates tested. Nine diverse viruses were compared as potential antigens in immunoperoxidase monolayer assays, where each one produced quite different results for a common panel of sera. As a single virus is used in each diagnostic assay, results must therefore be interpreted cautiously. For a real-time RT-PCR assay, published oligonucleotide primer and probe sequences were evaluated against available genetic sequences of British and European viruses, and were re-designed where considerable mismatches were found. The multiplex assay incorporating these modified primers to detect genotype 1 and 2 PRRS viruses was then validated for use with diagnostic sera and tissues. As the increasing degree of diversity exhibited by British strains is mirrored in other countries, PRRSV will continue to provide an ongoing challenge to diagnosis at a global, as well as national level. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial community analysis of a coastal hot spring in Kagoshima, Japan, using molecular- and culture-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Minako; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Kurosawa, Norio

    2013-08-01

    Ibusuki hot spring is located on the coastline of Kagoshima Bay, Japan. The hot spring water is characterized by high salinity, high temperature, and neutral pH. The hot spring is covered by the sea during high tide, which leads to severe fluctuations in several environmental variables. A combination of molecular- and culture-based techniques was used to determine the bacterial and archaeal diversity of the hot spring. A total of 48 thermophilic bacterial strains were isolated from two sites (Site 1: 55.6°C; Site 2: 83.1°C) and they were categorized into six groups based on their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Two groups (including 32 isolates) demonstrated low sequence similarity with published species, suggesting that they might represent novel taxa. The 148 clones from the Site 1 bacterial library included 76 operational taxonomy units (OTUs; 97% threshold), while 132 clones from the Site 2 bacterial library included 31 OTUs. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were frequently detected in both clone libraries. The clones were related to thermophilic, mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria. Approximately half of the sequences in bacterial clone libraries shared <92% sequence similarity with their closest sequences in a public database, suggesting that the Ibusuki hot spring may harbor a unique and novel bacterial community. By contrast, 77 clones from the Site 2 archaeal library contained only three OTUs, most of which were affiliated with Thaumarchaeota.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of Robinia pseudoacacia seeds induced by short-term spaceflight based on two molecular marker systems and morphological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C Q; Li, Y F; Sun, P; Sun, Y H; Zhang, G J; Yang, M S; Zhang, Y Y; Li, Y; Wang, L

    2012-12-17

    The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a forest legume that is highly valued as a honey plant and for its wood. We explored the effect of short-term spaceflight on development of R. pseudoacacia seedlings derived from seeds that endured a 15-day flight; the genetic diversity and variation of plants sampled from space-mutagenized seeds were compared to plants from parallel ground-based control seeds using molecular markers and morphological traits. In the morphology analysis, the space-mutagenized group had apparent variation compared with the control group in morphological traits, including plant height, basal diameter, number of branches, branch stipular thorn length, branch stipular thorn middle width, leaflet vertex angle, and tippy leaf vertex angle. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular marker analyses showed a slightly higher levels of genetic diversity in the space-mutagenized group compared to the control group. In the SRAP analysis, the space-mutagenized group had 115 polymorphic bands vs 98 in the controls; 91.27% polymorphic loci vs 77.78% in the controls; 1.9127 ± 0.2834 alleles vs 1.7778 ± 0.4174 in the controls; Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.2930 ± 0.1631 vs 0.2688 ± 0.1862 in the controls, and the Shannon's information index (I) was 0.4452 ± 0.2177 vs 0.4031 ± 0.2596 in the controls. The number of alleles was significantly higher in the space-mutagenized group. In the SSR analysis, the space-mutagenized group also had more polymorphic bands (51 vs 46), a greater percentage of polymorphic loci (89.47% vs 80.70%); h was also higher (0.2534 ± 0.1533 vs 0.2240 ± 0.1743), as was I (0.3980 ± 0.2069 vs 0.3501 ± 0.2412). These results demonstrated that the range of genetic variation in the populations of R. pseudoacacia increased after spaceflight. It also suggested that the SSR and SRAP markers are effective markers for studying mutations and genetic diversity in R. pseudoacacia. The data

  14. Network diversity through two-step crystal engineering of a decorated 6-connected primary molecular building block

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Qing-Yuan

    2016-10-04

    [Cr3O(nicotinate)6]+ was isolated and then utilised as a new primary molecular building block, PMBB, linked by 2-, 3- and 4-connected metal centres. Five novel metal–organic materials (MOMs) with acs, stp, rtl, fsc and pcu topologies were thereby isolated and characterised.

