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Sample records for arc therapy summary

  1. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330o arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of ≥12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  2. Clinical Applications of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present treatment planning case studies for several treatment sites for which volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) could have a positive impact; and to share an initial clinical experience with VMAT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Four case studies are presented to show the potential benefit of VMAT compared with conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in pediatric cancer, bone marrow-sparing whole-abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI), and SBRT of the lung and spine. Details of clinical implementation of VMAT for SBRT are presented. The VMAT plans are compared with conventional techniques in terms of dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency. Results: Volumetric modulated arc therapy reduced the treatment time of spine SBRT by 37% and improved isodose conformality. Conformal and VMAT techniques for lung SBRT had similar dosimetric quality, but VMAT had improved target coverage and took 59% less time to deliver, although monitor units were increased by 5%. In a complex pediatric pelvic example, VMAT reduced treatment time by 78% and monitor units by 25% compared with IMRT. A double-isocenter VMAT technique for WAPI can spare bone marrow while maintaining good delivery efficiency. Conclusions: Volumetric modulated arc therapy is a new technology that may benefit different patient populations, including pediatric cancer patients and those undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and WAPI. Volumetric modulated arc therapy has been used and shown to be beneficial for significantly improving delivery efficiency of lung and spine SBRT.

  3. Dosimetric and delivery characterizations of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy for maxillary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the efficiency and accuracy of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for maxillary cancer. Plans for gantry rotation angles of 360deg and 180deg (full-arc and half-arc VMAT) were created for six maxillary cancer cases with the Monaco treatment planning system, and delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Full-arc and half-arc VMAT were compared with regard to homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose to normal brain, total monitor units (MU), delivery times, root mean square (r.m.s.) gantry accelerations (deg/s2), and r.m.s. gantry angle errors (deg). The half-arc VMAT plans achieved comparable HI and CI to the full-arc plans. Mean doses to the normal brain and brainstem with the half-arc VMAT plans were on average 16% and 17% lower than those with the full-arc VMAT plans. For other organs at risk (OARs), no significant dose volume histogram (DVH) differences were observed between plans. Half-arc VMAT resulted in 11% less total MU and 20% shorter delivery time than the full-arc VMAT, while r.m.s. gantry acceleration and r.m.s. gantry angle error during half-arc VMAT delivery were 30% and 23% less than those during full-arc VMAT delivery, respectively. Furthermore, the half-arc VMAT plans were comparable with the full-arc plans regarding dose homogeneity and conformity in maxillary cancer, and provided a statistical decrease in mean dose to OAR, total MU, delivery time and gantry angle error. Half-arc VMAT plans may be a suitable treatment option in radiotherapy for maxillary cancer. (author)

  4. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H and N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used

  5. Risk of radiogenic second cancers following volumetric modulated arc therapy and proton arc therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Laura A.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Zhang, Rui; Etzel, Carol; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2012-11-01

    Prostate cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy are at an increased risk to develop a radiogenic second cancer. Proton therapy has been shown to reduce the predicted risk of second cancer when compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, it is unknown if this is also true for the rotational therapies proton arc therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The objective of this study was to compare the predicted risk of cancer following proton arc therapy and VMAT for prostate cancer. Proton arc therapy and VMAT plans were created for three patients. Various risk models were combined with the dosimetric data (therapeutic and stray dose) to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer in the bladder and rectum. Ratios of ERR values (RRR) from proton arc therapy and VMAT were calculated. RRR values ranged from 0.74 to 0.99, and all RRR values were shown to be statistically less than 1, except for the value calculated with the linear-non-threshold risk model. We conclude that the predicted risk of cancer in the bladder or rectum following proton arc therapy for prostate cancer is either less than or approximately equal to the risk following VMAT, depending on which risk model is applied.

  6. Modulation indices for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to present a modulation index (MI) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the speed and acceleration analysis of modulating-parameters such as multi-leaf collimator (MLC) movements, gantry rotation and dose-rate, comprehensively. The performance of the presented MI (MIt) was evaluated with correlation analyses to the pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) results, differences in modulating-parameters between VMAT plans versus dynamic log files, and differences in dose-volumetric parameters between VMAT plans versus reconstructed plans using dynamic log files. For comparison, the same correlation analyses were performed for the previously suggested modulation complexity score (MCSv), leaf travel modulation complexity score (LTMCS) and MI by Li and Xing (MI Li and Xing). In the two-tailed unpaired parameter condition, p values were acquired. The Spearman’s rho (rs) values of MIt, MCSv, LTMCS and MI Li and Xing to the local gamma passing rate with 2%/2 mm criterion were −0.658 (p < 0.001), 0.186 (p = 0.251), 0.312 (p = 0.05) and −0.455 (p = 0.003), respectively. The values of rs to the modulating-parameter (MLC positions) differences were 0.917, −0.635, −0.857 and 0.795, respectively (p < 0.001). For dose-volumetric parameters, MIt showed higher statistically significant correlations than the conventional MIs. The MIt showed good performance for the evaluation of the modulation-degree of VMAT plans. (paper)

  7. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Ming; Yuanming Feng; Huan Liu; Ying Zhang; Li Zhou; Jun Deng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our institution in the past seven years. Methods and Materials A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercia...

  8. Electron arc therapy: physical measurement and treatment planning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, D.D.; Peacock, L.M.; Gibbs, F.A. Jr.; Stewart, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    An electron beam arc therapy technique has been developed for the treatment of the post-mastectomy chest wall using a clinical linear accelerator modified for arc therapy. The effects on the dose distribution of primary X ray collimators, secondary cerrobend blocks attached to the accelerator accessory tray, and tertiary cerrobend casting of the treatment area on the patient's thorax have been investigated. A computerized treatment planning program has been developed to aid in visualization and optimization of dose distributions. A simple technique to estimate the width variation in the secondary collimator necessary to compensate for radial patient thickness changes in the cephalocaudad direction is described. Electron beam energies of 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, 15 MeV, and 18 MeV have been studied. The physical measurements needed to implement this technique are described, and a comparison of electron arc therapy dose distributions with other standard treatment techniques is presented.

  9. Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Johansen, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    named SmartArc and its capability to generate treatment plans for head and neck cancer was tested. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma, previously treated with IMRT by means of Pinnacle and Elekta accelerators, were replanned with single arc VMAT. The VMAT......BACKGROUND: The quality of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plans is highly dependent on the performance of the optimization algorithm used. Recently new algorithms have become available which are capable of generating VMAT plans for Elekta accelerators. The VMAT algorithm in Pinnacle is...... planning objectives were to achieve clinical target coverage and sparing of the organs at risk (OAR). Comparison with the original clinically used IMRT was made by evaluating (1) dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for PTVs, (2) DVHs for OARs, (3) delivery time and monitor units (MU), and (4) treatment accuracy...

  10. Physical aspects of electron-beam arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, F.M.; Fullerton, G.D.; Lee, J.M.F.; Moore, V.C.; Levitt, S.H.

    1977-08-01

    The effect of different parameters on dose distribution in electron-beam arc therapy was studied in order to develop a technique for routine clinical use. A special diaphragm was designed to facilitate telecentric rotation. Dosimetry was performed with an ion chamber, film, and LiF powder in cylindrical polystyrene phantoms and an Alderson Rando phantom. Dose distributions were evaluated with regard to dose homogeneity, and a method of sharpening the dose fall-off near the ends of the arc was proposed. Criteria for selection of isocenter depth and field size were developed. Methods of dose calculation, calibration, and treatment planning are discussed.

  11. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  12. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed

  13. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Alber, Markus [Department of Medical Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C DK-8000 (Denmark); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Bokrantz, Rasmus [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm SE-111 34 (Sweden); Chen, Danny [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Men, Chunhua [Department of Research, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Papp, Dávid [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Romeijn, Edwin [H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Salari, Ehsan [Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas 67260 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  14. Proton Arc Reduces Range Uncertainty Effects and Improves Conformality Compared With Photon Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gu, Guan; Marcelos, Tiago; Kooy, Hanne; Willers, Henning [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To describe, in a setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the theoretical dosimetric advantages of proton arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in which the beam penumbra of a rotating beam is used to reduce the impact of range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with proton SBRT underwent repeat planning with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (Photon-VMAT) and an in-house-developed arc planning approach for both proton passive scattering (Passive-Arc) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT-Arc). An arc was mimicked with a series of beams placed at 10° increments. Tumor and organ at risk doses were compared in the context of high- and low-dose regions, represented by volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In the high-dose region, conformality index values are 2.56, 1.91, 1.31, and 1.74, and homogeneity index values are 1.29, 1.22, 1.52, and 1.18, respectively, for 3 proton passive scattered beams, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT. Therefore, proton arc leads to a 30% reduction in the 95% isodose line volume to 3-beam proton plan, sparing surrounding organs, such as lung and chest wall. For chest wall, V30 is reduced from 21 cm{sup 3} (3 proton beams) to 11.5 cm{sup 3}, 12.9 cm{sup 3}, and 8.63 cm{sup 3} (P=.005) for Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. In the low-dose region, the mean lung dose and V20 of the ipsilateral lung are 5.01 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), 4.38 Gy(RBE), 4.91 Gy(RBE), and 5.99 Gy(RBE) and 9.5%, 7.5%, 9.0%, and 10.0%, respectively, for 3-beam, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy with proton arc and Photon-VMAT generate significantly more conformal high-dose volumes than standard proton SBRT, without loss of coverage of the tumor and with significant sparing of nearby organs, such as chest wall. In addition

  15. Is a single arc sufficient in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for complex-shaped target volumes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for complex-shaped target volumes with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Materials and methods: This retrospective planning study was based on 20 patients composed of prostate cancer (n = 5), postoperative (n = 5) or primary (n = 5) radiotherapy for pharyngeal cancer and for cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 5); a SIB with two or three dose levels was planned in all patients. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan with direct-machine-parameter optimization (DMPO) and VMAT plans with one to three arcs (SmartArc technique) were generated in the Pinnacle planning system. Results: Single arc VMAT improved target coverage and dose homogeneity in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Two and three VMAT arcs were required to achieve equivalent results compared to ss-IMRT in postoperative and primary radiotherapy for pharyngeal cancer, respectively. In radiotherapy for cancer of the paranasal sinuses, multiarc VMAT resulted in increased spread of low doses to the lenses and decreased target coverage in the region between the orbits. Conclusions: The complexity of the target volume determined whether single arc VMAT was equivalent to ss-IMRT. Multiple arc VMAT improved results compared to single arc VMAT at cost of increased delivery times, increased monitor unites and increased spread of low doses.

  16. Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Pediatric Posterior Fossa Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) to noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. Methods and Materials: Nine pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors, mean age 9 years (range, 6–15 years), treated using IMRT were chosen for this comparative planning study because of their tumor location. Each patient’s treatment was replanned to receive 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) using five different methods: eight-field noncoplanar IMRT, single coplanar IMAT, double coplanar IMAT, single noncoplanar IMAT, and double noncoplanar IMAT. For each method, the dose to 95% of the PTV was held constant, and the doses to surrounding critical structures were minimized. The different plans were compared based on conformity, total linear accelerator dose monitor units, and dose to surrounding normal tissues, including the entire body, whole brain, temporal lobes, brainstem, and cochleae. Results: The doses to the target and critical structures for the various IMAT methods were not statistically different in comparison with the noncoplanar IMRT plan, with the following exceptions: the cochlear doses were higher and whole brain dose was lower for coplanar IMAT plans; the cochleae and temporal lobe doses were lower and conformity increased for noncoplanar IMAT plans. The advantage of the noncoplanar IMAT plan was enhanced by doubling the treatment arc. Conclusion: Noncoplanar IMAT results in superior treatment plans when compared to noncoplanar IMRT for the treatment of posterior fossa tumors. IMAT should be considered alongside IMRT when treatment of this site is indicated.

  17. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  18. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy vs. c-IMRT for the Treatment of Upper Thoracic Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu-Zhe Zhang; Tian-Tian Zhai; Jia-Yang Lu; Jian-Zhou Chen; Zhi-Jian Chen; De-Rui Li; Chuang-Zhen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare plans using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with conventional sliding window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (c-IMRT) to treat upper thoracic esophageal cancer (EC). Methods CT datasets of 11 patients with upper thoracic EC were identified. Four plans were generated for each patient: c-IMRT with 5 fields (5F) and VMAT with a single arc (1A), two arcs (2A), or three arcs (3A). The prescribed doses were 64 Gy/32 F for the primary tumor (PTV64). The dose-volume...

  19. 38: Optimization of electron arc therapy doses by dynamic collimator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of delivering a uniform dose to a large curved surface such as a patient's chest wall has been addressed by the technique of electron arc therapy. Prospective computer simulations show that a dramatic improvement in dose uniformity can, in many clinical situations, be achieved by dynamic shaping of the electron arc collimator, under computer control, as a function of gantry angle and distance superior or inferior to the central plane. Computer optimization techniques applied to the design of a multivane dynamic electron arc collimator is presented, along with representative treatment plans resulting from inclusion of this dynamic technique in electron arc therapy. 17 refs.; 5 figs

  20. A synthetic diamond diode in volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zani, Margherita; Bucciolini, Marta; Casati, Marta; Talamonti, Cinzia [Dipartimento di Scienze biomediche, sperimentali e cliniche, Università degli Studi di Firenze - Azienza Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Largo Brambilla 3, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, Giuseppe; Tonnetti, Alessia; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca [INFN-Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the behavior of a single crystal diamond diode (SCDD) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose verifications. This delivery technique is one of the most severe test of a dosimeter performance due to the modulation of the dose rate achieved by simultaneously changing the velocity of the gantry and the position of the collimator leaves. The performed measurements with VMAT photon beams can therefore contribute to an overall global validation of the device to be used in dose distribution verifications.Methods: The SCDD response to 6 MVRX has been tested and compared with reference ionization chambers and treatment planning system (TPS) calculations in different experiments: (a) measurements of output factors for small field sizes (square fields of side ranging between 8 mm and 104 mm) by SCDD and A1SL ionization chamber; (b) angular dependence evaluation of the entire experimental set-up by SCDD, A1SL, and Farmer ionization chambers; and (c) acquisition of dose profiles for a VMAT treatment of a pulmonary disease in latero-lateral and gantry-target directions by SCDD and A1SL ionization chamber.Results: The output factors measured by SCDD favorably compare with the ones obtained by A1SL, whose response is affected by the lack of charged particle equilibrium and by averaging effect when small fields are involved. From the experiment on angular dependence, a good agreement is observed among the diamond diode, the ion chambers, and the TPS. In VMAT profiles, the absorbed doses measured by SCDD and A1SL compare well with the TPS calculated ones. An overall better agreement is observed in the case of the diamond dosimeter, which is also showing a better accuracy in terms of distance to agreement in the high gradient regions.Conclusions: Synthetic diamond diodes, whose performance were previously studied for conformal and IMRT radiotherapy techniques, were found to be suitable detectors also for dosimetric measurements

  1. Clinical Studies of Biofield Therapies: Summary, Methodological Challenges, and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Shamini; Hammerschlag, Richard; Mills, Paul; Cohen, Lorenzo; Krieger, Richard; Vieten, Cassandra; Lutgendorf, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Biofield therapies are noninvasive therapies in which the practitioner explicitly works with a client's biofield (interacting fields of energy and information that surround living systems) to stimulate healing responses in patients. While the practice of biofield therapies has existed in Eastern and Western cultures for thousands of years, empirical research on the effectiveness of biofield therapies is still relatively nascent. In this article, we provide a summary of the state of the eviden...

  2. Applications of two-step intensity modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Organs at risk sometimes are surrounded by the target volume. At a first glance it seems to be impossible, to spare the organs at risk, i.e. the spinal cord, without underdosage of parts of the concave target volume. A fast method called ''two-step intensity modulated arc therapy'' (two-step IMAT) will be shown that avoids underdosage in the target volume near such organs at risk. Materials and Methods: Simple rotational techniques reduce the dose to the surrounded organ, however, the blocking of the organ at risk spoils the homogeneity of dose in the target volume in the vicinity of the organ. A further narrow rotation field, tangential to the concave part of the target volume, increases the dose there and homogenizes the dose distribution without deteriorating the dose in the organ at risk significantly. Results: Some cases show that the two-step IMAT and its modifications guarantee a sufficient dose homogeneity in the target volume surrounding an organ at risk. Besides basic theoretical considerations exemplary solutions for head and neck tumors, tumors adjacent to the spinal cord and mamma carcinoma of patients with extremely arched chest are demonstrated. Conclusion: Double rotation techniques can provide sufficient dose homogeneity for concave target volumes with excellent sparing of the surrounded organ at risk. They are not time consuming and can be used until IMRT will be applied routinely with adequate time load and effort. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of plan optimization for single and dual volumetric-modulated arc therapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy during post-mastectomy regional irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Li-Rong; ZHOU, YI-BING; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with single arc (1ARC) and dual arc (2ARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate the quality and delivery efficiency of post-mastectomy regional irradiation. A total of 24 female patients who required post-mastectomy regional irradiation were enrolled into the current study, and 1ARC, 2ARC and IMRT plans were designed for each individual patient. The quality of these plans was ...

  4. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for postmastectomy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the feasibility of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Fifteen PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with helical tomotherapy (HT) were identified for the study. Planning target volumes (PTV) included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. A systematic approach to constructing VMAT that met the clinical goals was devised. VMAT plans were then constructed for each patient and compared with HT plans with which they had been treated. The resulting plans were compared on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP); and treatment delivery time. Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student’s t-test. Both modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. VMAT plans showed better CI (p < 0.01) and better OAR sparing at low doses than HT plans, particularly at doses less than 5 Gy. On the other hand, HT plans showed better DHI (p < 0.01) and showed better OAR sparing at higher doses. Both modalities achieved nearly 100% tumor control probability and approximately 1% NTCP in the lungs and heart. VMAT showed lower SCCP than HT (p < 0.01), though both plans showed higher SCCP values than conventional mixed beam (electron-photon) plans reported by our group previously. VMAT plans required 66.2% less time to deliver than HT. Both VMAT and HT provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. Both techniques are currently utilized at our institution

  5. Ultrafast treatment plan optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a novel aperture-based algorithm for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plan optimization with high quality and high efficiency. Methods: The VMAT optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale convex programming problem solved by a column generation approach. The authors consider a cost function consisting two terms, the first enforcing a desired dose distribution and the second guaranteeing a smooth dose rate variation between successive gantry angles. A gantry rotation is discretized into 180 beam angles and for each beam angle, only one MLC aperture is allowed. The apertures are generated one by one in a sequential way. At each iteration of the column generation method, a deliverable MLC aperture is generated for one of the unoccupied beam angles by solving a subproblem with the consideration of MLC mechanic constraints. A subsequent master problem is then solved to determine the dose rate at all currently generated apertures by minimizing the cost function. When all 180 beam angles are occupied, the optimization completes, yielding a set of deliverable apertures and associated dose rates that produce a high quality plan. Results: The algorithm was preliminarily tested on five prostate and five head-and-neck clinical cases, each with one full gantry rotation without any couch/collimator rotations. High quality VMAT plans have been generated for all ten cases with extremely high efficiency. It takes only 5-8 min on CPU (MATLAB code on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU) and 18-31 s on GPU (CUDA code on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card) to generate such plans. Conclusions: The authors have developed an aperture-based VMAT optimization algorithm which can generate clinically deliverable high quality treatment plans at very high efficiency.

  6. Physical aspects of the angle-beta concept in electron arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.; Freeman, C.R.; Souhami, L.; Guerra, J. (Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    A technique for the determination of treatment parameters that are required to achieve a desired depth dose distribution in electron arc therapy is discussed and a method for calculating isodose distributions is presented. Both the treatment technique and the dose calculation method rely on the angle beta concept, which uniquely describes the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses in electron arc therapy on the nominal field width, isocenter depth, and virtual source-axis distance. The angle beta concept is discussed in detail and the electron pseudo-arc therapy technique used at McGill is described. Also presented is the method used to achieve dose homogeneity in target volumes treated with the pseudo-arc technique.

  7. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  8. Arc therapy for total body irradiation – A robust novel treatment technique for standard treatment rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We developed a simple and robust total body irradiation (TBI) method for standard treatment rooms that obviates the need for patient translation devices. Methods and materials: Two generic arcs with rectangular segments for a patient thickness of 16 and 20 cm (arc16/arc20) were generated. An analytical fit was performed to determine the weights of the arc segments depending on patient thickness and gantry angle. Stability and absolute dose for both arcs were measured using EBT3 films in a range of solid water slab phantom thicknesses. Additionally ionization chamber measurements were performed every 10 cm at a source surface distance (SSD) of ∼200 cm. Results: The measured standard deviation for arc16 is ±3% with a flatness ⩽9.0%. Arc20 had a standard deviation of ±3% with a flatness ⩽7.3% for all measured thicknesses. The theoretical curves proved to be accurate for the prediction of the segment weightings for the two arcs. In vivo measurements for the first 22 clinical patients showed a dose deviation of less than 3%. Conclusions: Arc therapy is a convenient and stable method for TBI. This cost-effective approach has been introduced clinically, obviating the need for field patches and to physically move the patient

  9. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, Dávid

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. In this model, a 360-degree arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multi-leaf collimator (MLC) constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. We demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. For that purpose, we first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated...

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    KR Muralidhar; Bhudevi Soubhagya; Shabbir Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS) between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plan...

  11. Clinical Studies of Biofield Therapies: Summary, Methodological Challenges, and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shamini; Hammerschlag, Richard; Mills, Paul; Cohen, Lorenzo; Krieger, Richard; Vieten, Cassandra; Lutgendorf, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Biofield therapies are noninvasive therapies in which the practitioner explicitly works with a client's biofield (interacting fields of energy and information that surround living systems) to stimulate healing responses in patients. While the practice of biofield therapies has existed in Eastern and Western cultures for thousands of years, empirical research on the effectiveness of biofield therapies is still relatively nascent. In this article, we provide a summary of the state of the evidence for biofield therapies for a number of different clinical conditions. We note specific methodological issues for research in biofield therapies that need to be addressed (including practitioner-based, outcomes-based, and research design considerations), as well as provide a list of suggested next steps for biofield researchers to consider. PMID:26665043

  12. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  13. SU-E-T-62: Cardiac Toxicity in Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, X; Zhang, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Feng, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhou, L [West China Hospital, Sichuan (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Deng, J [Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The cardiac toxicity for lung cancer patients, each treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DAT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is investigated. Methods: 120 lung patients were selected for this study: 25 treated with DAT, 50 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. For comparison, all plans were generated in the same treatment planning system, normalized such that the 100% isodose lines encompassed 95% of planning target volume. The plan quality was evaluated in terms of homogeneity index (HI) and 95% conformity index (%95 CI) for target dose coverage and mean dose, maximum dose, V{sub 30} Gy as well as V{sub 5} Gy for cardiac toxicity analysis. Results: When all the plans were analyzed, the VMAT plans offered the best target coverage with 95% CI = 0.992 and HI = 1.23. The DAT plans provided the best heart sparing with mean heart dose = 2.3Gy and maximum dose = 11.6Gy, as compared to 5.7 Gy and 31.1 Gy by IMRT as well as 4.6 Gy and 30.9 Gy by VMAT. The mean V30Gy and V5Gy of the heart in the DAT plans were up to 11.7% lower in comparison to the IMRT and VMAT plans. When the tumor volume was considered, the VMAT plans spared up to 70.9% more doses to the heart when the equivalent diameter of the tumor was larger than 4cm. Yet the maximum dose to the heart was reduced the most in the DAT plans with up to 139.8% less than that of the other two plans. Conclusion: Overall, the VMAT plans achieved the best target coverage among the three treatment modalities, and would spare the heart the most for the larger tumors. The DAT plans appeared advantageous in delivering the least maximum dose to the heart as compared to the IMRT and VMAT plans.

  14. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Dávid, E-mail: Papp.David@mgh.harvard.edu; Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. Methods: In this model, a 360° arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multileaf collimator constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. Results: The authors demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. The authors first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using fluence map optimization and 20 intensity-modulated fields in equally spaced beam directions, which is beyond the standard of care. Modeling the typical clinical setup for the treatment sites considered, IMRT plans using seven or nine beams are also computed. Subsequently, VMAT plans are optimized by dividing the 360° arc into 20 corresponding arc segments. Assuming typical machine parameters (a dose rate of 600 MU/min, and a maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s), it is demonstrated that the optimized VMAT plans with 2–3 min delivery time are of noticeably better quality than the 7–9 beam IMRT plans. The VMAT plan quality approaches the quality of the 20-beam IMRT benchmark plan for delivery times between 3 and 4 min. Conclusions: The results indicate that high quality treatments can be delivered in a single arc with 20 arc segments if sufficient time is allowed for modulation in each segment.

  15. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. Methods: In this model, a 360° arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multileaf collimator constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. Results: The authors demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. The authors first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using fluence map optimization and 20 intensity-modulated fields in equally spaced beam directions, which is beyond the standard of care. Modeling the typical clinical setup for the treatment sites considered, IMRT plans using seven or nine beams are also computed. Subsequently, VMAT plans are optimized by dividing the 360° arc into 20 corresponding arc segments. Assuming typical machine parameters (a dose rate of 600 MU/min, and a maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s), it is demonstrated that the optimized VMAT plans with 2–3 min delivery time are of noticeably better quality than the 7–9 beam IMRT plans. The VMAT plan quality approaches the quality of the 20-beam IMRT benchmark plan for delivery times between 3 and 4 min. Conclusions: The results indicate that high quality treatments can be delivered in a single arc with 20 arc segments if sufficient time is allowed for modulation in each segment

  16. Intrafraction motion correction by tracking of fiducial marker projections on sequential MV images in arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Van Herck, Hans; Crijns, Wouter; Slagmolen, Pieter; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Haustermans, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Van Herck H., Crijns W., Slagmolen P., Maes F., Van den Heuvel F., Haustermans K., ''Intrafraction motion correction by tracking of fiducial marker projections on sequential MV images in arc therapy'', Varian Research Partnership Symposium, March 18-20, 2013, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

  17. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59–95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40–1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications

  18. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT

  19. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Douglas A., E-mail: douglas.hoover@lhsc.on.ca; Chen, Jeff Z. [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); MacFarlane, Michael [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Oncology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Battista, Jerry J. [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  20. Statistical quality control for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery using machine log data

    CERN Document Server

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Han, Tae Jin; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up statistical quality control for monitoring of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery error using machine log data. Eclipse and Clinac iX linac with the RapidArc system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) is used for delivery of the VMAT plan. During the delivery of the RapidArc fields, the machine determines the delivered motor units (MUs) and gantry angle position accuracy and the standard deviations of MU (sigma_MU; dosimetric error) and gantry angle (sigma_GA; geometric error) are displayed on the console monitor after completion of the RapidArc delivery. In the present study, first, the log data was analyzed to confirm its validity and usability; then, statistical process control (SPC) was applied to monitor the sigma_MU and sigma_GA in a timely manner for all RapidArc fields: a total of 195 arc fields for 99 patients. The sigma_MU and sigma_GA were determined twice for all fields, that is, first during the patient-specific plan QA and then again during th...

  1. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, Dante E., E-mail: droa@uci.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Irvine-Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States); Schiffner, Daniel C.; Zhang Juying; Dietrich, Salam N.; Kuo, Jeffrey V.; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.A.L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Irvine-Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI{sub RTOG}), homogeneity index (HI{sub RTOG}), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D{sub mean} and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D{sub max} and D{sub mean}. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times {+-} SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 {+-} 7.3, 2.6 {+-} 1.6, and 3.0 {+-} 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery

  2. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CIRTOG), homogeneity index (HIRTOG), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), Dmean and D5–D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of Dmax and Dmean. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times ± SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 ± 7.3, 2.6 ± 1.6, and 3.0 ± 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery of SRS and SBRT to intracranial and

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Craig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yangy2@upmc.edu; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc

  4. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Fu; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Yeh, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chen-Fa; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)) and 5 Gy (V(5 Gy)) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. PMID:26116150

  5. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient׳s neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient׳s data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain. PMID:26235550

  6. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in anal canal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aillères Norbert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans in anal canal cancers. Methods Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1 and a double (RA2 modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2 based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1 was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU and delivery treatment time were also reported. Results All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p Conformity index (CI95% for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2, 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT, and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1. Homogeneity (D5% - D95% for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2, 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT, and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1. RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted

  7. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans in anal canal cancers. Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1) and a double (RA2) modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2) based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1) was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue) were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU) and delivery treatment time were also reported. All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p < 0.05). Conformity index (CI95%) for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2), 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT), and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1). Homogeneity (D5% - D95%) for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2), 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT), and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1). RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted in comparable sparing for

  8. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  9. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B.; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds’ degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%–8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (> 4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measurement also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single element point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  10. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

     Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds' degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%-8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (> 4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measure-ment also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single ele-ment point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  11. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jia-Fu [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Dah-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Hui-Ling, E-mail: hlyeh@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen-Fa [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]{sub 50.4} {sub Gy} and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV{sub 62} {sub Gy}). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) and 5 Gy (V{sub 5} {sub Gy}) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer.

  12. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]50.4 Gy and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV62 Gy). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V20 Gy) and 5 Gy (V5 Gy) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer

  13. Incorporating geometric ray tracing to generate initial conditions for intensity modulated arc therapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose and background: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a rotational variant of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that is achieved by allowing the multileaf collimator (MLC) positions to vary as the gantry rotates around the patient. This work describes a method to generate an IMAT plan through the use of a fast ray tracing technique based on dosimetric and geometric information for setting initial MLC leaf positions prior to final IMAT optimization. Methods and materials: Three steps were used to generate an IMAT plan. The first step was to generate arcs based on anatomical contours. The second step was to generate ray importance factor (RIF) maps by ray tracing the dose distribution inside the planning target volume (PTV) to modify the MLC leaf positions of the anatomical arcs to reduce the maximum dose inside the PTV. The RIF maps were also segmented to create a new set of arcs to improve the dose to low dose voxels within the PTV. In the third step, the MLC leaf positions from all arcs were put through a leaf position optimization (LPO) algorithm and brought into a fast Monte Carlo dose calculation engine for a final dose calculation. The method was applied to two phantom cases, a clinical prostate case and the Radiological Physics Center (RPC)'s head and neck phantom. The authors assessed the plan improvements achieved by each step and compared plans with and without using RIF. They also compared the IMAT plan with an IMRT plan for the RPC phantom. Results: All plans that incorporated RIF and LPO had lower objective function values than those that incorporated LPO only. The objective function value was reduced by about 15% after the generation of RIF arcs and 52% after generation of RIF arcs and leaf position optimization. The IMAT plan for the RPC phantom had similar dose coverage for PTV1 and PTV2 (the same dose volume histogram curves), however, slightly lower dose to the normal tissues compared to a six-field IMRT plan. Conclusion: The

  14. Tangential volumetric modulated arc therapy technique for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Virén, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Janne; Myllyoja, Kimmo; Koskela, Kristiina; Lahtinen, Tapani; Seppälä, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to introduce a new restricted tangential volumetric modulated arc therapy (tVMAT) technique for whole breast irradiation and compare its dosimetric properties to other currently used breast cancer radiotherapy techniques. Method Ten consecutive women with left-sided breast cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study. Four treatment plans were generated for each patient: 1) standard tangential field-in-field (FinF), 2) tangential intensity modul...

  15. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    OpenAIRE

    Sapkaroski, Daniel; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerg...

  16. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy in lung cancer: Current literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT is a novel radiation technique that delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target by allowing the simultaneous variation of gantry rotation speed, dose rate and multiple-leaf collimators leaf positions. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on two VMAT systems, RapidArc and SmartArc with main focus on planning studies of lung cancer. A systematic review of available data was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed with the keywords ′′lung′′ and "VMAT". The published data show that VMAT techniques have clear superiority over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with regard to improving dose conformity and sparing of organs at risks (OARs. The data indicates that for lung tumor VMAT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT provide equivalent dose homogeneity, dose conformity and target volume coverage; however, contradictory results were obtained in terms of OARs sparing. The major advantages of VMAT over IMRT are the reduction in the number of monitor units and faster treatment delivery times without compromising the quality of the treatment plans. Moreover, faster delivery time is more patient-friendly and it minimizes intra-fractional patient motion allowing treatment volumes stay within their respective treatment margins. Current literature data shows that VMAT can be a good option to treat lung cancer; however, data on clinical trials are still lacking. The clinical trials are essential to confirm the safety and efficacy of VMAT techniques.

  17. MO-H-19A-02: Investigation of Modulated Electron Arc (MeArc) Therapy for the Treatment of Scalp Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Electron arc therapy has long been proposed as the most suitable technique for the treatment of superficial tumors that follow circularly curved surfaces. However it was challenged by unsuitability of the conventional applicators and the lack of adequate 3-D dose calculation tools for arc electron beams in the treatment planning systems (TPS). Now with the availability of an electron specific multi-leaf collimator (eMLC) and an in-house Monte Carlo (MC) based TPS, we were motivated to investigate more advanced modulated electron arc (MeARC) therapy and its beneficial outcome. Methods: We initiated the study by a film measurement conducted in a head and neck phantom, where we delivered electron arcs in a step and shoot manner using the light field as a guide to avoid fields abutments. This step was done to insure enough clearance for the arcs with eMLC. MCBEAM and MCPLAN MC codes were used for the treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation, respectively. Treatment plans were generated for targets drawn in real patient CTs and head and neck phantom. We utilized beams eye view available from a commercial planning system to create beamlets having same isocenter and adjoined at the scalp surface. Then dose-deposition coefficients from those beamlets were calculated for all electron energies using MCPLAN. An in-house optimization code was then used to find the optimum weights needed from individual beamlets. Results: MeARC showed a nicely tailored dose distribution around the circular curved target on the scalp. Some hot spots were noticed and could be attributed to fields abutment problem owing to the bulging nature of electron profiles. Brain dose was shown to be at lower levels compared to photon treatment. Conclusion: MeARC was shown to be a promising modality for treating scalp cases and could be beneficial to all superficial tumors with a circular curvature

  18. MO-H-19A-02: Investigation of Modulated Electron Arc (MeArc) Therapy for the Treatment of Scalp Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Jin, L; Martin, J; Li, J; Chibani, O; Galloway, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Electron arc therapy has long been proposed as the most suitable technique for the treatment of superficial tumors that follow circularly curved surfaces. However it was challenged by unsuitability of the conventional applicators and the lack of adequate 3-D dose calculation tools for arc electron beams in the treatment planning systems (TPS). Now with the availability of an electron specific multi-leaf collimator (eMLC) and an in-house Monte Carlo (MC) based TPS, we were motivated to investigate more advanced modulated electron arc (MeARC) therapy and its beneficial outcome. Methods: We initiated the study by a film measurement conducted in a head and neck phantom, where we delivered electron arcs in a step and shoot manner using the light field as a guide to avoid fields abutments. This step was done to insure enough clearance for the arcs with eMLC. MCBEAM and MCPLAN MC codes were used for the treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation, respectively. Treatment plans were generated for targets drawn in real patient CTs and head and neck phantom. We utilized beams eye view available from a commercial planning system to create beamlets having same isocenter and adjoined at the scalp surface. Then dose-deposition coefficients from those beamlets were calculated for all electron energies using MCPLAN. An in-house optimization code was then used to find the optimum weights needed from individual beamlets. Results: MeARC showed a nicely tailored dose distribution around the circular curved target on the scalp. Some hot spots were noticed and could be attributed to fields abutment problem owing to the bulging nature of electron profiles. Brain dose was shown to be at lower levels compared to photon treatment. Conclusion: MeARC was shown to be a promising modality for treating scalp cases and could be beneficial to all superficial tumors with a circular curvature.

  19. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Xiaojuan; Xu Yong; Zhou Lin; Liu Yongmei; Li Tao; Jiang Xiaoqin; Gong Youling

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT) techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. Materials and methods 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time compariso...

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 ± 0.3 to 9.2 ± 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 ± 3.8 to 98.3 ± 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Bignardi, Mario; Alongi, Filippo; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Castiglioni, Simona; Pentimalli, Sara; Tozzi, Angelo (IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy)), e-mail: pietro.mancosu@humanitas.it; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca (Oncology Inst. of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 +- 0.3 to 9.2 +- 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 +- 3.8 to 98.3 +- 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  2. Feasibility of single-isocenter, multi-arc non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy for multiple brain tumors using a linear accelerator with a 160-leaf multileaf collimator: a phantom study

    OpenAIRE

    Iwai, Yoshio; Ozawa, Shuichi; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Pellegrini, Roberto; Yoda, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of single isocenter, multi-arc non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for multiple brain tumors was studied using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with an Agility multileaf collimator and a Monaco treatment planning system. Two VMAT radiosurgery plans consisting of a full arc and three half arcs were created with a prescribed dose of 20 Gy in a single fraction. After dose delivery to a phantom, ionization chambers and radiochromic films were used for dose mea...

  3. Baseline tests for arc melter vitrification of INEL buried wastes. Volume 1: Facility description and summary data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.; Soelberg, N.R.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-11-19

    This report presents field results and raw data from the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Arc Melter Vitrification Project Phase 1 baseline test series conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). The baseline test series was conducted using the electric arc melter facility at the USBM Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. Five different surrogate waste feed mixtures were tested that simulated thermally-oxidized, buried, TRU-contaminated, mixed wastes and soils present at the INEL. The USBM Arc Furnace Integrated Waste Processing Test Facility includes a continuous feed system, the arc melting furnace, an offgas control system, and utilities. The melter is a sealed, 3-phase alternating current (ac) furnace approximately 2 m high and 1.3 m wide. The furnace has a capacity of 1 metric ton of steel and can process as much as 1,500 lb/h of soil-type waste materials. The surrogate feed materials included five mixtures designed to simulate incinerated TRU-contaminated buried waste materials mixed with INEL soil. Process samples, melter system operations data and offgas composition data were obtained during the baseline tests to evaluate the melter performance and meet test objectives. Samples and data gathered during this program included (a) automatically and manually logged melter systems operations data, (b) process samples of slag, metal and fume solids, and (c) offgas composition, temperature, velocity, flowrate, moisture content, particulate loading and metals content. This report consists of 2 volumes: Volume I summarizes the baseline test operations. It includes an executive summary, system and facility description, review of the surrogate waste mixtures, and a description of the baseline test activities, measurements, and sample collection. Volume II contains the raw test data and sample analyses from samples collected during the baseline tests.

  4. Baseline tests for arc melter vitrification of INEL buried wastes. Volume 1: Facility description and summary data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents field results and raw data from the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Arc Melter Vitrification Project Phase 1 baseline test series conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). The baseline test series was conducted using the electric arc melter facility at the USBM Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. Five different surrogate waste feed mixtures were tested that simulated thermally-oxidized, buried, TRU-contaminated, mixed wastes and soils present at the INEL. The USBM Arc Furnace Integrated Waste Processing Test Facility includes a continuous feed system, the arc melting furnace, an offgas control system, and utilities. The melter is a sealed, 3-phase alternating current (ac) furnace approximately 2 m high and 1.3 m wide. The furnace has a capacity of 1 metric ton of steel and can process as much as 1,500 lb/h of soil-type waste materials. The surrogate feed materials included five mixtures designed to simulate incinerated TRU-contaminated buried waste materials mixed with INEL soil. Process samples, melter system operations data and offgas composition data were obtained during the baseline tests to evaluate the melter performance and meet test objectives. Samples and data gathered during this program included (a) automatically and manually logged melter systems operations data, (b) process samples of slag, metal and fume solids, and (c) offgas composition, temperature, velocity, flowrate, moisture content, particulate loading and metals content. This report consists of 2 volumes: Volume I summarizes the baseline test operations. It includes an executive summary, system and facility description, review of the surrogate waste mixtures, and a description of the baseline test activities, measurements, and sample collection. Volume II contains the raw test data and sample analyses from samples collected during the baseline tests

  5. Verification of dose distribution for volumetric modulated arc therapy total marrow irradiation in a humanlike phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning studies have been reported to provide good target coverage and organs at risk (OARs) sparing in total marrow irradiation (TMI). A comprehensive dosimetric study simulating the clinical situation as close as possible is a norm in radiotherapy before a technique can be used to treat a patient. Without such a study, it would be difficult to make a reliable and safe clinical transition especially with a technique as complicated as VMAT-TMI. To this end, the dosimetric feasibility of VMAT-TMI technique in terms of treatment planning, delivery efficiency, and the most importantly three dimensional dose distribution accuracy was investigated in this study. The VMAT-TMI dose distribution inside a humanlike Rando phantom was measured and compared to the dose calculated using RapidArc especially in the field junctions and the inhomogeneous tissues including the lungs, which is the dose-limiting organ in TMI. Methods: Three subplans with a total of nine arcs were used to treat the planning target volume (PTV), which was determined as all the bones plus the 3 mm margin. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at 39 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated plan doses. Planar dose for each arc was verified using mapcheck. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of 0.5% (range: -4.3% and 6.6%) from the calculated dose in the junctions and in the inhomogeneous medium including the lungs. Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that RapidArc VMAT technique is dosimetrically accurate, safe, and efficient in delivering TMI within clinically acceptable time frame.

  6. Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. c-IMRT for the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Zhe Zhang

    Full Text Available To compare plans using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT with conventional sliding window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (c-IMRT to treat upper thoracic esophageal cancer (EC.CT datasets of 11 patients with upper thoracic EC were identified. Four plans were generated for each patient: c-IMRT with 5 fields (5F and VMAT with a single arc (1A, two arcs (2A, or three arcs (3A. The prescribed doses were 64 Gy/32 F for the primary tumor (PTV64. The dose-volume histogram data, the number of monitoring units (MUs and the treatment time (TT for the different plans were compared.All of the plans generated similar dose distributions for PTVs and organs at risk (OARs, except that the 2A- and 3A-VMAT plans yielded a significantly higher conformity index (CI than the c-IMRT plan. The CI of the PTV64 was improved by increasing the number of arcs in the VMAT plans. The maximum spinal cord dose and the planning risk volume of the spinal cord dose for the two techniques were similar. The 2A- and 3A-VMAT plans yielded lower mean lung doses and heart V50 values than the c-IMRT. The V20 and V30 for the lungs in all of the VMAT plans were lower than those in the c-IMRT plan, at the expense of increasing V5, V10 and V13. The VMAT plan resulted in significant reductions in MUs and TT.The 2A-VMAT plan appeared to spare the lungs from moderate-dose irradiation most effectively of all plans, at the expense of increasing the low-dose irradiation volume, and also significantly reduced the number of required MUs and the TT. The CI of the PTVs and the OARs was improved by increasing the arc-number from 1 to 2; however, no significant improvement was observed using the 3A-VMAT, except for an increase in the TT.

