WorldWideScience

Sample records for archaea ecology metabolism

  1. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  2. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  3. 2007 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imke Schroeder

    2008-09-18

    The Archaea are a fascinating and diverse group of prokaryotic organisms with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of this GRC conference, 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology', expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting the evolution and composition of microbial communities and novel archaeal species, their impact on the environment, archaeal metabolism, and research that stems from sequence analysis of archaeal genomes. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple reputable areas with new scientific topics in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  4. 2003 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard F. Shand

    2004-09-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2003 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, NH from August 3-8, 2003. The Conference was well-attended with 150 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, ''free time'' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field. I want to personally thank you for your support of this Conference. As you know, in the interest of promoting the presentation of unpublished and frontier-breaking research, Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings. If you wish any further details, please feel free to contact me. Thank you, Dr. Richard F. Shand, 2003 Conference Chair.

  5. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology [sic], Metabolism. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Charles

    2001-08-10

    The Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism [and Molecular Biology] was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, New Hampshire, August 5-10, 2001. The conference was attended by 135 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Ecology and genetic elements; Genomics and evolution; Ecology, genomes and gene regulation; Replication and recombination; Chromatin and transcription; Gene regulation; Post-transcription processing; Biochemistry and metabolism; Proteomics and protein structure; Metabolism and physiology. The featured speaker addressed the topic: ''Archaeal viruses, witnesses of prebiotic evolution?''

  6. A novel bifunctional transcriptional regulator of riboflavin metabolism in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Irina A; Vetting, Matthew W; Li, Xiaoqing; Almo, Steven C; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2017-01-09

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is the precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are essential coenzymes in all free-living organisms. Riboflavin biosynthesis in many Bacteria but not in Archaea is controlled by FMN-responsive riboswitches. We identified a novel bifunctional riboflavin kinase/regulator (RbkR), which controls riboflavin biosynthesis and transport genes in major lineages of Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. RbkR proteins are composed of the riboflavin kinase domain and a DNA-binding winged helix-turn-helix-like domain. Using comparative genomics, we predicted RbkR operator sites and reconstructed RbkR regulons in 94 archaeal genomes. While the identified RbkR operators showed significant variability between archaeal lineages, the conserved core of RbkR regulons includes riboflavin biosynthesis genes, known/predicted vitamin uptake transporters and the rbkR gene. The DNA motifs and CTP-dependent riboflavin kinase activity of two RbkR proteins were experimentally validated in vitro The DNA binding activity of RbkR was stimulated by CTP and suppressed by FMN, a product of riboflavin kinase. The crystallographic structure of RbkR from Thermoplasma acidophilum was determined in complex with CTP and its DNA operator revealing key residues for operator and ligand recognition. Overall, this study contributes to our understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks for vitamin homeostasis in Archaea.

  7. Distribution of Bathyarchaeota (MCG) archaea in the South China Sea sediments and implication of its ecological roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiantian, Y.; Wang, F.; MingYang, N.

    2015-12-01

    Tiantian Yu1,2, Mingyang Niu1,2 and Fengping Wang1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai, 200240, China; 2State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China ABSTRACT: Archaea of Bathyarchaeota Phylum (Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group, MCG) are widespread and abundant in various marine and continental environments. However, very little is understood on the metabolisms and ecological roles of this cosmopolitan sedimentary archaea , partly due to obstacles of cultivation. Bathyarchaeota could be divided into large members of subgroups with potentially high genetic heterogeneity, implying different metabolic capabilities and functions in different subgroups. Here, we report our work on investigating Bathyarchaeota abundance and types of subgroups in the South China Sea(SCS) sediments, aim to understand their ecological roles in the carbon cycling. Bathyarchaeota were found the most dominant archaeal group in the sediments of SCS , most of which belong to subgroups MCG-8, MCG-15, MCG-17 and MCG-3. A new pair of 16S rRNA gene primers was designed as the published primers could not cover MCG-15 and MCG-17, which are the most dominant subgroups in the SCS sediments. Comparing with previous primers which used for quantifying the abundance of Bathyarchaeota via Q-PCR, the new primer revealed about an order of magnitude higher abundance in all South China Sea sediments. The relationship of geochemical parameters and MCG subgroups will further be explored to provide the basis for further understanding the metabolic function and biogeochemical roles of these poor-understood sedimentary archaea.

  8. Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling of Archaea Lends Insight into Diversity of Metabolic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Decades of biochemical, bioinformatic, and sequencing data are currently being systematically compiled into genome-scale metabolic reconstructions (GEMs). Such reconstructions are knowledge-bases useful for engineering, modeling, and comparative analysis. Here we review the fifteen GEMs of archaeal species that have been constructed to date. They represent primarily members of the Euryarchaeota with three-quarters comprising representative of methanogens. Unlike other reviews on GEMs, we specially focus on archaea. We briefly review the GEM construction process and the genealogy of the archaeal models. The major insights gained during the construction of these models are then reviewed with specific focus on novel metabolic pathway predictions and growth characteristics. Metabolic pathway usage is discussed in the context of the composition of each organism's biomass and their specific energy and growth requirements. We show how the metabolic models can be used to study the evolution of metabolism in archaea. Conservation of particular metabolic pathways can be studied by comparing reactions using the genes associated with their enzymes. This demonstrates the utility of GEMs to evolutionary studies, far beyond their original purpose of metabolic modeling; however, much needs to be done before archaeal models are as extensively complete as those for bacteria. PMID:28133437

  9. Novel Cardiolipins from Uncultured Methane-Metabolizing Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Y. Yoshinaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel cardiolipins from Archaea were detected by screening the intact polar lipid (IPL composition of microbial communities associated with methane seepage in deep-sea sediments from the Pakistan margin by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A series of tentatively identified cardiolipin analogues (dimeric phospholipids or bisphosphatidylglycerol, BPG represented 0.5% to 5% of total archaeal IPLs. These molecules are similar to the recently described cardiolipin analogues with four phytanyl chains from extreme halophilic archaea. It is worth noting that cardiolipin analogues from the seep archaeal communities are composed of four isoprenoidal chains, which may contain differences in chain length (20 and 25 carbon atoms and degrees of unsaturation and the presence of a hydroxyl group. Two novel diether lipids, structurally related to the BPGs, are described and interpreted as degradation products of archaeal cardiolipin analogues. Since archaeal communities in seep sediments are dominated by anaerobic methanotrophs, our observations have implications for characterizing structural components of archaeal membranes, in which BPGs are presumed to contribute to modulation of cell permeability properties. Whether BPGs facilitate interspecies interaction in syntrophic methanotrophic consortia remains to be tested.

  10. A RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathway in methanogenic archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Takunari; Mehrotra, Sandhya; Endo, Chikako; Kizu, Natsuko; Matusda, Mami; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yokota, Akiho; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Ashida, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Two enzymes are considered to be unique to the photosynthetic Calvin–Benson cycle: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), responsible for CO2 fixation, and phosphoribulokinase (PRK). Some archaea possess bona fide RuBisCOs, despite not being photosynthetic organisms, but are thought to lack PRK. Here we demonstrate the existence in methanogenic archaea of a carbon metabolic pathway involving RuBisCO and PRK, which we term ‘reductive hexulose-phosphate' (RHP) pathway. These archaea possess both RuBisCO and a catalytically active PRK whose crystal structure resembles that of photosynthetic bacterial PRK. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometric analysis of metabolites reveals that the RHP pathway, which differs from the Calvin–Benson cycle only in a few steps, is active in vivo. Our work highlights evolutionary and functional links between RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathways in methanogenic archaea and photosynthetic organisms. Whether the RHP pathway allows for autotrophy (that is, growth exclusively with CO2 as carbon source) remains unknown. PMID:28082747

  11. Localization of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase as Metabolic Marker for Diverse Methanogenic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-Coenzyme M reductase (MCR as key enzyme for methanogenesis as well as for anaerobic oxidation of methane represents an important metabolic marker for both processes in microbial biofilms. Here, the potential of MCR-specific polyclonal antibodies as metabolic marker in various methanogenic Archaea is shown. For standard growth conditions in laboratory culture, the cytoplasmic localization of the enzyme in Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter wolfei, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanosarcina mazei, and in anaerobically methane-oxidizing biofilms is demonstrated. Under growth limiting conditions on nickel-depleted media, at low linear growth of cultures, a fraction of 50–70% of the enzyme was localized close to the cytoplasmic membrane, which implies “facultative” membrane association of the enzyme. This feature may be also useful for assessment of growth-limiting conditions in microbial biofilms.

  12. Population ecology of nitrifying archaea and bacteria in the Southern California Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J Michael; Sachdeva, Rohan; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2010-05-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, and although relatively little is currently known about their biogeochemical roles in marine ecosystems, recognition that Crenarchaeota posses ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and may act as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) offers another means of probing the ecology of these microorganisms. Here we use a time series approach combining quantification of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers with bacterial community fingerprints and biogeochemistry, to explore the population and community ecology of nitrification. At multiple depths (150, 500 and 890 m) in the Southern California Bight sampled monthly from 2003 to 2006, AOA were enumerated via quantitative PCR of archaeal amoA and marine group 1 Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes. Based on amoA genes, AOA were highly variable in time - a consistent feature of marine Crenarchaeota- however, average values were similar at different depths and ranged from 2.20 to 2.76 x 10(4) amoA copies ml(-1). Archaeal amoA genes were correlated with Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes (r(2) = 0.79) and the slope of this relationship was 1.02, demonstrating that the majority of marine group 1 Crenarchaeota present over the dates and depths sampled possessed amoA. Two AOA clades were specifically quantified and compared with betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (beta-AOB) amoA genes at 150 m; these AOA groups were found to strongly co-vary in time (r(2) = 0.70, P < 0.001) whereas AOA : beta-AOB ratios ranged from 13 to 5630. Increases in the AOA : beta-AOB ratio correlated with the accumulation of nitrite (r(2) = 0.87, P < 0.001), and may be indicative of differences in substrate affinities and activities leading to periodic decoupling between ammonia and nitrite oxidation. These data capture a dynamic nitrogen cycle in which multiple microbial groups appear to be active participants.

  13. A comparative genomic analysis of energy metabolism in sulfate reducing bacteria and archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês A. C. ePereira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of sequenced genomes of sulfate-reducing organisms (SRO has increased significantly in the recent years, providing an opportunity for a broader perspective into the energy metabolism of such organisms. In this work we carried out a comparative survey of energy metabolism genes found in twenty-five available genomes of SRO. This analysis revealed a higher diversity of possible energy conserving pathways than classically considered to be present in these organisms, and permitted the identification of new proteins not known to be present in this group. The Deltaproteobacteria (and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii are characterized by a large number of cytochromes c and cytochrome c-associated membrane redox complexes, indicating that periplasmic electron transfer pathways are important in these bacteria. The Archaea and Clostridia groups contain practically no cytochromes c or associated membrane complexes. However, despite the absence of a periplasmic space, a few extracytoplasmic membrane redox proteins were detected in the Gram-positive bacteria. Several ion-translocating complexes were detected in SRO including H+-pyrophosphatases, complex I homologues, Rnf and Ech/Coo hydrogenases. Furthermore, we found evidence that cytoplasmic electron bifurcating mechanisms, recently described for other anaerobes, are also likely to play an important role in energy metabolism of SRO. A number of cytoplasmic [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, formate dehydrogenases and heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins are likely candidates to be involved in energy coupling through electron bifurcation, from diverse electron donors such as H2, formate, pyruvate, NAD(PH, β-oxidation and others. In conclusion, this analysis indicates that energy metabolism of SRO is far more versatile than previously considered, and that both chemiosmotic and flavin-based electron bifurcating mechanisms provide alternative strategies for energy conservation.

  14. Marxism, social metabolism, and ecologically unequal exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Alier, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Authors working on "industrial metabolism" or "social metabolism" look at the economy in terms of flows of energy and materials. Together with the ecological economists, they see the economy as a subsystem of a larger physical system. Marx and Engels followed with a few years' delay many of the remarkable scientific and technical novelties of their time.

  15. Archaea in biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offre, Pierre; Spang, Anja; Schleper, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Archaea constitute a considerable fraction of the microbial biomass on Earth. Like Bacteria they have evolved a variety of energy metabolisms using organic and/or inorganic electron donors and acceptors, and many of them are able to fix carbon from inorganic sources. Archaea thus play crucial roles in the Earth's global geochemical cycles and influence greenhouse gas emissions. Methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation are important steps in the carbon cycle; both are performed exclusively by anaerobic archaea. Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite is performed by Thaumarchaeota. They represent the only archaeal group that resides in large numbers in the global aerobic terrestrial and marine environments on Earth. Sulfur-dependent archaea are confined mostly to hot environments, but metal leaching by acidophiles and reduction of sulfate by anaerobic, nonthermophilic methane oxidizers have a potential impact on the environment. The metabolisms of a large number of archaea, in particular those dominating the subsurface, remain to be explored.

  16. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  17. Archaea in Symbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, the analysis of microbial diversity in various habitats greatly increased our knowledge on the kingdom Archaea. At the same time, we became aware of the multiple ways in which Archaea may interact with each other and with organisms of other kingdoms. The large group of euryarchaeal methanogens and their methane oxidizing relatives, in particular, take part in essential steps of the global methane cycle. Both of these processes, which are in reverse to each other, are partially conducted in a symbiotic interaction with different partners, either ciliates and xylophagous animals or sulfate reducing bacteria. Other symbiotic interactions are mostly of unknown ecological significance but depend on highly specific mechanisms. This paper will give an overview on interactions between Archaea and other organisms and will point out the ecological relevance of these symbiotic processes, as long as these have been already recognized.

  18. Research on metabolic network of extremely halophilic archaea%极端嗜盐古菌代谢网络研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁德武

    2012-01-01

    Extremely halophilic archaea belonging to the euryarchaeota halobium branch, it is a typical population in archaea, and very important to microbial resources. In this article, we mainly study the structure and function of metabolic network about one extremely halophilic archaea: Halobacterium salinarum Rl. We obtain a list of all metabolic reactions in Halobacterium salinarum Rl from published high-quality metabolic models, and represent it with metabolite graph. We analyze functional modules and hubs of the network, and discussed their biological signification.%极端嗜盐古菌(extremely thermophilic archaea)属于广域古菌界盐杆菌科,是古菌域中的典型生理类群,也是重要的极端微生物资源.文章主要对一种极端嗜盐古菌——盐沼盐杆菌(Halobacterium salinarum R1)——代谢网络的结构与功能进行了分析.对高质量盐沼盐杆菌代谢网络数据进行整理,构建了其中所有的代谢反应列表,并用代谢物图来表示.分析了该网络的功能模块和关键节点,并讨论了它们的生物学功能意义.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype–metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype–phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype–environment–phenotype relationships. PMID:27634775

  20. Metabolism of pentose sugars in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Charlotte E M; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Hough, David W; Danson, Michael J

    2010-10-29

    We have previously shown that the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus solfataricus, catabolizes d-glucose and d-galactose to pyruvate and glyceraldehyde via a non-phosphorylative version of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. At each step, one enzyme is active with both C6 epimers, leading to a metabolically promiscuous pathway. On further investigation, the catalytic promiscuity of the first enzyme in this pathway, glucose dehydrogenase, has been shown to extend to the C5 sugars, D-xylose and L-arabinose. In the current paper we establish that this promiscuity for C6 and C5 metabolites is also exhibited by the third enzyme in the pathway, 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate aldolase, but that the second step requires a specific C5-dehydratase, the gluconate dehydratase being active only with C6 metabolites. The products of this pathway for the catabolism of D-xylose and L-arabinose are pyruvate and glycolaldehyde, pyruvate entering the citric acid cycle after oxidative decarboxylation to acetyl-coenzyme A. We have identified and characterized the enzymes, both native and recombinant, that catalyze the conversion of glycolaldehyde to glycolate and then to glyoxylate, which can enter the citric acid cycle via the action of malate synthase. Evidence is also presented that similar enzymes for this pentose sugar pathway are present in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and metabolic tracer studies in this archaeon demonstrate its in vivo operation in parallel with a route involving no aldol cleavage of the 2-keto-3-deoxy-pentanoates but direct conversion to the citric acid cycle C5-metabolite, 2-oxoglutarate.

  1. Systematic identification of gene families for use as "markers" for phylogenetic and phylogeny-driven ecological studies of bacteria and archaea and their major subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Wu

    Full Text Available With the astonishing rate that genomic and metagenomic sequence data sets are accumulating, there are many reasons to constrain the data analyses. One approach to such constrained analyses is to focus on select subsets of gene families that are particularly well suited for the tasks at hand. Such gene families have generally been referred to as "marker" genes. We are particularly interested in identifying and using such marker genes for phylogenetic and phylogeny-driven ecological studies of microbes and their communities (e.g., construction of species trees, phylogenetic based assignment of metagenomic sequence reads to taxonomic groups, phylogeny-based assessment of alpha- and beta-diversity of microbial communities from metagenomic data. We therefore refer to these as PhyEco (for phylogenetic and phylogenetic ecology markers. The dual use of these PhyEco markers means that we needed to develop and apply a set of somewhat novel criteria for identification of the best candidates for such markers. The criteria we focused on included universality across the taxa of interest, ability to be used to produce robust phylogenetic trees that reflect as much as possible the evolution of the species from which the genes come, and low variation in copy number across taxa. We describe here an automated protocol for identifying potential PhyEco markers from a set of complete genome sequences. The protocol combines rapid searching, clustering and phylogenetic tree building algorithms to generate protein families that meet the criteria listed above. We report here the identification of PhyEco markers for different taxonomic levels including 40 for "all bacteria and archaea", 114 for "all bacteria (greatly expanding on the ∼30 commonly used, and 100 s to 1000 s for some of the individual phyla of bacteria. This new list of PhyEco markers should allow much more detailed automated phylogenetic and phylogenetic ecology analyses of these groups than possible

  2. Genome-resolved metagenomics reveals that sulfur metabolism dominates the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Jain, S.; Reed, D. C.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plumes occur when hot fluids from hydrothermal vents replete with chemically reduced elements and compounds like sulfide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, iron and manganese mix with cold, oxic seawater. Chemosynthetic microbes use these reduced chemicals to power primary production and are pervasive throughout the deep sea, even at sites far removed from hydrothermal vents. Although neutrally-buoyant hydrothermal plumes have been well-studied, rising hydrothermal plumes have received little attention even though they represent an important interface in the deep-sea where microbial metabolism and particle formation processes control the transformation of important elements and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we used genome-resolved metagenomic analyses and thermodynamic-bioenergetic modeling to study the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes at five different hydrothermal vents spanning a range of geochemical gradients at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our analyses show that differences in the geochemistry of hydrothermal vents do not manifest in microbial diversity and community composition, both of which display only minor variance across ELSC hydrothermal plumes. Microbial metabolism is dominated by oxidation of reduced sulfur species and supports a diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses that provide intriguing insights into metabolic plasticity and virus-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the microbial community. The manifestation of sulfur oxidation genes in hydrogen and methane oxidizing organisms hints at metabolic opportunism in deep-sea microbes that would enable them to respond to varying redox conditions in hydrothermal plumes. Finally, we infer that the abundance, diversity and metabolic versatility of microbes associated with sulfur oxidation impart functional redundancy that could allow it to persist in the dynamic settings of hydrothermal plumes.

  3. Phylogenomic analysis of proteins that are distinctive of Archaea and its main subgroups and the origin of methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Radhey S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Archaea are highly diverse in terms of their physiology, metabolism and ecology. Presently, very few molecular characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by either all archaea or the different main groups within archaea. The evolutionary relationships among different groups within the Euryarchaeota branch are also not clearly understood. Results We have carried out comprehensive analyses on each open reading frame (ORFs in the genomes of 11 archaea (3 Crenarchaeota – Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius; 8 Euryarchaeota – Pyrococcus abyssi, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanopyrus kandleri, Methanococcoides burtonii, Halobacterium sp. NCR-1, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Picrophilus torridus to search for proteins that are unique to either all Archaea or for its main subgroups. These studies have identified 1448 proteins or ORFs that are distinctive characteristics of Archaea and its various subgroups and whose homologues are not found in other organisms. Six of these proteins are unique to all Archaea, 10 others are only missing in Nanoarchaeum equitans and a large number of other proteins are specific for various main groups within the Archaea (e.g. Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales, Halobacteriales, Thermococci, Thermoplasmata, all methanogenic archaea or particular groups of methanogens. Of particular importance is the observation that 31 proteins are uniquely present in virtually all methanogens (including M. kandleri and 10 additional proteins are only found in different methanogens as well as A. fulgidus. In contrast, no protein was exclusively shared by various methanogen and any of the Halobacteriales or Thermoplasmatales. These results strongly indicate that all methanogenic archaea form a monophyletic group exclusive of other archaea and that this lineage likely evolved from Archaeoglobus. In addition, 15 proteins

  4. Molecular Tools for the Detection of Nitrogen Cycling Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Rusch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea are widespread in extreme and temperate environments, and cultured representatives cover a broad spectrum of metabolic capacities, which sets them up for potentially major roles in the biogeochemistry of their ecosystems. The detection, characterization, and quantification of archaeal functions in mixed communities require Archaea-specific primers or probes for the corresponding metabolic genes. Five pairs of degenerate primers were designed to target archaeal genes encoding key enzymes of nitrogen cycling: nitrite reductases NirA and NirB, nitrous oxide reductase (NosZ, nitrogenase reductase (NifH, and nitrate reductases NapA/NarG. Sensitivity towards their archaeal target gene, phylogenetic specificity, and gene specificity were evaluated in silico and in vitro. Owing to their moderate sensitivity/coverage, the novel nirB-targeted primers are suitable for pure culture studies only. The nirA-targeted primers showed sufficient sensitivity and phylogenetic specificity, but poor gene specificity. The primers designed for amplification of archaeal nosZ performed well in all 3 criteria; their discrimination against bacterial homologs appears to be weakened when Archaea are strongly outnumbered by bacteria in a mixed community. The novel nifH-targeted primers showed high sensitivity and gene specificity, but failed to discriminate against bacterial homologs. Despite limitations, 4 of the new primer pairs are suitable tools in several molecular methods applied in archaeal ecology.

  5. Ecological implications of metabolic compensation at low temperatures in salamanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Catenazzi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is influencing the biology of the world’s biota. Temperature increases are occurring at a faster pace than that experienced by organisms in their evolutionary histories, limiting the organisms’ response to new conditions. Mechanistic models that include physiological traits can help predict species’ responses to warming. Changes in metabolism at high temperatures are often examined; yet many species are behaviorally shielded from high temperatures. Salamanders generally favor cold temperatures and are one of few groups of metazoans to be most species-rich in temperate regions. I examined variation in body temperature, behavioral activity, and temperature dependence of resting heart rate, used as a proxy for standard metabolic rate, in fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra. Over 26 years, I found that salamanders are behaviorally active at temperatures as low as 1 °C, and aestivate at temperatures above 16 °C. Infrared thermography indicates limited thermoregulation opportunities for these nocturnal amphibians. Temperature affects resting heart rate, causing metabolic depression above 11 °C, and metabolic compensation below 8 °C: heart rate at 3 °C is 224% the expected heart rate. Thus, salamanders operating at low temperatures during periods of peak behavioral activity are able to maintain a higher metabolic rate than the rate expected in absence of compensation. This compensatory mechanism has important ecological implications, because it increases estimated seasonal heart rates. Increased heart rate, and thus metabolism, will require higher caloric intake for field-active salamanders. Thus, it is important to consider a species performance breadth over the entire temperature range, and particularly low temperatures that are ecologically relevant for cold tolerant species such as salamanders.

  6. An urban metabolism and ecological footprint assessment of Metro Vancouver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennie; Kissinger, Meidad; Rees, William E

    2013-07-30

    As the world urbanizes, the role of cities in determining sustainability outcomes grows in importance. Cities are the dominant form of human habitat, and most of the world's resources are either directly or indirectly consumed in cities. Sustainable city analysis and management requires understanding the demands a city places on a wider geographical area and its ecological resource base. We present a detailed, integrated urban metabolism of residential consumption and ecological footprint analysis of the Vancouver metropolitan region for the year 2006. Our overall goal is to demonstrate the application of a bottom-up ecological footprint analysis using an urban metabolism framework at a metropolitan, regional scale. Our specific objectives are: a) to quantify energy and material consumption using locally generated data and b) to relate these data to global ecological carrying capacity. Although water is the largest material flow through Metro Vancouver (424,860,000 m(3)), it has the smallest ecological footprint (23,100 gha). Food (2,636,850 tonnes) contributes the largest component to the ecological footprint (4,514,400 gha) which includes crop and grazing land as well as carbon sinks required to sequester emissions from food production and distribution. Transportation fuels (3,339,000 m(3)) associated with motor vehicle operation and passenger air travel comprises the second largest material flow through the region and the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions (7,577,000 tonnes). Transportation also accounts for the second largest component of the EF (2,323,200 gha). Buildings account for the largest electricity flow (17,515,150 MWh) and constitute the third largest component of the EF (1,779,240 gha). Consumables (2,400,000 tonnes) comprise the fourth largest component of the EF (1,414,440 gha). Metro Vancouver's total Ecological Footprint in 2006 was 10,071,670 gha, an area approximately 36 times larger than the region itself. The EFA reveals that

  7. Bioprospecting Archaea: Focus on Extreme Halophiles

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, André

    2016-12-12

    In 1990, Woese et al. divided the Tree of Life into three separate domains: Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. Archaea were originally perceived as little more than “odd bacteria” restricted to extreme environmental niches, but later discoveries challenged this assumption. Members of this domain populate a variety of unexpected environments (e.g. soils, seawater, and human bodies), and we currently witness ongoing massive expansions of the archaeal branch of the Tree of Life. Archaea are now recognized as major players in the biosphere and constitute a significant fraction of the earth’s biomass, yet they remain underexplored. An ongoing surge in exploration efforts is leading to an increase in the (a) number of isolated strains, (b) associated knowledge, and (c) utilization of Archaea in biotechnology. They are increasingly employed in fields as diverse as biocatalysis, biocomputing, bioplastic production, bioremediation, bioengineering, food, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. This chapter provides a general overview on bioprospecting Archaea, with a particular focus on extreme halophiles. We explore aspects such as diversity, ecology, screening techniques and biotechnology. Current and future trends in mining for applications are discussed.

  8. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  9. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  10. A bioenergetic basis for membrane divergence in archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, Víctor; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2014-08-01

    Membrane bioenergetics are universal, yet the phospholipid membranes of archaea and bacteria-the deepest branches in the tree of life-are fundamentally different. This deep divergence in membrane chemistry is reflected in other stark differences between the two domains, including ion pumping and DNA replication. We resolve this paradox by considering the energy requirements of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). We develop a mathematical model based on the premise that LUCA depended on natural proton gradients. Our analysis shows that such gradients can power carbon and energy metabolism, but only in leaky cells with a proton permeability equivalent to fatty acid vesicles. Membranes with lower permeability (equivalent to modern phospholipids) collapse free-energy availability, precluding exploitation of natural gradients. Pumping protons across leaky membranes offers no advantage, even when permeability is decreased 1,000-fold. We hypothesize that a sodium-proton antiporter (SPAP) provided the first step towards modern membranes. SPAP increases the free energy available from natural proton gradients by ∼60%, enabling survival in 50-fold lower gradients, thereby facilitating ecological spread and divergence. Critically, SPAP also provides a steadily amplifying advantage to proton pumping as membrane permeability falls, for the first time favoring the evolution of ion-tight phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids of archaea and bacteria incorporate different stereoisomers of glycerol phosphate. We conclude that the enzymes involved took these alternatives by chance in independent populations that had already evolved distinct ion pumps. Our model offers a quantitatively robust explanation for why membrane bioenergetics are universal, yet ion pumps and phospholipid membranes arose later and independently in separate populations. Our findings elucidate the paradox that archaea and bacteria share DNA transcription, ribosomal translation, and ATP synthase, yet

  11. Tropical Aquatic Archaea Show Environment-Specific Community Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Cynthia B.; Cardoso, Alexander M.; Coutinho, Felipe H.; Lima, Joyce L.; Pinto, Leonardo H.; Albano, Rodolpho M.; Clementino, Maysa M.; Martins, Orlando B.; Vieira, Ricardo P.

    2013-01-01

    The Archaea domain is ubiquitously distributed and extremely diverse, however, environmental factors that shape archaeal community structure are not well known. Aquatic environments, including the water column and sediments harbor many new uncultured archaeal species from which metabolic and ecological roles remain elusive. Some environments are especially neglected in terms of archaeal diversity, as is the case of pristine tropical areas. Here we investigate the archaeal composition in marine and freshwater systems from Ilha Grande, a South Atlantic tropical environment. All sampled habitats showed high archaeal diversity. No OTUs were shared between freshwater, marine and mangrove sediment samples, yet these environments are interconnected and geographically close, indicating environment-specific community structuring. Group II Euryarchaeota was the main clade in marine samples, while the new putative phylum Thaumarchaeota and LDS/RCV Euryarchaeota dominated freshwaters. Group III Euryarchaeota, a rare clade, was also retrieved in reasonable abundance in marine samples. The archaeal community from mangrove sediments was composed mainly by members of mesophilic Crenarchaeota and by a distinct clade forming a sister-group to Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. Our results show strong environment-specific community structuring in tropical aquatic Archaea, as previously seen for Bacteria. PMID:24086729

  12. The ecological dichotomy of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the hyper-arid soils of the Antarctic Dry Valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Maria Magalhães

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are considered to be one of the most physically and chemically extreme terrestrial environments on the Earth. However, little is known about the organisms involved in nitrogen transformations in these environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in four McMurdo Dry Valleys with highly variable soil geochemical properties and climatic conditions: Miers Valley, Upper Wright Valley, Beacon Valley and Battleship Promontory. The bacterial communities of these four Dry Valleys have been examined previously, and the results suggested that the extremely localized bacterial diversities are likely driven by the disparate physicochemical conditions associated with these locations. Here we showed that AOB and AOA amoA gene diversity was generally low; only four AOA and three AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified from a total of 420 AOA and AOB amoA clones. Quantitative PCR analysis of amoA genes revealed clear differences in the relative abundances of AOA and AOB amoA genes among samples from the four Dry Valleys. Although AOB amoA gene dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in soils from Miers Valley and Battleship Promontory, AOA amoA gene were more abundant in samples from Upper Wright and Beacon Valleys, where the environmental conditions are considerably harsher (e.g., extremely low soil C/N ratios and much higher soil electrical conductivity. Correlations between environmental variables and amoA genes copy numbers, as examined by redundancy analysis (RDA, revealed that higher AOA/AOB ratios were closely related to soils with high salts and Cu contents and low pH. Our findings hint at a dichotomized distribution of AOA and AOB within the Dry Valleys, potentially driven by environmental constraints.

  13. Genetic techniques for the archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Joel A; Picking, Jonathan W; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic techniques for the Archaea have undergone a rapid expansion in complexity, resulting in increased exploration of the role of Archaea in the environment and detailed analyses of the molecular physiology and information-processing systems in the third domain of life. Complementary gains in describing the ever-increasing diversity of archaeal organisms have allowed these techniques to be leveraged in new and imaginative ways to elucidate shared and unique aspects of archaeal diversity and metabolism. In this review, we introduce the four archaeal clades for which advanced genetic techniques are available--the methanogens, halophiles, Sulfolobales, and Thermococcales--with the aim of providing an overall profile of the advantages and disadvantages of working within each clade, as essentially all of the genetically accessible archaeal organisms require unique culturing techniques that present real challenges. We discuss the full repertoire of techniques possible within these clades while highlighting the recent advances that have been made by taking advantage of the most prominent techniques and approaches.

  14. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological featur...

  15. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony;

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil sh...

  16. The rate of metabolism in marine animals: environmental constraints, ecological demands and energetic opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Seibel, Brad A.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    The rates of metabolism in animals vary tremendously throughout the biosphere. The origins of this variation are a matter of active debate with some scientists highlighting the importance of anatomical or environmental constraints, while others emphasize the diversity of ecological roles that organisms play and the associated energy demands. Here, we analyse metabolic rates in diverse marine taxa, with special emphasis on patterns of metabolic rate across a depth gradient, in an effort to und...

  17. Evolution of specialization and ecological character displacement: metabolic plasticity matters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egas, C.J.M.; Reydon, Th.A.C.; Hemerik, L.

    2005-01-01

    An important question in evolutionary biology, especially with respect to herbivorous arthropods, is the evolution of specialization. In a previous paper, the combined evolutionary dynamics of specialization and ecological character displacement was studied, focusing on the role of herbivore foragin

  18. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2011-01-22

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30-40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and -0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis.

  19. Critical PO2 is size-independent in insects: implications for the metabolic theory of ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jon F; Klok, C J; Waters, James S

    2014-10-01

    Insects, and all animals, exhibit hypometric scaling of metabolic rate, with larger species having lower mass-specific metabolic rates. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) is based on models ascribing hypometric scaling of metabolic rate to constrained O2 supply systems in larger animals. We compiled critical PO2 of metabolic and growth rates for more than 40 insect species with a size range spanning four orders of magnitude. Critical PO2 values vary from far below 21kPa for resting animals to near 21kPa for growing or flying animals and are size-independent, demonstrating that supply capacity matches oxygen demand. These data suggest that hypometric scaling of resting metabolic rate in insects is not driven by constraints on oxygen availability.

  20. Archaea in Yellowstone Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Gorby, Yuri; McDermott, Timothy R; Nealson, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex has yielded foundational discoveries that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the Archaea. This study continues on this theme, examining Yellowstone Lake and its lake floor hydrothermal vents. Significant Archaea novelty and diversity were found associated with two near-surface photic zone environments and two vents that varied in their depth, temperature and geochemical profile. Phylogenetic diversity was assessed using 454-FLX sequencing (~51,000 pyrosequencing reads; V1 and V2 regions) and Sanger sequencing of 200 near-full-length polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clones. Automated classifiers (Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and Greengenes) were problematic for the 454-FLX reads (wrong domain or phylum), although BLAST analysis of the 454-FLX reads against the phylogenetically placed full-length Sanger sequenced PCR clones proved reliable. Most of the archaeal diversity was associated with vents, and as expected there were differences between the vents and the near-surface photic zone samples. Thaumarchaeota dominated all samples: vent-associated organisms corresponded to the largely uncharacterized Marine Group I, and in surface waters, ~69-84% of the 454-FLX reads matched archaeal clones representing organisms that are Nitrosopumilus maritimus-like (96-97% identity). Importance of the lake nitrogen cycling was also suggested by >5% of the alkaline vent phylotypes being closely related to the nitrifier Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. The Euryarchaeota were primarily related to the uncharacterized environmental clones that make up the Deep Sea Euryarchaeal Group or Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Group-6. The phylogenetic parallels of Yellowstone Lake archaea to marine microorganisms provide opportunities to examine interesting evolutionary tracks between freshwater and marine lineages.

  1. Perspectives on biotechnological applications of archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Schiraldi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Many archaea colonize extreme environments. They include hyperthermophiles, sulfur-metabolizing thermophiles, extreme halophiles and methanogens. Because extremophilic microorganisms have unusual properties, they are a potentially valuable resource in the development of novel biotechnological processes. Despite extensive research, however, there are few existing industrial applications of either archaeal biomass or archaeal enzymes. This review summarizes current knowledge about the biotechnological uses of archaea and archaeal enzymes with special attention to potential applications that are the subject of current experimental evaluation. Topics covered include cultivation methods, recent achievements in genomics, which are of key importance for the development of new biotechnological tools, and the application of wild-type biomasses, engineered microorganisms, enzymes and specific metabolites in particular bioprocesses of industrial interest.

  2. Metabolic profiles of countries and ecological distribution conflicts.

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Alier, Joan

    2004-01-01

    “Social metabolism” is a notion that links up the natural sciences and the social sciences, and also human history. Work has been done by some groups in Europe in order to operationalize the old idea of looking at the economy from the point of view of “social metabolism”. That idea arose in the 1850s. (Marx used the word Stoffwechsel, and referred explicitly to the metabolism of cells and organisms which also existed in human society. However, neither himself nor Marxist authors did calculati...

  3. Biodiversity, ecological determinants, and metabolic exploitation of sourdough microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, L; Vrancken, G; Ravyts, F; Rimaux, T; Weckx, S

    2009-10-01

    Sourdough is a microbial ecosystem of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts in a matrix of mainly cereal flour and water. Culture-dependent and culture-independent microbiological analysis together with metabolite target analyses of different sourdoughs enabled to understand this complex fermentation process. It is difficult to link the species diversity of the sourdough microbiota with the (geographical) type of sourdough and the flour used, although the type and quality of the latter is the main source of autochthonous LAB in spontaneous sourdough fermentations and plays a key role in establishing stable microbial consortia within a short time. Carbohydrate fermentation targeted towards maltose catabolism, the use of external alternative electron acceptors, amino acid transamination reactions, and/or the arginine deiminase pathway are metabolic activities that favour energy production, cofactor (re)cycling, and/or tolerance towards acid stress, and hence contribute to the competitiveness and dominance of certain species of LAB found in sourdoughs. Also, microbial interactions play an important role. The availability of genome sequences for several LAB species that are of importance in sourdough as well as technological advances in the fields of functional genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics enable new approaches to study sourdough fermentations beyond the single species level and will allow an integral analysis of the metabolic activities and interactions taking place in sourdough. Finally, the implementation of selected starter cultures in sourdough technology is of pivotal importance for the industrial production of sourdoughs to be used as flavour carrier, texture-improving, or health-promoting dough ingredient.

  4. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Sanchez, Laura M.

    2015-12-22

    ABSTRACT

    Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date, analyses of such multi-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here, we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites’ abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributing to the shifts. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome data sets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that contribute significantly to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which the predicted variation negatively correlates with the measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome data sets reveals similar trends, including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step toward a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in

  5. Is there a metabolism of an urban ecosystem? An ecological critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubiewski, Nancy

    2012-11-01

    The energy and material flows of a city are often described as urban metabolism (UM), which is put forward as a way to link a city's ecology and economy. UM draws parallels to the biology of individual organisms, yet the analogy is misapplied. In striving to be interdisciplinary, UM makes this organismic comparison rather than identifying the city as an ecosystem, thereby ignoring developments in ecological theory. Using inappropriate rhetoric misdirects researchers, which influences scientific investigation-from problem statements to interpretations. UM is valuable in quantifying the city's use of natural resources but does not achieve a comprehensive, integrated analysis of the urban ecosystem. To realize an interdisciplinary, perhaps transdisciplinary, understanding of urban ecology, researchers need to emphasize the essential tenets of material flows analysis, view the city as an ecosystem, and use language that properly reflects current knowledge, theory, and conceptual frameworks in the foundational disciplines.

  6. DNA replication origins in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfang eWu; Jingfang eLiu; Haibo eYang; Hua eXiang

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to ...

  7. Electron transfer in syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a key process in methanogenic and sulphate-reducing environments. Bacteria and archaea that live in syntrophic communities take advantage of the metabolic abilities of their syntrophic partner to overcome energy barriers and break down compounds that they cannot dig

  8. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J;

    2006-01-01

    Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light...

  9. Interspecific Differences in Metabolic Rate and Metabolic Temperature Sensitivity Create Distinct Thermal Ecological Niches in Lizards (Plestiodon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles M.; Burggren, Warren W.

    2016-01-01

    Three congeneric lizards from the southeastern United States (Plestiodon fasciatus, P. inexpectatus, and P. laticeps) exhibit a unique nested distribution. All three skink species inhabit the US Southeast, but two extend northward to central Ohio (P. fasciatus and P. laticeps) and P. fasciatus extends well into Canada. Distinct interspecific differences in microhabitat selection and behavior are associated with the cooler temperatures of the more Northern ranges. We hypothesized that interspecific differences in metabolic temperature sensitivity locally segregates them across their total range. Resting oxygen consumption was measured at 20°, 25° and 30°C. Plestiodon fasciatus, from the coolest habitats, exhibited greatly elevated oxygen consumption compared to the other species at high ecologically-relevant temperatures (0.10, 0.17 and 0.83 ml O2. g-1. h-1 at 20°, 25° and 30°C, respectively). Yet, P. inexpectatus, from the warmest habitats, exhibited sharply decreased oxygen consumption compared to the other species at lower ecologically-relevant temperatures (0.09, 0.27 and 0.42 ml O2. g-1. h-1 at 20°, 25° and 30°C, respectively). Plestiodon laticeps, from both open and closed microhabitats and intermediate latitudinal range, exhibited oxygen consumptions significantly lower than the other two species (0.057, 0.104 and 0.172 ml O2. g-1. h-1 at 20°, 25° and 30°C, respectively). Overall, Plestiodon showed metabolic temperature sensitivities (Q10s) in the range of 2–3 over the middle of each species’ normal temperature range. However, especially P. fasciatus and P. inexpectatus showed highly elevated Q10s (9 to 25) at the extreme ends of their temperature range. While morphologically similar, these skinks are metabolically distinct across the genus’ habitat, likely having contributed to their current distribution. PMID:27760215

  10. Distribution and phylogenies of enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway from archaea and hyperthermophilic bacteria support a gluconeogenic origin of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron S. Ronimus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathway (the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP pathway, the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway are widely distributed and are often considered to be central to the origins of metabolism. In particular, several enzymes of the lower portion of the EMP pathway (the so-called trunk pathway, including triosephosphate isomerase (TPI; EC 5.3.1.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1.12/13, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; EC 2.7.2.3 and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11, are extremely well conserved and universally distributed among the three domains of life. In this paper, the distribution of enzymes of gluconeogenesis/glycolysis in hyperthermophiles—microorganisms that many believe represent the least evolved organisms on the planet—is reviewed. In addition, the phylogenies of the trunk pathway enzymes (TPIs, GAPDHs, PGKs and enolases are examined. The enzymes catalyzing each of the six-carbon transformations in the upper portion of the EMP pathway, with the possible exception of aldolase, are all derived from multiple gene sequence families. In contrast, single sequence families can account for the archaeal and hyperthermophilic bacterial enzyme activities of the lower portion of the EMP pathway. The universal distribution of the trunk pathway enzymes, in combination with their phylogenies, supports the notion that the EMP pathway evolved in the direction of gluconeogenesis, i.e., from the bottom up.

  11. Environmental evidence for net methane production and oxidation in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lloyd, Karen; Teske, Andreas; Alperin, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Uncultured ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea are often assumed to be obligate methanotrophs that are incapable of net methanogenesis, and are therefore used as proxies for anaerobic methane oxidation in many environments in spite of uncertainty regarding their metabolic capabilities. Anaero...

  12. Industrial ecology and social metabolism: State of Heat; Ecologia Industrial y metabolismo socioeconomico: Concepto y evoluacion historica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Alier, J.

    2003-07-01

    Industrial Ecology is a new term for an idea that arose in the nineteenth century, that of looking at the economy in terms of social metabolism. This implies to perceive the economy as a open to the entry of energy and materials, and to the exit of waste and dissipated heat. Nowadays there is empirical work on social metabolism at the corporations level and of the whole economy. This article summarized the work of some authors, pioneers in the fields of agricultural energetics and urban ecology. It also reconstructs the debated between a social metabolic approach and both Marxian and neoclassical economics approaches. (Author) 78 refs.

  13. Posttranslational protein modification in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W W

    2005-09-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and Bacteria, posttranslational modification in Archaea has received far less attention. Although archaeal proteins can undergo posttranslational modifications reminiscent of what their eucaryal and bacterial counterparts experience, examination of archaeal posttranslational modification often reveals aspects not previously observed in the other two domains of life. In some cases, posttranslational modification allows a protein to survive the extreme conditions often encountered by Archaea. The various posttranslational modifications experienced by archaeal proteins, the molecular steps leading to these modifications, and the role played by posttranslational modification in Archaea form the focus of this review.

  14. Lipid-Based Immuno-Magnetic Separation of Archaea from a Mixed Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickle, C. M.; Bailey, J.; Lloyd, K. G.; Shumaker, A.; Flood, B.

    2014-12-01

    Despite advancing techniques in microbiology, an estimated 98% of all microbial species on Earth have yet to be isolated in pure culture. Natural samples, once transferred to the lab, are commonly overgrown by "weed" species whose metabolic advantages enable them to monopolize available resources. Developing new methods for the isolation of thus-far uncultivable microorganisms would allow us to better understand their ecology, physiology and genetic potential. Physically separating target organisms from a mixed community is one approach that may allow enrichment and growth of the desired strain. Here we report on a novel method that uses known physiological variations between taxa, in this case membrane lipids, to segregate the desired organisms while keeping them alive and viable for reproduction. Magnetic antibodies bound to the molecule squalene, which is found in the cell membranes of certain archaea, but not bacteria, enable separation of archaea from bacteria in mixed samples. Viability of cells was tested by growing the separated fractions in batch culture. Efficacy and optimization of the antibody separation technique are being evaluated using qPCR and cell counts. Future work will apply this new separation technique to natural samples.

  15. On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Leuko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

  16. Impact of a synbiotic food on the gut microbial ecology and metabolic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human gut harbors a diverse community of microorganisms which serve numerous important functions for the host wellbeing. Functional foods are commonly used to modulate the composition of the gut microbiota contributing to the maintenance of the host health or prevention of disease. In the present study, we characterized the impact of one month intake of a synbiotic food, containing fructooligosaccharides and the probiotic strains Lactobacillus helveticus Bar13 and Bifidobacterium longum Bar33, on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic profiles of 20 healthy subjects. Results The synbiotic food did not modify the overall structure of the gut microbiome, as indicated by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE. The ability of the probiotic L. helveticus and B. longum strains to pass through the gastrointestinal tract was hypothesized on the basis of real-time PCR data. In spite of a stable microbiota, the intake of the synbiotic food resulted in a shift of the fecal metabolic profiles, highlighted by the Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (GC-MS/SPME analysis. The extent of short chain fatty acids (SCFA, ketones, carbon disulfide and methyl acetate was significantly affected by the synbiotic food consumption. Furthermore, the Canonical discriminant Analysis of Principal coordinates (CAP of GC-MS/SPME profiles allowed a separation of the stool samples recovered before and after the consumption of the functional food. Conclusion In this study we investigated the global impact of a dietary intervention on the gut ecology and metabolism in healthy humans. We demonstrated that the intake of a synbiotic food leads to a modulation of the gut metabolic activities with a maintenance of the gut biostructure. In particular, the significant increase of SCFA, ketones, carbon disulfide and methyl acetate following the feeding period suggests potential health

  17. River basins as social-ecological systems: linking levels of societal and ecosystem water metabolism in a semiarid watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Cabello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available River basin modeling under complexity requires analytical frameworks capable of dealing with the multiple scales and dimensions of environmental problems as well as uncertainty in the evolution of social systems. Conceptual and methodological developments can now be framed using the wide socio-eco-hydrological approach. We add hierarchy theory into the mix to discuss the conceptualization of river basins as complex, holarchic social-ecological systems. We operationalize the social-ecological systems water metabolism framework in a semiarid watershed in Spain, and add the governance dimension that shapes human-environment reciprocity. To this purpose, we integrate an eco-hydrological model with the societal metabolism accounting scheme for land use, human activity, and water use. We explore four types of interactions: between societal organization and water uses/demands, between ecosystem organization and their water requirements/supplies, between societal metabolism and aquatic ecosystem health, and between water demand and availability. Our results reveal a metabolic pattern of a high mountain rural system striving to face exodus and agricultural land abandonment with a multifunctional economy. Centuries of social-ecological evolution shaping waterscapes through traditional water management practices have influenced the eco-hydrological functioning of the basin, enabling adaptation to aridity. We found a marked spatial gradient on water supply, use pattern, and impact on water bodies from the head to the mouth of the basin. Management challenges posed by the European water regulatory framework as a new driver of social-ecological change are highlighted.

  18. The metabolic theory of ecology: prospects and challenges for plant biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Charles A; Gilooly, James F; Allen, Andrew P; Weitz, Joshua S; Niklas, Karl J

    2010-11-01

    The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) as applied to the plant sciences aims to provide a general synthesis for the structure and functioning of plants from organelles to ecosystems. MTE builds from simple assumptions of individual metabolism to make predictions about phenomena across a wide range of scales, from individual plant structure and function to community dynamics and global nutrient cycles. The scope of its predictions include morphological allometry, biomass partitioning, vascular network design, and life history phenomena at the individual level; size-frequency distributions, population growth rates, and energetic equivalence at the community level; and the flux, turnover and storage of nutrients at the ecosystem level. Here, we provide an overview of MTE, by considering its assumptions and predictions at these different levels of organization and explaining how the model integrates phenomena among all of these scales. We highlight the model's many successes in predicting novel patterns and draw attention to areas in which gaps remain between observations and MTE's assumptions and predictions. Considering the theory as a whole, we argue that MTE has made a significant contribution in furthering our understanding of those unifying aspects of the structure and function of plants, populations, communities, and ecosystems.