  15. What are the cyanobacterial genera Cyanothece and Cyanobacterium? Contribution to the combined molecular and phenotype taxonomic evaluation of cyanobacterial diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komárek, Jiří; Cepák, Vladislav; Kaštovský, J.; Sulek, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 153, č. 113 (2004), s. 1-36 ISSN 0342-1120 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114; GA AV ČR IAA6005308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : taxonomy * cyanobacteria * molecular evaluation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  16. Processes underpinning development and maintenance of diversity in rice in West Africa: Evidence from combining morphological and molecular markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokuwa, G.A.; Nuijten, H.A.C.P.; Okry, F.; Teeken, B.W.E.; Maat, H.; Richards, P.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the interplay of artificial and natural selection in rice adaptation in low-input farming systems in West Africa. Using 20 morphological traits and 176 molecular markers, 182 farmer varieties of rice (Oryza spp.) from 6 West African countries were characterized. Principal component

  17. First insight into dead wood protistan diversity: a molecular sampling of bright-spored Myxomycetes (Amoebozoa, slime-moulds) in decaying beech logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clissmann, Fionn; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Hoppe, Björn; Krüger, Dirk; Kahl, Tiemo; Unterseher, Martin; Schnittler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Decaying wood hosts a large diversity of seldom investigated protists. Environmental sequencing offers novel insights into communities, but has rarely been applied to saproxylic protists. We investigated the diversity of bright-spored wood-inhabiting Myxomycetes by environmental sequencing. Myxomycetes have a complex life cycle culminating in the formation of mainly macroscopic fruiting bodies, highly variable in shape and colour that are often found on decaying logs. Our hypothesis was that diversity of bright-spored Myxomycetes would increase with decay. DNA was extracted from wood chips collected from 17 beech logs of varying decay stages from the Hainich-Dün region in Central Germany. We obtained 260 partial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of bright-spored Myxomycetes that were assembled into 29 OTUs, of which 65% were less than 98% similar to those in the existing database. The OTU richness revealed by molecular analysis surpassed that of a parallel inventory of fruiting bodies. We tested several environmental variables and identified pH, rather than decay stage, as the main structuring factor of myxomycete distribution. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Genetic diversity and relationship in American and African oil palm as revealed by RFLP and AFLP molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcelos Edson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the genetic diversity, its organization and the genetic relationships within oil palm (Elaeis oleifera (Kunth Cortés, from America, and E. guineensis (Jacq., from Africa germplasm using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP. In complement to a previous RFLP study on 241 E. oleifera accessions, 38 E. guineensis accessions were analyzed using the same 37 cDNA probes. These accessions covered a large part of the geographical distribution areas of these species in America and Africa. In addition, AFLP analysis was performed on a sub-set of 40 accessions of E. oleifera and 22 of E. guineensis using three pairs of enzyme/primer combinations. Data were subjected to Factorial Analysis of Correspondence (FAC and cluster analysis, with parameters of genetic diversity being also studied. Results appeared congruent between RFLP and AFLP. In the E. oleifera, AFLP confirmed the strong structure of genetic diversity revealed by RFLP, according to geographical origin of the studied material, with the identification of the same four distinct genetic groups: Brazil, French Guyana/Surinam, Peru, north of Colombia/Central America. Both markers revealed that genetic divergence between the two species is of the same magnitude as that among provenances of E. oleifera. This finding is in discrepancy with the supposed early tertiary separation of the two species.