  7. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, S.O.; Hol, S.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Essers, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 13 patients, four treatment co

  8. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhengzheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is to report 1 the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2 the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery.

  9. Influence of increment of gantry angle and number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy planning in Monaco planning system: A planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the increment of gantry angle and the number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with 80 multileaf collimator (MLC. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans were done with different increment of gantry angle like 15 o , 20 o , 30 o and 40 o . The remaining parameters were similar for all the plans. The results were compared. To compare the plan quality with number of arcs, VMAT plans were done with single and dual arc with increment of gantry angle of 20 o . The dose to gross tumor volume (GTV for 60 Gy and planning target volume (PTV for 48 Gy was compared. The dosimetric parameters D 98% , D 95% , D 50% and D max of GTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and conformity index (CI of GTV were studied and the dose to 98% and 95% of PTV was analyzed. Maximum dose to spinal cord and planning risk volume of cord (PRV cord was compared. The Volume of lung receiving 10 Gy, 20 Gy and mean dose was analyzed. The volume of heart receiving 30 Gy and 45 Gy was compared. The volume of normal tissue receiving greater than 2 Gy and 5 Gy was compared. The number of monitor units (MU required to deliver the plans were compared. The plan with larger increment of gantry angle proved to be superior to smaller increment of gantry angle plans in terms of dose coverage, HI, CI and normal tissue sparing. The number of arcs did not make any difference in the quality of the plan.

  10. Feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and high intensity photon beams for hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report technical features, early outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients (22 lesions) were prospectively enrolled in a feasibility study. Dose prescription was 50Gy in 10 fractions. Seven patients (35%) were classified as AJCC stage I-II while 13 (65%) were stages III-IV. Eighteen patients (90%) were Child-Pugh stage A, the remaining were stage B. All patients were treated with RapidArc technique with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of 10MV from a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Technical, dosimetric and early clinical assessment was performed to characterize treatment and its potential outcome. Median age was 68 years, median initial tumor volume was 124 cm3 (range: 6–848). Median follow-up time was 7.4 months (range: 3–13). All patients completed treatment without interruption. Mean actuarial overall survival was of 9.6 ± 0.9 months (95%C.L. 7.8-11.4), median survival was not reached; complete response was observed in 8/22 (36.4%) lesions; partial response in 7/22 (31.8%), stable disease in 6/22 (27.3%), 1/22 (4.4%) showed progression. Toxicity was mild with only 1 case of grade 3 RILD and all other types were not greater than grade 2. Concerning dosimetric data, Paddick conformity index was 0.98 ± 0.02; gradient index was 3.82 ± 0.93; V95% to the clinical target volume was 93.6 ± 7.7%. Mean dose to kidneys resulted lower than 3.0Gy; mean dose to stomach 4.5 ± 3.0Gy; D1cm3 to spinal cord was 8.2 ± 4.5Gy; D1% to the esophagus was 10.2 ± 9.7Gy. Average beam on time resulted 0.7 ± 0.2 minutes (range: 0.4-1.4) with the delivery of an average of 4.4 partial arcs (range: 3–6) of those 86% non-coplanar. Clinical results could suggest to introduce VMAT-RapidArc as an appropriate SBRT technique for patients with HCC in view of a prospective dose escalation trial

  11. Verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plan by long-file analysis of linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To verify the dose delivery accuracy of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plan by log-file analysis of linear accelerator that can be created when a dynamic delivery occurs. Methods: Accelerator log file in binary format recorded the accelerator execution plan for each control point corresponding to the gantry angle, multi-leaf collimator leave position, cumulative machine monitor units (MU). These information were read from the accelerator log file with Matlab7.1, then the original control points in the plan file replaced the corresponding information for the log,which generated a new plan. New plan was exported into the planning system to recalculate the dose. The volume dose histogram (DVH) and dose distribution was contrasted to determine the accuracy of the accelerator plan of implementation between two plans. Results: Compared with the original plan, gantry angle difference over ± 1° accounted for about 35% of the entire arc of control points in 4 of 12 arcs and the percentage of the leave error of ±0.5 mm was about 95%. MU error of a single control point was larger, but the cumulative MU for each are was small which was located between-0.09% to 0.11% in the selected 12 arcs. Between the targets, the maximum dose,minimum dose, the mean dose differences were from -0.07% to 0.42%, -0.38% to 0.40%, 0.03% to 0.08%, respectively. The maximum dose and mean dose differences of organs at risks were located from -1.16% to 2.51%, -1.21% to 3.12%, respectively. Conclusions: Accelerator log-file analysis to verify the VMAT plan nan be supplied to the experimental method supplement. (authors)

  12. 3D dosimetry by compass program with array detector for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of dose of volumetric modulated arc therapy using the home-made phantom, a glass detector, GafChromic Film, ion chamber and a compass program with matrixx detector. We measured the isodose curve in the RTtarget, LTtagert and G4 using the compass program and Matrixx detector with homemade multi-purpose VMAT phantom, three times a day measured by five days. Measurements were compared with the calculated values. Compass analysis program was used to analysis relative iso dose curve. As a result, average passing rate were 85.22% ± 1., 89.96% ± 2. and 95.14 % ± 1.18. Compass analysis program and Matrixx detector are useful dose verification tools for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy. However, doses were somewhat different between calculated dose and measured dose at steep dose gradient region and low dose region. We recommend that absolute dose be necessary to be measured using the glass detector and ion chamber at region.

  13. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm3 ± 1.0 cm3 and 28.52 cm3 ± 3.22 cm3, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D2% and D98% were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D100% mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met

  14. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Bender, Edward [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Basavatia, Amar; Hong, Linda; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Tomé, Wolfgang A., E-mail: wtome@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm{sup 3} ± 1.0 cm{sup 3} and 28.52 cm{sup 3} ± 3.22 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D{sub 100%} mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met.

  15. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy planning using multicriteria optimization for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Sarah; Matzinger, Oscar; Pachoud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) multicriteria optimization (MCO) algorithm clinically available in the RayStation treatment planning system (TPS) and its ability to reduce treatment planning time while providing high dosimetric plan quality. Nine patients with localized prostate cancer who were previously treated with 78 Gy in 39 fractions using VMAT plans and rayArc system based on the direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) algorithm were selected and replanned using the VMAT-MCO system. First, the dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated using multiple conformity metrics that account for target coverage and sparing of healthy tissue, used in our departmental clinical protocols. The conformity and homogeneity index, number of monitor units, and treatment planning time for both modalities were assessed. Next, the effects of the technical plan parameters, such as constraint leaf motion CLM (cm/°) and maximum arc delivery time T (s), on the accuracy of delivered dose were evaluated using quality assurance passing rates (QAs) measured using the Delta4 phantom from ScandiDos. For the dosimetric plan's quality analysis, the results show that the VMAT-MCO system provides plans comparable to the rayArc system with no statistical difference for V95% (p < 0.01), D1% (p < 0.01), CI (p < 0.01), and HI (p < 0.01) of the PTV, bladder (p < 0.01), and rectum (p < 0.01) constraints, except for the femoral heads and healthy tissues, for which a dose reduction was observed using MCO compared with rayArc (p < 0.01). The technical parameter study showed that a combination of CLM equal to 0.5 cm/degree and a maximum delivery time of 72 s allowed the accurate delivery of the VMAT-MCO plan on the Elekta Versa HD linear accelerator. Planning evaluation and dosimetric measurements showed that VMAT-MCO can be used clinically with the advantage of enhanced planning process efficiency by reducing the treatment planning time

  16. Critical Appraisal of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastases to Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A planning study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs, RapidArc (RA), fixed beam IMRT (IM), and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with multiple static fields or short conformal arcs in a series of patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solitary or oligo-metastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were included in the study. Dose prescription was set to 45 Gy (mean dose to clinical target volume [CTV]) in six fractions of 7.5 Gy. Objectives for CTV and planning target volume (PTV) were as follows: Dosemin >95%, Dosemax 15Gy 36Gy 36Gy 15Gy 3) for liver. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated to assess plan quality. Results: Planning objectives on CTV and PTV were achieved by all techniques. Use of RA improved PTV coverage (V95% = 90.2% ± 5.2% for RA compared with 82.5% ± 9.6% and 84.5% ± 8.2% for CRT and IM, respectively). Most planning objectives for organs at risk were met by all techniques except for the duodenum, small bowel, and stomach, in which the CRT plans exceeded the dose/volume constraints in some patients. The MU/fraction values were as follows: 2186 ± 211 for RA, 2583 ± 699 for IM, and 1554 ± 153 for CRT. Effective treatment time resulted as follows: 3.7 ± 0.4 min for RA, 10.6 ± 1.2 min for IM, and 6.3 ± 0.5 min for CRT. Conclusions: Delivery of SBRT by RA showed improvements in conformal avoidance with respect to standard conformal irradiation. Delivery parameters confirmed logistical advantages of RA, particularly compared with IM.

  17. Beam's-Eye-View Dosimetrics-Guided Inverse Planning for Aperture-Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To use angular beam's-eye-view dosimetrics (BEVD) information to improve the computational efficiency and plan quality of inverse planning of aperture-modulated arc therapy (AMAT). Methods and Materials: In BEVD-guided inverse planning, the angular space spanned by a rotational arc is represented by a large number of fixed-gantry beams with angular spacing of ∼2.5 degrees. Each beam is assigned with an initial aperture shape determined by the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection of the planning target volume (PTV) and an initial weight. Instead of setting the beam weights arbitrarily, which slows down the subsequent optimization process and may result in a suboptimal solution, a priori knowledge about the quality of the beam directions derived from a BEVD is adopted to initialize the weights. In the BEVD calculation, a higher score is assigned to directions that allow more dose to be delivered to the PTV without exceeding the dose tolerances of the organs at risk (OARs) and vice versa. Simulated annealing is then used to optimize the segment shapes and weights. The BEVD-guided inverse planning is demonstrated by using two clinical cases, and the results are compared with those of a conventional approach without BEVD guidance. Results: An a priori knowledge-guided inverse planning scheme for AMAT is established. The inclusion of BEVD guidance significantly improves the convergence behavior of AMAT inverse planning and results in much better OAR sparing as compared with the conventional approach. Conclusions: BEVD-guidance facilitates AMAT treatment planning and provides a comprehensive tool to maximally use the technical capacity of the new arc therapeutic modality.

  18. Tangential volumetric modulated arc therapy technique for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to introduce a new restricted tangential volumetric modulated arc therapy (tVMAT) technique for whole breast irradiation and compare its dosimetric properties to other currently used breast cancer radiotherapy techniques. Ten consecutive women with left-sided breast cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study. Four treatment plans were generated for each patient: 1) standard tangential field-in-field (FinF), 2) tangential intensity modulated radiotherapy (tIMRT), 3) tangential VMAT (tVMAT) with two dual arcs of 50-60° and 4) continuous VMAT (cVMAT) with a dual arc of 240°. The plans were created with Monaco® (tIMRT, tVMAT and cVMAT) and Oncentra® (FinF) treatment planning systems. With both VMAT techniques significantly higher cardiac avoidance, dose coverage and dose homogenity were achieved when compared with FinF or tIMRT techniques (p < 0.01). VMAT techniques also decreased the high dose areas (above 20 Gy) of ipsilateral lung. There were no significant differences in the mean dose of contralateral breast between the tVMAT, tIMRT and FinF techniques. The dose coverage (V47.5 Gy) was greatest with cVMAT. However, with cVMAT the increase of contralateral breast dose was significant. The present results support the hypothesis that the introduced tVMAT technique is feasible for treatment of left-sided breast cancer. With tVMAT dose to heart and ipsilateral lung can be reduced and the dose homogeneity can be improved without increasing the dose to contralateral breast or lung

  19. ARC3.2 Summary for City Leaders Climate Change and Cities: Second Assessment Report of the Urban Climate Change Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Solecki, W.; Romero-Lankao, P.; Mehrotra, S.; Dhakal, S.; Bowman, T.; Ibrahim, S. Ali

    2015-01-01

    ARC3.2 presents a broad synthesis of the latest scientific research on climate change and cities. Mitigation and adaptation climate actions of 100 cities are documented throughout the 16 chapters, as well as online through the ARC3.2 Case Study Docking Station. Pathways to Urban Transformation, Major Findings, and Key Messages are highlighted here in the ARC3.2 Summary for City Leaders. These sections lay out what cities need to do achieve their potential as leaders of climate change solutions. UCCRN Regional Hubs in Europe, Latin America, Africa, Australia and Asia will share ARC3.2 findings with local city leaders and researchers. The ARC3.2 Summary for City Leaders synthesizes Major Findings and Key Messages on urban climate science, disasters and risks, urban planning and design, mitigation and adaptation, equity and environmental justice, economics and finance, the private sector, urban ecosystems, urban coastal zones, public health, housing and informal settlements, energy, water, transportation, solid waste, and governance. These were based on climate trends and future projections for 100 cities around the world.

  20. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A dosimetric comparison with TomoTherapy and step-and-shoot IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a novel technique, employs a linear accelerator to conduct dynamic modulation rotation radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT with helical tomotherapy (HT) and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with regard to the sparing effect on organs at risk (OARs), dosimetric quality, and efficiency of delivery. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with NPC treated by HT were re-planned by VMAT (two arcs) and IMRT (7–9 fields) for dosimetric comparison. The target area received three dose levels (70, 60, and 54 Gy) in 33 fractions using simultaneous integrated boosts technique. The Philips Pinnacle Planning System 9.0 was adopted to design VMAT, using SmartArc as the planning algorithm. For a fair comparison, the planning target volume (PTV) coverage of the 3 plans was normalized to the same level. Dosimetric comparisons between VMAT, HT, and IMRT plans were analyzed to evaluate (1) coverage, homogeneity, and conformity of PTV, (2) sparing of OARs, (3) delivery time, and (4) monitor units (MUs). Results: The VMAT, HT, and IMRT plans had similar PTV coverage with an average of 96%. There was no significant difference between VMAT and HT in homogeneity, while the homogeneity indices of VMAT (1.06) and HT (1.06) were better than IMRT plans (1.07, p < 0.05). HT plans provided a better conformity index (1.17) than VMAT (1.28, p = 0.01) and IMRT (1.36, p = 0.02). When compared with IMRT, VMAT and HT had a better sparing effect on brain stem and spinal cord (p < 0.05). The effect of parotid sparing was similar between VMAT (mean = 26.3 Gy) and HT (mean = 27.5 Gy), but better than IMRT (mean = 31.3 Gy, p < 0.01). The delivery time per fraction for VMAT (5.7 min) were much lower than for HT (9.5 min, p < 0.01) and IMRT (9.2 min, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Our results indicate that VMAT provides better sparing of normal tissue, homogeneity, and

  1. Ultra-fast treatment plan optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel aperture-based algorithm for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plan optimization with high quality and high efficiency. Methods: The VMAT optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale convex programming problem solved by a column generation approach. We consider a cost function consisting two terms, the first which enforces a desired dose distribution while the second guarantees a smooth dose rate variation between successive gantry angles. At each iteration of the column generation method, a subproblem is first solved to generate one more deliverable MLC aperture which potentially decreases the cost function most effectively. A subsequent master problem is then solved to determine the dose rate at all currently generated apertures by minimizing the cost function. The iteration of such an algorithm yields a set of deliverable apertures, as well as dose rates, at all gantry angles. Results: The algorithm was preliminarily tested on five prostate and five head-a...

  2. Critical structure sparing in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for central lung lesions: helical tomotherapy vs. volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helical tomotherapy (HT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT are both advanced techniques of delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Here, we conduct a study to compare HT and partial-arc VMAT in their ability to spare organs at risk (OARs when stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is delivered to treat centrally located early stage non-small-cell lung cancer or lung metastases. METHODS: 12 patients with centrally located lung lesions were randomly chosen. HT, 2 & 8 arc (Smart Arc, Pinnacle v9.0 plans were generated to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. Target and OAR dose parameters were compared. Each technique's ability to meet dose constraints was further investigated. RESULTS: HT and VMAT plans generated essentially equivalent PTV coverage and dose conformality indices, while a trend for improved dose homogeneity by increasing from 2 to 8 arcs was observed with VMAT. Increasing the number of arcs with VMAT also led to some improvement in OAR sparing. After normalizing to OAR dose constraints, HT was found to be superior to 2 or 8-arc VMAT for optimal OAR sparing (meeting all the dose constraints (p = 0.0004. All dose constraints were met in HT plans. Increasing from 2 to 8 arcs could not help achieve optimal OAR sparing for 4 patients. 2/4 of them had 3 immediately adjacent structures. CONCLUSION: HT appears to be superior to VMAT in OAR sparing mainly in cases which require conformal dose avoidance of multiple immediately adjacent OARs. For such cases, increasing the number of arcs in VMAT cannot significantly improve OAR sparing.

  3. Ipsilateral kidney sparing in treatment of pancreatic malignancies using volumetric-modulated arc therapy avoidance sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has shown treating pancreatic cancer with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to be superior to either intensity-modulated radiation therapy or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), with respect to reducing normal tissue toxicity, monitor units, and treatment time. Furthermore, using avoidance sectors with RapidArc planning can further reduce normal tissue dose while maintaining target conformity. This study looks at the methods in reducing dose to the ipsilateral kidney, in pancreatic head cases, while observing dose received by other critical organs using avoidance sectors. Overall, 10 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient had preoperative/unresectable pancreatic tumor and were selected based on the location of the right kidney being situated within the traditional 3D-CRT treatment field. The target planning target volume (286.97 ± 85.17 cm3) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy using avoidance sectors of 30°, 40°, and 50° and then compared with VMAT as well as 3D-CRT. Analysis of the data shows that the mean dose to the right kidney was reduced by 11.6%, 15.5%, and 21.9% for avoidance angles of 30°, 40°, and 50°, respectively, over VMAT. The mean dose to the total kidney also decreased by 6.5%, 8.5%, and 11.0% for the same increasing angles. Spinal cord maximum dose, however, increased as a function of angle by 3.7%, 4.8%, and 6.1% compared with VMAT. Employing avoidance sector angles as a complement to VMAT planning can significantly reduce high dose to the ipsilateral kidney while not greatly overdosing other critical organs

  4. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  5. Ipsilateral kidney sparing in treatment of pancreatic malignancies using volumetric-modulated arc therapy avoidance sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Raymond W., E-mail: rwc3b@alumni.virginia.edu; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2015-10-01

    Recent research has shown treating pancreatic cancer with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to be superior to either intensity-modulated radiation therapy or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), with respect to reducing normal tissue toxicity, monitor units, and treatment time. Furthermore, using avoidance sectors with RapidArc planning can further reduce normal tissue dose while maintaining target conformity. This study looks at the methods in reducing dose to the ipsilateral kidney, in pancreatic head cases, while observing dose received by other critical organs using avoidance sectors. Overall, 10 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient had preoperative/unresectable pancreatic tumor and were selected based on the location of the right kidney being situated within the traditional 3D-CRT treatment field. The target planning target volume (286.97 ± 85.17 cm{sup 3}) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy using avoidance sectors of 30°, 40°, and 50° and then compared with VMAT as well as 3D-CRT. Analysis of the data shows that the mean dose to the right kidney was reduced by 11.6%, 15.5%, and 21.9% for avoidance angles of 30°, 40°, and 50°, respectively, over VMAT. The mean dose to the total kidney also decreased by 6.5%, 8.5%, and 11.0% for the same increasing angles. Spinal cord maximum dose, however, increased as a function of angle by 3.7%, 4.8%, and 6.1% compared with VMAT. Employing avoidance sector angles as a complement to VMAT planning can significantly reduce high dose to the ipsilateral kidney while not greatly overdosing other critical organs.

  6. Independent absorbed-dose calculation using the Monte Carlo algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the result of independent absorbed-dose calculations based on a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for various treatment sites. All treatment plans were created by the superposition/convolution (SC) algorithm of SmartArc (Pinnacle V9.2, Philips). The beam information was converted into the format of the Monaco V3.3 (Elekta), which uses the X-ray voxel-based MC (XVMC) algorithm. The dose distribution was independently recalculated in the Monaco. The dose for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ at risk (OAR) were analyzed via comparisons with those of the treatment plan. Before performing an independent absorbed-dose calculation, the validation was conducted via irradiation from 3 different gantry angles with a 10- × 10-cm2 field. For the independent absorbed-dose calculation, 15 patients with cancer (prostate, 5; lung, 5; head and neck, 3; rectal, 1; and esophageal, 1) who were treated with single-arc VMAT were selected. To classify the cause of the dose difference between the Pinnacle and Monaco TPSs, their calculations were also compared with the measurement data. In validation, the dose in Pinnacle agreed with that in Monaco within 1.5%. The agreement in VMAT calculations between Pinnacle and Monaco using phantoms was exceptional; at the isocenter, the difference was less than 1.5% for all the patients. For independent absorbed-dose calculations, the agreement was also extremely good. For the mean dose for the PTV in particular, the agreement was within 2.0% in all the patients; specifically, no large difference was observed for high-dose regions. Conversely, a significant difference was observed in the mean dose for the OAR. For patients with prostate cancer, the mean rectal dose calculated in Monaco was significantly smaller than that calculated in Pinnacle. There was no remarkable difference between the SC and XVMC calculations in the high-dose regions. The difference observed in the low-dose regions may

  7. Application of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique on liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning following RTOG 0438 guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chengyu, E-mail: shicy1974@yahoo.com; Chen, Yong; Fang, Deborah; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique has comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number.

  8. Developing a class solution for Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To develop a class solution for prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Materials and methods: Seven datasets were used to compare plans using one 360° arc (1FA), one 210° arc (1PA), two full arcs and two partial arcs. Subsequently using 1PA, fifteen datasets were compared using (i) 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, (ii) 8 mm CTV–PTV margins and (iii) including the proximal SV within the CTV. Monaco™ 3.2 (Elekta™) was used for planning with the Agility™ MLC system (Elekta™). Results: Highly conformal plans were produced using all four arc arrangements. Compared to 1FA, 1PA resulted in significantly reduced rectal doses, and monitor units and estimated delivery times were reduced in six of seven cases. Using 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, planning constraints were met for all fifteen datasets. Using 8 mm margins required relaxation of the uppermost bladder constraint in three cases to achieve adequate coverage, and, compared to 6 mm margins, rectal and bladder doses significantly increased. Including the proximal SV required relaxation of the uppermost bladder and rectal constraints in two cases, and rectal and bladder doses significantly increased. Conclusions: Prostate SABR VMAT is optimal using 1PA. 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, compatible with daily fiducial-based IGRT, are consistently feasible in terms of target objectives and OAR constraints

  9. Use of two-dimensional chamber arrays in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) requires, as another kind of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), patient-specific QA procedures. This work analyzes the method carried out in our institution for VMAT treatment verification. Our hypothesis is that traditional IMRT QA is valid for VMAT technique. Results obtained for absolute point-dose measurements with ion chamber are presented, as well as comparison with treatment planning system calculations (mean difference of (-0.50 ± 0.43)%). In addition, different setups with 2D ion chamber array for dose distributions comparison are analyzed. These detectors are the basis of our QA procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of those setups are shown. The present study includes results for 111 patients treated with VMAT technique from different disease sites. We conclude that 2D ion chamber arrays traditionally used in IMRT QA are valid detectors for rotational techniques if these arrays are used together with additional devices (phantoms, accessories) that allow us to obtain as much information as possible. (Author)

  10. Development of an optimization concept for arc-modulated cone beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we propose an optimization concept for a rotation therapy technique which is referred to as arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT). The aim is a reduction of the treatment time while achieving a treatment plan quality equal to or better than that of IMRT. Therefore, the complete dose is delivered in one single gantry rotation and the beam is modulated by a multileaf collimator. The degrees of freedom are the field shapes and weights for a predefined number of beam directions. In the new optimization loop, the beam weights are determined by a gradient algorithm and the field shapes by a tabu search algorithm. We present treatment plans for AMCBT for two clinical cases. In comparison to step-and-shoot IMRT treatment plans, it was possible by AMCBT to achieve dose distributions with a better dose conformity to the target and a lower mean dose for the most relevant organ at risk. Furthermore, the number of applied monitor units was reduced for AMCBT in comparison to IMRT treatment plans

  11. Development of an optimization concept for arc-modulated cone beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Silke; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2007-07-21

    In this paper, we propose an optimization concept for a rotation therapy technique which is referred to as arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT). The aim is a reduction of the treatment time while achieving a treatment plan quality equal to or better than that of IMRT. Therefore, the complete dose is delivered in one single gantry rotation and the beam is modulated by a multileaf collimator. The degrees of freedom are the field shapes and weights for a predefined number of beam directions. In the new optimization loop, the beam weights are determined by a gradient algorithm and the field shapes by a tabu search algorithm. We present treatment plans for AMCBT for two clinical cases. In comparison to step-and-shoot IMRT treatment plans, it was possible by AMCBT to achieve dose distributions with a better dose conformity to the target and a lower mean dose for the most relevant organ at risk. Furthermore, the number of applied monitor units was reduced for AMCBT in comparison to IMRT treatment plans. PMID:17664597

  12. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs) and mixed-energy plans (MEPs) were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV...

  13. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D30%, D60%, D90%, V30%, V60%, V90%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor

  15. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle in volumetric arc therapy of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Tas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organ at risks (OARs in eleven prostate cancer patients planned with single and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. Single and double arc VMAT treatment plans were created using Monaco5.0® with collimator angle set to 0°. All plans were normalized 7600 cGy dose to the 95% of clinical target volume (CTV volume. The single arc VMAT plans were reoptimized with different collimator angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°, and for double arc VMAT plans (0–0°, 15°–345, 30–330°, 45–315°, 60–300°, 75–285°, 90–270° using the same optimization parameters. For the comparison the parameters of heterogeneity index (HI, dose-volume histogram and minimum dose to the 95% of PTV volume (D95 PTV calculated and analyzed. The best plans were verified using 2 dimensional ion chamber array IBA Matrixx® and three-dimensional IBA Compass® program. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis. A higher D95 (PTV were found for single arc VMAT with 15° collimator angle. For double arc, VMAT with 60–300° and 75–285° collimator angles. However, lower rectum doses obtained for 75–285° collimator angles. There was no significant dose difference, based on other OARs which are bladder and femur head. When we compared single and double arc VMAT's D95 (PTV, we determined 2.44% high coverage and lower HI with double arc VMAT. All plans passed the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis with more than 97% of the points and we had an average γ-index for CTV 0.36, for PTV 0.32 with double arc VMAT. These results were significant by Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically. The results show that dose coverage of target and OAR's doses also depend significantly on the collimator angles due to the geometry of target and OARs. Based on the results we have decided to plan prostate

  16. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle in volumetric arc therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Bora; Bilge, Hatice; Ozturk, Sibel Tokdemir

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risks (OARs) in eleven prostate cancer patients planned with single and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when varying collimator angle. Single and double arc VMAT treatment plans were created using Monaco5.0(®) with collimator angle set to 0°. All plans were normalized 7600 cGy dose to the 95% of clinical target volume (CTV) volume. The single arc VMAT plans were reoptimized with different collimator angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°), and for double arc VMAT plans (0-0°, 15°-345, 30-330°, 45-315°, 60-300°, 75-285°, 90-270°) using the same optimization parameters. For the comparison the parameters of heterogeneity index (HI), dose-volume histogram and minimum dose to the 95% of PTV volume (D95 PTV) calculated and analyzed. The best plans were verified using 2 dimensional ion chamber array IBA Matrixx(®) and three-dimensional IBA Compass(®) program. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by the γ-index (3%/3 mm) analysis. A higher D95 (PTV) were found for single arc VMAT with 15° collimator angle. For double arc, VMAT with 60-300° and 75-285° collimator angles. However, lower rectum doses obtained for 75-285° collimator angles. There was no significant dose difference, based on other OARs which are bladder and femur head. When we compared single and double arc VMAT's D95 (PTV), we determined 2.44% high coverage and lower HI with double arc VMAT. All plans passed the γ-index (3%/3 mm) analysis with more than 97% of the points and we had an average γ-index for CTV 0.36, for PTV 0.32 with double arc VMAT. These results were significant by Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically. The results show that dose coverage of target and OAR's doses also depend significantly on the collimator angles due to the geometry of target and OARs. Based on the results we have decided to plan prostate cancer patients in our

  17. Dosimetric dependence on the collimator angle in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Isa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organs-at-risk (OARs in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. The collimator angle has the largest impact and is worth considering, so, its awareness is essential for a planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a reasonable time frame. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. The conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, gradient index (GI, machine monitor units (MUs, dose-volume histogram and mean and maximum dose of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, the dose-volume histogram and mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as the bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans.Results: There was no significant difference, based on the planned dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. A higher CI (0.53 and lower HI (0.064 were found in the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided a lower value of HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. Collimator angles of 75o and 90o were found to be good for rectum sparing, and collimator angles of 75o and 30o were found to be good for sparing of right and left femur, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: Our study indicates that the dosimetric results provide support and guidance to allow the clinical radiation physicists to make careful decisions in implementing suitable collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OARs sparing in prostate VMAT.

  18. Intensity modulated radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy in breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KR Muralidhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has the capacity to optimize the dose distribution. We analyzed the dosimetric differences of plans in treatment planning system (TPS between VMAT and IMRT in treating breast cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were simulated, planned, and treated with VMAT using single, double or partial arcs. IMRT treatments were generated using 4 to 5 tangential IMRT fields for the same patients. All treatment plans were planned for 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The VMAT and IMRT plans were compared using the planning target volume (PTV dose and doses to the other organs at risk (OARs. Results: For the PTV, comparable minimum, mean, maximum, median, and modal dose as well equivalent sphere diameter of the structure (Equis were observed between VMAT and IMRT plans and found that these values were significantly equal in both techniques. The right lung mean and modal doses were considerably higher in VMAT plans while maximum value was considerably lower when compared with IMRT plans. The left lung mean and modal doses were higher with VMAT while maximum doses were higher in IMRT plans. The mean dose to the heart and maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT. The mean dose to the body was higher in VMAT plans while the maximum dose was higher in IMRT plans. Conclusion: Four field tangential IMRT delivered comparable PTV dose with generally less dose to normal tissues in our breast cancer treatment study. The IMRT plans typically had more favourable dose characteristics to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and body dose when compared with VMAT. The only minor advantage of VMAT for breast cases was slightly better PTV coverage.

  19. Two-step intensity modulated arc therapy (2-step IMAT) with segment weight and width optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-step intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a simplified IMAT technique which delivers the treatment over typically two continuous gantry rotations. The aim of this work was to implement the technique into a computerized treatment planning system and to develop an approach to optimize the segment weights and widths. 2-step IMAT was implemented into the Prism treatment planning system. A graphical user interface was developed to generate the plan segments automatically based on the anatomy in the beam's-eye-view. The segment weights and widths of 2-step IMAT plans were subsequently determined in Matlab using a dose-volume based optimization process. The implementation was tested on a geometric phantom with a horseshoe shaped target volume and then applied to a clinical paraspinal tumour case. The phantom study verified the correctness of the implementation and showed a considerable improvement over a non-modulated arc. Further improvements in the target dose uniformity after the optimization of 2-step IMAT plans were observed for both the phantom and clinical cases. For the clinical case, optimizing the segment weights and widths reduced the maximum dose from 114% of the prescribed dose to 107% and increased the minimum dose from 87% to 97%. This resulted in an improvement in the homogeneity index of the target dose for the clinical case from 1.31 to 1.11. Additionally, the high dose volume V105 was reduced from 57% to 7% while the maximum dose in the organ-at-risk was decreased by 2%. The intuitive and automatic planning process implemented in this study increases the prospect of the practical use of 2-step IMAT. This work has shown that 2-step IMAT is a viable technique able to achieve highly conformal plans for concave target volumes with the optimization of the segment weights and widths. Future work will include planning comparisons of the 2-step IMAT implementation with fixed gantry intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and commercial IMAT

  20. Use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in patients where conventional radiotherapy was not deliverable. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for a twelve-year-old boy with Stage IIIB nodular sclerosing HL postchemotherapy with positive positron emission tomography scan. VMAT was used for Phase 1 (19.8 Gy in 11 fractions) and Phase 2 (10.8 Gy in 6 fractions) treatment plans. Single anticlockwise arc plans were constructed using SmartArc (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with control points spaced at 4°. The inverse-planning objectives were to uniformly irradiate the planning target volume (PTV) with the prescription dose while keeping the volume of lung receiving greater than 20 Gy (V20Gy) to less than 30% and minimize the dose to the other adjacent organs at risk (OAR). Pretreatment verification was conducted and the treatment delivery was on an MLCi Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK). The planning results were retrospectively confirmed in a further 4 patients using a single PTV with a prescribed dose of 19.8 Gy in 11 fractions. Acceptable dose coverage and homogeneity were achieved for both Phase 1 and 2 plans while keeping the lung V20Gy at 22.5% for the composite plan. The beam-on times for Phase 1 and Phase 2 plans were 109 and 200 seconds, respectively, and the total monitor units were 337.2 MU and 292.5 MU, respectively. The percentage of measured dose points within 3% and 3 mm for Phase 1 and Phase 2 were 92% and 98%, respectively. Both plans were delivered successfully. The retrospective planning study showed that VMAT improved PTV dose uniformity and reduced the irradiated volume of heart and lung, although the volume of lung irradiated to low doses increased. Two-phased VMAT offers an attractive option for large volume sites, such as HL, giving a high level of target coverage and significant OAR sparing together with efficient delivery

  1. Use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young K., E-mail: Young.Lee@rmh.nhs.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bedford, James L. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taj, Mary [Paediatric Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Saran, Frank H. [Radiotherapy Department, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in patients where conventional radiotherapy was not deliverable. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for a twelve-year-old boy with Stage IIIB nodular sclerosing HL postchemotherapy with positive positron emission tomography scan. VMAT was used for Phase 1 (19.8 Gy in 11 fractions) and Phase 2 (10.8 Gy in 6 fractions) treatment plans. Single anticlockwise arc plans were constructed using SmartArc (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with control points spaced at 4°. The inverse-planning objectives were to uniformly irradiate the planning target volume (PTV) with the prescription dose while keeping the volume of lung receiving greater than 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) to less than 30% and minimize the dose to the other adjacent organs at risk (OAR). Pretreatment verification was conducted and the treatment delivery was on an MLCi Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK). The planning results were retrospectively confirmed in a further 4 patients using a single PTV with a prescribed dose of 19.8 Gy in 11 fractions. Acceptable dose coverage and homogeneity were achieved for both Phase 1 and 2 plans while keeping the lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy} at 22.5% for the composite plan. The beam-on times for Phase 1 and Phase 2 plans were 109 and 200 seconds, respectively, and the total monitor units were 337.2 MU and 292.5 MU, respectively. The percentage of measured dose points within 3% and 3 mm for Phase 1 and Phase 2 were 92% and 98%, respectively. Both plans were delivered successfully. The retrospective planning study showed that VMAT improved PTV dose uniformity and reduced the irradiated volume of heart and lung, although the volume of lung irradiated to low doses increased. Two-phased VMAT offers an attractive option for large volume sites, such as HL, giving a high level of target coverage and significant OAR sparing together with

  2. Total body irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy: Dosimetric data and first clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To implement total body irradiation (TBI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). We applied the Varian RapidArc™ software to calculate and optimize the dose distribution. Emphasis was placed on applying a homogenous dose to the PTV and on reducing the dose to the lungs. From July 2013 to July 2014 seven patients with leukaemia were planned and treated with a VMAT-based TBI-technique with photon energy of 6 MV. The overall planning target volume (PTV), comprising the whole body, had to be split into 8 segments with a subsequent multi-isocentric planning. In a first step a dose optimization of each single segment was performed. In a second step all these elements were calculated in one overall dose-plan, considering particular constraints and weighting factors, to achieve the final total body dose distribution. The quality assurance comprised the verification of the irradiation plans via ArcCheck™ (Sun Nuclear), followed by in vivo dosimetry via dosimeters (MOSFETs) on the patient. The time requirements for treatment planning were high: contouring took 5–6 h, optimization and dose calculation 25–30 h and quality assurance 6–8 h. The couch-time per fraction was 2 h on day one, decreasing to around 1.5 h for the following fractions, including patient information, time for arc positioning, patient positioning verification, mounting of the MOSFETs and irradiation. The mean lung dose was decreased to at least 80 % of the planned total body dose and in the central parts to 50 %. In two cases we additionally pursued a dose reduction of 30 to 50 % in a pre-irradiated brain and in renal insufficiency. All high dose areas were outside the lungs and other OARs. The planned dose was in line with the measured dose via MOSFETs: in the axilla the mean difference between calculated and measured dose was 3.6 % (range 1.1–6.8 %), and for the wrist/hip-inguinal region it was 4.3 % (range 1.1–8.1 %). TBI with VMAT provides the benefit of satisfactory dose

  3. New possibilities for volumetric-modulated arc therapy using the Agility trademark 160-leaf multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemer, Nadine; Scherf, Christian; Koehn, Janett; Kara, Eugen; Loutfi-Krauss, Britta; Imhoff, Detlef; Roedel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla; Licher, Joerg [Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    This study compares the quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans optimized for an Elekta Agility trademark (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) multileaf collimator (MLC; leaf width 5 mm) and an Elekta MLCi2 (leaf width 10 mm) for complex target volumes (anal, AC; head and neck, H and N and prostate cancer, PC). For plan comparisons, 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT or VMAT using the MLCi2 were selected. For each patient, a retrospective treatment plan using the MLCi2 for the technique not applied was created, as were treatment plans for both techniques using the Agility trademark MLC. Dose-volume histograms (DHVs) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) were compared. Further parameters relating to dose conformity, dose homogeneity and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the PTV, compliance with the intended OAR dose criteria and overall dose to normal tissue were analyzed. Verification measurements were performed and optimization and treatment times were compared. Compared to the MLCi2 plans, the Agility trademark IMRT and VMAT plans show better or equivalent results in terms of PTV dose conformity and homogeneity. Compliance with the intended OAR dose criteria does not differ according to technique or MLC type. Slight differences are shown for dose distributions in OARs and normal tissue. Verification measurements show that all plans fulfill the acceptance criteria of a minimum of 95 % matched dose points for the 3 %/3 mm γ criterion. Optimization times for the VMAT plans increase compared to the IMRT plans, whereas treatment times decrease. With the MLCi2, treatment of complex target volumes with VMAT was only possible with compromises in terms of target coverage. Using the Agility trademark MLC, even complex target volumes can be treated with VMAT without compromising target coverage or resulting in higher exposure of OARs or normal tissue. (orig.) [German] Diese Studie vergleicht die

  4. Measurement comparison and Monte Carlo analysis for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery verification using the ArcCHECK dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Koren, Sion; Veltchev, Iavor; Li, Jinsheng; Wang, Lu; Price, Robert A; Ma, C-M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate the capabilities of a cylindrical diode array system for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment quality assurance (QA). The VMAT plans were generated by the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for dose calculation. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized as a validation tool for the TPS calculations and the ArcCHECK measurements. The megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) of the ArcCHECK system was adopted for the geometry reconstruction in the TPS and for MC simulations. A 10 × 10 cm2 open field validation was performed for both the 6 and 10 MV photon beams to validate the absolute dose calibration of the ArcCHECK system and also the TPS dose calculations for this system. The impact of the angular dependency on noncoplanar deliveries was investigated with a series of 10 × 10 cm2 fields delivered with couch rotation 0° to 40°. The sensitivity of detecting the translational (1 to 10 mm) and the rotational (1° to 3°) misalignments was tested with a breast VMAT case. Ten VMAT plans (six prostate, H&N, pelvis, liver, and breast) were investigated to evaluate the agreement of the target dose and the peripheral dose among ArcCHECK measurements, and TPS and MC dose calculations. A customized acrylic plug holding an ion chamber was used to measure the dose at the center of the ArcCHECK phantom. Both the entrance and the exit doses measured by the ArcCHECK system with and without the plug agreed with the MC simulation to 1.0%. The TPS dose calculation with a 2.5 mm grid overestimated the exit dose by up to 7.2% when the plug was removed. The agreement between the MC and TPS calculations for the ArcCHECK without the plug improved significantly when a 1 mm dose calculation grid was used in the TPS. The noncoplanar delivery test demonstrated that the angular dependency has limited impact on the gamma passing rate (< 1.2% drop) for the 2%-3% dose and 2mm-3 mm

  5. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V45 Gy, V30 Gy, and V20 Gy organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way

  6. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the treatment planning among all three modalities with identical patient contouring and treatment planning goal. A proton therapy plan was generated in XiO treatment planning system (TPS using 2 fields for each target. For a comparative purpose, IMRT and RapidArc plans were generated in Eclipse TPS. Treatment plans were generated for a total dose of 74 CGE or Gy prescribed to each planning target volume (PTV (left and right with 2 CGE or Gy per fraction. In IMRT and RapidArc plans, normalization was done based on PTV coverage values in proton plans. Results: The mean PTV dose deviation from the prescription dose was lower in proton plan (within 3.4%, but higher in IMRT (6.5% to 11.3% and RapidArc (3.8% to 11.5% plans. Proton therapy produced lower mean dose to the total lung, heart, and esophagus when compared to IMRT and RapidArc. The relative volume of the total lung receiving 20, 10, and 5 CGE or Gy (V20, V10, and V5, respectively were lower using proton therapy than using IMRT, with absolute differences of 9.71%, 22.88%, and 39.04%, respectively. The absolute differences in the V20, V10, and V5 between proton and RapidArc plans were 4.84%, 19.16%, and 36.8%, respectively, with proton therapy producing lower dosimetric values. Conclusion: Based on the results presented in this case study, uniform scanning proton therapy has a dosimetric advantage over both IMRT and RapidArc for a synchronous bi-lateral NSCLC, especially for the normal lung tissue, heart, and

  7. Comparing four volumetric modulated arc therapy beam arrangements for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compared four different volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam arrangements for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer examining plan quality and the impact on a radiotherapy department's resources. Twenty prostate cases were retrospectively planned using four VMAT beam arrangements (1) a partial arc (PA), (2) one arc (1A), (3) one arc plus a partial arc (1A + PA) and (4) two arcs (2A). The quality of the dose distributions generated were compared by examining the overall plan quality, the homogeneity and conformity to the planning target volume (PTV), the number of monitor units and the dose delivered to the organs at risk. Departmental resources were considered by recording the planning time and beam delivery time. Each technique produced a plan of similar quality that was considered adequate for treatment; though some differences were noted. The 1A, 1A + PA and 2A plans demonstrated a better conformity to the PTV which correlated to improved sparing of the rectum in the 60–70 Gy range for the 1A + PA and 2A techniques. The time needed to generate the plans was different for each technique ranging from 13.1 min for 1A + PA to 17.8 min for 1A. The PA beam delivery time was fastest with a mean time of 0.9 min. Beam-on times then increased with an increase in the number of arcs up to an average of 2.2 min for the 2A technique. Which VMAT technique is best suited for clinical implementation for the treatment of prostate cancer may be dictated by the individual patient and the availability of departmental resources

  8. High dose for prostate irradiation with image guided radiotherapy: Contribution of intensity modulation arc-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare two Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for prostate cancer: the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and the 'Step and Shoot' technique (S and S). Materials and methods: VMAT and S and S plans (RX 18 MV) were created and compared (Wilcoxon test) for 10 patients. The dosimetric goal of both treatments was to deliver 46 Gy to the seminal vesicles and 80 Gy to the prostate, while respecting the dose constrains in the organs at risk of toxicity. For one patient, the two techniques were compared for dose painting and escalation in target volumes defined on MRI and registered thanks to intra-prostatic fiducial. Results: VMAT, compared to S and S, offered: an increase of the PTV2s (prostate) volume receiving 77 to 80 Gy and a decrease of V82 and V83; a decrease of V4 to V6, V16 to V23, and V69 to V73 for the rectal wall; a decrease of V25 for the bladder wall; a decrease of V21 to V43 for the femoral heads; a decrease of V26 to V44 and V72 to V80 but an increase of V1 to V21 and V49 to V60 for the healthy tissues. The Conformal Index 'COIN' was better with VMAT than S and S (0.60 to 0.66). The delivered MU were significantly reduced with VMAT (8% mean) as well as the delivery time (4 min to 1.5 min). VMAT allowed delivering theoretically 90 Gy in the peripheral zone and 100 Gy in the tumor. Conclusion: In case of prostate irradiation, VMAT shows improvement compared with S and S. In particular, organs at risk are better spared, the delivery time is shortened and the number of delivered UM is decreased. (authors)

  9. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  10. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  11. Randomized Algorithms For High Quality Treatment Planning in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yu; Wen, Zaiwen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been becoming a more and more important radiation technique widely used in clinical application for cancer treatment. One of the key problems in VMAT is treatment plan optimization, which is complicated due to the constraints imposed by the involved equipments. In this paper, we consider a model with four major constraints: the bound on the beam intensity, an upper bound on the rate of the change of the beam intensity, the moving speed of leaves of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and its directional-convexity. We solve the model by a two-stage algorithm: performing minimization with respect to the shapes of the aperture and the beam intensities alternatively. Specifically, the shapes of the aperture are obtained by a greedy algorithm whose performance is enhanced by random sampling in the leaf pairs with a decremental rate. The beam intensity is optimized using a gradient projection method with non-monotonic line search. We further improve the propo...