  19. Gas chromatographic metabolic profiling: a sensitive tool for functional microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Daniell, Tim J; Chenu, Claire; Nunan, Naoise

    2008-12-01

    Microbial metabolomics, which consists of a non-targeted analysis of the metabolites released from ('exometabolome') or existing in ('endometabolome') a cell has mostly been used to study the metabolism of particular microbes. Metabolomes also represent a picture of microbial activity and we suggest that the exometabolome may also contain pertinent information for studying microbial interaction networks. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is the most commonly used technique in metabolomics studies. It allows a wide range of metabolites to be detected but requires the derivatisation of compounds prior to detection. This type of non-targeted analysis can introduce biases to the detection and quantification of the different metabolites, particularly at the extraction and derivatisation steps. The aims of this study, therefore, were to quantify the sources of variability and to test the sensitivity of the GC metabolic profiling approach to small environmental changes such as shifts in temperature. The temperature sensitivity of metabolic profiles was compared with that of catabolic profiles obtained using Biolog microplates. Analytical variability was compared with biological variability by incubating bacterial strains isolated from soil with fructose at 20 degrees C and by replicating each step of the protocol (incubation, extraction and derivatisation). For both the endo- and the exometabolome, more than 70% of the total variability was of biological origin and principal components analysis clearly separated the strains along the first ordination axis. The endometabolome distinguished bacterial strains at the species level only, whereas separation was evident at the species and group level with the exometabolome. Temperature had a significant but differential effect on the metabolite production of the bacterial strains whilst their catabolic profiles remained relatively unaffected. The exometabolome was more sensitive to temperature shifts than the

  20. Ecological network analysis of an urban water metabolic system: model development, and a case study for Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhifeng; Fath, Brian D

    2010-09-15

    Using ecological network analysis, we analyzed the network structure and ecological relationships in an urban water metabolic system. We developed an ecological network model for the system, and used Beijing as an example of analysis based on the model. We used network throughflow analysis to determine the flows among components, and measured both indirect and direct flows. Using a network utility matrix, we determined the relationships and degrees of mutualism among six compartments--1) local environment, 2) rainwater collection, 3) industry, 4) agriculture, 5) domestic sector, and 6) wastewater recycling--which represent producer, consumer, and reducer trophic levels. The capacity of producers to provide water for Beijing decreased from 2003 to 2007, and consumer demand for water decreased due to decreasing industrial and agricultural demand; the recycling capacity of reducers also improved, decreasing the discharge pressure on the environment. The ecological relationships associated with the local environment or the wastewater recycling sector changed little from 2003 to 2007. From 2003 to 2005, the main changes in the ecological relationships among components of Beijing's water metabolic system mostly occurred between the local environment, the industrial and agricultural sectors, and the domestic sector, but by 2006 and 2007, the major change was between the local environment, the agricultural sector, and the industrial sector. The other ecological relationships did not change during the study period. Although Beijing's mutualism indices remained generally stable, the ecological relationships among compartments changed greatly. Our analysis revealed ways to further optimize this system and the relationships among compartments, thereby optimizing future urban water resources development.

  1. Predicting the Plant Root-Associated Ecological Niche of 21 Pseudomonas Species Using Machine Learning and Metabolic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Jennifer; Larsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Plants rarely occur in isolated systems. Bacteria can inhabit either the endosphere, the region inside the plant root, or the rhizosphere, the soil region just outside the plant root. Our goal is to understand if using genomic data and media dependent metabolic model information is better for training machine learning of predicting bacterial ecological niche than media independent models or pure genome based species trees. We considered three machine learning techniques: support vector machin...

  2. Metagenomic analysis of an ecological wastewater treatment plant’s microbial communities and their potential to metabolize pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcom, Ian N.; Driscoll, Heather; Vincent, James; Leduc, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants have been detected in drinking water, groundwater, surface water, and soil around the world. Even in locations where wastewater treatment is required, they can be found in drinking water wells, municipal water supplies, and agricultural soils. It is clear conventional wastewater treatment technologies are not meeting the challenge of the mounting pressures on global freshwater supplies. Cost-effective ecological wastewater treatment technologies have been developed in response. To determine whether the removal of micropollutants in ecological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is promoted by the plant-microbe interactions, as has been reported for other recalcitrant xenobiotics, biofilm microbial communities growing on the surfaces of plant roots were profiled by whole metagenome sequencing and compared to the microbial communities residing in the wastewater. In this study, the concentrations of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were quantified in each treatment tank of the ecological WWTP treating human wastewater at a highway rest stop and visitor center in Vermont. The concentrations of detected PPCPs were substantially greater than values reported for conventional WWTPs likely due to onsite recirculation of wastewater. The greatest reductions in PPCPs concentrations were observed in the anoxic treatment tank where Bacilli dominated the biofilm community. Benzoate degradation was the most abundant xenobiotic metabolic category identified throughout the system. Collectively, the microbial communities residing in the wastewater were taxonomically and metabolically more diverse than the immersed plant root biofilm. However, greater heterogeneity and higher relative abundances of xenobiotic metabolism genes was observed for the root biofilm. PMID:27610223

  3. Ecological network analysis of an urban metabolic system based on input-output tables: model development and case study for Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Hongmei; Fath, Brian D; Liu, Hong; Yang, Zhifeng; Liu, Gengyuan; Su, Meirong

    2014-01-15

    If cities are considered as "superorganisms", then disorders of their metabolic processes cause something analogous to an "urban disease". It is therefore helpful to identify the causes of such disorders by analyzing the inner mechanisms that control urban metabolic processes. Combining input-output analysis with ecological network analysis lets researchers study the functional relationships and hierarchy of the urban metabolic processes, thereby providing direct support for the analysis of urban disease. In this paper, using Beijing as an example, we develop a model of an urban metabolic system that accounts for the intensity of the embodied ecological elements using monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, and use this data to compile the corresponding physical input-output tables. This approach described the various flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes and let us build an ecological network model with 32 components. Then, using two methods from ecological network analysis (flow analysis and utility analysis), we quantitatively analyzed the physical input-output relationships among urban components, determined the ecological hierarchy of the components of the metabolic system, and determined the distribution of advantage-dominated and disadvantage-dominated relationships, thereby providing scientific support to guide restructuring of the urban metabolic system in an effort to prevent or cure urban "diseases".

  4. Regulated polyploidy in halophilic archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Breuert

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1 cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2 Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell, and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy.

  5. “Altiarchaeales”: Uncultivated Archaea from the Subsurface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Probst

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limited cultivability of the vast majority of microorganisms, researchers have applied environmental genomics and other state-of-the-art technologies to gain insights into the biology of uncultivated Archaea and bacteria in their natural biotope. In this review, we summarize the scientific findings on a recently proposed order-level lineage of uncultivated Archaea called Altiarchaeales, which includes “Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum” as the most well-described representative. Ca. A. hamiconexum possesses a complex biology: thriving strictly anaerobically, this microorganism is capable of forming highly-pure biofilms, connecting the cells by extraordinary cell surface appendages (the “hami” and has other highly unusual traits, such as a double-membrane-based cell wall. Indicated by genomic information from different biotopes, the Altiarchaeales seem to proliferate in deep, anoxic groundwater of Earth’s crust bearing a potentially very important function: carbon fixation. Although their net carbon fixation rate has not yet been determined, they appear as highly abundant organisms in their biotopes and may thus represent an important primary producer in the subsurface. In sum, the research over more than a decade on Ca. A. hamiconexum has revealed many interesting features of its lifestyle, its genomic information, metabolism and ultrastructure, making this archaeon one of the best-studied uncultivated Archaea in the literature.

  6. Archaea Signal Recognition Particle Shows the Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Zwieb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea SRP is composed of an SRP RNA molecule and two bound proteins named SRP19 and SRP54. Regulated by the binding and hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphates, the RNA-bound SRP54 protein transiently associates not only with the hydrophobic signal sequence as it emerges from the ribosomal exit tunnel, but also interacts with the membrane-associated SRP receptor (FtsY. Comparative analyses of the archaea genomes and their SRP component sequences, combined with structural and biochemical data, support a prominent role of the SRP RNA in the assembly and function of the archaea SRP. The 5e motif, which in eukaryotes binds a 72 kilodalton protein, is preserved in most archaea SRP RNAs despite the lack of an archaea SRP72 homolog. The primary function of the 5e region may be to serve as a hinge, strategically positioned between the small and large SRP domain, allowing the elongated SRP to bind simultaneously to distant ribosomal sites. SRP19, required in eukaryotes for initiating SRP assembly, appears to play a subordinate role in the archaea SRP or may be defunct. The N-terminal A region and a novel C-terminal R region of the archaea SRP receptor (FtsY are strikingly diverse or absent even among the members of a taxonomic subgroup.

  7. Unifying ecological stoichiometry and metabolic theory to predict production and trophic transfer in a marine planktonic food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, Stefanie D; Schmitt, Jennifer A; Ryabov, Alexey; Tsakalakis, Ioannis; Blasius, Bernd; Prelle, Lara; Tiedemann, Marc; Hodapp, Dorothee

    2016-05-19

    Two ecological frameworks have been used to explain multitrophic interactions, but rarely in combination: (i) ecological stoichiometry (ES), explaining consumption rates in response to consumers' demand and prey's nutrient content; and (ii) metabolic theory of ecology (MTE), proposing that temperature and body mass affect metabolic rates, growth and consumption rates. Here we combined both, ES and MTE to investigate interactive effects of phytoplankton prey stoichiometry, temperature and zooplankton consumer body mass on consumer grazing rates and production in a microcosm experiment. A simple model integrating parameters from both frameworks was used to predict interactive effects of temperature and nutrient conditions on consumer performance. Overall, model predictions reflected experimental patterns well: consumer grazing rates and production increased with temperature, as could be expected based on MTE. With decreasing algal food quality, grazing rates increased due to compensatory feeding, while consumer growth rates and final biovolume decreased. Nutrient effects on consumer biovolume increased with increasing temperature, while nutrient effects on grazing rates decreased. Highly interactive effects of temperature and nutrient supply indicate that combining the frameworks of ES and MTE is highly important to enhance our ability to predict ecosystem functioning in the context of global change.

  8. Proteomic Properties Reveal Phyloecological Clusters of Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Nela; Smole, Zlatko; Krisko, Anita

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we propose a novel way to describe the variety of environmental adaptations of Archaea. We have clustered 57 Archaea by using a non-redundant set of proteomic features, and verified that the clusters correspond to environmental adaptations to the archaeal habitats. The first cluster consists dominantly of hyperthermophiles and hyperthermoacidophilic aerobes. The second cluster joins together halophilic and extremely halophilic Archaea, while the third cluster contains mesophilic (mostly methanogenic) Archaea together with thermoacidophiles. The non-redundant subset of proteomic features was found to consist of five features: the ratio of charged residues to uncharged, average protein size, normalized frequency of beta-sheet, normalized frequency of extended structure and number of hydrogen bond donors. We propose this clustering to be termed phyloecological clustering. This approach could give additional insights into relationships among archaeal species that may be hidden by sole phylogenetic analysis. PMID:23133575

  9. Proteomic properties reveal phyloecological clusters of Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nela Nikolic

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a novel way to describe the variety of environmental adaptations of Archaea. We have clustered 57 Archaea by using a non-redundant set of proteomic features, and verified that the clusters correspond to environmental adaptations to the archaeal habitats. The first cluster consists dominantly of hyperthermophiles and hyperthermoacidophilic aerobes. The second cluster joins together halophilic and extremely halophilic Archaea, while the third cluster contains mesophilic (mostly methanogenic Archaea together with thermoacidophiles. The non-redundant subset of proteomic features was found to consist of five features: the ratio of charged residues to uncharged, average protein size, normalized frequency of beta-sheet, normalized frequency of extended structure and number of hydrogen bond donors. We propose this clustering to be termed phyloecological clustering. This approach could give additional insights into relationships among archaeal species that may be hidden by sole phylogenetic analysis.

  10. Environmental and ecological controls of coral community metabolism on Palmyra Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koweek, David; Dunbar, Robert B.; Rogers, Justin S.; Williams, Gareth J.; Price, Nichole; Mucciarone, David; Teneva, Lida

    2015-03-01

    Accurate predictions of how coral reefs may respond to global climate change hinge on understanding the natural variability to which these ecosystems are exposed and to which they contribute. We present high-resolution estimates of net community calcification (NCC) and net community production (NCP) from Palmyra Atoll, an uninhabited, near-pristine coral reef ecosystem in the central Pacific. In August-October 2012, we employed a combination of Lagrangian and Eulerian frameworks to establish high spatial (~2.5 km2) and temporal (hourly) resolution coral community metabolic estimates. Lagrangian drifts, all conducted during daylight hours, resulted in NCC estimates of -51 to 116 mmol C m-2 h-1, although most NCC estimates were in the range of 0-40 mmol C m-2 h-1. Lagrangian drift NCP estimates ranged from -7 to 67 mmol C m-2 h-1. In the Eulerian setup, we present carbonate system parameters (dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and pCO2) at sub-hourly resolution through several day-night cycles and provide hourly NCC and NCP rate estimates. We compared diel cycles of all four carbonate system parameters to the offshore surface water (0-50 m depth) and show large departures from offshore surface water chemistry. Hourly Eulerian estimates of NCC aggregated over the entire study ranged from 14 to 53 mmol C m-2 h-1, showed substantial variability during daylight hours, and exhibited a diel cycle with elevated NCC in the afternoons and depressed, but positive, NCC at night. The Eulerian NCP range was very high (-55 to 177 mmol C m-2 h-1) and exhibited strong variability during daylight hours. Principal components analysis revealed that NCC and NCP were most closely aligned with diel cycle forcing, whereas the NCC/NCP ratio was most closely aligned with reef community composition. Our analysis demonstrates that ecological community composition is the primary determinant of coral reef biogeochemistry on a near-pristine reef and that reef biogeochemistry is

  11. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fröhlich-Nowoisky

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, accounting for up to ∼10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to Bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of Archaea in the atmosphere. By DNA analysis targeting the 16S rRNA and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over one year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne Archaea. The detected Archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase of bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role for the dispersal of Archaea, including ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens. Also, anthropogenic activities might influence the atmospheric abundance and diversity of Archaea.

  12. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Ruzene Nespoli, C.; Pickersgill, D. A.; Galand, P. E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Nunes, T.; Gomes Cardoso, J.; Almeida, S. M.; Pio, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Conrad, R.; Pöschl, U.; Després, V. R.

    2014-11-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, and are thus outside extreme environments, accounting for up to ~10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of archaea in the atmosphere. By means of DNA analysis and Sanger sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA (435 sequences) and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over 1 year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea. The detected archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b) being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase in bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly predicted methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands (72 sequences) and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role in the dispersal of archaea, including assumed ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens.

  13. Archaea: From Genomics to Physiology and the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vothknecht, Ute C.; Tumbula, Debra L.

    1999-01-01

    This document represents a report on a meeting about Archaea. The meeting had an unusually diversified mix of topics all related to Archaea highlighting their differences and similarities with other kingdoms of life. Thus, a large number of scientists from others areas of biology participated in this conference. One-third of the speakers (11 of 33) represented laboratories whose main interests have not been archaea and who have not previously participated in similar symposia or workshops. Thus, this symposium provided a unique opportunity for archaeal researchers to interact in a wider forum. Because of the broad range of topics covered, the conference also introduced many of the participants to new areas of archaeal research. The discussions of genomics, molecular mechanisms of transcription, metabolic pathways and evolution were at a very high level. Talks and posters provided detailed discussions of the state of the current knowledge in RNA processing, transcriptional initiation, chromatin structure, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, autotrophic CO2 fixation, Upid biosynthesis and a wide range of other topics. In addition to providing overviews, major areas of scientific argument were clearly delineated, particularly in the discussions of genomics and evolution. Some of the questions raised included: how representative are individual gene trees of organismal evolution, how prevalent is horizontal evolution, how reliable are functional assignments in genomics? On these topics, the different points of view were well represented. The future of any field depends on the enthusiasm and intellectual engagement of young scientists working in the area. Therefore, the participation of 29 graduate and postdoctoral students (out of about 135 participants) was a highlight of the meeting. This was the consequence of funding contributions by NSF and NASA.

  14. UNDERSTANDING ECOLOGICAL RISK IN RURAL WATERSHEDS THROUGH MEASURMENTS OF STREAM COMMUNITY METABOLISM, NUTRIENT AND SEDIMENT DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project, and associated research, is to establish thresholds for ecological response to watershed disturbance and to develop tools and insights that will help us manage risks and evaluate best management practice (BMP) effectiveness. Changes in the amount and typ...

  15. Extreme sweetness: protein glycosylation in archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Although N-glycosylation was first reported in archaea almost 40 years ago, detailed insights into this process have become possible only recently, with the availability of complete genome sequences for almost 200 archaeal species and the development of appropriate molecular tools. As a result of these advances, recent efforts have not only succeeded in delineating the pathways involved in archaeal N-glycosylation, but also begun to reveal how such post-translational protein modification helps archaea to survive in some of the harshest environments on the planet.

  16. Protein glycosylation in Archaea: sweet and extreme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    While each of the three domains of life on Earth possesses unique traits and relies on characteristic biological strategies, some processes are common to Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea. Once believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now clear that Bacteria and Archaea are also capable of performing N-glycosylation. However, in contrast to Bacteria, where this posttranslational modification is still considered a rare event, numerous species of Archaea, isolated from a wide range of environments, have been reported to contain proteins bearing Asn-linked glycan moieties. Analysis of the chemical composition of the Asn-linked polysaccharides decorating archaeal proteins has, moreover, revealed the use of a wider variety of sugar subunits than seen in either eukaryal or bacterial glycoproteins. Still, although first reported some 30 years ago, little had been known of the steps or components involved in the archaeal version of this universal posttranslational modification. Now, with the availability of sufficient numbers of genome sequences and the development of appropriate experimental tools, molecular analysis of archaeal N-glycosylation pathways has become possible. Accordingly using halophilic, methanogenic and thermophilic model species, insight into the biosynthesis and attachment of N-linked glycans decorating archaeal glycoproteins is starting to amass. In this review, current understanding of N-glycosylation in Archaea is described.

  17. Biochemical trade-offs: evidence for ecologically linked secondary metabolism of the sponge Oscarella balibaloi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julijana Ivanisevic

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolite production is assumed to be costly and therefore the resource allocation to their production should be optimized with respect to primary biological functions such as growth or reproduction. Sponges are known to produce a great diversity of secondary metabolites with powerful biological activities that may explain their domination in some hard substrate communities both in terms of diversity and biomass. Oscarella balibaloi (Homoscleromorpha is a recently described, highly dynamic species, which often overgrows other sessile marine invertebrates. Bioactivity measurements (standardized Microtox assay and metabolic fingerprints were used as indicators of the baseline variations of the O. balibaloi secondary metabolism, and related to the sponge reproductive effort over two years. The bioactivity showed a significant seasonal variation with the lowest values at the end of spring and in early summer followed by the highest bioactivity in the late summer and autumn. An effect of the seawater temperature was detected, with a significantly higher bioactivity in warm conditions. There was also a tendency of a higher bioactivity when O. balibaloi was found overgrowing other sponge species. Metabolic fingerprints revealed the existence of three principal metabolic phenotypes: phenotype 1 exhibited by a majority of low bioactive, female individuals, whereas phenotypes 2 and 3 correspond to a majority of highly bioactive, non-reproductive individuals. The bioactivity was negatively correlated to the reproductive effort, minimal bioactivities coinciding with the period of embryogenesis and larval development. Our results fit the Optimal Defense Theory with an investment in the reproduction mainly shaping the secondary metabolism variability, and a less pronounced influence of other biotic (species interaction and abiotic (temperature factors.

  18. Challenges and Opportunities of Long-Term Continuous Stream Metabolism Measurements at the National Ecological Observatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, K. J.; Lunch, C. K.; Baxter, C.; Hall, R.; Holtgrieve, G. W.; Roberts, B. J.; Marcarelli, A. M.; Tank, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in dissolved oxygen sensing and modeling have made continuous measurements of whole-stream metabolism relatively easy to make, allowing ecologists to quantify and evaluate stream ecosystem health at expanded temporal and spatial scales. Long-term monitoring of continuous stream metabolism will enable a better understanding of the integrated and complex effects of anthropogenic change (e.g., land-use, climate, atmospheric deposition, invasive species, etc.) on stream ecosystem function. In addition to their value in the particular streams measured, information derived from long-term data will improve the ability to extrapolate from shorter-term data. With the need to better understand drivers and responses of whole-stream metabolism come difficulties in interpreting the results. Long-term trends will encompass physical changes in stream morphology and flow regime (e.g., variable flow conditions and changes in channel structure) combined with changes in biota. Additionally long-term data sets will require an organized database structure, careful quantification of errors and uncertainties, as well as propagation of error as a result of the calculation of metabolism metrics. Parsing of continuous data and the choice of modeling approaches can also have a large influence on results and on error estimation. The two main modeling challenges include 1) obtaining unbiased, low-error daily estimates of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER), and 2) interpreting GPP and ER measurements over extended time periods. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), in partnership with academic and government scientists, has begun to tackle several of these challenges as it prepares for the collection and calculation of 30 years of continuous whole-stream metabolism data. NEON is a national-scale research platform that will use consistent procedures and protocols to standardize measurements across the United States, providing long

  19. The human gut microbial ecology associated with overweight and obesity determines ellagic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selma, María V; Romo-Vaquero, María; García-Villalba, Rocío; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    We recently identified three metabotypes (0, A and B) that depend on the metabolic profile of urolithins produced from polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). The gut microbiota and Gordonibacter spp. recently were identified as species able to produce urolithins. A higher percentage of metabotype B was found in patients with metabolic syndrome or colorectal cancer in comparison with healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to analyse differences in EA metabolism between healthy overweight-obese and normoweight individuals and evaluate the role of gut microbial composition including Gordonibacter. Although the three metabotypes were confirmed in both groups, metabotype B prevailed in overweight-obese (31%) versus normoweight (20%) individuals while metabotype A was higher in normoweight (70%) than the overweight-obese group (57%). This suggests that weight gain favours the growth of bacteria capable of producing urolithin B and/or isourolithin A with respect to urolithin A-producing bacteria. Gordonibacter spp. levels were not significantly different between normoweight and overweight-obese groups but higher Gordonibacter levels were found in metabotype A individuals than in those with metabotype B. Other bacterial species have been reported to show a much closer relationship to obesity and dysbiosis than Gordonibacter. However, Gordonibacter levels are negatively correlated with metabotype B, which prevails in metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer. This is the first report that links overweight and obesity with an alteration in the catabolism of EA, and where the correlation of Gordonibacter to this alteration is shown. Future investigation of Gordonibacter and urolithin metabotypes as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets of obesity-related diseases is warranted.

  20. Presence of Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Their Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in Ilica Bay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulecal, Y.; Temel, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recenlty, the processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and ammonia oxidation within the domain Archaea, have been recognized as two new links in the global nitrogen cycle. The distribution and ubiquity of marine Archaea an important role in global carbon and nitrogen cycling (Ingalls et al., 2006; Leininger et al., 2006; Wuchter et al.,2006a). However, our knowledge on archaeal distribution in aquatic ecosystem was largely confined to the extreme environments for a long time until DeLong (1992, 1998) revealed the ubiquity of archaea in common marine environments. Despite the great progress, more efforts need to be given to the study of archaeal diversity in the vast oceans and of the variations in the ecological environment from coastal to oceanic waters (Massana et al.,2000). Our studying area which Ilica Bay in Izmir (Turkey) has a lot of thermal springs. The aim of study was to investigate the presence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and their roles of nitrogen cycling in marine enviroments.We have not only used the geochemical analyses but also genetic tools. This study will supply knowledge for marine nitrogen cycling to understanding very well, in addition how Archea genes players in the process of anammox in shallow coastal marine environments.

  1. Viruses of the Archaea: a unifying view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, David; Forterre, Patrick; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2006-01-01

    DNA viruses of the Archaea have highly diverse and often exceptionally complex morphotypes. Many have been isolated from geothermally heated hot environments, raising intriguing questions about their origins, and contradicting the widespread notion of limited biodiversity in extreme environments........ Here, we provide a unifying view on archaeal viruses, and present them as a particular assemblage that is fundamentally different in morphotype and genome from the DNA viruses of the other two domains of life, the Bacteria and Eukarya.......DNA viruses of the Archaea have highly diverse and often exceptionally complex morphotypes. Many have been isolated from geothermally heated hot environments, raising intriguing questions about their origins, and contradicting the widespread notion of limited biodiversity in extreme environments...

  2. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Dean G; Bizzoco, Richard W; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents, known as 'fumaroles', are ubiquitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology has been extensively characterized, little is known about the subsurface microbial ecology of fumaroles largely because of the difficulty in collecting sufficient numbers of cells from boiling steam water for DNA extraction and culture isolation. Here we describe the first collection, molecular analysis and isolation of microbes from fumarole steam waters in Russia (Kamchatka) and the USA (Hawaii, New Mexico, California and Wyoming). Surprisingly, the steam vent waters from all the fumaroles contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats, saline soils, brine pools and salt lakes around the world. Microscopic cell counting estimated the cell dispersal rate at approximately 1.6 x 10(9) cells year(-1) from a single fumarole. We also managed to enrich microbes in high-salt media from every vent sample, and to isolate Haloarcula from a Yellowstone vent in a 20% salt medium after a month-long incubation, demonstrating both salt tolerance and viability of cells collected from high-temperature steam. Laboratory tests determined that microbes enriched in salt media survived temperatures greater than 75 degrees C for between 5 and 30 min during the collection process. Hawaiian fumaroles proved to contain the greatest diversity of halophilic Archaea with four new lineages that may belong to uncultured haloarchaeal genera. This high diversity may have resulted from the leaching of salts and minerals through the highly porous volcanic rock, creating a chemically complex saline subsurface.

  3. Role of microbes in the ecology of marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, A; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A

    Microbes are mostly unicellular microscopic living entities falling under the domains Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. They have multiple roles to play in the environment both for their own survival and towards maintaining ecological balance. A few...

  4. Metabolic diversity and ecological niches of Achromatium populations revealed with single-cell genomic sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammar eMansor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Large, sulfur-cycling, calcite-precipitating bacteria in the genus Achromatium represent a significant proportion of bacterial communities near sediment-water interfaces throughout the world. Our understanding of their potentially crucial roles in calcium, carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and iron cycling is limited because they have not been cultured or sequenced using environmental genomics approaches to date. We utilized single-cell genomic sequencing to obtain one incomplete and two nearly complete draft genomes for Achromatium collected at Warm Mineral Springs, FL. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the three cells represent distinct and relatively distant Achromatium populations (91-92% identity. The draft genomes encode key genes involved in sulfur and hydrogen oxidation; oxygen, nitrogen and polysulfide respiration; carbon and nitrogen fixation; organic carbon assimilation and storage; chemotaxis; twitching motility; antibiotic resistance; and membrane transport. Known genes for iron and manganese energy metabolism were not detected. The presence of pyrophosphatase and vacuolar (V-type ATPases, which are generally rare in bacterial genomes, suggests a role for these enzymes in calcium transport, proton pumping, and/or energy generation in the membranes of calcite-containing inclusions.

  5. Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae--their ecology, genetics and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Hervé

    2013-10-15

    The aging of certain white wines is dependent on the presence of yeast strains that develop a biofilm on the wine surface after the alcoholic fermentation. These strains belong to the genus Saccharomyces and are called flor yeasts. These strains possess distinctive characteristics compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting strain. The most important one is their capacity to form a biofilm on the air-liquid interface of the wine. The major gene involved in this phenotype is FLO11, however other genes are also involved in velum formation by these yeast and will be detailed. Other striking features presented in this review are their aneuploidy, and their mitochondrial DNA polymorphism which seems to reflect adaptive evolution of the yeast to a stressful environment where acetaldehyde and ethanol are present at elevated concentration. The biofilm assures access to oxygen and therefore permits continued growth on non-fermentable ethanol. This specific metabolism explains the peculiar organoleptic profile of these wines, especially their content in acetaldehyde and sotolon. This review deals with these different specificities of flor yeasts and will also underline the existing gaps regarding these astonishing yeasts.

  6. Visualization and quantification of archaeal and bacterial metabolically active cells in soil using fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Stepanov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    cells due to plowing was detected only within 40 cm soil layer, and this effect disappeared in lower horizons. The abundance of Archaea was higher in the upper horizons of arable soil as compared to virgin. Conversely, the abundance of Bacteria in the upper layers of arable Kastanozem decreased versus virgin soil. A relationship between soil organic carbon and the amount of soil metabolically active Bacteria and Archaea cells revealed that distribution of both Bacteria and Archaea throughout the soil profile was governed mostly by the organic matter content. Thus, the organic matter was a main factor of declining the Bacteria:Archaea ratio with the soil depth (from 7.1 to 4.2 for virgin soil and from 5 to 3.9 for arable soil). As a result, Archaea out-compete Bacteria under conditions of reduced energy supply. Thus, the FISH method combines classical microscopic and modern phylogenetic microbiological approaches and can be considered as an effective tool for ecological, diagnostic and environmental research in microbiology.

  7. An intertwined evolutionary history of methanogenic archaea and sulfate reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Susanti

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulfate reduction, two of the oldest energy conserving respiratory systems on Earth, apparently could not have evolved in the same host, as sulfite, an intermediate of sulfate reduction, inhibits methanogenesis. However, certain methanogenic archaea metabolize sulfite employing a deazaflavin cofactor (F(420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr where N- and C-terminal halves (Fsr-N and Fsr-C are homologs of F(420H(2 dehydrogenase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr, respectively. From genome analysis we found that Fsr was likely assembled from freestanding Fsr-N homologs and Dsr-like proteins (Dsr-LP, both being abundant in methanogens. Dsr-LPs fell into two groups defined by following sequence features: Group I (simplest, carrying a coupled siroheme-[Fe(4-S(4] cluster and sulfite-binding Arg/Lys residues; Group III (most complex, with group I features, a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster and an additional [Fe(4-S(4] cluster. Group II Dsr-LPs with group I features and a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster were proposed as evolutionary intermediates. Group III is the precursor of Fsr-C. The freestanding Fsr-N homologs serve as F(420H(2 dehydrogenase unit of a putative novel glutamate synthase, previously described membrane-bound electron transport system in methanogens and of assimilatory type sulfite reductases in certain haloarchaea. Among archaea, only methanogens carried Dsr-LPs. They also possessed homologs of sulfate activation and reduction enzymes. This suggested a shared evolutionary history for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and Dsr-LPs could have been the source of the oldest (3.47-Gyr ago biologically produced sulfide deposit.

  8. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  9. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  10. Susceptibility of archaea to antimicrobial agents: applications to clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelaifia, S; Drancourt, M

    2012-09-01

    We herein review the state of knowledge regarding the in vitro and in vivo susceptibility of archaea to antimicrobial agents, including some new molecules. Indeed, some archaea colonizing the human microbiota have been implicated in diseases such as periodontopathy. Archaea are characterized by their broad-spectrum resistance to antimicrobial agents. In particular, their cell wall lacks peptidoglycan, making them resistant to antimicrobial agents interfering with peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Archaea are, however, susceptible to the protein synthesis inhibitor fusidic acid and imidazole derivatives. Also, squalamine, an antimicrobial agent acting on the cell wall, proved effective against human methanogenic archaea. In vitro susceptibility data could be used to design protocols for the decontamination of complex microbiota and the selective isolation of archaea in anaerobic culture.

  11. The Genome of the Diatom Thalassiosira Pseudonana: Ecology, Evolution and Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbrust, E V; Berges, J A; Bowler, C; Green, B R; Martinez, D; Putnam, N H; Zhou, S; Allen, A E; Apt, K E; Bechner, M; Brzezinski, M A; Chaal, B K; Chiovitti, A; Davis, A K; Demarest, M S; Detter, J C; del Rio, T G; Goodstein, D; Hadi, M Z; Hellsten, U; Hildebrand, M; Jenkins, B D; Jurka, J; Kapitonov, V V; Kroger, N; Lau, W Y; Lane, T W; Larimer, F W; Lippmeier, J C; Lucas, S; Medina, M; Montsant, A; Obornik, M; Parker, M S; Palenik, B; Pazour, G J; Richardson, P M; Rynearson, T A; Saito, M A; Schwartz, D C; Thamatrakoln, K; Valentin, K; Vardi, A; Wilkerson, F P; Rokhsar, D S

    2005-11-14

    different evolutionary history from the higher plants that dominate photosynthesis on land. Higher plants and green, red and glaucophyte algae are derived from a primary endosymbiotic event in which a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing (or being invaded by) a prokaryotic cyanobacterium. In contrast, dominant bloom-forming eukaryotic phytoplankton in the ocean, such as diatoms and haptophytes, were derived by secondary endosymbiosis whereby a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing a photosynthetic eukaryote, probably a red algal endosymbiont (Fig. 1). Each endosymbiotic event led to new combinations of genes derived from the hosts and endosymbionts (7). Prior to this project, relatively few diatom genes had been sequenced, few chromosome numbers were known, and genetic maps did not exist (8). The ecological and evolutionary importance of diatoms motivated our sequencing and analysis of the nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial genomes of the marine centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

  12. The genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana: Ecology,evolution, and metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrust, E.V.; Berges, J.; Bowler, C.; Green, B.; Martinez, D.; Putnam, N.; Zhou, S.; Allen, A.; Apt, K.; Bechner, M.; Brzezinski, M.; Chaal, B.; Chiovitti, A.; Davis, A.; Goodstein, D.; Hadi, M.; Hellsten,U.; Hildebrand, M.; Jenkins, B.; Jurka, J.; Kapitonov, V.; Kroger, N.; Lau, W.; Lane, T.; Larimer, F.; Lippmeier, J.; Lucas, S.; Medina, M.; Montsant, A.; Obornik, M.; Parker, M. Schnitzler; Palenik, B.; Pazour,G.; Richardson, P.; Rynearson, T.; Saito, M.; Schwartz, D.; Thamatrakoln,K.; Valentin, K.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F.; Rokhsar, D.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F.P.; Rokhsar, D.S.

    2004-09-01

    different evolutionary history from the higher plants that dominate photosynthesis on land. Higher plants and green, red and glaucophyte algae are derived from a primary endosymbiotic event in which a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing (or being invaded by) a prokaryotic cyanobacterium. In contrast, dominant bloom-forming eukaryotic phytoplankton in the ocean, such as diatoms and haptophytes, were derived by secondary endosymbiosis whereby a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing a photosynthetic eukaryote, probably a red algal endosymbiont (Fig. 1). Each endosymbiotic event led to new combinations of genes derived from the hosts and endosymbionts (7). Prior to this project, relatively few diatom genes had been sequenced, few chromosome numbers were known, and genetic maps did not exist (8). The ecological and evolutionary importance of diatoms motivated our sequencing and analysis of the nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial genomes of the marine centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

  13. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun eKan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1-0.8 µm, 0.8-3.0 µm, and 3.0-20 µm were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water to 25:1 (vent water. Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 & V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the Lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon, DOC (dissolved organic carbon, SO42-, O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (>3 µm and contained higher predicted OTU richness and microbial diversities (genus level than free-living ones (< 0.8 µm. Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur.

  14. Methanogenic Archaea and oral infections – ways to unravel the black box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Horz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaea, organisms that make up the third domain of cellular life are members of the human oral microflora. They are strikingly less diverse than oral bacteria and appear to be relatively rare with respect to their numerical abundance. Since they have been exclusively found in association with oral infections such as periodontitis and apical periodontitis and given their unique physiology and energy metabolism, it is highly plausible that they are more than just secondary colonizers of infected areas, but instead are actively involved in the overall poly-microbial infection process. Conversely, it is a highly challenging task to clearly demonstrate their possible active participation – mostly due to the difficulty to grow them in routine microbiology laboratories. This current review points out the importance for understanding the medical impact of methanogens and aims at devising strategies for elucidating the true function of archaea in the oral ecosystem.

  15. A DNA element recognised by the molybdenum-responsive transcription factor ModE is conserved in Proteobacteria, green sulphur bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Richard N

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition metal molybdenum is essential for life. Escherichia coli imports this metal into the cell in the form of molybdate ions, which are taken up via an ABC transport system. In E. coli and other Proteobacteria molybdenum metabolism and homeostasis are regulated by the molybdate-responsive transcription factor ModE. Results Orthologues of ModE are widespread amongst diverse prokaryotes, but not ubiquitous. We identified probable ModE-binding sites upstream of genes implicated in molybdenum metabolism in green sulphur bacteria and methanogenic Archaea as well as in Proteobacteria. We also present evidence of horizontal transfer of nitrogen fixation genes between green sulphur bacteria and methanogenic Archaea. Conclusions Whereas most of the archaeal helix-turn-helix-containing transcription factors belong to families that are Archaea-specific, ModE is unusual in that it is found in both Archaea and Bacteria. Moreover, its cognate upstream DNA recognition sequence is also conserved between Archaea and Bacteria, despite the fundamental differences in their core transcription machinery. ModE is the third example of a transcriptional regulator with a binding signal that is conserved in Bacteria and Archaea.

  16. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., “trace methane oxidation”). In turn, ANME can produce methane, but only during net methane oxidation (i.e., enzymatic back flux). Net AOM is exergonic when coupled to an external electron acceptor such as sulfate (ANME-1, ANME-2abc, and ANME-3), nitrate (ANME-2d), or metal (oxides). In this review, the reversibility of the methanogenesis pathway and essential differences between ANME and methanogens are described by combining published information with domain based (meta)genome comparison of archaeal methanotrophs and selected archaea. These differences include abundances and special structure of methyl coenzyme M reductase and of multiheme cytochromes and the presence of menaquinones or methanophenazines. ANME-2a and ANME-2d can use electron acceptors other than sulfate or nitrate for AOM, respectively. Environmental studies suggest that ANME-2d are also involved in sulfate-dependent AOM. ANME-1 seem to use a different mechanism for disposal of electrons and possibly are less versatile in electron acceptors use than ANME-2. Future research will shed light on the molecular basis of reversal of the methanogenic pathway and electron transfer in different ANME types. PMID:28154498

  17. Microbial desulfurization of coal by thermophilic archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Gunnel

    1994-04-01

    The investigation was focused on the removal of pyrite as well as organic sulfur. One major objective was to identify and outline difficulties associated with microbial desulfurization of coal. The work has particularly been concentrated on the desulfurization environment of the microorganisms, the reprecipitation of dissolved sulfate as jarosite, the effect of microbial treatment on the properties of the coal and the comparison of different thermophilic archaea suggested for coal desulfurization. The investigated microorganisms were the thermophilic archaea Acidianus brierleyi, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus solfataricus and for comparison the mesophilic bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The major part of the work has been done with Acidianus brierleyi. Compounds leached from coal may seriously affect the growth of microorganisms suggested for coal desulfurization. Degradation of pyritic sulfur with the used strains of S. solfataricus and S. acidocaldarius, was observed to be impossible. However, both the thermophilic archaeon Acidianus brierleyi and the mesophilic bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, were capable of degrading pure pyrite as well as pyrite from low-sulfur coals. Up to 85% removal of pyritic sulfur was obtained for coals when staring with a pyrite sulfur content of 0.5-0.7%. From kinetic studies, it was shown that A. brierleyi and T. ferrooxidans remove sulfur from coal at roughly the same rate, at least for the coals investigated in this study. However, the rate for microbial oxidation of pure pyrite was seen to be much higher for A. brierleyi than for T. ferroxidans. 62 refs, 16 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Diurnally entrained anticipatory behavior in archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Whitehead

    Full Text Available By sensing changes in one or few environmental factors biological systems can anticipate future changes in multiple factors over a wide range of time scales (daily to seasonal. This anticipatory behavior is important to the fitness of diverse species, and in context of the diurnal cycle it is overall typical of eukaryotes and some photoautotrophic bacteria but is yet to be observed in archaea. Here, we report the first observation of light-dark (LD-entrained diurnal oscillatory transcription in up to 12% of all genes of a halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Significantly, the diurnally entrained transcription was observed under constant darkness after removal of the LD stimulus (free-running rhythms. The memory of diurnal entrainment was also associated with the synchronization of oxic and anoxic physiologies to the LD cycle. Our results suggest that under nutrient limited conditions halophilic archaea take advantage of the causal influence of sunlight (via temperature on O(2 diffusivity in a closed hypersaline environment to streamline their physiology and operate oxically during nighttime and anoxically during daytime.

  19. Swimming behavior of selected species of Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Bastian; Wirth, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    The swimming behavior of Bacteria has been studied extensively, at least for some species like Escherichia coli. In contrast, almost no data have been published for Archaea on this topic. In a systematic study we asked how the archaeal model organisms Halobacterium salinarum, Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Methanocaldococcus villosus, Pyrococcus furiosus, and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius swim and which swimming behavior they exhibit. The two Euryarchaeota M. jannaschii and M. villosus were found to be, by far, the fastest organisms reported up to now, if speed is measured in bodies per second (bps). Their swimming speeds, at close to 400 and 500 bps, are much higher than the speed of the bacterium E. coli or of a very fast animal, like the cheetah, each with a speed of ca. 20 bps. In addition, we observed that two different swimming modes are used by some Archaea. They either swim very rapidly, in a more or less straight line, or they exhibit a slower kind of zigzag swimming behavior if cells are in close proximity to the surface of the glass capillary used for observation. We argue that such a "relocate-and-seek" behavior enables the organisms to stay in their natural habitat.

  20. Genomic expansion of Domain Archaea highlights roles for organisms from new phyla in anaerobic carbon cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelle, Cindy; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Thomas, Brian C.; Hug, Laura A.; Brown, Christopher T.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Singh, Andrea; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    Domain Archaea is currently represented by one phylum (Euryarchaeota) and two superphyla (TACK and DPANN). However, gene surveys indicate the existence of a vast diversity of uncultivated archaea for which metabolic information is lacking. We sequenced DNA from complex sediment- and groundwater-associated microbial communities sampled prior to and during an acetate biostimulation field experiment to investigate the diversity and physiology of uncultivated subsurface archaea. We sampled 15 genomes that improve resolution of a new phylum within the TACK superphylum and 119 DPANN genomes that highlight a major subdivision within the archaeal domain that separates DPANN from TACK/Euryarchaeota lineages. Within the DPANN superphylum, which lacks any isolated representatives, we defined two new phyla using sequences from 100 newly sampled genomes. The first new phylum, for which we propose the name Woesearchaeota, was defined using 54 new sequences. We reconstructed a complete (finished) genome for an archaeon from this phylum that is only 0.8 Mb in length and lacks almost all core biosynthetic pathways, but has genes encoding enzymes predicted to interact with bacterial cell walls, consistent with a symbiotic lifestyle. The second new phylum, for which we propose the name Pacearchaeota, was defined based on 46 newly sampled archaeal genomes. This phylum includes the first non-methanogen with an intermediate Type II/III RuBisCO. We also reconstructed a complete (1.24 Mb) genome for another DPANN archaeon, a member of the Diapherotrites phylum. Metabolic prediction and transcriptomic data indicate that this organism has a fermentation-based lifestyle. In fact, genomic analyses consistently indicate lack of recognizable pathways for sulfur, nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and metal cycling, and suggest that symbiotic and fermentation-based lifestyles are widespread across the DPANN superphylum. Thus, as for a recently identified superphylum of bacteria with small genomes and no

  1. Diversity, physiology, and niche differentiation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding of nitrification. Surprising insights into the physiological distinctiveness of AOA are mirrored by the recognition of the phylogenetic uniqueness of these microbes, which fall within a novel archaeal phylum now known as Thaumarchaeota. The relative importance of AOA in nitrification, compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), is still under debate. This minireview provides a synopsis of our current knowledge of the diversity and physiology of AOA, the factors controlling their ecology, and their role in carbon cycling as well as their potential involvement in the production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. It emphasizes the importance of activity-based analyses in AOA studies and formulates priorities for future research.

  2. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in Archaea - Biochemical and evolutionary implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    Isoprenoids are indispensable for all types of cellular life in the Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya. These membrane-associated molecules are involved in a wide variety of vital biological functions, ranging from compartmentalization and stability, to protection and energy-transduction. In Archaea, is

  3. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduced by Crafoord Prize winner Carl Woese, this volume combines reviews of the major developments in archaeal research over the past 10-15 years with more specialized articles dealing with important recent breakthroughs. Drawing on major themes presented at the June 2005 meeting held in Muni...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....... to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...

  4. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  5. Overview of the genetic tools in the Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruyuki eAtomi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This section provides an overview of the genetic systems developed in the Archaea. Genetic manipulation is possible in many members of the halophiles, methanogens, Sulfolobus and Thermococcales. We describe the selection/counterselection principles utilized in each of these groups, which consist of antibiotics and their resistance markers, and auxotrophic host strains and complementary markers. The latter strategy utilizes techniques similar to those developed in yeast. However, Archaea are resistant to many of the antibiotics routinely used for selection in the Bacteria, and a number of strategies specific to the Archaea have been developed. In addition, examples utilizing the genetic systems developed for each group will be briefly described.

  6. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the allele frequencies of genetic variants 373 Ala→Pro and 451 Arg→Gln of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and to explore their potential impacts on serum lipid metabolism. Methods: The genotypes in CETP codon 373 and 451 in 91 German healthy students and 409 an-

  7. Ecological network analysis for carbon metabolism of eco-industrial parks: a case study of a typical eco-industrial park in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Chen, Bin; Feng, Kuishuang; Hubacek, Klaus

    2015-06-16

    Energy production and industrial processes are crucial economic sectors accounting for about 62% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally in 2012. Eco-industrial parks are practical attempts to mitigate GHG emissions through cooperation among businesses and the local community in order to reduce waste and pollution, efficiently share resources, and help with the pursuit of sustainable development. This work developed a framework based on ecological network analysis to trace carbon metabolic processes in eco-industrial parks and applied it to a typical eco-industrial park in Beijing. Our findings show that the entire metabolic system is dominated by supply of primary goods from the external environment and final demand. The more carbon flows through a sector, the more influence it would exert upon the whole system. External environment and energy providers are the most active and dominating part of the carbon metabolic system, which should be the first target to mitigate emissions by increasing efficiencies. The carbon metabolism of the eco-industrial park can be seen as an evolutionary system with high levels of efficiency, but this may come at the expense of larger levels of resilience. This work may provide a useful modeling framework for low-carbon design and management of industrial parks.

  8. Experimental fossilisation of viruses from extremophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Orange

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of viruses at different stages of the origin of life has recently been reconsidered. It appears that viruses may have accompanied the earliest forms of life, allowing the transition from an RNA to a DNA world and possibly being involved in the shaping of tree of life in the three domains that we know presently. In addition, a large variety of viruses has been recently identified in extreme environments, hosted by extremophilic microorganisms, in ecosystems considered as analogues to those of the early Earth. Traces of life on the early Earth were preserved by the precipitation of silica on the organic structures. We present the results of the first experimental fossilisation by silica of viruses from extremophilic Archaea (SIRV2 – Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2, TPV1 – Thermococcus prieurii virus 1, and PAV1 – Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1. Our results confirm that viruses can be fossilised, with silica precipitating on the different viral structures (proteins, envelope over several months in a manner similar to that of other experimentally and naturally fossilised microorganisms. This study thus suggests that viral remains or traces could be preserved in the rock record although their identification may be challenging due to the small size of the viral particles.

  9. Molecular characterization of hydrolytic enzymes from hyperthermophilic archaea.

    OpenAIRE

    Voorhorst, W.G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Hyperthermophiles are recently discovered microorganisms which are able to grow optimally above 85 °C. Most hyperthermophiles belong to the Archaea, the third domain of life. One of the main interests in hyperthermophiles to deepen the insight in the way their proteins are stabilized and how to apply this knowledge to improve the stability of biotechnologically relevant enzymes. In this thesis attention has been focused on hydrolytic enzymes from hyperthermophilic archaea to provide insight i...

  10. Towards Glycoengineering in Archaea: Replacement of Haloferax volcanii AglD with Homologous Glycosyltransferases from Other Halophilic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Calo, Doron; Eilam, Yael; Lichtenstein, Rachel G.; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Like eukarya and bacteria, archaea also perform N-glycosylation. However, the N-linked glycans of archaeal glycoproteins present a variety not seen elsewhere. Archaea accordingly rely on N-glycosylation pathways likely involving a broad range of species-specific enzymes. To harness the enormous applied potential of such diversity for the generation of glycoproteins bearing tailored N-linked glycans, the development of an appropriate archaeal glycoengineering platform is required. With a seque...

  11. Oxygen-dependent niche formation of a pyrite-dependent acidophilic consortium built by archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle; Dolch, Kerstin; Geiger, Katharina; Krause, Susanne; Asskamp, Maximilian; Eusterhues, Karin; Kriews, Michael; Wilhelms-Dick, Dorothee; Goettlicher, Joerg; Majzlan, Juraj; Gescher, Johannes

    2013-09-01

    Biofilms can provide a number of different ecological niches for microorganisms. Here, a multispecies biofilm was studied in which pyrite-oxidizing microbes are the primary producers. Its stability allowed not only detailed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based characterization of the microbial population in different areas of the biofilm but also to integrate these results with oxygen and pH microsensor measurements conducted before. The O2 concentration declined rapidly from the outside to the inside of the biofilm. Hence, part of the population lives under microoxic or anoxic conditions. Leptospirillum ferrooxidans strains dominate the microbial population but are only located in the oxic periphery of the snottite structure. Interestingly, archaea were identified only in the anoxic parts of the biofilm. The archaeal community consists mainly of so far uncultured Thermoplasmatales as well as novel ARMAN (Archaeal Richmond Mine Acidophilic Nanoorganism) species. Inductively coupled plasma analysis and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra provide further insight in the biofilm characteristics but revealed no other major factors than oxygen affecting the distribution of bacteria and archaea. In addition to catalyzed reporter deposition FISH and oxygen microsensor measurements, microautoradiographic FISH was used to identify areas in which active CO2 fixation takes place. Leptospirilla as well as acidithiobacilli were identified as primary producers. Fixation of gaseous CO2 seems to proceed only in the outer rim of the snottite. Archaea inhabiting the snottite core do not seem to contribute to the primary production. This work gives insight in the ecological niches of acidophilic microorganisms and their role in a consortium. The data provided the basis for the enrichment of uncultured archaea.