  19. Molecular diversity and distribution of anammox community in sediments of the Dongjiang River, a drinking water source of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W; Xu, M-Y; Wu, W-M; Guo, J; Xia, C-Y; Sun, G-P; Wang, A-J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) community in sediments of the Dongjiang River, a drinking water source of Hong Kong. The diversity and distribution of the anammox community were investigated based on a comparative analyses of 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidation (hzo) genes of anammox bacteria. Candidatus Brocadia and two new anammox bacterial clusters were detected based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes. In contrast, the targeting of hzo genes indicated the presence of only Candidatus Jettenia with four different clusters. It was found that the sequence diversities of hzo genes were higher than those of the 16S rRNA genes. The abundance of anammox bacteria varied significantly among the sediment samples based on qPCR. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that nitrite concentration was the key factor influencing the abundance of anammox bacteria. The redundance analysis (RDA) confirmed that the combination of the contents of nitrite and nitrate, and the ratio of total nitrogen vs total carbon (TN/TC) had significant impact on the anammox bacterial community structure. The results revealed that the diverse anammox bacteria were present in sediments of the Dongjiang River, and the community structures were associated with varied environmental factors caused by urban pollutant invasion. This is the first report about the distribution of anammox bacterial community in sediments of the Dongjiang River, which provides helpful information of anammox niche specificity and influencing factors in the river ecosystem. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. From Amazonia to the Atlantic forest: molecular phylogeny of Phyzelaphryninae frogs reveals unexpected diversity and a striking biogeographic pattern emphasizing conservation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Antoine; Loebmann, Daniel; Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago; Padial, José M; Orrico, Victor G D; Lyra, Mariana L; Roberto, Igor Joventino; Kok, Philippe J R; Haddad, Célio F B; Rodrigues, Miguel T

    2012-11-01

    Documenting the Neotropical amphibian diversity has become a major challenge facing the threat of global climate change and the pace of environmental alteration. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the actual number of species in South American tropical forests is largely underestimated, but also that many lineages are millions of years old. The genera Phyzelaphryne (1 sp.) and Adelophryne (6 spp.), which compose the subfamily Phyzelaphryninae, include poorly documented, secretive, and minute frogs with an unusual distribution pattern that encompasses the biotic disjunction between Amazonia and the Atlantic forest. We generated >5.8 kb sequence data from six markers for all seven nominal species of the subfamily as well as for newly discovered populations in order to (1) test the monophyly of Phyzelaphryninae, Adelophryne and Phyzelaphryne, (2) estimate species diversity within the subfamily, and (3) investigate their historical biogeography and diversification. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed the monophyly of each group and revealed deep subdivisions within Adelophryne and Phyzelaphryne, with three major clades in Adelophryne located in northern Amazonia, northern Atlantic forest and southern Atlantic forest. Our results suggest that the actual number of species in Phyzelaphryninae is, at least, twice the currently recognized species diversity, with almost every geographically isolated population representing an anciently divergent candidate species. Such results highlight the challenges for conservation, especially in the northern Atlantic forest where it is still degraded at a fast pace. Molecular dating revealed that Phyzelaphryninae originated in Amazonia and dispersed during early Miocene to the Atlantic forest. The two Atlantic forest clades of Adelophryne started to diversify some 7 Ma minimum, while the northern Amazonian Adelophryne diversified much earlier, some 13 Ma minimum. This striking biogeographic pattern coincides with

  1. Molecular Analysis of the Diversity of Sulfate-Reducing and Sulfur-Oxidizing Prokaryotes in the Environment, Using aprA as Functional Marker Gene▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosposulfate reductase is a key enzyme of the microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation processes. Because the alpha- and beta-subunit-encoding genes, aprBA, are highly conserved among sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, they are most suitable for molecular profiling of the microbial community structure of the sulfur cycle in environment. In this study, a new aprA gene-targeting assay using a combination of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is presented. The screening of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing reference strains as well as the analyses of environmental DNA from diverse habitats (e.g., microbial mats, invertebrate tissue, marine and estuarine sediments, and filtered hydrothermal water) by the new primer pair revealed an improved microbial diversity coverage and less-pronounced template-to-PCR product bias in direct comparison to those of the previously published primer set (B. Deplancke, K. R. Hristova, H. A. Oakley, V. J. McCracken, R. Aminov, R. I. Mackie, and H. R. Gaskins, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2166-2174, 2000). The concomitant molecular detection of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes was confirmed. The new assay was applied in comparison with the 16S rRNA gene-based analysis to investigate the microbial diversity of the sulfur cycle in sediment, seawater, and manganese crust samples from four study sites in the area of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, Caribbean Sea (Caribflux project). The aprA gene-based approach revealed putative sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria of chemolithoheterotrophic lifestyle to have been abundant in the nonhydrothermal sediment and water column. In contrast, the sulfur-based microbial community that inhabited the surface of the volcanic manganese crust was more complex, consisting predominantly of putative chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. PMID:17921272