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of an arc therapy treatment by means of a PC distribution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It would be always desirable to have an independent assessment of a planning system. Monte Carlo (MC) offers an accurate way of checking dose distribution in non homogeneous volumes. Nevertheless, its main drawback is the long processing times needed. A distribution model to simulate arc-therapy treatments with Monte Carlo techniques has been developed. This model divides the individual tasks with a physical sense. In this way, not only the CPU time is substantially reduced but a detailed analysis can be achieved. A distribution program modifies the input parameters in the code to send a different task to each processor. This model has been installed on a PC network without any resident software. This model works independently of the operating system pre-installed. The PC acting as a server exports the required operating system (Linux), the MC code and the input data, as well as it stores all the results. Some very complex radiosurgery treatments simulated using this model leads a CPU time about one hour. (orig.)

  13. Establishing an optimized patient-specific verification program for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) increases the workload significantly. We compared the results from 4 verification methods to establish an efficient VMAT QA. Planning for VMAT treatments was carried out for 40 consecutive patients. Pretreatment verifications were carried out with ion chamber array Physikalish-Technische Werkstätten (PTW729), electronic portal dosimetry (EPID), ion chamber measurements, and independent dose calculation with Diamond program. 2D analyses were made using the gamma analysis (3 mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference relative to maximum, 10% dose threshold). Average point dose difference calculated by Eclipse relative to ion chamber measurements and Diamond were 0.1%±0.9% and 0.6%±2.2%, respectively. Average pass rate for PTW729 was 99.2%±1.9% and 98.3%±1.3% for EPID. The total required time (linac occupancy time given in parentheses) for each QA method was: PTW729 43.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), EPID 14.5 minutes (2.5 minutes), ion chamber 34.5 minutes (26.5 minutes), and Diamond 12.0 minutes (0 minute). The results were consistent and allowed us to establish an optimized protocol, considering safety and accuracy as well as workload, consisting of 2 verification methods: EPID 2D analysis and independent dose calculation

  14. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability

  15. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Junjie, E-mail: junjiewang47@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Xu, Feng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Hua [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  16. Effect of the Collimator Angle on Dosimetric Verification of the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Won Taek; Kim, Dong Won; Ki, Yongkan; Lee, Juhye; Bae, Jinsuk; Park, Dahl

    2015-01-01

    Collimator angle is usually rotated when planning volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to the leakage of radiation between multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. We studied the effect of the collimator angles on the results of dosimetric verification of the VMAT plans for head and neck patients. We studied VMAT plans for 10 head and neck patients. We made 2 sets of VMAT plans for each patient. Each set was composed of 10 plans with collimator angles of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 degrees. Plans in the first set were optimized individually and plans in the second set shared the 30 degree collimator angle optimization. Two sets of plans were verified using the 2-dimensional ion chamber array MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The comparison between the calculation and measurements were made by the $\\gamma$-index analysis. The $\\gamma$-index (2\\%/2 mm) and (3\\%/3 mm) passing rates had negative correlations with the collimator angle. Maximum difference between $\\gamma$-index (3\\%/3 mm) passing rates o...

  17. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma after extrapleural pleuropneumonectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Krayenbuehl, J; Riesterer, O; Graydon, S; Dimmerling, P; Kloeck, S; Ciernik, I F

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy reduces the local relapse rate after pleuropneumonectomy of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The optimal treatment technique with photons remains undefined. Comparative planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was performed. Six MPM patients with significant postoperative intrathoracic air cavities were planned with IMRT and VMAT. A dose comparison for the targets and organ at risks (OAR) was performed. Robustness was a...

  18. Dosimetric impact of different CT datasets for stereotactic treatment planning using 3D conformal radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oechsner, Markus; Odersky, Leonhard; Berndt, Johannes; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Wilkens, Jan Jakob; DUMA, MARCIANA NONA

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) by using four differently generated CT datasets for dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung and liver tumors. Additionally, dose differences between 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans calculated on these CT datasets were determined. Methods Twenty SBRT patients, ten lung cases and ten liver cases, ...

  19. Treatment of lung cancer using volumetric modulated arc therapy and image guidance: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a radiotherapy technique in which the gantry rotates while the beam is on. Gantry speed, multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position and dose rate vary continuously during the irradiation. For optimum results, this type of treatment should be subject to image guidance. The application of VMAT and image guidance to the treatment of a lung cancer patient is described. Material and methods. In-house software AutoBeam was developed to facilitate treatment planning for VMAT beams. The algorithm consisted of a fluence optimisation using the iterative least-squares technique, a segmentation and then a direct-aperture optimisation. A dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was planned, using a single arc with 35 control points at 10 deg intervals. The resulting plan was transferred to a commercial treatment planning system for final calculation. The plan was verified using a 0.6cm3 ionisation chamber and film in a rectangular phantom. The patient was treated supine on a customised lung board and imaged daily with cone-beam CT for the first three days then weekly thereafter. Results. The VMAT plan provided slightly improved coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) and slightly lower volume of lung irradiated to 20 Gy (V20) than a three-field conformal plan (PTV minimum dose 85.0 Gy vs. 81.8 Gy and lung V20 31.5% vs. 34.8%). The difference between the measured and planned dose was -1.1% (measured dose lower) and 97.6% of the film passed a gamma test of 3% and 3mm. The VMAT treatment required 90s for delivery of a single fraction of 2 Gy instead of 180s total treatment time for the conformal plan. Conclusion. VMAT provides a quality dose distribution with a short treatment time as shown in an example of a lung tumour. The technique should allow for more efficient delivery of high dose treatments, such as used for hypofractionated radiotherapy of small volume lung tumours, and the technique may also be used in conjunction with

  20. Effects of flattening filter-free and volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery on treatment efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan M; Popple, Richard A; Prendergast, Brendan M; Clark, Grant M; Dobelbower, Michael C; Fiveash, John B

    2013-01-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are available on an increasing number of commercial linear accelerators. FFF beams have higher dose rates than flattened beams of equivalent energy which can lead to increased efficiency of treatment delivery, especially in conjunction with increased FFF beam energy and arc-based delivery configurations. The purpose of this study is to quantify and assess the implications of improved treatment efficiency for several FFF delivery options on common types of linac applicable radiotherapy. Eleven characteristic cases representative of a variety of clinical treatment sites and prescription doses were selected from our patient population. Treatment plans were generated for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. For each case, a reference plan was created using DMLC IMRT with 6MV flat beams. From the same initial objectives, plans were generated using DMLC IMRT and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 6 MV FFF and 10 MV FFF beams (max. dose rates of 1400 and 2400 MU/min, respectively). The plans were delivered to a phantom; beam-on time, total treatment delivery time, monitor units (MUs), and integral dose were recorded. For plans with low dose fractionations (1.8-2.0 & 3.85 Gy/fraction), mean beam-on time difference between reference plan and most efficient FFF plan was 0.56 min (41.09% decrease); mean treatment delivery time difference between the reference plan and most efficient FFF plan was 1.54 min (range: 0.31-3.56 min), a relative improvement of 46.1% (range: 29.2%-59.2%). For plans with high dose fractionations (16-20 Gy/fraction), mean beam-on time difference was 6.79 min (74.9% decrease); mean treatment delivery time difference was 8.99 min (range: 5.40-13.05 min), a relative improvement of 71.1% (range: 53.4%- 82.4%). 10 MV FFF VMAT beams generated the most efficient plan, except in the spine SBRT case. The distribution of monitor unit counts did not vary by plan type. In cases where respiratory motion management would

  1. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT

  2. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J; Hoover, D [Department of Oncology, Department of Medical Biophysics, London Health Science Centre, London, ON (Canada); MacFarlane, M [London Health Science Centre, London, ON (Canada); Wong, E [Department of Oncology, Department of Medical Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  3. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. Methods The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV and high (18 MV beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. Results The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively. For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%: GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. Conclusion The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid

  4. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV) and high (18 MV) beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees) gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees) to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD) of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively). For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%): GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid Quality Assurance tool for the verification of RapidArc fields

  5. RapidArc volumetric modulated therapy planning for prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Ohlhues, Lars; Medin, Joakim;

    2009-01-01

    clinical practice in May 2008 for treatment of prostate cancer patients. We report here our experiences with performing treatment planning using the Eclipse RapidArc optimization software for this patient group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A stand-alone installation of Eclipse 8.5 with RapidArc optimization...... capability was performed at Rigshospitalet. Patient data for 8 prostate cancer patients were imported, most of whom were previously treated at Rigshospitalet using IMRT. Three of the patients were treated at Rigshospitalet using the RapidArc technique. Treatment plans were optimized using objectives as given......PURPOSE: Recently, Varian Medical Systems have announced the introduction of a new treatment technique, RapidArc, in which dose is delivered over a single gantry rotation with dynamically variable MLC positions, dose rate and gantry speed. At Rigshospitalet, the RapidArc technique was brought into...

  6. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs c-IMRT in esophageal cancer: A treatment planning comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yin; Bo Xu; Guang-Ying Zhu; Hao Wu; Jian Gong; Jian-Hao Geng; Fan Jiang; An-Hui Shi; Rong Yu; Yong-Heng Li; Shu-Kui Han

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with conventional sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT) plans in esophageal cancer (EC).METHODS:Twenty patients with EC were selected,including 5 cases located in the cervical,the upper,the middle and the lower thorax,respectively.Five plans were generated with the eclipse planning system:three using c-IMRT with 5 fields (5F),7 fields (7F) and 9 fields (9F),and two using VMAT with a single arc (1A) and double arcs (2A).The treatment plans were designed to deliver a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with the same constrains in a 2.0 Gy daily fraction,5 d a week.Plans were normalized to 95% of the PTV that received 100% of the prescribed dose.We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs,spinal cord and heart.Monitor units (MU) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of OAR were also reported.RESULTS:Both c-IMRT and VMAT plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations.The dose conformity to PTV was improved as the number of field in c-IMRT or rotating arc in VMAT was increased.The doses to PTV and OAR in VMAT plans were not statistically different in comparison with c-IMRT plans,with the following exceptions:in cervical and upper thoracic EC,the conformity index (CI) was higher in VMAT (1A 0.78 and 2A 0.8) than in c-IMRT (SF 0.62,7F 0.66 and 9F 0.73) and homogeneity was slightly better in c-IMRT (7F 1.09 and 9F 1.07) than in VMAT (1A 1.1 and 2A 1.09).Lung V30 was lower in VMAT (1A 12.52 and 2A 12.29) than in c-IMRT (7F 14.35 and 9F 14.81).The humeral head doses were significantly increased in VMAT as against c-IMRT.In the middle and lower thoracic EC,CI in VMAT (1A 0.76 and 2A 0.74) was higher than in c-IMRT (5F 0.63 Gy and 7F 0.67 Gy),and homogeneity was almost similar between VMAT and c-IMRT.V20 (2A 21.49 Gy vs 7F 24.59 Gy and 9F 24.16 Gy) and V30 (2A 9.73 Gy vs 5F 12

  7. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS

  8. Three-dimensional radiochromic film dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy using a spiral water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We validated 3D radiochromic film dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using a newly developed spiral water phantom. The phantom consists of a main body and an insert box, each of which has an acrylic wall thickness of 3 mm and is filled with water. The insert box includes a spiral film box used for dose-distribution measurement, and a film holder for positioning a radiochromic film. The film holder has two parallel walls whose facing inner surfaces are equipped with spiral grooves in a mirrored configuration. The film is inserted into the spiral grooves by its side edges and runs along them to be positioned on a spiral plane. Dose calculation was performed by applying clinical VMAT plans to the spiral water phantom using a commercial Monte Carlo-based treatment-planning system, Monaco, whereas dose was measured by delivering the VMAT beams to the phantom. The calculated dose distributions were resampled on the spiral plane, and the dose distributions recorded on the film were scanned. Comparisons between the calculated and measured dose distributions yielded an average gamma-index pass rate of 87.0% (range, 91.2-84.6%) in nine prostate VMAT plans under 3 mm/3% criteria with a dose-calculation grid size of 2 mm. The pass rates were increased beyond 90% (average, 91.1%; range, 90.1-92.0%) when the dose-calculation grid size was decreased to 1 mm. We have confirmed that 3D radiochromic film dosimetry using the spiral water phantom is a simple and cost-effective approach to VMAT dose verification. (author)

  9. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes

  10. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.sapkaroski@gmail.com; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  11. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes. PMID:26229679

  12. Development and Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Technique for Craniospinal Axis Radiotherapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop and compare a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique with conventional radiotherapy for craniospinal irradiation with respect to improved dose conformity and homogeneity in the planning target volume (PTV) and to reduced dose to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Conventional craniospinal axis radiotherapy plans of 5 patients were acquired. The median (range) length of the PTV was 58.9 (48.1–83.7) cm. The 6-MV VMAT plans were inversely planned with one isocenter near the base of the brain and the minimum number of isocenters required for the specified lengths of spine. The plans were optimized with high weighting for PTV coverage and low weighting for OAR sparing. Conformity and heterogeneity indices, dose–volume histograms, mean doses, and non-PTV integral doses from the two plans (prescription dose 23.4 Gy in 13 fractions) were compared. Results: The median (range) conformity index of VMAT was 1.22 (1.09–1.45), compared with 1.69 (1.44–2.67) for conventional plans (p = 0.04). The median (range) heterogeneity index was also lower for VMAT compared with conventional plans: 1.04 (1.03–1.07) vs. 1.12 (1.09–1.19), respectively (p = 0.04). A significant reduction of mean and maximum doses was observed in the heart, thyroid, esophagus, optic nerves, and eyes with VMAT when compared with conventional plans. A decrease in body V10Gy was observed, but for 4 of 5 patients non-PTV integral dose was increased with VMAT when compared with the conventional plans. Conclusions: A VMAT technique to treat the craniospinal axis significantly reduces OAR dose, potentially leading to lower late organ toxicity. However, this is achieved at the expense of increased low-dose volumes, which is inherent to the technique, carrying a potentially increased risk of secondary malignancies.

  13. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Rana; Shyam Pokharel; Yuanshui Zheng; Li Zhao; Dina Risalvato; Carlos Vargas; Nancy Cersonsky

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT) scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the tre...

  14. Assessing the Dosimetric Impact of Real-Time Prostate Motion During Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a method for dose reconstruction by incorporating the interplay effect between aperture modulation and target motion, and to assess the dosimetric impact of real-time prostate motion during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Clinical VMAT plans were delivered with the TrueBeam linac for 8 patients with prostate cancer. The real-time target motion during dose delivery was determined based on the 2-dimensional fiducial localization using an onboard electronic portal imaging device. The target shift in each image was correlated with the control point with the same gantry angle in the VMAT plan. An in-house-developed Monte Carlo simulation tool was used to calculate the 3-dimensional dose distribution for each control point individually, taking into account the corresponding real-time target motion (assuming a nondeformable target with no rotation). The delivered target dose was then estimated by accumulating the dose from all control points in the plan. On the basis of this information, dose–volume histograms and 3-dimensional dose distributions were calculated to assess their degradation from the planned dose caused by target motion. Thirty-two prostate motion trajectories were analyzed. Results: The minimum dose to 0.03 cm3 of the gross tumor volume (D0.03cc) was only slightly degraded after taking motion into account, with a minimum value of 94.1% of the planned dose among all patients and fractions. However, the gross tumor volume receiving prescription dose (V100%) could be largely affected by motion, dropping below 60% in 1 trajectory. We did not observe a correlation between motion magnitude and dose degradation. Conclusions: Prostate motion degrades the delivered dose to the target in an unpredictable way, although its effect is reduced over multiple fractions, and for most patients the degradation is small. Patients with greater prostate motion or those treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy would

  15. Committee Opinion No. 645 Summary: Dual Therapy for Gonococcal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Gonorrhea is the second most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States, with an estimated 820,000 new Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections occurring each year. Antimicrobial resistance limits treatment success, heightens the risk of complications, and may facilitate the transmission of sexually transmitted infections. Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to the sulfonamides, the tetracyclines, and penicillin. Dual therapy with ceftriaxone and azithromycin remains the only recommended first-line regimen for the treatment of gonorrhea in the United States. Dual therapy with ceftriaxone and azithromycin should be administered together on the same day, preferably simultaneously, and under direct observation. Pregnant women who are infected with N gonorrhoeae should be treated with the recommended dual therapy. A test-of-cure is not needed for individuals diagnosed with uncomplicated urogenital or rectal gonorrhea who are treated with the recommended or alternative regimens. Repeat N gonorrhoeae infection is prevalent among patients who have been diagnosed with and treated for gonorrhea in the preceding several months. Most of these infections result from reinfection; therefore, clinicians should advise patients with gonorrhea to be retested 3 months after treatment. Pregnant women with antenatal gonococcal infection should be retested in the third trimester unless recently treated. PMID:27548417

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  17. Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma Workshop Summary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuender D. Yang; Yu-Zhi Chen; Shau-Ku Huang

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased globally in the past 2 decades. To address this critical issue, a workshop on "Current Understanding and Therapy of Asthma" was recently held in Beijing, as a part of the 10th International Conference of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America (SCBA). Several pertinent topics were addressed by leading experts from China, Taiwan, Japan and the US, which include epidemiology, the molecular genetic mechanism, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of asthma. This article highlights the issues presented and discussed in this ground-breaking symposium emphasizing this important public health problem in the Chinese population. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):436-439.

  18. Comparative analysis of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the various dosimetric parameters of dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans for base of tongue cases. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta synergy linear accelerator with 80 MLC. IMRT plans were planned with nine stationary beams, and VMAT plans were done for 360° arc with single arc or dual arc. The dose to the planning target volumes (PTV for 70, 63, and 56 Gy was compared. The dose to 95, 98, and 50% volume of PTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and the conformity index (CI of the PTV 70 were also analyzed. IMRT and VMAT plan showed similar dose coverage, HI, and CI. Maximum dose and dose to 1-cc volume of spinal cord, planning risk volume (PRV cord, and brain stem were compared. IMRT plan and VMAT plan showed similar results except for the 1 cc of PRV cord that received slightly higher dose in VMAT plan. Mean dose and dose to 50% volume of right and left parotid glands were analyzed. VMAT plan gave better sparing of parotid glands than IMRT. In normal tissue dose analyses VMAT was better than IMRT. The number of monitor units (MU required for delivering the good quality of the plan and the time required to deliver the plan for IMRT and VMAT were compared. The number of MUs for VMAT was higher than that of IMRT plans. However, the delivery time was reduced by a factor of two for VMAT compared with IMRT. VMAT plans yielded good quality of the plan compared with IMRT, resulting in reduced treatment time and improved efficiency for base of tongue cases.

  19. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior–posterior direction, with systematic (∑) and random (σ) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%±19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to ∑=0.01 mm and σ = 0.55 mm in the anterior–posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%±4.6% and 99.7%±0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a γ index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  20. A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle3 Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle3 Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume

  1. Image-Based Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking of Moving Targets During Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard, E-mail: perpolse@rm.dk [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Fledelius, Walther [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Cho, Byungchul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Keall, Paul [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) enables efficient and highly conformal dose delivery. However, intrafraction motion may compromise the delivered target dose distribution. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking can potentially mitigate the impact of target motion on the dose. The purpose of this study was to use a single kV imager for DMLC tracking during IMAT and to investigate the ability of this tracking to maintain the dose distribution. Methods: A motion phantom carrying a two-dimensional (2D) ion chamber array and buildup material with an embedded gold marker reproduced eight representative tumor trajectories (four lung tumors, four prostate). For each trajectory, a low and high IMAT plan were delivered with and without DMLC tracking. The three-dimensional (3D) real-time target position signal for tracking was provided by fluoroscopic kV images acquired immediately before and during treatment. For each image, the 3D position of the embedded marker was estimated from the imaged 2D position by a probability-based method. The MLC leaves were continuously refitted to the estimated 3D position. For lung, prediction was used to compensate for the tracking latency. The delivered 2D dose distributions were measured with the ion chamber array and compared with a reference dose distribution delivered without target motion using a 3%/3 mm {gamma}-test. Results: For lung tumor motion, tracking reduced the mean {gamma}-failure rate from 38% to 0.7% for low-modulation IMAT plans and from 44% to 2.8% for high-modulation plans. For prostate, the {gamma}-failure rate reduction was from 19% to 0% (low modulation) and from 20% to 2.7% (high modulation). The dominant contributor to the residual {gamma}-failures during tracking was target localization errors for most lung cases and leaf fitting errors for most prostate cases. Conclusion: Image-based tracking for IMAT was demonstrated for the first time. The tracking greatly improved the dose distributions to

  2. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  3. Hippocampal avoidance with volumetric modulated arc therapy in melanoma brain metastases – the first Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can deliver intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) like dose distributions in a short time; this allows the expansion of IMRT treatments to palliative situations like brain metastases (BMs). VMAT can deliver whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with hippocampal avoidance and a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to achieve stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for BMs. This study is an audit of our experience in the treatment of brain metastases with VMAT in our institution. Metastases were volumetrically contoured on fused diagnostic gadolinium enhanced T1 weighted MRI/planning CT images. Risk organs included hippocampus, optic nerve, optic chiasm, eye, and brain stem. The hippocampi were contoured manually as one paired organ with assistance from a neuroradiologist. WBRT and SIB were integrated into a single plan. Thirty patients with 73 BMs were treated between March 2010 and February 2012 with VMAT. Mean follow up time was 3.5 months. For 26 patients, BMs arose from primary melanoma and for the remaining four patients from non-small cell lung cancer (n= 2), primary breast cancer, and sarcoma. Mean age was 60 years. The male to female ratio was 2:1. Five patients were treated without hippocampal avoidance (HA) intent. The median WBRT dose was 31 Gy with a median SIB dose for BMs of 50 Gy, given over a median of 15 fractions. Mean values for BMs were as follows: GTV = 6.9 cc, PTV = 13.3 cc, conformity index = 8.6, homogeneity index = 1.06. Mean and maximum hippocampus dose was 20.4 Gy, and 32.4 Gy, respectively, in patients treated with HA intent. Mean VMAT treatment time from beam on to beam off for one fraction was 3.43 minutes, which compared to WBRT time of 1.3 minutes. Twenty out of 25 assessable lesions at the time of analysis were controlled. Treatment was well tolerated; grade 4 toxicity was reported in one patient. The median overall survival was 9.40 months VMAT for BMs is feasible, safe and associated with a similar

  4. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose–volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose

  5. Image-Based Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking of Moving Targets During Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) enables efficient and highly conformal dose delivery. However, intrafraction motion may compromise the delivered target dose distribution. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking can potentially mitigate the impact of target motion on the dose. The purpose of this study was to use a single kV imager for DMLC tracking during IMAT and to investigate the ability of this tracking to maintain the dose distribution. Methods: A motion phantom carrying a two-dimensional (2D) ion chamber array and buildup material with an embedded gold marker reproduced eight representative tumor trajectories (four lung tumors, four prostate). For each trajectory, a low and high IMAT plan were delivered with and without DMLC tracking. The three-dimensional (3D) real-time target position signal for tracking was provided by fluoroscopic kV images acquired immediately before and during treatment. For each image, the 3D position of the embedded marker was estimated from the imaged 2D position by a probability-based method. The MLC leaves were continuously refitted to the estimated 3D position. For lung, prediction was used to compensate for the tracking latency. The delivered 2D dose distributions were measured with the ion chamber array and compared with a reference dose distribution delivered without target motion using a 3%/3 mm γ-test. Results: For lung tumor motion, tracking reduced the mean γ-failure rate from 38% to 0.7% for low-modulation IMAT plans and from 44% to 2.8% for high-modulation plans. For prostate, the γ-failure rate reduction was from 19% to 0% (low modulation) and from 20% to 2.7% (high modulation). The dominant contributor to the residual γ-failures during tracking was target localization errors for most lung cases and leaf fitting errors for most prostate cases. Conclusion: Image-based tracking for IMAT was demonstrated for the first time. The tracking greatly improved the dose distributions to moving targets.

  6. Cherenkov imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy for real-time radiation beam tracking and treatment response monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    External beam radiotherapy utilizes high energy radiation to target cancer with dynamic, patient-specific treatment plans. The otherwise invisible radiation beam can be observed via the optical Cherenkov photons emitted from interaction between the high energy beam and tissue. Using a specialized camera-system, the Cherenkov emission can thus be used to track the radiation beam on the surface of the patient in real-time, even for complex cases such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two patients undergoing VMAT of the head and neck were imaged and analyzed, and the viability of the system to provide clinical feedback was established.

  7. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 deg. continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 deg. split arc proton therapy (two 90 degree sign arcs) using CT profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  8. Dosimetric analysis of isocentrically shielded volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tian; Xing, Lei; Chang, Daniel T.; Peng, Xun; Xie, Liang-Xi; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of an isocentrically shielded RapidArc (IS-RA) technique for treatment of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer (lrNPC). In IS-RA, the isocenter was placed at the center of the pre-irradiated brainstem (BS)/spinal cord (SC) and the jaws were set to shield the BS/SC while ensuring the target coverage during the whole gantry rotation. For fifteen patients, the IS-RA plans were compared with the conventional RapidArc (C-RA) regardi...

  9. Simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for bilateral breast: a treatment planning and dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc and fixed field intensity modulated therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vanetti Eugenio; Fogliata Antonella; Clivio Alessandro; Nicolini Giorgia; Cozzi Luca

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A study was performed comparing dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) on patients with bilateral breast carcinoma. Materials and methods Plans for IMRT and RA, were optimised for 10 patients prescribing 50 Gy to the breast (PTVII, 2.0 Gy/fraction) and 60 Gy to the tumour bed (PTVI, 2.4 Gy/fraction). Objectives were: for PTVs V90%>95%, Dmax

  10. SU-E-T-309: Tangential Modulated Arc Therapy: A Novel Technique for the Treatment of Superficial Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadsell, M; Chin, E; Li, R; Xing, L; Bush, K [Stanford University Cancer Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We propose a new type of treatment that employs a modulated and sliding tangential photon field to provide superior coverage of superficial targets when compared to other commonly employed methods while drastically reducing dose to the underlying sensitive structures often present in these cases. Methods: Modulated treatment plans were formulated for a set of three representative cases. The first was a revised treatment of a scalp sarcoma, while the second was a treatment of a right posterior chest wall sarcoma. For these cases, asymmetric jaw placement, angular limitations, and central isocenter placements were used to force the optimization algorithm into finding solutions with beamlines that were not perpendicular to the body surface. The final case targeted the chest wall of a breast cancer patient, in which standard treatments were compared to the use of modulated fields with multiple isocenters along the chest wall. Results: When compared with unrestricted modulated arcs, the tangential arc scalp treatment reduced the max and mean doses delivered to the brain by 33Gy (from 55 to 22Gy) and 6Gy (from 14Gy to 8Gy), respectively. In the right posterior chest wall case, the V10 in the ipsilateral lung was kept below 5% while retaining a Rx dose (45Gy) target coverage of over 97%. For the breast case, the modulated plan achieved reductions in high dose to the ipsilateral lung and heart by a factor of 2–3 when compared to classic laterally opposed tangents and reduced the V5 by 40% when compared to standard modulated arcs. Conclusion: Tangential modulated arc therapy has outperformed the conventional modalities of treatment for superficial lesions used in our clinic. We hope that with the advent of digitally controlled linear accelerators, we can uncover further benefits of this new technique and extend its applicability to a wider section of the patient population.

  11. SU-E-T-138: Dosimetric Verification For Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Cranio-Spinal Irradiation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Dosimetric feasibility of cranio-spinal irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-CSI) technique in terms of dose distribution accuracy was investigated using a humanlike phantom. Methods: The OARs and PTV volumes for the Rando phantom were generated on supine CT images. Eclipse (version 8.6) TPS with AAA algorithm was used to create the treatment plan with VMAT-CSI technique. RapidArc plan consisted of cranial, upper spinal (US) and lower spinal (LS) regions that were optimized in the same plan. US field was overlapped by 3cm with cranial and LS fields. Three partial arcs for cranium and 1 full arc for each US and LS region were used. The VMAT-CSI dose distribution inside the Rando phantom was measured with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and film dosimetry, and was compared to the calculated doses of field junctions, target and OARs. TLDs were placed at 24 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated point doses. Planar doses for field junctions were verified with Gafchromic films. Films were analyzed in PTW Verisoft application software using gamma analysis method with the 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 4% dose agreement criteria. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of -0.3% (range: -8% and 12%) when compared with calculated doses for the areas inside the treatment portal. The maximum dose difference was 12% higher in testicals that are outside the treatment region and 8% lower in lungs where the heterogeinity was higher. All planar dose verifications for field junctions passed the gamma analysis and measured planar dose distributions demonstrated average 97% agreement with calculated doses. Conclusion: The dosimetric data verified with TLD and film dosimetry shows that VMAT-CSI technique provides accurate dose distribution and can be delivered safely

  12. Assessment of a model based optimization engine for volumetric modulated arc therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate in-silico the performance of a model-based optimization process for volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) applied to hepatocellular cancer treatments. 45 clinically accepted RA plans were selected to train a knowledge-based engine for the prediction of individualized dose-volume constraints. The model was validated on the same plans used for training (closed-loop) and on a set of other 25 plans not used for the training (open-loop). Dose prescription, target size, localization in the liver and arc configuration were highly variable in both sets to appraise the power of generalization of the engine. Quantitative dose volume histogram analysis was performed as well as a pass-fail analysis against a set of 8 clinical dose-volume objectives to appraise the quality of the new plans. Qualitative and quantitative equivalence was observed between the clinical and the test plans. The use of model-based optimization lead to a net improvement in the pass-rate of the clinical objectives compared to the plans originally optimized with standard methods (this pass-rate is the frequency of cases where the objectives are respected vs. the cases where constraints are not fulfilled). The increase in the pass-rate resulted of 2.0%, 0.9% and 0.5% in a closed-loop and two different open-loop validation experiments. A knowledge-based engine for the optimization of RapidArc plans was tested and lead to clinically acceptable plans in the case of hepatocellular cancer radiotherapy. More studies are needed before a broad clinical use

  13. Photo-dynamic therapy (pdt) for skin cancer using a xenon arc lamp with interference filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Phototherapy involves the production of photochemical reactions in cells by the direct action of light, including Ultra Violet, leading to biological effects, including cell death. Photo Dynamic Therapy involves the application of light, at wavelengths and intensity which has no biological effects, in combination with a photosensitizing compound, which is biologically inert in the absence of light, which once located in cells, can produce cellular damage when activated by light of certain wavelengths. The active compound produced during PDT is singlet Oxygen which has a half life of 3 microseconds. This necessitates the use of very powerful light sources, such as lasers, in order to achieve treatment delivery within a reasonable time, say minutes. Even though PDT is very effective in the treatment of skin cancer using topically applied photosensitizing drugs, the cost of powerful lasers, required to produce light in the red part of the spectrum, has been prohibitively expensive for widespread application of the above technique. A 300 Watt Xenon arc light source, with tuneable wavelength and bandwidth, used predominantly for Forensic Science applications, manufactured by Rofin Australia Pty, Ltd, has been modified by the manufacturer, boosting the power to 500 Watts. A group of Interference filters have been specifically made to facilitate irradiation at 670nm, 620nm and 600 nm, at relatively narrow bandwidth, typically 50 nm. This would provide adequate penetration of the light, for a variety of skin cancers, depending on the thickness of the lesion and the skin type involved. A relatively broad band Ultra Violet interference filter has also been inserted in the instrument for observation of Fluorescence of the lesion prior to treatment, as an indicator of photosensitizing drug uptake by the lesion involved. Patients with skin cancers such as Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) and Paget's Extramammary disease were treated at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

  14. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for the treatment of retroperitoneal sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas remains controversial and a technical challenge considering the threshold of contiguous critical organs tolerance. We performed consecutive RapidArc dosimetric plans in preoperative or postoperative setting. A dosimetric study was carried out from six preoperative (group A) and four postoperative (group B) CT-scans, performed in 7 patients. Prescribed dose was 45 and 50 Gy for groups A and B, respectively. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume (CTV) plus 5 mm. The CTV encompassed the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 10 mm or the tumoral bed. The dosimetric plans were optimized on a RapidArc Eclipse console using the progressive resolution algorithm, PRO version 8.8. Normalization method allowed the coverage of 99% of the PTV by 95% of the dose. Mean PTV were 2318.5 ± 2223.9 cc [range 348-6198 cc] and 698.3 ± 216.6 cc [range 463 -933 cc] for groups A and B, respectively. Plans were optimized for single arcs in group B and for single or two arcs in group A. The contralateral kidney volume receiving 5 Gy (V5Gy) was 21.5 ± 23.3% [range 0-55%] and 3.1 ± 2.6% [range 0-7.3%] for groups A and B, respectively. The mean dose received by 1% of the kidney (D1%) was 5.6 ± 2.4 Gy [range 3.6 -7.6 Gy] for group A and 5.4 ± 0.7 Gy [range 4.3-6 Gy] for group B. The volume of small bowel excluding the PTV (small bowel-PTV) that received 40 Gy and 30 Gy (V40Gy and V30Gy) in group A were 7.5 ± 4.4% [range 5.4-14.1%] and 18.5 ± 7.1% [range 10-30.4%], respectively. In group B, small bowel-PTV V40Gy and V30Gy were 4.7 ± 3.3% [range 3.3-8%] and 21.6 ± 7.5% [range 9.4-30%] respectively. In a second step, we treated two patients in the postoperative group. Treatment time delivery with one arc was 74 seconds. No severe acute toxicity was observed. RapidArc technology for retroperitoneal sarcomas showed acceptable dosimetric results in preoperative or postoperative clinical situation. From the first treated

  15. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaojuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. Materials and methods 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time comparison. Results The SA-VMAT plans showed the superior target dose coverage, although the minimum/mean/maximum doses to the target were similar. For the total and contralateral lungs, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and mean lung dose (MLD were observed in the SA/PA-VMAT plans (p 20, V30 and MLD of the controlateral lung more notably, comparing to those parameters of the IMRT and SA-VMAT plans respectively. The delivered monitor units (MUs and treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT plans, especially PA-VMAT plans (for MUs: mean 458.3 vs. 439.2 vs. 435.7 MUs, p vs. 10.6 vs. 6.4 minutes, p Conclusions The SA-VMAT technique achieves highly conformal dose distribution to the target. Comparing to the IMRT plans, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and MLD were observed in the total and contralateral lungs in the VMAT plans, especially in the PA-VMAT plans. The SA/PA-VMAT plans also reduced treatment time with more efficient dose delivering. But the clinical benefit of the VMAT technique for locally advanced lung cancer needs further investigations.

  16. Planning analysis for locally advanced lung cancer: dosimetric and efficiency comparisons between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single-arc/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), single/partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA/PA-VMAT) techniques in treatment planning for locally advanced lung cancer. 12 patients were retrospectively studied. In each patient's case, several parameters were analyzed based on the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the IMRT, SA/PA-VMAT plans respectively. Also, each plan was delivered to a phantom for time comparison. The SA-VMAT plans showed the superior target dose coverage, although the minimum/mean/maximum doses to the target were similar. For the total and contralateral lungs, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and mean lung dose (MLD) were observed in the SA/PA-VMAT plans (p < 0.05, respectively). The PA-VMAT technique improves the dose sparing (V20, V30 and MLD) of the controlateral lung more notably, comparing to those parameters of the IMRT and SA-VMAT plans respectively. The delivered monitor units (MUs) and treatment times were reduced significantly with VMAT plans, especially PA-VMAT plans (for MUs: mean 458.3 vs. 439.2 vs. 435.7 MUs, p < 0.05 and for treatment time: mean 13.7 vs. 10.6 vs. 6.4 minutes, p < 0.01). The SA-VMAT technique achieves highly conformal dose distribution to the target. Comparing to the IMRT plans, the higher V5/10, lower V20/30 and MLD were observed in the total and contralateral lungs in the VMAT plans, especially in the PA-VMAT plans. The SA/PA-VMAT plans also reduced treatment time with more efficient dose delivering. But the clinical benefit of the VMAT technique for locally advanced lung cancer needs further investigations

  17. Effect of interfractional shoulder motion on low neck nodal targets for patients treated using volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT.Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor site. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs and a second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient’s treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the deformed low neck contours.Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3.Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT.-------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Casey K

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for adult craniospinal irradiation—A comparison with traditional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) poses a challenging planning process because of the complex target volume. Traditional 3D conformal CSI does not spare any critical organs, resulting in toxicity in patients. Here the dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are compared with classic conformal planning in adults for both cranial and spine fields to develop a clinically feasible technique that is both effective and efficient. Ten adult patients treated with CSI were retrospectively identified. For the cranial fields, 5-field IMRT and dual 356° VMAT arcs were compared with opposed lateral 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) fields. For the spine fields, traditional posterior-anterior (PA) PA fields were compared with isocentric 5-field IMRT plans and single 200° VMAT arcs. Two adult patients have been treated using this IMRT technique to date and extensive quality assurance, especially for the junction regions, was performed. For the cranial fields, the IMRT technique had the highest planned target volume (PTV) maximum and was the least efficient, whereas the VMAT technique provided the greatest parotid sparing with better efficiency. 3D-CRT provided the most efficient delivery but with the highest parotid dose. For the spine fields, VMAT provided the best PTV coverage but had the highest mean dose to all organs at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT had the highest PTV and OAR maximum doses but was the most efficient. IMRT provides the greatest OAR sparing but the longest delivery time. For those patients with unresectable disease that can benefit from a higher, definitive dose, 3D-CRT–opposed laterals are the most clinically feasible technique for cranial fields and for spine fields. Although inefficient, the IMRT technique is the most clinically feasible because of the increased mean OAR dose with the VMAT technique. Quality assurance of the beams, especially the junction regions, is essential

  19. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for adult craniospinal irradiation—A comparison with traditional techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shen, Xinglei; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Ying; Shi, Wenyin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Biswas, Tithi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) poses a challenging planning process because of the complex target volume. Traditional 3D conformal CSI does not spare any critical organs, resulting in toxicity in patients. Here the dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are compared with classic conformal planning in adults for both cranial and spine fields to develop a clinically feasible technique that is both effective and efficient. Ten adult patients treated with CSI were retrospectively identified. For the cranial fields, 5-field IMRT and dual 356° VMAT arcs were compared with opposed lateral 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) fields. For the spine fields, traditional posterior-anterior (PA) PA fields were compared with isocentric 5-field IMRT plans and single 200° VMAT arcs. Two adult patients have been treated using this IMRT technique to date and extensive quality assurance, especially for the junction regions, was performed. For the cranial fields, the IMRT technique had the highest planned target volume (PTV) maximum and was the least efficient, whereas the VMAT technique provided the greatest parotid sparing with better efficiency. 3D-CRT provided the most efficient delivery but with the highest parotid dose. For the spine fields, VMAT provided the best PTV coverage but had the highest mean dose to all organs at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT had the highest PTV and OAR maximum doses but was the most efficient. IMRT provides the greatest OAR sparing but the longest delivery time. For those patients with unresectable disease that can benefit from a higher, definitive dose, 3D-CRT–opposed laterals are the most clinically feasible technique for cranial fields and for spine fields. Although inefficient, the IMRT technique is the most clinically feasible because of the increased mean OAR dose with the VMAT technique. Quality assurance of the beams, especially the junction regions, is essential.