  12. Unearthing the ecology of soil microorganisms using a high resolution DNA-SIP approach to explore cellulose and xylose metabolism in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles ePepe-Ranney

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP. Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either 13C-xylose or 13C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for 13C-incorporation into DNA from 13C-xylose and 13C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated 13C in the 13C-xylose treatment changed over time being predominantly Firmicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These 13C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi and Planctomycetes.

  13. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, Mark A; Romine, Margaret; Jennings, Ryan deM; Jay, Zack J; Tringe, Susannah G; Rusch, Doug B; Beam, Jacob P; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicates that the replicate assemblies represent a new candidate phylum within the domain Archaea referred to here as 'Geoarchaeota' or 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in the metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen-sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron-oxide mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogs active in YNP today.

  14. Higher-level classification of the Archaea: evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Bapteste

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a phylogenetic approach to analyze the evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens. We show that 23 vertically transmitted ribosomal proteins do not support the monophyly of methanogens, and propose instead that there are two distantly related groups of extant archaea that produce methane, which we have named Class I and Class II. Based on this finding, we subsequently investigated the uniqueness of the origin of methanogenesis by studying both the enzymes of methanogenesis and the proteins that synthesize its specific coenzymes. We conclude that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis appeared only once during evolution. Genes involved in the seven central steps of the methanogenic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 are ubiquitous in methanogens and share a common history. This suggests that, although extant methanogens produce methane from various substrates (CO2, formate, acetate, methylated C-1 compounds, these archaea have a core of conserved enzymes that have undergone little evolutionary change. Furthermore, this core of methanogenesis enzymes seems to originate (as a whole from the last ancestor of all methanogens and does not appear to have been horizontally transmitted to other organisms or between members of Class I and Class II. The observation of a unique and ancestral form of methanogenesis suggests that it was preserved in two independent lineages, with some instances of specialization or added metabolic flexibility. It was likely lost in the Halobacteriales, Thermoplasmatales and Archaeoglobales. Given that fossil evidence for methanogenesis dates back 2.8 billion years, a unique origin of this process makes the methanogenic archaea a very ancient taxon.

  15. DEB modeling for nanotoxicology, microbial ecology, and environmental engineering. Comment on: ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Patricia A.

    2017-03-01

    Jusup et al. [1] appeal to mathematical physicists, and to biologists, by providing the theoretical basis for dynamic energy budget (DEB) modeling of individual organisms and populations, while emphasizing model simplicity, universality, and applicability to real world problems. Comments herein regard the disciplinary tensions proposed by the authors and suggest that-in addition to important applications in eco- and specifically nano-toxicology-there are opportunities for DEB frameworks to inform relative complexity in microbial ecological process modeling. This commentary also suggests another audience for bridging DEB theory and application-engineers solving environmental problems.

  16. Genomic Analysis of Deeply-Branching Bacteria and Archaea from IODP Leg 347: Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. T.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Among the diverse inhabitants of the marine subsurface are "deeply-branching" bacteria and archaea, whose recent evolutionary ancestors have eluded isolation and characterization by traditional culture-based methods. By using single-cell genomics, we were able to target members of common deeply-branching mircorganisms found in a sediment core acquired during IODP Leg 347. Cells were separated from sediment layers (37 and 84 meters below the seafloor) deposited at site 60, hole B, near Anholt Island tens to hundreds of thousands of years ago. Ten single amplified genomes from 4 bacterial and 1 archaeal lineages were chosen from the 60 successfully sorted cells. The lineages include: Desulfobacterium sp., OPB41, OP8, NT-B2, Marine Group II archaea. Two lineages have not been genomically sampled before, while all 5 are frequently found in a variety of marine sediment habitats. The genome assemblies range in completeness from 45 - 85% and contain a number of phylogenetically relevant genes that has helped to anchor their position in the tree of life. The metabolic strategies, including putative sulfate reduction and carbon degradation pathways, employed by these cells have allowed them to survive in an environment with diminishing sources of labile carbon substrates.

  17. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaart, M.R.A.; Bielen, A.A.M.; Oost, van der J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are pro

  18. Updated clusters of orthologous genes for Archaea: a complex ancestor of the Archaea and the byways of horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collections of Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COGs provide indispensable tools for comparative genomic analysis, evolutionary reconstruction and functional annotation of new genomes. Initially, COGs were made for all complete genomes of cellular life forms that were available at the time. However, with the accumulation of thousands of complete genomes, construction of a comprehensive COG set has become extremely computationally demanding and prone to error propagation, necessitating the switch to taxon-specific COG collections. Previously, we reported the collection of COGs for 41 genomes of Archaea (arCOGs. Here we present a major update of the arCOGs and describe evolutionary reconstructions to reveal general trends in the evolution of Archaea. Results The updated version of the arCOG database incorporates 91% of the pangenome of 120 archaea (251,032 protein-coding genes altogether into 10,335 arCOGs. Using this new set of arCOGs, we performed maximum likelihood reconstruction of the genome content of archaeal ancestral forms and gene gain and loss events in archaeal evolution. This reconstruction shows that the last Common Ancestor of the extant Archaea was an organism of greater complexity than most of the extant archaea, probably with over 2,500 protein-coding genes. The subsequent evolution of almost all archaeal lineages was apparently dominated by gene loss resulting in genome streamlining. Overall, in the evolution of Archaea as well as a representative set of bacteria that was similarly analyzed for comparison, gene losses are estimated to outnumber gene gains at least 4 to 1. Analysis of specific patterns of gene gain in Archaea shows that, although some groups, in particular Halobacteria, acquire substantially more genes than others, on the whole, gene exchange between major groups of Archaea appears to be largely random, with no major ‘highways’ of horizontal gene transfer. Conclusions The updated collection

  19. In-Vitro Archaeacidal Activity of Biocides against Human-Associated Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several methanogenic archaea have been detected in the human intestinal microbiota. These intestinal archaea may contaminate medical devices such as colonoscopes. However, no biocide activity has been reported among these human-associated archaea. METHODOLOGY: The minimal archaeacidal concentration (MAC) of peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, squalamine and twelve parent synthetic derivatives reported in this study was determined against five human-associated methanogenic archaea inclu...

  20. Geographical Distribution of Methanogenic Archaea in Nine Representative Paddy Soils in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qianhui; Zhong, Linghao; Deng, Ye; Shi, Yu; Wang, Baozhan; Jia, Zhongjun; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi

    2016-01-01

    Paddy field methanogenic archaea are responsible for methane (CH4) production and contribute significantly to climate change. The information regarding the spatial variations in the abundance, the diversity and the composition of such ecologically important microbes, however, is quite limited at large scale. In this investigation, we studied the abundance, alpha diversity and geographical distribution of methanogenic archaeal communities in nine representative paddy sites, along a large latitudinal gradient in China, using pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. It is found that all paddy soils harbor constant methanogenic archaeal constituents, which is dominated by family Methanocellaceae (37.3%), Methanobacteriaceae (22.1%), Methanosaetaceae (17.2%), and Methanosarcinaceae (9.8%). Methanogenic archaeal abundance is primarily influenced by soil C (R = 0.612, P = 0.001) and N (R = 0.673, P = 0.001) contents, as well as alpha diversity by soil pH (PD: R = -0.552, P = 0.006; Chao1: R = -0.615, P = 0.002). Further exploration revealed that both spatial distance (R = 0.3469, P = 0.001, partial mental test) and soil chemical variables mainly about soil C and N (R = 0.2847, P = 0.001) are the two major factors affecting methanogenic archaeal community composition distribution in paddy soils. This finding will allow us to develop a better picture of the biogeographic ranges of these ecologically important microbes and get deeper insights into their ecology. PMID:27679621

  1. Molecular characterization of hydrolytic enzymes from hyperthermophilic archaea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhorst, W.G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Hyperthermophiles are recently discovered microorganisms which are able to grow optimally above 85 °C. Most hyperthermophiles belong to the Archaea, the third domain of life. One of the main interests in hyperthermophiles to deepen the insight in the way their proteins are stabilized and how to appl

  2. Sweet to the extreme: protein glycosylation in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Chaban, Bonnie; VanDyke, David J; Jarrell, Ken F; Eichler, Jerry

    2008-06-01

    Post-translational modifications account for much of the biological diversity generated at the proteome level. Of these, glycosylation is the most prevalent. Long thought to be unique to Eukarya, it is now clear that both Bacteria and Archaea are also capable of N-glycosylation, namely the covalent linkage of oligosaccharides to select target asparagine residues. However, while the eukaryal and bacterial N-glycosylation pathways are relatively well defined, little is known of the parallel process in Archaea. Of late, however, major advances have been made in describing the process of archaeal N-glycosylation. Such efforts have shown, as is often the case in archaeal biology, that protein N-glycosylation in Archaea combines particular aspects of the eukaryal and bacterial pathways along with traits unique to this life form. For instance, while the oligosaccharides of archaeal glycoproteins include nucleotide-activated sugars formed by bacterial pathways, the lipid carrier on which such oligosaccharides are assembled is the same as used in eukaryal N-glycosylation. By contrast, transfer of assembled oligosaccharides to their protein targets shows Archaea-specific properties. Finally, addressing N-glycosylation from an archaeal perspective is providing new general insight into this event, as exemplified by the solution of the first crystal structure of an oligosaccharide transferase from an archaeal source.

  3. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Rusch, Douglas B; Tringe, Susannah G; Macur, Richard E; Jennings, Ryan deM; Boyd, Eric S; Spear, John R; Roberto, Francisco F

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G + C content) and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport, and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH). These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high-temperature systems of YNP.

  4. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenome sequence from high-temperature archaeal habitats demonstrate linkages between metabolic potential and geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP provide an unparalled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (~40-45 Mbase Sanger sequencing per site was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and/or microbial mats and subjected to numerous phylogenetic and functional analyses. Analysis of individual sequences (e.g., MEGAN and G+C content and assemblies from each habitat type revealed the presence of dominant archaeal populations in all environments, 10 of whose genomes were largely reconstructed from the sequence data. Analysis of protein family occurrence, particularly of those involved in energy conservation, electron transport and autotrophic metabolism, revealed significant differences in metabolic strategies across sites consistent with differences in major geochemical attributes (e.g., sulfide, oxygen, pH. These observations provide an ecological basis for understanding the distribution of indigenous archaeal lineages across high temperature systems of YNP.

  5. Archaea were widespread in sediments of the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgel, Daniel; Peckmann, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    The Messinian salinity crisis (MSC) was among the most extreme and short-lived paleooceanographic events in Earth history and dramatically impacted the depositional environments of the Mediterranean. Many of the Messinian sedimentary sequences reflect environmental variability on extremely short time scales, typified by phenomena like evaporation and high salinities, anoxia, and desiccation. Only few organisms tolerate such severe conditions. Among those are archaea, many of which are especially well adapted to extreme conditions. We studied various MSC locations and deposits to shed light onto the role of archaea in the MSC, focusing on lipid biomarkers. These are (1) primary gypsum with abundant, yet problematic filamentous microfossils from various locations in the Mediterranean, (2) Calcare di Base, limestones from Sicily and Calabria, and (3) Calcare Solfifero, authigenic carbonates associated with native sulfur from Sicily. (1) Primary gypsum beds with abundant filamentous fossils are widespread in the Mediterranean. Archaea were found as important contributor of organic matter in these evaporites. The filaments, however, have previously been interpreted to represent cyanobacteria based on the extraction and amplification of cyanobacterial DNA. Cyanobacteria produce specific and long-lasting biomarkers, but no such compounds were found in the studied deposits, thus, the assignment of the filaments to cyanobacteria necessitates further verification. (2) The Calcare di Base are widespread, genetically heterogeneous Messinian limestones, which are particularly common in Sicily and Calabria. The environmental conditions during their deposition, as well as mechanisms and timing of formation are a matter of debate. The studied Calcare di Base samples were found to contain specific halophilic archaeal signatures and numerous pseudomorphs after halite. (3) The Calcare Solfifero, authigenic carbonates accompanied by elemental sulfur formed in the course of microbial

  6. Intestinal concentrations of free and encapsulated dietary medium-chain fatty acids and effects on gastric microbial ecology and bacterial metabolic products in the digestive tract of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentek, Jürgen; Buchheit-Renko, Susanne; Männer, Klaus; Pieper, Robert; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2012-02-01

    The influence of low dietary levels of free and encapsulated medium-chain fatty acids on their concentrations in the digesta, the gastric microbial ecology and bacterial metabolic products in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in weaned piglets was studied. Starting after weaning, 36 piglets were fed a diet without (Control) or with medium-chain fatty acids uncoated (MCFA) or coated with vegetable fat and lecithin (MCFAc). After 4 weeks, the animals were killed, and digesta from the stomach and different sections of the GIT were collected. The concentrations of caprylic (p < 0.001) and capric (p = 0.001) acids were higher in the stomachs of piglets fed diets MCFA and MCFAc compared to the Control group. The concentrations dropped rapidly along the GIT, regardless of encapsulation, and tended to be higher in groups MCFA and MCFAc compared to the Control. Compared to the Control group, ingestion of diet MCFAc led to an increase in the number of eubacteria (p = 0.001), enterobacteriaceae (p < 0.001), clostridial clusters I (p = 0.001) and IV (p = 0.019), Lactobacillus johnsonii (p < 0.001) and Lactobacillus amylovorus (p = 0.001) in gastric contents. A similar trend was seen with diet MCFA. Relative concentrations of short-chain fatty acids were characterised by lower propionic acid levels (p = 0.045), numerically (p < 0.1) higher acetic, lower n-butyric and i-valeric acid concentrations in the small intestine. Lactic acid concentrations were not significantly changed in the GIT, but ammonia concentrations increased (p < 0.001) in the distal small intestine in the MCFA and MCFAc groups. In conclusion, medium-chain fatty acids affected microbial ecology parameters in the gastric contents and bacterial metabolites in the small intestine. At low dietary levels, medium-chain fatty acids may be regarded as modulators of the gastric microbiota in weaned piglets.

  7. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  8. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia eMendez-Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics technologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and ultra-micro-archaea demand their inclusion in the microbial characterisation of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including ultra-micro-archaeal and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far.

  9. [Ecology and ecologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Ecology (from the Greek words οιχοσ, "house" and λογια "study of") is the science of the "house", since it studies the environments where we live. There are three main ways of thinking about Ecology: Ecology as the study of interactions (between humans and the environment, between humans and living beings, between all living beings, etc.), Ecology as the statistical study of interactions, Ecology as a faith, or rather as a science that requires a metaphysical view. The history of Ecology shows us how this view was released by the label of "folk sense" to gain the epistemological status of science, a science that strives to be interdisciplinary. So, the aim of Ecology is to study, through a scientific methodology, the whole natural world, answering to very different questions, that arise from several fields (Economics, Biology, Sociology, Philosophy, etc.). The plurality of issues that Ecology has to face led, during the Twentieth-century, to branch off in several different "ecologies". As a result, each one of these new approaches chose as its own field a more limited and specific portion of reality.

  10. Diversity, Physiology, and Niche Differentiation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding o...

  11. Classification of Bacteria and Archaea: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, Karl Heinz

    2009-12-01

    The late 19th century was the beginning of bacterial taxonomy and bacteria were classified on the basis of phenotypic markers. The distinction of prokaryotes and eukaryotes was introduced in the 1960s. Numerical taxonomy improved phenotypic identification but provided little information on the phylogenetic relationships of prokaryotes. Later on, chemotaxonomic and genotypic methods were widely used for a more satisfactory classification. Archaea were first classified as a separate group of prokaryotes in 1977. The current classification of Bacteria and Archaea is based on an operational-based model, the so-called polyphasic approach, comprised of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data, as well as phylogenetic information. The provisional status Candidatus has been established for describing uncultured prokaryotic cells for which their phylogenetic relationship has been determined and their authenticity revealed by in situ probing. The ultimate goal is to achieve a theory-based classification system based on a phylogenetic/evolutionary concept. However, there are currently two contradictory opinions about the future classification of Bacteria and Archaea. A group of mostly molecular biologists posits that the yet-unclear effect of gene flow, in particular lateral gene transfer, makes the line of descent difficult, if not impossible, to describe. However, even in the face of genomic fluidity it seems that the typical geno- and phenotypic characteristics of a taxon are still maintained, and are sufficient for reliable classification and identification of Bacteria and Archaea. There are many well-defined genotypic clusters that are congruent with known species delineated by polyphasic approaches. Comparative sequence analysis of certain core genes, including rRNA genes, may be useful for the characterization of higher taxa, whereas various character genes may be suitable as phylogenetic markers for the delineation of lower taxa. Nevertheless, there may still be

  12. Genomes of two new ammonia-oxidizing archaea enriched from deep marine sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Je Park

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are ubiquitous and abundant and contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ocean. In this study, we assembled AOA draft genomes from two deep marine sediments from Donghae, South Korea, and Svalbard, Arctic region, by sequencing the enriched metagenomes. Three major microorganism clusters belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were deduced from their 16S rRNA genes, GC contents, and oligonucleotide frequencies. Three archaeal genomes were identified, two of which were distinct and were designated Ca. "Nitrosopumilus koreensis" AR1 and "Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2. AR1 and AR2 exhibited average nucleotide identities of 85.2% and 79.5% to N. maritimus, respectively. The AR1 and AR2 genomes contained genes pertaining to energy metabolism and carbon fixation as conserved in other AOA, but, conversely, had fewer heme-containing proteins and more copper-containing proteins than other AOA. Most of the distinctive AR1 and AR2 genes were located in genomic islands (GIs that were not present in other AOA genomes or in a reference water-column metagenome from the Sargasso Sea. A putative gene cluster involved in urea utilization was found in the AR2 genome, but not the AR1 genome, suggesting niche specialization in marine AOA. Co-cultured bacterial genome analysis suggested that bacterial sulfur and nitrogen metabolism could be involved in interactions with AOA. Our results provide fundamental information concerning the metabolic potential of deep marine sedimentary AOA.

  13. Genomes of two new ammonia-oxidizing archaea enriched from deep marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Je; Ghai, Rohit; Martín-Cuadrado, Ana-Belén; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Chung, Won-Hyong; Kwon, KaeKyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Madsen, Eugene L; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous and abundant and contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ocean. In this study, we assembled AOA draft genomes from two deep marine sediments from Donghae, South Korea, and Svalbard, Arctic region, by sequencing the enriched metagenomes. Three major microorganism clusters belonging to Thaumarchaeota, Epsilonproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were deduced from their 16S rRNA genes, GC contents, and oligonucleotide frequencies. Three archaeal genomes were identified, two of which were distinct and were designated Ca. "Nitrosopumilus koreensis" AR1 and "Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2. AR1 and AR2 exhibited average nucleotide identities of 85.2% and 79.5% to N. maritimus, respectively. The AR1 and AR2 genomes contained genes pertaining to energy metabolism and carbon fixation as conserved in other AOA, but, conversely, had fewer heme-containing proteins and more copper-containing proteins than other AOA. Most of the distinctive AR1 and AR2 genes were located in genomic islands (GIs) that were not present in other AOA genomes or in a reference water-column metagenome from the Sargasso Sea. A putative gene cluster involved in urea utilization was found in the AR2 genome, but not the AR1 genome, suggesting niche specialization in marine AOA. Co-cultured bacterial genome analysis suggested that bacterial sulfur and nitrogen metabolism could be involved in interactions with AOA. Our results provide fundamental information concerning the metabolic potential of deep marine sedimentary AOA.

  14. Potential Role of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase (acs) and Malate Dehydrogenase (mae) in the Evolution of the Acetate Switch in Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott P; McClure, Marcella A; Johnson, Kiki; Cleveland, Sean; Hunt, Kristopher A; Fields, Matthew W

    2015-08-03

    Although many Archaea have AMP-Acs (acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase) and ADP-Acs, the extant methanogenic genus Methanosarcina is the only identified Archaeal genus that can utilize acetate via acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta). Despite the importance of ack as the potential urkinase in the ASKHA phosphotransferase superfamily, an origin hypothesis does not exist for the acetate kinase in Bacteria, Archaea, or Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that Archaeal AMP-Acs and ADP-Acs contain paralogous ATPase motifs previously identified in Ack, which demonstrate a novel relation between these proteins in Archaea. The identification of ATPase motif conservation and resulting structural features in AMP- and ADP-acetyl-CoA synthetase proteins in this study expand the ASKHA superfamily to include acetyl-CoA synthetase. Additional phylogenetic analysis showed that Pta and MaeB sequences had a common ancestor, and that the Pta lineage within the halophilc archaea was an ancestral lineage. These results suggested that divergence of a duplicated maeB within an ancient halophilic, archaeal lineage formed a putative pta ancestor. These results provide a potential scenario for the establishment of the Ack/Pta pathway and provide novel insight into the evolution of acetate metabolism for all three domains of life.

  15. Asgard archaea illuminate the origin of eukaryotic cellular complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Caceres, Eva F; Saw, Jimmy H; Bäckström, Disa; Juzokaite, Lina; Vancaester, Emmelien; Seitz, Kiley W; Anantharaman, Karthik; Starnawski, Piotr; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Stott, Matthew B; Nunoura, Takuro; Banfield, Jillian F; Schramm, Andreas; Baker, Brett J; Spang, Anja; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2017-01-19

    The origin and cellular complexity of eukaryotes represent a major enigma in biology. Current data support scenarios in which an archaeal host cell and an alphaproteobacterial (mitochondrial) endosymbiont merged together, resulting in the first eukaryotic cell. The host cell is related to Lokiarchaeota, an archaeal phylum with many eukaryotic features. The emergence of the structural complexity that characterizes eukaryotic cells remains unclear. Here we describe the 'Asgard' superphylum, a group of uncultivated archaea that, as well as Lokiarchaeota, includes Thor-, Odin- and Heimdallarchaeota. Asgard archaea affiliate with eukaryotes in phylogenomic analyses, and their genomes are enriched for proteins formerly considered specific to eukaryotes. Notably, thorarchaeal genomes encode several homologues of eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery components, including Sec23/24 and TRAPP domains. Furthermore, we identify thorarchaeal proteins with similar features to eukaryotic coat proteins involved in vesicle biogenesis. Our results expand the known repertoire of 'eukaryote-specific' proteins in Archaea, indicating that the archaeal host cell already contained many key components that govern eukaryotic cellular complexity.

  16. Surface Appendages of Archaea: Structure, Function, Genetics and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Siu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms representing diverse subgroupings of the Domain Archaea are known to possess unusual surface structures. These can include ones unique to Archaea such as cannulae and hami as well as archaella (archaeal flagella and various types of pili that superficially resemble their namesakes in Bacteria, although with significant differences. Major advances have occurred particularly in the study of archaella and pili using model organisms with recently developed advanced genetic tools. There is common use of a type IV pili-model of assembly for several archaeal surface structures including archaella, certain pili and sugar binding structures termed bindosomes. In addition, there are widespread posttranslational modifications of archaellins and pilins with N-linked glycans, with some containing novel sugars. Archaeal surface structures are involved in such diverse functions as swimming, attachment to surfaces, cell to cell contact resulting in genetic transfer, biofilm formation, and possible intercellular communication. Sometimes functions are co-dependent on other surface structures. These structures and the regulation of their assembly are important features that allow various Archaea, including thermoacidophilic, hyperthermophilic, halophilic, and anaerobic ones, to survive and thrive in the extreme environments that are commonly inhabited by members of this domain.

  17. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms.

  18. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  19. Changes of Key Enzymes in Sucrose Metabol ism of Flue-cured Tobacco in Different Ecological Regions%不同生态区烤烟蔗糖代谢关键酶活性的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任竹; 赵会纳; 曾陨涛; 元野; 韦成才; 冯小芽; 冯先情; 李伟鹏; 雷波

    2014-01-01

    为了解不同生态区与烤烟蔗糖代谢关键酶活性变化的差异,采集关键生产时期K326的烟样,对不同生态区烟叶的蔗糖代谢关键酶活性进行测定与分析。结果表明:淀粉酶(AMS)、蔗糖合成酶(SS)与不同生态区之间和不同生长时期间的差异均达到极显著水平,生态区与生长时期的交互作用对淀粉酶(AMS)、蔗糖磷酸合成酶(SPS)、蔗糖合成酶(SS)活性的影响均达极显著水平。%In order to explore the changes of key enzymes in sucrose metabolism of flue-cured tobacco in different ecological regions,the key enzymes activity in sucrose metabolism of K326 flue-cured tobacco collected in key production period from different ecological regions was detected and analyzed.Results:the difference of AMS and SS in different ecological region and growth stage reached extremely significant level.The interaction of ecological region and growth stage had very significant influence on AMS,SPS and SS.

  20. The Influence of Ecological and Conventional Plant Production Systems on Soil Microbial Quality under Hops (Humulus lupulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Oszust

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge about microorganisms—activity and diversity under hop production is still limited. We assumed that, different systems of hop production (within the same soil and climatic conditions significantly influence on the composition of soil microbial populations and its functional activity (metabolic potential. Therefore, we compared a set of soil microbial properties in the field experiment of two hop production systems (a ecological based on the use of probiotic preparations and organic fertilization (b conventional—with the use of chemical pesticides and mineral fertilizers. Soil analyses included following microbial properties: The total number microorganisms, a bunch of soil enzyme activities, the catabolic potential was also assessed following Biolog EcoPlates®. Moreover, the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA was characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP of PCR ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA gene products. Conventional and ecological systems of hop production were able to affect soil microbial state in different seasonal manner. Favorable effect on soil microbial activity met under ecological, was more probably due to livestock-based manure and fermented plant extracts application. No negative influence on conventional hopyard soil was revealed. Both type of production fulfilled fertilizing demands. Under ecological production it was due to livestock-based manure fertilizers and fermented plant extracts application.

  1. Modeling complex metabolic reactions, ecological systems, and financial and legal networks with MIANN models based on Markov-Wiener node descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duardo-Sánchez, Aliuska; Munteanu, Cristian R; Riera-Fernández, Pablo; López-Díaz, Antonio; Pazos, Alejandro; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2014-01-27

    The use of numerical parameters in Complex Network analysis is expanding to new fields of application. At a molecular level, we can use them to describe the molecular structure of chemical entities, protein interactions, or metabolic networks. However, the applications are not restricted to the world of molecules and can be extended to the study of macroscopic nonliving systems, organisms, or even legal or social networks. On the other hand, the development of the field of Artificial Intelligence has led to the formulation of computational algorithms whose design is based on the structure and functioning of networks of biological neurons. These algorithms, called Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), can be useful for the study of complex networks, since the numerical parameters that encode information of the network (for example centralities/node descriptors) can be used as inputs for the ANNs. The Wiener index (W) is a graph invariant widely used in chemoinformatics to quantify the molecular structure of drugs and to study complex networks. In this work, we explore for the first time the possibility of using Markov chains to calculate analogues of node distance numbers/W to describe complex networks from the point of view of their nodes. These parameters are called Markov-Wiener node descriptors of order k(th) (W(k)). Please, note that these descriptors are not related to Markov-Wiener stochastic processes. Here, we calculated the W(k)(i) values for a very high number of nodes (>100,000) in more than 100 different complex networks using the software MI-NODES. These networks were grouped according to the field of application. Molecular networks include the Metabolic Reaction Networks (MRNs) of 40 different organisms. In addition, we analyzed other biological and legal and social networks. These include the Interaction Web Database Biological Networks (IWDBNs), with 75 food webs or ecological systems and the Spanish Financial Law Network (SFLN). The calculated W

  2. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  3. An ecological analysis of the herbivory-elicited JA burst and its metabolism: plant memory processes and predictions of the moving target model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stork

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid herbivore-induced jasmonic acid (JA accumulation is known to mediate many induced defense responses in vascular plants, but little is known about how JA bursts are metabolized and modified in response to repeated elicitations, are propagated throughout elicited leaves, or how they directly influence herbivores. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found the JA burst in a native population of Nicotiana attenuata to be highly robust despite environmental variation and we examined the JA bursts produced by repeated elicitations with Manduca sexta oral secretions (OS at whole- and within-leaf spatial scales. Surprisingly, a 2(nd OS-elicitation suppressed an expected JA burst at both spatial scales, but subsequent elicitations caused more rapid JA accumulation in elicited tissue. The baseline of induced JA/JA-Ile increased with number of elicitations in discrete intervals. Large veins constrained the spatial spread of JA bursts, leading to heterogeneity within elicited leaves. 1(st-instar M. sexta larvae were repelled by elicitations and changed feeding sites. JA conjugated with isoleucine (JA-Ile translates elicitations into defense production (e.g., TPIs, but conjugation efficiency varied among sectors and depended on NaWRKY3/6 transcription factors. Elicited TPI activity correlated strongly with the heterogeneity of JA/JA-Ile accumulations after a single elicitation, but not repeated elicitations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ecologically informed scaling of leaf elicitation reveals the contribution of repeated herbivory events to the formation of plant memory of herbivory and the causes and importance of heterogeneity in induced defense responses. Leaf vasculature, in addition to transmitting long-distance damage cues, creates heterogeneity in JA bursts within attacked leaves that may be difficult for an attacking herbivore to predict. Such unpredictability is a central tenet of the Moving Target Model of defense, which posits that

  4. Application of real-time PCR to determination of combined effect of antibiotics on Bacteria, Methanogenic Archaea, Archaea in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of erythromycin-tetracycline-sulfamethoxazole (ETS) and sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline (ST) antibiotic combinations on the microbial community and examined the ways in which these antimicrobials impact the performance of anaerobic reactors. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the effect that different antibiotic combinations had on the total and active Bacteria, Archae and Methanogenic Archae. Three primer sets that targeted metabolic genes encoding formylterahydrofolate synthetase, methyl-coenzyme M reductase and acetyl-coA synthetase were also used to determine the inhibition level on the mRNA expression of the homoacetogens, methanogens and specifically acetoclastic methanogens, respectively. These microorganisms play a vital role in the anaerobic degradation of organic waste and targeting these gene expressions offers operators or someone at a treatment plant the potential to control and the improve the anaerobic system. The results of the investigation revealed that acetogens have a competitive advantage over Archaea in the presence of ETS and ST combinations. Although the efficiency with which methane production takes place and the quantification of microbial populations in both the ETS and ST reactors decreased as antibiotic concentrations increased, the ETS batch reactor performed better than the ST batch reactor. According to the expression of genes results, the syntrophic interaction of acetogens and methanogens is critical to the performance of the ETS and ST reactors. Failure to maintain the stability of these microorganisms resulted in a decrease in the performance and stability of the anaerobic reactors.

  5. Evolutionary strategies of viruses, bacteria and archaea in hydrothermal vent ecosystems revealed through metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika E Anderson

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems, a high proportion of which are lysogenic, must also withstand these environmental extremes. Here, we explore the evolutionary strategies of both microorganisms and viruses in hydrothermal systems through comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome, collected by size fractionation of high temperature fluids from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent. We detected a high enrichment of mobile elements and proviruses in the cellular fraction relative to microorganisms in other environments. We observed a relatively high abundance of genes related to energy metabolism as well as cofactors and vitamins in the viral fraction compared to the cellular fraction, which suggest encoding of auxiliary metabolic genes on viral genomes. Moreover, the observation of stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool suggests viral strategies that promote prolonged host integration. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for hydrothermal vent viruses to integrate into hosts, facilitate horizontal gene transfer, and express or transfer genes that manipulate the hosts' functional capabilities.

  6. Evolutionary strategies of viruses, bacteria and archaea in hydrothermal vent ecosystems revealed through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2014-01-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems, a high proportion of which are lysogenic, must also withstand these environmental extremes. Here, we explore the evolutionary strategies of both microorganisms and viruses in hydrothermal systems through comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome, collected by size fractionation of high temperature fluids from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent. We detected a high enrichment of mobile elements and proviruses in the cellular fraction relative to microorganisms in other environments. We observed a relatively high abundance of genes related to energy metabolism as well as cofactors and vitamins in the viral fraction compared to the cellular fraction, which suggest encoding of auxiliary metabolic genes on viral genomes. Moreover, the observation of stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool suggests viral strategies that promote prolonged host integration. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for hydrothermal vent viruses to integrate into hosts, facilitate horizontal gene transfer, and express or transfer genes that manipulate the hosts' functional capabilities.

  7. Lessons from the genomes of extremely acidophilic bacteria and archaea with special emphasis on bioleaching microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Valdés, Jorge; Quatrini, Raquel; Duarte, Francisco; Holmes, David S

    2010-10-01

    This mini-review describes the current status of recent genome sequencing projects of extremely acidophilic microorganisms and highlights the most current scientific advances emerging from their analysis. There are now at least 56 draft or completely sequenced genomes of acidophiles including 30 bacteria and 26 archaea. There are also complete sequences for 38 plasmids, 29 viruses, and additional DNA sequence information of acidic environments is available from eight metagenomic projects. A special focus is provided on the genomics of acidophiles from industrial bioleaching operations. It is shown how this initial information provides a rich intellectual resource for microbiologists that has potential to open innovative and efficient research avenues. Examples presented illustrate the use of genomic information to construct preliminary models of metabolism of individual microorganisms. Most importantly, access to multiple genomes allows the prediction of metabolic and genetic interactions between members of the bioleaching microbial community (ecophysiology) and the investigation of major evolutionary trends that shape genome architecture and evolution. Despite these promising beginnings, a major conclusion is that the genome projects help focus attention on the tremendous effort still required to understand the biological principles that support life in extremely acidic environments, including those that might allow engineers to take appropriate action designed to improve the efficiency and rate of bioleaching and to protect the environment.

  8. Metabolism of hyperthermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönheit, P; Schäfer, T

    1995-01-01

    Hyperthermophiles are characterized by a temperature optimum for growth between 80 and 110°C. They are considered to represent the most ancient phenotype of living organisms and thus their metabolic design might reflect the situation at an early stage of evolution. Their modes of metabolism are diverse and include chemolithoautotrophic and chemoorganoheterotrophic. No extant phototrophic hyperthermophiles are known. Lithotrophic energy metabolism is mostly anaerobic or microaerophilic and based on the oxidation of H2 or S coupled to the reduction of S, SO inf4 (sup2-) , CO2 and NO inf3 (sup-) but rarely to O2. the substrates are derived from volcanic activities in hyperthermophilic habitats. The lithotrophic energy metabolism of hyperthermophiles appears to be similar to that of mesophiles. Autotrophic CO2 fixation proceeds via the reductive citric acid cycle, considered to be one of the first metabolic cycles, and via the reductive acetyl-CoA/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. The Calvin cycle has not been found in hyperthermophiles (or any Archaea). Organotrophic metabolism mainly involves peptides and sugars as substrates, which are either oxidized to CO2 by external electron acceptors or fermented to acetate and other products. Sugar catabolism in hyperthermophiles involves non-phosphorylated versions of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and modified versions of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The 'classical' Embden-Meyerhof pathway is present in hyperthermophilic Bacteria (Thermotoga) but not in Archaea. All hyperthermophiles (and Archaea) tested so far utilize pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase for acetyl-CoA formation from pyruvate. Acetyl-CoA oxidation in anaerobic sulphur-reducing and aerobic hyperthermophiles proceeds via the citric acid cycle; in the hyperthermophilic sulphate-reducer Archaeoglobus an oxidative acetyl-CoA/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway is operative. Acetate formation from acetyl-CoA in Archaea, including hyperthermophiles, is

  9. Purine biosynthesis in archaea: variations on a theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Anne M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to perform de novo biosynthesis of purines is present in organisms in all three domains of life, reflecting the essentiality of these molecules to life. Although the pathway is quite similar in eukaryotes and bacteria, the archaeal pathway is more variable. A careful manual curation of genes in this pathway demonstrates the value of manual curation in archaea, even in pathways that have been well-studied in other domains. Results We searched the Integrated Microbial Genome system (IMG for the 17 distinct genes involved in the 11 steps of de novo purine biosynthesis in 65 sequenced archaea, finding 738 predicted proteins with sequence similarity to known purine biosynthesis enzymes. Each sequence was manually inspected for the presence of active site residues and other residues known or suspected to be required for function. Many apparently purine-biosynthesizing archaea lack evidence for a single enzyme, either glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase or inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase, suggesting that there are at least two more gene variants in the purine biosynthetic pathway to discover. Variations in domain arrangement of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide synthetase and substantial problems in aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase and inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase assignments were also identified. Manual curation revealed some overly specific annotations in the IMG gene product name, with predicted proteins without essential active site residues assigned product names implying enzymatic activity (21 proteins, 2.8% of proteins inspected or Enzyme Commission (E. C. numbers (57 proteins, 7.7%. There were also 57 proteins (7.7% assigned overly generic names and 78 proteins (10.6% without E.C. numbers as part of the assigned name when a specific enzyme name and E. C. number were well-justified. Conclusions The patchy distribution of purine biosynthetic genes in archaea is

  10. Administrative Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  11. METABOLISM OF SULFATE-REDUCING PROKARYOTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HANSEN, TA

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is carried out by a heterogeneous group of bacteria and archaea that occur in environments with temperatures up to 105 degrees C. As a group together they have the capacity to metabolize a wide variety of compounds ranging from hydrogen via typical organic fermentatio

  12. Thermoacidophilic archaea for pyrite oxidation in coal desulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Liselotte

    1995-10-01

    The desulfurization of low-sulfur coals has been demonstrated with the thermoacidophilic archaeon Acidianus brierleyi. A. brierleyi facilitates the removal of inorganic sulfur from coal and oxidizes mineral pyrite. The results imply that the mechanism behind microbial coal desulfurization and pyrite oxidation is a combination of biotic and abiotic leaching of pyrite. The extent of sulfur removal is dependent on the type of coal and is closely related to he amount of pyritic sulfur in the coal. Studies have shown that neither ash content nor heating value were dramatically affected by the microbial treatment. The use of the archaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus solfataricus, as well as the mesophilic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and several Pseudomonas species, has also been studied for coal desulfurization and mineral pyrite oxidation. The archaea and Pseudomonas species did not grow autotrophically on mineral pyrite neither did they oxidize pyrite in coal. The oxidation rate was, however, 5-10 times less than with A. brierleyi on mineral pyrite. The rate of sulfur removal from coal was in the same range as for A. brierleyi which indicates that different reactions are rate limiting in coal depyritization than in mineral pyrite oxidation. 133 refs, 18 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g) compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA. PMID:23401664

  14. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Torres-Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June and rainy seasons (July, October, and November. Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g, with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA.

  15. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodt Avital

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Results Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. Conclusions CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. Open peer review This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten

  16. Dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in contrasted freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugoni, Mylène; Etien, Sandrine; Bourges, Antoine; Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Mallet, Clarisse; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier; Mary, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota have been recognized as the main drivers of aerobic ammonia oxidation in many ecosystems. However, little is known about the role of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in lacustrine ecosystems. In this study, the photic zone of three contrasted freshwater ecosystems located in France was sampled during two periods: winter homothermy (H) and summer thermal stratification (TS), to investigate the distribution of planktonic AOA and AOB. We showed that AOB were predominant in nutrient-rich ecosystems, whereas AOA dominated when ammonia concentrations were the lowest and during winter, which could provide a favorable environment for their growth. Moreover, analyses of archaeal libraries revealed the ubiquity of the thaumarchaeal I.1a clade associated with higher diversity of AOA in the most nutrient-poor lake. More generally, this work assesses the presence of AOA in lakes, but also highlights the existence of clades typically associated with lacustrine and hot spring ecosystems and specific ecological niches occupied by these microorganisms.

  17. Intact polar lipids of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: Structural diversity anapplication inmolecular ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.

    2011-01-01

    Non-extremophilic Crenarchaeota are ubiquitous, and comprise a major component of the microbial assemblages in many modern-day systems. Several studies have analyzed glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids synthesized by Crenarchaeota to interpret the presence, distribution, and

  18. Intact polar lipids of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: structural diversity application in molecular ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-extremophilic Crenarchaeota are ubiquitous, and comprise a major component of the microbial assemblages in many modern-day systems. Several studies have analyzed glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids synthesized by non-extremophilic Crenarchaeota to interpret the presence,

  19. An improved Greengenes taxonomy with explicit ranks for ecological and evolutionary analyses of bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Daniel; Price, Morgan N; Goodrich, Julia; Nawrocki, Eric P; DeSantis, Todd Z; Probst, Alexander; Andersen, Gary L; Knight, Rob; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2012-03-01

    Reference phylogenies are crucial for providing a taxonomic framework for interpretation of marker gene and metagenomic surveys, which continue to reveal novel species at a remarkable rate. Greengenes is a dedicated full-length 16S rRNA gene database that provides users with a curated taxonomy based on de novo tree inference. We developed a 'taxonomy to tree' approach for transferring group names from an existing taxonomy to a tree topology, and used it to apply the Greengenes, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and cyanoDB (Cyanobacteria only) taxonomies to a de novo tree comprising 408,315 sequences. We also incorporated explicit rank information provided by the NCBI taxonomy to group names (by prefixing rank designations) for better user orientation and classification consistency. The resulting merged taxonomy improved the classification of 75% of the sequences by one or more ranks relative to the original NCBI taxonomy with the most pronounced improvements occurring in under-classified environmental sequences. We also assessed candidate phyla (divisions) currently defined by NCBI and present recommendations for consolidation of 34 redundantly named groups. All intermediate results from the pipeline, which includes tree inference, jackknifing and transfer of a donor taxonomy to a recipient tree (tax2tree) are available for download. The improved Greengenes taxonomy should provide important infrastructure for a wide range of megasequencing projects studying ecosystems on scales ranging from our own bodies (the Human Microbiome Project) to the entire planet (the Earth Microbiome Project). The implementation of the software can be obtained from http://sourceforge.net/projects/tax2tree/.

  20. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  1. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Loescher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O which occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been described to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oceans (ETSP. Particularly in the ETNA, maxima in abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes correlated with the N2O maximum and the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen

  2. Microbial desulfurization of coal by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and thermophilic archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, G.; Pott, B.-M.; Larsson, L.; Holst, O.; Karlsson, H.T. (Univ. of Lund, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering II, Chemical Center)

    1994-11-01

    Several different microorganisms have been suggested for desulfurization. In the present investigation, the thermophilic archaea [ital Acidianus brierleyi] (DSM 1651), [ital Sulfolobus acidocaldarius] (DSM 639) and [ital Sulfolobus solfataricus] (DSM 1616) were compared with the mesophyilic bacterium [ital Thiobacillus ferrooxidans] (DSM 583) concerning their capability of removing sulfur from coal. The desulfurization rate as well as the amount of sulfur removed by the microorganisms was studied. Two of the investigated microorganisms [ital Thiobacillus ferrooxidans] and [ital Acidianus brierleyi], were capable of oxidizing pure pyrite as well as oxidizing sulfur in coal. A kinetic analysis was performed assuming first order reactions. The rate constant for oxidation of pure pyrite by [ital A. brierleyi] was observed to be higher than for [ital T. ferrooxidans]. The values of the rate constants for sulfur removal from coal were comparable for the two microorganisms, but were higher than for oxidation of pure pyrite. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Gansen, Martina; Frenzel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH(3)F) caused surprisingly little differences in community composition of active methanogenic archaea from a rice field soil. By measuring the natural abundances of carbon isotopes we found that the effective dose for a 90% inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis in anoxic paddy soil incubations was <0.75% CH(3)F (v/v). The construction of clone libraries as well as t-RFLP analysis revealed that the active community, as indicated by mcrA transcripts (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, a key enzyme for methanogenesis), remained stable over a wide range of CH(3)F concentrations and represented only a subset of the methanogenic community. More precisely, Methanocellaceae were of minor importance, but Methanosarcinaceae dominated the active population, even when CH(3)F inhibition only allowed for aceticlastic methanogenesis. In addition, we detected mcrA gene fragments of a so far unrecognised phylogenetic cluster. Transcription of this phylotype at methyl fluoride concentrations suppressing aceticlastic methanogenesis suggests that the respective organisms perform hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Hence, the application of CH(3)F combined with transcript analysis is not only a useful tool to measure and assign in situ acetate usage, but also to explore substrate usage by as yet uncultivated methanogens.

  4. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Daebeler

    Full Text Available The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH(3F caused surprisingly little differences in community composition of active methanogenic archaea from a rice field soil. By measuring the natural abundances of carbon isotopes we found that the effective dose for a 90% inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis in anoxic paddy soil incubations was <0.75% CH(3F (v/v. The construction of clone libraries as well as t-RFLP analysis revealed that the active community, as indicated by mcrA transcripts (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, a key enzyme for methanogenesis, remained stable over a wide range of CH(3F concentrations and represented only a subset of the methanogenic community. More precisely, Methanocellaceae were of minor importance, but Methanosarcinaceae dominated the active population, even when CH(3F inhibition only allowed for aceticlastic methanogenesis. In addition, we detected mcrA gene fragments of a so far unrecognised phylogenetic cluster. Transcription of this phylotype at methyl fluoride concentrations suppressing aceticlastic methanogenesis suggests that the respective organisms perform hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Hence, the application of CH(3F combined with transcript analysis is not only a useful tool to measure and assign in situ acetate usage, but also to explore substrate usage by as yet uncultivated methanogens.

  5. Towards glycoengineering in archaea: replacement of Haloferax volcanii AglD with homologous glycosyltransferases from other halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Eilam, Yael; Lichtenstein, Rachel G; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    Like eukarya and bacteria, archaea also perform N-glycosylation. However, the N-linked glycans of archaeal glycoproteins present a variety not seen elsewhere. Archaea accordingly rely on N-glycosylation pathways likely involving a broad range of species-specific enzymes. To harness the enormous applied potential of such diversity for the generation of glycoproteins bearing tailored N-linked glycans, the development of an appropriate archaeal glycoengineering platform is required. With a sequenced genome, a relatively well-defined N-glycosylation pathway, and molecular tools for gene manipulation, the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii (Hfx. volcanii) represents a promising candidate. Accordingly, cells lacking AglD, a glycosyltransferase involved in adding the final hexose of a pentasaccharide N-linked to the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein, were transformed to express AglD homologues from other haloarchaea. The introduction of nonnative versions of AglD led to the appearance of an S-layer glycoprotein similar to the protein from the native strain. Indeed, mass spectrometry confirmed that AglD and its homologues introduce the final hexose to the N-linked S-layer glycoprotein pentasaccharide. Heterologously expressed haloarchaeal AglD homologues contributed to N-glycosylation in Hfx. volcanii despite an apparent lack of AglD function in those haloarchaea from where the introduced homologues came. For example, although functional in Hfx. volcanii, no transcription of the Halobacterium salinarum aglD homologue, OE1482, was detected in cells of the native host grown under various conditions. Thus, at least one AglD homologue works more readily in Hfx. volcanii than in the native host. These results warrant the continued assessment of Hfx. volcanii as a glycosylation "workshop."

  6. Eubacteria and Archaea community of simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yujiao; ZUO Jiane; CHEN Lili; WANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the successful performance of a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with the capacity of simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification (SMD), the specific phylogenetic groups and community structure of microbes in the SMD granule in the UASB reactor were investigated by the construction of the Eubacteria and Archaea 16S rDNA clone libraries, fragment length polymorphism, and sequence blast. Real time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) technique was used to quantify the contents of Eubacteria and Archaea in the SMD granule. The contents of some special predominant methanogens were also investigated. The results indicated that the Methanosaeta and Methanobacteria were the predominant methanogens in all Archaea in the SMD granule, with contents of 71. 59% and 22. 73% in all 88 random Archaea clones, respectively. The diversity of Eubacteria was much more complex than that of Archaea. The low GC positive gram bacteria and Б-Protebacteria were the main predominant Eubacteria species in SMD granule, their contents were 49. 62% and 12. 03% in all 133 random Eubacteria clones respectively. The results of RTQ-PCR indicated that the content of Archaea was less than Eubacteria, the Archaea content in total microorganisms in SMD granule was about 27. 6%.

  7. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya eOzuolmez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and the interactions between both groups. We tested interspecies hydrogen transfer and coexistence between marine methanogens and sulfate reducers using mixed pure cultures of two types of microorganisms. First, Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (DSM 1744, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate reducer, was cocultured together with the obligate aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii using acetate as carbon and energy source. Next, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, an obligate H2- and formate-utilizing methanogen, was used as a partner organism to M. concilii in the presence of acetate. Finally, we performed a coexistence experiment between M. concilii and an acetotrophic sulfate reducer Desulfobacter latus AcSR2. Our results showed that D. vulgaris was able to reduce sulfate and grow from hydrogen leaked by M. concilii. In the other coculture, M. maripaludis was sustained by hydrogen leaked by M. concilii as revealed by qPCR. The growth of the two aceticlastic microbes indicated co-existence rather than competition. Altogether, our results indicate that H2 leaking from M. concilii could be used by efficient H2-scavengers. This metabolic trait, revealed from coculture studies, brings new insight to the metabolic flexibility of methanogens and sulfate reducers residing in marine environments in response to changing environmental conditions and community compositions. Using dedicated physiological studies we were able to unravel the occurrence of less obvious interactions between marine methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  8. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuolmez, Derya; Na, Hyunsoo; Lever, Mark A; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Jørgensen, Bo B; Plugge, Caroline M

    2015-01-01

    Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and the interactions between both groups. We tested interspecies hydrogen transfer and coexistence between marine methanogens and sulfate reducers using mixed pure cultures of two types of microorganisms. First, Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (DSM 1744), a hydrogenotrophic sulfate reducer, was cocultured together with the obligate aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii using acetate as carbon and energy source. Next, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, an obligate H2- and formate-utilizing methanogen, was used as a partner organism to M. concilii in the presence of acetate. Finally, we performed a coexistence experiment between M. concilii and an acetotrophic sulfate reducer Desulfobacter latus AcSR2. Our results showed that D. vulgaris was able to reduce sulfate and grow from hydrogen leaked by M. concilii. In the other coculture, M. maripaludis was sustained by hydrogen leaked by M. concilii as revealed by qPCR. The growth of the two aceticlastic microbes indicated co-existence rather than competition. Altogether, our results indicate that H2 leaking from M. concilii could be used by efficient H2-scavengers. This metabolic trait, revealed from coculture studies, brings new insight to the metabolic flexibility of methanogens and sulfate reducers residing in marine environments in response to changing environmental conditions and community compositions. Using dedicated physiological studies we were able to unravel the occurrence of less obvious interactions between marine methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  9. Distribution and Abundance of Archaea in South China Sea Sponge Holoxea sp. and the Presence of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Sponge Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with bacterial symbionts, little is known about archaea in sponges especially about their spatial distribution and abundance. Understanding the distribution and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea will help greatly in elucidating the potential function of symbionts in nitrogen cycling in sponges. In this study, gene libraries of 16S rRNA gene and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA genes and quantitative real-time PCR were used to study the spatial distribution and abundance of archaea in the South China Sea sponge Holoxea sp. As a result, Holoxea sp. specific AOA, mainly group C1a (marine group I: Crenarchaeota were identified. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaea was observed for the first time within sponge cells. This study suggested a close relationship between sponge host and its archaeal symbionts as well as the archaeal potential contribution to sponge host in the ammonia-oxidizing process of nitrification.