  2. Molecular analysis of the diversity of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes in the environment, using aprA as functional marker gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase is a key enzyme of the microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation processes. Because the alpha- and beta-subunit-encoding genes, aprBA, are highly conserved among sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, they are most suitable for molecular profiling of the microbial community structure of the sulfur cycle in environment. In this study, a new aprA gene-targeting assay using a combination of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is presented. The screening of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing reference strains as well as the analyses of environmental DNA from diverse habitats (e.g., microbial mats, invertebrate tissue, marine and estuarine sediments, and filtered hydrothermal water) by the new primer pair revealed an improved microbial diversity coverage and less-pronounced template-to-PCR product bias in direct comparison to those of the previously published primer set (B. Deplancke, K. R. Hristova, H. A. Oakley, V. J. McCracken, R. Aminov, R. I. Mackie, and H. R. Gaskins, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2166-2174, 2000). The concomitant molecular detection of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes was confirmed. The new assay was applied in comparison with the 16S rRNA gene-based analysis to investigate the microbial diversity of the sulfur cycle in sediment, seawater, and manganese crust samples from four study sites in the area of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, Caribbean Sea (Caribflux project). The aprA gene-based approach revealed putative sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria of chemolithoheterotrophic lifestyle to have been abundant in the nonhydrothermal sediment and water column. In contrast, the sulfur-based microbial community that inhabited the surface of the volcanic manganese crust was more complex, consisting predominantly of putative chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria.

  3. Electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane drive microbial community structure and diversity in mud volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ge; Ma, Anzhou; Zhang, Yanfen; Deng, Ye; Zheng, Guodong; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Fortin, Danielle

    2018-04-06

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) emit globally significant quantities of methane into the atmosphere, however, methane cycling in such environments is not yet fully understood, as the roles of microbes and their associated biogeochemical processes have been largely overlooked. Here, we used data from high-throughput sequencing of microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicons from six MVs in the Junggar Basin in northwest China to quantify patterns of diversity and characterize the community structure of archaea and bacteria. We found anaerobic methanotrophs and diverse sulfate- and iron-reducing microbes in all of the samples, and the diversity of both archaeal and bacterial communities was strongly linked to the concentrations of sulfate, iron, and nitrate, which could act as electron acceptors in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The impacts of sulfate/iron/nitrate on AOM in the MVs were verified by microcosm experiments. Further, two representative MVs were selected to explore the microbial interactions based on phylogenetic molecular ecological networks. The sites showed distinct network structures, key species and microbial interactions, with more complex and numerous linkages between methane-cycling microbes and their partners being observed in the iron/sulfate-rich MV. These findings suggest that electron acceptors are important factors driving the structure of microbial communities in these methane-rich environments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) from Vietnam and Cambodia using agro-morphological and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Toan Duc; Geleta, Mulatu; Bui, Tri Minh; Bui, Tuyen Cach; Merker, Arnulf; Carlsson, Anders S

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively analyze the genetic diversity of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) using agro-morphological and molecular markers. Twelve sesame populations collected from three regions in Cambodia and Vietnam were used in this study. A high genetic variation was revealed both by agro-morphological and RAPD markers within and among the 12 sesame populations. The range of agro-morphological trait based average taxonomic distance among populations (0.02 to 0.47) was wider than that of RAPD based genetic distance (0.06 to 0.27). The mean distance revealed by agro-morphological markers (0.23) and RAPD markers (0.22) was similar. RAPD based analysis revealed a relatively higher genetic diversity in populations from South Vietnam as compared to the other two regions. Interestingly, populations from this region also had higher values for yield related traits such as number of capsules per plant, number of seeds per capsule, and seed yield per plant suggesting positive correlation between the extent of genetic variation within population and yield related traits in sesame. A highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) was found between agro-morphological and RAPD markers in estimating the genetic distance between populations. Both methods suggested the existence of a substantial amount of genetic diversity both in the Vietnamese and Cambodian populations. Although both agro-morphological and RAPD markers were found to be useful in genetic diversity analysis in sesame, their combined use would give superior results. © 2011 The Authors.