  20. Interplay effects between dose distribution quality and positioning accuracy in total marrow irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of inaccurate isocenter positioning during treatment of total marrow (lymph-node) irradiation (TMI-TMLI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).Methods: Four patients treated with TMI and TMLI were randomly selected from the internal database. Plans were optimized with VMAT technique. Planning target volume (PTV) included all the body bones; for TMLI, lymph nodes and spleen were considered into the target, too. Dose prescription to PTV was 12 Gy in six fractions, two times per day for TMI, and 2 Gy in single fraction for TMLI. Ten arcs on five isocenters (two arcs for isocenter) were used to cover the upper part of PTV (i.e., from cranium to middle femurs). For each plan, three series of random shifts with values between −3 and +3 mm and three between −5 and +5 mm were applied to the five isocenters simulating involuntary patient motion during treatment. The shifts were applied separately in the three directions: left–right (L-R), anterior–posterior (A-P), and cranial–caudal (C-C). The worst case scenario with simultaneous random shifts in all directions simultaneously was considered too. Doses were recalculated for the 96 shifted plans (24 for each patient).Results: For all shifts, differences 100 cm3. Maximum doses increased up to 15% for C-C shifted plans. PTV covered by the 95% isodose decreased of 2%–8% revealing target underdosage with the highest values in C-C direction.Conclusions: The correct isocenter repositioning of TMI-TMLI patients is fundamental, in particular in C-C direction, in order to avoid over- and underdosages especially in the overlap regions. For this reason, a dedicated immobilization system was developed in the authors' center to best immobilize the patient

  1. Interplay effects between dose distribution quality and positioning accuracy in total marrow irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tomatis, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy); Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara [Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy); Nicolini, Giorgia; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona 6500 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of inaccurate isocenter positioning during treatment of total marrow (lymph-node) irradiation (TMI-TMLI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).Methods: Four patients treated with TMI and TMLI were randomly selected from the internal database. Plans were optimized with VMAT technique. Planning target volume (PTV) included all the body bones; for TMLI, lymph nodes and spleen were considered into the target, too. Dose prescription to PTV was 12 Gy in six fractions, two times per day for TMI, and 2 Gy in single fraction for TMLI. Ten arcs on five isocenters (two arcs for isocenter) were used to cover the upper part of PTV (i.e., from cranium to middle femurs). For each plan, three series of random shifts with values between −3 and +3 mm and three between −5 and +5 mm were applied to the five isocenters simulating involuntary patient motion during treatment. The shifts were applied separately in the three directions: left–right (L-R), anterior–posterior (A-P), and cranial–caudal (C-C). The worst case scenario with simultaneous random shifts in all directions simultaneously was considered too. Doses were recalculated for the 96 shifted plans (24 for each patient).Results: For all shifts, differences <0.5% were found for mean doses to PTV, body, and organs at risk with volumes >100 cm{sup 3}. Maximum doses increased up to 15% for C-C shifted plans. PTV covered by the 95% isodose decreased of 2%–8% revealing target underdosage with the highest values in C-C direction.Conclusions: The correct isocenter repositioning of TMI-TMLI patients is fundamental, in particular in C-C direction, in order to avoid over- and underdosages especially in the overlap regions. For this reason, a dedicated immobilization system was developed in the authors' center to best immobilize the patient.

  2. Feasibility of single-isocenter, multi-arc non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy for multiple brain tumors using a linear accelerator with a 160-leaf multileaf collimator: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Yoshio; Ozawa, Shuichi; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Pellegrini, Roberto; Yoda, Kiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility of single isocenter, multi-arc non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for multiple brain tumors was studied using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with an Agility multileaf collimator and a Monaco treatment planning system. Two VMAT radiosurgery plans consisting of a full arc and three half arcs were created with a prescribed dose of 20 Gy in a single fraction. After dose delivery to a phantom, ionization chambers and radiochromic films were used for dose measurement. The first VMAT radiosurgery plan had nine targets inside the phantom, and the doses were measured by the chambers at two different points and by the films on three sagittal and three coronal planes. The differences between the calculated dose and the dose measured by a Farmer ionization chamber and a pinpoint ionization chamber were radiosurgery plan was based on a clinical 14 brain metastases. Differences between calculated and film-measured doses were evaluated on two sagittal planes. The average pass rates of the gamma indices on the planes under each of 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria were 97.8% and 88.8%, respectively. It was confirmed that single-isocenter, non-coplanar multi-arc VMAT radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases was feasible using Elekta Synergy with Agility and Monaco treatment planning systems. It was further shown that film dosimetry was accurately performed for a dose of up to nearly 25 Gy. PMID:24944266

  3. Direct Plan Comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young Eun; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-01-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-Trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan using analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both CK and RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended ...

  4. Volumetric intensity-modulated Arc (RapidArc therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-D conformal radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chia-Wen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the RapidArc plan for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans using dosimetric analysis. Methods Nine patients with unresectable HCC were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric values for RapidArc, IMRT, and 3DCRT were calculated for total doses of 45~50.4 Gy using 1.8 Gy/day. The parameters included the conformal index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, and hot spot (V107% for the planned target volume (PTV as well as the monitor units (MUs for plan efficiency, the mean dose (Dmean for the organs at risk (OAR and the maximal dose at 1% volume (D1% for the spinal cord. The percentage of the normal liver volume receiving ≥ 40, > 30, > 20, and > 10 Gy (V40 Gy, V30 Gy, V20 Gy, and V10 Gy and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP were also evaluated to determine liver toxicity. Results All three methods achieved comparable homogeneity for the PTV. RapidArc achieved significantly better CI and V107% values than IMRT or 3DCRT (p p mean of the normal liver than did 3DCRT or RapidArc (p = 0.001. 3DCRT had higher V40 Gy and V30 Gy values for the normal liver than did RapidArc or IMRT. Although the V10 Gy to the normal liver was higher with RapidArc (75.8 ± 13.1% than with 3DCRT or IMRT (60.5 ± 10.2% and 57.2 ± 10.0%, respectively; p p = 0.02. Conclusions RapidArc provided favorable tumor coverage compared with IMRT or 3DCRT, but RapidArc is not superior to IMRT in terms of liver protection. Further studies are needed to establish treatment outcome differences between the three approaches.

  5. Preclinical Assessment of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Total Marrow Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A preclinical investigation was undertaken to explore a treatment technique for total marrow irradiation using RapidArc, a volumetric modulated arc technique. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography datasets of 5 patients were included. Plans with eight overlapping coaxial arcs were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose prescription was 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction, normalized so that 100% isodose covered 85% of the planning target volume (PTV). The PTV consisted of the whole skeleton (including ribs and sternum), from the top of the skull to the medium distal third of the femurs. Planning objectives for organs at risk (OARs) were constrained to a median dose <6 to 7 Gy. OARs included brain, eyes, oral cavity, parotids, thyroid, lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, stomach, abdominal cavity, bladder, rectum, and genitals. Pretreatment quality assurance consisted of portal dosimetry comparisons, scoring the delivery to calculation agreement with the gamma agreement index. Results: The median total body volume in the study was 57 liters (range, 49-81 liters), for an average diameter of 47 cm (range, 46-53 cm) and a total length ranging from 95 to 112 cm. The median PTV volume was 6.8 liters (range, 5.8-10.8 liters). The mean dose to PTV was 109% (range, 107-112%). The global mean of median dose to all OARs was 4.9 Gy (range, 4.5-5.1 Gy over the 5 patients). The individual mean of median doses per organ ranged from 2.3 Gy (oral cavity) to 7.3 Gy (bowels cavity). Preclinical quality assurance resulted in a mean gamma agreement index of 94.3 ± 5.1%. The delivery time measured from quality assurance runs was 13 minutes. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues with adequate coverage of skeletal bones was shown to be feasible with RapidArc. Pretreatment quality assurance measurements confirmed the technical agreement between expected and actually delivered dose distributions, suggesting the possibility of incorporating this technique in the treatment options for

  6. Comparison of Gafchromic EBT2 and EBT3 for patient-specific quality assurance: Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery using volumetric modulated arc therapy with multiple noncoplanar arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Unit, University of Torino, Turin 10126 (Italy); Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Medical Physics Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin 10126 (Italy); Mantovani, Cristina [Radiation Oncology Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin 10126 (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) brain stereotactic radiosurgery raises specific issues on dosimetric procedures, mainly represented by the small radiation fields associated with the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, the need of small detectors and the high dose delivered (up to 30 Gy). Gafchromic{sup TM} EBT2 and EBT3 films may be considered the dosimeter of choice, and the authors here provide some additional data about uniformity correction for this new generation of radiochromic films.Methods: A new analysis method using blue channel for marker dye correction was proposed for uniformity correction both for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Symmetry, flatness, and field-width of a reference field were analyzed to provide an evaluation in a high-spatial resolution of the film uniformity for EBT3. Absolute doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) as baseline. VMAT plans with multiple noncoplanar arcs were generated with a treatment planning system on a selected pool of eleven patients with cranial lesions and then recalculated on a water-equivalent plastic phantom by Monte Carlo algorithm for patient-specific QA. 2D quantitative dose comparison parameters were calculated, for the computed and measured dose distributions, and tested for statistically significant differences.Results: Sensitometric curves showed a different behavior above dose of 5 Gy for EBT2 and EBT3 films; with the use of inhouse marker-dye correction method, the authors obtained values of 2.5% for flatness, 1.5% of symmetry, and a field width of 4.8 cm for a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} reference field. Compared with TLD and selecting a 5% dose tolerance, the percentage of points with ICRU index below 1 was 100% for EBT2 and 83% for EBT3. Patients analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between EBT2 and EBT3 in the percentage of points with gamma values <1 (p= 0.009 and p= 0.016); the percent difference as well as

  7. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  8. Simultaneous MV-kV imaging for intrafractional motion management during volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Margie A; Sonnick, Mark; Pham, Hai; Regmi, Rajesh; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Morf, Daniel; Mageras, Gig S; Zelefsky, Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical feasibility of a motion monitoring method employing simultaneously acquired MV and kV images during volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Short-arc digital tomosynthesis (SA-DTS) is used to improve the quality of the MV images that are then combined with orthogonally acquired kV images to assess 3D motion. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold seeds was used to assess accuracy of the method under static, typical prostatic, and respiratory motion scenarios. Automatic registra-tion of kV images and single MV frames or MV SA-DTS reconstructed with arc lengths from 2° to 7° with the appropriate reference fiducial template images was performed using special purpose-built software. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by retrospectively analyzing images acquired over four or five sessions for each of three patients undergoing hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. The standard deviation of the registration error in phantom using MV SA-DTS was similar to single MV images for the static and prostate motion scenarios (σ = 0.25 mm). Under respiratory motion conditions, the standard deviation of the registration error increased to 0.7mm and 1.7 mm for single MV and MV SA-DTS, respectively. Registration failures were observed with the respiratory scenario only and were due to motion-induced fiducial blurring. For the three patients studied, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between automatic registration using 4° MV SA-DTS and manual registration using single MV images results was 0.07±0.52mm. The MV SA-DTS results in patients were, on average, superior to single-frame MV by nearly 1 mm - significantly more than what was observed in phantom. The best MV SA-DTS results were observed with arc lengths of 3° to 4°. Registration failures in patients using MV SA-DTS were primarily due to blockage of the gold seeds by the MLC. The failure rate varied from 2% to 16%. Combined MV SA

  9. Simultaneous MV-kV imaging for intrafractional motion management during volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Margie A.; Sonnick, Mark; Pham, Hai; Regmi, Rajesh; Xiong, Jian-ping; Morf, Daniel; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical feasibility of a motion monitoring method employing simultaneously acquired MV and kV images during volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Short-arc digital tomosynthesis (SA-DTS) is used to improve the quality of the MV images that are then combined with orthogonally acquired kV images to assess 3D motion. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold seeds was used to assess accuracy of the method under static, typical prostatic, and respiratory motion scenarios. Automatic registration of kV images and single MV frames or MV SA-DTS reconstructed with arc lengths from 2° to 7° with the appropriate reference fiducial template images was performed using special purpose-built software. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by retrospectively analyzing images acquired over four or five sessions for each of three patients undergoing hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. The standard deviation of the registration error in phantom using MV SA-DTS was similar to single MV images for the static and prostate motion scenarios (σ = 0.25 mm). Under respiratory motion conditions, the standard deviation of the registration error increased to 0.7mm and 1.7 mm for single MV and MV SA-DTS, respectively. Registration failures were observed with the respiratory scenario only and were due to motion-induced fiducial blurring. For the three patients studied, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between automatic registration using 4° MV SA-DTS and manual registration using single MV images results was 0.07±0.52mm. The MV SA-DTS results in patients were, on average, superior to single-frame MV by nearly 1 mm — significantly more than what was observed in phantom. The best MV SA-DTS results were observed with arc lengths of 3° to 4°. Registration failures in patients using MV SA-DTS were primarily due to blockage of the gold seeds by the MLC. The failure rate varied from 2% to 16%. Combined MV SA

  10. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV-WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV-Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV-Pelvis: Dmax < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV-WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV-Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean). U5-95% for PTV-WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV-Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  11. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. Materials and methods: For 13 patients, four treatment combinations were compared; 3D-conformal RT (i.e., forward IMRT) in free-breathing 3D-CRT(FB), 3D-CRT(vmDIBH), 2 partial arcs VMAT(FB), and VMAT(vmDIBH). Prescribed dose was 42.56 Gy in 16 fractions. For 10 additional patients, 3D-CRT and VMAT in vmDIBH only were also compared. Results: Dose conformity, PTV coverage, ipsilateral and total lung doses were significantly better for VMAT plans compared to 3D-CRT. Mean heart dose (Dmean,heart) reduction in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) was between 0.9 and 8.6 Gy, depending on initial Dmean,heart (in 3D-CRT(FB) plans). VMAT(vmDIBH) reduced the Dmean,heart further when Dmean,heart was still >3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH). Mean contralateral breast dose was higher for VMAT plans (2.7 Gy) compared to 3DCRT plans (0.7 Gy). Conclusions: VMAT and 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) significantly reduced heart dose for patients treated with locoregional RT of left-sided breast cancer. When Dmean,heart exceeded 3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) plans, VMAT(vmDIBH) resulted in a cumulative heart dose reduction. VMAT also provided better target coverage and reduced ipsilateral lung dose, at the expense of a small increase in the dose to the contralateral breast

  12. Application of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a dual-vendor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and treatment time achievable with the new VMAT optimization tool implemented in the treatment planning system Oncentra MasterPlan® as compared to IMRT for Elekta SynergyS® linear accelerators. VMAT was implemented on a SynergyS® linear accelerator (Elekta Ltd., Crawley, UK) with Mosaiq® record and verify system (IMPAC Medical Systems, Sunnyvale, CA) and the treatment planning system Oncentra MasterPlan® (Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands). VMAT planning was conducted for three typical target types of prostate cancer, hypopharynx/larynx cancer and vertebral metastases, and compared to standard IMRT with respect to plan quality, number of monitor units (MU), and treatment time. For prostate cancer and vertebral metastases single arc VMAT led to similar plan quality as compared to IMRT. For treatment of the hypopharynx/larynx cancer, a second arc was necessary to achieve sufficient plan quality. Treatment time was reduced in all cases to 35% to 43% as compared to IMRT. Times required for optimization and dose calculation, however, increased by a factor of 5.0 to 6.8. Similar or improved plan quality can be achieved with VMAT as compared to IMRT at reduced treatment times but increased calculation times

  13. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs and mixed-energy plans (MEPs were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV energy for both the primary and boost plans. Second, the MEPs were created using 16 MV energy for the primary plan and 6 MV energy for the boost plan. The primary and boost MEPs used identical beam parameters and same dose optimization values as in the primary and boost SEPs for the corresponding case. The dosimetric parameters from the composite plans (SEPs and MEPs were evaluated. Results: The dose to the target volume was slightly higher (on average <1% in the SEPs than in the MEPs. The conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI values between the SEPs and MEPs were comparable. The dose to rectum and bladder was always higher in the SEPs (average difference up to 3.7% for the rectum and up to 8.4% for the bladder than in the MEPs. The mean dose to femoral heads was higher by about 0.8% (on average in the MEPs than in the SEPs. The number of monitor units and integral dose were higher in the SEPs compared to the MEPs by average differences of 9.1% and 5.5%, respectively.Conclusion: The preliminary results from this study suggest that use of mixed-energy VMAT plan for high-risk prostate cancer could potentially reduce the integral dose and minimize the dose to rectum and bladder, but for the higher femoral head dose.-----------------------------------------------Cite this article as:Pokharel S. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:01011.DOI: http

  14. Comparison of organ-at-risk sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton therapy and volumetric modulated arc photon therapy in head-and-neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barten, Danique L. J., E-mail: d.barten@vumc.nl; Tol, Jim P.; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R. [Department of Radiotherapy, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1118, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) aims to improve organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing over photon radiotherapy. However, it may be less robust for setup and range uncertainties. The authors investigated OAR sparing and plan robustness for spot-scanning proton planning techniques and compared these with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans. Methods: Ten HNC patients were replanned using two arc VMAT (RapidArc) and spot-scanning proton techniques. OARs to be spared included the contra- and ipsilateral parotid and submandibular glands and individual swallowing muscles. Proton plans were made using Multifield Optimization (MFO, using three, five, and seven fields) and Single-field Optimization (SFO, using three fields). OAR sparing was evaluated using mean dose to composite salivary glands (Comp{sub Sal}) and composite swallowing muscles (Comp{sub Swal}). Plan robustness was determined for setup and range uncertainties (±3 mm for setup, ±3% HU) evaluating V95% and V107% for clinical target volumes. Results: Averaged over all patients Comp{sub Sal}/Comp{sub Swal} mean doses were lower for the three-field MFO plans (14.6/16.4 Gy) compared to the three-field SFO plans (20.0/23.7 Gy) and VMAT plans (23.0/25.3 Gy). Using more than three fields resulted in differences in OAR sparing of less than 1.5 Gy between plans. SFO plans were significantly more robust than MFO plans. VMAT plans were the most robust. Conclusions: MFO plans had improved OAR sparing but were less robust than SFO and VMAT plans, while SFO plans were more robust than MFO plans but resulted in less OAR sparing. Robustness of the MFO plans did not increase with more fields.

  15. Dosimetry Comparison between Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with RapidArc and Fixed Field Dynamic IMRT for Local-Regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-min Zheng; Xiao-xia Dong; Hao Wu; You-jia Duan; Shu-kui Han; Yan Sun

    2011-01-01

    Objective:A dosimetric study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy with RapidArc on locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).Methods:The CT scan data sets of 20 patients of locally advanced NPC were selected randomly.The plans were managed using volumetric modulated arc with RapidArc and fixed nine-field coplanar dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for these patients.The dosimetry of the planning target volumes (PTV),the organs at risk (OARs) and the healthy tissue were evaluated.The dose prescription was set to 70 Gy to the primary tumor and 60 Gy to the clinical target volumes (CTV) in 33 fractions.Each fraction applied daily,five fractions per week.The monitor unit (MU) values and the delivery time were scored to evaluate the expected treatment efficiency.Results:Both techniques had reached clinical treatment's requirement.The mean dose (Dmean),maximum dose (Dmax) and minimum dose (Dmin) in RapidArc and fixed field IMRT for PTV were 68.4±0.6 Gy,74.8±0.9 Gy and 56.8±1.1 Gy; and 67.6±0.6 Gy,73.8±0.4 Gy and 57.5±0.6 Gy (P<0.05),respectively.Homogeneity index was 78.85±1.29 in RapidArc and 80.34±0.54 (P<0.05) in IMRT.The conformity index (CI:95%) was 0.78±0.01 for both techniques (P>0.05).Compared to IMRT,RapidArc allowed a reduction of Dmean to the brain stem,mandible and optic nerves of 14.1% (P<0.05),5.6% (P<0.05) and 12.2% (P<0.05),respectively.For the healthy tissue and the whole absorbed dose,Dmean of RapidArc was reduced by 3.6% (P<0.05),and 3.7% (P<0.05),respectively.The Dmean to the parotids,the spinal cord and the lens had no statistical difference among them.The mean MU values of RapidArc and IMRT were 550 and 1,379.The mean treatment time of RapidArc and IMRT was 165 s and 447 s.Compared to IMRT,the delivery time and the MU values of RapidArc were reduced by 63% and 60%,respectively.Conclusion:For locally advanced NPC,both RapidArc and IMRT reached

  16. Dosimetric study comparing volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and fixed dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric are modulation with RapidArc and fixed field dynamic IMRT for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with early left-sided breast cancer received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. After target definition, treatment planning was performed by RapidArc and two fixed fields dynamic IMRT respectively on the same CT scan. The target dose distribution, homogeneity of the breast, and the irradiation dose and volume for the lungs, heart, and contralateral breast were read in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and compared between RapidArc and IMRT. The treatment delivery time and monitor units were also compared. Results: In comparison with the IMRT planning,the homogeneity of clinical target volume (CTV), the volume proportion of 95% prescribed dose (V95%) was significantly higher by 0.65% in RapidArc (t=5.16, P=0.001), and the V105% and V110% were lower by 10.96% and 1.48 % respectively, however, without statistical significance (t=-2.05, P=0.055 and t=-1.33, P=0.197). The conformal index of planning target volume (PTV) by the RapidArc planning was (0.88±0.02), significantly higher than that by the IMRT planning [(0.74±0.03), t=18.54, P<0.001]. The homogeneity index (HI) of PTV by the RapidArc planning was 1.11±0.01, significantly lower than that by the IMRT planning (1.12±0.02, t=-2.44, P=0.02). There were no significant differences in the maximum dose (Dmax) and V20 for the ipsilateral lung between the RapidArc and IMRT planning, but the values of V10, V5, Dmin and Dmean by RapidArc planning were all significantly higher than those by the IMRT planning (all P<0.01). The values of max dose and V30 for the heart were similar by both techniques, but the values of V10 and V5 by the RapidArc planning were significantly higher (by 18% and 50%, respectively). The V5 of the contralateral breast and lung by the RapidArc planning were increased by 9

  17. The superiority of hybrid-volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique over double arcs VMAT and 3D-conformal technique in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer – A planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of three different treatment techniques – conformal radiotherapy (CRT), double arcs volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc, RA) and Hybrid-RapidArc (H-RA) for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: CRT, RA and H-RA plans were optimized for 24 stage III NSCLC patients. The target prescription dose was 60 Gy. CRT consisted of 5–7 coplanar fields, while RA comprised of two 204o arcs. H-RA referred to two 204o arcs plus 2 static fields, which accounted for approximately half of the total dose. The plans were optimized to fulfill the departmental plan acceptance criteria. Results: RA and H-RA yielded a 20% better conformity compared with CRT. Lung volume receiving >20 Gy (V20) and mean lung dose (MLD) were the lowest in H-RA (V20 1.7% and 2.1% lower, MLD 0.59 Gy and 0.41 Gy lower than CRT and RA respectively) without jeopardizing the low-dose lung volume (V5). H-RA plans gave the lowest mean maximum spinal cord dose (34.4 Gy, 3.9 Gy < CRT and 2.2 Gy < RA plans) and NTCP of lung. Higher average MU per fraction (addition 52.4 MU) was observed with a reduced treatment time compared with CRT plans. Conclusion: The H-RA technique was superior in dosimetric outcomes for treating locally-advanced NSCLC compared to CRT and RA.

  18. Target splitting non-coplanar RapidArc radiation therapy for a diffuse sebaceous carcinoma of the scalp: a novel delivery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare conventional lateral photon-electron, fixed-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), coplanar and non-coplanar RapidArc for the treatment of a diffuse sebaceous gland carcinoma of the scalp. Comprehensive dosimetry comparisons were performed among 3D-CRT, IMRT and various RapidArc plans. Target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and doses to organs at risk (OAR) were calculated. Monitor unites (MUs) and delivery time of each treatment were also recorded to evaluate the execution efficiency. The influence of target splitting technique and non-coplanar planning on plan quality was discussed. IMRT was superior to 3D-CRT concerning targets’ coverage at the sacrifice of larger irradiated brain volumes to low doses. CIs and HIs were better in coplanar RapidArc and non-coplanar RapidArc plans than 3D-CRT and IMRT. Best dose coverage and sparing of OARs were achieved in non-coplanar plans using target splitting technique. Treatment delivery time was longest in the IMRT plan and shortest in the coplanar RapidArc plan without target splitting. The 3%/3 mm gamma test pass rates were above 95% for all the plans. Target splitting technique and non-coplanar arcs are recommended for total scalp irradiation

  19. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

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    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for

  20. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for

  1. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-independent comparison of radiotherapy treatment planning of IMRT and VMAT for head-and-neck cancer performed by several institutes and based on the same CT- and contouring data. Five institutes generated IMRT and VMAT plans for five oropharyngeal cancer patients using either Pinnacle3 or Oncentra Masterplan to be delivered on Elekta linear accelerators. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT plans within the same patient and institute showed significantly better sparing for almost all OARs with VMAT. The average mean dose to the parotid glands and oral cavity was reduced from 27.2 Gy and 39.4 Gy for IMRT to 25.0 Gy and 36.7 Gy for VMAT, respectively. The dose conformity at 95% of the prescribed dose for PTVboost and PTVtotal was 1.45 and 1.62 for IMRT and 1.37 and 1.50 for VMAT, respectively. The average effective delivery time was reduced from 13:15 min for IMRT to 5:54 min for VMAT. Independently of institution-specific optimization strategies, the quality of the VMAT plans including double arcs was superior to step-and-shoot IMRT plans including 5–9 beam ports, while the effective treatment delivery time was shortened by ~50% with VMAT

  2. Poster — Thur Eve — 17: In-phantom and Fluence-based Measurements for Quality Assurance of Volumetric-driven Adaptation of Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of head and neck cancer, some patients lose weight which may result in anatomical deviations from the initial plan. If these deviations are substantial a new treatment plan can be designed for the remainder of treatment (i.e., adaptive planning). Since the adaptive treatment process is resource intensive, one possible approach to streamlining the quality assurance (QA) process is to use the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to measure the integrated fluence for the adapted plans instead of the currently-used ArcCHECK device (Sun Nuclear). Although ArcCHECK is recognized as the clinical standard for patient-specific VMAT plan QA, it has limited length (20 cm) for most head and neck field apertures and has coarser detector spacing than the EPID (10 mm vs. 0.39 mm). In this work we compared measurement of the integrated fluence using the EPID with corresponding measurements from the ArcCHECK device. In the past year nine patients required an adapted plan. Each of the plans (the original and adapted) is composed of two arcs. Routine clinical QA was performed using the ArcCHECK device, and the same plans were delivered to the EPID (individual arcs) in integrated mode. The dose difference between the initial plan and adapted plan was compared for ArcCHECK and EPID. In most cases, it was found that the EPID is more sensitive in detecting plan differences. Therefore, we conclude that EPID provides a viable alternative for QA of the adapted head and neck plans and should be further explored

  3. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of benign skull-base tumors: a dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with Rapidarc® versus non-coplanar dynamic arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benign tumors of the skull base are a challenge when delivering radiotherapy. An appropriate choice of radiation technique may significantly improve the patient’s outcomes. Our study aimed to compare the dosimetric results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between non-coplanar dynamic arcs and coplanar volumetric modulated arctherapy (Rapidarc®). Thirteen patients treated with Novalis TX® were analysed: six vestibular schwannomas, four pituitary adenomas and three meningioma. Two treatment plans were created for each case: dynamic arcs (4–5 non coplanar arcs) and Rapidarc® (2 coplanar arcs). All tumors were >3 cm and accessible to both techniques. Patients had a stereotactic facemask (Brainlab) and were daily repositioned by Exactrac®. GTV and CTV were contoured according to tumor type. A 1-mm margin was added to the CTV to obtain PTV. Radiation doses were 52.2–54 Gy, using 1.8 Gy per fraction. Treatment time was faster with Rapidarc®. The mean PTV V95 % was 98.8 for Rapidarc® and 95.9 % for DA (p = 0.09). Homogeneity index was better with Rapidarc®: 0.06 vs. 0.09 (p = 0.01). Higher conformity index values were obtained with Rapidarc®: 75.2 vs. 67.9 % (p = 0.04). The volume of healthy brain that received a high dose (V90 %) was 0.7 % using Rapidarc® vs. 1.4 % with dynamic arcs (p = 0.05). Rapidarc® and dynamic arcs gave, respectively, a mean D40 % of 10.5 vs. 18.1 Gy (p = 0.005) for the hippocampus and a Dmean of 25.4 vs. 35.3 Gy (p = 0.008) for the ipsilateral cochlea. Low-dose delivery with Rapidarc® and dynamic arcs were, respectively, 184 vs. 166 cm3 for V20 Gy (p = 0.14) and 1265 vs. 1056 cm3 for V5 Gy (p = 0.67). Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using Rapidarc® for large benign tumors of the skull base provided target volume coverage that was at least equal to that of dynamics arcs, with better conformity and homogeneity and faster treatment time. Rapidarc® also offered better sparing of the ipsilateral cochlea and hippocampus

  4. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Spine Radiosurgery: Superior Treatment Planning and Delivery Compared to Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leor Zach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS delivers an accurate and efficient high radiation dose to vertebral metastases in 1–5 fractions. We aimed to compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to static beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for spine SRS. Methods and Materials. Ten spine lesions of previously treated SRS patients were planned retrospectively using both IMRT and VMAT with a prescribed dose of 16 Gy to 100% of the planning target volume (PTV. The plans were compared for conformity, homogeneity, treatment delivery time, and safety (spinal cord dose. Results. All evaluated parameters favored the VMAT plan over the IMRT plans. Dmin in the IMRT was significantly lower than in the VMAT plan (7.65 Gy/10.88 Gy, p<0.001, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC was found to be significantly better for the VMAT plans compared to the IMRT plans (0.77/0.58, resp., p  value<0.01, and an almost 50% reduction in the net treatment time was calculated for the VMAT compared to the IMRT plans (6.73 min/12.96 min, p<0.001. Conclusions. In our report, VMAT provides better conformity, homogeneity, and safety profile. The shorter treatment time is a major advantage and not only provides convenience to the painful patient but also contributes to the precision of this high dose radiation therapy.

  5. SU-E-J-99: Reconstruction of Cone Beam CT Image Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Exit Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the possibility of obtaining an image of the treated volume during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with exit beams. Method: Using a Varian Clinac 21EX and MVCT detector the following three sets of detector projection data were obtained for cone beam CT reconstruction with and without a Catphan 504 phantom. 1) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm2 open beam with 3 MUs, 2) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm2 MLC closed beam with 14 MUs. 3) 137 projection images from a test RapicArc QA plan. All projection images were obtained in ‘integrated image’ mode. We used OSCaR code to reconstruct the cone beam CT images. No attempts were made to reduce scatter or artifacts. Results: With projection set 1) we obtained a good quality MV CBCT image by optimizing the reconstruction parameters. Using projection set 2) we were not able to obtain a CBCT image of the phantom, which was determined to be due to the variation of interleaf leakage with gantry angle. From projection set 3), we were able to obtain a weak but meaningful signal in the image, especially in the target area where open beam signals were dominant. This finding suggests that one might be able to acquire CBCT images with rough body shape and some details inside the irradiated target area. Conclusion: Obtaining patient images using the VMAT exit beam is challenging but possible. We were able to determine sources of image degradation such as gantry angle dependent interleaf leakage and beams with a large scatter component. We are actively working on improving image quality

  6. SU-E-T-444: Quantitatively Comparison of Low Dose Spillage Outside of PTV Edge in Arc Therapy Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare low dose spillage outside of PTV edge in arc therapy modalities Methods: The machines used in the study are Tomotherapy Hi-Arc and Varian 21EX with millennium120 MLC. TPS are TomoPlaning and RayStation for VMAT, respectively. The phantom is a 30cm diameter cylindrical solid water (TOMOTHERAPY, TOMOPHANTOM ASSY). The PTV is 4cm length with ellipsoidal sectional shape with major axis=5cm, minor axis=3cm in the axial plane and reversed in the coronal plane. The PTV volume is created with interpolation. It is located at the center of the phantom. The prescribed dose is 1000x5 cGy to 95% the PTV. The isocenter is set co-centered with the PTV. EBT-3 film was used to measure iso-dose lines at the center plane. Film dosimetry is performed with the RIT, v6.2. Results: the study shows: (1) dose falloff gradient is usually uneven, depending on the PTV shape in the gantry rotation plane. For an elliptical shape, the low dose spillage is wider in the minor axis direction than that in the major axis direction. The more a shape is closer to circular, the more even gradient is all directions; (2)for a circular shape (CAX plane in this study), the maximum dose in % of Rx dose at 2cm from PTV is 55% for Tomo, vs. 70% for VMAT (3) the most rapid dose falloff rang is between 95%–80% IDL for both modalities. Conclusion: Tomo has more rapid dose falloff outside of PTV. In some areas, the gradient is double for Tomo helical than that for LINAC VMAT at same points. Future work will examine the differences between optimization of doses and inherent delivery limitations

  7. SU-E-T-604: Dosimetric Dependence On the Collimator Angle in Prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when using different collimator angles. It is because collimator angle awareness is essential for planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a rational time. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o) were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. For each change of collimator angle, a new plan was re-optimized for that angle. The prescription dose was 78 Gy per 39 fractions. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index, machine monitor unit, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans. Results: There was no significance difference, based on the plan dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. Higher CI and lower HI were found for the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided lower HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. The 75o and 90o collimator angle were found good for the rectum sparing, and the 75o and 30o collimator angle were found good for the right and left femur sparing, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: The dosimetric results in this study are useful to the planner to select different collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OAR sparing in prostate VMAT

  8. SU-E-T-604: Dosimetric Dependence On the Collimator Angle in Prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M; Rehman, J; Khan, M [The Islaimia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Punjab (Pakistan); Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when using different collimator angles. It is because collimator angle awareness is essential for planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a rational time. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o) were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. For each change of collimator angle, a new plan was re-optimized for that angle. The prescription dose was 78 Gy per 39 fractions. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index, machine monitor unit, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans. Results: There was no significance difference, based on the plan dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. Higher CI and lower HI were found for the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided lower HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. The 75o and 90o collimator angle were found good for the rectum sparing, and the 75o and 30o collimator angle were found good for the right and left femur sparing, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: The dosimetric results in this study are useful to the planner to select different collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OAR sparing in prostate VMAT.

  9. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors: A Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques with a limited number of segments for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: For a random selection of 27 patients eligible for SBRT, coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT and coplanar VMAT (using SmartArc) treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle3 and compared. In addition, film measurements were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the skin dose for the different treatment techniques. Results: Using VMAT, the delivery times could be reduced to an average of 6.6 min compared with 23.7 min with noncoplanar IMRT. The mean dose to the healthy lung was 4.1 Gy for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and 4.2 Gy for coplanar IMRT. The volume of healthy lung receiving >5 Gy and >20 Gy was 18.0% and 5.4% for VMAT, 18.5% and 5.0% for noncoplanar IMRT, and 19.4% and 5.7% for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The dose conformity at 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose of 54 Gy was 1.13 and 5.17 for VMAT, 1.11 and 4.80 for noncoplanar IMRT and 1.12 and 5.31 for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The measured skin doses were comparable for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and slightly greater for coplanar IMRT. Conclusions: Coplanar VMAT for SBRT for early-stage lung cancer achieved plan quality and skin dose levels comparable to those using noncoplanar IMRT and slightly better than those with coplanar IMRT. In addition, the delivery time could be reduced by ≤70% with VMAT.

  10. Direct plan comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Eun; Kwak, Jungwon; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-07-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan by using an analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both the CK and the RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended by the RTOG 0631 spine and 0915 lung SBRT protocols. The mean CI' SD values of the PTV were 1.11' 0.03 and 1.17' 0.10 for RA and CK ( p = 0.02), respectively. On average, the maximum dose delivered to the spinal cord in CK plans was approximately 11.6% higher than that in RA plans, and this difference was statistically significant ( p < 0.001). High-dose spillages were 0.86% and 2.26% for RA and CK ( p = 0.203), respectively. Intermediate-dose spillage characterized by D2cm was lower for RA than for CK; however, R50% was not statistically different. Even though both systems can create highly conformal volumetric dose distributions, the current study shows that RA demonstrates lower high- and intermediate-dose spillages than CK. Therefore, RA plans for spinal SBRT may be superior to CK plans.

  11. Study on feasibility of preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy based on volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) based on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 162 patients with LARC who received NCRT plus surgery (and postoperative chemotherapy) in our hospital from April 2011 to April 2013. These patients included 113 males and 49 females, with a median age of 56 years (23-84 years). Of all patients, 22, 11, and 5 had stage Ⅱa,Ⅱb,and Ⅱc disease, respectively, and 1, 58, and 65 had stage Ⅲa, Ⅲb, and Ⅲc disease, respectively. All patients received single-arc VMAT, with target doses of 50 Gy/25 fractions for PTV1 and 46 Gy/25 fractions for PTV2, as well as induction and concurrent chemotherapy (median 3 cycles), with Xelox regimen (capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 plus oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2 or 130 mg/m2) as the main chemotherapy protocol. Results: All patients received radiotherapy, and only 2 of them discontinued radiotherapy due to grade 3 diarrhea. The overall incidence rates of grade 3 hematological and nonhematological toxicities among all patients during chemoradiotherapy were 9.3% and 16.0%, respectively. Surgery was performed after a median interval of 53.5 days (34-86 days). After surgery,the pathological complete response rate, R0 resection rate,and sphincter preservation rate for low rectal cancer were 30.2%, 100%, and 45.9%, respectively. Among all patients, 16.7% developed postoperative complications, and no one died within 30 days after surgery; 85.2%, 87.1%, and 88.9% showed decreases in T stage, N stage,and clinical stage,respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative NCRT based on VMAT for LARC is safe and feasible, but its effect on long-term survival needs further observation. (authors)

  12. Prostatic displacement during extreme hypofractionated radiotherapy using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine prostate displacement during extreme hypofractionated volume modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using pre- and post-treatment orthogonal images with three implanted gold seed fiducial markers. A total of 150 image pairs were obtained from 30 patients who underwent extreme hypofractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 40 Gy in five fractions on standard linear accelerators. Position verification was obtained with orthogonal x-rays before and after treatment and were used to determine intra-fraction prostate displacement. The mean prostate displacements were 0.03 ± 1.23 mm (1SD), 0.18 ± 1.55 mm, and 0.37 ± 1.95 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. The mean 3D displacement was 2.32 ± 1.55 mm. Only 6 (4%) fractions had a 3D displacement of >5 mm. The average time of treatment delivery for a given fraction was 195 ± 59 seconds. The mean intra-fraction prostate displacement during a course of extreme hypofractionated radiotherapy delivered via VMAT, continues to be small. Clinical margins typically used in a similar fixed-angle IMRT treatment are adequate. The use of VMAT in further extreme hypofractionation may limit prostatic motion uncertainties that would be otherwise be associated with longer treatment times

  13. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality

  14. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  15. Radiotherapy for unresectable sinonasal cancers: Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation therapy with coplanar and non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for treatment of unresectable paranasal sinuses cancers (PNSCs) with different clinical presentations. Material and methods: Four patients treated for primary target volume only (group 1), four requiring elective nodal irradiation (group 2) and four with positive nodes in macroscopic disease (group 3) were selected. For each patient were generated 7 fields IMRT, coplanar VMAT (c-VMAT) and non-coplanar VMAT (nc-VMAT) treatment plans. Total doses were 70 Gy and 54 Gy to high dose planning target volume (HD-PTV) and low-dose-PTV, respectively. Dose–volume histogram, conformity and homogeneity index (CI and HI), and monitor units (MUs) per Gy were evaluated. Results: VMAT provided significantly better target coverage, in terms of V100% (Volume encompassed by the isodose 100%), than IMRT, in particular when nc-VMAT was used. In general, organ at risk sparing is similar with the three approaches, although nc-VMAT can allow a statistically significant reduction of dose to contralateral parotid gland and cochlea for all three groups. Conclusions: VMAT can offer significant improvement of treatment for all unresectable PNSCs over existing IMRT techniques. In particular, nc-VMAT may be a further advantage for those patients with sinonasal cancers and involvement of the nodes in whom large volumes and complex/irregular shape have to be irradiated, even if clinical benefits should be established in the future

  16. Robust plan optimization for electromagnetic transponder guided hypo-fractionated prostate treatment using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop an optimization algorithm for volumetric modulated arc therapy which incorporates an electromagnetic tracking (EMT) guided gating strategy and is robust to residual intra-fractional motion uncertainties. In a computer simulation, intra-fractional motion traces from prior treatments with EMT were converted to a probability distribution function (PDF), truncated using a patient specific action volume that encloses allowed deviations from the planned position, and renormalized to yield a new PDF with EMT-gated interventions. In lieu of a conventional planning target volume (PTV), multiple instances of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were replicated and displaced to extreme positions inside the action volume representing possible delivery scenarios. When optimizing the volumetric modulated arc therapy plan, doses to the CTV and OARs were calculated as a sum of doses to the replicas weighted by the PDF to account for motion. A treatment plan meeting the clinical constraints was produced and compared to the counterpart conventional margin (PTV) plan. EMT traces from a separate testing database served to simulate motion during gated delivery. Dosimetric end points extracted from dose accumulations for each motion trace were utilized to evaluate potential clinical benefit. Five prostate cases from a hypofractionated protocol (42.5 Gy in 5 fractions) were retrospectively investigated. The patient specific gating window resulted in tight anterior and inferior action levels (∼1 mm) to protect rectal wall and bladder wall, and resulted in an average of four beam interruptions per fraction in the simulation. The robust-optimized plans achieved the same average CTV D95 coverage of 40.5 Gy as the PTV-optimized plans, but with reduced patient-averaged rectum wall D1cc by 2.2 Gy (range 0.7 to 4.7 Gy) and bladder wall mean dose by 2.9 Gy (range 2.0 to 3.4 Gy). Integration of an intra-fractional motion management strategy into the robust

  17. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Iris Z.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is to report 1) the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2) the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery. Materials and methods. Eleven VMAT plans were selected and modified using an in-house developed software. For each control point of a VMAT arc, MLC leaves with the highest speed (1.87-1.95 cm/s) were set to move at the maximal allowable speed (2.3 cm/s), which resulted in a leaf position difference of less than 2 mm. The modified plans were considered as ‘standard’ plans, and the original plans were treated as the ‘slowing MLC’ plans for simulating ‘standard’ plans with leaves moving at relatively lower speed. The measurement of each ‘slowing MLC’ plan using MapCHECK®2 was compared with calculated planar dose of the ‘standard’ plan with respect to absolute dose Van Dyk distance-to-agreement (DTA) comparisons using 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. Results All ‘slowing MLC’ plans passed the 90% pass rate threshold using 3%/3 mm criteria while one brain and three anal VMAT cases were below 90% with 2%/2 mm criteria. For ten out of eleven cases, DVH comparisons between ‘standard’ and ‘slowing MLC’ plans demonstrated minimal dosimetric changes in targets and organs-at-risk. Conclusions For highly modulated VMAT plans, pass rate threshold (90%) using 3%/3mm criteria is not sensitive in detecting MLC leaf errors that will not trigger the MLC leaf interlock. However, the consequential effects of non-beam hold MLC errors on target and OAR doses are negligible, which supports the reliability of current patient-specific IMRT quality assurance (QA) method for VMAT plans. PMID:27069458

  18. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of benign skull-base tumors: a dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with Rapidarc® versus non-coplanar dynamic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Fanny; Magnier, Florian; Berger, Lucie; Miroir, Jessica; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre; Lapeyre, Michel; Biau, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign tumors of the skull base are a challenge when delivering radiotherapy. An appropriate choice of radiation technique may significantly improve the patient’s outcomes. Our study aimed to compare the dosimetric results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between non-coplanar dynamic arcs and coplanar volumetric modulated arctherapy (Rapidarc®). Methods Thirteen patients treated with Novalis TX® were analysed: six vestibular schwannomas, four pituitary adenomas and three m...