  10. Distinct Biogeographic Patterns for Archaea, Bacteria, and Fungi along the Vegetation Gradient at the Continental Scale in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Dai, Zhongmin; Wang, Haizhen; Dsouza, Melissa; Liu, Xingmei; He, Yan; Wu, Jianjun; Gilbert, Jack A.; Brookes, Philip C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The natural forest ecosystem in Eastern China, from tropical forest to boreal forest, has declined due to cropland development during the last 300 years, yet little is known about the historical biogeographic patterns and driving processes for the major domains of microorganisms along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient. We predicted the biogeographic patterns of soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities across 110 natural forest sites along a transect across four vegetation zones in Eastern China. The distance decay relationships demonstrated the distinct biogeographic patterns of archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities. While historical processes mainly influenced bacterial community variations, spatially autocorrelated environmental variables mainly influenced the fungal community. Archaea did not display a distance decay pattern along the vegetation gradient. Bacterial community diversity and structure were correlated with the ratio of acid oxalate-soluble Fe to free Fe oxides (Feo/Fed ratio). Fungal community diversity and structure were influenced by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and free aluminum (Ald), respectively. The role of these environmental variables was confirmed by the correlations between dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and edaphic variables. However, most of the dominant OTUs were not correlated with the major driving variables for the entire communities. These results demonstrate that soil archaea, bacteria, and fungi have different biogeographic patterns and driving processes along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient, implying different community assembly mechanisms and ecological functions for archaea, bacteria, and fungi in soil ecosystems. IMPORTANCE Understanding biogeographic patterns is a precursor to improving our knowledge of the function of microbiomes and to predicting ecosystem responses to environmental change. Using natural forest soil samples from 110 locations, this

  11. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the Archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.; Verhees, C.H.; Akerboom, A.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes, so

  12. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  13. Insertion Sequences show diverse recent activities in Cyanobacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ying

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile genetic elements (MGEs play an essential role in genome rearrangement and evolution, and are widely used as an important genetic tool. Results In this article, we present genetic maps of recently active Insertion Sequence (IS elements, the simplest form of MGEs, for all sequenced cyanobacteria and archaea, predicted based on the previously identified ~1,500 IS elements. Our predicted IS maps are consistent with the NCBI annotations of the IS elements. By linking the predicted IS elements to various characteristics of the organisms under study and the organism's living conditions, we found that (a the activities of IS elements heavily depend on the environments where the host organisms live; (b the number of recently active IS elements in a genome tends to increase with the genome size; (c the flanking regions of the recently active IS elements are significantly enriched with genes encoding DNA binding factors, transporters and enzymes; and (d IS movements show no tendency to disrupt operonic structures. Conclusion This is the first genome-scale maps of IS elements with detailed structural information on the sequence level. These genetic maps of recently active IS elements and the several interesting observations would help to improve our understanding of how IS elements proliferate and how they are involved in the evolution of the host genomes.

  14. Picoheterotroph (Bacteria and Archaea biomass distribution in the global ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Landry

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We compiled a database of 39 766 data points consisting of flow cytometric and microscopical measurements of picoheterotroph abundance, including both Bacteria and Archaea. After gridding with 1° spacing, the database covers 1.3% of the ocean surface. There are data covering all ocean basins and depths except the Southern Hemisphere below 350 m or from April until June. The average picoheterotroph biomass is 3.9 ± 3.6 μg C l−1 with a 20-fold decrease between the surface and the deep sea. We estimate a total ocean inventory of about 1.3 × 1029 picoheterotroph cells. Surprisingly, the abundance in the coastal regions is the same as at the same depths in the open ocean. Using an average of published open ocean measurements for the conversion from abundance to carbon biomass of 9.1 fg cell−1, we calculate a picoheterotroph carbon inventory of about 1.2 Pg C. The main source of uncertainty in this inventory is the conversion factor from abundance to biomass. Picoheterotroph biomass is ~2 times higher in the tropics than in the polar oceans. doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.779142

  15. Intercontinental dispersal of bacteria and archaea by transpacific winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Smith,; H. Timonen,; D. Jaffe,; Griffin, Dale W.; M. Birmele,; Perry, K.D.; Ward, P.D.; M. Roberts,

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are abundant in the upper atmosphere, particularly downwind of arid regions, where winds can mobilize large amounts of topsoil and dust. However, the challenge of collecting samples from the upper atmosphere and reliance upon culture-based characterization methods have prevented a comprehensive understanding of globally dispersed airborne microbes. In spring 2011 at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory in North America (2.8 km above sea level), we captured enough microbial biomass in two transpacific air plumes to permit a microarray analysis using 16S rRNA genes. Thousands of distinct bacterial taxa spanning a wide range of phyla and surface environments were detected before, during, and after each Asian long-range transport event. Interestingly, the transpacific plumes delivered higher concentrations of taxa already in the background air (particularly Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes). While some bacterial families and a few marine archaea appeared for the first and only time during the plumes, the microbial community compositions were similar, despite the unique transport histories of the air masses. It seems plausible, when coupled with atmospheric modeling and chemical analysis, that microbial biogeography can be used to pinpoint the source of intercontinental dust plumes. Given the degree of richness measured in our study, the overall contribution of Asian aerosols to microbial species in North American air warrants additional investigation.

  16. Involvement of thermophilic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidova, Irene A; Duncan, Kathleen E; Perez-Ibarra, B Monica; Suflita, Joseph M

    2012-07-01

    Two thermophilic archaea, strain PK and strain MG, were isolated from a culture enriched at 80°C from the inner surface material of a hot oil pipeline. Strain PK could ferment complex organic nitrogen sources (e.g. yeast extract, peptone, tryptone) and was able to reduce elemental sulfur (S°), Fe(3+) and Mn(4+) . Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organism belonged to the order Thermococcales. Incubations of this strain with elemental iron (Fe°) resulted in the abiotic formation of ferrous iron and the accumulation of volatile fatty acids during yeast extract fermentation. The other isolate, strain MG, was a H(2) :CO(2) -utilizing methanogen, phylogenetically affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter family. Co-cultures of the strains grew as aggregates that produced CH(4) without exogenous H(2) amendment. The co-culture produced the same suite but greater concentrations of fatty acids from yeast extract than did strain PK alone. Thus, the physiological characteristics of organisms both alone and in combination could conceivably contribute to pipeline corrosion. The Thermococcus strain PK could reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide, produce fatty acids and reduce ferric iron. The hydrogenotrophic methanogen strain MG enhanced fatty acid production by fermentative organisms but could not couple the dissolution Fe° with the consumption of water-derived H(2) like other methanogens.

  17. A First Analysis of Metallome Biosignatures of Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyllinniskii Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, no experimental data has been reported for the metallome of hyperthermophilic microorganisms although their metal requirements for growth are known to be unique. Here, experiments were conducted to determine (i cellular trace metal concentrations of the hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, and (ii a first estimate of the metallome for these hyperthermophilic species via ICP-MS. The metal contents of these cells were compared to parallel experiments using the mesophilic bacterium Escherichia coli grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Fe and Zn were typically the most abundant metals in cells. Metal concentrations for E. coli grown aerobically decreased in the order Fe > Zn > Cu > Mo > Ni > W > Co. In contrast, M. jannaschii and P. furiosus show almost the reverse pattern with elevated Ni, Co, and W concentrations. Of the three organisms, a biosignature is potentially demonstrated for the methanogen M. jannaschii that may, in part, be related to the metallome requirements of methanogenesis. The bioavailability of trace metals more than likely has varied through time. If hyperthermophiles are very ancient, then the trace metal patterns observed here may begin to provide some insights regarding Earth's earliest cells and in turn, early Earth chemistry.

  18. Spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria across eight freshwater lakes in sediments from Jiangsu of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizingarchaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB play an important role innitrogen transformation in freshwater sediments. However, it is still unclear towhat extent the distribution patterns of these microorganisms are affected bythe freshwater sediment across a large geographical scale. This study wasdesigned to gain insight into the heterogeneity distribution of AOA and AOB in32 freshwater sediments from a wide range of ecologic types. Real-time quantitative polymerasechain reaction PCR(qPCR combined with the terminal restrictionfragment length polymorphism(T-RFLP were employed to characterize the abundance, diversity, and communitystructure of the AOA and AOB in 32 freshwater sediments. AOA and AOB wereubiquitous in all sediments, and archaeal amoA far outnumbered bacterial amoA inmost sediments with lower organic matters. The abundance of AOA and AOB did notvary with the freshwater ecological type (macrophyte dominated region and algaedominated region. Based on  the T-RFLP of an amoA gene, this research found that organicmatters in pore water rather than other factors affect the AOA communitystructure in sediments, while the AOB were not significantly different in thefreshwater sediments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all archaeal amoAsequences fell within either the Crenarchaeotal Group (CG I.1b or the CGI.1asubgroup, and all AOB clustered with genus Nitrosomonas or Nitrosospira. The data obtained inthis study elucidates the role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea andammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the nitrogen cycle of freshwater ecosystems.

  19. Bridging domains : a comparison between information processing in Archaea and Eukarya

    OpenAIRE

    de Koning

    2015-01-01

    Bridging Domains A Comparison between Information Processing in Archaea and Eukarya Studying Information Processing Living cells evolved complex systems to handle the flow of information both accurately and efficiently. These systems are highly comparable between the three domains of life: eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. The central components of replication, transcription, aminoacylation, and translation are found in every living cell known today, with only relatively small deviations, des...

  20. Large Tailed Spindle Viruses of Archaea: a New Way of Doing Viral Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Rebecca; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Engelhardt, Harald; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Viruses of Archaea continue to surprise us. Archaeal viruses have revealed new morphologies, protein folds, and gene content. This is especially true for large spindle viruses, which infect only Archaea. We present a comparison of particle morphologies, major coat protein structures, and gene content among the five characterized large spindle viruses to elucidate defining characteristics. Structural similarities and a core set of genes support the grouping of the large spindle viruses into a new superfamily.

  1. Influence of Martian regolith analogs on the activity and growth of methanogenic archaea, with special regard to long-term desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janosch eSchirmack

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea have been studied as model organisms for possible life on Mars for several reasons: they can grow lithoautotrophically by using hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon sources, respectively; they are anaerobes; and they evolved at a time when conditions on early Earth are believed to have looked similar to those of early Mars. As Mars is currently dry and cold and as water might be available only at certain time intervals, any organism living on this planet would need to cope with desiccation. On Earth there are several regions with low water availability as well, e.g. permafrost environments, desert soils and salt pans. Here, we present the results of a set of experiments investigating the influence of different Martian regolith analogs on the metabolic activity and growth of three methanogenic strains exposed to culture conditions as well as long-term desiccation. In most cases, concentrations below 1 %wt of regolith in the media resulted in an increase of methane production rates, whereas higher concentrations decreased the rates, thus prolonging the lag phase. Further experiments showed that methanogenic archaea are capable of producing methane when incubated on a water-saturated sedimentary matrix of regolith lacking nutrients. Survival of methanogens under these conditions was analyzed with a 400 day desiccation experiment in the presence of regolith analogs. All tested strains of methanogens survived the desiccation period as it was determined through reincubation on fresh medium and via qPCR following propidium monoazide treatment to identify viable cells. The survival of long-term desiccation and the ability of active metabolism on water-saturated MRAs strengthens the possibility of methanogenic archaea or physiologically similar organisms to exist in environmental niches on Mars. The best results were achieved in presence of a phyllosilicate, which provides insights of possible positive effects in habitats

  2. Distance-decay and taxa-area relationships for bacteria, archaea and methanogenic archaea in a tropical lake sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Pedroni Barreto

    Full Text Available The study of of the distribution of microorganisms through space (and time allows evaluation of biogeographic patterns, like the species-area index (z. Due to their high dispersal ability, high reproduction rates and low rates of extinction microorganisms tend to be widely distributed, and they are thought to be virtually cosmopolitan and selected primarily by environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that, despite these characteristics, microorganisms may behave like larger organisms and exhibit geographical distribution. In this study, we searched patterns of spatial diversity distribution of bacteria and archaea in a contiguous environment. We collected 26 samples of a lake sediment, distributed in a nested grid, with distances between samples ranging from 0.01 m to 1000 m. The samples were analyzed using T-RFLP (Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism targeting mcrA (coding for a subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase and the genes of Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA. From the qualitative and quantitative results (relative abundance of operational taxonomic units we calculated the similarity index for each pair to evaluate the taxa-area and distance decay relationship slopes by linear regression. All results were significant, with mcrA genes showing the highest slope, followed by Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We showed that the microorganisms of a methanogenic community, that is active in a contiguous environment, display spatial distribution and a taxa-area relationship.

  3. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya eDe Gannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA has changed the paradigm of nitrification being initiated solely by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In the present study, AOA abundance and diversity was examined in composts produced from combinations of plant waste materials common in tropical agriculture (rice straw, sugar cane bagasse, coffee hulls, which were mixed with either cow- or sheep-manure. The objective was to determine how AOA abundance and diversity varied as a function of compost system and time, the latter being a contrast between the start of the compost process (mesophilic phase and the finished product (mature phase. The results showed that AOA were relatively abundant in composts of tropical agricultural wastes, and significantly more so than were the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, while the AOA communities in the composts were predominatly group I.1b, the communities were diverse and exhibited structures that diverged between compost types and phases. These patterns could be taken as indicators of the ecophysiological diversity in the soil AOA (groub I.1b, in that significantly different AOA communties developed when exposed to varying physico-chemical environments. Nitrification patterns and levels differed in the composts which, for the mature material, could have signifcant effects on its performanc as a plant growth medium. Thus, it will also be important to determine the association of AOA (and diversity in their communities with nitrification in these systems.

  4. Constraints on mechanisms and rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane by microbial consortia: process-based modeling of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Orcutt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is the main process responsible for the removal of methane generated in Earth's marine subsurface environments. However, the biochemical mechanism of AOM remains elusive. By explicitly resolving the observed spatial arrangement of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria found in consortia mediating AOM, potential intermediates involved in the electron transfer between the methane oxidizing and sulfate reducing partners were investigated via a consortium-scale reaction transport model that integrates the effect of diffusional transport with thermodynamic and kinetic controls on microbial activity. Model simulations were used to assess the impact of poorly constrained microbial characteristics such as minimum energy requirements to sustain metabolism and cell specific rates. The role of environmental conditions such as the influence of methane levels on the feasibility of H2, formate and acetate as intermediate species, and the impact of the abundance of intermediate species on pathway reversal were examined. The results show that higher production rates of intermediates via AOM lead to increased diffusive fluxes from the methane oxidizing archaea to sulfate reducing bacteria, but the build-up of the exchangeable species can cause the energy yield of AOM to drop below that required for ATP production. Comparison to data from laboratory experiments shows that under the experimental conditions of Nauhaus et al. (2007, none of the potential intermediates considered here is able to support metabolic activity matching the measured rates.

  5. The role of Dynamic Energy Budget theory in predictive modeling of stressor impacts on ecological systems. Comment on: ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, Nika; Forbes, Valery E.

    2017-03-01

    Human activities have been modifying ecosystems for centuries, from pressures on wild populations we harvest to modifying habitats through urbanization and agricultural activities. Changes in global climate patterns are adding another layer of, often unpredictable, perturbations to ecosystems on which we rely for life support [1,2]. To ensure the sustainability of ecosystem services, especially at this point in time when the human population is estimated to grow by another 2 billion by 2050 [3], we need to predict possible consequences of our actions and suggest relevant solutions [4,5]. We face several challenges when estimating adverse impacts of our actions on ecosystems. We describe these in the context of ecological risk assessment of chemicals. Firstly, when attempting to assess risk from exposure to chemicals, we base our decisions on a very limited number of species that are easily cultured and kept in the lab. We assume that preventing risk to these species will also protect all of the untested species present in natural ecosystems [6]. Secondly, although we know that chemicals interact with other stressors in the field, the number of stressors that we can test is limited due to logistical and ethical reasons. Similarly, empirical approaches are limited in both spatial and temporal scale due to logistical, financial and ethical reasons [7,8]. To bypass these challenges, we can develop ecological models that integrate relevant life history and other information and make testable predictions across relevant spatial and temporal scales [8-10].

  6. In-vitro archaeacidal activity of biocides against human-associated archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Khelaifia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several methanogenic archaea have been detected in the human intestinal microbiota. These intestinal archaea may contaminate medical devices such as colonoscopes. However, no biocide activity has been reported among these human-associated archaea. METHODOLOGY: The minimal archaeacidal concentration (MAC of peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, squalamine and twelve parent synthetic derivatives reported in this study was determined against five human-associated methanogenic archaea including Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanobrevibacter oralis, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilicus, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and two environmental methanogens Methanobacterium beijingense and Methanosaeta concilii by using a serial dilution technique in Hungates tubes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MAC of squalamine derivative S1 was 0.05 mg/L against M. smithii strains, M. oralis, M. arboriphilicus, M. concilii and M. beijingense whereas MAC of squalamine and derivatives S2-S12 varied from 0.5 to 5 mg/L. For M. stadtmanae and M. luminyensis, MAC of derivative S1 was 0.1 mg/L and varied from 1 to ≥ 10 mg/L for squalamine and its parent derivatives S2-S12. Under the same experimental conditions, chlorhexidine and peracetic acid lead to a MAC of 0.2 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively against all tested archaea. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Squalamine derivative S1 exhibited a 10-200 higher archaeacidal activity than other tested squalamine derivatives, on the majority of human-associated archaea. As previously reported and due to their week corrosivity and their wide spectrum of antibacterial and antifungal properties, squalamine and more precisely derivative S1 appear as promising compounds to be further tested for the decontamination of medical devices contaminated by human-associated archaea.

  7. Presence of Archaea in the Indoor Environment and Their Relationships with Housing Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpour, Sepideh; Scott, James A; Turvey, Stuart E; Brook, Jeffrey R; Takaro, Timothy K; Sears, Malcolm R; Klironomos, John

    2016-08-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in soils, oceans, or human and animal gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. However, very little is known about the presence of Archaea in indoor environments and factors that can regulate their abundances. Using a quantitative PCR approach, and targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes in floor dust samples, we found that Archaea are a common part of the indoor microbiota, 5.01 ± 0.14 (log 16S rRNA gene copies/g dust, mean ± SE) in bedrooms and 5.58 ± 0.13 in common rooms, such as living rooms. Their abundance, however, was lower than bacteria: 9.20 ± 0.32 and 9.17 ± 0.32 in bedrooms and common rooms, respectively. In addition, by measuring a broad array of environmental factors, we obtained preliminary insights into how the abundance of total archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies in indoor environment would be associated with building characteristics and occupants' activities. Based on the results, Archaea are not equally distributed within houses, and the areas with greater input of outdoor microbiome and higher traffic and material heterogeneity tend to have a higher abundance of Archaea. Nevertheless, more research is needed to better understand causes and consequences of this microbial group in indoor environments.

  8. Exploring the diversity of extremely halophilic archaea in food-grade salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Olivier; Fourmentin, Jeanne; Delincé, Bruno; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-11-17

    Salting is one of the oldest means of food preservation: adding salt decreases water activity and inhibits microbial development. However, salt is also a source of living bacteria and archaea. The occurrence and diversity of viable archaea in this extreme environment were assessed in 26 food-grade salts from worldwide origin by cultivation on four culture media. Additionally, metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene was performed on nine salts. Viable archaea were observed in 14 salts and colony counts reached more than 10(5)CFU per gram in three salts. All archaeal isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing belonged to the Halobacteriaceae family and were related to 17 distinct genera among which Haloarcula, Halobacterium and Halorubrum were the most represented. High-throughput sequencing generated extremely different profiles for each salt. Four of them contained a single major genus (Halorubrum, Halonotius or Haloarcula) while the others had three or more genera of similar occurrence. The number of distinct genera per salt ranged from 21 to 27. Halorubrum had a significant contribution to the archaeal diversity in seven salts; this correlates with its frequent occurrence in crystallization ponds. On the contrary, Haloquadratum walsbyi, the halophilic archaea most commonly found in solar salterns, was a minor actor of the food-grade salt diversity. Our results indicate that the occurrence and diversity of viable halophilic archaea in salt can be important, while their fate in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion remains largely unknown.

  9. Ecological stability in response to warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussmann, Katarina E.; Schwarzmueller, Florian; Brose, Ulrich; Jousset, Alexandre; Rall, Bjoern C.

    2014-01-01

    That species' biological rates including metabolism, growth and feeding scale with temperature is well established from warming experiments(1). The interactive influence of these changes on population dynamics, however, remains uncertain. As a result, uncertainty about ecological stability in respon

  10. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium: Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in Southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaf, Christopher Leopold

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South-Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund (55.7°N, 13.2°E) between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half-time, Teff,eco, of fallout radiocaesium and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half-times, Ts, of 137Cs and 40K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of 137Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of 137Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for 137Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average (+/-1 WSE), 66 +/- 3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81 +/- 4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated in the group during the post-Chernobyl study period. The effective ecological half-time for 137Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8 +/- 0.2 y. The aggregate transfer of 137Cs from deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 1.7 Bq kg-1/kBq m-2. These vales may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the reference group in the 1960s, and an aggregate transfer factor of 9.8 Bq kg-1/kBq m-2. The average committed effective dose from ingested 137Cs Chernobyl fallout in the study group was estimated to be 0.02 mSv and from the nuclear weapons fallout to 0.20 mSv. The estimates of whole-body content of 137Cs in the Russian subjects obtained through

  11. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  12. Untapped Resources: Biotechnological Potential of Peptides and Secondary Metabolites in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, James C.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are an understudied domain of life often found in “extreme” environments in terms of temperature, salinity, and a range of other factors. Archaeal proteins, such as a wide range of enzymes, have adapted to function under these extreme conditions, providing biotechnology with interesting activities to exploit. In addition to producing structural and enzymatic proteins, archaea also produce a range of small peptide molecules (such as archaeocins) and other novel secondary metabolites such as those putatively involved in cell communication (acyl homoserine lactones), which can be exploited for biotechnological purposes. Due to the wide array of metabolites produced there is a great deal of biotechnological potential from antimicrobials such as diketopiperazines and archaeocins, as well as roles in the cosmetics and food industry. In this review we will discuss the diversity of small molecules, both peptide and nonpeptide, produced by archaea and their potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26504428

  13. Ecological Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary; Rosen, Ori; Tanner, Martin A.

    2004-09-01

    This collection of essays brings together a diverse group of scholars to survey the latest strategies for solving ecological inference problems in various fields. The last half-decade has witnessed an explosion of research in ecological inference--the process of trying to infer individual behavior from aggregate data. Although uncertainties and information lost in aggregation make ecological inference one of the most problematic types of research to rely on, these inferences are required in many academic fields, as well as by legislatures and the Courts in redistricting, by business in marketing research, and by governments in policy analysis.

  14. Archaea in metazoan diets: implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Andrew R; Levin, Lisa A; Orphan, Victoria J; Marlow, Jeffrey J

    2012-08-01

    Although the importance of trophic linkages, including 'top-down forcing', on energy flow and ecosystem productivity is recognized, the influence of metazoan grazing on Archaea and the biogeochemical processes that they mediate is unknown. Here, we test if: (1) Archaea provide a food source sufficient to allow metazoan fauna to complete their life cycle; (2) neutral lipid biomarkers (including crocetane) can be used to identify Archaea consumers; and (3) archaeal aggregates are a dietary source for methane seep metazoans. In the laboratory, we demonstrated that a dorvilleid polychaete, Ophryotrocha labronica, can complete its life cycle on two strains of Euryarchaeota with the same growth rate as when fed bacterial and eukaryotic food. Archaea were therefore confirmed as a digestible and nutritious food source sufficient to sustain metazoan populations. Both strains of Euryarchaeota used as food sources had unique lipids that were not incorporated into O. labronica tissues. At methane seeps, sulfate-reducing bacteria that form aggregations and live syntrophically with anaerobic-methane oxidizing Archaea contain isotopically and structurally unique fatty acids (FAs). These biomarkers were incorporated into tissues of an endolithofaunal dorvilleid polychaete species from Costa Rica (mean bulk δ(13)C=-92±4‰; polar lipids -116‰) documenting consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates. FA composition of additional soft-sediment methane seep species from Oregon and California provided evidence that consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates is widespread at methane seeps. This work is the first to show that Archaea are consumed by heterotrophic metazoans, a trophic process we coin as 'archivory'.

  15. Community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rice field soil as affected by nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Ke, Xiubin; Wu, Liqin; Lu, Yahai

    2009-02-01

    Little information is available on the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in flooded rice soils. Consequently, a microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on the composition of AOB and AOA communities in rice soil by using molecular analyses of ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) fragments. Experimental treatments included three levels of N (urea) fertilizer, i.e. 50, 100 and 150 mgNkg(-1) soil. Soil samples were operationally divided into four fractions: surface soil, bulk soil deep layer, rhizosphere and washed root material. NH(4)(+)-N was the dominant form of N in soil porewater and increased with N fertilization. Cloning and sequencing of amoA gene fragments showed that the AOB community in the rice soil consisted of three major groups, i.e. Nitrosomonas communis cluster, Nitrosospira cluster 3a and cluster 3b. The sequences related to Nitrosomonas were predominant. There was a clear effect of N fertilizer and soil depth on AOB community composition based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting. Nitrosomonas appeared to be more abundant in the potentially oxic or micro-oxic fractions, including surface soil, rhizosphere and washed root material, than the deep layer of anoxic bulk soil. Furthermore, Nitrosomonas increased relatively in the partially oxic fractions and that of Nitrosospira decreased with the increasing application of N fertilizer. However, AOA community composition remained unchanged according to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses.

  16. Ecological Modernization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Globalization provides a thorough understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of globalization as well as the various historical and analytical interpretations. Consisting of over 400 entries, coverage includes key cultural, ecological, economic, geographical, historical, poli

  17. Cognitive ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    2010-10-01

    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson's ecological psychology, Bateson's ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units of analysis defined by inherent properties of the elements to units defined in terms of dynamic patterns of correlation across elements, the study of cognitive ecosystems will become an increasingly important part of cognitive science.

  18. Community Ecology

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a workshop on community ecology organized at Davis, in April, 1986, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation. There have been several recent symposia on community ecology (Strong et. al., 1984, Diamond and Case, 1987) which have covered a wide range of topics. The goal of the workshop at Davis was more narrow: to explore the role of scale in developing a theoretical approach to understanding communities. There are a number of aspects of scale that enter into attempts to understand ecological communities. One of the most basic is organizational scale. Should community ecology proceed by building up from population biology? This question and its ramifications are stressed throughout the book and explored in the first chapter by Simon Levin. Notions of scale have long been important in understanding physical systems. Thus, in understanding the interactions of organisms with their physical environment, questions of scale become paramount. These more physical questions illustrate the...

  19. The effects of various land reclamation scenarios on the succession of soil Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi over the short and long term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjian eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecological restoration of mining areas has mainly focused on the succession dynamics of vegetation and the fate of microbial communities remains poorly understood. We examined changes in soil characteristics and plant and microbial communities with increasing reclamation period in an open coal mine. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were assessed by tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing. At the phylum level, Proteobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Ascomycota had the highest detected relative abundance within bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. Partial regressions and canonical correspondence analysis demonstrated that vegetation played a major role in bacterial and archaeal diversity and assemblies, and soil characteristics, especially nitrogen, were important for fungal diversity and assemblies. Spearman rank correlation indicated that bacterial and archaeal communities showed synergistic succession with plants; whereas, fungal communities showed no such pattern. Overall, our data suggest that there are different drivers of bacterial, archaeal and fungal succession during secondary succession in a reclaimed open mine.

  20. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  1. Human metabolism and ecological transfer of radioactive caesium. Comparative studies of Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout, in southern Sweden and in Bryansk, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L

    2000-05-01

    The whole-body content of radiocaesium was measured in a South Swedish urban group of people residing in the city of Lund between 1960 and 1994. The results from the survey have been analysed in order to estimate the ecological half time, T{sub eff,eco} of fallout radiocaesium, and the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man in the region. After 1987, the biological half times, T{sub e} of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K in man were also determined in the reference group through whole-body content measurements in combination with 24-hour urine sampling. Relationships between 24-hour urinary excretion and body burden of {sup 137}Cs in the group together with data from the literature were then applied to urine samples collected in 1994 and 1995 from adult subjects living in the highly contaminated region of Bryansk, Russia, in order to estimate their average body burden of {sup 137}Cs. The equivalent biological half-time for {sup 137}Cs in females of the Lund reference group was, on average 66{+-}3 d, which agrees with other findings, whereas the value for the males, 81{+-}4 d, was, on average, significantly lower than what is found in the literature. This is partly explained by the elevated mean age and relatively low mean body muscle mass of the males investigated. The {sup 137}Cs from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s still gave a significant contribution to the total {sup 137}Cs levels in man during the post-Chernobyl study period (1987-1994). About 10% of the peak post-Chernobyl concentration level of {sup 137}Cs (3.5-4 Bq/kg) in 1987, was attributed to pre-Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs. The effective ecological half-time for {sup 137}Cs from Chernobyl was found to be 1.8{+-}0.2 y. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of {sup 137}Cs from ground deposition to mean activity concentration in man was estimated to be 0.4 Bq/kg/kBq/m{sup 2}. These values may be compared with an effective ecological half-time of 1.3 years found in the Lund reference group in

  2. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  3. Massive Expansion of Marine Archaea During The Early Albian Oceanic Anoxic Event 1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, M. M.; Kuypers, M. M.; Blokker, P.; Erbacher, J.; Kinkel, H.; Pancost, R. D.; Pancost, R. D.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), periods of globally enhanced burial of organic matter (OM) in the marine realm, played an important role in the mid-Cretaceous `greenhouse climate' by effectively reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. It is generally believed that these OAEs were caused either by decreased remineralisation or increased production of phytoplanktonic OM. Here we show that enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial during the early Albian OAE1b (~112 My) was caused by a different process. Combined biogeochemical and stable carbon isotopic analyses indicate that black shales from this period contain up to 80% of OC derived from archaea. Archaea-derived isoprenoidal tetraether membrane lipids and free and macromolecularly bound isoprenoid alkanes are abundantly present in these black shales. More specifically the presence of certain ether lipids (cyclic biphytane tetraethers) indicates representatives of the pelagic archaea. To the best of our knowledge this is the earliest fossil evidence for marine planktonic archaea, extending their geological record by more than 60 million years. The diversity of archaeal lipids recovered from the OAE1b black shales suggests that they derive from a multitude of archaeal species. However, the specific 13C enrichment of all such lipids indicates a common `heavy' (13C-rich) carbon source for the archaea and/or a common pathway of carbon-fixation with a reduced 13C fractionation effect compared to the Calvin cycle used by algae, cyanobacteria and higher plants. The large differences (up to 12%) in 13C/12C ratios between the algal biomarkers and the much more abundant archaeal molecular fossils suggest that the latter were not living heterotrophically on photoautotrophic biomass. It seems likely that the archaea present during OAE1b used a chemical energy source (possibly ammonium) for carbon fixation since photoautotrophy within the domain of the Archaea is restricted to only a few species from hypersaline

  4. Decoupling of DAMO archaea from DAMO bacteria in a methane-driven microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Mu, Yang; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-03-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) contributes significantly to the global methane sink. Previously, studies of anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea have been limited as they have not been separable from their bacterial partners during the AOM process because of their dependence on the bacteria. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a device capable of directly transforming chemical energy to electrical energy via electrochemical reactions involving biochemical pathways. In this study, decoupling of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) archaea and DAMO bacteria was investigated in an microbial fuel cell (MFC) using methane as the fuel. The DAMO fuel cell worked successfully but demonstrated weak electrogenic capability with around 25 mV production. After 45 days' enrichment, the sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed the DAMO archaea percentage had increased from 26.96% (inoculum) to 65.77% (electrode biofilm), while the DAMO bacteria percentage decreased from 24.39% to 2.07%. Moreover, the amount of ANME-2d had doubled in the electrode biofilm compared with the inoculum. The sequencing results also showed substantial enrichment of the Ignavibacterium and Geobacter genera. The roles of Ignavibacterium and Geobacter in the MFC system need to be further investigated. Nevertheless, these results illustrate that an MFC device may provide a possible approach to separate DAMO archaea from DAMO bacteria.

  5. Molecular analysis of the human faecal archaea in a southern Indian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANDYA B RANI; RAMADASS BALAMURUGAN; BALAKRISHNAN S RAMAKRISHNA

    2017-03-01

    Archaea are an important constituent of the human gut microbiota, but there is no information on human gut archaea inan Indian population. In this study, faecal samples were obtained from different age groups (neonatal babies, preschoolchildren, school-going children, adolescents, adults and elderly) of a southern Indian population, and from atribal population also resident in southern India). 16S rRNA gene sequences specific to Archaea were amplified frompooled faecal DNA in each group, sequenced, and aligned against the NCBI database. Of the 806 adequate sequencesin the study, most aligned with 22 known sequences. There were 9 novel sequences in the present study. All sequenceswere deposited in the GenBank nucleotide sequence database with the following accession numbers: KF607113 -KF607918. Methanobrevibacter was the most prevalent genus among all the age groups accounting for 98% inneonates, 96% in post-weaning, and 100% each in preschool, school and adult population. In the elderly, Methanobrevibacteraccounted for 96% and in tribal adults, 99% of the clones belonged to Methanobrevibacter genus. Othergenera detected included Caldisphaera, Halobaculum, Methanosphaeraand Thermogymnomonas. Methanobrevibactersmithii predominated in all age groups, accounting for 749 (92.9%) of the 806 sequences. Archaea can befound in the faeces of southern Indian residents immediately after birth. Methanobrevibacter smithii was the dominantfaecal archeon in all age groups, with other genera being found at the extremes of age.

  6. Massive expansion of marine archaea during a mid-Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, M.M.M.; Blokker, P.; Erbacher, J.;

    2001-01-01

    Biogeochemical and stable carbon isotopic analysis of black-shale sequences deposited during an Albian oceanic anoxic event (∼112 million years ago) indicate that up to 80 weight percent of sedimentary organic carbon is derived from marine, nonthermophilic archaea. The carbon-13 content of archae...

  7. Murein and pseudomurein cell wall binding domains of bacteria and archaea-a comparative view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall, a major barrier protecting cells from their environment, is an essential compartment of both bacteria and archaea. It protects the organism from internal turgor pressure and gives a defined shape to the cell. The cell wall serves also as an anchoring surface for various proteins and a

  8. UV-inducible DNA exchange in hyperthermophilic archaea mediated by type IV pili

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajon, Malgorzata; Froels, Sabrina; van Wolferen, Marleen; Stoecker, Kilian; Teichmann, Daniela; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Grogan, Dennis W.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Schleper, Christa; Ajon, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Archaea, like bacteria and eukaryotes, contain proteins involved in various mechanisms of DNA repair, highlighting the importance of these processes for all forms of life. Species of the order Sulfolobales of hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota are equipped with a strongly UV-inducible type IV pilus sys

  9. Analysis of putative nonulosonic acid biosynthesis pathways in Archaea reveals a complex evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    Sialic acids and the other nonulosonic acid sugars, legionaminic acid and pseudaminic acid, are nine carbon-containing sugars that can be detected as components of the glycans decorating proteins and other molecules in Eukarya and Bacteria. Yet, despite the prevalence of N-glycosylation in Archaea and the variety of sugars recruited for the archaeal version of this post-translational modification, only a single report of a nonulosonic acid sugar in an archaeal N-linked glycan has appeared. Hence, to obtain a clearer picture of nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis capability in Archaea, 122 sequenced genomes were scanned for the presence of genes involved in the biogenesis of these sugars. The results reveal that while Archaea and Bacteria share a common route of sialic acid biosynthesis, numerous archaeal nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis pathway components were acquired from elsewhere via various routes. Still, the limited number of Archaea encoding components involved in the synthesis of nonulosonic acid sugars implies that such saccharides are not major components of glycans in this domain.

  10. Role of multiprotein bridging factor 1 in archaea: bridging the domains?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de B.; Blombach, F.; Wu Hao,; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2009-01-01

    MBF1 (multiprotein bridging factor 1) is a highly conserved protein in archaea and eukaryotes. It was originally identified as a mediator of the eukaryotic transcription regulator BmFTZ-F1 (Bombyx mori regulator of fushi tarazu). MBF1 was demonstrated to enhance transcription by forming a bridge bet

  11. Bridging domains : a comparison between information processing in Archaea and Eukarya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de B.

    2015-01-01

    Bridging Domains A Comparison between Information Processing in Archaea and Eukarya

    Studying Information Processing Living cells evolved complex systems to handle the flow of information both accurately and efficiently.

  12. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, E.I.; Mochizuki, T,; Quemin, E.R. J.; Schouten, S.; Krupovica, M.; Prangishvili, D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Her

  13. Unique clusters of Archaea in Salar de Huasco, an athalassohaline evaporitic basin of the Chilean Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorador, Cristina; Vila, Irma; Remonsellez, Francisco; Imhoff, Johannes F; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2010-08-01

    Analyses of clone libraries from water and sediments of different sites from Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude athalassohaline wetland in the Chilean Altiplano, revealed the presence of five unique clusters of uncultured Archaea that have not been previously reported or specifically assigned. These sequences were distantly related (83-96% sequence identity) to a limited number of other clone sequences and revealed no identity to cultured Archaea. The abundance of Archaea and Bacteria was estimated using qPCR and community composition was examined through the construction of clone libraries of archaeal 16S rRNA gene. Archaea were found to be dominant over Bacteria in sediments from two saline sites (sites H4: 6.31 x 10(4) and site H6: 1.37 x 10(4) microS cm(-1)) and in one of the water samples (freshwater from site H0: 607 muS cm(-1)). Euryarchaeotal sequences were more abundant than crenarchaeotal sequences. Many of the clone sequences (52%) were similar to uncultured archaeal groups found in marine ecosystems having identity values between 99% and 97%. A major fraction of the sequences (40%) were members of Methanobacteria, while others were included in the Marine Benthic Groups B and D, the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group, the Terrestrial Miscellaneous Euryarchaeotal Group, Marine Group I and Halobacteria. The presence of uncultured archaeal groups in Salar de Huasco extends their known distribution in inland waters, providing new clues about their possible function in the environment.

  14. Diversity of membrane transport proteins for vitamins in bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jähme, Michael; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All organisms use cofactors to extend the catalytic capacities of proteins. Many bacteria and archaea can synthesize cofactors from primary metabolites, but there are also prokaryotes that do not have the complete biosynthetic pathways for all essential cofactors. These organisms are dep

  15. Hydrogen peroxide detoxification is a key mechanism for growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jong-Geol; Park, Soo-Je; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, So-Jeong; Gwak, Joo-Han; Hong, Heeji; Si, Ok-Ja; Lee, Sanghoon; Madsen, Eugene L.; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), that is, members of the Thaumarchaeota phylum, occur ubiquitously in the environment and are of major significance for global nitrogen cycling. However, controls on cell growth and organic carbon assimilation by AOA are poorly understood. We isolated an ammonia-oxidi

  16. Evidence for a Xer/dif system for chromosome resolution in archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cortez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination events between circular chromosomes, occurring during or after replication, can generate dimers that need to be converted to monomers prior to their segregation at cell division. In Escherichia coli, chromosome dimers are converted to monomers by two paralogous site-specific tyrosine recombinases of the Xer family (XerC/D. The Xer recombinases act at a specific dif site located in the replication termination region, assisted by the cell division protein FtsK. This chromosome resolution system has been predicted in most Bacteria and further characterized for some species. Archaea have circular chromosomes and an active homologous recombination system and should therefore resolve chromosome dimers. Most archaea harbour a single homologue of bacterial XerC/D proteins (XerA, but not of FtsK. Therefore, the role of XerA in chromosome resolution was unclear. Here, we have identified dif-like sites in archaeal genomes by using a combination of modeling and comparative genomics approaches. These sites are systematically located in replication termination regions. We validated our in silico prediction by showing that the XerA protein of Pyrococcus abyssi specifically recombines plasmids containing the predicted dif site in vitro. In contrast to the bacterial system, XerA can recombine dif sites in the absence of protein partners. Whereas Archaea and Bacteria use a completely different set of proteins for chromosome replication, our data strongly suggest that XerA is most likely used for chromosome resolution in Archaea.

  17. Ecological epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilvitis, Holly J; Alvarez, Mariano; Foust, Christy M; Schrey, Aaron W; Robertson, Marta; Richards, Christina L

    2014-01-01

    Biologists have assumed that heritable variation due to DNA sequence differences (i.e., genetic variation) allows populations of organisms to be both robust and adaptable to extreme environmental conditions. Natural selection acts on the variation among different genotypes and ultimately changes the genetic composition of the population. While there is compelling evidence about the importance of genetic polymorphisms, evidence is accumulating that epigenetic mechanisms (e.g., chromatin modifications, DNA methylation) can affect ecologically important traits, even in the absence of genetic variation. In this chapter, we review this evidence and discuss the consequences of epigenetic variation in natural populations. We begin by defining the term epigenetics, providing a brief overview of various epigenetic mechanisms, and noting the potential importance of epigenetics in the study of ecology. We continue with a review of the ecological epigenetics literature to demonstrate what is currently known about the amount and distribution of epigenetic variation in natural populations. Then, we consider the various ecological contexts in which epigenetics has proven particularly insightful and discuss the potential evolutionary consequences of epigenetic variation. Finally, we conclude with suggestions for future directions of ecological epigenetics research.

  18. Dynamic Experiments for Bioprocess Parameter Optimization with Extreme Halophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Lorantfy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The to-date studies on extreme halophiles were focused on shake flask cultivations. Bioreactor technology with quantitative approaches can offer a wide variety of biotechnological applications to exploit the special biochemical features of halophiles. Enabling industrial use of Haloferax mediterranei, finding the optima of cultivation parameters is of high interest. In general, process parameter optimizations were mainly carried out with laborious and time-consuming chemostat cultures. This work offers a faster alternative for process parameter optimization by applying temperature ramps and pH shifts on a halophilic continuous bioreactor culture. Although the hydraulic equilibrium in continuous culture is not reached along the ramps, the main effects on the activity from the dynamic studies can still be concluded. The results revealed that the optimal temperature range may be limited at the lower end by the activity of the primary metabolism pathways. At the higher end, the mass transfer of oxygen between the gaseous and the liquid phase can be limiting for microbial growth. pH was also shown to be a key parameter for avoiding overflow metabolism. The obtained experimental data were evaluated by clustering with multivariate data analyses. Showing the feasibility on a halophilic example, the presented dynamic methodology offers a tool for accelerating bioprocess development.

  19. Apparent Minimum Free Energy Requirements for Methanogenic Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Anoxic Marine Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the most fundamental constraints governing the distribution of microorganisms in the environment is the availability of chemical energy at biologically useful levels. To assess the minimum free energy yield that can support microbial metabolism in situ, we examined the thermodynamics of H2-consuming processes in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA. Depth distributions of H2 partial pressure, along with a suite of relevant concentration data, were determined in sediment cores collected in November (at 14.5 C) and August (at 27 C) and used to calculate free energy yields for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. At both times of year, and for both processes, free energy yields gradually decreased (became less negative) with depth before reaching an apparent asymptote. Sulfate reducing bacteria exhibited an asymptote of -19.1 +/- 1.7 kj(mol SO4(2-)(sup -1) while methanogenic archaea were apparently supported by energy yields as small as -10.6 +/- 0.7 kj(mol CH4)(sup -1).

  20. 丛枝菌根共生体的氮代谢运输及其生态作用%Nitrogen metabolism and translocation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiote and its ecological implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元敬; 刘智蕾; 何兴元; 田春杰

    2013-01-01

    丛枝菌根真菌能与80%的陆生维管植物形成互惠共生关系,共生体的存在对促进植物营养吸收和提高抗逆性具有重要意义.丛枝菌根真菌从宿主植物获取其光合产物碳水化合物的同时,通过外生菌丝吸收各种氮源,有效增强了宿主植物对氮素的吸收,以及氮在植物居群和群落水平上的交流,改善了植物营养代谢,增强了植物应对外界环境胁迫的能力.而共生体对氮的吸收、转运,以及氮从真菌到宿主植物的传输、代谢机制至今仍有许多问题亟待解决.本文综述了当前丛枝菌根共生体中氮传输代谢的主要机制,以及碳、磷对共生体氮传输代谢的影响;从群落和生态系统水平,简要阐述了丛枝菌根真菌在植物中氮分配的作用和对宿主植物的生态学意义,并提出共生体中氮代谢的一些需要深入研究的问题.%Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can form mutually beneficial relations with more than 80% of vascular plants, and the existence of the symbiote is of significance in promoting the growth and stress tolerance of host plants.AMF can obtain the photosynthate carbohydrates from host plants, and in the meantime, effectively promote the nitrogen (N) uptake by host plants via the absorption of various N sources by mycorrhiza mycelia, resulting in the N exchange at population or community level, the improvement of host plants nutrition and metabolism, and the strengthening of the stress tolerance of host plants.However, there are still in debates in which ways the symbiote absorbs and transfers N and what the mechanisms the N metabolism and translocation from AMF to host plants.This paper reviewed the mechanisms of N metabolism and translocation in the symbiote and the effects of carbon and phosphorous on the N metabolism and translocation.The roles of AMF in the N allocation in host plants and the related ecological significance at community and ecosystem levels were briefly

  1. Information Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a pedagogical didactical paradigm for teaching student-designers how to deal with context issues. Form/context-relationships are conceptualized as information ecologies and described as behavioral settings using a key concept developed by social psychologist R.A. Baker...... in the 1960ties, and chosen here because it integrates cultural and psychological trajectories in a theory of living settings. The pedagogical-didactical paradigm comprises three distinct information ecologies, named after their intended outcome: the problem-setting, the exploration-setting, and the fit......-setting. It is specified how context issues can be treated within each of these information ecologies. The paper concludes by discussing the outcome of applying this paradigm with respect to the student-designers’ competence as reflective practitioners....

  2. Grappling archaea: ultrastructural analyses of an uncultivated, cold-loving archaeon and its biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra ePerras

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Similarly to Bacteria, Archaea are microorganisms that interact with their surrounding environment in a versatile manner. To date, interactions based on cellular structure and surface appendages have mainly been documented using model systems of cultivable archaea under laboratory conditions. Here, we report on the microbial interactions and ultrastructural features of the uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon, which is highly dominant in its biotope. Therefore, biofilm samples taken from the Sippenauer Moor, Germany, were investigated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM; negative staining, thin-sectioning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM in order to elucidate the fine structures of the microbial cells and the biofilm itself. The biofilm consisted of small archaeal cocci (0.6 µm diameter, arranged in a regular pattern (1.2-2.0 µm distance from cell to cell, whereas each archaeon was connected to 6 other archaea on average. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS were limited to the close vicinity of the archaeal cells, and specific cell surface appendages (hami, Moissl et al., 2005 protruded beyond the EPS matrix enabling microbial interaction by cell-cell contacts among the archaea and between archaea and bacteria. All analyzed hami revealed their previously described architecture of nano-grappling hooks and barb-wire basal structures. Considering the archaeal cell walls, the SM1 Euryarchaea exhibited a double-membrane, which has rarely been reported for members of this phylogenetic domain. Based on these findings, the current generalized picture on archaeal cell walls needs to be revisited, as archaeal cell structures are more complex and sophisticated than previously assumed, particularly when looking into the uncultivated majority.

  3. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  4. Constraints on mechanisms and rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane by microbial consortia: process-based modeling of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Orcutt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is the main process responsible for the removal of methane generated in Earth's marine subsurface environments. However, the biochemical mechanism of AOM remains elusive. By explicitly resolving the observed spatial arrangement of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria found in consortia mediating AOM, potential intermediates involved in the electron transfer between the methane oxidizing and sulfate reducing partners were investigated via a consortium-scale reaction transport model that integrates the effect of diffusional transport with thermodynamic and kinetic controls on microbial activity. Model simulations were used to assess the impact of poorly constrained microbial characteristics such as minimum energy requirements to sustain metabolism, substrate affinity and cell specific rates. The role of environmental conditions such as the influence of methane levels on the feasibility of H2, formate and acetate as intermediate species, and the impact of the abundance of intermediate species on pathway reversal was examined. The results show that higher production rates of intermediates via AOM lead to increased diffusive fluxes from the methane oxidizing archaea to sulfate reducing bacteria, but the build-up of the exchangeable species causes the energy yield of AOM to drop below that required for ATP production. Comparison to data from laboratory experiments shows that under the experimental conditions of Nauhaus et al. (2007, neither hydrogen nor formate is exchanged fast enough between the consortia partners to achieve measured rates of metabolic activity, but that acetate exchange might support rates that approach those observed.