  5. High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhi, K; Sarmah, D K; Deka, M; Bhau, B S

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612).

  6. Molecular cytogenetics of the Androctonus scorpions: an oasis of calm in turbulent karyotype evolution of the diverse family Buthidae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sadílek, D.; Nguyen, Petr; Koç, H.; Kovařík, F.; Yağmur, E. A.; Šťáhlavský, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 1 (2015), s. 69-76 ISSN 0024-4066 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-35819P Grant - others:Mšk ČR(CZ) SVV 260 087/2014 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : 18S rDNA * FISH * holocentric chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.984, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bij.12488/epdf

  7. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacterial and Archaeal Type Strains, Phase III: the genomes of soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, William B; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhou, Yuguang; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; De Vos, Paul; Vandamme, Peter; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project to sequence about 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes of elevated phylogenetic diversity. Herein, we propose to extend this approach to type strains of prokaryotes associated with soil or plants and their close relatives as well as type strains from newly described species. Understanding the microbiology of soil and plants is critical to many DOE mission areas, such as biofuel production from biomass, biogeochemistry, and carbon cycling. We are also targeting type strains of novel species while they are being described. Since 2006, about 630 new species have been described per year, many of which are closely aligned to DOE areas of interest in soil, agriculture, degradation of pollutants, biofuel production, biogeochemical transformation, and biodiversity.

  8. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ben H; Baudin, Rémy; Franck, Antoine; Hugel, Sylvain; Strasberg, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis) can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species). A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between islands.

  9. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H Warren

    Full Text Available Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species. A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between

  10. A comparative study of microbial diversity and community structure in marine sediments using poly(A tailing and reverse transcription PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko eHoshino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a better understanding of metabolically active microbial communities, we tested a molecular ecological approach using poly(A tailing of environmental 16S rRNA, followed by full-length complementary DNA (cDNA synthesis and sequencing to eliminate potential biases caused by mismatching of PCR primer sequences. The RNA pool tested was extracted from marine sediments of the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field in the southern Okinawa Trough. The sequences obtained using the ploy(A tailing method were compared statistically and phylogenetically with those obtained using conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR with published domain-specific primers. Both methods indicated that Deltaproteobacteria are predominant in sediment (>85% of the total sequence read. The poly(A tailing method indicated that Desulfobacterales were the predominant deltaproteobacteria, while most of the sequences in libraries constructed using RT-PCR were derived from Desulfuromonadales. This discrepancy may have been due to low coverage of Desulfobacterales by the primers used. A comparison of library diversity indices indicated that the poly(A tailing method retrieves more phylogenetically diverse sequences from the environment. The four archaeal 16S rRNA sequences that were obtained using the poly(A tailing method formed deeply branching lineages that were related to Candidatus Parvarchaeum and the Ancient Archaeal Group. These results clearly demonstrate that poly(A tailing followed by cDNA sequencing is a powerful and less biased molecular ecological approach for the study of metabolically active microbial communities.