  19. Dosimetric effects of weight loss or gain during volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight loss or gain during the course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can alter the planned dose to the target volumes and critical organs. Typically, source-to-surface distance (SSD) measurements are documented by therapists on a weekly basis to ensure that patients' exterior surface and isocenter-to-skin surface distances remain stable. The radiation oncology team then determines whether the patient has undergone a physical change sufficient to require a new treatment plan. The effect of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetry is not well known, and it is unclear when rescanning or replanning is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on IMRT or VMAT dose delivery in patients with prostate cancer and to determine the SSD change threshold for replanning. Whether IMRT or VMAT provides better dose stability under weight change conditions was also determined. We generated clinical IMRT and VMAT prostate and seminal vesicle treatment plans for varying SSDs for 10 randomly selected patients with prostate cancer. The differences due to SSD change were quantified by a specific dose change for a specified volume of interest. The target mean dose, decreased or increased by 2.9% per 1-cm SSD decrease or increase in IMRT and by 3.6% in VMAT. If the SSD deviation is more than 1 cm, the radiation oncology team should determine whether to continue treatment without modifications, to adjust monitor units, or to resimulate and replan

  20. SU-E-T-430: Modeling MLC Leaf End in 2D for Sliding Window IMRT and Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a 2D geometric model for MLC accounting for leaf end dose leakage for dynamic IMRT and Rapidarc therapy. Methods: Leaf-end dose leakage is one of the problems for MLC dose calculation and modeling. Dosimetric leaf gap used to model the MLC and to count for leakage in dose calculation, but may not be accurate for smaller leaf gaps. We propose another geometric modeling method to compensate for the MLC round-shape leaf ends dose leakage, and improve the accuracy of dose calculation and dose verification. A triangular function is used to geometrically model the MLC leaf end leakage in the leaf motion direction, and a step function is used in the perpendicular direction. Dose measurements with different leaf gap, different window width, and different window height were conducted, and the results were used to fit the analytical model to get the model parameters. Results: Analytical models have been obtained for stop-and-shoot and dynamic modes for MLC motion. Parameters a=0.4, lw'=5.0 mm for 6X and a=0.54, lw'=4.1 mm for 15x were obtained from the fitting process. The proposed MLC leaf end model improves the dose profile at the two ends of the sliding window opening. This improvement is especially significant for smaller sliding window openings, which are commonly used for highly modulated IMRT plans and arc therapy plans. Conclusion: This work models the MLC round leaf end shape and movement pattern for IMRT dose calculation. The theory, as well as the results in this work provides a useful tool for photon beam IMRT dose calculation and verification

  1. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was evaluated in comparison to non interrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds). The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to non interrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater

  2. Peripheral dose measurements in cervical cancer radiotherapy: a comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and step-and-shoot IMRT techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Ming X; ZHANG, XU; Yin, Ce; Feng, Ge; Li, Na; Gao, Song; Liu, Da W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the peripheral doses resulting from volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in cervical cancer radiotherapy. Methods Nine patients with cervical cancer had treatment planned with both VMAT and IMRT. A specially designed phantom was used for this study, with ion chambers placed at interest points approximating the position of the breast, thyroid, and lens. The peripheral doses at the phantom...

  3. SU-E-T-405: Robustness of Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans to Systematic MLC Positional Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of systematic MLC positional errors (PEs) on the quality of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: Five patients with head-and-neck cancer (HN) and five patients with prostate cancer were randomly chosen for this study. The clinically approved VMAT plans were designed with 2–4 coplanar arc beams with none-zero collimator angles in the Pinnacle planning system. The systematic MLC PEs of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mm on both MLC banks were introduced into the original VMAT plans using an in-house program, and recalculated with the same planned Monitor Units in the Pinnacle system. For each patient, the original VMAT plans and plans with MLC PEs were evaluated according to the dose-volume histogram information and Gamma index analysis. Results: For one primary target, the ratio of V100 in the plans with 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mm MLC PEs to those in the clinical plans was 98.8 ± 2.2%, 97.9 ± 2.1%, 90.1 ± 9.0% for HN cases and 99.5 ± 3.2%, 98.9 ± 1.0%, 97.0 ± 2.5% for prostate cases. For all OARs, the relative difference of Dmean in all plans was less than 1.5%. With 2mm/2% criteria for Gamma analysis, the passing rates were 99.0 ± 1.5% for HN cases and 99.7 ± 0.3% for prostate cases between the planar doses from the original plans and the plans with 1.0 mm MLC errors. The corresponding Gamma passing rates dropped to 88.9 ± 5.3% for HN cases and 83.4 ± 3.2% for prostate cases when comparing planar doses from the original plans and the plans with 2.0 mm MLC errors. Conclusion: For VMAT plans, systematic MLC PEs up to 1.0 mm did not affect the plan quality in term of target coverage, OAR sparing, and Gamma analysis with 2mm/2% criteria

  4. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc therapy for lymph node metastasized prostate cancer: Early late toxicity and 3-year clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: For patients with N1 prostate cancer (PCa) aggressive local therapies can be advocated. We evaluated clinical outcome, gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity after intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (IMAT) + androgen deprivation (AD) for N1 PCa. Material and methods: Eighty patients with T1-4N1M0 PCa were treated with IMAT and 2–3 years of AD. A median dose of 69.3 Gy (normalized isoeffective dose at 2 Gy per fraction: 80 Gy [α/β = 3]) was prescribed in 25 fractions to the prostate. The pelvic lymph nodes received a minimal dose of 45 Gy. A simultaneous integrated boost to 72 Gy and 65 Gy was delivered to the intraprostatic lesion and/or pathologically enlarged lymph nodes, respectively. GI and GU toxicity was scored using the RTOG/RILIT and RTOG-SOMA/LENT-CTC toxicity scoring system respectively. Three-year actuarial risk of grade 2 and 3/4 GI–GU toxicity and biochemical and clinical relapse free survival (bRFS and cRFS) were calculated with Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3 and 2 GI toxicity is 8% and 20%, respectively. Three-year actuarial risk for late grade 3–4 and 2 GU toxicity was 6% and 34%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was 81% and 89%, respectively. Actuarial 3-year bRFS and cRFS was, respectively 26% and 32% lower for patients with cN1 disease when compared to patients with cN0 disease. Conclusion: IMAT for N1 PCa offers good clinical outcome with moderate toxicity. Patients with cN1 disease have poorer outcome

  5. Physical and biological pretreatment quality assurance of the head and neck cancer plan with the volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Lee, Yun-Hee; Lee, Seu-Ran; Kim, Min-Ju; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate both the physical and the biological quality assurance (QA) aspects as pretreatment QA of the head and neck (H&N) cancer plan for the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Ten H&N plans were studied. The COMPASS® dosimetry analysis system and the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculation free program were used as the respective measurement and calculation tools. The reliability of these tools was verified by a benchmark study in accordance with the TG-166 report. For the physical component of QA, the gamma passing rates and the false negative cases between the calculated and the measured data were evaluated. The biological component of QA was performed based on the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), TCP and NTCP values. The evaluation was performed for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and the organs at risks (OARs), including the eyes, the lens, the parotid glands, the esophagus, the spinal cord, and the brainstem. All cases had gamma passing rates above 95% at an acceptance tolerance level with the 3%/3 mm criteria. In addition, the false negative instances were presented for the PTVs and OARs. The gamma passing rates exhibited a weak correlation with false negative cases. For the biological QA, the physical dose errors affect the EUD and the TCP for the PTVs, but no linear correlation existed between them. The EUD and NTCP for the OARs were shown the random differences that could not be attributed to the dose errors from the physical QA. The differences in the EUD and NTCP between the calculated and the measured results were mainly demonstrated for the parotid glands. This study describes the importance and the necessity of improved QA to accompany both the physical and the biological aspects for accurate radiation treatment.

  6. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  7. Feasibility of accelerated partial breast irradiation with volumetric-modulated arc therapy in elderly and frail patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an option for adjuvant radiotherapy according to ASTRO and ESTRO recommendations. Among the available techniques, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is attractive but has not been extensively studied for APBI. This study assessed its feasibility, tolerance and early oncological outcomes. We analysed the data of nine patients (median age 74 years) with ten lesions (one bilateral cancer) treated from May 2011 to July 2012 with APBI using VMAT. The radiation oncologist delineated the surgical tumour bed, and added an 18 mm isotropic margin to obtain the planning target volume (PTV). The dose was 40 Gy prescribed in 4 Gy fractions given twice a day over five days. Patients were regularly followed for toxicities and oncological outcomes. Mean PTV was 100.0 cm3 and 95 % of the PTV received a mean dose of 99.7 % of the prescribed dose. Hot spots represented 0.3 % of the PTV. 6.2 %, 1.6 % and 0.3 % of the ipsilateral lung volume received 5 Gy (V5Gy), 10 Gy (V10Gy) and 20 Gy (V20Gy), respectively. Regarding the contralateral lung, V5Gy was 0.3 %, and V10Gy and V20Gy were nil. V5Gy accounted for 3.1 % of the heart. An average 580 monitor units were delivered. No acute or late grade ≥ 2 toxicities were observed. With a median follow-up of 26 months, no relapses occurred. In our study, VMAT allowed optimal dosimetry with consequential high therapeutic ratio in elderly and frail patients

  8. SU-E-J-70: Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Techniques Using Portal Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a method for verification of dose distribution in a patient during treatment using multiple isocentric Intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques with portal dosimetry. Methods: Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has an integrated image mode for portal dosimetry (PD). The source-to-imager distance was taken at 150 cm to avoid collision to the table. Fourteen fractions were analyzed for this study. During shift in a single plan from one isocenter to another isocenter, EPID also shifted longitudinally for each field by taking the extent of divergence of beam into the consideration for EPID distance of 150cm. Patients were given treatment everyday with EPID placed in proper position for each field. Several parameters were obtained by comparing the dose distribution between fractions to fraction. The impact of the intra-fraction and inter-fraction of the patient in combination with isocenter shift of the beams were observed. Results: During treatment, measurements were performed by EPID and were evaluated by the gamma method. Analysis was done between fractions for multiple isocenter treatments. The pass rates of the gamma analysis with a criterion of 3% and 3 mm for the 14 fractions were over 97.8% with good consistency. Whereas maximum gamma exceeded the criteria in few fractions (in<1 cc vol). Average gamma was observed in the criteria of 0.5%. Maximum dose difference and average dose differences were less than 0.22 CU and 0.01 CU for maximum tolerance of 1.0 CU and 0.2 CU respectively. Conclusion: EPID with extended distance is ideal method to verify the multiple isocentric dose distribution in patient during treatment, especially cold and hot spots in junction dose. Verification of shifts as well as the dose differences between each fraction due to inter-fraction and intra-fraction of the patient can be derived

  9. SU-E-T-421: Feasibility Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Constant Dose Rate for Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. Methods: The nine-Field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry Run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs Decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. Conclusion: VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability. This work is supported by the grant project, National Natural; Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237)

  10. SU-E-T-421: Feasibility Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Constant Dose Rate for Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. Methods: The nine-Field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry Run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs Decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. Conclusion: VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability. This work is supported by the grant project, National Natural; Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237)

  11. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elith, Craig A [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Dempsey, Shane E; Warren-Forward, Helen M [School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time.

  12. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time

  13. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 43.9 ± 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 49.1 ± 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 ± 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 ± 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 7.4 ± 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 ± 0.05 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  14. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J.; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV)50Gy or PTV62.5Gy (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D98 was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D98 was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D98 was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D98 was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup errors and might be unacceptable for

  15. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  16. Evaluation the implementation of volumetric modulated arc therapy QA in the radiation therapy treatment according to various factors by using the portal dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Hyeon; Bae, Sun Myung; Seo, Dong Rin; Kang, Tae Young; Baek, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The pre-treatment QA using Portal dosimetry for Volumetric Arc Therapy To analyze whether maintaining the reproducibility depending on various factors. Test was used for TrueBeam STx{sup TM} (Ver.1.5, Varian, USA). Varian Eclipse Treatment planning system(TPS) was used for planning with total of seven patients include head and neck cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer was established for a Portal dosimetry QA plan. In order to measure these plans, Portal Dosimetry application (Ver.10) (Varian) and Portal Vision aS1000 Imager was used. Each Points of QA was determined by dividing, before and after morning treatment, and the after afternoon treatment ended (after 4 hours). Calibration of EPID(Dark field correction, Flood field correction, Dose normalization) was implemented before Every QA measure points. MLC initialize was implemented after each QA points and QA was retried. Also before QA measurements, Beam Ouput at the each of QA points was measured using the Water Phantom and Ionization chamber(IBA dosimetry, Germany). The mean values of the Gamma pass rate(GPR, 3%, 3mm) for every patients between morning, afternoon and evening was 97.3%, 96.1%, 95.4% and the patient's showing maximum difference was 95.7%, 94.2% 93.7%. The mean value of GPR before and after EPID calibration were 95.94%, 96.01%. The mean value of Beam Output were 100.45%, 100.46%, 100.59% at each QA points. The mean value of GPR before and after MLC initialization were 95.83%, 96.40%. Maintain the reproducibility of the Portal Dosimetry as a VMAT QA tool required management of the various factors that can affect the dosimetry.

  17. Use of FDG-PET to guide dose prescription heterogeneity in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancers with volumetric modulated arc therapy: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess if FDG-PET could guide dose prescription heterogeneity and decrease arbitrary location of hotspots in SBRT. For three patients with stage I lung cancer, a CT-simulation and a FDG-PET were registered to define respectively the PTVCT and the biological target volume (BTV). Two plans involving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were calculated. The first plan delivered 4 × 12 Gy within the PTVCT and the second plan, with SIB, 4 × 12 Gy and 13.8 Gy (115% of the prescribed dose) within the PTVCT and the BTV respectively. The Dmax-PTVCT had to be inferior to 60 Gy (125% of the prescribed dose). Plans were evaluated through the D95%, D99% and Dmax-PTVCT, the D2 cm, the R50% and R100% and the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the isodose 115% and BTV. DSC allows verifying the location of the 115% isodose (ideal value = 1). The mean PTVCT and BTV were 36.7 (±12.5) and 6.5 (±2.2) cm3 respectively. Both plans led to similar target coverage, same doses to the OARs and equivalent fall-off of the dose outside the PTVCT. On the other hand, the location of hotspots, evaluated through the DSC, was improved for the SIB plans with a mean DSC of 0.31 and 0.45 for the first and the second plans respectively. Use of PET to decrease arbitrary location of hotspots is feasible with VMAT and SIB for lung cancer

  18. Analysis of direct clinical consequences of MLC positional errors in volumetric-modulated arc therapy using 3D dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Mani, Ganesh K; Subramani, Vikraman; Mueller, Lutz; Palaniappan, Karrthick K; Kataria, Tejinder

    2015-01-01

    In advanced, intensity-modulated external radiotherapy facility, the multileaf collimator has a decisive role in the beam modulation by creating multiple segments or dynamically varying field shapes to deliver a uniform dose distribution to the target with maximum sparing of normal tissues. The position of each MLC leaf has become more critical for intensity-modulated delivery (step-and-shoot IMRT, dynamic IMRT, and VMAT) compared to 3D CRT, where it defines only field boundaries. We analyzed the impact of the MLC positional errors on the dose distribution for volumetric-modulated arc therapy, using a 3D dosimetry system. A total of 15 VMAT cases, five each for brain, head and neck, and prostate cases, were retrospectively selected for the study. All the plans were generated in Monaco 3.0.0v TPS (Elekta Corporation, Atlanta, GA) and delivered using Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Systematic errors of +1, +0.5, +0.3, 0, -1, -0.5, -0.3 mm were introduced in the MLC bank of the linear accelerator and the impact on the dose distribution of VMAT delivery was measured using the COMPASS 3D dosim-etry system. All the plans were created using single modulated arcs and the dose calculation was performed using a Monte Carlo algorithm in a grid size of 3 mm. The clinical endpoints D95%, D50%, D2%, and Dmax,D20%, D50% were taken for the evaluation of the target and critical organs doses, respectively. A significant dosimetric effect was found for many cases even with 0.5 mm of MLC positional errors. The average change of dose D 95% to PTV for ± 1 mm, ± 0.5 mm, and ±0.3mm was 5.15%, 2.58%, and 0.96% for brain cases; 7.19%, 3.67%, and 1.56% for head and neck cases; and 8.39%, 4.5%, and 1.86% for prostate cases, respectively. The average deviation of dose Dmax was 5.4%, 2.8%, and 0.83% for brainstem in brain cases; 8.2%, 4.4%, and 1.9% for spinal cord in H&N; and 10.8%, 6.2%, and 2.1% for rectum in prostate cases, respectively. The average changes in dose followed a linear

  19. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  20. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  1. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  2. Determination of action thresholds for electromagnetic tracking system-guided hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy may benefit from both volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to shortened treatment time and intrafraction real-time monitoring provided by implanted radiofrequency(RF) transponders. The authors investigate dosimetrically driven action thresholds (whether treatment needs to be interrupted and patient repositioned) in VMAT treatment with electromagnetic (EM) tracking. Methods: VMAT plans for five patients are generated for prescription doses of 32.5 and 42.5 Gy in five fractions. Planning target volume (PTV) encloses the clinical target volume (CTV) with a 3 mm margin at the prostate-rectal interface and 5 mm elsewhere. The VMAT delivery is modeled using 180 equi-spaced static beams. Intrafraction prostate motion is simulated in the plan by displacing the beam isocenter at each beam assuming rigid organ motion according to a previously recorded trajectory of the transponder centroid. The cumulative dose delivered in each fraction is summed over all beams. Two sets of 57 prostate motion trajectories were randomly selected to form a learning and a testing dataset. Dosimetric end points including CTV D95%, rectum wall D1cc, bladder wall D1cc, and urethra Dmax, are analyzed against motion characteristics including the maximum amplitude of the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right components. Action thresholds are triggered when intrafraction motion causes any violations of dose constraints to target and organs at risk (OAR), so that treatment is interrupted and patient is repositioned. Results: Intrafraction motion has a little effect on CTV D95%, indicating PTV margins are adequate. Tight posterior and inferior action thresholds around 1 mm need to be set in a patient specific manner to spare organs at risk, especially when the prescription dose is 42.5 Gy. Advantages of setting patient specific action thresholds are to reduce false positive alarms by 25% when prescription dose is low, and

  3. Determination of action thresholds for electromagnetic tracking system-guided hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Mah, Dennis; Happersett, Laura; Cox, Brett; Hunt, Margie; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York 10467 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy may benefit from both volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to shortened treatment time and intrafraction real-time monitoring provided by implanted radiofrequency(RF) transponders. The authors investigate dosimetrically driven action thresholds (whether treatment needs to be interrupted and patient repositioned) in VMAT treatment with electromagnetic (EM) tracking. Methods: VMAT plans for five patients are generated for prescription doses of 32.5 and 42.5 Gy in five fractions. Planning target volume (PTV) encloses the clinical target volume (CTV) with a 3 mm margin at the prostate-rectal interface and 5 mm elsewhere. The VMAT delivery is modeled using 180 equi-spaced static beams. Intrafraction prostate motion is simulated in the plan by displacing the beam isocenter at each beam assuming rigid organ motion according to a previously recorded trajectory of the transponder centroid. The cumulative dose delivered in each fraction is summed over all beams. Two sets of 57 prostate motion trajectories were randomly selected to form a learning and a testing dataset. Dosimetric end points including CTV D95%, rectum wall D1cc, bladder wall D1cc, and urethra Dmax, are analyzed against motion characteristics including the maximum amplitude of the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right components. Action thresholds are triggered when intrafraction motion causes any violations of dose constraints to target and organs at risk (OAR), so that treatment is interrupted and patient is repositioned. Results: Intrafraction motion has a little effect on CTV D95%, indicating PTV margins are adequate. Tight posterior and inferior action thresholds around 1 mm need to be set in a patient specific manner to spare organs at risk, especially when the prescription dose is 42.5 Gy. Advantages of setting patient specific action thresholds are to reduce false positive alarms by 25% when prescription dose is low, and

  4. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiosurgery in oligometastatic breast and gynecological cancers: feasibility and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Torre, Gabriella; Corrado, Giacomo; Legge, Francesco; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Tagliaferri, Luca; Mignogna, Samantha; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the preliminary results of the first stereotactic body radiosurgery (SRS) experience with volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in oligometastatic breast and recurrent gynecological tumors (OBRGT) are reported in terms of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. Patients were treated in a head-first supine treatment position on a customized body frame immobilization shell. SRS-VMAT treatment plans were optimized using the ERGO++ treatment planning system. Response assessment was performed 8-12 weeks after treatment by morphologic imaging modalities, or if feasible, also by functional imaging. Thirty-six lesions in 24 consecutive patients (median age, 63 years; range, 40-81) were treated: 13.9% had primary or metastatic lung lesions, 30.5% had liver metastases, 36.1% had bone lesions, 16.7% had lymph node metastases and 2.8% had a primary vulvar melanoma. The median dose was 18 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=50.4 Gy), the minimal dose was 12 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=26.4 Gy) and the maximal dose was 28 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=106.4 Gy). Seven patients (29.2%) experienced acute toxicity, which however was grade 2 in only 1 case. Moreover, only 3 patients (12.5%) developed late toxicity of which only 1 was grade 2. Objective response rate was 77.7% including 16 lesions achieving complete response (44.4%) and 12 lesions achieving partial response (33.3%). The median duration of follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 6-50). Recurrence/progression within the SRS-VMAT treated field was observed in 6 patients (total lesions=7) with a 2-year inside SRS-VMAT field disease control expressed on a per lesion basis of 69%. Recurrence/progression of disease outside the SRS-VMAT field was documented in 15 patients; the 2-year outside SRS-VMAT field metastasis‑free survival, expressed on a per patient basis, was 35%. Death due to disease was documented in 6 patients and the 2-year overall survival was 58%. Although the maximum tolerated dose was

  5. Comparative dosimetric and radiobiological contributions of intensity-modulated tomo-therapy, RapidArc and conventional radiotherapy of cancers of the ORL sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the comparison of three different intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques for a homogeneous group of patients presenting cervico-facial tumours. The comparison is based on dosimetric, physical and radiological criteria. tomo-therapy seems better than both others in terms of dose coverage and homogeneity in the planning target volumes (PTV) while ensuring a good protection of organs at risk. RapidArc seems to be a good alternative because it ensures a better protection of the contralateral parotid with respect to the conventional IMRT. Short communication

  6. Texture analysis on the fluence map to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Texture analysis on fluence maps was performed to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: A total of six textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation, and entropy were calculated for fluence maps generated from 20 prostate and 20 head and neck VMAT plans. For each of the textural features, particular displacement distances (d) of 1, 5, and 10 were adopted. To investigate the deliverability of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates of pretreatment quality assurance, and differences in modulating parameters such as multileaf collimator (MLC) positions, gantry angles, and monitor units at each control point between VMAT plans and dynamic log files registered by the Linac control system during delivery were acquired. Furthermore, differences between the original VMAT plan and the plan reconstructed from the dynamic log files were also investigated. To test the performance of the textural features as indicators for the modulation degree of VMAT plans, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (rs) with the plan deliverability were calculated. For comparison purposes, conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT, leaf travel modulation complexity score, and modulation index supporting station parameter optimized radiation therapy (MISPORT) were calculated, and their correlations were analyzed in the same way. Results: There was no particular textural feature which always showed superior correlations with every type of plan deliverability. Considering the results comprehensively, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) generally showed considerable correlations with every type of plan deliverability. These textural features always showed higher correlations to the plan deliverability than did the conventional modulation indices, except in the case of modulating parameter differences. The rs values of

  7. Texture analysis on the fluence map to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So-Yeon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744, (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of); Carlson, Joel [Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Texture analysis on fluence maps was performed to evaluate the degree of modulation for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: A total of six textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation, and entropy were calculated for fluence maps generated from 20 prostate and 20 head and neck VMAT plans. For each of the textural features, particular displacement distances (d) of 1, 5, and 10 were adopted. To investigate the deliverability of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates of pretreatment quality assurance, and differences in modulating parameters such as multileaf collimator (MLC) positions, gantry angles, and monitor units at each control point between VMAT plans and dynamic log files registered by the Linac control system during delivery were acquired. Furthermore, differences between the original VMAT plan and the plan reconstructed from the dynamic log files were also investigated. To test the performance of the textural features as indicators for the modulation degree of VMAT plans, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r{sub s}) with the plan deliverability were calculated. For comparison purposes, conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT, leaf travel modulation complexity score, and modulation index supporting station parameter optimized radiation therapy (MI{sub SPORT}) were calculated, and their correlations were analyzed in the same way. Results: There was no particular textural feature which always showed superior correlations with every type of plan deliverability. Considering the results comprehensively, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) generally showed considerable correlations with every type of plan deliverability. These textural features always showed higher correlations to the plan deliverability than did the conventional modulation indices, except in the case of modulating parameter differences. The r

  8. Characterization of a novel 2D array dosimeter for patient-specific quality assurance with volumetric arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this study, the authors are evaluating a new, commercially available 2D array that offers 3D dose reconstruction for patient specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA).Methods: The OCTAVIUS 4D system and its accompanying software (VERISOFT) by PTW were evaluated for the accuracy of the dose reconstruction for patient specific pretreatment IMRT QA. OCTAVIUS 4D measures the dose plane at the linac isocenter as the phantom rotates synchronously with the gantry, maintaining perpendicularity with the beam, by means of an inclinometer and a motor. The measurements collected during a volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery (VMAT) are reconstructed into a 3D dose volume. The VERISOFT application is used to perform the analysis, by comparing the reconstructed dose against the 3D dose matrix from the treatment planning system (TPS) that is computed for the same geometry and beam arrangement as that of the measurement. In this study, the authors evaluated the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm of this new system using a series of tests. Using the Octavius 4D phantom as the patient, dose distributions for various field sizes, beam orientations, shapes, and combination of fields were calculated using the Pinnacle3, TPS, and the respective DICOMRT dose was exported to the VERISOFT analysis software. Measurements were obtained by delivering the test treatment plans and comparisons were made based on gamma index, dose profiles, and isodose distribution analysis. In addition, output factors were measured and the dose linearity of the array was assessed. Those measurements were compared against measurements in water using a single, calibrated ionization chamber as well as calculations from Pinnacle for the same delivery geometries.Results: The number of voxels that met the 3%/3 mm criteria for the volumetric 3D gamma index analysis ranged from 92.3% to 98.9% for all the patient plans that the authors evaluated. 2D gamma analysis in the

  9. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between RapidArc and fixed gantry angle dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (dIMRT) in developing the pre-operative radiotherapy for rectal cancer patients. Methods: Two techniques, RapidArc and dIMRT, were used respectively to develop the synchronous intensity modulated plans for 10 stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ rectal cancer patients at the dose of gross tumor volume (GTV) of 50.6 Gy divided into 22 fractions and planning target volume (PTV) of 41.8 Gy divided into 22 fractions. Both plans satisfied the condition of 95% of PTV covered by 41.8 Gy. The dose-volume histogram data, isodose distribution, monitor units, and treatment time were compared. Results: The two kinds of dose volume histogram (DVH) developed by these two techniques were almost the same. The conformal indexes of GTV and PTV by RapidArc were better than those by dIMRT (t=7.643, 8.226, P<0.05), while the homogeneity of target volume by dIMRT was better (t=-10.065, -4.235, P<0.05). The dose of rectum and small bowel planned by RapidArc was significantly lower than that by dIMRT (t=2.781, P<0.05). There were no significant differences in the mean doses of bladder and femoral head between these two techniques. The mean monitor units of RapidArc was 475.5, fewer by 48.5% in comparison with that by the dIMRT (924.6). The treatment mean time by RapidArc was 1.2 min, shorter by 79.5% in comparison with that by dIMRT (5.58 min). Conclusions: There is no significant dosimetric difference between the two plans of RapidArc and dIMRT. Compared with dIMRT, RapidArc achieves equal target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing while using fewer monitor units and less time during radiotherapy for patient with rectal cancer. (authors)

  10. Renal replacement therapy in Europe: a summary of the 2011 ERA–EDTA Registry Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M.; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón; Arcos Fuster, Emma; Bikbov, Boris T.; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; Čala, Svetlana; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs; Collart, Frederic; Díaz Tejeiro, Rafael; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Ferrer-Alamar, Manuel; Finne, Patrik; García Bazaga, María de los Angelos; Garneata, Liliana; Golan, Eliezer; Gonzalez Fernández, Raquel; Heaf, James G.; Hoitsma, Andries; Ioannidis, George A.; Kolesnyk, Mykola; Kramar, Reinhard; Lasalle, Mathilde; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Lopot, Frantisek; van de Luijtgaarden, Moniek W.M.; Macário, Fernando; Magaz, Ángela; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; de Meester, Johan; Metcalfe, Wendy; Ots-Rosenberg, Mai; Palsson, Runolfur; Piñera, Celestino; Pippias, Maria; Prütz, Karl G.; Ratkovic, Marina; Resić, Halima; Rodríguez Hernández, Aurelio; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Spustová, Viera; Stel, Vianda S.; Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.

    2014-01-01

    Background This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA–EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). Methods Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea were used. From 27 registries, individual patient data were received, whereas 17 registries contributed data in aggregated form. We present the incidence and prevalence of RRT, and renal transplant rates in 2011. In addition, survival probabilities and expected remaining lifetimes were calculated for those registries providing individual patient data. Results The overall unadjusted incidence rate of RRT in 2011 among all registries reporting to the ERA–EDTA Registry was 117 per million population (pmp) (n = 71.631). Incidence rates varied from 24 pmp in Ukraine to 238 pmp in Turkey. The overall unadjusted prevalence of RRT for ESRD on 31 December 2011 was 692 pmp (n = 425 824). The highest prevalence was reported by Portugal (1662 pmp) and the lowest by Ukraine (131 pmp). Among all registries, a total of 22 814 renal transplantations were performed (37 pmp). The highest overall transplant rate was reported from Spain, Cantabria (81 pmp), whereas the highest rate of living donor transplants was reported from Turkey (39 pmp). For patients who started RRT between 2002 and 2006, the unadjusted 5-year patient survival on RRT was 46.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46.6–47.0], and on dialysis 39.3% (95% CI 39.2–39.4). The unadjusted 5-year patient survival after the first renal transplantation performed between 2002 and 2006 was 86.7% (95% CI 86.2–87.2) for kidneys from deceased donors and 94.3% (95% CI 93.6–95.0) for kidneys from living donors. PMID:25852881

  11. New directions in cellular therapy of cancer: a summary of the summit on cellular therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A summit on cellular therapy for cancer discussed and presented advances related to the use of adoptive cellular therapy for melanoma and other cancers. The summit revealed that this field is advancing rapidly. Conventional cellular therapies, such as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, are becoming more effective and more available. Gene therapy is becoming an important tool in adoptive cell therapy. Lymphocytes are being engineered to express high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs, chimeric antibody-T cell receptors (CARs and cytokines. T cell subsets with more naïve and stem cell-like characteristics have been shown in pre-clinical models to be more effective than unselected populations and it is now possible to reprogram T cells and to produce T cells with stem cell characteristics. In the future, combinations of adoptive transfer of T cells and specific vaccination against the cognate antigen can be envisaged to further enhance the effectiveness of these therapies.

  12. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  13. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bree, Ingrid de, E-mail: i.de.bree@zrti.nl [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands); Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  14. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  15. Three-dimensional versus four-dimensional dose calculation for volumetric modulated arc therapy of hypofractionated treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a non-negligible source of uncertainty in radiotherapy. A common approach is to delineate the target volume in all respiratory phases (ITV) and to calculate a treatment plan using the average reconstruction of the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. In this study the extent of the interplay effect caused by interaction between dynamic dose delivery and respiratory tumor motion, as well as other motion effects were investigated. These effects are often ignored when the ITV concept is used. Methods and Materials: Nine previously treated patients with in ten abdominal or thoracic cancer lesions (3 liver, 3 adrenal glands and 4 lung lesions) were selected for this planning study. For all patients, phase-sorted respiration-correlated 4DCT scans were taken, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments were planned using the ITV concept. Margins from ITV to planning target volume (PTV) of 3-10 mm were used. Plans were optimized and dose distributions were calculated on the average reconstruction of the 4DCT. 4D dose distributions were calculated to evaluate motion effects, caused by the interference of dynamic treatment delivery with respiratory tumor motion and inhomogeneously planned target dose. These calculations were performed on the phase-sorted CT series with a respiration-correlated assignment of the treatment plan's monitor units (MU) to the respiration phases of the 4DCT. The 4D dose was accumulated with rigid as well as deformable registrations of the CT series and compared to the original 3D dose distribution. Maximum, minimum and mean doses to ITV and PTV, and maximum or mean doses to organs at risk (OAR), were compared after rigid accumulation. The dose variation in the gross tumor volume (GTV) was compared after deformable registration. Results: Using rigid registrations, variations in the investigated dose parameters between 3D and 4D dose calculations were found to be within -2.1% to 1.4% for

  16. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, Juan Diego [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Physics, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra 31008 (Spain); Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  17. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  18. Three-dimensional versus four-dimensional dose calculation for volumetric modulated arc therapy of hypofractionated treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrbar, Stefanie; Lang, Stephanie; Stieb, Sonja; Riesterer, Oliver; Stark, Luisa Sabrina; Guckenberger, Matthias; Kloeck, Stephan [University Hospital Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a non-negligible source of uncertainty in radiotherapy. A common approach is to delineate the target volume in all respiratory phases (ITV) and to calculate a treatment plan using the average reconstruction of the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. In this study the extent of the interplay effect caused by interaction between dynamic dose delivery and respiratory tumor motion, as well as other motion effects were investigated. These effects are often ignored when the ITV concept is used. Methods and Materials: Nine previously treated patients with in ten abdominal or thoracic cancer lesions (3 liver, 3 adrenal glands and 4 lung lesions) were selected for this planning study. For all patients, phase-sorted respiration-correlated 4DCT scans were taken, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments were planned using the ITV concept. Margins from ITV to planning target volume (PTV) of 3-10 mm were used. Plans were optimized and dose distributions were calculated on the average reconstruction of the 4DCT. 4D dose distributions were calculated to evaluate motion effects, caused by the interference of dynamic treatment delivery with respiratory tumor motion and inhomogeneously planned target dose. These calculations were performed on the phase-sorted CT series with a respiration-correlated assignment of the treatment plan's monitor units (MU) to the respiration phases of the 4DCT. The 4D dose was accumulated with rigid as well as deformable registrations of the CT series and compared to the original 3D dose distribution. Maximum, minimum and mean doses to ITV and PTV, and maximum or mean doses to organs at risk (OAR), were compared after rigid accumulation. The dose variation in the gross tumor volume (GTV) was compared after deformable registration. Results: Using rigid registrations, variations in the investigated dose parameters between 3D and 4D dose calculations were found to be within -2.1% to 1.4% for

  19. Large planning target volume in whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers - a comparison between volumetric arc and fixed beam based intensity modulation in ovarian cancers: a comparison between volumetric arc and fixed beam based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this study is to assess dosimetric characteristics of multiple iso-centre volumetric-modulated arc therapy for the treatment of a large PTV in whole abdomen and ovarian cancers and in comparison with IMRT. Two patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) underwent CT-simulation in supine position with vacuum cushion and acquired CT-image with 3 mm slice thickness. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated with multiple isocenter using Eclipse Planning System (V10.0.39) for (6 MV photon) Varian UNIQUE Performance Linac equipped with a Millennium-120 MLC and optimised with Progressive Resolution optimizer (PRO3) for prescription 36 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTVWAR) and 45 Gy with daily fraction of 1.8 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTVPelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost and calculated with AAA algorithm in 2.5 mm grid resolution. Mean, V95%, V90%, V107% and uniformity number (Uniformity was defined as US-95%=D5%-D95%/Dmean) was calculated for Planning Target Volumes (PTVs). Organs at Risk (OAR's) were analysed statistically in terms of dose and volume. MU and delivery time were compared. Pre-treatment quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAl) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds with EPID as well as corresponding Dynalog files were generated and analysed. Feasibility and deliverability of VMAT plans showed to be a solution for the treatment planning and delivery for a large PTV volume (PTV-WAR) treatments, surrounded by critical structures such as liver, spinal canal, and kidneys, offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT. VMAT combines the advantages of faster delivery and lower number of monitor units (MU). It would help to reduce potential risk of secondary malignancy. VMAT(RapidArc) showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  20. Dosimetric difference amongst 3 techniques: TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Francis Kar-ho, E-mail: leekarhof@hotmail.com; Yip, Celia Wai-yi; Cheung, Frankie Chun-hung; Leung, Alex Kwok-cheung; Chau, Ricky Ming-chun; Ngan, Roger Kai-cheong

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achieved similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases.

  1. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  2. SU-E-T-389: Effect of Interfractional Shoulder Motion On Low Neck Nodal Targets for Patients Treated Using Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, K; Wong, P; Tung, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs. A second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient's treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the low neck contours. Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan) and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan) for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3. Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT.

  3. Simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for bilateral breast: a treatment planning and dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc and fixed field intensity modulated therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanetti Eugenio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed comparing dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT on patients with bilateral breast carcinoma. Materials and methods Plans for IMRT and RA, were optimised for 10 patients prescribing 50 Gy to the breast (PTVII, 2.0 Gy/fraction and 60 Gy to the tumour bed (PTVI, 2.4 Gy/fraction. Objectives were: for PTVs V90%>95%, Dmax20 Gy Results For PTVII minus PTVI, V90% was 97.8 ± 3.4% for RA and 94.0 ± 3.5% for IMRT (findings are reported as mean ± 1 standard deviation; D5%-D95% (homogeneity was 7.3 ± 1.4 Gy (RA and 11.0 ± 1.1 Gy (IMRT. Conformity index (V95%/VPTVII was 1.10 ± 0.06 (RA and 1.14 ± 0.09 (IMRT. MLD was 20 Gy was 9.7 ± 1.3% (RA and 12.8 ± 2.5% (IMRT on left lung, similar for right lung. Mean dose to heart was 6.0 ± 2.7 Gy (RA and 7.4 ± 2.5 Gy (IMRT. MU resulted in 796 ± 121 (RA and 1398 ± 301 (IMRT; the average measured treatment time was 3.0 ± 0.1 minutes (RA and 11.5 ± 2.0 (IMRT. From pre-treatment dosimetry, % of field area with γ Conclusion RapidArc showed dosimetric improvements with respect to IMRT, delivery parameters confirmed its logistical advantages, pre-treatment dosimetry proved its reliability.

  4. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF) beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc). We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments). Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes

  5. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alongi Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments. Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  6. A Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Frontal and Temporal High-Grade Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the predecessor to Varian's RapidArc, is a novel extension of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) wherein the dose is delivered in a single gantry rotation while the multileaf collimator leaves are in motion. Leaf positions and the weights of field samples along the arc are directly optimized, and a variable dose rate is used. This planning study compared seven-field coplanar IMRT (cIMRT) with VMAT for high-grade gliomas that had planning target volumes (PTVs) overlapping organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: 10 previously treated patients were replanned to 60 Gy in 30 fractions with cIMRT and VMAT using the following planning objectives: 98% of PTV covered by 95% isodose without violating OAR and hotspot dose constraints. Mean OAR doses were maximally decreased without reducing PTV coverage or violating hotspot constraints. We compared dose-volume histogram data, monitor units, and treatment times. Results: There was equivalent PTV coverage, homogeneity, and conformality. VMAT significantly reduced maximum and mean retinal, lens, and contralateral optic nerve doses compared with IMRT (p < 0.05). Brainstem, chiasm, and ipsilateral optic nerve doses were similar. For 2-Gy fractions, mean monitor units were as follows: cIMRT = 789 ± 112 and VMAT = 363 ± 45 (relative reduction 54%, p = 0.002), and mean treatment times (min) were as follows: cIMRT = 5.1 ± 0.4 and VMAT = 1.8 ± 0.1 (relative reduction 65%, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Compared with cIMRT, VMAT achieved equal or better PTV coverage and OAR sparing while using fewer monitor units and less time to treat high-grade gliomas.