  5. SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) : towards a silicon cell model for the central carbohydrate metabolism of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus under temperature variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Sonja-Verena; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Gertig, Susanne; Haferkamp, Patrick; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kouril, Theresa; Manica, Andrea; Pham, Trong K.; Ruoff, Peter; Schleper, Christa; Schomburg, Dietmar; Sharkey, Kieran J.; Siebers, Bettina; Sierocinski, Pawel; Steuer, Ralf; van der Oost, John; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Wieloch, Patricia; Wright, Phillip C.; Zaparty, Melanie; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2009-01-01

    SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) focuses on the study of the CCM (central carbohydrate metabolism) of Sulfolobus solfataricus and its regulation under temperature variation at the systems level. in Archaea, carbohydrates are metabolized by modifications of the classical pathways known from Bact

  6. SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology): towards a silicon cell model for the central carbohydrate metabolism of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus under temperature variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, S.V.; Birkeland, N.K.; Driessen, A.J.; Gertig, S.; Haferkamp, P.; Klenk, H.P.; Kouril, T.; Manica, A.; Pham, T.K.; Ruoff, P.; Schleper, C.; Schomburg, D.; Sharkey, K.J.; Siebers, A.G.; Sierocinski, P.; Steuer, R.; Oost, J. van der; Westerhoff, H.V.; Wieloch, P.; Wright, P.C.; Zaparty, M.

    2009-01-01

    SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) focuses on the study of the CCM (central carbohydrate metabolism) of Sulfolobus solfataricus and its regulation under temperature variation at the systems level. In Archaea, carbohydrates are metabolized by modifications of the classical pathways known from Bact

  7. SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology): towards a silicon cell model for the central carbohydrate metabolism of the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus under temperature variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, S.V.; Birkeland, N.K.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Gertig, S.; Haferkamp, P.; Klenk, H.P.; Kouril, T.; Manica, A.; Pham, T.K.; Ruoff, P.; Schleper, C.; Schomburg, D.; Sharkey, K.; Siebers, B.; Sierocinski, P.; Steur, R.; Oost, van der J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Wieloch, P.; Wright, P.C.; Zaparty, M.

    2009-01-01

    SulfoSYS (Sulfolobus Systems Biology) focuses on the study of the CCM (central carbohydrate metabolism) of Sulfolobus solfataricus and its regulation under temperature variation at the systems level. In Archaea, carbohydrates are metabolized by modifications of the classical pathways known from Bact

  8. Central Metabolic Pathways of Hyperthermophiles: Important Clues on how Metabolism Gives Rise to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronimus, R. S.; Morgan, H. W.

    2004-06-01

    Vital clues on life's origins within the galaxy exist here on present day Earth. Life is currently divided into the three domains Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya based on the phylogeny of small ribosomal subunit RNA (16S/18S) gene sequences. The domains are presumed to share a ``last universal common ancestor'' (LUCA). Hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea, which are able to thrive at 80^{circ}C or higher, dominate the bottom of the tree of life and are thus suggested to be the least evolved, or most ``ancient''. Geochemical data indicates that life first appeared on Earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago in a hot environment. Due to these considerations, hyperthermophiles represent the most appropriate microorganisms to investigate the origins of metabolism. The central biochemical pathway of gluconeogenesis/glycolysis (the Embden-Meyerhof pathway) which produces six carbon sugars from three carbon compounds is present in all organisms and can provide important hints concerning the early development of metabolism. Significantly, there are a number of striking deviations from the textbook canonical reaction sequence that are found, particularly in hyperthermophilic archaea. In this paper the phylogenetic istribution of enzymes of the pathway is detailed; overall, the distribution pattern provides strong evidence for the pathway to have developed from the bottom-up.

  9. Genome sequencing of methanogenic Archaea Methanosarcina mazei TUC01 strain isolated from an Amazonian Flooded Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, R. A.; Graças, D. A.; Ramos, R. T.; Carneiro, A. R.; Lopes, T. S.; Lima, A. R.; Zahlouth, R. L.; Pellizari, V. H.; Silva, A.

    2013-05-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is a strictly anaerobic methanogen from the Methanosarcinales order. This species is known for its broad catabolic range among methanogens and is widespread throughout diverse environments. The draft genome of a strain cultivated from the sediment of the Tucuruí hydroelectric power station, the fourth largest hydroelectric dam in the world, is described here. Approximately 80% of methane is produced by biogenic sources, such as methanogenic archaea from M. mazei species. Although the methanogenesis pathway is well known, some aspects of the core genome, genome evolution and shared genes are still unclear. A sediment sample from the Tucuruí hydropower station reservoir was inoculated in mineral media supplemented with acetate and methanol. This media was maintained in an H2:CO2 (80:20) atmosphere to enrich and cultivate M. mazei. The enrichment was conducted at 30°C under standard anaerobic conditions. After several molecular and cellular analyses, total DNA was extracted from a non-pure culture of M. mazei, amplified using phi29 DNA polymerase (BioLabs) and finally used as a source template for genome sequencing. The draft genome was obtained after two rounds of sequencing. First, the genome was sequenced using a SOLiD System V3 with a mate-paired library, which yielded 24,405,103 and 24,399,268 reads (50 bp) for the R3 and F3 tags, respectively. The second round of sequencing was performed using the SOLiD 5500 XL platform with a mate-paired library, resulting in a total of 113,588,848 reads (60 bp) for each tag (F3 and R3). All reads obtained by this procedure were filtered using Quality Assessment software, whereby reads with an average quality score below Phred 20 were removed. Velvet and Edena were used to assemble the reads, and Simplifier was used to remove the redundant sequences. After this, a total of 16,811 contigs were obtained. M. mazei GO1 (AE008384) genome was used to map the contigs and generate the scaffolds. We used the

  10. A comprehensive study into the molecular methodology and molecular biology of methanogenic Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Methanogens belong to the kingdom of Euryarchaeota in the domain of Archaea. The Archaea differ from Bacteria in many aspects important to molecular work. Among these are cell wall composition, their sensitivity to antibiotics, their translation and transcription machinery, and their very strict...... procedures. Efficient genetic manipulation systems, including shuttle and integration vector systems, have appeared for mesophilic, but not for thermophilic species within the last few years and will have a major impact on future investigations of methanogenic molecular biology....... complete methanogenic genomes have been sequenced and published and more are underway. Besides, sequences are known from a multitude of individual genes from methanogens. Standard methods for simple DNA and RNA work can normally be employed, but permeabilization of the cell wall may demand special...

  11. Lipid sugar carriers at the extremes: The phosphodolichols Archaea use in N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry; Guan, Ziqiang

    2017-03-19

    N-glycosylation, a post-translational modification whereby glycans are covalently linked to select Asn residues of target proteins, occurs in all three domains of life. Across evolution, the N-linked glycans are initially assembled on phosphorylated cytoplasmically-oriented polyisoprenoids, with polyprenol (mainly C55 undecaprenol) fulfilling this role in Bacteria and dolichol assuming this function in Eukarya and Archaea. The eukaryal and archaeal versions of dolichol can, however, be distinguished on the basis of their length, degree of saturation and by other traits. As is true for many facets of their biology, Archaea, best known in their capacity as extremophiles, present unique approaches for synthesizing phosphodolichols. At the same time, general insight into the assembly and processing of glycan-bearing phosphodolichols has come from studies of the archaeal enzymes responsible. In this review, these and other aspects of archaeal phosphodolichol biology are addressed.

  12. Environmental factors shaping the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in sugarcane field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tago, Kanako; Okubo, Takashi; Shimomura, Yumi; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hori, Tomoyuki; Nagayama, Atsushi; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors such as pH and nutrient content on the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in soil has been extensively studied using experimental fields. However, how these environmental factors intricately influence the community structure of AOB and AOA in soil from farmers' fields is unclear. In the present study, the abundance and diversity of AOB and AOA in soils collected from farmers' sugarcane fields were investigated using quantitative PCR and barcoded pyrosequencing targeting the ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit (amoA) gene. The abundances of AOB and AOA amoA genes were estimated to be in the range of 1.8 × 10(5)-9.2 × 10(6) and 1.7 × 10(6)-5.3 × 10(7) gene copies g dry soil(-1), respectively. The abundance of both AOB and AOA positively correlated with the potential nitrification rate. The dominant sequence reads of AOB and AOA were placed in Nitrosospira-related and Nitrososphaera-related clusters in all soils, respectively, which varied at the level of their sub-clusters in each soil. The relationship between these ammonia-oxidizing community structures and soil pH was shown to be significant by the Mantel test. The relative abundances of the OTU1 of Nitrosospira cluster 3 and Nitrososphaera subcluster 7.1 negatively correlated with soil pH. These results indicated that soil pH was the most important factor shaping the AOB and AOA community structures, and that certain subclusters of AOB and AOA adapted to and dominated the acidic soil of agricultural sugarcane fields.

  13. Glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases in Archaea: putative components of the N-glycosylation pathway in the third domain of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidovich, Hilla; Eichler, Jerry

    2009-11-01

    The ability of Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea to perform N-glycosylation underlies the importance and possible antiquity of this post-translational protein modification. However, in contrast to the relatively well-studied eukaryal and bacterial pathways, the archaeal N-glycosylation process is less understood. To remedy this disparity, the following study has examined 56 available archaeal genomes with the aim of identifying glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferases, including those putatively catalyzing this post-translational processing event. This analysis reveals that while oligosaccharyltransferases, central components of the N-glycosylation pathway, are found across the range of archaeal phenotypes, the N-glycosylation machinery of hyperthermophilic Archaea may well rely on fewer components than do the parallel systems of nonhyperthermophilic Archaea. Moreover, genes encoding predicted glycosyltransferases of hyperthermophilic Archaea tend to be far more scattered within the genome than is the case with nonhyperthermophilic species, where putative glycosyltransferase genes are often clustered around identified oligosaccharyltransferase-encoding sequences.

  14. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... their roots and thereby stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in their rhizosphere. However, oxygen release and inorganic nitrogen concentrations differ markedly between macrophyte species. We therefore propose (i) that the rhizosphere of freshwater macrophytes harbours a species...

  15. Accurate Prediction of the Statistics of Repetitions in Random Sequences: A Case Study in Archaea Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Mireille; Chassignet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive patterns in genomic sequences have a great biological significance and also algorithmic implications. Analytic combinatorics allow to derive formula for the expected length of repetitions in a random sequence. Asymptotic results, which generalize previous works on a binary alphabet, are easily computable. Simulations on random sequences show their accuracy. As an application, the sample case of Archaea genomes illustrates how biological sequences may differ from random sequences.

  16. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Zheng eHe; Ju-Pei eShen; Li-Mei eZhang; Hong J eDi

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chi...

  17. Post-translational Modification of Extremophilic Proteins: N-glycosylation in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-02

    Conference, Lucca, Italy 2013-Proteins: From birth to death. Jerusalem, Israel 2014-Meeting of the Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology ...it all, trends in microbiology , (11 2012): 512. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2012.08.007 J. Eichler, K. Jarrell, S. Albers. A proposal for the naming of N...Jerry Eichler. Extreme sweetness: protein glycosylation in archaea, Nature Reviews Microbiology , (01 2013): 151. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro2957 Lina

  18. Assessment of active methanogenic archaea in a methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Míriam; Morey, Lluís; Viñas, Marc; Bonmatí, August

    2016-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea enrichment of a granular sludge was undertaken in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor fed with methanol in order to enrich methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic populations. A microbial community assessment, in terms of microbial composition and activity-throughout the different stages of the feeding process with methanol and acetate-was performed using specific methanogenic activity (SMA) assays, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from DNA and complementary DNA (cDNA). Distinct methanogenic enrichment was revealed by qPCR of mcrA gene in the methanol-fed community, being two orders of magnitude higher with respect to the initial inoculum, achieving a final mcrA/16S rRNA ratio of 0.25. High-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that the resulting methanogenic population was mainly composed by methylotrophic archaea (Methanomethylovorans and Methanolobus genus), being also highly active according to the RNA-based assessment. SMA confirmed that the methylotrophic pathway, with a direct conversion of methanol to CH4, was the main step of methanol degradation in the UASB. The biomass from the UASB, enriched in methanogenic archaea, may bear great potential as additional inoculum for bioreactors to carry out biogas production and other related processes.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of Archaea in the intestinal tract of termites from different lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Huang, Zhou; Han, Shuai; Fan, Shuo; Yang, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Termites are among the few arthropods that emit methane to the atmosphere, which is a significant source of global greenhouse gas due to their huge biomass on earth. In this study, phylogenetic diversity of Archaea of five termite species from different lineages were analyzed based on 16S rRNA genes. Archaea associated with wood-feeding lower termite, R. chinensis were exclusively Methanobrevibacter in the order Methanobacteriales. This type of methanogens was also found in Nasutitermes sp. and Microcerotermes sp. but not in the fungus-cultivating termites, Odontotermes formosanus and Macrotermes barneyi, which harbor Archaea of the order Methanoplasmatales and Methanosarcinales in their guts. Archaeal diversity of wood-feeding higher termites was higher than wood-feeding lower termites. The highest archaeal diversity was found in Nasutitermes sp. In addition to methanogens affiliated with the orders Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanoplasmatales, 37% of archaeal clones were affiliated with non-methanogenic Thaumarchaeota. The results of this study will be significant for further understanding of symbiotic relationship between intestinal microbiota and termites.

  20. Archaea-based microbial fuel cell operating at high ionic strength conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Sacco, Natalia; Mauas, Pablo J D; Cortón, Eduardo

    2011-11-01

    In this work, two archaea microorganisms (Haloferax volcanii and Natrialba magadii) used as biocatalyst at a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode were evaluated. Both archaea are able to grow at high salt concentrations. By increasing the media conductivity, the internal resistance was diminished, improving the MFC's performance. Without any added redox mediator, maximum power (P (max)) and current at P (max) were 11.87/4.57/0.12 μW cm(-2) and 49.67/22.03/0.59 μA cm(-2) for H. volcanii, N. magadii and E. coli, respectively. When neutral red was used as the redox mediator, P (max) was 50.98 and 5.39 μW cm(-2) for H. volcanii and N. magadii, respectively. In this paper, an archaea MFC is described and compared with other MFC systems; the high salt concentration assayed here, comparable with that used in Pt-catalyzed alkaline hydrogen fuel cells, will open new options when MFC scaling up is the objective necessary for practical applications.

  1. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Šustr

    Full Text Available Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE. The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  2. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  3. Archaea and fungi of the human gut microbiome: correlations with diet and bacterial residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Diet influences health as a source of nutrients and toxins, and by shaping the composition of resident microbial populations. Previous studies have begun to map out associations between diet and the bacteria and viruses of the human gut microbiome. Here we investigate associations of diet with fungal and archaeal populations, taking advantage of samples from 98 well-characterized individuals. Diet was quantified using inventories scoring both long-term and recent diet, and archaea and fungi were characterized by deep sequencing of marker genes in DNA purified from stool. For fungi, we found 66 genera, with generally mutually exclusive presence of either the phyla Ascomycota or Basiodiomycota. For archaea, Methanobrevibacter was the most prevalent genus, present in 30% of samples. Several other archaeal genera were detected in lower abundance and frequency. Myriad associations were detected for fungi and archaea with diet, with each other, and with bacterial lineages. Methanobrevibacter and Candida were positively associated with diets high in carbohydrates, but negatively with diets high in amino acids, protein, and fatty acids. A previous study emphasized that bacterial population structure was associated primarily with long-term diet, but high Candida abundance was most strongly associated with the recent consumption of carbohydrates. Methobrevibacter abundance was associated with both long term and recent consumption of carbohydrates. These results confirm earlier targeted studies and provide a host of new associations to consider in modeling the effects of diet on the gut microbiome and human health.

  4. Distribution of glutathione transferases in Gram-positive bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocati, Nerino; Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2012-03-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been widely studied in Gram-negative bacteria and the structure and function of several representatives have been elucidated. Conversely, limited information is available about the occurrence, classification and functional features of GSTs both in Gram-positive bacteria and in Archaea. An analysis of 305 fully-sequenced Gram-positive genomes highlights the presence of 49 putative GST genes in the genera of both Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla. We also performed an analysis on 81 complete genomes of the Archaea domain. Eleven hits were found in the Halobacteriaceae family of the Euryarchaeota phylum and only one in the Crenarchaeota phylum. A comparison of the identified sequences with well-characterized GSTs belonging to both Gram-negative and eukaryotic GSTs sheds light on their putative function and the evolutionary relationships within the large GST superfamily. This analysis suggests that the identified sequences mainly cluster in the new Xi class, while Beta class GSTs, widely distributed in Gram-negative bacteria, are under-represented in Gram-positive bacteria and absent in Archaea.

  5. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  6. Methane metabolism in the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota revealed by genome-centric metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Chadwick, Grayson L; Robbins, Steven J; Orphan, Victoria J; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2015-10-23

    Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea play important roles in the global flux of methane. Culture-independent approaches are providing deeper insight into the diversity and evolution of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, but, until now, no compelling evidence has existed for methane metabolism in archaea outside the phylum Euryarchaeota. We performed metagenomic sequencing of a deep aquifer, recovering two near-complete genomes belonging to the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota (formerly known as the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group). These genomes contain divergent homologs of the genes necessary for methane metabolism, including those that encode the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) complex. Additional non-euryarchaeotal MCR-encoding genes identified in a range of environments suggest that unrecognized archaeal lineages may also contribute to global methane cycling. These findings indicate that methane metabolism arose before the last common ancestor of the Euryarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota.

  7. Graphic Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Weld Muller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay describes strategic approaches to graphic representation associated with critical environmental engagement and that build from the idea of works of architecture as stitches in the ecological fabric of the city. It focuses on the building up of partial or fragmented graphics in order to describe inclusive, open-ended possibilities for making architecture that marry rich experience and responsive performance. An aphoristic approach to crafting drawings involves complex layering, conscious absence and the embracing of tension. A self-critical attitude toward the generation of imagery characterized by the notion of ‘loose precision’ may lead to more transformative and environmentally responsive architectures.

  8. Scaling up the curvature of mammalian metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eBueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A curvilinear relationship between mammalian metabolic rate and body size on a log-log scale has been adopted in lieu of thelongstanding concept of a 3/4 allometric relationship (Kolokotrones et al. 2010. The central tenet of Metabolic Ecology (ME states that metabolism at the individual level scales-up to drive the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems. If this tenet is correct, the curvature of metabolism should be perceived in other ecological traits. By analyzing the size scaling allometry of eight different mammalian traits including basal and field metabolic rate, offspring biomass production, ingestion rate, costs of locomotion, life span, population growth rate and population density we show that the curvature affects most ecological rates and

  9. Identification and characterization of bifunctional proline racemase/hydroxyproline epimerase from archaea: discrimination of substrates and molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Watanabe

    Full Text Available Proline racemase (ProR is a member of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-independent racemase family, and is involved in the Stickland reaction (fermentation in certain clostridia as well as the mechanisms underlying the escape of parasites from host immunity in eukaryotic Trypanosoma. Hydroxyproline epimerase (HypE, which is in the same protein family as ProR, catalyzes the first step of the trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline metabolism of bacteria. Their substrate specificities were previously considered to be very strict, in spite of similarities in their structures and catalytic mechanisms, and no racemase/epimerase from the ProR superfamily has been found in archaea. We here characterized the ProR-like protein (OCC_00372 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis (TlProR. This protein could reversibly catalyze not only the racemization of proline, but also the epimerization of 4-hydroxyproline and 3-hydroxyproline with similar kinetic constants. Among the four (putative ligand binding sites, one amino acid substitution was detected between TlProR (tryptophan at the position of 241 and natural ProR (phenylalanine. The W241F mutant showed a significant preference for proline over hydroxyproline, suggesting that this (hydrophobic and bulky tryptophan residue played an importance role in the recognition of hydroxyproline (more hydrophilic and bulky than proline, and substrate specificity for hydroxyproline was evolutionarily acquired separately between natural HypE and ProR. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that such unique broad substrate specificity was derived from an ancestral enzyme of this superfamily.

  10. Evolution of metabolic network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonchev Danail

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of metabolic networks across species is a key to understanding how evolutionary pressures shape these networks. By selecting taxa representative of different lineages or lifestyles and using a comprehensive set of descriptors of the structure and complexity of their metabolic networks, one can highlight both qualitative and quantitative differences in the metabolic organization of species subject to distinct evolutionary paths or environmental constraints. Results We used a novel representation of metabolic networks, termed network of interacting pathways or NIP, to focus on the modular, high-level organization of the metabolic capabilities of the cell. Using machine learning techniques we identified the most relevant aspects of cellular organization that change under evolutionary pressures. We considered the transitions from prokarya to eukarya (with a focus on the transitions among the archaea, bacteria and eukarya, from unicellular to multicellular eukarya, from free living to host-associated bacteria, from anaerobic to aerobic, as well as the acquisition of cell motility or growth in an environment of various levels of salinity or temperature. Intuitively, we expect organisms with more complex lifestyles to have more complex and robust metabolic networks. Here we demonstrate for the first time that such organisms are not only characterized by larger, denser networks of metabolic pathways but also have more efficiently organized cross communications, as revealed by subtle changes in network topology. These changes are unevenly distributed among metabolic pathways, with specific categories of pathways being promoted to more central locations as an answer to environmental constraints. Conclusions Combining methods from graph theory and machine learning, we have shown here that evolutionary pressures not only affects gene and protein sequences, but also specific details of the complex wiring of functional modules

  11. Do the maximum sizes, ages and patterns of growth of three reef-dwelling labrid species at two latitudes differ in a manner conforming to the metabolic theory of ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek, E; Fairclough, D V; Hall, N G; Hesp, S A; Potter, I C

    2012-11-01

    The size and age data and patterns of growth of three abundant, reef-dwelling and protogynous labrid species (Coris auricularis, Notolabrus parilus and Ophthalmolepis lineolata) in waters off Perth at c. 32° S and in the warmer waters of the Jurien Bay Marine Park (JBMP) at c. 30° S on the lower west coast of Australia are compared. Using data for the top 10% of values and a randomization procedure, the maximum total length (L(T) ) and mass of each species and the maximum age of the first two species were estimated to be significantly greater off Perth than in the JBMP (all P 0.05). These latitudinal trends, thus, typically conform to those frequently exhibited by fish species and the predictions of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE). While, in terms of mass, the instantaneous growth rates of each species were similar at both latitudes during early life, they were greater at the higher latitude throughout the remainder and thus much of life, which is broadly consistent with the MTE. When expressed in terms of L(T), however, instantaneous growth rates did not exhibit consistent latitudinal trends across all three species. The above trends with mass, together with those for reproductive variables, demonstrate that a greater amount of energy is directed into somatic growth and gonadal development by each of these species at the higher latitude. The consistency of the direction of the latitudinal trends for maximum body size and age and pattern of growth across all three species implies that each species is responding in a similar manner to differences between the environmental characteristics, such as temperature, at those two latitudes. The individual maximum L(T), mass and age and pattern of growth of O. lineolata at a higher and thus cooler latitude on the eastern Australian coast are consistent with the latitudinal trends exhibited by those characteristics for this species in the two western Australian localities. The implications of using mass rather than

  12. Ecological macroeconomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2013-01-01

    of this discussion includes contributions from actors involved with efforts to advance a ‘Green New Deal’ that repeats the idea that the promotion of green innovation and government funding of greener infrastructure would improve competitiveness and increase employment. This time ‘Green Keynesianism’ is accompanied...... to shift resources from consumption to investment and describing the role of consumer-citizens in such a change. The chapter starts by identifying the problems and challenges for an ecological macroeconomics. The next section outlines some of the shortcomings of traditional macroeconomics...... to energy, transport, housing, food and so forth. The fourth section outlines briefly the roles of consumer-citizens in relation to such sustainability transformations and the final section considers the possibilities for initiating the envisioned changes....

  13. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr) of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO2-reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens) from the domain Archaea. Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2) from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F420 (F420H2) as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB). The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III)-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME) by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting. PMID:28174314

  14. Public aquaria as long-term enrichments for investigating planktonic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein, Nadine I.; Warren, Courtney E.; Lipp, Julius S.; Pagani, Mark; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The most abundant group of planktonic Archaea , the so-called Thaumarchaeota, represents 20% of all marine planktonic microorganisms (Karner et al., 2001) and their energy efficient performance of nitrification makes them key players in the global nitrogen- and carbon-cycle (Könneke et al., 2014). Furthermore, planktonic Archaea are considered to be the major producers of specific microbial membrane lipids that are extensively used as paleoproxies in marine climate research (Schouten et al., 2002). Therefore, assessing the parameters controlling the distribution of Archaea in the marine water column is crucial for studies of modern and past marine environments. Although diverse studies utilizing DNA- and biomarker-based approaches have constrained the turnover and distribution of marine Archaea, the environmental factors affecting their abundance and activity (e.g., Wuchter et al., 2006; Bale et al., 2013) are still poorly understood. Further, previous surveys, using enrichment cultivation and pure culture experiments, provided valuable information on adaptation of planktonic Archaea to changes of parameters affecting growth conditions, such as temperature, salinity and growth stage (Elling et al., 2014, 2015). Hence, we know that planktonic Archaea directly adapt their membranes to changing growth conditions, but also that environmental selection for individual phylogenetic groups of these organisms is also reflected in the membrane lipid pool. Extending these studies, this project further aims at constraining the environmental parameters controlling archaeal abundance in the marine environment. Public aquaria, which are comparable to perfectly monitored long-term enrichment cultures, are optimal sampling sites for this task. A comprehensive set of 120 water and substrate samples from fresh, marine and brackish systems exhibiting diverse conditions was selected from 15 public aquaria at the east and west coast of the USA. These samples were examined for their

  15. Ecological functions of uncultured microorganisms in the cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust of a seamount in the central Pacific are elucidated by fosmid sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Yingyi; CHENG Hong; Anton F Post; WANG Chunsheng; JIANG Xiawei; PAN Jie; WU Min; XU Xuewei

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-rich ferromanganese is an important seafloor mineral and is abundantly present in the seamount crusts. Such crusts form potential hotspots for biogeochemical activity and microbial diversity, yet our understanding of their microbial communities is lacking. In this study, a cultivation-independent approach was used to recover genomic information and derive ecological functions of the microbes in a sediment sample collected from the cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust of a seamount region in the central Pacific. A total of 78 distinct clones were obtained by fosmid library screening with a 16S rRNA based PCR method. Proteobacteria and MGI Thaumarch-aeota dominated the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequence results in the microbial community. Nine fosmid clones were sequenced and annotated. Numerous genes encoding proteins involved in metabolic functions and heavy metal resistance were identified, suggesting alternative metabolic pathways and stress responses that are essential for microbial survival in the cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust. In addition, genes that participate in the synthesis of organic acids and exoploymers were discovered. Reconstruction of the metabolic pathways revealed that the nitrogen cycle is an important biogeochemical process in the cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust. In addition, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events have been observed, and most of them came from bacteria, with some occurring in archaea and plants. Clone W4-93a, belonging to MGI Thaumarch-aeota, contained a region of gene synteny. Comparative analyses suggested that a high frequency of HGT events as well as genomic divergence play important roles in the microbial adaption to the deep-sea environment.

  16. Rooting the domain archaea by phylogenomic analysis supports the foundation of the new kingdom Proteoarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Deschamps, Philippe; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-12-19

    The first 16S rRNA-based phylogenies of the Archaea showed a deep division between two groups, the kingdoms Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. This bipartite classification has been challenged by the recent discovery of new deeply branching lineages (e.g., Thaumarchaeota, Aigarchaeota, Nanoarchaeota, Korarchaeota, Parvarchaeota, Aenigmarchaeota, Diapherotrites, and Nanohaloarchaeota) which have also been given the same taxonomic status of kingdoms. However, the phylogenetic position of some of these lineages is controversial. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the Archaea have often been carried out without outgroup sequences, making it difficult to determine if these taxa actually define lineages at the same level as the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. We have addressed the question of the position of the root of the Archaea by reconstructing rooted archaeal phylogenetic trees using bacterial sequences as outgroup. These trees were based on commonly used conserved protein markers (32 ribosomal proteins) as well as on 38 new markers identified through phylogenomic analysis. We thus gathered a total of 70 conserved markers that we analyzed as a concatenated data set. In contrast with previous analyses, our trees consistently placed the root of the archaeal tree between the Euryarchaeota (including the Nanoarchaeota and other fast-evolving lineages) and the rest of archaeal species, which we propose to class within the new kingdom Proteoarchaeota. This implies the relegation of several groups previously classified as kingdoms (e.g., Crenarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, Aigarchaeota, and Korarchaeota) to a lower taxonomic rank. In addition to taxonomic implications, this profound reorganization of the archaeal phylogeny has also consequences on our appraisal of the nature of the last archaeal ancestor, which most likely was a complex organism with a gene-rich genome.

  17. Chromosome segregation in Archaea mediated by a hybrid DNA partition machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliomaa-Sanford, Anne K; Rodriguez-Castañeda, Fernando A; McLeod, Brett N; Latorre-Roselló, Victor; Smith, Jasmine H; Reimann, Julia; Albers, Sonja V; Barillà, Daniela

    2012-03-06

    Eukarya and, more recently, some bacteria have been shown to rely on a cytoskeleton-based apparatus to drive chromosome segregation. In contrast, the factors and mechanisms underpinning this fundamental process are underexplored in archaea, the third domain of life. Here we establish that the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus harbors a hybrid segrosome consisting of two interacting proteins, SegA and SegB, that play a key role in genome segregation in this organism. SegA is an ortholog of bacterial, Walker-type ParA proteins, whereas SegB is an archaea-specific factor lacking sequence identity to either eukaryotic or bacterial proteins, but sharing homology with a cluster of uncharacterized factors conserved in both crenarchaea and euryarchaea, the two major archaeal sub-phyla. We show that SegA is an ATPase that polymerizes in vitro and that SegB is a site-specific DNA-binding protein contacting palindromic sequences located upstream of the segAB cassette. SegB interacts with SegA in the presence of nucleotides and dramatically affects its polymerization dynamics. Our data demonstrate that SegB strongly stimulates SegA polymerization, possibly by promoting SegA nucleation and accelerating polymer growth. Increased expression levels of segAB resulted in severe growth and chromosome segregation defects, including formation of anucleate cells, compact nucleoids confined to one half of the cell compartment and fragmented nucleoids. The overall picture emerging from our findings indicates that the SegAB complex fulfills a crucial function in chromosome segregation and is the prototype of a DNA partition machine widespread across archaea.

  18. Possible energetic linkage between primary production and deep-sea benthic archaea: insight from biogeochemical lipidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-04-01

    Marine archaea have been recognized as a cosmopolitan player for global carbon and nitrogen cycles in the water column and sub-seafloor environments. Recent molecular evidence based on lipids and DNA suggests that uncultured benthic archaea dominate biomass in marine sediment, implying past primary production is a crucial factor for their presently ongoing heterotrophy (e.g., 1-4). Focusing on benthic archaeal heterotrophic processes in deep-sea sediment, we preliminarily traced 13C-signature in archaeal lipids to determine de novo and salvage pathway by in situ 13C-experiment. On the basis of the differential 13C-uptake, we suggest that benthic archaea recycles sedimentary relic membrane lipids to minimize the energy expenditure during 405 days (5). The 16S rRNA and quantitative PCR analysis indicated a community shift in the composition of the benthic archaeal community (e.g., Marine Group I, Marine Benthic Group, Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group). In bacteria and eukarya, it is commonly recognized that free fatty acids are incorporated into cells and converted to acyl-CoA, which are eventually incorporated into membrane lipids as a salvage pathway (cf. 6). Considering the suggestion of salvage pathway in archaeal membrane synthesis (7,8), we discuss archaeal heterotrophic processes in terms of possible biogeochemical lipidomics. Reference [1] Biddle et al., (2006) PNAS, 103, 3846-3851. [2] Lipp et al., (2008) Nature, 454, 991-994. [3] Kallmeyer et al., (2012) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1203849109 [4] Hinrichs and Inagaki, (2012) Science, 338, 204-205. [5] Takano et al., (2010) Nature Geosci., 3, 858-861. [6] Silbert et al., (1968) J Bacteriol., 95, 1658-1665. [7] Poulter et al., (1988) JACS, 110, 2620-2624. [8] Ohnuma et al., (1996) J Biochem., 119, 541-547.

  19. [Ecological stoichiometry and its application to medicinal plant resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Jin, Hang; Zhang, Jin-Yu; Wang, Yuan-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Ecological stoichiometry is a study of the balance of biological system's energy and the balance of multiple chemical elements. It focuses on the relationship of the element ratio in ecological processes. In this paper, the concept and main theoretical basis of ecological stoichiometry were introduced, and the status of stoichiometry in medicinal plant resources was reviewed. According to the recent development of ecological stoichiometry, the future directions of ecological stoichiometry of medicinal plants could be the study of the relationship between stoichiometric characteristic and growth and secondary metabolism of medicinal plants, and the influence of biotic (or abiotic) factors on the stoichiometric characteristic of medicinal plants.

  20. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Y.; Ding, W. X.; Jia, Z. J.; Cai, Z. C.

    2011-02-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07-8.29 × 109 cells g-1 soil) in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13), it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13). This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland ecosystems. The CH4 production rate of the top soil layer increases with increasing latitude, from 273.64 μg CH4 kg-1 soil d-1 in the Poyang wetland to 664.59 μg CH4 kg-1 soil d-1 in the Carex lasiocarpa marsh of the Sanjiang Plain. We conclude that CH4 production potential in the freshwater wetlands of Eastern China is mainly affected by the supply of methanogenic substrates rather than temperature; in contrast

  1. Identification of Archaea-specific chemotaxis proteins which interact with the flagellar apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Judith

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea share with bacteria the ability to bias their movement towards more favorable locations, a process known as taxis. Two molecular systems drive this process: the motility apparatus and the chemotaxis signal transduction system. The first consists of the flagellum, the flagellar motor, and its switch, which allows cells to reverse the rotation of flagella. The second targets the flagellar motor switch in order to modulate the switching frequency in response to external stimuli. While the signal transduction system is conserved throughout archaea and bacteria, the archaeal flagellar apparatus is different from the bacterial one. The proteins constituting the flagellar motor and its switch in archaea have not yet been identified, and the connection between the bacterial-like chemotaxis signal transduction system and the archaeal motility apparatus is unknown. Results Using protein-protein interaction analysis, we have identified three proteins in Halobacterium salinarum that interact with the chemotaxis (Che proteins CheY, CheD, and CheC2, as well as the flagella accessory (Fla proteins FlaCE and FlaD. Two of the proteins belong to the protein family DUF439, the third is a HEAT_PBS family protein. In-frame deletion strains for all three proteins were generated and analyzed as follows: a photophobic responses were measured by a computer-based cell tracking system b flagellar rotational bias was determined by dark-field microscopy, and c chemotactic behavior was analyzed by a swarm plate assay. Strains deleted for the HEAT_PBS protein or one of the DUF439 proteins proved unable to switch the direction of flagellar rotation. In these mutants, flagella rotate only clockwise, resulting in exclusively forward swimming cells that are unable to respond to tactic signals. Deletion of the second DUF439 protein had only minimal effects. HEAT_PBS proteins could be identified in the chemotaxis gene regions of all motile haloarchaea

  2. Wordsworthian Ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱文宣

    2014-01-01

    Wordsworth devoted himself to the ideal of a harmonious relation between human and nature, between man and soci-ety, between man and the ego. In this sense, Wordsworth improved the development of ecology. This argument will be support-ed by the approach of eco-criticism and Heidegger’s eco-philosophy. And it is supported by the following points.The first part points out that Wordsworth’s love of nature led to his love of man, which was reflected by his care for common people. Part Two shows Wordsworth’s solicitude for dwelling. His notion of dwelling had aspect of poetic dwelling. The harmonious hu-man-nature relationship reveals thee essence of free dwelling. His poetic experiment agreed with Heidegger ’s argument on poet-ic creation. His discussion of free labour was like Heidegger’s interpretation of“merit”. Part Three tells about Wordsworth’s great effort to amend the alienated human nature by treasuring the Child’s nature, imagination and human feelings.In this way, the conclusion can be got:although it would be a huge project to reinterpret Wordsworth with the approaches of eco-criticism and Heidegger’s eco-philosophy, it is still worth making the effort.

  3. Sound Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Duffy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  4. [Political ecology, ecological economics, and public health: interfaces for the sustainability of development and health promotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Marcelo Firpo; Martinez-Alier, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes to focus contributions from political ecology and ecological economics to the field of collective health with a view towards integrating the discussions around health promotion, socio-environmental sustainability, and development. Ecological economics is a recent interdisciplinary field that combines economists and other professionals from the social, human, and life sciences. The field has developed new concepts and methodologies that seek to grasp the relationship between the economy and ecological and social processes such as social metabolism and metabolic profile, thereby interrelating economic, material, and energy flows and producing indicators and indexes for (un)sustainability. Meanwhile, political ecology approaches ecological issues and socio-environmental conflicts based on the economic and power dynamics characterizing modern societies. Collective health and the discussions on health promotion can expand our understanding of territory, communities, and the role of science and institutions based on the contributions of political ecology and ecological economics in analyzing development models and the distributive and socio-environmental conflicts generated by them.

  5. The major architects of chromatin: architectural proteins in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; White, Malcolm F; van Driel, Roel; Dame, Remus Th

    2008-01-01

    The genomic DNA of all organisms across the three kingdoms of life needs to be compacted and functionally organized. Key players in these processes are DNA supercoiling, macromolecular crowding and architectural proteins that shape DNA by binding to it. The architectural proteins in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes generally do not exhibit sequence or structural conservation especially across kingdoms. Instead, we propose that they are functionally conserved. Most of these proteins can be classified according to their architectural mode of action: bending, wrapping or bridging DNA. In order for DNA transactions to occur within a compact chromatin context, genome organization cannot be static. Indeed chromosomes are subject to a whole range of remodeling mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the role of (i) DNA supercoiling, (ii) macromolecular crowding and (iii) architectural proteins in genome organization, as well as (iv) mechanisms used to remodel chromosome structure and to modulate genomic activity. We conclude that the underlying mechanisms that shape and remodel genomes are remarkably similar among bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes.

  6. N-linked glycosylation in Archaea: a structural, functional, and genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Ken F; Ding, Yan; Meyer, Benjamin H; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-06-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most prevalent posttranslational modifications in nature. Accordingly, a pathway with shared commonalities is found in all three domains of life. While excellent model systems have been developed for studying N-glycosylation in both Eukarya and Bacteria, an understanding of this process in Archaea was hampered until recently by a lack of effective molecular tools. However, within the last decade, impressive advances in the study of the archaeal version of this important pathway have been made for halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles, combining glycan structural information obtained by mass spectrometry with bioinformatic, genetic, biochemical, and enzymatic data. These studies reveal both features shared with the eukaryal and bacterial domains and novel archaeon-specific aspects. Unique features of N-glycosylation in Archaea include the presence of unusual dolichol lipid carriers, the use of a variety of linking sugars that connect the glycan to proteins, the presence of novel sugars as glycan constituents, the presence of two very different N-linked glycans attached to the same protein, and the ability to vary the N-glycan composition under different growth conditions. These advances are the focus of this review, with an emphasis on N-glycosylation pathways in Haloferax, Methanococcus, and Sulfolobus.

  7. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  8. Impact of cystic fibrosis disease on archaea and bacteria composition of gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragoli, Francesco; Federici, Sara; Ferrari, Susanna; Minuti, Andrea; Rebecchi, Annalisa; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Guarino, Alfredo; Callegari, Maria Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is often associated with intestinal inflammation due to several factors, including altered gut microbiota composition. In this study, we analyzed the fecal microbiota among patients with cystic fibrosis of 10-22 years of age, and compared the findings with age-matched healthy subjects. The participating patients included 14 homozygotes and 14 heterozygotes with the delF508 mutation, and 2 heterozygotes presenting non-delF508 mutations. We used PCR-DGGE and qPCR to analyze the presence of bacteria, archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Overall, our findings confirmed disruption of the cystic fibrosis gut microbiota. Principal component analysis of the qPCR data revealed no differences between homozygotes and heterozygotes, while both groups were distinct from healthy subjects who showed higher biodiversity. Archaea were under the detection limit in all homozygotes subjects, whereas methanogens were detected in 62% of both cystic fibrosis heterozygotes and healthy subjects. Our qPCR results revealed a low frequency of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the homozygote (13%) and heterozygote (13%) patients with cystic fibrosis compared with healthy subjects (87.5%). This is a pioneer study showing that patients with cystic fibrosis exhibit significant reduction of H2-consuming microorganisms, which could increase hydrogen accumulation in the colon and the expulsion of this gas through non-microbial routes.

  9. RNomics and Modomics in the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii: identification of RNA modification genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decatur Wayne A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturally occurring RNAs contain numerous enzymatically altered nucleosides. Differences in RNA populations (RNomics and pattern of RNA modifications (Modomics depends on the organism analyzed and are two of the criteria that distinguish the three kingdoms of life. If the genomic sequences of the RNA molecules can be derived from whole genome sequence information, the modification profile cannot and requires or direct sequencing of the RNAs or predictive methods base on the presence or absence of the modifications genes. Results By employing a comparative genomics approach, we predicted almost all of the genes coding for the t+rRNA modification enzymes in the mesophilic moderate halophile Haloferax volcanii. These encode both guide RNAs and enzymes. Some are orthologous to previously identified genes in Archaea, Bacteria or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but several are original predictions. Conclusion The number of modifications in t+rRNAs in the halophilic archaeon is surprisingly low when compared with other Archaea or Bacteria, particularly the hyperthermophilic organisms. This may result from the specific lifestyle of halophiles that require high intracellular salt concentration for survival. This salt content could allow RNA to maintain its functional structural integrity with fewer modifications. We predict that the few modifications present must be particularly important for decoding, accuracy of translation or are modifications that cannot be functionally replaced by the electrostatic interactions provided by the surrounding salt-ions. This analysis also guides future experimental validation work aiming to complete the understanding of the function of RNA modifications in Archaeal translation.

  10. The Function of Gas Vesicles in Halophilic Archaea and Bacteria: Theories and Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Oren

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A few extremely halophilic Archaea (Halobacterium salinarum, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Haloferax mediterranei, Halorubrum vacuolatum, Halogeometricum borinquense, Haloplanus spp. possess gas vesicles that bestow buoyancy on the cells. Gas vesicles are also produced by the anaerobic endospore-forming halophilic Bacteria Sporohalobacter lortetii and Orenia sivashensis. We have extensive information on the properties of gas vesicles in Hbt. salinarum and Hfx. mediterranei and the regulation of their formation. Different functions were suggested for gas vesicle synthesis: buoying cells towards oxygen-rich surface layers in hypersaline water bodies to prevent oxygen limitation, reaching higher light intensities for the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, positioning the cells optimally for light absorption, light shielding, reducing the cytoplasmic volume leading to a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio (for the Archaea and dispersal of endospores (for the anaerobic spore-forming Bacteria. Except for Hqr. walsbyi which abounds in saltern crystallizer brines, gas-vacuolate halophiles are not among the dominant life forms in hypersaline environments. There only has been little research on gas vesicles in natural communities of halophilic microorganisms, and the few existing studies failed to provide clear evidence for their possible function. This paper summarizes the current status of the different theories why gas vesicles may provide a selective advantage to some halophilic microorganisms.

  11. Model organisms for genetics in the domain Archaea: methanogens, halophiles, Thermococcales and Sulfolobales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, John A; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Atomi, Haruyuki; Allers, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The tree of life is split into three main branches: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. Our knowledge of eukaryotic and bacteria cell biology has been built on a foundation of studies in model organisms, using the complementary approaches of genetics and biochemistry. Archaea have led to some exciting discoveries in the field of biochemistry, but archaeal genetics has been slow to get off the ground, not least because these organisms inhabit some of the more inhospitable places on earth and are therefore believed to be difficult to culture. In fact, many species can be cultivated with relative ease and there has been tremendous progress in the development of genetic tools for both major archaeal phyla, the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota. There are several model organisms available for methanogens, halophiles, and thermophiles; in the latter group, there are genetic systems for Sulfolobales and Thermococcales. In this review, we present the advantages and disadvantages of working with each archaeal group, give an overview of their different genetic systems, and direct the neophyte archaeologist to the most appropriate model organism.

  12. Halophilic archaea cultivated from surface sterilized middle-late eocene rock salt are polyploid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla T Jaakkola

    Full Text Available Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38-41 million years ago rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11-14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6-8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment.

  13. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yingang, E-mail: fengyg@qibebt.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Song, Xiaxia [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lin, Jinzhong [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xuan, Jinsong [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cui, Qiu [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Wang, Jinfeng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  14. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, Harmen J G; Verhees, Corné H; Akerboom, Jasper; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2006-07-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes, some of which catalyze unique conversions. Moreover, the enzymes appear not to be regulated allosterically, but rather at transcriptional level. To elucidate details of the gene expression control, the transcription initiation sites of the glycolytic genes in Pyrococcus furiosus have been mapped by primer extension analysis and the obtained promoter sequences have been compared with upstream regions of non-glycolytic genes. Apart from consensus sequences for the general transcription factors (TATA-box and BRE) this analysis revealed the presence of a potential transcription factor binding site (TATCAC-N(5)-GTGATA) in glycolytic and starch utilizing promoters of P. furiosus and several thermococcal species. The absence of this inverted repeat in Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus horikoshii probably reflects that their reduced catabolic capacity does not require this regulatory system. Moreover, this phyletic pattern revealed a TrmB-like regulator (PF0124 and TK1769) which may be involved in recognizing the repeat. This Thermococcales glycolytic regulon, with more than 20 genes, is the largest regulon that has yet been described for Archaea.

  15. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in soil microcosms is inhibited by acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offre, Pierre; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2009-10-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were considered to be responsible for the majority of ammonia oxidation in soil until the recent discovery of the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea. To assess the relative contributions of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil ammonia oxidation, their growth was analysed during active nitrification in soil microcosms incubated for 30 days at 30 degrees C, and the effect of an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation (acetylene) on their growth and soil nitrification kinetics was determined. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA genes did not detect any change in their community composition during incubation, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of bacterial amoA genes indicated a small decrease in abundance in control and acetylene-containing microcosms. DGGE fingerprints of archaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes demonstrated changes in the relative abundance of specific crenarchaeal phylotypes during active nitrification. Growth was also indicated by increases in crenarchaeal amoA gene copy number, determined by qPCR. In microcosms containing acetylene, nitrification and growth of the crenarchaeal phylotypes were suppressed, suggesting that these crenarchaea are ammonia oxidizers. Growth of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizers occurred in microcosms with active nitrification, indicating that ammonia oxidation was mostly due to archaea in the conditions of the present study.

  16. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07–8.29 × 109 cells g−1 soil in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P < 0.001, n = 13 and between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the total nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P < 0.001, n = 13 in wetland soils. This indicates that the amount of soil organic carbon may affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13, it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13. This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland

  17. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  18. Metabolic acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acidosis - metabolic ... Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not ... the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ...

  19. The information science of microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Aria S; Konwar, Kishori M; Louca, Stilianos; Hanson, Niels W; Hallam, Steven J

    2016-06-01

    A revolution is unfolding in microbial ecology where petabytes of 'multi-omics' data are produced using next generation sequencing and mass spectrometry platforms. This cornucopia of biological information has enormous potential to reveal the hidden metabolic powers of microbial communities in natural and engineered ecosystems. However, to realize this potential, the development of new technologies and interpretative frameworks grounded in ecological design principles are needed to overcome computational and analytical bottlenecks. Here we explore the relationship between microbial ecology and information science in the era of cloud-based computation. We consider microorganisms as individual information processing units implementing a distributed metabolic algorithm and describe developments in ecoinformatics and ubiquitous computing with the potential to eliminate bottlenecks and empower knowledge creation and translation.