  11. Microbial Diversity in a Venezuelan Orthoquartzite Cave is Dominated by the Chloroflexi (Class Ktedonobacterales and Thaumarchaeota Group I.1c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel A Barton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The majority of caves are formed within limestone rock and hence our understanding of cave microbiology comes from carbonate-buffered systems. In this paper, we describe the microbial diversity of Roraima Sur Cave, an orthoquartzite (SiO4 cave within Roraima Tepui, Venezuela. The cave contains a high level of microbial activity when compared with other cave systems, as determined by an ATP-based luminescence assay and cell counting. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of microbial diversity within the cave demonstrate the dominance of Actinomycetales and Alphaproteobacteria in endolithic bacterial communities close to the entrance, while communities from deeper in the cave are dominated (82-84% by a unique clade of Ktedonobacterales within the Chloroflexi. While members of this phylum are commonly found in caves, this is the first identification of members of the Class Ktedonobacterales. An assessment of archaeal species demonstrates the dominance of phylotypes from the Thaumarchaeota Group I.1c (100%, which have previously been associated with acidic environments. While the Thaumarchaeota have been seen in numerous cave systems, the dominance of Group I.1c in Roraima Sur Cave is unique and a departure from the traditional archaeal community structure. Geochemical analysis of the cave environment suggests that water entering the cave, rather than the nutrient-limited orthoquartzite rock, provides the carbon and energy necessary for microbial community growth and subsistence, while the poor buffering capacity of quartzite or the low pH of the environment may be selecting for this unusual community structure. Together these data suggest that pH, imparted by the geochemistry of the host rock, can play as important a role in niche-differentiation in caves as in other environmental systems.

  12. Archaeal and Bacterial Variation Across Geochemical Gradients in an Arsenic-Rich, Shallow Submarine Vent, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Osburn, M. R.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Near the Feni Islands of Papua New Guinea, reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with seawater, establishing redox disequilibria that may serve as energy sources for chemotrophic Archaea and Bacteria. Of particular interest are elevated arsenite concentrations (1000 μg/L) in the vent water and arsenate-rich ferrihydrite deposits (up to 7 wt.%) that envelope the sediment and coral. In sediment pore waters out to > 200m from the vents, a steeply decreasing arsenic gradient is observed. To establish a baseline of microbial community composition at the vent fluid-seawater interface, bulk DNA was extracted from ferrihydrite coatings, then amplified (16S rRNA, targeting both Archaea and Bacteria), cloned, and sequenced. Red and green biofilms associated with the coatings revealed archaeal communities exclusively composed of deeply-branching, uncultured Crenarchaea. The bacterial members of the community differed in the two biofilms; the red biofilm is primarily composed of gamma Proteobacteria, Chloroflexis, and Planctomycetes, but 60% of clones from the green biofilm community affiliates with the alpha Proteobacteria and candidate group OP11. The remaining portion of the bacterial community in the red coating is made of Thermotogales, Aquificales, Thermales phylotypes and uncultured Bacteria, while OP10, Chloroflexis and Plantomycetales complete the community in the green coatings. No clones associating with thermophilic bacterial groups were found in the green coatings. To provide a comparison to the vent source communities, a sediment core was taken 2.5m from the vent and two depths (10 and 40cm) were analyzed by similar molecular analysis. In both core horizons, the archaeal community is composed of > 75% uncultured Crenarchaea, similar to phylotypes found in deep-sea and terrestrial hydrothermal locations, with the remainder of the communities from known crenarchaeal phylotypes. The bacterial communities are primarily Chloroflexis and gamma Proteobacteria-like phylotypes

  13. Fossils and a large molecular phylogeny show that the evolution of species richness, generic diversity, and turnover rates are disconnected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yaowu; Onstein, Renske E; Carter, Richard J; Stadler, Tanja; Peter Linder, H

    2014-10-01

    The magnitude and extent of global change during the Cenozoic is remarkable, yet the impacts of these global changes on the biodiversity and evolutionary dynamics of species diversification remain poorly understood. To investigate this question, we combine paleontological and neontological data for the angiosperm order Fagales, an ecologically important clade of about 1370 species of trees with an exceptional fossil record. We show differences in patterns of accumulation of generic diversity, species richness, and turnover rates for Fagales. Generic diversity evolved rapidly since the Late Cretaceous and peaked during the Eocene or Oligocene. Turnover rates were high during periods of extreme global climate change, but relatively low when the climate remained stable. Species richness accumulated gradually throughout the Cenozoic, possibly at an accelerated pace after the Middle Miocene. Species diversification occurred in new environments: Quercoids radiating in Oligocene subtropical seasonally arid habitats, Casuarinaceae in Australian pyrophytic biomes, and Betula in Late Neogene holarctic habitats. These radiations were counterbalanced by regional extinctions in Late Neogene mesic warm-temperate forests. Thus, the overall diversification at species level is linked to regional radiations of clades with appropriate ecologies exploiting newly available habitats. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Increased sampling reveals novel lineages of Entamoeba: consequences of genetic diversity and host specificity for taxonomy and molecular detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, C Rune; Lebbad, Marianne; Victory, Emma L; Verweij, Jaco J; Tannich, Egbert; Alfellani, Mohammed; Legarraga, Paulette; Clark, C Graham