  7. SU-E-T-389: Effect of Interfractional Shoulder Motion On Low Neck Nodal Targets for Patients Treated Using Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs. A second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient's treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the low neck contours. Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan) and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan) for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3. Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT

  8. Comparison among therapy planning in volumetric modulated arc for prostate treatments using one or two arches; Comparacao entre planejamentos de terapia em arco volumetrico modulado para tratamentos de prostata utilizando um ou dois arcos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Diego C.S.A.; Pavan, Guilherme A.; Nardi, Stela P.; Fairbanks, Leandro R.; Anderson, Ernani; Junior, Juraci P.R.; Junior, Helio A.S., E-mail: diegocunhalves@hotmail.com [Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas/Grupo COI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    The study aims to evaluate and compare retrospective planning for prostate cancer using the volumetric modulated arc therapy technique (RapidArc™ - Varian) with one or two arcs. Ten cases of patients with prostate cancer present were replanning with the volume of PTV's between 296.4 cm{sup 3} and 149.6 cm{sup 3} with prescribed dose of 78 Gy. A planning default was created for each case seeking the best result of the distribution dose in the PTV and to minimize the dose to organs at risk, and from this, creates two copies for optimization of one and two arcs. Comparisons of maximum and minimum dose, index of conformity, homogeneity and gradient dose were evaluated in the PTV, the time of the radiation beam and the number of monitor units. The organ at risk were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG 0415 and compared in both optimizations. In terms of dosimetric values to organs at risk and PTV were similar, but there was an increase in the number of monitors units and the time of the radiation beam when using the technique with two arcs. Finally the results have showed that use a volumetric modulated arc therapy optimization for prostate cancer it is reaches similar dosimetric goals can be an effective option for radiotherapy department of developing countries with large number of patients. (author)

  9. 容积旋转调强放射治疗技术行全骨髓照射的可行性研究%The feasibility study on total marrow irradiation with rapid arc volumetric arc therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解传滨; 徐寿平; 俞伟; 曲宝林; 鞠忠建; 葛瑞刚; 巩汉顺; 徐伟; 丛小虎

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasible and dosimetry characteristics of a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods: VMAT planning was performed for 8 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95%planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose(12 Gy/10 F). The treatments were delivered and verified using ArcCHECK measurements. The plans were evaluated using isodose plots, dose volume histograms, dose homogeneity indexes, total MU and treatment times. Results:The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided preferable dose distributions, The average mean dose and maximum dose for PTV were 12.85 Gy and 14.85 Gy, The average D1 and D99 were 11.25 Gy and 13.77 Gy. The mean dose for organs were less than 6 Gy beside the head and neck organs such as brian,eye,oral cavity and paritid. The machine MU and treatment delivery time were 2608 MU and 16.5 minutes. the γ-analysis pass rate for head-neck, chest-abdomen, pelvic were 98.9%±1.9%,98.4%±1.8%,97.4%±2.1% for all RapidArc plans. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning and achieved seamlessly between the beams, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.%目的:探讨RapidArc容积旋转调强放射治疗技术(VMAT)行全骨髓照射(TMI)的可行性及其剂量学特点。方法:选取8例已行全身扫描的患者,照射靶区包括除前臂和手以外的全身骨髓,采用Eclipse 10.0计划系统自动勾画模块进行靶区勾画并外放3 mm生成PTV,处方剂量为12 Gy/10 F,采用单弧多中心衔接的方法设

  10. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT and modulated arc-therapy techniques in the treatment of cervical cancers; Comparaison dosimetrique des techniques de RCMI et d'arctherapie modulee dans le traitement des cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard-Oldrini, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Huger, S.; Marchesi, V.; Bouziz, D.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the dosimetric comparison of two techniques used for the treatment of cervical cancers: the intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) with static beams and modulated arc-therapy with RapidArc. The treatment plans of 15 patients have been compared. The clinical target volume (CTV) comprises the gross target volume, the cervix, the upper third of the vagina, and ganglionary areas. The previsional target volume comprises the clinical target volume and a one centimetre margin. Organs at risk are rectum, bladder, intestine and bone marrow. Arc-therapy seems to provide a better sparing of intestine that IMRT, while maintaining a good coverage of the previsional target volume and decreasing treatment duration. Short communication

  11. Evaluation of 3D pre-treatment verification for volumetric modulated arc therapy plan in head region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangchan, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Suriyapee, S.

    2016-03-01

    The development of pre-treatment QA tools contributes to the three dimension (3D) dose verification using the calculation software with the measured planar dose distribution. This research is aimed to evaluate the Sun Nuclear 3DVH software with Thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD) measurement. The two VMAT patient plans (2.5 arcs) of 6 MV photons with different PTV locations were transferred to the Rando phantom images. The PTV of the first plan located in homogeneous area and vice versa in the second plan. For treatment planning process, the Rando phantom images were employed in optimization and calculation with the PTV, brain stem, lens and TLD position contouring. The verification plans were created, transferred to the ArcCHECK for measurement and calculated the 3D dose using 3DVH software. The range of the percent dose differences in both PTV and organ at risk (OAR) between TLD and 3DVH software of the first and the second plans were -2.09 to 3.87% and -1.39 to 6.88%, respectively. The mean percent dose differences for the PTV were 1.62% and 3.93% for the first and the second plans, respectively. In conclusion, the 3DVH software results show good agreement with TLD when the tumor located in the homogeneous area.

  12. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  13. Accelerating total body irradiation with large field modulated arc therapy in standard treatment rooms without additional equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polednik, Martin; Lohr, Frank; Ehmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a generic and ultra-efficient modulated arc technique for treatment with total body irradiation (TBI) without additional equipment in standard treatment rooms. A continuous gantry arc between 300 and 70 composed of 26 subarcs (5 per subarc) using a field size of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} was used to perform the initial beam data measurements. The profile was measured parallel to the direction of gantry rotation at a constant depth of 9 cm (phantom thickness 18 cm). Beam data were measured for single 5 subarcs, dissecting the individual contribution of each subarc to a certain measurement point. The phantom was moved to 20 measurement positions along the profile. Then profile optimization was performed manually by varying the weighting factors of all segments until calculated doses at all points were within ± 1 %. Finally, the dose distribution of the modulated arc was verified in phantom thicknesses of 18 and 28 cm. The measured profile showed a relative mean dose of 99.7 % [standard deviation (SD) 0.7 %] over the length of 200 cm at a depth of 9 cm. The measured mean effective surface dose (at a depth of 2 cm) was 102.7 % (SD 2.1 %). The measurements in the 28 cm slab phantom revealed a mean dose of 95.9 % (SD 2.9 %) at a depth of 14 cm. The mean dose at a depth of 2 cm was 111.9 % (SD 4.1 %). Net beam-on-time for a 2 Gy fraction is approximately 8 min. This highly efficient modulated arc technique for TBI can replace conventional treatment techniques, providing a homogeneous dose distribution, dosimetric robustness, extremely fast delivery, and applicability in small treatment rooms, with no need for additional equipment. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieses Projekts war die Entwicklung einer generischen, hocheffizienten und modulierten Rotationsbestrahlungstechnik fuer Ganzkoerperbestrahlung (TBI, ''total body irradiation''), die ohne zusaetzliches Equipment in Standartbehandlungsraeumen angewendet werden kann. Ein

  14. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A [BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Island Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  15. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT

  16. Comparison of dose calculations between pencil-beam and Monte Carlo algorithms of the iPlan RT in arc therapy using a homogenous phantom with 3DVH software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To create an arc therapy plan, certain current general calculation algorithms such as pencil-beam calculation (PBC) are based on discretizing the continuous arc into multiple fields to simulate an arc. The iPlan RT™ treatment planning system incorporates not only a PBC algorithm, but also a more recent Monte Carlo calculation (MCC) algorithm that does not need beam discretization. The objective of this study is to evaluate the dose differences in a homogenous phantom between PBC and MCC by using a three-dimensional (3D) diode array detector (ArcCHECK™) and 3DVH software. A cylindrically shaped ‘target’ region of interest (ROI) and a ‘periphery ROI’ surrounding the target were designed. An arc therapy plan was created to deliver 600 cGy to the target within a 350° rotation angle, calculated using the PBC and MCC algorithms. The radiation doses were measured by the ArcCHECK, and reproduced by the 3DVH software. Through this process, we could compare the accuracy of both algorithms with regard to the 3D gamma passing rate (for the entire area and for each ROI). Comparing the PBC and MCC planned dose distributions directly, the 3D gamma passing rates for the entire area were 97.7% with the gamma 3%/3 mm criterion. Comparing the planned dose to the measured dose, the 3D gamma passing rates were 98.8% under the PBC algorithm and 100% under the MCC algorithm. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.034). Furthermore the gamma passing rate decreases 7.5% in the PBC when using the 2%/2 mm criterion compared to only a 0.4% decrease under the MCC. Each ROI as well as the entire area showed statistically significant higher gamma passing rates under the MCC algorithm. The failure points that did not satisfy the gamma criteria showed a regular pattern repeated every 10°. MCC showed better accuracy than the PBC of the iPlan RT in calculating the dose distribution in arc therapy, which was validated with the ArcCHECK and the 3DVH software. This may

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Volume-Modulated Arc Therapy in 205 Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: An Analysis of Survival and Treatment Toxicities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Guo

    Full Text Available To investigate the clinical efficacy and treatment toxicity of volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC.205 VMAT-treated NPC patients from our cancer center were prospectively entrolled. All patients received 68-70 Gy irradiation based on the planning target volume of the primary gross tumor volume. Acute and late toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria.The median follow-up period was 37.3 months (range, 6.3-45.1 months. The 3-year estimated local failure-free survival, regional failure-free survival, locoregional failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival were 95.5%, 97.0%, 94.0%, 92.1%, 86.8% and 97.0%, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed primary gross tumor volume, N stage and EBV-DNA to be independent predictors of VMAT outcomes (P < 0.05. The most common acute and late side effects were grade 2-3 mucositis (78% and xerostomia (83%, 61%, 34%, and 9% at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after VMAT, respectively.VMAT for the primary treatment of NPC achieved very high locoregional control with a favorable toxicity profile. The time-saving benefit of VMAT will enable more patients to receive precision radiotherapy.

  18. Potential for Improved Intelligence Quotient Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared With Conventional 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation for Whole-Ventricular Radiation in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Method and Materials: Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. Conclusion: For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children.

  19. SU-E-T-105: Development of 3D Dose Verification System for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Using Improved Polyacrylamide-Based Gel Dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this dosimetric study was to develop 3D dose verification system for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using polyacrylamide-based gel (PAGAT) dosimeter improved the sensitivity by magnesium chloride (MgCl2). Methods: PAGAT gel containing MgCl2 as a sensitizer was prepared in this study. Methacrylic-acid-based gel (MAGAT) was also prepared to compare the dosimetric characteristics with PAGAT gel. The cylindrical glass vials (4 cm diameter, 12 cm length) filled with each polymer gel were irradiated with 6 MV photon beam using Novalis Tx linear accelerator (Varian/BrainLAB). The irradiated polymer gel dosimeters were scanned with Signa 1.5 T MRI system (GE), and dose calibration curves were obtained using T2 relaxation rate (R2 = 1/T2). Dose rate (100-600 MU min−1) and fractionation (1-8 fractions) were varied. In addition, a cubic acrylic phantom (10 × 10 × 10 cm3) filled with improved PAGAT gel inserted into the IMRT phantom (IBA) was irradiated with VMAT (RapidArc). C-shape structure was used for the VMAT planning by the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). The dose comparison of TPS and measurements with the polymer gel dosimeter was accomplished by the gamma index analysis, overlaying the dose profiles for a set of data on selected planes using in-house developed software. Results: Dose rate and fractionation dependence of improved PAGAT gel were smaller than MAGAT gel. A high similarity was found by overlaying the dose profiles measured with improved PAGAT gel dosimeter and the TPS dose, and the mean pass rate of the gamma index analysis using 3%/3 mm criteria was achieved 90% on orthogonal planes for VMAT using improved PAGAT gel dosimeter. Conclusion: In-house developed 3D dose verification system using improved polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeter had a potential as an effective tool for VMAT QA

  20. Volumetric Arc Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Primary Prostate Radiotherapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion With 6 and 18 MV: A Planning Comparison Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), in the treatment of prostate cancer with maximal dose escalation to the intraprostatic lesion (IPL), without violating the organ-at-risk constraints. Additionally, the use of 6-MV photons was compared with 18-MV photons for all techniques. Methods and Materials: A total of 12 consecutive prostate cancer patients with an IPL on magnetic resonance imaging were selected for the present study. Plans were made for three IMRT field setups (three, five, and seven fields) and one VMAT field setup (single arc). First, optimal plans were created for every technique using biologic and physical planning aims. Next, an additional escalation to the IPL was planned as high as possible without violating the planning aims of the first step. Results: No interaction between the technique and photon energy (p = .928) occurred. No differences were found between the 6- and 18-MV photon beams, except for a reduction in the number of monitor units needed for 18 MV (p < .05). All techniques, except for three-field IMRT, allowed for dose escalation to a median dose of ≥93 ± 6 Gy (mean ± standard deviation) to the IPL. VMAT was superior to IMRT for rectal volumes receiving 20-50 Gy (p < .05). Conclusion: VMAT allowed for dose escalation to the IPL with better sparing of the rectum than static three-, five-, and seven-field IMRT setups. High-energy photons had no advantage over low-energy photons.

  1. A dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare dosimetric parameters of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with regard to the coverage of planning target volume (PTV) and the sparing of organs at risk (OAR). Ten patients with nasal cavity or paranasal sinus cancer were re-planned by VMAT (two-arc) plan and non-coplanar IMRT (7-, 11-, and 15-beam) plans. Planning objectives were to deliver 60 Gy in 30 fractions to 95% of PTV, with maximum doses (Dmax) of <50 Gy to the optic nerves, optic chiasm, and brainstem, <40 Gy to the eyes and <10 Gy to the lenses. The target mean dose (Dmean) to the parotid glands was <25 Gy, and no constraints were applied to the lacrimal glands. Planning was optimized to minimized doses to OAR without compromising coverage of the PTV. VMAT and three non-coplanar IMRT (7-, 11-, and 15-beam) plans were compared using the heterogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) of the PTV, Dmax and Dmean of the OAR, treatment delivery time, and monitor units (MUs). The HI and CI of VMAT plan were superior to those of the 7-, 11-, and 15-beam non-coplanar IMRT. VMAT and non-coplanar IMRT (7-, 11-, and 15-beam) showed equivalent sparing effects for the optic nerves, optic chiasm, brainstem, and parotid glands. For the eyes and lenses, VMAT achieved equivalent or better sparing effects when compared with the non-coplanar IMRT plans. VMAT showed lower MUs and reduced treatment delivery time when compared with non-coplanar IMRT. In 10 patients with nasal cavity or paranasal sinus cancer, a VMAT plan provided better homogeneity and conformity for PTV than non-coplanar IMRT plans, with a shorter treatment delivery time, while achieving equal or better OAR-sparing effects and using fewer MUs

  2. Dosimetric Impact of Breathing Motion in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Using Image-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Min, E-mail: min.mrao@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Wu Jianzhou; Cao Daliang; Wong, Tony; Mehta, Vivek; Shepard, David; Ye Jinsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor motion on dose delivery in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer, using fixed field intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: For each of 10 patients with stage I/II non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was carried out. The internal target volume was delineated on the maximum intensity projection CT, which was reconstructed from the 4DCT dataset. A 5-mm margin was used for generation of the planning target volume. VMAT and five-field IMRT plans were generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} SmartArc and direct machine parameter optimization, respectively. All plans were generated for an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator using 6-MV photons. Simulation was performed to study the interplay between multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences and target movement during the delivery of VMAT and IMRT. For each plan, 4D dose was calculated using deformable image registration of the 4DCT images. Target volume coverage and doses to critical structures calculated using 4D methodology were compared with those calculated using 3D methodology. Results: For all patients included in this study, the interplay effect was found to present limited impact (less than 1% of prescription) on the target dose distribution, especially for SBRT, in which fewer fractions (three fractions) are delivered. Dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was, on average, slightly decreased (1% of prescription) in the 4D calculation compared with the 3D calculation. The motion impact on target dose homogeneity was patient-dependent and relatively small. Conclusions: Both VMAT and IMRT plans experienced negligible interplay effects between MLC sequence and tumor motion. For the most part, the 3D doses to the GTV and critical structures provided good approximations of the 4D dose calculations.

  3. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3–4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist’s PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm3 to 137 ± 83 cm3 after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. The contouring inter-observer variability has dosimetric effects in the PTV coverage

  4. SU-E-T-269: Quality Assurance of Spine Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Flattening Filter Free Beams Using Gafchromic EBT3 Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We implemented the Gafchromic film-based patient specific QA of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening-filter free (FFF) beams for spine metastases and validated the accuracy of fast arc delivery. Methods: EBT3 films and a homemade cylindrical QA phantom were employed for dosimetric verification of VMATs. For 14 FFF VMAT plans (10 with 10-MV FFF beams and 4 with 6-MV FFF beams), the doses were recalculated on the phantom and delivered by a TrueBeam STx accelerator equipped with a high-definition 120 leaf MLC. The EBT3 films were scanned using an Epson 10000XL scanner through the FilmQA Pro software. All the irradiated film images were converted to dose map using a calibration response curve. The resulting dose map of film measurement was compared with treatment plan and evaluated using gamma analysis with dose tolerance of 2% within 2 mm. In addition, the point-dose measurement in the phantom using an ion chamber was evaluated as a reference in a ratio of measured and planned doses. Results: The gamma pass rates averaged over all FFF plans for composite-field measurements were 96.0 ± 3.6% (88.9%–99.5%). When adopting a tolerance level of 3% - 3 mm, the gamma pass rates were improved with the ranges from 98% to 100%. In addition, dose profiles and dose distributions showed that spinal cord was protected by the rapid dose fall-off and by delivering the treatment with high precision. In point-dose measurements, the average differences between the measured and planned doses were 0.5% ± 1.0% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that Gafchromic EBT3 film would be an effective patient-specific QA tool, especially for VMAT of spine SBRT with treatment of small fields and highly gradient dose distributions. The results of film QA verified that the dosimetric accuracy of spine SBRT utilizing RapidArc with FFF beams in our institution is reliable

  5. SU-E-T-226: Junction Free Craniospinal Irradiation in Linear Accelerator Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy : A Novel Technique Using Dose Tapering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Spatially separated fields are required for craniospinal irradiation due to field size limitation in linear accelerator. Field junction shits are conventionally done to avoid hot or cold spots. Our study was aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of junction free irradiation plan of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for Meduloblastoma cases treated in linear accelerator using Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. Methods: VMAT was planned using multiple isocenters in Monaco V 3.3.0 and delivered in Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. A full arc brain and 40° posterior arc spine fields were planned using two isocentre for short (<1.3 meter height ) and 3 isocentres for taller patients. Unrestricted jaw movement was used in superior-inferior direction. Prescribed dose to PTV was achieved by partial contribution from adjacent beams. A very low dose gradient was generated to taper the isodoses over a long length (>10 cm) at the conventional field junction. Results: In this primary study five patients were planned and three patients were delivered using this novel technique. As the dose contribution from the adjacent beams were varied (gradient) to create a complete dose distribution, therefore there is no specific junction exists in the plan. The junction were extended from 10–14 cm depending on treatment plan. Dose gradient were 9.6±2.3% per cm for brain and 7.9±1.7 % per cm for spine field respectively. Dose delivery error due to positional inaccuracy was calculated for brain and spine field for ±1mm, ±2mm, ±3mm and ±5 mm were 1%–0.8%, 2%–1.6%, 2.8%–2.4% and 4.3%–4% respectively. Conclusion: Dose tapering in junction free CSI do not require a junction shift. Therefore daily imaging for all the field is also not essential. Due to inverse planning dose to organ at risk like thyroid kidney, heart and testis can be reduced significantly. VMAT gives a quicker delivery than Step and shoot or dynamic IMRT

  6. Development of a novel quality assurance system based on rolled-up and rolled-out radiochromic films in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a cylindrical phantom with rolled-up radiochromic films and dose analysis software in the rolled-out plane for quality assurance (QA) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The phantom consists of an acrylic cylindrical body wrapped with radiochromic film inserted into an outer cylindrical shell of 5 cm thickness. The rolled-up films with high spatial resolution enable detection of specific dose errors along the arc trajectory of continuously irradiated and modulated beams in VMAT. The developed dose analysis software facilitates dosimetric evaluation in the rolled-up and rolled-out planes of the film; the calculated doses on the corresponding points where the rolled-up film was placed were reconstructed into a rectangular dose matrix equivalent to that of the rolled-out plane of the film. The VMAT QA system was implemented in 3 clinical cases of prostate, nasopharynx, and pelvic metastasis. Each calculated dose on the rolled-out plane was compared with measurement values by modified gamma evaluation. Detected positions of dose disagreement on the rolled-out plane were also distinguished in cylindrical coordinates. The frequency of error occurrence and error distribution were summarized in a histogram and in an axial view of rolled-up plane to intuitively identify the corresponding positions of detected errors according to the gantry angle. Results: The dose matrix reconstructed from the developed VMAT QA system was used to verify the measured dose distribution along the arc trajectory. Dose discrepancies were detected on the rolled-out plane and visualized on the calculated dose matrix in cylindrical coordinates. The error histogram obtained by gamma evaluation enabled identification of the specific error frequency at each gantry angular position. The total dose error occurring on the cylindrical surface was in the range of 5%-8% for the 3 cases. Conclusions: The developed system provides a practical and reliable QA method to

  7. Simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for bilateral breast: a treatment planning and dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc and fixed field intensity modulated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed comparing dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) on patients with bilateral breast carcinoma. Plans for IMRT and RA, were optimised for 10 patients prescribing 50 Gy to the breast (PTVII, 2.0 Gy/fraction) and 60 Gy to the tumour bed (PTVI, 2.4 Gy/fraction). Objectives were: for PTVs V90%>95%, Dmax<107%; Mean lung dose MLD<15 Gy, V20 Gy<22%; heart involvement was to be minimised. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment dosimetry was performed using EPID and a 2D-array based methods. For PTVII minus PTVI, V90% was 97.8 ± 3.4% for RA and 94.0 ± 3.5% for IMRT (findings are reported as mean ± 1 standard deviation); D5%-D95% (homogeneity) was 7.3 ± 1.4 Gy (RA) and 11.0 ± 1.1 Gy (IMRT). Conformity index (V95%/VPTVII) was 1.10 ± 0.06 (RA) and 1.14 ± 0.09 (IMRT). MLD was <9.5 Gy for all cases on each lung, V20 Gy was 9.7 ± 1.3% (RA) and 12.8 ± 2.5% (IMRT) on left lung, similar for right lung. Mean dose to heart was 6.0 ± 2.7 Gy (RA) and 7.4 ± 2.5 Gy (IMRT). MU resulted in 796 ± 121 (RA) and 1398 ± 301 (IMRT); the average measured treatment time was 3.0 ± 0.1 minutes (RA) and 11.5 ± 2.0 (IMRT). From pre-treatment dosimetry, % of field area with γ <1 resulted 98.8 ± 1.3% and 99.1 ± 1.5% for RA and IMRT respectively with EPID and 99.1 ± 1.8% and 99.5 ± 1.3% with 2D-array (ΔD = 3% and DTA = 3 mm). RapidArc showed dosimetric improvements with respect to IMRT, delivery parameters confirmed its logistical advantages, pre-treatment dosimetry proved its reliability

  8. Effectiveness of exercise therapy: a best-evidence summary of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, N.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Bouter, L.M.; Dekker, J.; Arendzen, J.H.; Bie, R.A. de; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Helders, P.J.M.; Keus, S.H.; Kwakkel, G.; Lenssen, T.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Reijman, M.; Terwee, C.B.; Theunissen, C.; Thomas, S.; Baar, M.E. van; Hul, A. van 't; Peppen, R.P. van; Verhagen, A.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to summarise the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal, nervous, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. Systematic reviews were identified by means of a comprehensive search strategy in 11 bibl

  9. Case Study: Manual Therapy in Patient of 18 Years with Youthful Scoliosis Idiopathic Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Yaneth Franco Monsalve

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a lateral deviation of the spine from the mean line, characterized by a lateral curvature and a vertebral rotation. It is generallyof idiopathic character and appears mainly in adolescent females. Multiple techniques of conservative treatment for the scoliosis exist such as the manual therapy that complements the treatment for this pathology. This technique uses manipulation of soft tissue and bone, obtainingtherefore a more effective recovery, improving the quality of life of the patient. The objective of this study of case was to compareand to describe the changes in the conditionsof an eighteen years old patient, with left thoracolumbar scoliosis by the application of manual therapy; integral valuation was carried out by manual therapy, orthopedic, computerizedposition analysis, analyses the place of job, treatments with physical instruments, mobilizationsof the thoracic and lumbar joints (segmentsT5-T6, T6-T7, T7-T8, T8-T9, muscular energy techniques, exercises of global postural re-education, cervical and lumbar stabilization, exercises of fortification for weak musculature and stretching exercises to elongate retracted musculature. At the beginning of the treatment, the angle of Cobb was 24º ,verified through ax-ray, and after the sessions of manual therapy it was 18º, demonstrating significantly improved angle (6º. The effectiveness of the treatment was verified: diminution of the pain, increase of the muscular force, postural realignment, the satisfactionof the patient and significant recovery confirmed by the radiographic studies.

  10. Summary of ongoing clinical protocols for proton and heavier-ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1954 when the very first patient was treated at LBNL with heavy-charged particles, some 84,000 patients in total have now been treated with protons, and another 13,000 patients have been treated with carbon and other heavier ions. During the first several decades of this endeavor, particle therapy was accessible only at a small number of programs. More recently, however, this therapy has become available at a rapidly increasing number of facilities worldwide. This expansion of the discipline has led to the development of many more clinical trials, designed to optimize particle-beam therapy and to compare the results achieved with those resulting from other treatment methods. Presently, more than 50 clinical protocols worldwide are actively involved in the effort to improve our understanding of these clinical guidelines. The purpose of this brief review is to offer a broad overview of these protocols, highlighting the specific disease categories that are now being studied using proton and/or heavier-ion therapy, and how the parameters of dose-escalation, beam conformity, and RBE modeling are being evaluated for various disease sites and stages.

  11. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LARVMAT-to-LAR3D-CRT) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by the different

  12. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Medical Physics, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, Torino (Italy); Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR{sub VMAT}-to-LAR{sub 3D-CRT}) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by

  13. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  14. Arc Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Dahle, H; Limousin, M

    2013-01-01

    The existence of an arc statistics problem was at the center of a strong debate in the last fifteen years. With the aim to clarify if the optical depth for giant gravitational arcs by galaxy clusters in the so called concordance model is compatible with observations, several studies were carried out which helped to significantly improve our knowledge of strong lensing clusters, unveiling their extremely complex internal structure. In particular, the abundance and the frequency of strong lensing events like gravitational arcs turned out to be a potentially very powerful tool to trace the structure formation. However, given the limited size of observational and theoretical data-sets, the power of arc statistics as a cosmological tool has been only minimally exploited so far. On the other hand, the last years were characterized by significant advancements in the field, and several cluster surveys that are ongoing or planned for the near future seem to have the potential to make arc statistics a competitive cosmo...

  15. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  16. A moving blocker-based strategy for simultaneous megavoltage and kilovoltage scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate a moving blocker-based approach in estimating and correcting megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) scatter contamination in kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and materials: During the concurrent CBCT/VMAT acquisition, a physical attenuator (i.e., “blocker”) consisting of equally spaced lead strips was mounted and moved constantly between the CBCT source and patient. Both kV and MV scatter signals were estimated from the blocked region of the imaging panel, and interpolated into the unblocked region. A scatter corrected CBCT was then reconstructed from the unblocked projections after scatter subtraction using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on constraint optimization. Experimental studies were performed on a Catphan® phantom and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of using a moving blocker for kV–MV scatter correction. Results: Scatter induced cupping artifacts were substantially reduced in the moving blocker corrected CBCT images. Quantitatively, the root mean square error of Hounsfield units (HU) in seven density inserts of the Catphan phantom was reduced from 395 to 40. Conclusions: The proposed moving blocker strategy greatly improves the image quality of CBCT acquired with concurrent VMAT by reducing the kV–MV scatter induced HU inaccuracy and cupping artifacts

  17. Peripheral dose measurements in cervical cancer radiotherapy: a comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and step-and-shoot IMRT techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the peripheral doses resulting from volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in cervical cancer radiotherapy. Nine patients with cervical cancer had treatment planned with both VMAT and IMRT. A specially designed phantom was used for this study, with ion chambers placed at interest points approximating the position of the breast, thyroid, and lens. The peripheral doses at the phantom interest points were measured and compared between the VMAT and IMRT techniques. VMAT provides a potential dosimetric advantage compared with IMRT. The mean (± standard deviation) peripheral dose to the breast point for 1 fraction (2 Gy) during VMAT measured 5.13 ± 0.96 mGy, compared with 9.04 ± 1.50 mGy for IMRT. At the thyroid and lens interest points, the mean (± standard deviation) peripheral dose during VMAT was 2.19 ± 0.33 and 2.16 ± 0.28 mGy, compared with 7.07 ± 0.76 and 6.97 ± 0.91 mGy for IMRT, respectively. VMAT reduced the monitor units used by 28% and shortened the treatment delivery time by 54% compared with IMRT. While the dosimetric results are similar for both techniques, VMAT results in a lower peripheral dose to the patient and reduces the monitor-unit usage and treatment delivery time compared with IMRT

  18. Assessing the Role of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Relative to IMRT and Helical Tomotherapy in the Management of Localized, Locally Advanced, and Post-Operative Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify differences in treatment delivery efficiency and dosimetry between step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five prostate cancer patients were selected retrospectively for this planning study. Treatment plans were generated for: prostate alone (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5), prostate bed (n = 5), and prostate bed + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5). Target coverage, dose homogeneity, integral dose, monitor units (MU), and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were compared across techniques. Time required to deliver each plan was measured. Results: The dosimetric quality of IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans were comparable for target coverage (planning target volume V95%, clinical target volume V100% all >98.7%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) for all treatment groups. Although HT resulted in a slightly higher integral dose and mean doses to the OAR, it yielded a lower maximum dose to all OAR examined. VMAT resulted in reductions in treatment times over IMRT (mean = 75%) and HT (mean = 70%). VMAT required 15-38% fewer monitor units than IMRT over all treatment volumes, with the reduction per fraction ranging from 100-423 MU from the smallest to largest volumes. Conclusions: VMAT improves efficiency of delivery for equivalent dosimetric quality as IMRT and HT across various prostate cancer treatment volumes in the intact and postoperative settings.

  19. The summary of 5499 hemangioma patients with β-radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the therapeutic effect of β-radiation therapy for hemangioma with 5499 patients. Methods: Local 90Sr application was used to treat erythema mole and strawberry hemangioma by administering different doses in according to age. 32P colloid and dexamethasone (32P-D) was utilized to treat spongiohemangioma (SH). Results: The healing rate of erythema mole was 94.12%, 63.53%, 60.86%, 55.93%, 46.71%, 37.63%, 32.35%, 27.51%, 20% respectively in accordance with different period of age from less than 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, 2 year, 3 year, 4 years, 5 years, 10 years to more than 10 years; meanwhile in the period of less than 4 years patients, the healing rate of strawberry hemangioma for every age group was 100%, 91.63%, 86.93%, 82.83%, 80%, 66.76% respectively. The healing rate of 32P-D treated SH which area less than 5 cm2, from 5 to 10 cm2, more than 10 cm2 was 100%, 92.9%, 77.67% respectively. Conclusions: The β-radiation therapy is a simple and practical way for hemangioma. Its therapeutic effect is related to type and size of hemangioma and the age of patients

  20. Do technological advances in linear accelerators improve dosimetric outcomes in stereotaxy? A head-on comparison of seven linear accelerators using volumetric modulated arc therapy-based stereotactic planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, B.; Pradhan, A.; A Munshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Linear accelerator (Linac) based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been used for treating small intracranial lesions. Recent development in the Linacs such as inbuilt micro multileaf collimator (MLC) and flattening filter free (FFF) beam are intended to provide a better dose conformity and faster delivery when using VMAT technique. This study was aimed to compare the dosimetric outcomes and monit...

  1. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatmen...

  2. SU-E-T-105: Development of 3D Dose Verification System for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Using Improved Polyacrylamide-Based Gel Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K; Fujimoto, S; Akagi, Y; Hirokawa, Y [Hiroshima Heiwa Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Hayashi, S [Hiroshima International University, Hiroshima (Japan); Miyazawa, M [R-TECH.INC, Toukyo (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this dosimetric study was to develop 3D dose verification system for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using polyacrylamide-based gel (PAGAT) dosimeter improved the sensitivity by magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}). Methods: PAGAT gel containing MgCl{sub 2} as a sensitizer was prepared in this study. Methacrylic-acid-based gel (MAGAT) was also prepared to compare the dosimetric characteristics with PAGAT gel. The cylindrical glass vials (4 cm diameter, 12 cm length) filled with each polymer gel were irradiated with 6 MV photon beam using Novalis Tx linear accelerator (Varian/BrainLAB). The irradiated polymer gel dosimeters were scanned with Signa 1.5 T MRI system (GE), and dose calibration curves were obtained using T{sub 2} relaxation rate (R{sub 2} = 1/T{sub 2}). Dose rate (100-600 MU min{sup −1}) and fractionation (1-8 fractions) were varied. In addition, a cubic acrylic phantom (10 × 10 × 10 cm{sup 3}) filled with improved PAGAT gel inserted into the IMRT phantom (IBA) was irradiated with VMAT (RapidArc). C-shape structure was used for the VMAT planning by the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). The dose comparison of TPS and measurements with the polymer gel dosimeter was accomplished by the gamma index analysis, overlaying the dose profiles for a set of data on selected planes using in-house developed software. Results: Dose rate and fractionation dependence of improved PAGAT gel were smaller than MAGAT gel. A high similarity was found by overlaying the dose profiles measured with improved PAGAT gel dosimeter and the TPS dose, and the mean pass rate of the gamma index analysis using 3%/3 mm criteria was achieved 90% on orthogonal planes for VMAT using improved PAGAT gel dosimeter. Conclusion: In-house developed 3D dose verification system using improved polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeter had a potential as an effective tool for VMAT QA.

  3. Intensity modulated arc therapy implementation in a three phase adaptive 18F-FDG-PET voxel intensity-based planning strategy for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the implementation of a new intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) class solution in comparison to a 6-static beam step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (s-IMRT) for three-phase adaptive 18F-FDG-PET-voxel-based dose-painting-by-numbers (DPBN) for head-and-neck cancer. We developed 18F-FDG-PET-voxel intensity-based IMAT employing multiple arcs and compared it to clinically used s-IMRT DPBN. Three IMAT plans using 18F-FDG-PET/CT acquired before treatment (phase I), after 8 fractions (phase II) and CT acquired after 18 fractions (phase III) were generated for each of 10 patients treated with 3 s-IMRT plans based on the same image sets. Based on deformable image registration (ABAS, version 0.41, Elekta CMS Software, Maryland Heights, MO), doses of the 3 plans were summed on the pretreatment CT using validated in-house developed software. Dosimetric indices in targets and organs-at-risk (OARs), biologic conformity of treatment plans set at ≤5 %, treatment quality and efficiency were compared between IMAT and s-IMRT for the whole group and for individual patients. Doses to most organs-at-risk (OARs) were significantly better in IMAT plans, while target levels were similar for both types of plans. On average, IMAT ipsilateral and contralateral parotid mean doses were 14.0 % (p = 0.001) and 12.7 % (p < 0.001) lower, respectively. Pharyngeal constrictors D50% levels were similar or reduced with up to 54.9 % for IMAT compared to s-IMRT for individual patient cases. IMAT significantly improved biologic conformity by 2.1 % for treatment phases I and II. 3D phantom measurements reported an agreement of ≥95 % for 3 % and 3 mm criteria for both treatment modalities. IMAT delivery time was significantly shortened on average by 41.1 %. IMAT implementation significantly improved the biologic conformity as compared to s-IMRT in adaptive dose-escalated DPBN treatments. The better OAR sparing and faster delivery highly improved the treatment

  4. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA (United States); Otto, K [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  5. Linac-based extracranial radiosurgery with Elekta volumetric modulated arc therapy and an anatomy-based treatment planning system: Feasibility and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilla, Savino; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Ianiro, Anna; Viola, Pietro; Craus, Maurizio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Piermattei, Angelo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2016-01-01

    We reported our initial experience in using Elekta volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and an anatomy-based treatment planning system (TPS) for single high-dose radiosurgery (SRS-VMAT) of liver metastases. This study included a cohort of 12 patients treated with a 26-Gy single fraction. Single-arc VMAT plans were generated with Ergo++ TPS. The prescription isodose surface (IDS) was selected to fulfill the 2 following criteria: 95% of planning target volume (PTV) reached 100% of the prescription dose and 99% of PTV reached a minimum of 90% of prescription dose. A 1-mm multileaf collimator (MLC) block margin was added around the PTV. For a comparison of dose distributions with literature data, several conformity indexes (conformity index [CI], conformation number [CN], and gradient index [GI]) were calculated. Treatment efficiency and pretreatment dosimetric verification were assessed. Early clinical data were also reported. Our results reported that target and organ-at-risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean and maximum doses to PTVs were on average 112.9% and 121.5% of prescribed dose, respectively. A very high degree of dose conformity was obtained, with CI, CN, and GI average values equal to 1.29, 0.80, and 3.63, respectively. The beam-on-time was on average 9.3 minutes, i.e., 0.36min/Gy. The mean number of monitor units was 3162, i.e., 121.6MU/Gy. Pretreatment verification (3%-3mm) showed an optimal agreement with calculated values; mean γ value was 0.27 and 98.2% of measured points resulted with γ < 1. With a median follow-up of 16 months complete response was observed in 12/14 (86%) lesions; partial response was observed in 2/14 (14%) lesions. No radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was observed in any patients as well no duodenal ulceration or esophagitis or gastric hemorrhage. In conclusion, this analysis demonstrated the feasibility and the appropriateness of high-dose single-fraction SRS-VMAT in liver metastases performed with Elekta VMAT

  6. Volumetric modulated arc therapy is superior to conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy - a comparison among prostate cancer patients treated in an Australian centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy technology is expanding rapidly. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) technologies such as RapidArc® (RA) may be a more efficient way of delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy-like (IM) treatments. This study is an audit of the RA experience in an Australian department with a planning and economic comparison to IM. 30 consecutive prostate cancer patients treated radically with RA were analyzed. Eight RA patients treated definitively were then completely re-planned with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D); and a conventional sliding window IM technique; and a new RA plan. The acceptable plans and their treatment times were compared and analyzed for any significant difference. Differences in staff costs of treatment were computed and analyzed. Thirty patients had been treated to date with eight being treated definitely to at least 74 Gy, nine post high dose brachytherapy (HDR) to 50.4Gy and 13 post prostatectomy to at least 64Gy. All radiotherapy courses were completed with no breaks. Acute rectal toxicity by the RTOG criteria was acceptable with 22 having no toxicity, seven with grade 1 and one had grade 2. Of the eight re-planned patients, none of the 3D (three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy) plans were acceptable based on local guidelines for dose to organs at risk. There was no statistically significant difference in planning times between IM and RA (p = 0.792). IM had significantly greater MUs per fraction (1813.9 vs 590.2 p < 0.001), total beam time per course (5.2 vs 3.1 hours, p = 0.001) and average treatment staff cost per patient radiotherapy course ($AUD489.91 vs $AUD315.66, p = 0.001). The mean saving in treatment staff cost for RA treatment was $AUD174.25 per patient. 3D was incapable of covering a modern radiotherapy volume for the radical treatment of prostate cancer. These volumes can be treated via conventional IM and RA. RA was significantly more efficient, safe and cost effective than IM. VMAT technologies are a superior way of

  7. Superior liver sparing by combined coplanar/noncoplanar volumetric-modulated arc therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: A planning and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Hsu, Feng-Ming [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian-Kuen, Wu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chien-Jang, Wu [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien, E-mail: jasoncheng@ntu.edu.tw [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Compared with step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) and tomotherapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allows additional arc configurations in treatment planning and noncoplanar (NC) delivery. This study was first to compare VMAT planning with sIMRT planning, and the second to evaluate the toxicity of coplanar (C)/NC-VMAT treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fifteen patients with HCC (7 with left-lobe and 8 with right-lobe tumors) were planned with C-VMAT, C/NC-VMAT, and sIMRT. The median total dose was 49 Gy (range: 40 to 56 Gy), whereas the median fractional dose was 3.5 Gy (range: 3 to 8 Gy). Different doses/fractionations were converted to normalized doses of 2 Gy per fraction using an α/β ratio of 2.5. The mean liver dose, volume fraction receiving more than 10 Gy (V10), 20 Gy (V20), 30 Gy (V30), effective volume (V{sub eff}), and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) were compared. C/NC-VMAT in 6 patients was evaluated for delivery accuracy and treatment-related toxicity. Compared with sIMRT, both C-VMAT (p = 0.001) and C/NC-VMAT (p = 0.03) had significantly improved target conformity index. Compared with C-VMAT and sIMRT, C/NC-VMAT for treating left-lobe tumors provided significantly better liver sparing as evidenced by differences in mean liver dose (p = 0.03 and p = 0.007), V10 (p = 0.003 and p = 0.009), V20 (p = 0.006 and p = 0.01), V30 (p = 0.02 and p = 0.002), V{sub eff} (p = 0.006 and p = 0.001), and EUD (p = 0.04 and p = 0.003), respectively. For right-lobe tumors, there was no difference in liver sparing between C/NC-VMAT, C-VMAT, and sIMRT. In all patients, dose to more than 95% of target points met the 3%/3 mm criteria. All 6 patients tolerated C/NC-VMAT and none of them had treatment-related ≥ grade 2 toxicity. The C/NC-VMAT can be used clinically for HCC and provides significantly better liver sparing in patients with left-lobe tumors.