  20. Interdisciplinary Pathways for Urban Metabolism Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    With its rapid rise as a metaphor to express coupled natural-human systems in cities, the concept of urban metabolism is evolving into a series of relatively distinct research frameworks amongst various disciplines, with varying definitions, theories, models, and emphases. In industrial ecology, housed primarily within the disciplinary domain of engineering, urban metabolism research has focused on quantifying material and energy flows into, within, and out of cities, using methodologies such as material flow analysis and life cycle assessment. In the field of urban ecology, which is strongly influenced by ecology and urban planning, research focus has been placed on understanding and modeling the complex patterns and processes of human-ecological systems within urban areas. Finally, in political ecology, closely aligned with human geography and anthropology, scholars theorize about the interwoven knots of social and natural processes, material flows, and spatial structures that form the urban metabolism. This paper offers three potential interdisciplinary urban metabolism research tracks that might integrate elements of these three "ecologies," thereby bridging engineering and the social and physical sciences. First, it presents the idea of infrastructure ecology, which explores the complex, emergent interdependencies between gray (water and wastewater, transportation, etc) and green (e.g. parks, greenways) infrastructure systems, as nested within a broader socio-economic context. For cities to be sustainable and resilient over time-space, the theory follows, these is a need to understand and redesign these infrastructure linkages. Second, there is the concept of an urban-scale carbon metabolism model which integrates consumption-based material flow analysis (including goods, water, and materials), with the carbon sink and source dynamics of the built environment (e.g. buildings, etc) and urban ecosystems. Finally, there is the political ecology of the material

  1. The role of tetraether lipid composition in the adaptation of thermophilic archaea to acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  2. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to various habitats in Pearl River Delta of China, a subtropical maritime zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixin Li; Wenbiao Jin; Zhaoyun Liang; Yangyang Yue; Junhong Lv

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widely considered key to ammonia oxidation in various environments.However,little work has been conducted to simultaneously investigate the abundance and diversity of AOA as well as correlations between archaeal amoA genotypes and environmental parameters of different ecosystems at one district.To understand the abundance,diversity,and distribution of AOA in Pearl River Delta of China in response to various habitats,the archaeal amoA genes in soil,marine,river,lake,hot spring and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) samples were investigated using real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and clone libraries.Our analyses indicated that the diversity of AOA in various habitats was different and could be clustered into five major clades,i.e.,estuary sediment,marine water/sediment,soil,hot spring and Cluster 1.Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the structure of AOA communities in similar ecological habitats exhibited strong relation.The canonical correspondence method indicated that the AOA community structure was strongly correlated to temperature,pH,total organic carbon,total nitrogen and dissolved oxygen variables.Assessing AOA amoA gene copy numbers,ranging from 6.84 × 106 to 9.45 × 107 copies/g in dry soil/sediment,and 6.06 × 106 to 2.41 × 107 copies/L in water samples,were higher than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) by 1-2 orders of magnitude.However,AOA amoA copy numbers were much lower than AOB in WWTP activated sludge samples.Overall,these studies suggested that AOA may be a major contributor to ammonia oxidation in natural habitats but play a minor role in highly aerated activated sludge.The result also showed the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance was positively correlated with temperature and less correlated with other environmental parameters.New data from our study provide increasing evidence for the relative abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the global nitrogen cycle.

  3. Niche segregation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.; Villanueva, L.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Reichart, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria have emerged as significant factors in the marine nitrogen cycle and are responsible for the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and dinitrogen gas, respectively. Potential for an interaction between these groups exists;

  4. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a methanoge

  5. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys of the Juan de Fuca Ridge▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufang; Xiao, Xiang; Jiang, Lijing; Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Meng, Jun; Wang, Fengping

    2009-01-01

    The abundance and diversity of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes from hydrothermal vent chimneys at the Juan de Fuca Ridge were investigated. The majority of the retrieved archaeal amoA sequences exhibited identities of less than 95% to those in the GenBank database. Novel ammonia-oxidizing archaea may exist in the hydrothermal vent environments. PMID:19395559

  6. Characterising the CRISPR immune system in Archaea using genome sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Shiraz Ali

    Archaea, a group of microorganisms distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, are equipped with an adaptive immune system called the CRISPR system, which relies on an RNA interference mechanism to combat invading viruses and plasmids. Using a genome sequence analysis approach, the four components...... of archaeal genomic CRISPR loci were analysed, namely, repeats, spacers, leaders and cas genes. Based on analysis of spacer sequences it was predicted that the immune system combats viruses and plasmids by targeting their DNA. Furthermore, analysis of repeats, leaders and cas genes revealed that CRISPR...... systems exist as distinct families which have key differences between themselves. Closely related organisms were seen harbouring different CRISPR systems, while some distantly related species carried similar systems, indicating frequent horizontal exchange. Moreover, it was found that cas genes of Type I...

  7. The discovery of archaea origin phosphomannomutase in algae based on the algal transcriptome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yanjing; CHI Shan; LIU Cui; CHEN Shengping; YU Jun; WANG Xumin; LIU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Phosphomannomutase (PMM;EC 5.4.2.8) is an enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion reaction between mannose-6-phosphate and mannose-1-phosphate. However, its systematic molecular and functional in-vestigations in algae have not hitherto been reported. In this work, with the accomplishment of the 1 000 Plant Project (OneKP) in which more than 218 species of Chromista, including 19 marine phaeophytes, 22 marine rhodophytes, 171 chlorophytes, 5 cryptophytes, 4 haptophytes, and 5 glaucophytes were sequenced, we used a gene analysis method to analyze the PMM gene sequences in algae and confirm the existence of the PMM gene in the transcriptomic sequencing data of Rhodophyta and Ochrophyta. Our results showed that only one type of PMM with four conserved motifs exists in Chromista which is similar to human PMM. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree revealed that algae PMM possibly originated from archaea.

  8. Not just for Eukarya anymore: protein glycosylation in Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry; Sharon, Nathan

    2008-10-01

    Of the many post-translational modifications proteins can undergo, glycosylation is the most prevalent and the most diverse. Today, it is clear that both N-glycosylation and O-glycosylation, once believed to be restricted to eukaryotes, also transpire in Bacteria and Archaea. Indeed, prokaryotic glycoproteins rely on a wider variety of monosaccharide constituents than do those of eukaryotes. In recent years, substantial progress in describing the enzymes involved in bacterial and archaeal glycosylation pathways has been made. It is becoming clear that enhanced knowledge of bacterial glycosylation enzymes may be of therapeutic value, while the demonstrated ability to introduce bacterial glycosylation genes into Escherichia coli represents a major step forward in glyco-engineering. A better understanding of archaeal protein glycosylation provides insight into this post-translational modification across evolution as well as protein processing under extreme conditions. Here, we discuss new structural and biosynthetic findings related to prokaryotic protein glycosylation, until recently a neglected topic.

  9. Genetic analysis of the br gene in halophilic archaea isolated from Xinjiang region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohong XU; Min WU; Huibin ZHANG; Zhihu LIU

    2008-01-01

    Some novel members of extremely halophilic archaea, strains AJ 11, AJ 12 and AJ 13, were isolated from the Aularz Lake located in the Altun Mountain National Nature Reserve of Xinjiang, Uygur Autonomous Region in China. Partial DNA fragments encoding a bacteriorho-dopsin (BR), as well as for 16S rRNA of isolated strains, were amplified by PCR and their DNA sequences were determined subsequently. On the basis of homology and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA, we thought that the isolated strains forming a microbiological population are the members of the genus Natrinema. The results of genetic analysis, such as GC content, transition/transver-sion (Ti/Tv) rate ratios and synonymous substitution rates (Ks) indicate that the br fragments, with a high level of genetic divergence, are faced with both purifying selection and bias mutation pressure. The study provides the basis for use of species and BR proteins resources.

  10. Changes in N-transforming archaea and bacteria in soil during the establishment of bioenergy crops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejian Mao

    Full Text Available Widespread adaptation of biomass production for bioenergy may influence important biogeochemical functions in the landscape, which are mainly carried out by soil microbes. Here we explore the impact of four potential bioenergy feedstock crops (maize, switchgrass, Miscanthus X giganteus, and mixed tallgrass prairie on nitrogen cycling microorganisms in the soil by monitoring the changes in the quantity (real-time PCR and diversity (barcoded pyrosequencing of key functional genes (nifH, bacterial/archaeal amoA and nosZ and 16S rRNA genes over two years after bioenergy crop establishment. The quantities of these N-cycling genes were relatively stable in all four crops, except maize (the only fertilized crop, in which the population size of AOB doubled in less than 3 months. The nitrification rate was significantly correlated with the quantity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA not bacteria (AOB, indicating that archaea were the major ammonia oxidizers. Deep sequencing revealed high diversity of nifH, archaeal amoA, bacterial amoA, nosZ and 16S rRNA genes, with 229, 309, 330, 331 and 8989 OTUs observed, respectively. Rarefaction analysis revealed the diversity of archaeal amoA in maize markedly decreased in the second year. Ordination analysis of T-RFLP and pyrosequencing results showed that the N-transforming microbial community structures in the soil under these crops gradually differentiated. Thus far, our two-year study has shown that specific N-transforming microbial communities develop in the soil in response to planting different bioenergy crops, and each functional group responded in a different way. Our results also suggest that cultivation of maize with N-fertilization increases the abundance of AOB and denitrifiers, reduces the diversity of AOA, and results in significant changes in the structure of denitrification community.

  11. Changes in N-transforming archaea and bacteria in soil during the establishment of bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuejian; Yannarell, Anthony C; Mackie, Roderick I

    2011-01-01

    Widespread adaptation of biomass production for bioenergy may influence important biogeochemical functions in the landscape, which are mainly carried out by soil microbes. Here we explore the impact of four potential bioenergy feedstock crops (maize, switchgrass, Miscanthus X giganteus, and mixed tallgrass prairie) on nitrogen cycling microorganisms in the soil by monitoring the changes in the quantity (real-time PCR) and diversity (barcoded pyrosequencing) of key functional genes (nifH, bacterial/archaeal amoA and nosZ) and 16S rRNA genes over two years after bioenergy crop establishment. The quantities of these N-cycling genes were relatively stable in all four crops, except maize (the only fertilized crop), in which the population size of AOB doubled in less than 3 months. The nitrification rate was significantly correlated with the quantity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) not bacteria (AOB), indicating that archaea were the major ammonia oxidizers. Deep sequencing revealed high diversity of nifH, archaeal amoA, bacterial amoA, nosZ and 16S rRNA genes, with 229, 309, 330, 331 and 8989 OTUs observed, respectively. Rarefaction analysis revealed the diversity of archaeal amoA in maize markedly decreased in the second year. Ordination analysis of T-RFLP and pyrosequencing results showed that the N-transforming microbial community structures in the soil under these crops gradually differentiated. Thus far, our two-year study has shown that specific N-transforming microbial communities develop in the soil in response to planting different bioenergy crops, and each functional group responded in a different way. Our results also suggest that cultivation of maize with N-fertilization increases the abundance of AOB and denitrifiers, reduces the diversity of AOA, and results in significant changes in the structure of denitrification community.

  12. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in the Arctic Ocean and Antarctic coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanetra, Karen M; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2009-09-01

    We compared abundance, distributions and phylogenetic composition of Crenarchaeota and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in samples collected from coastal waters west of the Antarctic Peninsula during the summers of 2005 and 2006, with samples from the central Arctic Ocean collected during the summer of 1997. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Crenarchaeota abundances were estimated from quantitative PCR measurements of amoA and 16S rRNA gene abundances. Crenarchaeota and AOA were approximately fivefold more abundant at comparable depths in the Antarctic versus the Arctic Ocean. Crenarchaeota and AOA were essentially absent from the Antarctic Summer Surface Water (SSW) water mass (0-45 m depth). The ratio of Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA to archaeal amoA gene abundance in the Winter Water (WW) water mass (45-105 m depth) of the Southern Ocean was much lower (0.15) than expected and in sharp contrast to the ratio (2.0) in the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) water mass (105-3500 m depth) immediately below it. We did not observe comparable segregation of this ratio by depth or water mass in Arctic Ocean samples. A ubiquitous, abundant and polar-specific crenarchaeote was the dominant ribotype in the WW and important in the upper halocline of the Arctic Ocean. Our data suggest that this organism does not contain an ammonia monooxygenase gene. In contrast to other studies where Crenarchaeota populations apparently lacking amoA genes are found in bathypelagic waters, this organism appears to dominate in well-defined, ammonium-rich, near-surface water masses in polar oceans.

  13. Integrating genomics into the taxonomy and systematics of the Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jongsik; Rainey, Fred A

    2014-02-01

    The polyphasic approach used today in the taxonomy and systematics of the Bacteria and Archaea includes the use of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data. The use of 16S rRNA gene sequence data has revolutionized our understanding of the microbial world and led to a rapid increase in the number of descriptions of novel taxa, especially at the species level. It has allowed in many cases for the demarcation of taxa into distinct species, but its limitations in a number of groups have resulted in the continued use of DNA-DNA hybridization. As technology has improved, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has provided a rapid and cost-effective approach to obtaining whole-genome sequences of microbial strains. Although some 12,000 bacterial or archaeal genome sequences are available for comparison, only 1725 of these are of actual type strains, limiting the use of genomic data in comparative taxonomic studies when there are nearly 11,000 type strains. Efforts to obtain complete genome sequences of all type strains are critical to the future of microbial systematics. The incorporation of genomics into the taxonomy and systematics of the Bacteria and Archaea coupled with computational advances will boost the credibility of taxonomy in the genomic era. This special issue of International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology contains both original research and review articles covering the use of genomic sequence data in microbial taxonomy and systematics. It includes contributions on specific taxa as well as outlines of approaches for incorporating genomics into new strain isolation to new taxon description workflows.

  14. The Role of Tetraether Lipid Composition in the Adaptation of Thermophilic Archaea to Acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eBoyd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings, the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly

  15. HicA of Escherichia coli defines a novel family of translation-independent mRNA interferases in bacteria and archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel G; Pandey, Deo P; Jaskolska, Milena

    2009-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci are common in free-living bacteria and archaea. TA loci encode a stable toxin that is neutralized by a metabolically unstable antitoxin. The antitoxin can be either a protein or an antisense RNA. So far, six different TA gene families, in which the antitoxins are proteins......, have been identified. Recently, Makarova et al. (K. S. Makarova, N. V. Grishin, and E. V. Koonin, Bioinformatics 22:2581-2584, 2006) suggested that the hicAB loci constitute a novel TA gene family. Using the hicAB locus of Escherichia coli K-12 as a model system, we present evidence that supports...... this inference: expression of the small HicA protein (58 amino acids [aa]) induced cleavage in three model mRNAs and tmRNA. Concomitantly, the global rate of translation was severely reduced. Using tmRNA as a substrate, we show that HicA-induced cleavage does not require the target RNA to be translated...

  16. Ecology and bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Andrew J; Hay, Mark; Magnusson, Bill; de Nys, Rocky; Smeathers, James; Vincent, Julian F V

    2011-05-01

    Bioprospecting is the exploration of biodiversity for new resources of social and commercial value. It is carried out by a wide range of established industries such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and agriculture as well as a wide range of comparatively new ones such as aquaculture, bioremediation, biomining, biomimetic engineering and nanotechnology. The benefits of bioprospecting have emerged from such a wide range of organisms and environments worldwide that it is not possible to predict what species or habitats will be critical to society, or industry, in the future. The benefits include an unexpected variety of products that include chemicals, genes, metabolic pathways, structures, materials and behaviours. These may provide physical blueprints or inspiration for new designs. Criticism aimed at bioprospecting has been addressed, in part, by international treaties and legal agreements aimed at stopping biopiracy and many activities are now funded by agencies that require capacity-building and economic benefits in host countries. Thus, much contemporary bioprospecting has multiple goals, including the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable management of natural resources and economic development. Ecologists are involved in three vital ways: first, applying ecological principles to the discovery of new resources. In this context, natural history becomes a vast economic database. Second, carrying out field studies, most of them demographic, to help regulate the harvest of wild species. Third, emphasizing the profound importance of millions of mostly microscopic species to the global economy.

  17. Virocell Metabolism: Metabolic Innovations During Host-Virus Interactions in the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Shilo; Ziv, Carmit; Creveld, Shiri Graff van; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-10-01

    Marine viruses are considered to be major ecological, evolutionary, and biogeochemical drivers of the marine environment, responsible for nutrient recycling and determining species composition. Viruses can re-shape their host's metabolic network during infection, generating the virocell-a unique metabolic state that supports their specific requirement. Here we discuss the concept of 'virocell metabolism' and its formation by rewiring of host-encoded metabolic networks, or by introducing virus-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes which provide the virocell with novel metabolic capabilities. The ecological role of marine viruses is commonly assessed by their relative abundance and phylogenetic diversity, lacking the ability to assess the dynamics of active viral infection. The new ability to define a unique metabolic state of the virocell will expand the current virion-centric approaches in order to quantify the impact of marine viruses on microbial food webs.

  18. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2013-04-29

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens.

  19. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna V Zhalnina

    Full Text Available The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  20. Ecological, Pedagogical, Public Rhetoric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Nathaniel A.; Weber, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    Public rhetoric pedagogy can benefit from an ecological perspective that sees change as advocated not through a single document but through multiple mundane and monumental texts. This article summarizes various approaches to rhetorical ecology, offers an ecological read of the Montgomery bus boycotts, and concludes with pedagogical insights on a…

  1. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, Per; Donovan, E R;

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selecti...

  2. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  3. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The BMP checks your blood sugar, calcium, and ... as creatinine to check your kidney function. The CMP includes all of those tests, as well as ...

  4. Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  5. Philosophy of ecology

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bryson; Peacock, Kent A

    2011-01-01

    The most pressing problems facing humanity today - over-population, energy shortages, climate change, soil erosion, species extinctions, the risk of epidemic disease, the threat of warfare that could destroy all the hard-won gains of civilization, and even the recent fibrillations of the stock market - are all ecological or have a large ecological component. in this volume philosophers turn their attention to understanding the science of ecology and its huge implications for the human project. To get the application of ecology to policy or other practical concerns right, humanity needs a clear and disinterested philosophical understanding of ecology which can help identify the practical lessons of science. Conversely, the urgent practical demands humanity faces today cannot help but direct scientific and philosophical investigation toward the basis of those ecological challenges that threaten human survival. This book will help to fuel the timely renaissance of interest in philosophy of ecology that is now oc...

  6. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pride David T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC, where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. Results From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of

  7. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their possible survival in halite fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Fendrihan, S.; Gerbl, F. W.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Frethem, C.

    2008-09-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from ancient subsurface salt sediments of great geological age (195-280 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. The characterization of subsurface microbial life is of astrobiological relevance since extraterrestrial halite has been detected and since microbial life on Mars, if existent, may have retreated into the subsurface. We attempted to simulate the embedding process of extremely halophilic archaea and to analyse any cellular changes which might occur. When enclosing haloarchaea in laboratory grown halite, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. With increased time of embedding, rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium salinarum strains were found to assume roundish morphologies. Upon dissolution of the salt crystals, these spheres were stable and viable for months when kept in buffers containing 4 M NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation with glutaraldehyde suggested a potentially gradual transformation from rods to spheres. This notion was supported by fluorescence microscopy of Halobacterium cells, following embedding in halite and staining with SYTO 9. One-dimensional protein patterns of rods and spheres, following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were similar except that the S-layer protein appeared reduced by about 15 - 20 % in spheres. The reddish-orange pigmentation of spheres was much lighter compared to that of rod-shaped cells, suggesting lowered concentrations of carotenoids; this was confirmed by extraction and spectrometry of pigments. The data suggested that Halobacterium cells are capable of forming specific

  8. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  9. Plant Terpenoids: Biosynthesis and Ecological Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Xia Cheng; Yong-Gen Lou; Ying-Bo Mao; Shan Lu; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2007-01-01

    Among plant secondary metabolites terpenoids are a structurally most diverse group; they function as phytoalexins in plant direct defense, or as signals in indirect defense responses which involves herbivores and their natural enemies. In recent years, more and more attention has been paid to the investigation of the ecological role of plant terpenoids. The biosynthesis pathways of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes include the synthesis of C5 precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its allylic isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the synthesis of the immediate diphosphate precursors, and the formation of the diverse terpenoids. Terpene synthases (TPSs) play a key role in volatile terpene synthesis. By expression of the TPS genes, significant achievements have been made on metabolic engineering to increase terpenoid production. This review mainly summarizes the recent research progress in elucidating the ecological role of terpenoids and characterization of the enzymes involved in the terpenoid biosynthesis. Spatial and temporal regulations of terpenoids metabolism are also discussed.

  10. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context.

  11. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea: Sequencing a Myriad of Type Strains

    KAUST Repository

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2014-08-05

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet\\'s most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet\\'s genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  12. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  13. Genomic encyclopedia of bacteria and archaea: sequencing a myriad of type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Parker, Charles T; Amann, Rudolf; Beck, Brian J; Chain, Patrick S G; Chun, Jongsik; Colwell, Rita R; Danchin, Antoine; Dawyndt, Peter; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; DeLong, Edward F; Detter, John C; De Vos, Paul; Donohue, Timothy J; Dong, Xiu-Zhu; Ehrlich, Dusko S; Fraser, Claire; Gibbs, Richard; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jansson, Janet K; Keasling, Jay D; Knight, Rob; Labeda, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lee, Jung-Sook; Li, Wen-Jun; Ma, Juncai; Markowitz, Victor; Moore, Edward R B; Morrison, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Nelson, Karen E; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ouzounis, Christos A; Pace, Norman; Parkhill, Julian; Qin, Nan; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Sikorski, Johannes; Smith, David; Sogin, Mitch; Stevens, Rick; Stingl, Uli; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Taylor, Dorothea; Tiedje, Jim M; Tindall, Brian; Wagner, Michael; Weinstock, George; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Owen; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Field, Dawn; Whitman, William B; Garrity, George M; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-08-01

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  14. Diversity and Distribution of Archaea in the Mangrove Sediment of Sundarbans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Bhattacharyya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves are among the most diverse and productive coastal ecosystems in the tropical and subtropical regions. Environmental conditions particular to this biome make mangroves hotspots for microbial diversity, and the resident microbial communities play essential roles in maintenance of the ecosystem. Recently, there has been increasing interest to understand the composition and contribution of microorganisms in mangroves. In the present study, we have analyzed the diversity and distribution of archaea in the tropical mangrove sediments of Sundarbans using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing resulted in approximately 142 Mb of data from three distinct mangrove areas (Godkhali, Bonnie camp, and Dhulibhashani. The taxonomic analysis revealed the dominance of phyla Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota (Marine Group I within our dataset. The distribution of different archaeal taxa and respective statistical analysis (SIMPER, NMDS revealed a clear community shift along the sampling stations. The sampling stations (Godkhali and Bonnie camp with history of higher hydrocarbon/oil pollution showed different archaeal community pattern (dominated by haloarchaea compared to station (Dhulibhashani with nearly pristine environment (dominated by methanogens. It is indicated that sediment archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  15. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their long term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from rock salt of great geological age (195-250 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. When simulating the embedding process of haloarchaea in laboratory-grown salt crystals, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. The issue of extreme long term microbial survival in rock salt has considerable implications for the search for extraterrestrial life. Halite has been found in Martian meteorites, salts are present on the Martian surface and there is good evidence for a salty ocean on the Jovian moon Europa. Therefore the search for halophilic prokaryotic life in such environments appears plausible. The development of detection methods for subsurface haloarchaea, which might also be applicable to samples from future missions to space, is important and some examples such as fluorescence microscopy methods with novel dyes will be described. (1) Fendrihan, S., Legat, A., Gruber, C., Pfaffenhuemer, M., Weidler, G., Gerbl, F., Stan- Lotter, H. (2006) Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long term microbial survival. Reviews in Environmental Science and Bio/technology 5, 1569-1605.

  16. Archaea rather than bacteria control nitrification in two agricultural acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2010-12-01

    Nitrification is a central component of the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia oxidation, the first step of nitrification, is performed in terrestrial ecosystems by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Published studies indicate that soil pH may be a critical factor controlling the relative abundances of AOA and AOB communities. In order to determine the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation in two agricultural acidic Scottish soils (pH 4.5 and 6), the influence of acetylene (a nitrification inhibitor) was investigated during incubation of soil microcosms at 20 °C for 1 month. High rates of nitrification were observed in both soils in the absence of acetylene. Quantification of respective amoA genes (a key functional gene for ammonia oxidizers) demonstrated significant growth of AOA, but not AOB. A significant positive relationship was found between nitrification rate and AOA, but not AOB growth. AOA growth was inhibited in the acetylene-containing microcosms. Moreover, AOA transcriptional activity decreased significantly in the acetylene-containing microcosms compared with the control, whereas no difference was observed for the AOB transcriptional activity. Consequently, growth and activity of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizer communities strongly suggest that AOA, but not AOB, control nitrification in these two acidic soils.

  17. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea grow under contrasting soil nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Shen, Ju-Pei; Winefield, Chris S; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Bowatte, Saman; He, Ji-Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Nitrification is a key process of the nitrogen (N) cycle in soil with major environmental implications. The recent discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) questions the traditional assumption of the dominant role of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrification. We investigated AOB and AOA growth and nitrification rate in two different layers of three grassland soils treated with animal urine substrate and a nitrification inhibitor [dicyandiamide (DCD)]. We show that AOB were more abundant in the topsoils than in the subsoils, whereas AOA were more abundant in one of the subsoils. AOB grew substantially when supplied with a high dose of urine substrate, whereas AOA only grew in the Controls without the urine-N substrate. AOB growth and the amoA gene transcription activity were significantly inhibited by DCD. Nitrification rates were much higher in the topsoils than in the subsoils and were significantly related to AOB abundance, but not to AOA abundance. These results suggest that AOB and AOA prefer different soil N conditions to grow: AOB under high ammonia (NH(3)) substrate and AOA under low NH(3) substrate conditions.

  18. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria and archaea from salt ponds in Hangu Saltworks, Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuangao; Xu, Gaochao; Sui, Liying

    2015-07-01

    A total of 26 isolates were obtained from solar salt ponds of different salinities (100, 150, 200, and 250) in Hangu Saltworks Co. Ltd., Tianjin, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that five bacteria genera Halomonas, Salinicoccus, Oceanobacillus, Gracibacillus, and Salimicrobium and one archaea genera Halorubrum were present. The genus Halomonas was predominant with eight strains distributed in a salinity range of 100-200, followed by Halorubrum with six strains in salinity 250. Based on the genus and original sampling salinity, eight bacterial and two archaeal isolates were selected for further morphological, physiological, and biochemical characterization. All of the bacterial strains were moderately halophilic with the optimal salinity for growth being either 50 or 100, while two archaeal strains were extremely halophilic with an optimal growth salinity of 200. Additionally, we put forth strain SM.200-5 as a new candidate Salimicrobium species based on the phylogenic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and its biochemical characteristics when compared with known related species.

  19. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Elena Ilka; Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Quemin, Emmanuelle; Schouten, Stefan; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2016-03-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Here, we describe a filamentous hyperthermophilic archaeal virus, Pyrobaculum filamentous virus 1 (PFV1), with a type of virion organization not previously observed in DNA viruses. The PFV1 virion, 400 ± 20 × 32 ± 3 nm, contains an envelope and an inner core consisting of two structural units: a rod-shaped helical nucleocapsid formed of two 14-kDa major virion proteins and a nucleocapsid-encompassing protein sheath composed of a single major virion protein of 18 kDa. The virion organization of PFV1 is superficially similar to that of negative-sense RNA viruses of the family Filoviridae, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus. The linear dsDNA of PFV1 carries 17,714 bp, including 60-bp-long terminal inverted repeats, and contains 39 predicted ORFs, most of which do not show similarities to sequences in public databases. PFV1 is a lytic virus that completely disrupts the host cell membrane at the end of the infection cycle.

  20. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in groundwater treatment and drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Voost, Stefan; van der Kooij, Dick

    2009-07-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote (AOP) community in three groundwater treatment plants and connected distribution systems was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and sequence analysis targeting the amoA gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Results demonstrated that AOB and AOA numbers increased during biological filtration of ammonia-rich anoxic groundwater, and AOP were responsible for ammonium removal during treatment. In one of the treatment trains at plant C, ammonia removal correlated significantly with AOA numbers but not with AOB numbers. Thus, AOA were responsible for ammonia removal in water treatment at one of the studied plants. Furthermore, an observed negative correlation between the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water and AOA numbers suggests that high DOC levels might reduce growth of AOA. AOP entered the distribution system in numbers ranging from 1.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(4) AOPs ml(-1). These numbers did not change during transport in the distribution system despite the absence of a disinfectant residual. Thus, inactive AOP biomass does not seem to be degraded by heterotrophic microorganisms in the distribution system. We conclude from our results that AOA can be commonly present in distribution systems and groundwater treatment, where they can be responsible for the removal of ammonia.

  1. Phylogenetic- and genome-derived insight into the evolution of N-glycosylation in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Lina; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor N; Allers, Thorsten; Gophna, Uri; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of oligosaccharides to target protein Asn residues, is a post-translational modification that occurs in all three domains of life. In Archaea, the N-linked glycans that decorate experimentally characterized glycoproteins reveal a diversity in composition and content unequaled by their bacterial or eukaryal counterparts. At the same time, relatively little is known of archaeal N-glycosylation pathways outside of a handful of model strains. To gain insight into the distribution and evolutionary history of the archaeal version of this universal protein-processing event, 168 archaeal genome sequences were scanned for the presence of aglB, encoding the known archaeal oligosaccharyltransferase, an enzyme key to N-glycosylation. Such analysis predicts the presence of AglB in 166 species, with some species seemingly containing multiple versions of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the events leading to aglB duplication occurred at various points during archaeal evolution. In many cases, aglB is found as part of a cluster of putative N-glycosylation genes. The presence, arrangement and nucleotide composition of genes in aglB-based clusters in five species of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax points to lateral gene transfer as contributing to the evolution of archaeal N-glycosylation.

  2. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  3. General trends in selectively driven codon usage biases in the domain archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Andrés; Jara, Eugenio; Leytón, Lucía; Diana, Leticia; Musto, Héctor

    2014-10-01

    Since the advent of rapid techniques for sequencing DNA in the mid 70's, it became clear that all codons coding for the same amino acid are not used according to neutral expectations. In the last 30 years, several theories were proposed for explaining this fact. However, the most important concepts were the result of analyses carried out in Bacteria, and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes like mammals (in other words, in two of the three Domains of life). In this communication, we study the main forces that shape codon usage in Archaeae under an evolutionary perspective. This is important because, as known, the orthologous genes related with the informational system in this Domain (replication, transcription and translation) are more similar to eukaryotes than to Bacteria. Our results show that the effect of selection acting at the level of translation is present in the Domain but mainly restricted to only a phylum (Euryarchaeota) and therefore is not as extended as in Bacteria. Besides, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of translational optimal codons and estimate the effect of selection acting at the level of accuracy. Finally, we discuss these results under some peculiarities that characterize this Domain.

  4. Genomic encyclopedia of bacteria and archaea: sequencing a myriad of type strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos C Kyrpides

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance. However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000. This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  5. Characterization and antimicrobial potential of extremely halophilic archaea isolated from hypersaline environments of the Algerian Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Inès; Hassani, Imene Ikrame; l'Haridon, Stéphane; Chalopin, Morgane; Hacène, Hocine; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea were isolated from different chotts and sebkha, dry salt lakes and salt flat respectively, of the Algerian Sahara and characterized using phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. From 102 extremely halophilic strains isolated, forty three were selected and studied. These strains were also screened for their antagonistic potential and the production of hydrolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis allowed the identification of 10 archaeal genera within the class Halobacteria: Natrinema (13 strains), Natrialba (12 strains), Haloarcula (4 strains), Halopiger (4 strains), Haloterrigena (3 strains), Halorubrum (2 strains), Halostagnicola (2 strains), Natronococcus, Halogeometricum and Haloferax (1 strain each). The most common producers of antimicrobial compounds belong to the genus Natrinema while the most hydrolytic isolates, with combined production of several enzymes, belong to the genus Natrialba. The strain affiliated to Halopiger djelfamassilliensis was found to produce some substances of interest (halocins, anti-Candida, enzymes). After partial purification and characterization of one of the strains Natrinema gari QI1, we found similarities between the antimicrobial compound and the halocin C8. Therefore, the gene encoding halocin C8 was amplified and sequenced.

  6. Precipitation of low-temperature dolomite from an anaerobic microbial consortium: the role of methanogenic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, P A; Goldstein, R H; González, L A; Roberts, J A

    2009-12-01

    Here we report precipitation of dolomite at low temperature (30 degrees C) mediated by a mixed anaerobic microbial consortium composed of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB), fermenters, and methanogens. Initial solution geochemistry is controlled by DIRB, but after 90 days shifts to a system dominated by methanogens. In live experiments conditions are initially saturated with respect to dolomite (Omega(dol) = 19.40) and increase by two orders of magnitude (Omega(dol) = 2 330.77) only after the onset of methanogenesis, as judged by the increasing [CH(4)] and the detection of methanogenic micro-organisms. We identify ordered dolomite in live microcosms after 90 days via powder X-ray diffraction, while sterile controls precipitate only calcite. Scanning electron microscopy and transmitted electron microscopy demonstrate that the precipitated dolomite is closely associated with cell walls and putative extra-cellular polysaccharides. Headspace gas measurements and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis confirm the presence of both autotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens and exclude the presence of DIRB and sulfate-reducing bacteria after dolomite begins forming. Furthermore, the absence of dolomite in the controls and prior to methanogenesis confirm that methanogenic Archaea are necessary for the low-temperature precipitation of dolomite under the experimental conditions tested.

  7. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Zhang, Li-Mei; Di, Hong J; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chinese soils with variable soil properties and soil management practices. The niche differentiation of AOB and AOA in contrasting soils have been functionally demonstrated using DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing) methods, which have shown that AOA dominate nitrification processes in acidic soils, while AOB dominated in neutral, alkaline and N-rich soils. Finally, we discuss the composition and activity of ammonia oxidizers in paddy soils, as well as the mitigation of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions and nitrate leaching via inhibition of nitrification by both AOB and AOA.

  8. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Zheng eHe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH3 oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA in Chinese soils with variable soil properties and soil management practices. The niche differentiation of AOB and AOA in contrasting soils have been functionally demonstrated using DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing methods, which have shown that AOA dominate nitrification processes in acidic soils, while AOB dominated in neutral, alkaline and N-rich soils. Finally, we discuss the composition and activity of ammonia oxidizer in paddy soils, as well as the mitigation of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O emissions and nitrate leaching via inhibition of nitrification by both AOB and AOA.

  9. Deepening, and repairing, the metabolic rift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mindi; McMichael, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically assesses the metabolic rift as a social, ecological, and historical concept describing the disruption of natural cycles and processes and ruptures in material human-nature relations under capitalism. As a social concept, the metabolic rift presumes that metabolism is understood in relation to the labour process. This conception, however, privileges the organisation of labour to the exclusion of the practice of labour, which we argue challenges its utility for analysing contemporary socio-environmental crises. As an ecological concept, the metabolic rift is based on outmoded understandings of (agro) ecosystems and inadequately describes relations and interactions between labour and ecological processes. Historically, the metabolic rift is integral to debates about the definitions and relations of capitalism, industrialism, and modernity as historical concepts. At the same time, it gives rise to an epistemic rift, insofar as the separation of the natural and social worlds comes to be expressed in social thought and critical theory, which have one-sidedly focused on the social. We argue that a reunification of the social and the ecological, in historical practice and in historical thought, is the key to repairing the metabolic rift, both conceptually and practically. The food sovereignty movement in this respect is exemplary.

  10. Genome-wide comparison of ferritin family from Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya, and Viruses: its distribution, characteristic motif, and phylogenetic relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lina; Xie, Ting; Hu, Qingqing; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Wanping

    2015-10-01

    Ferritins are highly conserved proteins that are widely distributed in various species from archaea to humans. The ubiquitous characteristic of these proteins reflects the pivotal contribution of ferritins to the safe storage and timely delivery of iron to achieve iron homeostasis. This study investigated the ferritin genes in 248 genomes from various species, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. The distribution comparison suggests that mammals and eudicots possess abundant ferritin genes, whereas fungi contain very few ferritin genes. Archaea and bacteria show considerable numbers of ferritin genes. Generally, prokaryotes possess three types of ferritin (the typical ferritin, bacterioferritin, and DNA-binding protein from starved cell), whereas eukaryotes have various subunit types of ferritin, thereby indicating the individuation of the ferritin family during evolution. The characteristic motif analysis of ferritins suggested that all key residues specifying the unique structural motifs of ferritin are highly conserved across three domains of life. Meanwhile, the characteristic motifs were also distinguishable between ferritin groups, especially phytoferritins, which show a plant-specific motif. The phylogenetic analyses show that ferritins within the same subfamily or subunits are generally clustered together. The phylogenetic relationships among ferritin members suggest that both gene duplication and horizontal transfer contribute to the wide variety of ferritins, and their possible evolutionary scenario was also proposed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the distribution, characteristic motif, and evolutionary relationship of the ferritin family.

  11. Characterization of halophilic C50 carotenoid-producing archaea isolated from solar saltworks in Bohai Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Liying; Liu, Liangsen; Deng, Yuangao

    2014-11-01

    Halophilic archaea comprise the majority of microorganisms found in hypersaline environments. C50 carotenoids accumulated in archaea cells are considered potential biotechnological products and possess a number of biological functions. Ten red colonies were isolated from brine water in a saltern crystallizer pond of the Hangu Saltworks, China. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the colonies belonged to the extremely halophilic archaea genera Halobacterium and Halorubrum. Two representative strains, Halobacterium strain SP-2 and Halorubrum strain SP-4, were selected for further study on the phenotypic characteristics and effects of salinity and pH on accumulation and composition of pigments in their cells. The archaeal strains were isolated and grown in a culture medium prepared by dissolving yeast extract (10 g/L) and acid-hydrolyzed casein (7.5 g/L) into brine water obtained from a local salt pond. Their optimum salinity and pH for growth were 250 and 7, respectively, although pigment accumulation (OD490 / mL broth) was highest at pH 8. In addition, at 150-300 salinity, increasing salinity resulted in decreasing pigment accumulation. Analysis of the UV-Vis spectrum, TLC and HLPC chromatograms showed that C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin is the major pigment in both strains.

  12. Eukaryotic versus prokaryotic marine picoplankton ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massana, Ramon; Logares, Ramiro

    2013-05-01

    Marine microorganisms contribute markedly to global biomass and ecosystem function. They include a diverse collection of organisms differing in cell size and in evolutionary history. In particular, microbes within the picoplankton are similar in size but belong to two drastically different cellular plans, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Compared with larger organisms, prokaryotes and picoeukaryotes share ecological features, such as high specific activity, large and constant abundances, and high dispersal potential. Still, there are some aspects where their different cell organization influences their ecological performance. First, prokaryotes have a huge metabolic versatility and are involved in all biogeochemical cycles, whereas picoeukaryotes are metabolically less flexible but can exploit diverse predatory life strategies due to their phagocytic capacity. Second, sexual reproduction is absent in prokaryotes but may be present in picoeukaryotes, thus determining different evolutionary diversification dynamics and making species limits clearer in picoeukaryotes. Finally, it is plausible that picoeukaryotes are less flexible to enter a reversible state of low metabolic activity, thus picoeukaryote assemblages may have fewer rare species and may be less resilient to environmental change. In summary, lumping together pico-sized microbes may be convenient for some ecological studies, but it is also important to keep in mind their differences.

  13. Development of Ecological Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Keizikas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research on ecological buildings and their influence on the constructional sphere. The aim of the paper is to reveal the essence of ecological architecture showing substantial progress and its potential to stimulate architectural and technological growth. The article also describes relations between the ideas of ecological buildings and the ‘passive house’ concepts and aspects of development as well as describes the possibilities of improving building sustainability and energy efficiency. Article in Lithuanian

  14. Social Ecological Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Spash, Clive L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces and explains how ecological economics has developed as a modern movement with its roots in environmentalism and radical environmental economics. Divisions and conflicts within the field are explored to show why material claiming to fall under the title of ecological economics fails to be representative of progress or the vision which drove socio-economic specialists to interact with ecologists in the first place. The argument is then put forward that ecological economics...

  15. Between Design and Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Mona Chor

    such vegetation, based on concepts and theories in plant community ecology. If these communities are based on local forbs there is a continuum in anthropogenic intervention from designed and intensively maintained to semi-natural herbaceous vegetation. Results from a large field experiment show that, after three...... colonised by grasses and eventually woody species. This thesis adds useful basic knowledge in plant community ecology and species-specific growth, which are relevant to research and planning in landscape architecture and ecology....

  16. [Demography and human ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, J M

    1993-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century the German biologist Ernest Haekel was the first scientist to use the term ecology, which was defined as the study of relationships of organisms or groups of organisms with the environment and indicated the interdependence of the living world, including plants, animals, and humans. This concept also indicates a continuous process of adaptation of organisms to their external environment. The basic concepts of scientific ecology, which developed at the end of the 19th century, can be attributed to Darwin: the relationships between living beings and the notion of the process of adaptation to their environment. The term human ecology appeared in the early 1920s. Human ecology embodies fundamental ideas: biotype, habitat, community, biocenosis, ecosystem, biomass, interchange and equilibrium, and circulation of energy. The accumulated knowledge about human ecology is broken down using the criteria of topography (ecology of humid forests, deserts, lakes, etc.); followed by the appearance of species; and the variants of classical division: auto ecology (influence of external factors on living beings) and sinecology (the study of groups of associated organisms, i.e., natural, animal, and vegetation communities). The species are considered on the basis of equality or sinecology (all of them have the same interests), while in human ecology a species is determined by its relation to a reference group--autoecology or anthropocentric ecology. In 1911, J. Thompson bridged the gap between biological knowledge and social sciences; in 1921, H. Barrows identified human ecology as a component of geography; in 1925, L. Bernard presented the classification of ecosystems; and in 1936, Ezra Park published his work, Human Ecology, followed in 1945 by the emergence of the Chicago school. Demography and human ecology are intimately connected because population is the result of natural and migratory movements, therefore the two sciences require a methodology

  17. Ecological perspectives on synthetic biology: insights from microbial population biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Ana E.; Rebolleda-Gómez, María; Benítez, Mariana; Travisano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic capabilities of microbes are the basis for many major biotechnological advances, exploiting microbial diversity by selection or engineering of single strains. However, there are limits to the advances that can be achieved with single strains, and attention has turned toward the metabolic potential of consortia and the field of synthetic ecology. The main challenge for the synthetic ecology is that consortia are frequently unstable, largely because evolution by constituent members affects their interactions, which are the basis of collective metabolic functionality. Current practices in modeling consortia largely consider interactions as fixed circuits of chemical reactions, which greatly increases their tractability. This simplification comes at the cost of essential biological realism, stripping out the ecological context in which the metabolic actions occur and the potential for evolutionary change. In other words, evolutionary stability is not engineered into the system. This realization highlights the necessity to better identify the key components that influence the stable coexistence of microorganisms. Inclusion of ecological and evolutionary principles, in addition to biophysical variables and stoichiometric modeling of metabolism, is critical for microbial consortia design. This review aims to bring ecological and evolutionary concepts to the discussion on the stability of microbial consortia. In particular, we focus on the combined effect of spatial structure (connectivity of molecules and cells within the system) and ecological interactions (reciprocal and non-reciprocal) on the persistence of microbial consortia. We discuss exemplary cases to illustrate these ideas from published studies in evolutionary biology and biotechnology. We conclude by making clear the relevance of incorporating evolutionary and ecological principles to the design of microbial consortia, as a way of achieving evolutionarily stable and sustainable systems. PMID

  18. Chemical ecology of fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Fungi are widespread in nature and have conquered nearly every ecological niche. Fungi occur not only in terrestrial but also in freshwater and marine environments. Moreover, fungi are known as a rich source of secondary metabolites. Despite these facts, the ecological role of many of these metabolites is still unknown and the chemical ecology of fungi has not been investigated systematically so far. This review intends to present examples of the various chemical interactions of fungi with other fungi, plants, bacteria and animals and to give an overview of the current knowledge of fungal chemical ecology.

  19. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  20. Ecologies of Learning, Ecologies of Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Helene

    The subject of this project/paper is the challenges that digital media pose to earlier definitions, divisions and conceptions of learning institutions and their activities. It is argued that, in the light of digital media, the idea of institutional co-creation of learning and literacies needs...... in the light of the new Danish school reform. How can different learning institutions contribute to a “joint” ecology of learning? What would the benefits be from this in terms of young people’s literacies? On what theoretical basis can such an ecology and co-creation take place? And what kind of didactics...

  1. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eBeman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, NO3- profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock and within Catalina Harbor, oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 x 107 genes g-1 varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in Bird Rock cores, and Catalina Harbor cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated Catalina Harbor sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria.

  2. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J M; Bertics, Victoria J; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another - yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O(2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 10(7) genes g(-) (1)) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

  3. Unifying elemental stoichiometry and metabolic theory in predicting species abundances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, David; Digel, Christoph; Rall, Björn Christian; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Brose, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    While metabolic theory predicts variance in population density within communities depending on population average body masses, the ecological stoichiometry concept relates density variation across communities to varying resource stoichiometry. Using a data set including biomass densities of 4959 pop

  4. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Sauder, Laura A; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  5. Temporal and spatial stability of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in aquarium biofilters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samik Bagchi

    Full Text Available Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4-5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥ 81-86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater

  6. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-12-05

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  7. Protein-DNA binding dynamics predict transcriptional response to nutrients in archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Sharma, Kriti; Pittman, Adrianne M C; Schmid, Amy K

    2013-10-01

    Organisms across all three domains of life use gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to integrate varied stimuli into coherent transcriptional responses to environmental pressures. However, inferring GRN topology and regulatory causality remains a central challenge in systems biology. Previous work characterized TrmB as a global metabolic transcription factor in archaeal extremophiles. However, it remains unclear how TrmB dynamically regulates its ∼100 metabolic enzyme-coding gene targets. Using a dynamic perturbation approach, we elucidate the topology of the TrmB metabolic GRN in the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. Clustering of dynamic gene expression patterns reveals that TrmB functions alone to regulate central metabolic enzyme-coding genes but cooperates with various regulators to control peripheral metabolic pathways. Using a dynamical model, we predict gene expression patterns for some TrmB-dependent promoters and infer secondary regulators for others. Our data suggest feed-forward gene regulatory topology for cobalamin biosynthesis. In contrast, purine biosynthesis appears to require TrmB-independent regulators. We conclude that TrmB is an important component for mediating metabolic modularity, integrating nutrient status and regulating gene expression dynamics alone and in concert with secondary regulators.

  8. Protein–DNA binding dynamics predict transcriptional response to nutrients in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Sharma, Kriti; Pittman, Adrianne M. C.; Schmid, Amy K.

    2013-01-01

    Organisms across all three domains of life use gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to integrate varied stimuli into coherent transcriptional responses to environmental pressures. However, inferring GRN topology and regulatory causality remains a central challenge in systems biology. Previous work characterized TrmB as a global metabolic transcription factor in archaeal extremophiles. However, it remains unclear how TrmB dynamically regulates its ∼100 metabolic enzyme-coding gene targets. Using a dynamic perturbation approach, we elucidate the topology of the TrmB metabolic GRN in the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. Clustering of dynamic gene expression patterns reveals that TrmB functions alone to regulate central metabolic enzyme-coding genes but cooperates with various regulators to control peripheral metabolic pathways. Using a dynamical model, we predict gene expression patterns for some TrmB-dependent promoters and infer secondary regulators for others. Our data suggest feed-forward gene regulatory topology for cobalamin biosynthesis. In contrast, purine biosynthesis appears to require TrmB-independent regulators. We conclude that TrmB is an important component for mediating metabolic modularity, integrating nutrient status and regulating gene expression dynamics alone and in concert with secondary regulators. PMID:23892291

  9. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    artifacts influence the use of others. Understanding this interplay becomes more and more essential for interaction design as our artifact ecologies grow. This paper continues a recent discourse on artifact ecologies. Through interviews with iPhone users, we demonstrate that relationships between artifacts...

  10. RADIOECOLOGY AND ECOLOGICAL IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shubik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The author's investigations results are presented in comparing with literary materials concerning the application of principles and methods of ecological immunology for solving radioecological questions. The data on characteristic of immunity and health of human population affected with radiation factors of the environment is given as well as animals' population state as the links offood ecological chains.

  11. Quantitative plant ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This e-book is written in the Wolfram' CDF format (download free CDF player from Wolfram.com) The objective of this e-book is to introduce the population ecological concepts for measuring and predicting the ecological success of plant species. This will be done by focusing on the measurement......, will not be covered in this e-book....

  12. The ecology of citizenship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coates, Robert; Garmany, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This article calls into question the relationship between citizenship, space and ecological stability. Drawing on case study research from urban Brazil, we argue that while space may be crucial to Western perspectives of citizenship – particularly in urban areas – the ecological coproduction of thes

  13. Microbial Diversity and Ecology in the Interfaces of the Deep-sea Anoxic Brine Pools in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Hikmawan, Tyas I.

    2015-05-01

    Deep-sea anoxic brine pools are one of the most extreme ecosystems on Earth, which are characterized by drastic changes in salinity, temperature, and oxygen concentration. The interface between the brine and overlaying seawater represents a boundary of oxic-anoxic layer and a steep gradient of redox potential that would initiate favorable conditions for divergent metabolic activities, mainly methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. This study aimed to investigate the diversity of Bacteria, particularly sulfate-reducing communities, and their ecological roles in the interfaces of five geochemically distinct brine pools in the Red Sea. Performing a comprehensive study would enable us to understand the significant role of the microbial groups in local geochemical cycles. Therefore, we combined culture-dependent approach and molecular methods, such as 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene, phylogenetic analysis of functional marker gene encoding for the alpha subunits of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA), and single-cell genomic analysis to address these issues. Community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated high bacterial diversity and domination of Bacteria over Archaea in most locations. In the hot and multilayered Atlantis II Deep, the bacterial communities were stratified and hardly overlapped. Meanwhile in the colder brine pools, sulfatereducing Deltaproteobacteria were the most prominent bacterial groups inhabiting the interfaces. Corresponding to the bacterial community profile, the analysis of dsrA gene sequences revealed collectively high diversity of sulfate-reducing communities. Desulfatiglans-like dsrA was the prevalent group and conserved across the Red Sea brine pools. In addition to the molecular studies, more than thirty bacterial strains were successfully isolated and remarkably were found to be cytotoxic against the cancer cell lines. However, none of them were sulfate reducers. Thus, a single-cell genomic analysis was used to study

  14. Metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Salim

    2007-01-01

    Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis.