    2011-07-01

    To expand the representation for phylogenetic analysis, ten additional complete Entamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained from humans, non-human primates, cattle and a tortoise. For some novel sequences no corresponding morphological data were available, and we suggest that these organisms should be referred to as ribosomal lineages (RL) rather than being assigned species names at present. To investigate genetic diversity and host specificity of selected Entamoeba species, a total of 91 new partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained, including 49 from Entamoeba coli, 18 from Entamoeba polecki, and 17 from Entamoeba hartmanni. We propose a new nomenclature for significant variants within established Entamoeba species. Based on current data we propose that the uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoeba infecting humans is called Entamoeba polecki and divided into four subtypes (ST1-ST4) and that Entamoeba coli is divided into two subtypes (ST1-ST2). New hosts for several species were detected and, while host specificity and genetic diversity of several species remain to be clarified, it is clear that previous reliance on cultivated material has given us a misleading and incomplete picture of variation within the genus Entamoeba. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Evolution of PvMSP3α Block II in Plasmodium vivax from Diverse Geographic Origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Gupta

    Full Text Available Block II of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 3α (PvMSP3α is conserved and has been proposed as a potential candidate for a malaria vaccine. The present study aimed to compare sequence diversity in PvMSP3a block II at a local microgeographic scale in a village as well as from larger geographic regions (countries and worldwide. Blood samples were collected from asymptomatic carriers of P. vivax in a village at the western border of Thailand and PvMSP3α was amplified and sequenced. For population genetic analysis, 237 PvMSP3α block II sequences from eleven P. vivax endemic countries were analyzed. PvMSP3α sequences from 20 village-level samples revealed two length variant types with one type containing a large deletion in block I. In contrast, block II was relatively conserved; especially, some non-synonymous mutations were extensively shared among 11 parasite populations. However, the majority of the low-frequency synonymous variations were population specific. The conserved pattern of nucleotide diversity in block II sequences was probably due to functional/structural constraints, which were further supported by the tests of neutrality. Notably, a small region in block II that encodes a predicted B cell epitope was highly polymorphic and showed signs of balancing selection, signifying that this region might be influenced by the immune selection and may serve as a starting point for designing multi-antigen/stage epitope based vaccines against this parasite.

  16. Metagenomic insights into the uncultured diversity and physiology of microbes in four hypersaline soda lake brines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still

  17. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavourakis, C.D.; Ghai, R.; Rodriguez-valera, F.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Tringe, S.G.; Hugenholtz, P.; Muyzer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still

  18. Defense Islands in Bacterial and Archaeal Genomes and Prediction of Novel Defense Systems ▿†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Snir, Sagi; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    The arms race between cellular life forms and viruses is a major driving force of evolution. A substantial fraction of bacterial and archaeal genomes is dedicated to antivirus defense. We analyzed the distribution of defense genes and typical mobilome components (such as viral and transposon genes) in bacterial and archaeal genomes and demonstrated statistically significant clustering of antivirus defense systems and mobile genes and elements in genomic islands. The defense islands are enrich...

  19. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J Scott; Edwards, Danielle L; Fisher, Robert N; Harlow, Peter S

    2008-10-27

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  20. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J.S.; Edwards, D.L.; Fisher, R.N.; Harlow, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  1. Novel archaeal plasmid pAH1 and its interactions with the lipothrixvirus AFV1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, Tamara; Smyth, John; Forterre, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    . Although nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed extensive intergenomic exchange during the evolution of archaeal conjugative plasmids, pAH1 was shown to be stably maintained suggesting that the host system is suitable for studying plasmid-virus interactions. AFV1 infection and propagation leads to a loss...... of the circular form of pAH1 and this effect correlates positively with the increase in the intracellular quantity of AFV1 DNA. We infer that the virus inhibits plasmid replication since no pAH1 degradation was observed. This mechanism of archaeal viral inhibition of plasmid propagation is not observed...... in bacteria where relevant bacteriophages either are dependent on a conjugative plasmid for successful infection or are excluded by a resident plasmid....