  8. Unilateral and bilateral neck SIB for head and neck cancer patients. Intensity-modulated proton therapy, tomotherapy, and RapidArc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberger, Carmen; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella [Humanitas Cancer Center Milan, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Jamil, Basil [Klinikum Frankfurt Oder, Praxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Frankfurt Oder (Germany); Raguse, Jan D. [Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Boettcher, Arne [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    To compare simultaneous integrated boost plans for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), helical tomotherapy (HT), and RapidArc therapy (RA) for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 20 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck received definitive chemoradiation with bilateral (n = 14) or unilateral (n = 6) neck irradiation and were planned using IMPT, HT, and RA with 54.4, 60.8, and 70.4 GyE/Gy in 32 fractions. Dose distributions, coverage, conformity, homogeneity to planning target volumes (PTV)s and sparing of organs at risk and normal tissue were compared. All unilateral and bilateral plans showed excellent PTV coverage and acceptable dose conformity. For unilateral treatment, IMPT delivered substantially lower mean doses to contralateral salivary glands (< 0.001-1.1 Gy) than both rotational techniques did (parotid gland: 6-10 Gy; submandibular gland: 15-20 Gy). Regarding the sparing of classical organs at risk for bilateral treatment, IMPT and HT were similarly excellent and RA was satisfactory. For unilateral neck irradiation, IMPT may minimize the dry mouth risk in this subgroup but showed no advantage over HT for bilateral neck treatment regarding classical organ-at-risk sparing. All methods satisfied modern standards regarding toxicity and excellent target coverage for unilateral and bilateral treatment of head and neck cancer at the planning level. (orig.) [German] Planvergleich von intensitaetsmodulierter Protonentherapie (IMPT), Tomotherapie (HT) und RapidArc-Therapie (RA) fuer Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region unter Anwendung des simultan integrierten Boost-Konzepts (SIB). Fuer 20 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region und bilateraler (n = 14) oder unilateraler (n = 6) zervikaler primaerer Radiochemotherapie erfolgte eine IMPT-, HT- und RA-Planung mit 54,4, 60,8 und 70,4 GyE/Gy in 32 Fraktionen. Die Dosisverteilung, Abdeckung, Konformitaet und Homogenitaet der PTVs sowie die

  9. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorayski, Peter; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Barry, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Foote, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI.

  10. Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, Static Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and 3D Conformal Planning for the Treatment of a Right-Sided Reconstructed Chest Wall and Regional Nodal Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared 3D conformal planning, static field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to investigate the suitable treatment plan and delivery method for a right-sided reconstructed chest wall and nodal case. The dose prescribed for the reconstructed chest wall and regional nodes was 50.4 Gy. Plans were compared for target coverage and doses of the lungs, heart, contralateral breast, and healthy tissue. All plans achieved acceptable coverage of the target and IMNs. The best right lung sparing achieved with 3D was a V20 Gy of 31.09%. Compared to it, VMAT reduced the same by 10.85% and improved the CI and HI over 3D by 18.75% and 2%, respectively. The ipsilateral lung V5 Gy to V20 Gy decreased with VMAT over IMRT by as high as 17.1%. The contralateral lung V5 Gy was also lowered with VMAT compared to IMRT by 16.22%. The MU and treatment beams were lowered with VMAT over IMRT by 30% and 10, respectively, decreasing the treatment time by >50%. VMAT was the treatment plan and delivery method of choice for this case due to a combination of improved lung sparing and reduced treatment time without compromising target coverage.

  11. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI

  12. 11C choline PET guided salvage radiotherapy with volumetric modulation arc therapy and hypofractionation for recurrent prostate cancer after HIFU failure: preliminary results of tolerability and acute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L E; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedule in 28 fractions with volumetric modulation arc therapy (VMAT). Genito-urinary (GU) and rectal and bowel toxicity were scored by common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4 (CTCAE V.4) scale. Biochemical response was assessed by ASTRO Phoenix criteria. Median age of patients was 67 years (range: 53-85). The median Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-9). The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the time of biochemical relapse after HIFU was 5.2 ng/mL (range: 2-64.2). Seven of the 15 patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started after HIFU failure, interrupted before 11C choline PET and radiotherapy. Median prescribed dose was 71.4 Gy (range: 71.4-74.2 Gy) in 28 fractions. No radiation related major upper gastrointestinal (GI), rectal and GU toxicity were experienced. GU, acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities were recorded in 7/15 and 4/15 respectively; bowel acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 4/15 and 1/15; rectal acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 3/15 and 2/15 respectively. No grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities occurred. Biochemical control was assessed in 12/15 (80%) patients. With a median follow up of 12 months, three out of 15 patients, with biochemical relapse, showed lymph-nodal recurrence. Our early clinical results and biochemical data confirm the feasibility and show a good tolerance of the 11C choline PET guided salvage radiation therapy after HIFU failure. The findings of low acute toxicity is encouraging, but longer

  13. Long-term outcomes of dynamic conformal arc irradiation combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in Japanese patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer. Case series study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are few reports of the outcomes of external beam radiotherapy in Asian males with localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of external beam irradiation using three-dimensional two-dynamic conformal arc therapy, combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, in patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer. Between March 2003 and August 2007, 150 Japanese patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer were definitively treated with three-dimensional two-dynamic conformal arc therapy. The median age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen values and neoadjuvant hormonal therapy period were 73 years, 9.4 ng/ml and 6 months, respectively. In principle, 74 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume, although the total dose was reduced to 70 Gy in patients with unfavorable risk factors, such as severe diabetes mellitus or anticoagulant therapy. No adjuvant hormonal therapy was given to any patient. Salvage hormonal therapy was started when the prostate-specific antigen value exceeded 4 ng/ml in a monotonically increasing manner. The median follow-up period was 79 months. Salvage hormonal therapy was initiated in 10 patients and the median prostate-specific antigen value at the initiation was 4.7 ng/ml. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of the biochemical relapse-free survival rate, the salvage hormonal therapy -free rate and the overall survival rate were 83.3% (95% confidence interval=77.1-89.6%), 94.3% (95% confidence interval=90.4-98.1%) and 96.3% (95% confidence interval=93.1-99.5%), respectively. The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of developing more than Grade 2 late rectal and urinary toxicities were 5.5 and 2.9%, respectively. Three-dimensional two-dynamic conformal arc therapy, with up to 74 Gy, in patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was well tolerated and achieved good biochemical control and survival outcomes. (author)

  14. Renal replacement therapy in Europe: a summary of the 2012 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippias, Maria; Stel, Vianda S.; Abad Diez, José Maria; Afentakis, Nikolaos; Herrero-Calvo, Jose Antonio; Arias, Manuel; Tomilina, Natalia; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Čala, Svjetlana; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs; Collart, Frederic; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón; García Bazaga, Maria de los Ángeles; De Meester, Johan; Díaz, Joan Manuel; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Ferrer Alamar, Manuel; Finne, Patrik; Garneata, Liliana; Golan, Eliezer; González Fernández, Raquel; Gutiérrez Avila, Gonzalo; Heaf, James; Hoitsma, Andries; Kantaria, Nino; Kolesnyk, Mykola; Kramar, Reinhard; Kramer, Anneke; Lassalle, Mathilde; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Lopot, Frantisek; Macário, Fernando; Magaz, Angela; Martín-Escobar, Eduardo; Metcalfe, Wendy; Noordzij, Marlies; Palsson, Runolfur; Pechter, Ülle; Prütz, Karl G.; Ratkovic, Marina; Resić, Halima; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Santiuste de Pablos, Carmen; Spustová, Viera; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Van Stralen, Karlijn; Thereska, Nestor; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This article summarizes the 2012 European Renal Association—European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org) with a specific focus on older patients (defined as ≥65 years). Methods Data provided by 45 national or regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea were used. Individual patient level data were received from 31 renal registries, whereas 14 renal registries contributed data in an aggregated form. The incidence, prevalence and survival probabilities of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) and renal transplantation rates for 2012 are presented. Results In 2012, the overall unadjusted incidence rate of patients with ESRD receiving RRT was 109.6 per million population (pmp) (n = 69 035), ranging from 219.9 pmp in Portugal to 24.2 pmp in Montenegro. The proportion of incident patients ≥75 years varied from 15 to 44% between countries. The overall unadjusted prevalence on 31 December 2012 was 716.7 pmp (n = 451 270), ranging from 1670.2 pmp in Portugal to 146.7 pmp in the Ukraine. The proportion of prevalent patients ≥75 years varied from 11 to 32% between countries. The overall renal transplantation rate in 2012 was 28.3 pmp (n = 15 673), with the highest rate seen in the Spanish region of Catalonia. The proportion of patients ≥65 years receiving a transplant ranged from 0 to 35%. Five-year adjusted survival for all RRT patients was 59.7% (95% confidence interval, CI: 59.3–60.0) which fell to 39.3% (95% CI: 38.7–39.9) in patients 65–74 years and 21.3% (95% CI: 20.8–21.9) in patients ≥75 years. PMID:26034584

  15. Dosimetric verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma using COMPASS 3D patient anatomy based system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the dosimetric performance of COMPASS system, a novel 3D quality assurance system for the verification of nasopharyngeal carcinoma volumetric modulated therapy (VMAT) treatment plan. Methods: Eight VMAT treatment plans of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were performed with MasterPlan, a treatment planning system (TPS), and then these treatment plans were sent to the COMPASS and MOSAIQ system, a coherent control system, respectively. Comparison of the COMPASS reconstructed dose versus TPS dose was conducted by using the dose volume-based indices:dose received by 95% volume of target (D95%), mean dose (Dmean) and γ pass rate, dose to the 1% of the spinal cord and brain stem volume (D1%), mean dose of leaf and right parotid (Dmean), and the volume received 30 Gy for left and right parotid (V30). COMPASS can reconstruct dose with the real measured delivery fluence after detector commissioning. Results: The average dose difference for the target volumes was within 1%, the difference for D95 was within 3% for most treatment plans, and the γ pass rate was higher than 95% for all target volumes. The average differences for the D1% values of spinal cord and brain stem were (4.3 ± 3.0)% and (5.9± 2.9)% respectively, and the average differences for the Dmean values of spinal cord and brain stem were (5.3 ± 3.0)% and (8.0 ± 3.5)% respectively. In general the COMPASS measured doses were all smaller than the TPS calculated doses for these two organs. The average differences of the Dmean values of the left and right parotids were (6.1± 3.1)% and (4.7 ± 4.4)% respectively, and the average differences of the V30 values of the left and right parotids were (9.4 ± 7.5 )% and (9.4 ± 9.9)% respectively. Conclusions: An ideal tool for the VMAT verification, the patient anatomy based COMPASS 3D dose verification system can check the dose difference between the real delivery and TPS calculation directly for each individual organ, either target volumes

  16. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs. 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary chemoradiotherapy of anal carcinoma. Effects on treatment-related side effects and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Hanne Elisabeth; Droege, Leif Hendrik; Hennies, Steffen; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Goettingen (Germany); Gaedcke, Jochen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of General Surgery, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced anal carcinoma. This study compared volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of treatment-related side effects and survival. From 1992-2014, 103 consecutive patients with anal carcinoma UICC stage I-III were treated. Concomitant CRT consisted of whole pelvic irradiation, including the iliac and inguinal lymph nodes, with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy per fractions) by VMAT (n = 17) or 3DCRT (n = 86) as well as two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Acute organ and hematological toxicity were assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events version 3.0. Side effects ≥ grade 3 were scored as high-grade toxicity. High-grade acute organ toxicity CTC ≥ 3 (P < 0.05), especially proctitis (P = 0.03), was significantly reduced in VMAT patients. The 2-year locoregional control (LRC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were both 100 % for VMAT patients compared with 80 and 73 % for 3DCRT patients. VMAT was shown to be a feasible technique, achieving significantly lower rates of acute organ toxicity and promising results for LRC and DFS. Future investigations will aim at assessing the advantages of VMAT with respect to late toxicity and survival after a prolonged follow-up time. (orig.) [German] Die primaere Radiochemotherapie (RCT) gilt als Standardtherapie fuer lokal fortgeschrittene Analkarzinome. In dieser Studie wurde die volumetrisch modulierte Rotationstherapie (''volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy'', VMAT) mit der klassischen dreidimensionalen konformalen Radiotherapie (3DCRT) hinsichtlich therapieassoziierter Nebenwirkungen und Ueberleben verglichen. Von 1992-2014 wurden 103 aufeinanderfolgende Patienten mit einem Analkarzinom im UICC-Stadium I-III behandelt. Die kombinierte RCT bestand aus der Bestrahlung des gesamten Beckens inklusive der iliakalen und der inguinalen

  17. A predictive model to guide management of the overlap region between target volume and organs at risk in prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study is to determine whether the magnitude of overlap between planning target volume (PTV) and rectum (Rectumoverlap) or PTV and bladder (Bladderoverlap) in prostate cancer volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is predictive of the dose-volume relationships achieved after optimization, and to identify predictive equations and cutoff values using these overlap volumes beyond which the Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) dose-volume constraints are unlikely to be met. Fifty-seven patients with prostate cancer underwent VMAT planning using identical optimization conditions and normalization. The PTV (for the 50.4 Gy primary plan and 30.6 Gy boost plan) included 5 to 10 mm margins around the prostate and seminal vesicles. Pearson correlations, linear regression analyses, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to correlate the percentage overlap with dose-volume parameters. The percentage Rectumoverlap and Bladderoverlap correlated with sparing of that organ but minimally impacted other dose-volume parameters, predicted the primary plan rectum V45 and bladder V50 with R2 = 0.78 and R2 = 0.83, respectively, and predicted the boost plan rectum V30 and bladder V30 with R2 = 0.53 and R2 = 0.81, respectively. The optimal cutoff value of boost Rectumoverlap to predict rectum V75 >15% was 3.5% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%, p overlap to predict bladder V80 >10% was 5.0% (sensitivity 83%, specificity 100%, p < 0.01). The degree of overlap between PTV and bladder or rectum can be used to accurately guide physicians on the use of interventions to limit the extent of the overlap region prior to optimization.

  18. Hair-sparing whole brain radiotherapy with volumetric arc therapy in patients treated for brain metastases: dosimetric and clinical results of a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the dosimetric results and impact of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) on temporary alopecia and hair-loss related quality of life (QOL) in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The potential of VMAT-WBRT to reduce the dose to the hair follicles was assessed. A human cadaver was treated with both VMAT-WBRT and conventional opposed field (OF) WBRT, while the subcutaneously absorbed dose was measured by radiochromic films and calculated by the planning system. The impact of these dose reductions on temporary alopecia was examined in a prospective phase II trial, with the mean score of hair loss at 1 month after VMAT-WBRT (EORTC-QOL BN20) as a primary endpoint and delivering a dose of 20 Gy in 5 fractions. An interim analysis was planned after including 10 patients to rule out futility, defined as a mean score of hair loss exceeding 56.7. A secondary endpoint was the global alopecia areata severity score measured with the “Severity of Alopecia Tool” (SALT) with a scale of 0 (no hair loss) to 100 (complete alopecia). For VMAT-WBRT, the cadaver measurements demonstrated a dose reduction to the hair follicle volume of 20.5% on average and of 41.8% on the frontal-vertex-occipital medial axis as compared to OF-WBRT. In the phase II trial, a total of 10 patients were included before the trial was halted due to futility. The EORTC BN20 hair loss score following WBRT was 95 (SD 12.6). The average median dose to the hair follicle volume was 12.6 Gy (SD 0.9), corresponding to a 37% dose reduction compared to the prescribed dose. This resulted in a mean SALT-score of 75. Compared to OF-WBRT, VMAT-WBRT substantially reduces hair follicle dose. These dose reductions could not be related to an improved QOL or SALT score

  19. Poster — Thur Eve — 36: Implementation of constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma on Varian 23EX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruohui [Department of Radiotherapy, Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University (China); Department of Medical Physics, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Fan, Xiaomei; Bai, Wenwen; Han, Chun [Department of Radiotherapy, Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University (China)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative planning approach for VMAT using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) implementation on conventional Linac Varian 23EX and used IMRT as a benchmark to evaluate the performance. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who were previously treated with IMRT on Varian 23EX were retrospectively planned for CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. Dose prescription was set to 60 Gy to PTVs in 30 fractions. The planning objectives for PTVs and OAR were corresponding with the IMRT plans. Dose to the PTVs and OAR were compared to IMRT with respect to plan quality, MU, treatment time and delivery accuracy. Results: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans led to equivalent or superior plan quality as compared to IMRT, PTV's CI relative increased 16.2%, while small deviations were observed on minimum dose for PTV. Volumes in the cord receiving 40Gy were increased from 3.6% with IMRT to 7.0%. Treatment times were reduced significantly with CDR-CAS-IMAT(mean 85.7s vs. 232.1s, p < .05), however, MU increased by a factor of 1.3 and lung V10/5/3.5/aver were relative increase 6.7%,12%,17.9%,4.2%, respectively. And increased the E-P low dose area volume decreased the hight dose area. There were no significant difference in Delta4 measurements results between both planning techniques. Conclusion: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans can be implemented smoothly and quickly into a busy cancer center, which improved PTV CI and reduces treatment time but increased the MU and low dose irradiated area. An evaluation of weight loss must be performed during treatment for CDR-CAS-IMAT patients.

  20. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Delivery of Prostate Radiotherapy: Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation of up to 360o, using either a constant dose rate (cdr-VMAT) or variable dose rate (vdr-VMAT) during rotation. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT prostate RT plans with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and IMRT plans. Patients and Methods: The 3D-CRT, five-field IMRT, cdr-VMAT, and vdr-VMAT RT plans were created for 10 computed tomography data sets from patients undergoing RT for prostate cancer. The parameters evaluated included the doses to organs at risk, equivalent uniform doses, dose homogeneity and conformality, and monitor units required for delivery of a 2-Gy fraction. Results: The IMRT and both VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than 3D-CRT plans for nearly all dosimetric endpoints analyzed. The lowest doses to organs at risk and most favorable equivalent uniform doses were achieved with vdr-VMAT, which was significantly better than IMRT for the rectal and femoral head dosimetric endpoints (p < 0.05) and significantly better than cdr-VMAT for most bladder and rectal endpoints (p < 0.05). The vdr-VMAT and cdr-VMAT plans required fewer monitor units than did the IMRT plans (relative reduction of 42% and 38%, respectively; p = 0.005) but more than for the 3D-CRT plans (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The IMRT and VMAT techniques achieved highly conformal treatment plans. The vdr-VMAT technique resulted in more favorable dose distributions than the IMRT or cdr-VMAT techniques, and reduced the monitor units required compared with IMRT

  1. A dose-volume intercomparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy, 3D static conformal, and rotational conformal techniques for portal vein tumor thrombus in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We created volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) in hepatocellular carcinoma, and compared the results with those from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and rotational conformal radiotherapy (R-CRT) plans. CT scan data from 10 consecutive patients with PVTT treated with 3D-CRT between January 2008 and January 2010 were utilized in the analysis. We analyzed the dosimetric properties of the plans for the 10 patients using the three different techniques with three different isocenter doses of 50, 56 and 60 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. The D95, Dmean, homogeneity index and conformity index were compared for the planning target volume (PTV). The Dmean, V20 and V30 were also compared for normal livers. The monitor units (MUs) and the treatment time were also evaluated. The normal liver V30 for VMAT was significantly less than that for 3D-CRT for the prescribed doses of 56 and 60 Gy (P<0.05). It was also found that the normal liver V30 resulting from 3D-CRT was prohibitively increased when the prescribed dose was increased in two steps. For PTV D95, we found no significant differences between the three techniques for the 50- and 56-Gy prescriptions, or between VMAT and the other techniques for the 60-Gy prescription. The differences in the MUs and treatment times were not statistically significant between VMAT and 3D-CRT. We have demonstrated that VMAT may be a more advantageous technique for dose escalation reaching 60 Gy in the treatment of PVTT due to the reduced normal liver V30. (author)

  2. Dosimetric comparison of three different treatment modalities for total scalp irradiation. The conventional lateral photon–electron technique, helical tomotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare lateral photon–electron (LPE), helical tomotherapy (HT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for total scalp irradiation. We selected a single adult model case and compared the dosimetric results for the three plans. All plans mainly used 6-MV photon beams, and the prescription dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. First, we compared the LPE, HT and VMAT plans, with all plans including a 1-cm bolus. We also compared HT plans with and without the bolus. The conformity indices for LPE, HT and VMAT were 1.73, 1.35 and 1.49, respectively. The HT plan showed the best conformity and the LPE plan showed the worst. However, the plans had similar homogeneity indexes. The dose to the hippocampus was the highest in the VMAT plan, with a mean of 6.7 Gy, compared with 3.5 Gy in the LPE plan and 4.8 Gy in the HT plan. The doses to the optical structures were all within the clinically acceptable range. The beam-on time and monitor units were highest in the HT plan. The HT plans with and without a bolus showed similar target coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. The HT plan showed the best target coverage and conformity, with low doses to the brain and hippocampus. This plan also had the advantage of not necessarily requiring a bolus. Although the VMAT plan showed better conformity than the LPE plan and acceptable OAR sparing, the dose to the hippocampus should be considered when high doses are prescribed. (author)

  3. A predictive model to guide management of the overlap region between target volume and organs at risk in prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Lee, Jennifer C.; Einaiem, Sara; Guirguis, Adel; Ikoro, N. C.; Ashamalla Hani [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The goal of this study is to determine whether the magnitude of overlap between planning target volume (PTV) and rectum (Rectum{sub overlap}) or PTV and bladder (Bladder{sub overlap}) in prostate cancer volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is predictive of the dose-volume relationships achieved after optimization, and to identify predictive equations and cutoff values using these overlap volumes beyond which the Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) dose-volume constraints are unlikely to be met. Fifty-seven patients with prostate cancer underwent VMAT planning using identical optimization conditions and normalization. The PTV (for the 50.4 Gy primary plan and 30.6 Gy boost plan) included 5 to 10 mm margins around the prostate and seminal vesicles. Pearson correlations, linear regression analyses, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to correlate the percentage overlap with dose-volume parameters. The percentage Rectum{sub overlap} and Bladder{sub overlap} correlated with sparing of that organ but minimally impacted other dose-volume parameters, predicted the primary plan rectum V{sub 45} and bladder V{sub 50} with R{sup 2} = 0.78 and R{sup 2} = 0.83, respectively, and predicted the boost plan rectum V{sub 30} and bladder V{sub 30} with R{sup 2} = 0.53 and R{sup 2} = 0.81, respectively. The optimal cutoff value of boost Rectumoverlap to predict rectum V75 >15% was 3.5% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%, p < 0.01), and the optimal cutoff value of boost Bladder{sub overlap} to predict bladder V{sub 80} >10% was 5.0% (sensitivity 83%, specificity 100%, p < 0.01). The degree of overlap between PTV and bladder or rectum can be used to accurately guide physicians on the use of interventions to limit the extent of the overlap region prior to optimization.

  4. Time-resolved versus time-integrated portal dosimetry: the role of an object’s position with respect to the isocenter in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyns, Lotte E. J. R.; Persoon, Lucas C. G. G.; Podesta, Mark; van Elmpt, Wouter J. C.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to compare time-resolved (TR) and time-integrated (TI) portal dosimetry, focussing on the role of an object’s position with respect to the isocenter in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Portal dose images (PDIs) are simulated and measured for different cases: a sphere (1), a bovine bone (2) and a patient geometry (3). For the simulated case (1) and the experimental case (2), several transformations are applied at different off-axis positions. In the patient case (3), three simple plans with different isocenters are created and pleural effusion is simulated in the patient. The PDIs before and after the sphere transformations, as well as the PDIs with and without simulated pleural effusion, are compared using a TI and TR gamma analysis. In addition, the performance of the TI and TR gamma analyses for the detection of real geometric changes in patients treated with clinical plans is investigated and a correlation analysis is performed between gamma fail rates and differences in dose volume histogram (DVH) metrics. The TI gamma analysis can show large differences in gamma fail rates for the same transformation at different off-axis positions (or for different plan isocenters). The TR gamma analysis, however, shows consistent gamma fail rates. For the detection of real geometric changes in patients treated with clinical plans, the TR gamma analysis has a higher sensitivity than the TI gamma analysis. However, the specificity for the TR gamma analysis is lower than for the TI gamma analysis. Both the TI and TR gamma fail rates show no correlation with changes in DVH metrics. This work shows that TR portal dosimetry is fundamentally superior to TI portal dosimetry, because it removes the strong dependence of the gamma fail rate on the off-axis position/plan isocenter. However, for 2D TR portal dosimetry, it is still difficult to interpret gamma fail rates in terms of changes in DVH metrics for patients treated with VMAT.

  5. Impact of pitch angle setup error and setup error correction on dose distribution in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Akihiro; Togawa, Kumiko; Yokoi, Tomohiro; Ueda, Shinichi; Noto, Kimiya; Kojima, Hironori; Isomura, Naoki; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2016-07-01

    In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer, a positional and rotational error correction is performed according to the position and angle of the prostate. The correction often involves body leaning, and there is concern regarding variation in the dose distribution. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the impact of body pitch rotation on the dose distribution regarding VMAT. Treatment plans were obtained retrospectively from eight patients with prostate cancer. The body in the computed tomography images for the original VMAT plan was shifted to create VMAT plans with virtual pitch angle errors of ±1.5° and ±3°. Dose distributions for the tilted plans were recalculated with use of the same beam arrangement as that used for the original VMAT plan. The mean value of the maximum dose differences in the dose distributions between the original VMAT plan and the tilted plans was 2.98 ± 0.96 %. The value of the homogeneity index for the planning target volume (PTV) had an increasing trend according to the pitch angle error, and the values of the D 95 for the PTV and D 2ml, V 50, V 60, and V 70 for the rectum had decreasing trends (p pitch angle error caused by body leaning had little effect on the dose distribution; in contrast, the pitch angle correction reduced the effects of organ displacement and improved these indexes. Thus, the pitch angle setup error in VMAT for prostate cancer should be corrected. PMID:26873139

  6. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F;

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) I...

  7. Treatment of left sided breast cancer for a patient with funnel chest: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs. 3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This case study presents a rare case of left-sided breast cancer in a patient with funnel chest, which is a technical challenge for radiation therapy planning. To identify the best treatment technique for this case, 3 techniques were compared: conventional tangential fields (3D conformal radiotherapy [3D-CRT]), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The plans were created for a SynergyS® (Elekta, Ltd, Crawley, UK) linear accelerator with a BeamModulator™ head and 6-MV photons. The planning system was Oncentra Masterplan® v3.3 SP1 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, Netherlands). Calculations were performed with collapsed cone algorithm. Dose prescription was 50.4 Gy to the average of the planning target volume (PTV). PTV coverage and homogeneity was comparable for all techniques. VMAT allowed reducing dose to the ipsilateral organs at risk (OAR) and the contralateral breast compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT: The volume of the left lung receiving 20 Gy was 19.3% for VMAT, 26.1% for IMRT, and 32.4% for 3D-CRT. In the heart, a D15% of 9.7 Gy could be achieved with VMAT compared with 14 Gy for IMRT and 46 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral breast, D15% was 6.4 Gy for VMAT, 8.8 Gy for IMRT, and 10.2 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral lung, however, the lowest dose was achieved with 3D-CRT with D10% of 1.7 Gy for 3D-CRT, and 6.7 Gy for both IMRT and VMAT. The lowest number of monitor units (MU) per 1.8-Gy fraction was required by 3D-CRT (192 MU) followed by VMAT (518 MU) and IMRT (727 MU). Treatment time was similar for 3D-CRT (3 min) and VMAT (4 min) but substantially increased for IMRT (13 min). VMAT is considered the best treatment option for the presented case of a patient with funnel chest. It allows reducing dose in most OAR without compromising target coverage, keeping delivery time well below 5 minutes

  8. Music Therapy Advances in Neuro-disability - Innovations in Research and Practice: Summary Report and Reflections on a Two-Day International Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Winn O'Kelly

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a summary of the oral papers presented during a two day international conference, which took place on 7th & 8th June 2013, at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability (RHN in London. The summary texts detail innovative research projects and clinical developments across music therapy, music neuroscience and music psychology addressing the needs of those with acquired and degenerative neurological conditions. The diverse and evolving work in this field is reflected in the topics covered, including disorders of consciousness, dementia, stroke, and the use of modern neuro-imaging methods to measure the effects of music therapy at a cortical level. A discussion of the implications of these converging foci highlights the benefits of the cross-disciplinary dialogue that characterised the conference.

  9. Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States. Summary report of a consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the ''Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States'' held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 9-11 December 1996. The present activities on nuclear data for radiotherapy are summarized in Member States, the present status of nuclear data for photon, neutron and proton therapy is reviewed and topics which are not presently covered by other institutions are identified. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  10. Craniospinal irradiation using Rapid Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Marino, A.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Losada, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.

    2013-07-01

    Cranio-Spinal Irradiation is technically very challenging, historically field edge matching is needed because of the mechanical limitations of standard linear accelerators. The purpose of this study is to assess the Volumetric Arc Therapy as a competitive technique for Cranio-Spinal Irradiation compared to the conventional 3D Conformal Radiotherapy technique. (Author)

  11. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic-based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT. PMID:27067229

  12. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with Oncentra MasterPlan® for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several comparison studies have shown the capability of VMAT to achieve similar or better plan quality as IMRT, while reducing the treatment time. The experience of VMAT in a multi vendor environment is limited. We compared the plan quality and performance of VMAT to IMRT and we investigate the effects of varying various user-selectable parameters. IMRT, single arc VMAT and dual arc VMAT were compared for four different head-and-neck tumors. For VMAT, the effect of varying gantry angle spacing and treatment time on the plan quality was investigated. A comparison of monitor units and treatment time was performed. IMRT and dual arc VMAT achieved a similar plan quality, while single arc could not provide an acceptable plan quality. Increasing the number of control points does not improve the plan quality. Dual arc VMAT delivery time is about 30% of IMRT delivery time. Dual arc VMAT is a fast and accurate technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. It applies similar number of MUs as IMRT, but the treatment time is strongly reduced, maintaining similar or better dose conformity to the PTV and OAR sparing

  13. Single Arc VMAT of H&N patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Johansen, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

      Background: A few planning systems are currently able to plan volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) which can be delivered on Elekta and Varian accelerators. Pinnacles version of a VMAT algorithm is called SmartArc. SmartArcs capability to modulate complicated treatment plans is to be tested...

  14. Single Arc VMAT of H&N patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Johansen, Jørgen;

      Background: A few planning systems are currently able to plan volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) which can be delivered on Elekta and Varian accelerators. Pinnacles version of a VMAT algorithm is called SmartArc. SmartArcs capability to modulate complicated treatment plans is to be tested...

  15. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH). Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients). All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16). Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88). According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation). No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50) compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. The 3-week course of postoperative radiation using VMAT with SIB showed to be

  16. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Planning for Primary Prostate Cancer With Selective Intraprostatic Boost Determined by {sup 18}F-Choline PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Yu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Wu, Lili [Department of Medical Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Hirata, Emily; Miyazaki, Kyle; Sato, Miles [Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Oncology Research, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Kwee, Sandi A., E-mail: kwee@hawaii.edu [Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Oncology Research, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated expected tumor control and normal tissue toxicity for prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with and without radiation boosts to an intraprostatically dominant lesion (IDL), defined by {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with localized prostate cancer underwent {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT before treatment. Two VMAT plans, plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} and plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}, were compared for each patient. The whole-prostate planning target volume (PTV{sub prostate}) prescription was 79 Gy in both plans, but plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} added simultaneous boost doses of 100 Gy and 105 Gy to the IDL, defined by 60% and 70% of maximum prostatic uptake on {sup 18}F-choline PET (IDL{sub suv60%} and IDL{sub suv70%}, respectively, with IDL{sub suv70%} nested inside IDL{sub suv60%} to potentially enhance tumor specificity of the maximum point dose). Plan evaluations included histopathological correspondence, isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: Planning objectives and dose constraints proved feasible in 30 of 30 cases. Prostate sextant histopathology was available for 28 cases, confirming that IDL{sub suv60%} adequately covered all tumor-bearing prostate sextants in 27 cases and provided partial coverage in 1 case. Plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} had significantly higher TCP than plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} across all prostate regions for α/β ratios ranging from 1.5 Gy to 10 Gy (P<.001 for each case). There were no significant differences in bladder and femoral head NTCP between plans and slightly lower rectal NTCP (endpoint: grade ≥ 2 late toxicity or rectal bleeding) was found for plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}. Conclusions: VMAT can potentially increase the likelihood of tumor control in primary prostate cancer while observing normal tissue tolerances through

  17. Toward optimal organ at risk sparing in complex volumetric modulated arc therapy: An exponential trade-off with target volume dose homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, Jim P., E-mail: j.tol@vumc.nl; Dahele, Max; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiotherapy typically aims for homogenous dose in the planning target volume (PTV) while sparing organs at risk (OAR). The authors quantified and characterized the trade-off between PTV dose inhomogeneity (IH) and OAR sparing in complex head and neck volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Methods: Thirteen simultaneous integrated boost plans were created per patient, for ten patients. PTV boost{sub (B)}/elective{sub (E)} optimization priorities were systematically increased. IH{sub B} and IH{sub E}, defined as (100% − V95%) + V107%, were evaluated against the average of the mean dose to the combined composite swallowing and combined salivary organs (D-OAR{sub comp}). To investigate the influence of OAR size and position with respect to PTV{sub B/E}, OAR dose was evaluated against a modified Euclidean distance (DM{sub B}/DM{sub E}) between OAR and PTV. Results: Although the achievable D-OAR{sub comp} for a given level of PTV IH differed between patients, excellent logarithmic fits described the D-OAR{sub comp}/IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} relationship in all patients (mean R{sup 2} of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively). Allowing an increase in average IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} over a clinically acceptable range, e.g., from 0.4% ± 0.5% to 2.0% ± 2.0% and 6.9% ± 2.8% to 14.8% ± 2.7%, respectively, corresponded to a decrease in average dose to the composite salivary and swallowing structures from 30.3 ± 6.5 to 23.6 ± 4.7 Gy and 32.5 ± 8.3 to 26.8 ± 9.3 Gy. The increase in PTV{sub E} IH was mainly accounted for by an increase in V107, by on average 5.9%, rather than a reduction in V95, which was on average only 2%. A linear correlation was found between the OAR dose to composite swallowing structures and contralateral parotid and submandibular gland, with DM{sub E} (R{sup 2} = 0.83, 0.88, 0.95). Only mean ipsilateral parotid dose correlated with DM{sub B} (R{sup 2} = 0.87). Conclusions: OAR sparing is highly dependent on the permitted PTV{sub B

  18. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a whole-ventricular irradiation: A planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT) in whole-ventricular irradiation. Computed tomography simulation data for 13 patients were acquired to create plans for VMAT and cIMRT. In both plans, the same median dose (100% = 24 Gy) was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV), which comprised a tumor bed and whole ventricles. During optimization, doses to the normal brain and body were reduced, provided that the dose constraints of the target coverage were satisfied. The dose-volume indices of the PTV, normal brain, and body as well as monitor units were compared between the 2 techniques by using paired t-tests. The results showed no significant difference in the homogeneity index (0.064 vs 0.065; p = 0.824) of the PTV and conformation number (0.78 vs 0.77; p = 0.065) between the 2 techniques. In the normal brain and body, the dose-volume indices showed no significant difference between the 2 techniques, except for an increase in the volume receiving a low dose in VMAT; the absolute volume of the normal brain and body receiving 1 Gy of radiation significantly increased in VMAT by 1.6% and 8.3%, respectively, compared with that in cIMRT (1044 vs 1028 mL for the normal brain and 3079.2 vs 2823.3 mL for the body; p<0.001). The number of monitor units to deliver a 2.0-Gy fraction was significantly reduced in VMAT compared with that in cIMRT (354 vs 873, respectively; p<0.001). In conclusion, VMAT delivers IMRT to complex target volumes such as whole ventricles with fewer monitor units, while maintaining target coverage and conformal isodose distribution comparable to cIMRT; however, in addition to those characteristics, the fact that the volume of the normal brain and body receiving a low dose would increase in VMAT should be considered

  19. SU-E-P-55: The Reaserch of Cervical Cancer Delivered with Constant Dose Rate and Gantry Speed Arc Therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) On Conventional Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postoperative cervical cancer patients with large target volume and the target shape is concave, treatmented with static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is time consuming. The purpose of this study is to investigate using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) on conventional linear accelrator, by comparing with the IMRT technology to evaluate the performance of CDR-CAS-IMAT on postoperative cervical cancer patients. Methods: 18 cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT on Varian 23IX were replanted using CDR-CAS-IMAT. The plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI) of target volume, the dose of organs at risk, radiation delivery time and monitor units were also compared. SPSS 19.0 software paired T-test analysis was carried out on the two sets of data. Results: Compared with the IMRT plans PTV’s CI (t= 3.85, P =0.001), CTV’s CI, HI, D90, D95, D98, V95, V98, V100 (t=4.21, −3.18, 2.13, 4.65, 7.79, 2.29, 6.00, 2.13, p=0.001, 0.005, 0.049, 0.000, 0.000, 0.035, 0.000, 0.049), and cord D2 and rectum V40 (t=−2.65, −2.47, p= P =0.017, 0.025), and treatment time and MU (t=−36.0, −6.26, P =0.000, 0.000) were better than that of IMRT group. But the IMRT plans in terms of decreasing bladder V50, bowel V30 (t=2.14, 3.00, P =0.048, 0.008) and low dose irradiation volume were superior to that of CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. There were no significant differences in other statistical index. Conclusion: Cervical cancer patients with CDR-CAS-IMAT on Varian Clinical 23IX can get equivalent or superior dose distribution compared with the IMRT technology. IMAT have much less treatment time and MU can reduce the uncertainty factor and patient discomfort in treatment. This work was supported by the Medical Science Foundation of the health department of Hebei

  20. SU-E-P-55: The Reaserch of Cervical Cancer Delivered with Constant Dose Rate and Gantry Speed Arc Therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) On Conventional Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Chi, Z; Gao, C; Xiaomei, F [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Gao, Y [Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Postoperative cervical cancer patients with large target volume and the target shape is concave, treatmented with static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is time consuming. The purpose of this study is to investigate using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) on conventional linear accelrator, by comparing with the IMRT technology to evaluate the performance of CDR-CAS-IMAT on postoperative cervical cancer patients. Methods: 18 cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT on Varian 23IX were replanted using CDR-CAS-IMAT. The plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI) of target volume, the dose of organs at risk, radiation delivery time and monitor units were also compared. SPSS 19.0 software paired T-test analysis was carried out on the two sets of data. Results: Compared with the IMRT plans PTV’s CI (t= 3.85, P =0.001), CTV’s CI, HI, D90, D95, D98, V95, V98, V100 (t=4.21, −3.18, 2.13, 4.65, 7.79, 2.29, 6.00, 2.13, p=0.001, 0.005, 0.049, 0.000, 0.000, 0.035, 0.000, 0.049), and cord D2 and rectum V40 (t=−2.65, −2.47, p= P =0.017, 0.025), and treatment time and MU (t=−36.0, −6.26, P =0.000, 0.000) were better than that of IMRT group. But the IMRT plans in terms of decreasing bladder V50, bowel V30 (t=2.14, 3.00, P =0.048, 0.008) and low dose irradiation volume were superior to that of CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. There were no significant differences in other statistical index. Conclusion: Cervical cancer patients with CDR-CAS-IMAT on Varian Clinical 23IX can get equivalent or superior dose distribution compared with the IMRT technology. IMAT have much less treatment time and MU can reduce the uncertainty factor and patient discomfort in treatment. This work was supported by the Medical Science Foundation of the health department of Hebei

  1. Dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation algorithm for stereotactic and conventional lung volumetric modulated arc therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the current study was to assess the dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for stereotactic (stage I) and conventional (stage III) lung cancer treatments planned with Eclipse version 10.0 Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm. The dosimetric impact of using AAA instead of AXB, and grid size 2.5 mm instead of 1.0 mm for VMAT treatment plans was evaluated. The clinical plan quality of AXB VMAT was assessed using 45 stage I and 73 stage III patients, and was compared with published results, planned with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The dosimetric impact on near-minimum PTV dose (D98%) using AAA instead of AXB was large (underdose up to 12.3%) for stage I and very small (underdose up to 0.8%) for stage III lung treatments. There were no significant differences for dose volume histogram (DVH) values between grid sizes. The calculation time was significantly higher for AXB grid size 1.0 than 2.5 mm (p < 0.01). The clinical quality of the VMAT plans was at least comparable with clinical qualities given in literature of lung treatment plans with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The average mean lung dose (MLD), lung V20Gy and V5Gy in this study were respectively 3.6 Gy, 4.1% and 15.7% for 45 stage I patients and 12.4 Gy, 19.3% and 46.6% for 73 stage III lung patients. The average contra-lateral lung dose V5Gy-cont was 35.6% for stage III patients. For stereotactic and conventional lung treatments, VMAT calculated with AXB grid size 2.5 mm resulted in accurate dose calculations. No hybrid technique was needed to obtain the dose constraints. AXB is recommended instead of AAA for avoiding serious overestimation of the minimum target doses compared to the actual delivered dose

  2. Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: A Fully Dynamic Delivery With Synchronized Couch and Gantry Motion Significantly Improves Dosimetric Indices Correlated With Poor Cosmesis in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jieming; Atwood, Todd; Eyben, Rie von; Fahimian, Benjamin; Chin, Erika; Horst, Kathleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States); Otto, Karl [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dimitre.hristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To develop planning and delivery capabilities for linear accelerator–based nonisocentric trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) and to evaluate the benefit of TMAT for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with the patient in prone position. Methods and Materials: An optimization algorithm for volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was generalized to allow for user-defined nonisocentric TMAT trajectories combining couch rotations and translations. After optimization, XML scripts were automatically generated to program and subsequently deliver the TMAT plans. For 10 breast patients in the prone position, TMAT and 6-field noncoplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated under equivalent objectives and constraints. These plans were compared with regard to whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. Results: For TMAT APBI, nonisocentric collision-free horizontal arcs with large angular span (251.5 ± 7.9°) were optimized and delivered with delivery time of ∼4.5 minutes. Percentage changes of whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose for TMAT relative to IMRT were −10.81% ± 6.91%, −27.81% ± 7.39%, −14.82% ± 9.67%, and 39.40% ± 10.53% (P≤.01). Conclusions: This is a first demonstration of end-to-end planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT. Compared with IMRT, TMAT resulted in marked reduction of the breast tissue volume irradiated at high doses.