  15. Predictive systems ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Matthew R; Bithell, Mike; Cornell, Stephen J; Dall, Sasha R X; Díaz, Sandra; Emmott, Stephen; Ernande, Bruno; Grimm, Volker; Hodgson, David J; Lewis, Simon L; Mace, Georgina M; Morecroft, Michael; Moustakas, Aristides; Murphy, Eugene; Newbold, Tim; Norris, K J; Petchey, Owen; Smith, Matthew; Travis, Justin M J; Benton, Tim G

    2013-11-22

    Human societies, and their well-being, depend to a significant extent on the state of the ecosystems that surround them. These ecosystems are changing rapidly usually in response to anthropogenic changes in the environment. To determine the likely impact of environmental change on ecosystems and the best ways to manage them, it would be desirable to be able to predict their future states. We present a proposal to develop the paradigm of predictive systems ecology, explicitly to understand and predict the properties and behaviour of ecological systems. We discuss the necessary and desirable features of predictive systems ecology models. There are places where predictive systems ecology is already being practised and we summarize a range of terrestrial and marine examples. Significant challenges remain but we suggest that ecology would benefit both as a scientific discipline and increase its impact in society if it were to embrace the need to become more predictive.

  16. Microbial metagenomes from three aquifers in the Fennoscandian shield terrestrial deep biosphere reveal metabolic partitioning among populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofen; Holmfeldt, Karin; Hubalek, Valerie; Lundin, Daniel; Åström, Mats; Bertilsson, Stefan; Dopson, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Microorganisms in the terrestrial deep biosphere host up to 20% of the earth's biomass and are suggested to be sustained by the gases hydrogen and carbon dioxide. A metagenome analysis of three deep subsurface water types of contrasting age (from 86% coverage. The populations were dominated by Proteobacteria, Candidate divisions, unclassified archaea and unclassified bacteria. The estimated genome sizes of the biosphere. The data were finally used to create a combined metabolic model of the deep terrestrial biosphere microbial community.

  17. Exploring Subglacial Microbial Ecology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Johnson, S. S.; Grzymski, J.

    2009-12-01

    Subglacial environments were long thought to be abiotic. We now know that microbial life exists below glaciers, but know relatively little about the in situ metabolic processes they mediate and how their activity transforms the geochemistry of subglacial efflux. It has been hypothesized that subglacial systems, driven to anoxia in the presence of sufficient organic matter, will follow a continuum of redox chemistries utilizing electron acceptors with decreasing reduction potential (i.e. Fe (III), sulfate, CO2). Indeed, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis have been detected in studies of polythermal glaciers. However, it is unclear whether there is sufficient organic matter to sustain highly reducing conditions below Antarctic ice. Here we present a broad overview of the microbial ecology of subglacial ecosystems and describe the links between microbial diversity and community function in these chemically complex environments. The subglacial environment below the Taylor Glacier, Antarctica provides an example where biogeochemical measurements made on subglacial efflux can inform specific mechanisms of microbial metabolism. We have tested the validity of these mechanisms using environmental genomic surveys and biogeochemical measurements of subglacial fluids to describe an active community that cycles iron and sulfur below Taylor Glacier. Examples include the incorporation of radiolabeled bicarbonate by cells in the outflow and detection of functional genes responsible for CO2-fixation (i.e. RuBisCO), and isotopic composition of sulfate sulfur and oxygen in the outflow indicative of sulfate reduction with the presence of functional genes of the sulfur cycle (i.e. APS reductase). Moving forward in our exploration of subglacial ecosystems, key questions regarding microbial energetics include: 1) How microorganisms cycle mineral substrates below glaciers to gain energy for growth 2) Whether subglacial microorganisms grow syntrophically in order to metabolize iron and

  18. Recent Developments in Ecological Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reader with published articles within the field of ecological economics, mostly from 1997 - 2007......Reader with published articles within the field of ecological economics, mostly from 1997 - 2007...

  19. New perspectives in benthic deep-sea microbial ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia eCorinaldesi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest and most remote biome of the biosphere. They play a fundamental role in global biogeochemical cycles and their functions allow existence of life on our planet. In the last 20 years enormous progress has been made in the investigation of deep-sea microbes, but the knowledge of the microbial ecology of the soft bottoms (representing >90% of the deep-sea floor surface is still very limited. Deep-sea sediments host the largest fractions of Bacteria, Archaea and viruses on Earth, and potentially, a high diversity. At the same time, available results from metagenomics suggest that a large fraction of microbial taxa is completely unknown to science. Estimating the diversity of deep-sea benthic microbes and understanding their functions are some of the challenges of absolute priority, not only for deep-sea microbial ecology, but also for the entire research field of life sciences. The achievement of these goals, given the importance of the deep-sea microbial life for the functioning of the global biosphere, will open new perspectives for the comprehension of adaptation processes to the impact of global changes.

  20. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  1. Quantitative plant ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This e-book is written in the Wolfram' CDF format (download free CDF player from Wolfram.com) The objective of this e-book is to introduce the population ecological concepts for measuring and predicting the ecological success of plant species. This will be done by focusing on the measurement...... and statistical modelling of plant species abundance and the relevant ecological processes that control species abundance. The focus on statistical modelling and likelihood function based methods also means that more algorithm based methods, e.g. ordination techniques and boosted regression tress...

  2. Complex adaptive systems ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2003-01-01

    In the following, I will analyze two articles called Complex Adaptive Systems EcologyI & II (Molin & Molin, 1997 & 2000). The CASE-articles are some of the more quirkyarticles that have come out of the Molecular Microbial Ecology Group - a groupwhere I am currently making observational studies....... They are the result of acooperation between Søren Molin, professor in the group, and his brother, JanMolin, professor at Department of Organization and Industrial Sociology atCopenhagen Business School. The cooperation arises from the recognition that bothmicrobial ecology and sociology/organization theory works...

  3. [Parasitism and ecological parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Parasitism as one of the life modes is a general biological phenomenon and is a characteristic of all viruses, many taxa of bacteria, fungi, protists, metaphytes, and metazoans. Zooparasitology is focused on studies of parasitic animals, particularly, on their taxonomy, anatomy, life cycles, host-parasite relations, biocoenotic connections, and evolution. Ecological parasitology is a component of ecology, as the scientific study of the relation of living organisms with each other and their surroundings. In the present paper, critical analysis of the problems, main postulates, and terminology of the modern ecological parasitology is given.

  4. Scaling of Metabolic Scaling within Physical Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. Glazier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the slope and elevation of scaling relationships between log metabolic rate and log body size vary taxonomically and in relation to physiological or developmental state, ecological lifestyle and environmental conditions. Here I discuss how the recently proposed metabolic-level boundaries hypothesis (MLBH provides a useful conceptual framework for explaining and predicting much, but not all of this variation. This hypothesis is based on three major assumptions: (1 various processes related to body volume and surface area exert state-dependent effects on the scaling slope for metabolic rate in relation to body mass; (2 the elevation and slope of metabolic scaling relationships are linked; and (3 both intrinsic (anatomical, biochemical and physiological and extrinsic (ecological factors can affect metabolic scaling. According to the MLBH, the diversity of metabolic scaling relationships occurs within physical boundary limits related to body volume and surface area. Within these limits, specific metabolic scaling slopes can be predicted from the metabolic level (or scaling elevation of a species or group of species. In essence, metabolic scaling itself scales with metabolic level, which is in turn contingent on various intrinsic and extrinsic conditions operating in physiological or evolutionary time. The MLBH represents a “meta-mechanism” or collection of multiple, specific mechanisms that have contingent, state-dependent effects. As such, the MLBH is Darwinian in approach (the theory of natural selection is also meta-mechanistic, in contrast to currently influential metabolic scaling theory that is Newtonian in approach (i.e., based on unitary deterministic laws. Furthermore, the MLBH can be viewed as part of a more general theory that includes other mechanisms that may also affect metabolic scaling.

  5. The membraneless bioelectrochemical reactor stimulates hydrogen fermentation by inhibiting methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Sasaki, Daisuke; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    The membraneless bioelectrochemical reactor (Ml-BER) is useful for dark hydrogen fermentation. The effect of the electrochemical reaction on microorganisms in the Ml-BER was investigated using glucose as the substrate and compared with organisms in a membraneless non-bioelectrochemical reactor (Ml-NBER) and bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) with a proton exchange membrane. The potentials on the working electrode of the Ml-BER and BER with membrane were regulated to -0.9 V (versus Ag/AgCl) to avoid water electrolysis with a carbon electrode. The Ml-BER showed suppressed methane production (19.8 ± 9.1 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) and increased hydrogen production (12.6 ± 3.1 mg-H·L(-1)·day(-1)) at pHout 6.2 ± 0.1, and the major intermediate was butyrate (24.9 ± 2.4 mM), suggesting efficient hydrogen fermentation. In contrast, the Ml-NBER showed high methane production (239.3 ± 17.9 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) and low hydrogen production (0.2 ± 0.0 mg-H·L(-1)·day(-1)) at pHout 6.3 ± 0.1. In the cathodic chamber of the BER with membrane, methane production was high (276.3 ± 20.4 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) (pHout, 7.2 ± 0.1). In the anodic chamber of the BER with membrane (anode-BER), gas production was low because of high lactate production (43.6 ± 1.7 mM) at pHout 5.0 ± 0.1. Methanogenic archaea were not detected in the Ml-BER and anode-BER. However, Methanosarcina sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were found in Ml-NBER. Prokaryotic copy numbers in the Ml-BER and Ml-NBER were similar, as were the bacterial community structures. Thus, the electrochemical reaction in the Ml-BER affected hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens, but not the bacterial community.

  6. Experimental characterization of Cis-acting elements important for translation and transcription in halophilic archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Brenneis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The basal transcription apparatus of archaea is well characterized. However, much less is known about the mechanisms of transcription termination and translation initation. Recently, experimental determination of the 5'-ends of ten transcripts from Pyrobaculum aerophilum revealed that these are devoid of a 5'-UTR. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that many transcripts of other archaeal species might also be leaderless. The 5'-ends and 3'-ends of 40 transcripts of two haloarchaeal species, Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii, have been determined. They were used to characterize the lengths of 5'-UTRs and 3'-UTRs and to deduce consensus sequence-elements for transcription and translation. The experimental approach was complemented with a bioinformatics analysis of the H. salinarum genome sequence. Furthermore, the influence of selected 5'-UTRs and 3'-UTRs on transcript stability and translational efficiency in vivo was characterized using a newly established reporter gene system, gene fusions, and real-time PCR. Consensus sequences for basal promoter elements could be refined and a novel element was discovered. A consensus motif probably important for transcriptional termination was established. All 40 haloarchaeal transcripts analyzed had a 3'-UTR (average size 57 nt, and their 3'-ends were not posttranscriptionally modified. Experimental data and genome analyses revealed that the majority of haloarchaeal transcripts are leaderless, indicating that this is the predominant mode for translation initiation in haloarchaea. Surprisingly, the 5'-UTRs of most leadered transcripts did not contain a Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence. A genome analysis indicated that less than 10% of all genes are preceded by a SD sequence and even most proximal genes in operons lack a SD sequence. Seven different leadered transcripts devoid of a SD sequence were efficiently translated in vivo, including artificial 5'-UTRs of random sequences. Thus, an interaction of

  7. Metabolism of oligosaccharides and starch in lactobacilli: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eGänzle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides, compounds that are composed of 2 – 10 monosaccharide residues, are major carbohydrate sources in habitats populated by lactobacilli. Moreover, oligosaccharide metabolism is essential for ecological fitness of lactobacilli. Disaccharide metabolism by lactobacilli is well understood; however, few data on the metabolism of higher oligosaccharides are available. Research on the ecology of intestinal microbiota as well as the commercial application of prebiotics has shifted the interest from (digestible disaccharides to (indigestible higher oligosaccharides. This review provides an overview on oligosaccharide metabolism in lactobacilli. Emphasis is placed on maltodextrins, isomalto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides, and raffinose-family oligosaccharides. Starch is also considered. Metabolism is discussed on the basis of metabolic studies related to oligosaccharide metabolism, information on the cellular location and substrate specificity of carbohydrate transport systems, glycosyl hydrolases and phorphorylases, and the presence of metabolic genes in genomes of 28 strains of lactobacilli. Metabolic pathways for disaccharide metabolism often also enable the metabolism of tri- and tetrasaccharides. However, with the exception of amylase and levansucrase, metabolic enzymes for oligosaccharide conversion are intracellular and oligosaccharide metabolism is limited by transport. This general restriction to intracellular glycosyl hydrolases differentiates lactobacilli from other bacteria that adapted to intestinal habitats, particularly Bifidobacterium spp.

  8. Metabolic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as porphyria Severe infection throughout the body ( sepsis ) Thyroid disease Vitamin deficiencies (including vitamins B12 , B6 , E , and B1 ) Some metabolic disorders are passed down through families (inherited), while others ...

  9. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  10. Public goods and metabolic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Herwig; Bruggeman, Frank J; Molenaar, Douwe; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Teusink, Bas

    2016-06-01

    Microbial growth can be characterized by a limited set of macroscopic parameters such as growth rate, biomass yield and substrate affinity. Different culturing protocols for laboratory evolution have been developed to select mutant strains that have one specific macroscopic growth parameter improved. Some of those mutant strains display tradeoffs between growth parameters and changed metabolic strategies, for example, a shift from respiration to fermentation. Here we discuss recent studies suggesting that metabolic strategies and growth parameter tradeoffs originate from a common set of physicochemical and cellular constraints, associated with the allocation of intracellular resources over biosynthetic processes, mostly protein synthesis. This knowledge will give insight in ecological and biological concepts and can be used for metabolic and evolutionary engineering strategies.

  11. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  12. Lipid Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008393 Effects of angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor blocker on triglyceride metabolism in the liver: experiment with Zucker fatty rats. RAN Jianmin(冉建民), et al. Dept Endocrinol, Guangzhou Red Cross Hosp, 4th Hosp Med Coll, Jinan Univ, Guangzhou 510220. Natl Med J China 2008;88(22):1557-1561. Objective To investigate the effects of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on triglyceride (TG) metabolism and mechanism thereof.

  13. Marine Ecological Environment Management Based on Ecological Compensation Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunzhen Qu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of marine environmental management is a key factor in the successful implementation of marine power strategies. The improvement in management levels of marine environments requires innovation in marine management. In other words, the transformation of marine environmental management into marine ecological environment management must be done in order to achieve sustainable development of the marine economy. As an environmental economic policy that combines both administrative and market measures, ecological compensation mechanisms have significant advantages in marine ecological environment management. Based on the study of the current development of ecological compensation mechanisms in China, through the analysis of the connotation of marine ecological civilization, existing marine ecological protection practices and marine environmental management methods, this paper posits that the current marine ecological environment management in China should be established on the basis of ecological compensation mechanisms. At present, a lack of laws and regulations for overall marine ecological environment management is the key factor restricting the practice of marine ecological environment management. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the current path of marine ecological environment management in China from the perspective of the construction of legal system of ecological compensation law, the establishment of ecological compensation fees, ecological taxes and ecological compensation fund systems, and the clear status for a marine ecological management and supervision body.

  14. Green Turtle Trophic Ecology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently conducting a study of green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) trophic ecology in the eastern Pacific. Tissue samples and stable carbon and stable...

  15. Market Squid Ecology Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains ecological information collected on the major adult spawning and juvenile habitats of market squid off California and the US Pacific Northwest....

  16. Ecological Provinces of Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This coverage provides information for the first level of the Ecological Classification System. The boundaries of the polygons of this coverage were derived from...

  17. Ecological Subsections of Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This coverage provides information for the third level of the Ecological Classification System. The boundaries of the polygons of this coverage were derived from...

  18. Ecological Sections of Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This coverage provides information for the second level of the Ecological Classification System. The boundaries of the polygons of this coverage were derived from...

  19. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.; Gansen, M.; Frenzel, P.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH3F) caused surprisingly

  20. Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate (PRPP): Biosynthesis, Enzymology, Utilization, and Metabolic Significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Andersen, Kasper R; Kilstrup, Mogens;

    2017-01-01

    is reviewed. Central to the metabolism of PRPP is PRPP synthase, which has been studied from all kingdoms of life by classical mechanistic procedures. The results of these analyses are unified with recent progress in molecular enzymology and the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of PRPP......Phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) is an important intermediate in cellular metabolism. PRPP is synthesized by PRPP synthase, as follows: ribose 5-phosphate + ATP → PRPP + AMP. PRPP is ubiquitously found in living organisms and is used in substitution reactions with the formation of glycosidic bonds...... synthases from eubacteria, archaea, and humans. The structures and mechanisms of catalysis of the five diphosphoryltransferases are compared, as are those of selected enzymes of diphosphoryl transfer, phosphoryl transfer, and nucleotidyl transfer reactions. PRPP is used as a substrate by a large number...

  1. Sraffa and ecological economics

    OpenAIRE

    Verger, Yoann

    2015-01-01

    References to Sraffa and to the neo-Ricardian school is something quite customary in ecological economics. By looking at contributions in this area since the beginning of ecological economics and at contributions on environmental problem from the neo-Ricardian school, we see that a connection between both school still has to be made. This connection should be articulated around the initial aim of Sraffa: to develop a new paradigm, competing against the neoclassical one. Only then it will be p...

  2. Indicators of Ecological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-03

    Wang et al. (2003) and earlier those of Chapra and Di Toro (1991). Wang et al. (2003) termed their approach the extreme value method and used it to...Thesis, Auburn University, Auburn, AL. 210 pp. Chapra , S. C., Di Toro, D. M., 1991. Delta method for estimating primary production, respiration, and...characteristics, The challenge in using ecological indicators is determining which of the numerous measures of ecological systems best characterize

  3. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel...... to how artists working with new information and media technologies create inventive ways of inserting sound and image into urban environments....

  4. Ecological Perspectives in HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blevis, Eli; Bødker, Susanne; Flach, John;

    The aim of the workshop is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to discuss the present and future of ecological perspectives in HCI. The participants will reflect on the current uses and interpretations of “ecology” and related concepts in the field. The workshop will assess...... the potential of ecological perspectives in HCI for supporting rich and meaningful analysis, as well as innovative design, of interactive technologies in real-life contexts...

  5. Developments in numerical ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P.; Legendre, L.

    1987-01-01

    From earlier ecological studies it has become apparent that simple univariate or bivariate statistics are often inappropriate, and that multivariate statistical analyses must be applied. Despite several difficulties arising from the application of multivariate methods, community ecology has acquired a mathematical framework, with three consequences: it can develop as an exact science; it can be applied operationally as a computer-assisted science to the solution of environmental problems; and it can exchange information with other disciplines using the language of mathematics.

  6. 极端嗜盐古菌蛋白类抗生素——嗜盐菌素%Halocin:Protein Antibiotics Produced by Extremely Halophilic Archaea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    厉云; 向华; 谭华荣

    2002-01-01

    @@ 古菌(Archaea)是一类与细菌及真核生物显著不同的生命的第三种形式[1],大多生活在极端或特殊环境,主要包括产甲烷古菌(Methanogenic Achaea)、极端嗜盐古菌(Extremely Halophilic Archaea)和极端嗜热古菌(Extremely Thermophilic Archaea)等三大类.极端古菌是极端环境微生物的重要成员,也是极端环境微生物资源开发的重要领域.其中,嗜盐古菌可产生一类蛋白类抗生素,称为嗜盐菌素(halocin).

  7. Metagenomic and Cultivation-Based Analysis of Novel Microorganisms and Functions in Metal-Contaminated Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Yelton, Alexis Pepper

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria and archaea have evolved metabolic strategies that enable them to live in environments contaminated by toxic metals. In fact, many bacteria and archaea take advantage of the redox sensitivity of these very same metals to gain energy via anaerobic respiration. Here, metagenomic techniques were developed and applied along with conventional physiological and ecological methods to elucidate multiple modes of adaptation of bacteria and archaea in metal-contaminated acid mine drainage...

  8. Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Soderberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP, the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP, whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP, the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.

  9. Diversity and Distribution of Archaea Community along a Stratigraphic Permafrost Profile from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accompanying the thawing permafrost expected to result from the climate change, microbial decomposition of the massive amounts of frozen organic carbon stored in permafrost is a potential emission source of greenhouse gases, possibly leading to positive feedbacks to the greenhouse effect. In this study, the community composition of archaea in stratigraphic soils from an alpine permafrost of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau was investigated. Phylogenic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences revealed that the community was predominantly constituted by Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. The active layer contained a proportion of Crenarchaeota at 51.2%, with the proportion of Euryarchaeota at 48.8%, whereas the permafrost contained 41.2% Crenarchaeota and 58.8% Euryarchaeota, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. OTU1 and OTU11, affiliated to Group 1.3b/MCG-A within Crenarchaeota and the unclassified group within Euryarchaeota, respectively, were widely distributed in all sediment layers. However, OTU5 affiliated to Group 1.3b/MCG-A was primarily distributed in the active layers. Sequence analysis of the DGGE bands from the 16S rRNAs of methanogenic archaea showed that the majority of methanogens belonged to Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales affiliated to Euryarchaeota and the uncultured ZC-I cluster affiliated to Methanosarcinales distributed in all the depths along the permafrost profile, which indicated a dominant group of methanogens occurring in the cold ecosystems.

  10. Enumeration of Archaea and Bacteria in seafloor basalt using real-time quantitative PCR and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einen, Jørn; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Ovreås, Lise

    2008-05-01

    A SYBR Green real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assay for the detection and quantification of Bacteria and Archaea present in the glassy rind of seafloor basalts of different ages and water depths is presented. Two sets of domain-specific primers were designed and validated for specific detection and quantification of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes in DNA extracted from basaltic glass. Total cell numbers were also estimated by fluorescence microscopy analysis of SYBR Gold-stained samples. The results from the two different approaches were concurrent, and Q-PCR results showed that the total number of cells present in basalts was in the range from 6 x 10(5) to 4 x 10(6) cells g(-1) basaltic glass. Further, it was demonstrated that these cells were almost exclusively from the domain Bacteria. When applying the same methods on samples of different ages (22 years-0.1 Ma) and water depths (139-3390 mbsl), no significant differences in cell concentrations or in the relative abundance of Archaea and Bacteria were detected.

  11. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  12. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  13. Benefits of ecological engineering practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüll, A.; Van Bohemen, H.; Costanza, R.; Mitsch, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    With the intention to further promote the field of ecological engineering and the solutions it provides, a workshop on “Benefits of Ecological Engineering Practices” was held 3 Dec 2009. It was conducted by the International Ecological Engineering Society in Paris at the conference “Ecological Engin

  14. Urban ecology and its Importance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾玛诺

    2015-01-01

    With the development of ecological problems are becoming more and more serious people pay more and more attention on ecological city,, this paper analyzes the sources of city ecological problems from the angle of the city planning, to explore the feasible measures to solve or al eviate the increasingly serious ecological problems.

  15. Benefits of ecological engineering practices

    OpenAIRE

    Brüll, A.; Van Bohemen, H.; Costanza, R.; Mitsch, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    With the intention to further promote the field of ecological engineering and the solutions it provides, a workshop on “Benefits of Ecological Engineering Practices” was held 3 Dec 2009. It was conducted by the International Ecological Engineering Society in Paris at the conference “Ecological Engineering: from Concepts to Application” organized by the Ecological Engineering Applications Group GAIE. This paper presents the results of the workshop related to three key questions: (1) what are t...

  16. Characterization of large-insert DNA libraries from soil for environmental genomic studies of Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treusch, Alexander H; Kletzin, Arnulf; Raddatz, Guenter

    2004-01-01

    covering 3 Gbp of community DNA from two different soil samples, a sandy ecosystem and a mixed forest soil. In a fosmid end sequencing approach including 5376 sequence tags of approximately 700 bp length, we show that mostly bacterial and, to a much lesser extent, archaeal and eukaryotic genome fragments......, are presented and discussed. We thereby extend the genomic information of uncultivated crenarchaeota from soil and offer hints to specific metabolic traits present in this group....

  17. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  18. Urban sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Krogh Groth

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Within recent years, there has been a renewed focus on sound in urban environments. From sound installations in public space to sound festivals in alternative settings, we find a common interest in sound art relating to the urban environment. Artworks or interventions presented in such contexts share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel. The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point to how artists working with new information and media technologies create inventive ways of inserting sound and image into urban environments.

  19. The Genome Sequence of Methanohalophilus mahii SLPT Reveals Differences in the Energy Metabolism among Members of the Methanosarcinaceae Inhabiting Freshwater and Saline Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Scheuner, Carmen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tice, Hope [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Chen, Feng [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Samuel [ORNL; Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia D [ORNL; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [ORNL; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpidis, Nikos C [ORNL; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-12-01

    Methanohalophilus mahii is the type species of the genus Methanohalophilus, which currently comprises three distinct species with validly published names. Mhp. mahii represents moderately halophilic methanogenic archaea with a strictly methylotrophic metabolism. The type strain SLPT was isolated from hypersaline sediments collected from the southern arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,012,424 bp genome is a single replicon with 2032 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. A comparison of the reconstructed energy metabolism in the halophilic species Mhp. mahii with other representatives of the Methanosarcinaceae reveals some interesting differences to freshwater species.

  20. The Genome Sequence of Methanohalophilus mahii SLPT Reveals Differences in the Energy Metabolism among Members of the Methanosarcinaceae Inhabiting Freshwater and Saline Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Scheuner, Carmen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Methanohalophilus mahii is the type species of the genus Methanohalophilus, which currently comprises three distinct species with validly published names. Mhp. mahii represents moderately halophilic methanogenic archaea with a strictly methylotrophic metabolism. The type strain SLPT was isolated from hypersaline sediments collected from the southern arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,012,424 bp genome is a single replicon with 2032 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. A comparison of the reconstructed energy metabolism in the halophilic species Mhp. mahii with other representatives of the Methanosarcinaceae reveals some interesting differences to freshwater species.

  1. The Genome Sequence of Methanohalophilus mahii SLPT Reveals Differences in the Energy Metabolism among Members of the Methanosarcinaceae Inhabiting Freshwater and Saline Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Spring

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanohalophilus mahii is the type species of the genus Methanohalophilus, which currently comprises three distinct species with validly published names. Mhp. mahii represents moderately halophilic methanogenic archaea with a strictly methylotrophic metabolism. The type strain SLPT was isolated from hypersaline sediments collected from the southern arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,012,424 bp genome is a single replicon with 2032 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. A comparison of the reconstructed energy metabolism in the halophilic species Mhp. mahii with other representatives of the Methanosarcinaceae reveals some interesting differences to freshwater species.

  2. ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS VS ECONOMIC(AL ECOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kharlamova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently world faces the dilemma – ecological economy or economic(al ecology. The researchers produce hundreds of surveys on the topic. However the analyses of recent most cited simulations had shown the diversity of results. Thus, for some states the Kuznets environmental curve has place, for others – no. Same could be said about different years for the same state. It provokes the necessity of drawing new group analyses to reveal the tendencies and relationships between economic and environmental factors. Most flexible and mirror factor of environmental sustainability is the volume of CO2 emissions. The econometric analysis was used for detecting the economic impact on this indicator at the global level and in the spectra of group of states depending on their income. The hypothesis of the existence of environmental Kuznets curve for the analysed data is rejected. Real GDP per capita impact on carbon dioxide emissions is considered only at the global level. The impact of openness of the economy is weak. Rejection happened also to the hypothesis that for the developed countries there is a reverse dependence between the environmental pollution and economic openness. Indicator “energy consumption per capita” impacts on greenhouse gas emissions only in countries with high income. Whereby it should be noted that the more developed a country is, the more elastic is this influence. These results have a potential usage for environmental policy regulation and climate strategy.

  3. Ecological city planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Rueda

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A territory, a city, a neighbourhood are all ecosystems; a mixture of chemico-physical and organic elements related to each other. That which defines an ecological system is the set of rules and characteristics which condition its relationships, and its duration in time is guaranteed by its efficiency and internal organization which applied to the city is translated in the reduction of the use of natural resources and in the increase of social organization. To increase the efficiency of the urban systems is the necessary condition for the formulation of ecological city planning favouring the maximum liveability of sites. Liveability is directly correlated to the optimization of numerous elements (public space, equipment, services, building techniques, innovative technology, social cohesion, biodiversity. To carry out such objectives, ecological city planning proposes a new model of town planning on three levels (subsoil, ground level, and upper level.

  4. Coevolutionary ecological economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallis, Giorgos [ICREA Researcher, ICTA, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, ETSE, QC/3095, 08193 Bellatera, Barcelona (Spain); Norgaard, Richard B. [Energy and Resources Group, University of California at Berkeley, 310 Barrows Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720-3050 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    This paper maps a coevolutionary research agenda for ecological economics. At an epistemological level coevolution offers a powerful logic for transcending environmental and social determinisms and developing a cross-disciplinary approach in the study of socio-ecological systems. We identify four consistent stories emerging out of coevolutionary studies in ecological economics, concerning: environmental degradation and development failure in peripheral regions; the lock-in of unsustainable production-consumption patterns; the vicious cycle between human efforts to control undesirable micro-organisms and the evolution of these organisms; and the adaptive advantages of other-regarding, cooperative behaviors and institutions. We identify challenges in the conceptualization of coevolutionary relationships in relation to: the interaction between different hierarchical levels of evolution; the role of space and social power; uneven rates of change and crises. We conclude with the political implications of a coevolutionary perspective based on the premises of pragmatism. (author)

  5. Assimilation, dissimilation, and detoxification of formaldehyde, a central metabolic intermediate of methylotrophic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Methanol is a valuable raw material used in the manufacture of useful chemicals as well as a potential source of energy to replace coal and petroleum. Biotechnological interest in the microbial utilization of methanol has increased because it is an ideal carbon source and can be produced from renewable biomass. Formaldehyde, a cytotoxic compound, is a central metabolic intermediate in methanol metabolism. Therefore, microorganisms utilizing methanol have adopted several metabolic strategies to cope with the toxicity of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is initially detoxified through trapping by some cofactors, such as glutathione, mycothiol, tetrahydrofolate, and tetrahydromethanopterin, before being oxidized to CO2. Alternatively, free formaldehyde can be trapped by sugar phosphates as the first reaction in the C1 assimilation pathways: the xylulose monophosphate pathway for yeasts and the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway for bacteria. In yeasts, although formaldehyde generation and consumption takes place in the peroxisome, the cytosolic formaldehyde oxidation pathway also plays a role in formaldehyde detoxification as well as energy formation. The key enzymes of the RuMP pathway are found in a variety of microorganisms including bacteria and archaea. Regulation of the genes encoding these enzymes and their catalytic mechanisms depend on the physiological traits of these organisms during evolution.

  6. Ecology of gelatious plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaspers, Cornelia

    as a result of this invasion and its ecological and economic impacts. In 2005, when M. leidyi was sighted in Northern Europe for the first time, similar consequences were feared. The aim of my PhD project was to understand the potential impact of M. leidyi on the Baltic Sea ecosystem and constrains on its...... in high and intermediate saline areas in Northern Europe. While the ecological impact of M. leidyi in the central Baltic appears to be limited concern, the environment in other European waters should be more favourable to their populations. In these areas, it is suggested that M. leidyi constitutes...

  7. Art, Ecology and Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzke, Anne Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The discourse of ecology and sustainability has gained critical traction in recent years. But how are these concepts framed within the space, language and idea of the exhibition? This panel discussion, moderated by Steven Lam and conducted by email in July 2012, sought to unpack the claims...... and limits of the ecological, looking specifically at various international case studies, within the practice of curatorial and exhibition studies. The discussion begins with a reflection on ‘DON'T/PANIC’ in Durban and ‘Rethink – Contemporary Art and Climate Change’ in Copenhagen, exhibitions that were...

  8. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  9. Small multicopy, non-integrative shuttle vectors based on the plasmid pRN1 for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus solfataricus, model organisms of the (cren-)archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkner, Silvia; Grogan, Dennis; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Lipps, Georg

    2007-01-01

    The extreme thermoacidophiles of the genus Sulfolobus are among the best-studied archaea but have lacked small, reliable plasmid vectors, which have proven extremely useful for manipulating and analyzing genes in other microorganisms. Here we report the successful construction of a series of Sulfolo

  10. The development of ecological tourism and ecological civilization construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张波

    2014-01-01

    This passage shows us the characters of ecology tourism and reveals the problems in the modern tourism , emphasises that we should develop ecology tourism and make a link between them, then leads to Sustainable Development.

  11. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  12. Phylogenetic and Functional Analysis of Metagenome Sequence from High-Temperature Archaeal Habitats Demonstrate Linkages between Metabolic Potential and Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus;

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to understand the environmental factors that control the distribution of archaea in thermal habitats. Here we describe, analyze, and synthesize metagenomic and geochemical data collected from seven high......-temperature sites that contain microbial communities dominated by archaea relative to bacteria. The specific objectives of the study were to use metagenome sequencing to determine the structure and functional capacity of thermophilic archaeal-dominated microbial communities across a pH range from 2.5 to 6.......4 and to discuss specific examples where the metabolic potential correlated with measured environmental parameters and geochemical processes occurring in situ. Random shotgun metagenome sequence (∼40-45 Mb Sanger sequencing per site) was obtained from environmental DNA extracted from high-temperature sediments and...

  13. Towards a Systems Approach in the Genetic Analysis of Archaea: Accelerating Mutant Construction and Phenotypic Analysis in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian K. Blaby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the availability of a genome sequence and increasingly sophisticated genetic tools, Haloferax volcanii is becoming a model for both Archaea and halophiles. In order for H. volcanii to reach a status equivalent to Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a gene knockout collection needs to be constructed in order to identify the archaeal essential gene set and enable systematic phenotype screens. A streamlined gene-deletion protocol adapted for potential automation was implemented and used to generate 22 H. volcanii deletion strains and identify several potentially essential genes. These gene deletion mutants, generated in this and previous studies, were then analyzed in a high-throughput fashion to measure growth rates in different media and temperature conditions. We conclude that these high-throughput methods are suitable for a rapid investigation of an H. volcanii mutant library and suggest that they should form the basis of a larger genome-wide experiment.

  14. Comparison of the community structures of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rhizoplanes of floating aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Shuting; Gu, Li

    2011-09-20

    Some common floating aquatic macrophytes could remove nutrients, such as nitrogen, from eutrophic water. However, the relationship between these macrophytes and the ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms on their rhizoplanes is still unknown. In this study, we examined communities of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) on the rhizoplanes of common floating aquatic macrophytes (Eichhornia crassipes, Pistia stratiotes and Ipomoea aquatic) in a eutrophic reservoir.The results show that AOB were the predominant ammonia-oxidizer on the three rhizoplanes. The principal AOB were Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas ureae clades. The principal group of AOA was most similar to the clone from activated sludge. The ratio of AOB amoA gene copies to AOA varied from 1.36 (on E. crassipes) to 41.90 (on P. stratiotes). Diversity of AOA was much lower than that of AOB in most samples, with the exception of P. stratiotes.

  15. Biodiversity in Benthic Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Nikolai; Carl, J. D.

    Foreword: This proceeding is based on a set of papers presented at the second Nordic Benthological Meeting held in Silkeborg, November 13-14, 1997. The main theme of the meeting was biodiversity in benthic ecology and the majority of contributions touch on this subject. In addition, the proceeding...

  16. Activity Book: Ocean Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a collection of activities to help elementary students study ocean ecology. The activities have students investigate ocean inhabitants, analyze animal adaptations, examine how temperature and saltiness affect ocean creatures, and learn about safeguarding the sea. Student pages offer reproducible learning sheets. (SM)

  17. Ecology and Human Destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Examines eschatology as the heart of Christian faith, suggesting that an appreciation of an eschatological interpretation of the cosmos enables acceptance of nature's transience and a grounding for an ecological ethic. Maintains that recent scientific developments present a promising, rather than pessimistic, picture of the universe. Holds that…

  18. Ecology in Urban Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Letitia K.; Ryan, Michael

    In this course guide to the teaching of urban ecology, six learning activities on the following topics are outlined: (1) city location and growth; (2) an in-depth study of New Orleans; (3) city shape and structure; (4) size and spacing of cities; (5) cities with special functions; (6) local community study. Educational objectives for each activity…

  19. Challenges of ecological restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halme, Panu; Allen, Katherine A.; Aunins, Ainars

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rate of ecosystem degradation has raised the need for ecological restoration throughout different biomes and continents. North European forests may appear as one of the least vulnerable ecosystems from a global perspective, since forest cover is not rapidly decreasing and many ecosys...

  20. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  1. Ecology of lianas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnitzer, S.A.; Bongers, F.; Burnham, R.J.; Putz, F.E.

    2015-01-01

    A liana is a long-stemmed, woody vine that is rooted in the soil at ground level and uses trees to climb up to the canopy to get access to well-lit areas of the forest. The main goal of this book is to present the current status of liana ecology in tropical and temperate forests. In essence, it is a

  2. Aspects of Marine Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations to impart ocean science understanding, specifically, aspects of marine ecology, to high school students. The course objectives include the ability of…

  3. Marine and Island Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Lawrence J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an ecology course which provides students with an opportunity to observe aquatic and terrestrial life in the Bahamas. States that students learn scientific methodology by measuring physical and chemical aspects of the island habitats. Provides information on the island, course description and objectives, transportation, facilities, and…

  4. The Autoimmune Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  5. Identification of novel positive-strand RNA viruses by metagenomic analysis of archaea-dominated Yellowstone hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Benjamin; Shaughnessy, Daniel P; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V; Roberto, Francisco F; Young, Mark

    2012-05-01

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  6. The impact of dissolved organic carbon on the spatial variability of methanogenic archaea communities in natural wetland ecosystems across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Jia, Zhongjun; Cai, Zucong

    2012-10-01

    Significant spatial variation in CH(4) emissions is a well-established feature of natural wetland ecosystems. To understand the key factors affecting CH(4) production, the variation in community structure of methanogenic archaea, in relation to substrate and external environmental influences, was investigated in selected wetlands across China, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Case study areas were the subtropical Poyang wetland, the warm-temperate Hongze wetland, the cold-temperate Sanjiang marshes, and the alpine Ruoergai peatland on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The topsoil layer in the Hongze wetland exhibited the highest population of methanogens; the lowest was found in the Poyang wetland. Maximum CH(4) production occurred in the topsoil layer of the Sanjiang Carex lasiocarpa marsh, the minimum was observed in the Ruoergai peatland. CH(4) production potential was significantly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration but not with the abundance or diversity indices of methanogenic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis and DOC concentration indicated a shift in the dominant methanogen from the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales in DOC-rich wetlands to Methanosarcinaceae with a low affinity in wetlands with relatively high DOC and then to the acetotrophic methanogen Methanosaetaceae with a high affinity in wetlands with low DOC, or with high DOC but rich sulfate-reducing bacteria. Therefore, it is proposed that the dominant methanogen type in wetlands is primarily influenced by available DOC concentration. In turn, the variation in CH(4) production potential in the wetlands of eastern China is attributable to differences in the DOC content and the dominant type of methanogen present.

  7. Molecular ecological network analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Ye

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the interaction among different species within a community and their responses to environmental changes is a central goal in ecology. However, defining the network structure in a microbial community is very challenging due to their extremely high diversity and as-yet uncultivated status. Although recent advance of metagenomic technologies, such as high throughout sequencing and functional gene arrays, provide revolutionary tools for analyzing microbial community structure, it is still difficult to examine network interactions in a microbial community based on high-throughput metagenomics data. Results Here, we describe a novel mathematical and bioinformatics framework to construct ecological association networks named molecular ecological networks (MENs through Random Matrix Theory (RMT-based methods. Compared to other network construction methods, this approach is remarkable in that the network is automatically defined and robust to noise, thus providing excellent solutions to several common issues associated with high-throughput metagenomics data. We applied it to determine the network structure of microbial communities subjected to long-term experimental warming based on pyrosequencing data of 16 S rRNA genes. We showed that the constructed MENs under both warming and unwarming conditions exhibited topological features of scale free, small world and modularity, which were consistent with previously described molecular ecological networks. Eigengene analysis indicated that the eigengenes represented the module profiles relatively well. In consistency with many other studies, several major environmental traits including temperature and soil pH were found to be important in determining network interactions in the microbial communities examined. To facilitate its application by the scientific community, all these methods and statistical tools have been integrated into a comprehensive Molecular Ecological

  8. Valuation of ecological resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

  9. Ecological stability in response to warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussmann, Katarina E.; Schwarzmüller, Florian; Brose, Ulrich; Jousset, Alexandre; Rall, Björn C.

    2014-03-01

    That species’ biological rates including metabolism, growth and feeding scale with temperature is well established from warming experiments. The interactive influence of these changes on population dynamics, however, remains uncertain. As a result, uncertainty about ecological stability in response under warming remains correspondingly high. In previous studies, severe consumer extinction waves in warmed microcosms were explained in terms of warming-induced destabilization of population oscillations. Here, we show that warming stabilizes predator-prey dynamics at the risk of predator extinction. Our results are based on meta-analyses of a global database of temperature effects on metabolic and feeding rates and maximum population size that includes species of different phylogenetic groups and ecosystem types. To unravel population-level consequences we parameterized a bioenergetic predator-prey model and simulated warming effects within ecological, non-evolutionary timescales. In contrast to previous studies, we find that warming stabilized population oscillations up to a threshold temperature, which is true for most of the possible parameter combinations. Beyond the threshold level, warming caused predator extinction due to starvation. Predictions were tested in a microbial predator-prey system. Together, our results indicate a major change in how we expect climate change to alter natural ecosystems: warming should increase population stability while undermining species diversity.

  10. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  11. Ecological zones of California deserts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset delineates ecological zones within California deserts. We derived ecological zones by reclassifying LANDFIRE vegetation biophysical setting types, plus...

  12. The redoubtable ecological periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological periodic tables are repositories of reliable information on quantitative, predictably recurring (periodic) habitat–community patterns and their uncertainty, scaling and transferability. Their reliability derives from their grounding in sound ecological principle...

  13. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  14. Fermentation enhancement of methanogenic archaea consortia from an Illinois basin coalbed via DOL emulsion nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiao

    Full Text Available Microbially enhanced coalbed methane technology must be used to increase the methane content in mining and generate secondary biogenic gas. In this technology, the metabolic processes of methanogenic consortia are the basis for the production of biomethane from some of the organic compounds in coal. Thus, culture nutrition plays an important role in remediating the nutritional deficiency of a coal seam. To enhance the methane production rates for microorganism consortia, different types of nutrition solutions were examined in this study. Emulsion nutrition solutions containing a novel nutritional supplement, called dystrophy optional modification latex, increased the methane yield for methanogenic consortia. This new nutritional supplement can help methanogenic consortia form an enhanced anaerobic environment, optimize the microbial balance in the consortia, and improve the methane biosynthesis rate.

  15. Fermentation enhancement of methanogenic archaea consortia from an Illinois basin coalbed via DOL emulsion nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Peng, Su-Ping; Wang, En-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Microbially enhanced coalbed methane technology must be used to increase the methane content in mining and generate secondary biogenic gas. In this technology, the metabolic processes of methanogenic consortia are the basis for the production of biomethane from some of the organic compounds in coal. Thus, culture nutrition plays an important role in remediating the nutritional deficiency of a coal seam. To enhance the methane production rates for microorganism consortia, different types of nutrition solutions were examined in this study. Emulsion nutrition solutions containing a novel nutritional supplement, called dystrophy optional modification latex, increased the methane yield for methanogenic consortia. This new nutritional supplement can help methanogenic consortia form an enhanced anaerobic environment, optimize the microbial balance in the consortia, and improve the methane biosynthesis rate.

  16. Especial de l'ICTA a Ecological economics

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Alier, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Investigadors de l'Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA) de la UAB han publicat a la revista Ecological Economics un dossier especial -Social Metabolism, Ecological Distribution Conflicts, and Valuation Languages- que analitza les relacions entre l'economia ecològica i l'ecologia política, fruit de recerques realitzades a indrets on l'extracció de recursos naturals i la contaminació produeixen conflictes econòmics, ecològics, culturals i socials importants.

  17. The Social-Ecological Ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidamak, A.; Tiittanen, T.

    1992-01-01

    Argues that it is essential for preschool education to explore environmental and ecological values. Discusses cognitive development of socio-ecological knowledge at three age levels. Asserts that folk tales provide good examples of ecological values because beauty usually triumphs over ugliness and good over evil. (CFR)

  18. Hanford Site Ecological Quality Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilyard, Gordon R.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Tzemos, Spyridon

    2002-02-17

    This report reviews the ecological quality profile methodology and results for the Hanford Site. It covers critical ecological assets and terrestrial resources, those in Columbia River corridor and those threatened and engdangered, as well as hazards and risks to terrestrial resources. The features of a base habitat value profile are explained, as are hazard and ecological quality profiles.

  19. Nutrition, ecology and nutritional ecology: towardan integrated framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Steven J.; Mayntz, David

    2009-01-01

    1. The science of nutritional ecology spans a wide range of fields, including ecology, nutrition, behaviour, morphology, physiology, life history and evolutionary biology. But does nutritional ecology have a unique theoretical framework and research program and thus qualify as a field of research...... in its own right? 2. We suggest that the distinctive feature of nutritional ecology is its integrative nature, and that the field would benefit from more attention to formalizing a theoretical and quantitative framework for developing this. 3. Such a framework, we propose, should satisfy three minimal...... requirements: it should be nutritionally explicit, organismally explicit, and ecologically explicit. 4. We evaluate against these criteria four existing frameworks (Optimal Foraging Theory, Classical Insect Nutritional Ecology, the Geometric Framework for nutrition, and Ecological Stoichiometry), and conclude...

  20. Ecological recovery in ERA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Scientific Committee (Scientific Committee); Topping, Christopher John

    2016-01-01

    EFSA performs environmental risk assessments (ERAs) for single potential stressors such as plant protection products, genetically modified organisms and feed additives and for invasive alien species that are harmful for plant health. In this risk assessment domain, the EFSA Scientific Committee...... recognises the importance of more integrated ERAs considering both the local and landscape scales, as well as the possible co-occurrence of multiple potential stressors that fall under the remit of EFSA, which are important when addressing ecological recovery. In this scientific opinion, the Scientific...... Committee gathered scientific knowledge on the potential for the recovery of non-target organisms for the further development of ERA. Current EFSA guidance documents and opinions were reviewed on how ecological recovery is addressed in ERA schemes. In addition, this scientific opinion is based on expert...

  1. Chasing Ecological Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species—naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities. PMID:27631692

  2. Fundamental ecology is fundamental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchamp, Franck; Dunne, Jennifer A; Le Maho, Yvon; May, Robert M; Thébaud, Christophe; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The primary reasons for conducting fundamental research are satisfying curiosity, acquiring knowledge, and achieving understanding. Here we develop why we believe it is essential to promote basic ecological research, despite increased impetus for ecologists to conduct and present their research in the light of potential applications. This includes the understanding of our environment, for intellectual, economical, social, and political reasons, and as a major source of innovation. We contend that we should focus less on short-term, objective-driven research and more on creativity and exploratory analyses, quantitatively estimate the benefits of fundamental research for society, and better explain the nature and importance of fundamental ecology to students, politicians, decision makers, and the general public. Our perspective and underlying arguments should also apply to evolutionary biology and to many of the other biological and physical sciences.

  3. Biosemiotics and ecological monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2001-01-01

    Through recent decades a global cultural-institutional network has gradually grown up to project, implement and use the enormous technological web that is supposed to observe, monitor, communicate, inventory and asses our environment and its biodiversity in order to implement sustainable management...... models. The majority of “knowledge tools” that have been incorporated in the mainstream of this “techno-web” are amply based on a combination of mechanistic biology, genetic reductionism, economical determinism and neo-Darwinian cultural and biological perspectives. These approaches leave aside many...... of the qualitative and relational aspects that can only be grasped by considering the semiotic networks operative in complex ecological and cultural systems. In this paper, it is suggested that a biosemiotic approach to ecology may prove useful for the modelling process, which in turn will allow the construction...

  4. Editorial: Pedagogical Media Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee M. Meister

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available From educational gaming through portable e-readers to cell phones, media are interpenetrating educational spaces and activities. Accordingly, understanding media in environmental or ecological terms has become increasingly important for education internationally. In North America, for example, the centenary of McLuhan’s birth has focused attention on approaches to media – whether oral, textual, electronic or digital– as a kind of environment in which education takes place. In parts of Europe, the so-called mediatic turn – following on the linguistic and iconic turns – has similarly emphasized the role of media as a condition for the possibility of educational activities and programs. With a few exceptions1 the papers in this special issue were first presented at the conference «Educational Media Ecologies: International Perspectives» which took place at the University of Paderborn, Germany, on March 27–28, 2012.2 The event was an interdisciplinary and transatlantic endeavor to bring together a wide range of perspectives on various issues relevant to educational media ecologies,3 and on related debates on mediation, medialization, mediatization, and mediality.4 The purpose of this volume, like the conference, is to foster and deepen international dialogue in the area of educational media. Areas of research and scholarship relevant to this dialogue include educational media, media literacy, educational philosophy, and media and cultural studies. The contributions, described below, put conceptual issues as well as social practices and applications at the center of the debate. Klaus Rummler opens the issue by clarifying the concept of ecology itself. Referencing a range of work over the past 50 years, Rummler describes how ecological models have been cast in sociological, semiotic, cultural, mediatic and other terms, and he explains the implications of these various perspectives for the study of educational contexts. Rummler also

  5. To the Ecological Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀青

    2014-01-01

    Landscape design is one of the space form and space environment comprehensive planning and design, to im-prove the quality of urban environment, quality of life and urban landscape level play a very important role.It is expounded in this article based on the value of landscape ecological aesthetics under the background of productive landscape, discusses the"bigfoot aesthetics"innovative application in modern landscape design and new thinking.

  6. To the Ecological Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀青

    2014-01-01

    Landscape design is one of the space form and space environment comprehensive planning and design, to im- prove the quality of urban environment, quality of life and urban landscape level play a very important role.It is expounded in this article based on the value of landscape ecological aesthetics under the background of productive landscape, discusses the "bigfoot aesthetics" innovative application in modern landscape design and new thinking.