  2. Haloferax volcanii, as a Novel Tool for Producing Mammalian Olfactory Receptors Embedded in Archaeal Lipid Bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Lobasso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of using an archaeal microorganism as a host system for expressing mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs. We have selected the archaeon Haloferax volcanii as a cell host system and one of the most extensively investigated OR, namely I7-OR, whose preferred ligands are short-chain aldehydes, such as octanal, heptanal, nonanal. A novel plasmid has been constructed to express the rat I7-OR, fused with a hexahistidine-tag for protein immunodetection. The presence of the recombinant receptor at a membrane level was demonstrated by immunoblot of the membranes isolated from the transgenic archaeal strain. In addition, the lipid composition of archaeonanosomes containing ORs has been characterized in detail by High-Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography (HPTLC in combination with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization—Time-Of-Flight/Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS analysis.

  3. On the Archaeal Origins of Eukaryotes and the Challenges of Inferring Phenotype from Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Gautam; Thattai, Mukund; Baum, Buzz

    2016-07-01

    If eukaryotes arose through a merger between archaea and bacteria, what did the first true eukaryotic cell look like? A major step toward an answer came with the discovery of Lokiarchaeum, an archaeon whose genome encodes small GTPases related to those used by eukaryotes to regulate membrane traffic. Although 'Loki' cells have yet to be seen, their existence has prompted the suggestion that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes engulfed the future mitochondrion by phagocytosis. We propose instead that the archaeal ancestor was a relatively simple cell, and that eukaryotic cellular organization arose as the result of a gradual transfer of bacterial genes and membranes driven by an ever-closer symbiotic partnership between a bacterium and an archaeon. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression, purification and crystallization of an archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Kraszewski, Jessica L.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Dunten, Pete W.

    2009-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of an archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase are described. Complete highly redundant X-ray data have been measured from a crystal diffracting to 3.13 Å resolution. An archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepcA) from Clostridium perfringens has been expressed in Escherichia coli in a soluble form with an amino-terminal His tag. The recombinant protein is enzymatically active and two crystal forms have been obtained. Complete diffraction data extending to 3.13 Å resolution have been measured from a crystal soaked in KAu(CN) 2 , using radiation at a wavelength just above the Au L III edge. The asymmetric unit contains two tetramers of PepcA

  5. The Vertical Distribution of Sediment Archaeal Community in the “Black Bloom” Disturbing Zhushan Bay of Lake Taihu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfang Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we investigated the vertical distribution of archaeal community in the sediment of Zhushan Bay of Lake Taihu, where the black bloom frequently occurred in summer. Overall, the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG, Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Group 6 (DHVEG-6, and Methanobacterium dominated the archaeal community. However, we observed significant difference in composition of archaeal community among different depths of the sediment. DHVEG-6 dominated in the surface layer (0–3 cm sediment. Methanobacterium was the dominating archaeal taxa in the L2 (3–6 cm and L3 (6–10 sediment. MCG was most abundant in the L4 (10–15 cm and L5 (15–20 cm sediment. Besides, DHVEG-6 was significantly affected by the concentration of total phosphorus (TP. And loss on ignition (LOI was an important environmental factor for Methanobacterium. As the typical archaeal taxa in the surface layer sediment, DHVEG-6 and Methanobacterium might be more adapted to abundant substrate supply from cyanobacterial blooms and take active part in the biomass transformation. We propose that DHVEG-6 and Methanobacterium could be the key archaeal taxa correlated with the “black bloom” formation in Zhushan Bay.

  6. Influence of phenylacetic acid pulses on anaerobic digestion performance and archaeal community structure in WWTP sewage sludge digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Léa; Urra, Johana; Rosenkranz, Francisca; Kroff, Pablo Araya; Plugge, Caroline M; Lesty, Yves; Chamy, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phenylacetic acid (PAA) pulses on anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and archaeal community structure was evaluated in anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Four pilot-scale continuous stirred tank reactors were set up at a full-scale municipal