  7. Recombination does not hinder formation or detection of ecological species of Synechococcus inhabiting a hot spring cyanobacterial mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Crystal Melendrez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of bacterial speciation have claimed to support the biological species concept—that reduced recombination is required for bacterial populations to diverge into species. This conclusion has been reached from the discovery that ecologically distinct clades show lower rates of recombination than that which occurs among closest relatives. However, these previous studies did not attempt to determine whether the more-rapidly recombining close relatives within the clades studied may also have diversified ecologically, without benefit of sexual isolation. Here we have measured the impact of recombination on ecological diversification within and between two ecologically distinct clades (A and B´ of Synechococcus in a hot spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National Park, using a cultivation-free, multi-locus approach. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries were constructed from mat samples collected at 60°C and 65°C. Analysis of multiple linked loci near Synechococcus 16S rRNA genes showed little evidence of recombination between the A and B´ lineages, but a record of recombination was apparent within each lineage. Recombination and mutation rates within each lineage were of similar magnitude, but recombination had a somewhat greater impact on sequence diversity than mutation, as also seen in many other bacteria and archaea. Despite recombination within the A and B´ lineages, there was evidence of ecological diversification within each lineage. The algorithm Ecotype Simulation identified sequence clusters consistent with ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes, and several hypothesized ecotypes were distinct in their habitat associations and in their adaptations to different microenvironments. We conclude that sexual isolation is more likely to follow ecological divergence than to precede it. Thus, an ecology-based model of speciation appears more appropriate than the biological species concept for bacterial and archaeal

  8. Resilience Through Ecological Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Brunetta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the strategic role that urban biodiversity and ecosystem services management, natural infrastructure and adaptive governance approaches can play in making our economies and societies more resilient and in linking human societies and the natural environment. Resilience – a concept that entered the debate on urban governance – means the ability of urban systems, considered as linear-systems, to react to external disturbances by returning to some socio-ecological equilibrium steady-state by overcoming a crisis period (Gunderson & al. 2010, Newman & al. 2009. In this view, green infrastructures can assume a strategic role in restoring and enhancing the ecological and environmental livability in urban areas. Starting from the International and European context, the paper discusses innovative programs and interdisciplinary projects and practices (some cases in Turin Metropolitan Area to demonstrate how green infrastructures can increase the adaptive capacity of urban systems in term of resilience. They can contribute to increase the ability of European cities to adapt to climate change and to reduce their ecological footprints, to enhance security and life quality.

  9. Ecological planning: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Frederick; Brooks, Kenneth

    1981-11-01

    Beginning with the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1969, the federal government of the United States has enacted numerous pieces of legislation intended to protect or conserve the environment. Other national governments have also enacted environmental legislation during the past two decades. State and local governments have also adopted policies concerned with environmental planning and management. Multiple laws and overlapping governmental agency responsibilities have confused development and resource management efforts. A comprehensive methodology that integrates the legal mandates and the agency missions into a common and unified framework is needed. Ecological planning offers such a method. Application of the method allows planners and resource managers to better understand the nature and character of the land and/or resource and therefore make better decisions about its appropriate use or management. The steps taken in an ecological planning process—1) goal setting, 2) inventory and analysis of data, 3) suitability analysis, 4) developing alternatives, 5) implementation, 6) administration, and 7) evaluation—are outlined and explained. Hand-drawn overlays and computer programs as techniques for handling ecological planning information are compared. Observations and suggestions for further research are offered.

  10. Ecological Econophysics for Degrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pueyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a synthesis of ecological economics with econophysics and other complexity approaches to economics. Arguably, the resulting “ecological econophysics” will be scientifically sounder than mainstream economics and much better suited to addressing a major challenge of our times: the development of democratically-based policies to reduce economic throughput to an environmentally sustainable level without triggering economic crises and without excluding part of the world’s population, i.e., to implement degrowth. Degrowth will need major structural changes, which leads us to question whether there are limits to the malleability of the economic system’s architecture. A fundamental limit will be encountered if, as suggested by the physics of complexity, long-lasting complex systems always occur midway between an ordered and a disordered state. There is much evidence that this hypothesis holds and that the current economic system satisfies this condition. However, this does not mean that the problems posed by this system should be unavoidable. Ecological econophysics gives clues to identifying alternative economic systems that would also function between order and chaos, but which would have radically different implications for environmental sustainability and social justice.

  11. Research on Ecological Civilization Evaluation Index System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ecological civilization, which refers to the harmonious development of man and the nature, has the connotation of the ecological material civilization, ecological consciousness civilization, ecological institutional civilization and ecological behavior civilization. The research on ecological civilization evaluation index system is important in that it can provide the guidance for the construction of ecological civilization, and besides it can improve public recognition of the importance of ecological civil...

  12. Statistical ecology comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Olivier; Buckland, Stephen T; Morgan, Byron J T; Bez, Nicolas; Bertrand, Sophie; Choquet, Rémi; Dray, Stéphane; Etienne, Marie-Pierre; Fewster, Rachel; Gosselin, Frédéric; Mérigot, Bastien; Monestiez, Pascal; Morales, Juan M; Mortier, Frédéric; Munoz, François; Ovaskainen, Otso; Pavoine, Sandrine; Pradel, Roger; Schurr, Frank M; Thomas, Len; Thuiller, Wilfried; Trenkel, Verena; de Valpine, Perry; Rexstad, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The desire to predict the consequences of global environmental change has been the driver towards more realistic models embracing the variability and uncertainties inherent in ecology. Statistical ecology has gelled over the past decade as a discipline that moves away from describing patterns towards modelling the ecological processes that generate these patterns. Following the fourth International Statistical Ecology Conference (1-4 July 2014) in Montpellier, France, we analyse current trends in statistical ecology. Important advances in the analysis of individual movement, and in the modelling of population dynamics and species distributions, are made possible by the increasing use of hierarchical and hidden process models. Exciting research perspectives include the development of methods to interpret citizen science data and of efficient, flexible computational algorithms for model fitting. Statistical ecology has come of age: it now provides a general and mathematically rigorous framework linking ecological theory and empirical data.

  13. Unifying elemental stoichiometry and metabolic theory in predicting species abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, David; Digel, Christoph; Rall, Björn C; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Brose, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    While metabolic theory predicts variance in population density within communities depending on population average body masses, the ecological stoichiometry concept relates density variation across communities to varying resource stoichiometry. Using a data set including biomass densities of 4959 populations of soil invertebrates across 48 forest sites we combined these two frameworks. We analyzed how the scaling of biomass densities with population-averaged body masses systematically interacts with stoichiometric variables. Simplified analyses employing either only body masses or only resource stoichiometry are highly context sensitive and yield variable and often misleading results. Our findings provide strong evidence that analyses of ecological state variables should integrate allometric and stoichiometric variables to explain deviations from predicted allometric scaling and avoid erroneous conclusions. In consequence, our study provides an important step towards unifying two prominent ecological theories, metabolic theory and ecological stoichiometry.

  14. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Plugge

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas methanogenic Archaea would be expected to succeed in the deeper sulfate-depleted layers of the sediment. Where sediments are high in organic matter, sulfate is depleted at shallow sediment depths, and biogenic methane production will occur. In the absence of sulfate, many SRB ferment organic acids and alcohols, producing hydrogen, acetate, and carbon dioxide, and may even rely on hydrogen- and acetate-scavenging methanogens to convert organic compounds to methane. SRB can establish two different life styles, and these can be termed as sulfidogenic and acetogenic, hydrogenogenic metabolism. The advantage of having different metabolic capabilities is that it raises the chance of survival in environments when electron acceptors become depleted. In marine sediments, SRB and methanogens do not compete but rather complement each other in the degradation of organic matter.Also in freshwater ecosystems with sulfate concentrations of only 10-200 μM, sulfate is consumed efficiently within the top several cm of the sediments. Here, many of the δ-Proteobacteria present have the genetic machinery to perform dissimilatory sulfate reduction, yet they have an acetogenic, hydrogenogenic way of life.In this review we evaluate the physiology and metabolic mode of SRB in relation with their environment.

  15. Archaea and Bacteria Acclimate to High Total Ammonia in a Methanogenic Reactor Treating Swine Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Esquivel-Elizondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition by ammonium at concentrations above 1000 mgN/L is known to harm the methanogenesis phase of anaerobic digestion. We anaerobically digested swine waste and achieved steady state COD-removal efficiency of around 52% with no fatty-acid or H2 accumulation. As the anaerobic microbial community adapted to the gradual increase of total ammonia-N (NH3-N from 890±295 to 2040±30 mg/L, the Bacterial and Archaeal communities became less diverse. Phylotypes most closely related to hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus (36.4% and Methanobrevibacter (11.6%, along with acetoclastic Methanosaeta (29.3%, became the most abundant Archaeal sequences during acclimation. This was accompanied by a sharp increase in the relative abundances of phylotypes most closely related to acetogens and fatty-acid producers (Clostridium, Coprococcus, and Sphaerochaeta and syntrophic fatty-acid Bacteria (Syntrophomonas, Clostridium, Clostridiaceae species, and Cloacamonaceae species that have metabolic capabilities for butyrate and propionate fermentation, as well as for reverse acetogenesis. Our results provide evidence countering a prevailing theory that acetoclastic methanogens are selectively inhibited when the total ammonia-N concentration is greater than ~1000 mgN/L. Instead, acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens coexisted in the presence of total ammonia-N of ~2000 mgN/L by establishing syntrophic relationships with fatty-acid fermenters, as well as homoacetogens able to carry out forward and reverse acetogenesis.

  16. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgavi, Diego P.; Rahahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka

    2015-01-01

    and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted...... the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult...... sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure...

  17. Influence of niche differentiation on the abundance of methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability. To understand the underlying factors that induce differences in CH4 emissions from natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical profile soils sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07−8.29×109 cells g−1 soil in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2=0.718, P<0.001, n=13 and between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the total nitrogen concentrations (R2=0.758, P<0.001, n=13 in wetland soils. This indicates that the amount of soil organic carbon may affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2=0.011, P>0.05, n=13, it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2=0.305, P=0.05, n=13. This suggests that the methanogen population is not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland ecosystems. The CH4 production rate of the top soil layer increases with increasing latitude, from 274 μg CH4 kg−1 soil d−1 in the Poyang wetland to 665 μg CH4 kg−1 soil d−1 in the Carex lasiocarpa

  18. Metabolic potential of microbial mats and microbialites: Autotrophic capabilities described by an in silico stoichiometric approach from shared genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-08-01

    Microbialites and microbial mats are complex communities with high phylogenetic diversity. These communities are mostly composed of bacteria and archaea, which are the earliest living forms on Earth and relevant to biogeochemical evolution. In this study, we identified the shared metabolic pathways for uptake of inorganic C and N in microbial mats and microbialites based on metagenomic data sets. An in silico analysis for autotrophic pathways was used to trace the paths of C and N to the system, following an elementary flux modes (EFM) approach, resulting in a stoichiometric model. The fragility was analyzed by the minimal cut sets method. We found four relevant pathways for the incorporation of CO2 (Calvin cycle, reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, and dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle), some of them present only in archaea, while nitrogen fixation was the most important source of N to the system. The metabolic potential to incorporate nitrate to biomass was also relevant. The fragility of the network was low, suggesting a high redundancy of the autotrophic pathways due to their broad metabolic diversity, and highlighting the relevance of reducing power source. This analysis suggests that microbial mats and microbialites are "metabolic pumps" for the incorporation of inorganic gases and formation of organic matter.

  19. Ecological and general systems an introduction to systems ecology

    CERN Document Server

    Odum, Howard T.

    1994-01-01

    Using an energy systems language that combines energetics, kinetics, information, cybernetics, and simulation, Ecological and General Systems compares models of many fields of science, helping to derive general systems principles. First published as Systems Ecology in 1983, Ecological and General Systems proposes principles of self-organization and the designs that prevail by maximizing power and efficiency. Comparisons to fifty other systems languages are provided. Innovative presentations are given on earth homeostasis (Gaia); the inadequacy of presenting equations without network relationships and energy constraints; the alternative interpretation of high entropy complexity as adaptive structure; basic equations of ecological economics; and the energy basis of scientific hierarchy.

  20. Ecological model of extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, G

    1997-01-01

    We present numerical results based on a simplified ecological system in evolution, showing features of extinction similar to that claimed for the biosystem on Earth. In the model each species consists of a population in interaction with the others, that reproduces and evolves in time. Each species is simultaneously a predator and a prey in a food chain. Mutations that change the interactions are supposed to occur randomly at a low rate. Extinctions of populations result naturally from the predator-prey dynamics. The model is not pinned in a fitness variable, and natural selection arises from the dynamics.

  1. Ecology Beyond Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Terri

    2011-01-01

    As the designers of the WWf building in Zeist, The Netherslands a CO2-neutral, self-sufficient office complex, RAU has set the bar for sustainable research and design. Guesteditor Terri Peters visited the firm's studio in Amsterdam to talk to principal Thomas Rau. As Peters relates, Rau prefers t...... to put on the dwindling supply of raw materials rather than the immidiate problems of energy consumption for which there are solutions within reach. With the emphasis on a more far-reaching approach, he places buildings in a wider context of ecological thinking and systems....

  2. Spherical particles of halophilic archaea correlate with exposure to low water activity – implications for microbial survival in fluid inclusions of ancient halite

    OpenAIRE

    Fendrihan, S.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M; Gerbl, F W; Holzinger, A.; Grösbacher, M; Briza, P; A. Erler; C. Gruber; Plätzer, K; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2012-01-01

    Viable extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) have been isolated from million-year-old salt deposits around the world; however, an explanation of their supposed longevity remains a fundamental challenge. Recently small roundish particles in fluid inclusions of 22 000- to 34 000-year-old halite were identified as haloarchaea capable of proliferation (Schubert BA, Lowenstein TK, Timofeeff MN, Parker MA, 2010, Environmental Microbiology, 12, 440–454). Searching for a method to produce such p...

  3. Etude de Pan A et de Pan B : deux protéines régulatrices du protéasome chez les archaea halophiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Chamieh, Hala

    2005-01-01

    Proteasomes are large ATP-dependent proteases implicated in degradation of key regulatory cellular proteins and abnormal cellular proteins. The current work is the first characterization of two AAA-ATPase proteasomal regulatory proteins PAN A and PAN B in halophilic archaea. The first part of the manuscript characterizes the mode of regulation of the two PANs in the extremely halophilic archaoen Halobacterium salinarium. Our experiments show the existence of two isoforms of each PAN proteins ...

  4. In silico analysis of 5'-UTRs highlights the prevalence of Shine-Dalgarno and leaderless-dependent mechanisms of translation initiation in bacteria and archaea, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ambuj; Gogoi, Prerana; Deka, Bhagyashree; Goswami, Shrayanti; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-08-07

    In prokaryotes, a heterogeneous set of protein translation initiation mechanisms such as Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence-dependent, SD sequence-independent or ribosomal protein S1 mediated and leaderless transcript-dependent exists. To estimate the distribution of coding sequences employing a particular translation initiation mechanism, a total of 107 prokaryotic genomes were analysed using in silico approaches. Analysis of 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes reveals the existence of three types of mRNAs described as transcripts with and without SD motif and leaderless transcripts. Our results indicate that although all the three types of translation initiation mechanisms are widespread among prokaryotes, the number of SD-dependent genes in bacteria is higher than that of archaea. In contrast, archaea contain a significantly higher number of leaderless genes than SD-led genes. The correlation analysis between genome size and SD-led & leaderless genes suggests that the SD-led genes are decreasing (increasing) with genome size in bacteria (archaea). However, the leaderless genes are increasing (decreasing) in bacteria (archaea) with genome size. Moreover, an analysis of the start-codon biasness confirms that among ATG, GTG and TTG codons, ATG is indeed the most preferred codon at the translation initiation site in most of the coding sequences. In leaderless genes, however, the codons GTG and TTG are also observed at the translation initiation site in some species contradicting earlier studies which suggested the usage of only ATG codon. Henceforth, the conventional mechanism of translation initiation cannot be generalized as an exclusive way of initiating the process of protein biosynthesis in prokaryotes.

  5. Effect of Feeding Palm Oil By-Products Based Diets on Total Bacteria, Cellulolytic Bacteria and Methanogenic Archaea in the Rumen of Goats

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrahim Abubakr; Abdul Razak Alimon; Halimatun Yaakub; Norhani Abdullah; Michael Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms are responsible for digestion and utilization of dietary feeds by host ruminants. Unconventional feed resources could be used as alternatives in tropical areas where feed resources are insufficient in terms of quality and quantity. The objective of the present experiment was to evaluate the effect of diets based on palm oil (PO), decanter cake (DC) or palm kernel cake (PKC) on rumen total bacteria, selected cellulolytic bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. Four diets: cont...

  6. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and nitrite-oxidizing nitrospiras in the biofilter of a shrimp recirculating aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Monisha N; Briones, Aurelio; Diana, James; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the nitrifier community in the biofilter of a zero discharge, recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for the production of marine shrimp in a low density (low ammonium production) system. The ammonia-oxidizing populations were examined by targeting 16S rRNA and amoA genes of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). The nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were investigated by targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Archaeal amoA genes were more abundant in all compartments of the RAS than bacterial amoA genes. Analysis of bacterial and archaeal amoA gene sequences revealed that most ammonia oxidizers were related to Nitrosomonas marina and Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The NOB detected were related to Nitrospira marina and Nitrospira moscoviensis, and Nitrospira marina-type NOB were more abundant than N. moscoviensis-type NOB. Water quality and biofilm attachment media played a role in the competitiveness of AOA over AOB and Nitrospira marina-over N. moscoviensis-type NOB.

  7. Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soil Treated with the Insecticide Imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Cycoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB in soil using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE approach. Analysis showed that AOA and AOB community members were affected by the insecticide treatment. However, the calculation of the richness (S and the Shannon-Wiener index (H values for soil treated with the field rate (FR dosage of imidacloprid (1 mg/kg soil showed no changes in measured indices for the AOA and AOB community members. In turn, the 10*FR dosage of insecticide (10 mg/kg soil negatively affected the AOA community, which was confirmed by the decrease of the S and H values in comparison with the values obtained for the control soil. In the case of AOB community, an initial decline followed by the increase of the S and H values was obtained. Imidacloprid decreased the nitrification rate while the ammonification process was stimulated by the addition of imidacloprid. Changes in the community structure of AOA and AOB could be due to an increase in the concentration of N-NH4+, known as the most important factor which determines the contribution of these microorganisms to soil nitrification.

  8. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have better adaptability in oxygenated/hypoxic alternant conditions compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Guangming; Zheng, Ping; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Ammonia oxidation is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Few studies compared the adaptability of AOA and AOB for oxygenated/hypoxic alternant conditions in water-level-fluctuating zones. Here, using qPCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing of functional amoA genes of AOA and AOB, we examined the changes of abundances, diversities, and community structures of AOA and AOB in periodically flooded soils compared to the non-flooded soils in Three Gorges Reservoir. The increased AOA operational taxonomic unit (OTU) numbers and the higher ratios of abundance (AOA:AOB) in the periodically flooded soils suggested AOA have better adaptability for oxygenated/hypoxic alternant conditions in the water-level-fluctuating zones in the Three Gorges Reservoir and probably responsible for the ammonia oxidation there. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) had the most significant effect on the community distribution of AOA (p ammonia-oxidizing microbes. ORP was significantly negatively correlated with AOA OTU numbers (p < 0.05), ratio of OTU numbers (AOA:AOB) (p < 0.01), and ratio of amoA gene abundances (AOA:AOB) (p < 0.05). ORP was also significantly positively correlated with AOB abundance (p < 0.05).

  9. Do Archaea and bacteria co-infection have a role in the pathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Higuchi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cardiopathy (CC in Chagas disease is a fibrotic myocarditis with C5b-9 complement deposition. Mycoplasma and Chlamydia may interfere with the complement response. Proteolytic enzymes and archaeal genes that have been described in Trypanosoma cruzi may increase its virulence. Here we tested the hypothesis that different ratios of Mycoplasma, Chlamydia and archaeal organisms, which are frequent symbionts, may be associated with chagasic clinical forms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: eight indeterminate form (IF and 20 CC chagasic endomyocardial biopsies were submitted to in situ hybridization, electron and immunoelectron microscopy and PCR techniques for detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP, Chlamydia pneumoniae(CP, C5b-9 and archaeal-like bodies. RESULTS: MP and CP-DNA were always present at lower levels in CC than in IF (p < 0.001 and were correlated with each other only in CC. Electron microscopy revealed Mycoplasma, Chlamydia and two types of archaeal-like bodies. One had electron dense lipid content (EDL and was mainly present in IF. The other had electron lucent content (ELC and was mainly present in CC. In this group, ELC correlated negatively with the other microbes and EDL and positively with C5b-9. The CC group was positive for Archaea and T. cruzi DNA. In conclusion, different amounts of Mycoplasma, Chlamydia and archaeal organisms may be implicated in complement activation and may have a role in Chagas disease outcome.

  10. Different effects of transgenic maize and nontransgenic maize on nitrogen-transforming archaea and bacteria in tropical soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, Simone Raposo; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Marriel, Ivanildo Evódio; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Seldin, Lucy; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-10-01

    The composition of the rhizosphere microbiome is a result of interactions between plant roots, soil, and environmental conditions. The impact of genetic variation in plant species on the composition of the root-associated microbiota remains poorly understood. This study assessed the abundances and structures of nitrogen-transforming (ammonia-oxidizing) archaea and bacteria as well as nitrogen-fixing bacteria driven by genetic modification of their maize host plants. The data show that significant changes in the abundances (revealed by quantitative PCR) of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities occurred as a result of the maize host being genetically modified. In contrast, the structures of the total communities (determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) were mainly driven by factors such as soil type and season and not by plant genotype. Thus, the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities but not structures of those communities were revealed to be responsive to changes in maize genotype, allowing the suggestion that community abundances should be explored as candidate bioindicators for monitoring the possible impacts of cultivation of genetically modified plants.

  11. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in cattle manure compost under various temperatures and ammonia concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Ryu; Tada, Chika; Asano, Ryoki; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Nakai, Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    A recent study showed that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) coexist in the process of cattle manure composting. To investigate their physiological characteristics, liquid cultures seeded with fermenting cattle manure compost were incubated at various temperatures (37°C, 46°C, or 60°C) and ammonium concentrations (0.5, 1, 4, or 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N). The growth rates of the AOB and AOA were monitored using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A genes. AOB grew at 37°C and 4 or 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N, whereas AOA grew at 46°C and 10 mM NH (4) (+) -N. Incubation with allylthiourea indicated that the AOB and AOA grew by oxidizing ammonia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and subsequent sequencing analyses revealed that a bacterium related to Nitrosomonas halophila and an archaeon related to Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis were the predominant AOB and AOA, respectively, in the seed compost and in cultures after incubation. This is the first report to demonstrate that the predominant AOA in cattle manure compost can grow and can probably oxidize ammonia under moderately thermophilic conditions.

  12. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA and AOB in five strongly acidic soils (pHnitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) completely inhibited the nitrification activity and CO(2) fixation by AOA, accompanied by decreasing thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance. Bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased in all microcosms irrespective of DCD addition, and mostly showed no correlation with nitrate concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of thaumarchaeal amoA gene and 16S rRNA gene revealed active (13)CO(2)-labeled AOA belonged to groups 1.1a-associated and 1.1b. Taken together, these results provided strong evidence that AOA have a more important role than AOB in autotrophic ammonia oxidation in strongly acidic soils.

  13. Control of archaellation in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: unravelling of the regulation of surface structure biosynthesis in Archaea begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Ken F

    2012-10-01

    Archaea have a variety of surface appendages including archaella (archaeal flagella), pili, hami and cannulae. While expected to be energetically expensive to express, studies focused on the regulation of such structures are nevertheless lacking. In the current issue of Molecular Microbiology, Reimann et al. (2012) identified a two-partner system called ArnA and ArnB in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that interact strongly with each other and are repressors of archaella expression while also having an enhancing effect on the appearance of type IV pili. ArnA is a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein while ArnB is a von Willebrand domain-containing protein. Both proteins can be phosphorylated in vitro by S. acidocaldarius protein kinases. The repression of archaella expression is dependent on dephosphorylation of the Arn proteins. Deletions of arnA or arnB resulted in increased levels of archaella operon proteins and cells that were hypermotile due to increased archaellation. Direct effects of ArnA/ArnB on transcription from fla promoters were demonstrated using arnA and arnB deletion strains but only a modest increase in transcription was demonstrated in each mutant suggesting that the repression effect observed may be due to protein-protein interactions. This paper represents a significant step forward in our understanding of archaeal surface structure biogenesis.

  14. Distinct symmetry and limited peptide refolding activity of the thermosomes from the acidothermophilic archaea Acidianus tengchongensis S5{sup T}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [The State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Hu, Zhong-jun [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Luo, Yuan-ming [The State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Huo, Yan-wu [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Ma, Qing [The State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); The College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); He, Yong-zhi; Zhang, Yu-ying [The State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Sun, Fei, E-mail: feisun@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dong, Zhi-yang, E-mail: dongzy@sun.im.ac.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2010-03-05

    Recombinant thermosomes from the Acidianus tengchongensis strain S5{sup T} were purified to homogeneity and assembled in vitro into homo-oligomers (rATcpn{alpha} or rATcpn{beta}) and hetero-oligomers (rATcpn{alpha}{beta}). The symmetries of these complexes were determined by electron microscopy and image analysis. The rATcpn{alpha} homo-oligomer was shown to possess 8-fold symmetry while both rATcpn{beta} and rATcpn{alpha}{beta} oligomers adopted 9-fold symmetry. rATcpn{alpha}{beta} oligomers were shown to contain the {alpha} and {beta} subunits in a 1:2 ratio. All of the complexes prevented the irreversible inactivation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase at 55 {sup o}C and completely prevented the formation of aggregates during thermal inactivation of citrate synthase at 45 {sup o}C. All rATcpn complexes showed trace ATP hydrolysis activity. Furthermore, rATcpn{beta} sequestered fully chemically denatured substrates (GFP and thermophilic malic dehydrogenase) in vitro without refolding them in an ATP-dependent manner. This property is similar to previously reported properties of chaperonins from Sulfolobus tokodaii and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. These features are consistent with the slow growth rates of these species of archaea in their native environment.

  15. Protein N-glycosylation in Archaea: defining Haloferax volcanii genes involved in S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2006-07-01

    In this study, characterization of the N-glycosylation process in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii was undertaken. Initially, putative Hfx. volcanii homologues of genes involved in eukaryal or bacterial N-glycosylation were identified by bioinformatics. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed that the proposed N-glycosylation genes are transcribed, indicative of true proteins being encoded. Where families of related gene sequences were detected, differential transcription of family members under a variety of physiological and environmental conditions was shown. Gene deletions point to certain genes, like alg11, as being essential yet revealed that others, such as the two versions of alg5, are not. Deletion of alg5-A did, however, lead to slower growth and interfered with surface (S)-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, as detected by modified migration on SDS-PAGE and glycostaining approaches. As deletion of stt3, the only component of the oligosaccharide transferase complex detected in Archaea, did not affect cell viability, it appears that N-glycosylation is not essential in Hfx. volcanii. Deletion of stt3 did, nonetheless, hinder both cell growth and S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation. Thus, with genes putatively involved in Hfx. volcanii protein glycosylation identified and the ability to address the roles played by the encoded polypeptides in modifying a reporter glycoprotein, the steps of the archaeal N-glycosylation pathway can be defined.

  16. N-Linked Glycans Are Assembled on Highly Reduced Dolichol Phosphate Carriers in the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Michelle M; Imperiali, Barbara; Eichler, Jerry; Guan, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    In all three domains of life, N-glycosylation begins with the assembly of glycans on phosphorylated polyisoprenoid carriers. Like eukaryotes, archaea also utilize phosphorylated dolichol for this role, yet whereas the assembled oligosaccharide is transferred to target proteins from dolichol pyrophosphate in eukaryotes, archaeal N-linked glycans characterized to date are derived from a dolichol monophosphate carrier, apart from a single example. In this study, glycan-charged dolichol phosphate from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was identified and structurally characterized. Normal and reverse phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the existence of dolichol phosphate charged with the heptasaccharide recently described in in vitro studies of N-glycosylation on this species. As with other described archaeal dolichol phosphates, the α- and ω-terminal isoprene subunits of the P. furiosus lipid are saturated, in contrast to eukaryal phosphodolichols that present only a saturated α-position isoprene subunit. Interestingly, an additional 1-4 of the 12-14 isoprene subunits comprising P. furiosus dolichol phosphate are saturated, making this lipid not only the longest archaeal dolichol phosphate described to date but also the most highly saturated.

  17. N-glycosylation in Archaea: on the coordinated actions of Haloferax volcanii AglF and AglM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Magidovich, Hilla; Ventura, Valeria V; Hitchen, Paul G; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    Like Eukarya and Bacteria, Archaea are also capable of performing N-glycosylation. In the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii, N-glycosylation is mediated by the products of the agl gene cluster. In the present report, this gene cluster was expanded to include an additional sequence, aglM, shown to participate in the biosynthesis of hexuronic acids contained within a pentasaccharide decorating the S-layer glycoprotein, a reporter H. volcanii glycoprotein. In response to different growth conditions, changes in the transcription profile of aglM mirrored changes in the transcription profiles of aglF, aglG and aglI, genes encoding confirmed participants in the H. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, thus offering support to the hypothesis that in H. volcanii, N-glycosylation serves an adaptive role. Following purification, biochemical analysis revealed AglM to function as a UDP-glucose dehydrogenase. In a scoupled reaction with AglF, a previously identified glucose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucuronic acid was generated from glucose-1-phosphate and UTP in a NAD(+)-dependent manner. These experiments thus represent the first step towards in vitro reconstitution of the archaeal N-glycosylation process.

  18. N-Linked Glycans Are Assembled on Highly Reduced Dolichol Phosphate Carriers in the Hyperthermophilic Archaea Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Chang

    Full Text Available In all three domains of life, N-glycosylation begins with the assembly of glycans on phosphorylated polyisoprenoid carriers. Like eukaryotes, archaea also utilize phosphorylated dolichol for this role, yet whereas the assembled oligosaccharide is transferred to target proteins from dolichol pyrophosphate in eukaryotes, archaeal N-linked glycans characterized to date are derived from a dolichol monophosphate carrier, apart from a single example. In this study, glycan-charged dolichol phosphate from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus was identified and structurally characterized. Normal and reverse phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the existence of dolichol phosphate charged with the heptasaccharide recently described in in vitro studies of N-glycosylation on this species. As with other described archaeal dolichol phosphates, the α- and ω-terminal isoprene subunits of the P. furiosus lipid are saturated, in contrast to eukaryal phosphodolichols that present only a saturated α-position isoprene subunit. Interestingly, an additional 1-4 of the 12-14 isoprene subunits comprising P. furiosus dolichol phosphate are saturated, making this lipid not only the longest archaeal dolichol phosphate described to date but also the most highly saturated.

  19. Diversity of Archaea in Icelandic hot springs based on 16S rRNA and chaperonin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; González-Pastor, Jose E

    2011-07-01

    The diversity of archaeal communities growing in four hot springs (65-90 °C, pH 6.5) was assessed with 16S rRNA gene primers specific for the domain Archaea. Overall, mainly uncultured members of the Desulfurococcales, the Thermoproteales and the Korarchaeota, were identified. Based on this diversity, a set of chaperonin heat-shock protein (Hsp60) gene sequences from different archaeal species were aligned to design two degenerate primer sets for the amplification of the chaperonin gene: Ths and Kor (which can also detect the korarchaeotal chaperonin gene from one of the samples). A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the chaperonin sequences retrieved and other sequences from cultured representatives. The Alpha and Beta paralogs of the chaperonin gene were observed within the main clades and orthologs among them. Cultivated representatives from these clades were assigned to either paralog in the chaperonin tree. Uncultured representatives observed in the 16S rRNA gene analysis were found to be related to the Desulfurococcales. The topologies of the 16S rRNA gene and chaperonin phylogenetic trees were compared, and similar phylogenetic relationships were observed. Our results suggest that the chaperonin Hsp60 gene may be used as a phylogenetic marker for the clades found in this extreme environment.

  20. Differential Virus Host-Ranges of the Fuselloviridae of Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Implications for Evolution in Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Michael eCeballos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging model for investigating virus-host interactions in hyperthermophilic Archaea is the Fusellovirus-Sulfolobus system. The host, Sulfolobus, is a hyperthermophilic acidophile endemic to sulfuric volcanic-driven hot springs worldwide. The Fuselloviruses, also known as Sulfolobus Spindle-shaped Viruses (SSVs, are lemon or spindle shaped double-stranded DNA viruses that are also found worldwide. Although a few studies have addressed the host-range for the type virus, SSV1, using common Sulfolobus strains, a comprehensive host-range study for SSV-Sulfolobus systems has not been performed. Herein, we examine six bona fide SSV strains (SSV1, SSV2, SSV3, SSVL1, SSVK1, SSVRH and their respective infection characteristics on multiple hosts from the family Sulfolobaceae. A halo assay was used to determine virus infectivity and host susceptibility. Different SSV strains have different host-ranges with SSV1 exhibiting the narrowest host-range and SSVRH exhibiting the broadest host range. There is no correlation between geographic separation of viruses and their hosts and their relative infectivity and susceptibility. In contrast to previous reports, SSVs can infect hosts beyond the genus Sulfolobus. Furthermore, the Fusellovirus-Sulfolobus system appears to exhibit host-advantage. This work provides a foundation for understanding Fusellovirus biology and virus-host co-evolution in extreme ecosystems, a rapidly emerging field of study.

  1. Evaluation of revised polymerase chain reaction primers for more inclusive quantification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kelley A; Bertagnolli, Anthony; Pannu, Manmeet W; Strand, Stuart E; Brown, Sally L; Stahl, David A

    2015-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) fill key roles in the nitrogen cycle. Thus, well-vetted methods for characterizing their distribution are essential for framing studies of their significance in natural and managed systems. Quantification of the gene coding for one subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) by polymerase chain reaction is frequently employed to enumerate the two groups. However, variable amplification of sequence variants comprising this conserved genetic marker for ammonia oxidizers potentially compromises within- and between-system comparisons. We compared the performance of newly designed non-degenerate quantitative polymerase chain reaction primer sets to existing primer sets commonly used to quantify the amoA of AOA and AOB using a collection of plasmids and soil DNA samples. The new AOA primer set provided improved quantification of model mixtures of different amoA sequence variants and increased detection of amoA in DNA recovered from soils. Although both primer sets for the AOB provided similar results for many comparisons, the new primers demonstrated increased detection in environmental application. Thus, the new primer sets should provide a useful complement to primers now commonly used to characterize the environmental distribution of AOA and AOB.

  2. Abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in different types of soil in the Yangtze River estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ran LI; Yi-ping XIAO; Wen-wei REN; Zeng-fu LIU; Jin-huan SHI; Zhe-xue QUAN

    2012-01-01

    Tidal fiats are soil resources of great significance.Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle and is often a critical first step in nitrogen removal from estuarine and coastal environments.We determined the abundance as well as composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in different soils during land reclamation process.The abundance of AOA was higher than that of AOB in farm land and wild land while AOA was not detected in tidal flats using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The different abundances of AOB and AOA were negatively correlated with the salinity.The diversities of AOB and AOA were also investigated using clone libraries by amplification of amoA gene.Among AOB,nearly all sequences belonged to the Nitrosomonas lineage in the initial land reclamation process,i.e.,tidal flats,while both Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira lineages were detected in later and transition phases of land reclamation process,farm land and wild land.The ratio of the numbers of sequences of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira lineages was positively correlated with the salinity and the net nitrification rate.As for AOA,there was no obvious correlation with the changes in the physicochemical properties of the soil.This study suggests that AOB may be more import than AOA with respect to influencing the different land reclamation process stages.

  3. Bacteria and Archaea community structure in the rumen microbiome of goats (Capra hircus) from the semiarid region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Isabel S; Barreto, Cristine C; Costa, Ohana Y A; Bomfim, Marco A; Castro, Alinne P; Kruger, Ricardo H; Quirino, Betania F

    2011-06-01

    Most studies present in the literature about the rumen microbiome have focused on cattle and sheep. This is the first report of the characterization of the bacterial and archaeal communities present in the liquid and solid-associated fractions of the rumen from free ranging Moxotó breed goats using 16S rRNA gene libraries. PCR was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene with bacterial and archaeal universal primers and sequences from each library constructed were obtained. Sequences of Bacteria from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were predominant. The overall dominant classes in the rumen were Clostridia and Bacteroidia, which are known to play a role in plant fiber degradation in other ruminants. Unclassified Bacteria accounted for 4.7% of the liquid fraction sequences and 16.4% of the solid fraction sequences. From the archaeal libraries only sequences from the phylum Euryarcheota were identified and were assigned to the class Methanobacteria of the genera Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera. A group of Archaea not previously known to be associated with the rumen was identified: uncultured methanogens belonging to the "uncultured marine bacteria" groups II and III. The local water contained high salt concentrations and this may explain the presence of these groups in the Moxotó goat rumen.

  4. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on total bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahim Abubakr

    Full Text Available Rumen microorganisms are responsible for digestion and utilization of dietary feeds by host ruminants. Unconventional feed resources could be used as alternatives in tropical areas where feed resources are insufficient in terms of quality and quantity. The objective of the present experiment was to evaluate the effect of diets based on palm oil (PO, decanter cake (DC or palm kernel cake (PKC on rumen total bacteria, selected cellulolytic bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. Four diets: control diet (CD, decanter cake diet (DCD, palm kernel cake diet (PKCD and CD plus 5% PO diet (CPOD were fed to rumen cannulated goats and rumen samples were collected at the start of the experimental diets (day 0 and on days 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24 and 30 post dietary treatments. Feeding DCD and PKCD resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05 DNA copy number of total bacteria, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefeciens, and Ruminococcus albus. Rumen methanogenic archaea was significantly lower (P<0.05 in goats fed PKCD and CPOD and the trend showed a severe reduction on days 4 and 6 post experimental diets. In conclusion, results indicated that feeding DCD and PKC increased the populations of cellulolytic bacteria and decreased the density of methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

  5. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on total bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakr, Abdelrahim; Alimon, Abdul Razak; Yaakub, Halimatun; Abdullah, Norhani; Ivan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms are responsible for digestion and utilization of dietary feeds by host ruminants. Unconventional feed resources could be used as alternatives in tropical areas where feed resources are insufficient in terms of quality and quantity. The objective of the present experiment was to evaluate the effect of diets based on palm oil (PO), decanter cake (DC) or palm kernel cake (PKC) on rumen total bacteria, selected cellulolytic bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. Four diets: control diet (CD), decanter cake diet (DCD), palm kernel cake diet (PKCD) and CD plus 5% PO diet (CPOD) were fed to rumen cannulated goats and rumen samples were collected at the start of the experimental diets (day 0) and on days 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, 24 and 30 post dietary treatments. Feeding DCD and PKCD resulted in significantly higher (P<0.05) DNA copy number of total bacteria, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefeciens, and Ruminococcus albus. Rumen methanogenic archaea was significantly lower (P<0.05) in goats fed PKCD and CPOD and the trend showed a severe reduction on days 4 and 6 post experimental diets. In conclusion, results indicated that feeding DCD and PKC increased the populations of cellulolytic bacteria and decreased the density of methanogenic archaea in the rumen of goats.

  6. Sensory Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin STEVENS; Guest Editor

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Sensory ecology deals with how animals capture in formation from their environment, and the sensory sys tems involved in doing so (Hailman, 1977; Lythgoe, 1979; Dusenbery, 1992; Mappes and Stevens 2010). Although the term sensory ecology itself is compara tively recent, its basis has a long history, in part due to numerous links with subjects such as neurobiology, physiology, ethology, and evolutionary behavioral ecology.

  7. ECOLOGY AFFECTED IN OIL EXPLOITATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mingren; Zeng Dezhang; Zhang Shiquan; Shi Lifeng

    1997-01-01

    @@ Introduction During the Eighth Five-Year Plan period(1991-1995), a study about crude impacts on ecology in oil exploitation was conducted in seven representative onshore oil fields of China. The study discusses crude pollutant's impacts on ecology in terms of its production,movement, transformation and concentration in the ecological system,as well as its toxicity and damage degree on living things , by means of investigation on the spot, test analysis and analogue test.

  8. [Landscape and ecological genomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetushkin, E Ia

    2013-10-01

    Landscape genomics is the modern version of landscape genetics, a discipline that arose approximately 10 years ago as a combination of population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. It studies the effects of environmental variables on gene flow and other microevolutionary processes that determine genetic connectivity and variations in populations. In contrast to population genetics, it operates at the level of individual specimens rather than at the level of population samples. Another important difference between landscape genetics and genomics and population genetics is that, in the former, the analysis of gene flow and local adaptations takes quantitative account of landforms and features of the matrix, i.e., hostile spaces that separate species habitats. Landscape genomics is a part of population ecogenomics, which, along with community genomics, is a major part of ecological genomics. One of the principal purposes of landscape genomics is the identification and differentiation of various genome-wide and locus-specific effects. The approaches and computation tools developed for combined analysis of genomic and landscape variables make it possible to detect adaptation-related genome fragments, which facilitates the planning of conservation efforts and the prediction of species' fate in response to expected changes in the environment.

  9. ECOLOGICAL GROWTH BOUNDARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna BLUSZCZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The trends of the society for the continuous growth, combined with the demographic changes, today have led to the important ecological problems on a global scale, which include, among others: the increased use of non-renewable natu-ral resources, an increase of the greenhouse gas emissions, contamination of soil, water, air and the progressive degra-dation of ecosystems. In the face of such serious threats the global initiatives of all countries are important to limit the results of the excessive consumption. The aim of the article is to present the methods of measurement of the consump-tion level of natural resources by the societies and the examination of relationships between the level of development of the societies and the use of resources. The popular measure – the ecological footprint – was used as a measurement method for the consumption of the today’s generations in relation to the regenerative possibilities of the natural envi-ronment. On the other hand, as the assessment method for the level of development of societies – the Human Develop-ment Index (HDI, including three basic areas: the life expectancy, GDP level per capita and education was used. The results of the research indicate that the current trend of the unlimited consumption of the highly developed countries takes place at the expense of the future generations.

  10. Ecological Growth Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluszcz, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The trends of the society for the continuous growth, combined with the demographic changes, today have led to the important ecological problems on a global scale, which include, among others: the increased use of non-renewable natural resources, an increase of the greenhouse gas emissions, contamination of soil, water, air and the progressive degradation of ecosystems. In the face of such serious threats the global initiatives of all countries are important to limit the results of the excessive consumption. The aim of the article is to present the methods of measurement of the consumption level of natural resources by the societies and the examination of relationships between the level of development of the societies and the use of resources. The popular measure - the ecological footprint - was used as a measurement method for the consumption of the today's generations in relation to the regenerative possibilities of the natural environment. On the other hand, as the assessment method for the level of development of societies - the Human Development Index (HDI), including three basic areas: the life expectancy, GDP level per capita and education was used. The results of the research indicate that the current trend of the unlimited consumption of the highly developed countries takes place at the expense of the future generations.

  11. ECOLOGICAL BUILDING DESIGN DETERMINANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vakili-Ardebili

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable building design process is driven on the basis of a range of design eco-indicators. Consideration of a multitude of eco-determinants, such as environment, economy, resources, energy consumption and society values in addition to design characteristics and contexts, makes the process of ecological design even more complex. A large number of eco-drivers are extracted from the literature and current design practices. To gain a better insight on eco-design determinants, a survey focusing on the use of eco-design drivers has been conducted with various architects in the UK. The factor analysis method was used to remove redundant data from the survey. Through the factor analysis approach, 115 eco-determinants are grouped into six main clusters. This article presents the process, analysis and findings of this work. The extracted eco-indicators and their associated clusters can be used to improve the process of ecological building design. DOI: 10.3763/aedm.2008.0096 Source: Architectural Engineering and Design Management, Volume 6, Number 2, 2010 , pp. 111-131(21

  12. Graduate Education in Ecological Economics

    OpenAIRE

    John M. Polimeni

    2004-01-01

    Interest in graduate education in ecological economics is increasing. However, no formal plan of study for a Ph.D. in ecological economics has been disseminated. The lack of a formal plan is problematic as the field of ecological economics matures, interest grows, and new programs are being developed. This paper attempts to fill a void by creating a program of study addressing the proficiencies a graduate student in ecological economics should have upon completion of his/her Ph.D. based on th...

  13. Ecological implications of behavioural syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sih, Andrew; Cote, Julien; Evans, Mara; Fogarty, Sean; Pruitt, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Interspecific trait variation has long served as a conceptual foundation for our understanding of ecological patterns and dynamics. In particular, ecologists recognise the important role that animal behaviour plays in shaping ecological processes. An emerging area of interest in animal behaviour, the study of behavioural syndromes (animal personalities) considers how limited behavioural plasticity, as well as behavioural correlations affects an individual's fitness in diverse ecological contexts. In this article we explore how insights from the concept and study of behavioural syndromes provide fresh understanding of major issues in population ecology. We identify several general mechanisms for how population ecology phenomena can be influenced by a species or population's average behavioural type, by within-species variation in behavioural type, or by behavioural correlations across time or across ecological contexts. We note, in particular, the importance of behavioural type-dependent dispersal in spatial ecology. We then review recent literature and provide new syntheses for how these general mechanisms produce novel insights on five major issues in population ecology: (1) limits to species' distribution and abundance; (2) species interactions; (3) population dynamics; (4) relative responses to human-induced rapid environmental change; and (5) ecological invasions.

  14. Ecological Effects of Allelopathic Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, M.; Strandberg, M.; Strandberg, B.

    with the environment through spread of GM-plants or transgenes outside agricultural areas. The last chapter discuss GM-allelopathic plants in relation to the ecological risk assessment. Preface: This report is based on a literature review on allelopathy from an ecological impact point of view carried out in 1999...... on allelopathy in these crops. It discusses the ecological effects of allelopathic plants in natural ecosystems and factors of importance for the effects of these plants are pointed out. Finally the report presents suggestions for an ecological risk assessment of crops with an enhanced release of allelochemicals...

  15. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  16. Metagenomics: advances in ecology and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Helen L; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2005-06-15

    This review highlights the significant advances which have been made in prokaryotic ecology and biotechnology due to the application of metagenomic techniques. It is now possible to link processes to specific microorganisms in the environment, such as the detection of a new phototrophic process in marine bacteria, and to characterise the metabolic cooperation which takes place in mixed species biofilms. The range of prokaryote derived products available for biotechnology applications is increasing rapidly. The knowledge gained from analysis of biosynthetic pathways provides valuable information about enzymology and allows engineering of biocatalysts for specific processes. The expansion of metagenomic techniques to include alternative heterologous hosts for gene expression and the development of sophisticated assays which enable screening of thousands of clones offers the possibility to find out even more valuable information about the prokaryotic world.

  17. Survivability and growth kinetics of methanogenic archaea at various pHs and pressures: Implications for deep subsurface life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Navita; Nepal, Sudip; Kral, Timothy; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-02-01

    Life as we know it requires liquid water and sufficient liquid water is highly unlikely on the surface of present-day Mars. However, according to thermal models there is a possibility of liquid water in the deep subsurface of Mars. Thus, the martian subsurface, where the pressure and temperature is higher, could potentially provide a hospitable environment for a biosphere. Also, methane has been detected in the Mars' atmosphere. Analogous to Earth's atmospheric methane, martian methane could also be biological in origin. The carbon and energy sources for methanogenesis in the subsurface of Mars could be available by downwelling of atmospheric CO2 into the regolith and water-rock reactions such as serpentinization, respectively. Corresponding analogs of the martian subsurface on Earth might be the active sites of serpentinization at depths where methanogenic thermophilic archaea are the dominant species. Methanogens residing in Earth's hydrothermal environments are usually exposed to a variety of physiological stresses including a wide range of pressures, temperatures, and pHs. Martian geochemical models imply that the pH of probable groundwater varies from 4.96 to 9.13. In this work, we used the thermophilic methanogen, Methanothermobacter wolfeii, which grows optimally at 55oC. Therefore, a temperature of 55oC was chosen for these experiments, possibly simulating Mars' subsurface temperature. A martian geophysical model suggests depth and pressure corresponding to a temperature of 55 °C would be between 1-30 km and 100-3,000 atm respectively. Here, we have simulated Mars deep subsurface pH, pressure, and temperature conditions and have investigated the survivability, growth rate, and morphology of M. wolfeii after exposure to a wide range of pH 5-9) and pressure (1-1200 atm) at a temperature of 55 °C. Interestingly, in this study we have found that M. wolfeii was able to survive at all the pressures and pHs tested at 55 °C. In order to understand the effect of

  18. Reinventing the Wheel: Teaching Restoration Ecology without the Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speldewinde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Restoration ecology is "the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged or destroyed." Restoration can range from returning the system to its "natural" state through to restoring some ecological functionality to a system. The University of Western Australia offers an undergraduate degree in Restoration…

  19. Civic Ecology: Linking Social and Ecological Approaches in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, Marianne E.; Tidball, Keith G.

    2010-01-01

    Civic ecology refers to the philosophy and science of community forestry, community gardening, watershed enhancement, and other volunteer-driven restoration practices in cities and elsewhere. Such practices, although often viewed as initiatives to improve a degraded environment, also foster social attributes of resilient social-ecological systems,…

  20. Reinventing the Wheel: Teaching Restoration Ecology without the Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speldewinde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Restoration ecology is "the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged or destroyed." Restoration can range from returning the system to its "natural" state through to restoring some ecological functionality to a system. The University of Western Australia offers an undergraduate degree in…