  3. Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for dosimetric evaluations of intrafraction motion for gated and ungated intensity modulated arc therapy deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mike; Gladwish, Adam; Staruch, Robert; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2008-11-01

    Respiratory gated radiation therapy allows for a smaller margin expansion for the planning target volume (PTV) to account for respiratory induced motion and is emerging as a common method to treat lung and liver tumors. We investigated the dosimetric effect of free motion and gated delivery for intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of PTV margin and duty cycle for gated delivery is studied with Monte Carlo simulations. A motion phantom is used for this study. Two sets of contours were drawn on the mid-inspiration CT scan of this motion phantom. For each set of contours, an IMAT plan to be delivered with constant dose rate was created. The plans were generated on a CT scan of the phantom in the static condition with 3 mm PTV margin and applied to the motion phantom under four conditions: static, full superior-inferior (SI) motion (A = 1 cm, T = 4 s) and gating conditions (25% and 50% duty cycles) with full SI motion. A 6 by 15 cm piece of radiographic film was placed in the sagittal plane of the phantom and then irradiated under all measurement conditions. Film calibration was performed with a step-wedge method to convert optical density to dose. Gated IMAT delivery was first validated in 2D by comparing static film with that from gating and full motion. A previously verified simulation tool for IMRT that takes the log files from the multileaf collimator (MLC) controller and the gating system were adapted to simulate the delivered IMAT treatment for full 3D dosimetric analysis. The IMAT simulations were validated against the 2D film measurements. The resultant IMAT simulations were evaluated with dose criteria, dose-volume histograms and 3D gamma analysis. We validated gated IMAT deliveries when we compared the static film with the one from gating using 25% duty cycle using 2D gamma analysis. Within experimental and setup uncertainties, film measurements agreed with their corresponding simulated

  4. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  5. 食管癌VMAT与IMRT的剂量学比较%The application of volumetric modulated arc therapy in esophageal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽虹; 王澜; 韩春; 张靖; 田华; 李晓宁

    2015-01-01

    目的 比较食管癌VMAT与静态IMRT的剂量学差异,探索VMAT的可行性.方法 2011-2012年入组食管癌患者30例,颈段、胸下段各5例,胸上段、胸中段各10例.用医科达Oncentra 4.1计划系统分别设计单弧VMAT和IMRT计划,PTV处方剂量60Gy分30次.用Delta 4进行剂量验证.配对t检验或Wilcoxon符号检验比较两组计划PTV、OAR受量、机器跳数及有效治疗时间.结果 两组计划均能满足临床剂量学要求.与IMRT相比VMAT的CI值好(P =0.008),脊髓Dmax更低(P=0.032),但心脏V30、V40、Dmean增高(P=0.041、0.012、0.002);颈段病变VMAT的肺V5-V15及MLD增高(P=0.002~0.022、0.022);胸上段病变VMAT的心脏V30、Dmwan增高(P=0.030、0.026),脊髓Dmax减低(P=0.006);胸中段病变VMAT的肺V10-V20减低(P =0.015~0.041);胸下段病变两组计划各项指标相近(P=0.262~0.998).3 mm/3%标准下γ通过率VMAT为92.75%,IMRT为92.98% (P =0.826).机器跳数VMAT为460.66 MU,IMRT为522.55 MU,平均减少11.84% (P =0.001).有效治疗时间VMAT为139.6 s,IMRT为298.73 s,缩短了53.27%(P=0.000).结论 在靶区覆盖率相似前提下,VMAT可降低部分OAR受量,并能改善CI值、减少机器跳数、缩短有效治疗时间.Synergy平台上的VMAT计划剂量稳定可靠.%Objective To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and static intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for esophageal carcinoma.Methods Thirty patients were selected in this study,including 5 cases in the cervical,5 the lower thorax,10 the upper thorax and 10 the middle thorax.VMAT plans with a single arc and IMRT plans with five fields designed for each patients.Planning target volume (PTV) were prescribed to 60 Gy in 30 fractions.Delta 4 was used to verifie the dosimetric of treatment plans.Using paired t-test or Wilcoxon signed-test to compare the dose distribution on planning and organs at risk (OAR).The monitor units and treatment time were also evaluated to

  6. Effectiveness of music therapy: a summary of systematic reviews based on randomized controlled trials of music interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamioka H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroharu Kamioka,1 Kiichiro Tsutani,2 Minoru Yamada,3 Hyuntae Park,4 Hiroyasu Okuizumi,5 Koki Tsuruoka,6 Takuya Honda,7 Shinpei Okada,8 Sang-Jun Park,8 Jun Kitayuguchi,9 Takafumi Abe,9 Shuichi Handa,5 Takuya Oshio,10 Yoshiteru Mutoh111Faculty of Regional Environment Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Drug Policy and Management, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 3Kyoto University Graduate School Research, Kyoto, Japan; 4Department of Functioning Activation, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan; 5Mimaki Onsen (Spa Clinic, Tomi, Nagano, Japan; 6Graduate School of Social Services, Japan College of Social Work, Tokyo, Japan; 7Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan; 8Physical Education and Medicine Research Foundation, Tomi, Nagano, Japan; 9Physical Education and Medicine Research Center Unnan, Shimane, Japan; 10Social Welfare Service Corporation CARE-PORT MIMAKI, Tomi, Nagano, Japan; 11The Research Institute of Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, JapanObjective: The objective of this review was to summarize evidence for the effectiveness of music therapy (MT and to assess the quality of systematic reviews (SRs based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs.Study design: An SR of SRs based on RCTs.Methods: Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included were those with at least one treatment group in which MT was applied. We searched the following databases from 1995 to October 1, 2012: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL (Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Global Health Library, and Ichushi-Web. We also searched all Cochrane Database and Campbell Systematic Reviews up to October 1, 2012. Based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, we identified a disease targeted for each article.Results: Twenty-one studies met all inclusion criteria. This study included 16

  7. The Effect of Flattening Filter Free on Three-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-Wan; Lai, You-Qun; Lin, Qin; Ha, Hui-Ming; Fu, Li-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) may affect outcome measures of radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters in three types of radiotherapy plans, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), with or without the flattening filter (FF), developed for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From July 2013 to October 2013, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT treatment plans were designed using 6 MV and 10 MV, with and without FF, for 10 patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC. The evaluation of the treatment plans included homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), monitor units (MU), mean dose (Dmean), treatment time, and the influence of FFF on volumes. There was no difference in CI or HI between FFF and FF models with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans. At 6 MV, a lower Dmean was seen in the FFF model of 3D-CRT and in the VMAT plan at 10 MV. In the IMRT 6 MV, IMRT 10 MV, and VMAT 10 MV plans, higher MUs were seen in the FFF models. FFF treatments are similar in quality to FF plans, generally lead to more monitor units, and are associated with shorter treatment times. FFF plans ranked by the order of superiority in terms of a time advantage are VMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT. PMID:26011493

  8. For the development of therapy with ionising radiation in tooth, mouth and jaw medicine. An historical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the corresponding literature study, the development of therapy with ionising radiation, especially in the areas of tooth, mouth and jaw medicine, is reported from the discovery of X-rays up till the present. First from 1915 on did the X-ray antiphlogistic irradiation with in importance, from 1925 to about 1940 it played a domineering role, after the war was hardly still in use and since 1970 is considered in the stomatological sector obsolete. In comparison, already in 1905 there were individual successes in tumor therapy using X radiation. After many failures and competition with the method of radium therapy in the following years, a new upswing in X-radiation came starting in around 1930 with the introduction of the Chaoul contact therapy. The high point of this development is the introduction of supervolt therapy starting around 1965. It is the result of comprehensive research in the area of radiation physics. As a result of further developed techniques there were soon combined and competing procedures available, whose results, however, have not been adequately compared and documented. From 1970 on electronic data processing has primarily taken over individual irradiation planning (cobalt 60 and electron irradiation), predictions about clinically relevant therapy successes are not present at this time. (TRV)

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 67: Tangential Modulated Arc Therapy (TMAT): A Novel Technique using Megavoltage Photons for the Treatment of Superficial Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new type of treatment that employs a modulated tangential photon field to provide superior coverage of complex superficial targets when compared to other commonly employed methods, and drastically reduce dose to the underlying sensitive structures often present in these cases. TMAT plans were formulated for a set of four representative cases: 1. Scalp sarcoma, 2. Posterior chest-wall sarcoma, 3. Pleural mesothelioma with intact lung, 4. Chest-wall with deep inframammary nodes. For these cases, asymmetric jaw placement, angular limitations, and central isocenter placements were used to force optimization solutions with beam lines tangential to the body surface. When compared with unrestricted modulated arcs, the tangential arc scalp treatment reduced the max and mean doses delivered to the brain by 33Gy (from 55Gy to 22Gy) and 6Gy (from 14Gy to 8Gy), respectively. In the posterior chest wall case, the V10 for the ipsilateral lung was kept below 5% impressively while retaining the 45Gy target prescription coverage by over 97%. For the breast chest-wall case, the TMAT plan achieved reductions in high dose to the ipsilateral lung and heart by a factor of 2–3 when compared to classic, laterally opposed, tangents and reduced the V5 by 40% when compared to standard modulated arcs. TMAT has outperformed the conventional modalities of treatment for superficial lesions used in our clinic. We hope that with the advent of digitally controlled linear accelerators, we can uncover further benefits of this new technique and extend its applicability to a wider section of the patient population

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 67: Tangential Modulated Arc Therapy (TMAT): A Novel Technique using Megavoltage Photons for the Treatment of Superficial Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadsell, M; Xing, L; Bush, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We propose a new type of treatment that employs a modulated tangential photon field to provide superior coverage of complex superficial targets when compared to other commonly employed methods, and drastically reduce dose to the underlying sensitive structures often present in these cases. TMAT plans were formulated for a set of four representative cases: 1. Scalp sarcoma, 2. Posterior chest-wall sarcoma, 3. Pleural mesothelioma with intact lung, 4. Chest-wall with deep inframammary nodes. For these cases, asymmetric jaw placement, angular limitations, and central isocenter placements were used to force optimization solutions with beam lines tangential to the body surface. When compared with unrestricted modulated arcs, the tangential arc scalp treatment reduced the max and mean doses delivered to the brain by 33Gy (from 55Gy to 22Gy) and 6Gy (from 14Gy to 8Gy), respectively. In the posterior chest wall case, the V10 for the ipsilateral lung was kept below 5% impressively while retaining the 45Gy target prescription coverage by over 97%. For the breast chest-wall case, the TMAT plan achieved reductions in high dose to the ipsilateral lung and heart by a factor of 2–3 when compared to classic, laterally opposed, tangents and reduced the V5 by 40% when compared to standard modulated arcs. TMAT has outperformed the conventional modalities of treatment for superficial lesions used in our clinic. We hope that with the advent of digitally controlled linear accelerators, we can uncover further benefits of this new technique and extend its applicability to a wider section of the patient population.

  11. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  12. Rotating arc spark plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  13. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Early Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: Is It Better Than the Conventional Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Wing Cheung Wu; Man In Pun; Cho Pan Lam; To Wing Mok; Wah Wai Mok

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the performance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques: single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA-VMAT) and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT) with the static beam conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (C-IMRT) for non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Twelve stage I and II NSCLC patients were recruited and their planning CT with contoured planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) was used for planning. Using th...

  14. The iSBTc/SITC primer on tumor immunology and biological therapy of cancer: a summary of the 2010 program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urba Walter J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC (formerly the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer, iSBTc, aims to improve cancer patient outcomes by advancing the science, development and application of biological therapy and immunotherapy. The society and its educational programs have become premier destinations for interaction and innovation in the cancer biologics community. For over a decade, the society has offered the Primer on Tumor Immunology and Biological Therapy of Cancer™ in conjunction with its Annual Scientific Meeting. This report summarizes the 2010 Primer that took place October 1, 2010 in Washington, D.C. as part of the educational offerings associated with the society's 25th anniversary. The target audience was basic and clinical investigators from academia, industry and regulatory agencies, and included clinicians, post-doctoral fellows, students, and allied health professionals. Attendees were provided a review of basic immunology and educated on the current status and most recent advances in tumor immunology and clinical/translational caner immunology. Ten prominent investigators presented on the following topics: innate immunity and inflammation; an overview of adaptive immunity; dendritic cells; tumor microenvironment; regulatory immune cells; immune monitoring; cytokines in cancer immunotherapy; immune modulating antibodies; cancer vaccines; and adoptive T cell therapy. Presentation slides, a Primer webinar and additional program information are available online on the society's website.

  15. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ%≤1, γavg < 0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc-therapy and intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate at high risk; Comparaison dosimetrique de l'arctherapie volumique modulee et de la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite dans le traitement de la prostate a haut risque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Largeron, G.; Pouchard, I.; Lorchel, F.; Passerat, V.; Barbet, N.; Khodri, M. [Centre de radiotherapie Orlam, Macon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a dosimetric comparison of IMRT (intensity-modulated radiotherapy) plans with that of volumetric-modulated arc-therapy in the case of treatment of high risk prostate, these plans being calculated on an Eclipse 8.9 (Varian{sup TM}) treatment planning system. The study is based on the treatment of 20 patients. Both techniques give similar results in terms of target volume coverage plan as well as in terms of organ-at-risk sparing, except for the plan with a single arc which results in smaller coverage and a lower homogeneity. Short communication

  17. SU-E-T-483: Treatment Planning Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Left-Sided Breast and Chestwall Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform the comparison of dose distributions and dosevolume- histograms generated by VMAT and conventional field-in-field technique for left-sided breast and chestwall cancers; to determine whether VMAT offers more dosimetric benefits than does the field-in-field technique. Methods: All VMAT and field-in-filed plans were produced in Eclipse(version 10). Five plans were generated for left-sided breast and leftsided chestwall with supraclavicular nodes, respectively. A clockwise arc (CW) and a counter-clockwise arc (CCW) were used with start and stop angles being 310o±10o and 140o±10o. Collimator angles were 30o for CW and 330o for CCW. The conformity index (CI) is the ratio of V95% over PTV. The homogeneity index (HI) is the ratio of the difference between D2% and D98% over the prescribed dose. The V5, as an indicator of low dose bath to organs-at-risk, was used for ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and contralateral breast. The V20, as an indicator of radiation pneumonitis, was used for ipsilateral lung. Results: Breast/chestwall VMAT delivers much higher low dose bath to ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung and contralateral breast/chestwall for both intact breast and chestwall with nodes. V5 for heart is increased in VMAT plans. V20 for ipsilateral lung is lower in VMAT plans. PTV coverage is similar for both techniques. For one particular chestwall patient with supraclavicular and internal mammary nodes, VMAT offers superior dose coverage of PTVs with slightly more low-dose-wash to heart, contralateral lung and contralateral breast. Conclusion: This study indicates that there is generally no benefit using VMAT for left-sided intact breast, due to large low-dose-bath (5Gy) to normal tissues with insignificant improvement in PTV coverage. Dosimetric benefits will be seen in VMAT plans for some chestwall patients with large size, and/or internal mammary nodes, etc. Whether a chestwall patient is treated with VMAT should be carefully

  18. Optimising the dosimetric quality and efficiency of post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: a planning study comparing the performance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with an optimised seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate radiotherapy treatment plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. The quality of radiotherapy plans for 10 patients planned and treated with a seven-field IMRT technique for biochemical failure post-prostatectomy were subsequently compared with 10 prospectively planned single-arc VMAT plans using the same computed tomography data set and treatment planning software. Plans were analysed using parameters to assess for target volume coverage, dose to organs at risk (OAR), biological outcomes, dose conformity and homogeneity, as well as the total monitor units (MU), planning and treatment efficiency. The mean results for the study population are reported for the purpose of comparison. For IMRT, the median dose to the planning target volume, V95% and D95% was 71.1 Gy, 98.9% and 68.3 Gy compared with 71.2 Gy, 99.2% and 68.6 Gy for VMAT. There was no significant difference in the conformity index or homogeneity index. The VMAT plans achieved better sparing of the rectum and the left and right femora with a reduction in the median dose by 7.9, 6.3 and 3.6 Gy, respectively. The total number of monitor units (MU) was reduced by 24% and treatment delivery time by an estimated 3 min per fraction without a significant increase in planning requirements. VMAT can achieve post-prostatectomy radiotherapy plans of comparable quality to IMRT with the potential to reduce dose to OAR and improve the efficiency of treatment delivery.

  19. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy for left-sided breast cancer and all regional nodes improves target volumes coverage and reduces treatment time and doses to the heart and left coronary artery, compared with a field-in-field technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared two intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for left-sided breast treatment, involving lymph node irradiation including the internal mammary chain. Inverse planned arc-therapy (VMAT) was compared with a forward-planned multi-segment technique with a mono-isocenter (MONOISO). Ten files were planned per technique, delivering a 50-Gy dose to the breast and 46.95 Gy to nodes, within 25 fractions. Comparative endpoints were planning target volume (PTV) coverage, dose to surrounding structures, and treatment delivery time. PTV coverage, homogeneity and conformality were better for two arc VMAT plans; V95%PTV-T was 96% for VMAT vs 89.2% for MONOISO. Homogeneity index (HI)PTV-T was 0.1 and HIPTV-N was 0.1 for VMAT vs 0.6 and 0.5 for MONOISO. Treatment delivery time was reduced by a factor of two using VMAT relative to MONOISO (84 s vs 180 s). High doses to organs at risk were reduced (V30left lung = 14% using VMAT vs 24.4% with MONOISO; dose to 2% of the volume (D2%)heart = 26.1 Gy vs 32 Gy), especially to the left coronary artery (LCA) (D2%LCA = 34.4 Gy vs 40.3 Gy). However, VMAT delivered low doses to a larger volume, including contralateral organs (mean dose [Dmean]right lung = 4 Gy and Dmeanright breast = 3.2 Gy). These were better protected using MONOISO plans (Dmeanright lung = 0.8 Gy and Dmeanright breast = 0.4 Gy). VMAT improved PTV coverage and dose homogeneity, but clinical benefits remain unclear. Decreased dose exposure to the LCA may be clinically relevant. VMAT could be used for complex treatments that are difficult with conventional techniques. Patient age should be considered because of uncertainties concerning secondary malignancies. (author)

  20. Peek Arc Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Bodirsky, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies peek arc consistency, a reasoning technique that extends the well-known arc consistency technique for constraint satisfaction. In contrast to other more costly extensions of arc consistency that have been studied in the literature, peek arc consistency requires only linear space and quadratic time and can be parallelized in a straightforward way such that it runs in linear time with a linear number of processors. We demonstrate that for various constraint languages, peek arc consistency gives a polynomial-time decision procedure for the constraint satisfaction problem. We also present an algebraic characterization of those constraint languages that can be solved by peek arc consistency, and study the robustness of the algorithm.

  1. Rapid Arc for heat and Neck cancer (200 patients experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Triana, G.; Gesto, C.; Diaz, I.; Candal, A.; Fernandez, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Poncet, M.; Silva, M. C.; Soto, M.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy is increasingly standard for head and neck cancer. These advances have resulted in longer treatment times when compared to 3D Conformal Radiotherapy. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy potentially enables shorter treatment time, achieving similar dose results. We report feasibility and acute toxicity profile of patients treated with moderate hypo fractionation and simultaneous integrated boost by means of Image Guided- Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy technique in the first two years from its clinical implementation at COG. (Author)

  2. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  3. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  4. Primary Ewing′s sarcoma of the squamous part of temporal bone in a young girl treated with adjuvant volumetric arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Moujhuri Nandi; Jibak Bhattacharya; Suchanda Goswami; Chanchal Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Ewing′s sarcoma (ES)/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors usually arise in the long bones of children and young adults. Primary ES of the cranium is unusual. Treatment involves multi-modality therapy incorporating surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; outcomes are similar to those arising from long bones. We report a case of Primary ES of the squamous part of temporal bone with intracranial extension in a 9-year-old girl who was treated with surgery, chemotherapy followed by adjuvant...

  5. Summary of dose plan system for boron neutron capture therapy 'SERA' and it's application at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is difficult for epithermal neutron irradiation to measure doses of thermal and fast neutron at near the surface of body in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Dose plan system for the BNCT, 'SERA' (Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications) was developed by the groups of INEEL (Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory) and MSU (Montana State University) in USA. The SERA system consists of seven modules in which contain image data of CT or MRI, three dimensional image data, two or three dimensional calculation, Monte Carlo simulation calculation, plan of irradiation conditions including boron concentration, one dimensional dose distribution and dose-volume histogram, and two dimensional dose distribution each. The BNCT using epithermal neutron irradiation and the SERA system was carried out to eight patients of tumor, six persons of oral tumor and two persons of brain tumor, in the KUR during Dec. 2001 - Oct. 2002. Thermal neutron flux, epithermal neutron flux and gamma ray doses are measured by phantom experiments. The calculated results of the SERA system give good agreement with the values obtained by the phantom experiments, within accuracy of 10%. (M. Suetake)

  6. Application of the thermoluminescent (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry techniques to determinate the isodose curves in a cancer treatment planning simulation using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy - VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an advance technique of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). This progress is due to the continuous gantry rotation with the radiation beam modulation providing lower time of the patient treatment. This research aimed the verification of the isodose curves in a simulation of a vertebra treatment with spinal cord protection using the thermoluminescent (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry techniques and the LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100), CaS04:Dy and Al203:C dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Ti micro dosimeters (TLD-100). The dosimeters were characterized using PMMA plates of 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 and different thickness. All irradiations were done using Truebeam STx linear accelerator of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, with 6 MV photons beam. After the dosimeter characterization, they were irradiated according the specific planning simulation and using a PMMA phantom developed to VMAT measurements. This irradiation aimed to verify the isodose curves of the treatment simulation using the two dosimetry techniques. All types of dosimeters showed satisfactory results to determine the dose distribution but analysing the complexity of the isodose curves and the proximity of them, the LiF:Mg,Ti micro dosimeter showed the most appropriate for use due to its small dimensions. Regarding the best technique, as both technique showed satisfactory results, the TL technique presents less complex to be used because the most of the radiotherapy departments already have a TL laboratory. The OSL technique requires more care and greater investment in the hospital. (author)

  7. Off-label use of medical products in radiation therapy: Summary of the Report of AAPM Task Group No. 121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    approval process, along with manufacturers' responsibilities, labeling, marketing and promotion, and off-label use. This is an educational and descriptive report and does not contain prescriptive recommendations. This report addresses the role of the medical physicist in clinical situations involving off-label use. Case studies in radiation therapy are presented. Any mention of commercial products is for identification only; it does not imply recommendations or endorsements of any of the authors or the AAPM. The full report, containing extensive background on off-label use with several appendices, is available on the AAPM website (http://www.aapm.org/pubs/reports/).

  8. Liver support therapy with molecular adsorbents recirculating system in liver failure:a summary of 252 cases from 14 centers in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Min-min; HU Xiao-bin; LUO Hong-tao; LIU Yi-he; WANG Wen-ya; CHEN Shi-jun; YE Qi-fa; YANG Yi-jun; CHEN Shi-bin; ZHOU Xin-min; GUO Li-min; ZHANG Yue-xin; DING Xiao-qiang

    2008-01-01

    Background A liver support therapy,named molecular adsorbents recirculating system (MARS),has been used for more than 700 liver failure patients in China.We made here a summary to evaluate the effects of MARS treatment in different applications with emphasis on hepatitis B virus (HBV) based liver failure.Methods This report analyzed data of 252 patients (mean age (44.9±12.7) years) in three groups:acute severe hepatitis (ASH),subacute severe hepatitis (SSH) and chronic severe hepatitis (CSH).The largest group was CSH (156 patients,61.9%),and 188 patients (74.6%,188/252) were infected with HBV.Results MARS treatments were associated with significant reduction of albumin bound toxins and water-soluble toxins.Most of the patients showed a positive response with a significant improvement of multiple organ function substantiated by a significant increase in prothrombin time activity (PTA) and median arterial pressure (MAP).There was a decrease in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) grade and Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) scale.Thirty-nine of 188 HBV patients (20.7%) dropped out of the commendatory consecutive therapy ending with lower survival of 43.6% while the rest of the 149 patients had a survival rate of 62.4%.Survival within the ASH and SSH groups were 81.2% and 75.0%,respectively.In the CSH group,end stage patients were predominant (65/151,43%),whereas the early and middle stage patients had a better prognosis:early stage survival,including orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) survival of 91.7%,middle stage survival of 75%,end stage survival of 33.8%.Conclusions MARS continues to be the most favorable extracorporeal treatment for liver support therapy in China for a wide range of conditions,including the majority of hepatitis B related liver failure conditions.The appropriate application of MARS for the right indications and stage of hepatic failure,as well as the fulfillment of prescribed treatments,will lead to the optimal therapeutic result.

  9. Assessing the feasibility of volumetric-modulated arc therapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-VMAT): An analysis for complex head-neck, high-risk prostate and rectal cancer cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allowed the simultaneous delivery of different doses to different target volumes within a single fraction, an approach called simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). As consequence, the fraction dose to the boost volume can be increased while keeping low doses to the elective volumes, and the number of fractions and overall treatment time will be reduced, translating into better radiobiological effectiveness. In recent years, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been shown to provide similar plan quality with respect to fixed-field IMRT but with large reduction in treatment time and monitor units (MUs) number. However, the feasibility of VMAT when used with SIB strategy has few investigations to date. We explored the potential of VMAT in a SIB strategy for complex cancer sites. A total of 15 patients were selected, including 5 head-and-neck, 5 high-risk prostate, and 5 rectal cancer cases. Both a double-arc VMAT and a 7-field IMRT plan were generated for each case using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system for an Elekta Precise linac. Dosimetric indexes for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared based on dose-volume histograms. Conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose-contrast index were used for target analyses. The equivalent uniform doses and the normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for main OARs. MUs number and treatment time were analyzed to score treatment efficiency. Pretreatment dosimetry was performed using 2-dimensional (2D)-array dosimeter. SIB-VMAT plans showed a high level of fluence modulation needed for SIB treatments, high conformal dose distribution, similar target coverage, and a tendency to improve OARs sparing compared with the benchmark SIB-IMRT plans. The median treatment times reduced from 13 to 20 minutes to approximately 5 minutes for all cases with SIB-VMAT, with a MUs reduction up to 22.5%. The 2D-array ion-chambers' measurements reported an agreement

  10. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  11. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  12. ALICE - ARC integration

    OpenAIRE

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva; Peters, Andreas; Siaz, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Gridware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructur...

  13. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number

  14. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, L; Deng, G [Department of Oncology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xie, J; Cheng, J; Liang, N; Zhang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Qianfoshan Hospital Affiliated to Shandon, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, J; Luo, H [Division of Oncology, Department of Graduate, Weifang Medical College, 2610, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number.

  15. Simultaneous in-field boost for patients with 1 to 4 brain metastasis/es treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy: a prospective study on quality-of-life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess treatment toxicity and patients' survival/quality of life (QoL) after volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) for cancer patients with 1 - 4 brain metastases (BM) treated with or without surgery. Between March and December 2010, 29 BM patients (total volume BM, < 40 cm3) aged < 80 years, KPS ≥ 70, RPA < III were included in this prospective trial. Whole brain VMAT (30 Gy) and a SIB to the BM (40 Gy) was delivered in 10 fraction. Mean age was 62.1 ± 8.5 years. Fifteen (51.7%) underwent surgery. KPS and MMSE were prospectively assessed. A self-assessed questionnaire was used to assess the QoL (EORTC QLQ-C30 with -BN20 module). As of April 2011 and after a mean FU of 5.4 ± 2.8 months, 14 (48.3%) patients died. The 6-month overall survival was 55.1%. Alopecia was only observed in 9 (31%) patients. In 3-month survivors, KPS was significantly (p = 0.01) decreased. MMSE score remained however stable (p = 0.33). Overall, QoL did decrease after VMAT. The mean QLQ-C30 global health status (p = 0.72) and emotional functional (p = 0.91) scores were decreased (low QoL). Physical (p = 0.05) and role functioning score (p = 0.01) were significantly worse and rapidly decreased during treatment. The majority of BN20 domains and single items worsened 3 months after VMAT except headaches (p = 0.046) and bladder control (p = 0.26) which improved. The delivery of 40 Gy in 10 fractions to 1 - 4 BM using VMAT was achieved with no significant toxicity. QoL, performance status, but not MMSE, was however compromised 3 months after treatment in this selected cohort of BM patients

  16. Optimal set of grid size and angular increment for practical dose calculation using the dynamic conformal arc technique: a systematic evaluation of the dosimetric effects in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To recommend the optimal plan parameter set of grid size and angular increment for dose calculations in treatment planning for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) considering both accuracy and computational efficiency. Dose variations with varying grid sizes (2, 3, and 4 mm) and angular increments (2°, 4°, 6°, and 10°) were analyzed in a thorax phantom for 3 spherical target volumes and in 9 patient cases. A 2-mm grid size and 2° angular increment are assumed sufficient to serve as reference values. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using dose–volume histograms, monitor units (MUs), and dose to organs at risk (OARs) for a definite volume corresponding to the dose–volume constraint in lung SBRT. The times required for dose calculations using each parameter set were compared for clinical practicality. Larger grid sizes caused a dose increase to the structures and required higher MUs to achieve the target coverage. The discrete beam arrangements at each angular increment led to over- and under-estimated OARs doses due to the undulating dose distribution. When a 2° angular increment was used in both studies, a 4-mm grid size changed the dose variation by up to 3–4% (50 cGy) for the heart and the spinal cord, while a 3-mm grid size produced a dose difference of <1% (12 cGy) in all tested OARs. When a 3-mm grid size was employed, angular increments of 6° and 10° caused maximum dose variations of 3% (23 cGy) and 10% (61 cGy) in the spinal cord, respectively, while a 4° increment resulted in a dose difference of <1% (8 cGy) in all cases except for that of one patient. The 3-mm grid size and 4° angular increment enabled a 78% savings in computation time without making any critical sacrifices to dose accuracy. A parameter set with a 3-mm grid size and a 4° angular increment is found to be appropriate for predicting patient dose distributions with a dose difference below 1% while reducing the

  17. Modeling of Arc Force in Plasma Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhonglin; HU Shengsun; YIN Fengliang; WANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    A three. dimensional mathematical model for the transferred-type argon arc was developed to describe arc force on the anode surface. The software ANSYS was employed to solve the model. The model includes a part of torch and tungsten electrode to achieve m ore reasonable results. The arc temperature and flow fields were derived. And the influences of welding parameters on arc force were also studied. The simulated results show that arc pressure at the anode are dependent on the welding current, plasma gas flow rate and electrode neck-in, while not sensitive to arc length.

  18. ALICE-ARC integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  19. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  20. Influence of multileaf collimator leaf width on volumetric modulated arc therapy plans evaluated on AAPM standard phantom%应用AAPM标准模体评估MLC宽度对VMAT计划的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娜; 王培; 张德康; 唐斌; 黎杰; 王先良; 吴凡; 秦远; 康盛伟

    2016-01-01

    目的:使用AAPM119报告标准模体和标准靶区设计双弧VMAT计划,依照AAPM119报告剂量目标要求比较Agility和MLCi2两种叶片剂量参数。方法利用AAPM119报告中Cshape、Head and Neck、Prostate和Multitarget标准靶区勾画结构,按照AAPM计划目标要求,首先采用医科达Agility MLC进行计划设计,在计划设计参数不变情况下仅更换为医科达MLCi2进行计划优化和剂量计算。以AAPM119报告目标剂量为标准,分析两种MLC叶片在4种靶区勾画结构下的靶区和OAR剂量体积参数的差异。结果依照AAPM119号报告所达到的平均剂量标准,Cshape、Head and Neck和Multitarget 靶区结构采用Agility制作的放疗计划剂量指标多优于采用MLCi2制作的放疗计划, Prostate靶区结构采用MLCi2制作的放疗计划剂量指标优于采用Agility制作的放疗计划。结论在靶区勾画结构、计划设计人员、计划设计参数和评价标准全部相同下,对严苛剂量限值目标医科达Agility比医科达MLCi2能更好达到剂量目标要求。%Objective To develop double-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) plans using standard phantom and standard target volume in AAPM119 report, and to investigate the dosimetric parameters of Agility and MLCi2 leafs according to the requirements for target dose in AAPM119 report. Methods The Cshape, Head and Neck, Prostate, and Multitarget structures for standard target volume delineation in AAPM119 report were used.The Elekta Agility multi-leaf collimator was used to develop plans, and then with other parameters remaining unchanged, Elekta MLCi2 was used for plan optimization and dose calculation.The target dose in AAPM119 report was used as the standard to analyze the differences in target volume and dose-volume parameters of organs at risk between the four structures for target volume delineation.Results According to the mean dose in AAPM119 report, in the Cshape, Head and Neck, and

  1. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  2. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  3. Do technological advances in linear accelerators improve dosimetric outcomes in stereotaxy? A head-on comparison of seven linear accelerators using volumetric modulated arc therapy-based stereotactic planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Linear accelerator (Linac based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has been used for treating small intracranial lesions. Recent development in the Linacs such as inbuilt micro multileaf collimator (MLC and flattening filter free (FFF beam are intended to provide a better dose conformity and faster delivery when using VMAT technique. This study was aimed to compare the dosimetric outcomes and monitor units (MUs of the stereotactic treatment plans for different commercially available MLC models and beam profiles. Materials and Methods: Ten patients having 12 planning target volume (PTV/gross target volume's (GTVs who received the SRS/SRT treatment in our clinic using Axesse Linac (considered reference arm gold standard were considered for this study. The test arms comprised of plans using Elekta Agility with FFF, Elekta Agility with the plane beam, Elekta APEX, Varian Millennium 120, Varian Millennium 120HD, and Elekta Synergy in Monaco treatment planning system. Planning constraints and calculation grid spacing were not altered in the test plans. To objectively evaluate the efficacy of MLC-beam model, the resultant dosimetric outcomes were subtracted from the reference arm parameters. Results: V95%, V100%, V105%, D1%, maximum dose, and mean dose of PTV/GTV showed a maximum inter MLC - beam model variation of 1.5% and 2% for PTV and GTV, respectively. Average PTV conformity index and heterogeneity index shows a variation in the range 0.56–0.63 and 1.08–1.11, respectively. Mean dose difference (excluding Axesse for all organs varied between 1.1 cGy and 74.8 cGy (mean dose = 6.1 cGy standard deviation [SD] = 26.9 cGy and 1.7 cGy–194.5 cGy (mean dose 16.1 cGy SD = 57.2 cGy for single and multiple fraction, respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetry of VMAT-based SRS/SRT treatment plan had minimal dependence on MLC and beam model variations. All tested MLC

  4. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  5. SU-E-J-10: A Moving-Blocker-Based Strategy for Simultaneous Megavoltage and Kilovoltage Scatter Correction in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image Acquired During Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, L; Lee, H; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a moving-blocker-based approach in estimating and correcting megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) scatter contamination in kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: XML code was generated to enable concurrent CBCT acquisition and VMAT delivery in Varian TrueBeam developer mode. A physical attenuator (i.e., “blocker”) consisting of equal spaced lead strips (3.2mm strip width and 3.2mm gap in between) was mounted between the x-ray source and patient at a source to blocker distance of 232mm. The blocker was simulated to be moving back and forth along the gantry rotation axis during the CBCT acquisition. Both MV and kV scatter signal were estimated simultaneously from the blocked regions of the imaging panel, and interpolated into the un-blocked regions. Scatter corrected CBCT was then reconstructed from un-blocked projections after scatter subtraction using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on constraint optimization. Experimental studies were performed on a Catphan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of using moving blocker for MV-kV scatter correction. Results: MV scatter greatly degrades the CBCT image quality by increasing the CT number inaccuracy and decreasing the image contrast, in addition to the shading artifacts caused by kV scatter. The artifacts were substantially reduced in the moving blocker corrected CBCT images in both Catphan and pelvis phantoms. Quantitatively, CT number error in selected regions of interest reduced from 377 in the kV-MV contaminated CBCT image to 38 for the Catphan phantom. Conclusions: The moving-blockerbased strategy can successfully correct MV and kV scatter simultaneously in CBCT projection data acquired with concurrent VMAT delivery. This work was supported in part by a grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (RP130109) and a grant from the American

  6. Clinical utility of RapidArcTM radiotherapy technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Infusino E

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Erminia Infusino Department of Radiotherapy, Campus Bio-Medico University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: RapidArcTM is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360° and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords "RapidArc", "Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy", and "Intensity-modulated radiotherapy". Keywords: IMRT, VMAT, SBRT, SRS, treatment planning software 

  7. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  8. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  9. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  10. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng;

    2013-01-01

    means that the summaries can be merged in a way akin to other algebraic operators such as sum and max, which is especially useful for computing summaries on massive distributed data. Several data summaries are trivially mergeable by construction, most notably all the sketches that are linear functions...... of the datasets. But some other fundamental ones, like those for heavy hitters and quantiles, are not (known to be) mergeable. In this article, we demonstrate that these summaries are indeed mergeable or can be made mergeable after appropriate modifications. Specifically, we show that for ϵ-approximate heavy...... to geometric summaries such as ϵ-approximations which permit approximate multidimensional range counting queries. While most of the results in this article are theoretical in nature, some of the algorithms are actually very simple and even perform better than the previously best known algorithms, which we...

  11. 保乳术后全乳照射 VMAT 与 IMRT 的计量学比较%Dosimetric comparison of volumetric -modulated arc therapy and intensity -modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵金; 吴文安; 廖娟; 雎岩; 梁静; 宋丽萍

    2016-01-01

    目的:比较保乳术后全乳照射 VMAT 与静态 IMRT 的剂量学差异,探索 VMAT 的可行性。方法:2014年-2015年入组乳腺癌患者10例,左侧、右侧乳腺癌各5例。用 Varian Eclipse 计划系统分别设计双弧VMAT 和5野 IMRT 计划,PTV 处方剂量50Gy 分25次,用 Delta 4进行剂量验证。配对 t 检验比较两组计划PTV、OAR 受量、机器跳数及有效治疗时间。结果:两组计划均能满足临床剂量学要求。 VMAT 与 IMRT相比CI 值分别为(1.01±0.1)和(1.36±0.2)(P <0.05);HI 值分别为(0.124±0.01)和(0.173±0.02)(P <0.05);心脏 V20、V30、Dmean增高(P =0.041、0.012、0.002);肺 V20-V30无明显统计学差异,但是增加了患侧肺的 V5(58.2±3.5)% vs (51.4±4.2)%(P <0.05);机器跳数分别为(452±98)和(786±32)(P <0.05);有效治疗时间(2.5±0.89)min 和(15±1.78)min(P <0.05)。结论:在靶区覆盖率相似前提下,VMAT 可降低部分 OAR 受量,并能改善 CI 值、减少机器跳数、缩短有效治疗时间。Synergy 平台上的 VMAT 计划剂量稳定可靠。%Objective:To compare the dosimetric difference in VMAT and IMRT planning for breast cancer.Methods:Varian Eclipse,ten patients received radiotherapy alone after breast-conserving surgery were randomly selected.For each patient,two plans(VMAT and IMRT)were designed.In each plan,the volume of planning target volume (PTV)received prescription dose was not less than 95%.The dosimetric parameters were assessed with dosevolume histogram (DVH)and mean dose in PTV and organ at risk(OAR).Results:The irradition volume and meandose of heart and V5 of the lung can be increased by VMAT.Better conformal index(CI)and homogeneity index (HI)of PTV can be achieved.The MU and the therapy time can be reduced by the VMAT.Conclusion:The design ofVMAT plan for breast cancer should

  12. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions

  13. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Siu, Zhuo, E-mail: a0018876@nus.edu.sg [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Advanced Concepts and Nanotechnology, Data Storage Institute, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1 (Off Kent Ridge Crescent, NUS), Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Jalil, Mansoor B. A. [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Ghee Tan, Seng [Advanced Concepts and Nanotechnology, Data Storage Institute, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1 (Off Kent Ridge Crescent, NUS), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  14. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  15. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  16. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  17. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the sourc...

  18. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  19. Arc-preserving subsequences of arc-annotated sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-01

    Arc-annotated sequences are useful in representing the structural information of RNA and protein sequences. The longest arc-preserving common subsequence problem has been introduced as a framework for studying the similarity of arc-annotated sequences. In this paper, we consider arc-annotated sequences with various arc structures. We consider the longest arc preserving common subsequence problem. In particular, we show that the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(crossing,chain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(crossing,chain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete for some fixed alphabet $\\Sigma$ such that $|\\Sigma| = 2$. Also we show that if $|\\Sigma| = 1$, then the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete.

  20. 二维电离室矩阵实时验证 VMAT 剂量价值研究%Real-time patient transit dose verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy by a 2D ionization chamber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘潇; 王运来; 鞠忠建; 徐伟; 金丽媛

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the real?time dose verification with 2D array ion chamber array in volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source?detector distance (SDD) was 140 cm. 8 mm RW3 solid water was added to the 2D array to improve the signal noise ratio. Patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to be delivered on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real?time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions were evaluated using gamma index criteria of 3 mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the first time result. Results The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%;the gamma index pass rate for esophageal, prostate and liver cancer patient were about 92%, 92% and 94%, respectively. Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusions The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.%目的:探讨利用二维电离室矩阵进行 VMAT 患者透射剂量实时验证的临床价值。方法将二维电离室矩阵面板粘贴固定在加速器 EPID 探测面板上,源到 EPID 探测面板距离为140 cm。电离室矩阵面板上加8 mm 的 RW3固体水以提高信躁比。选取食管癌、前列腺癌、肝癌患者计划,在圆柱形 Cheese 模体上照射测量5次,研究患者计划在模体中剂量验证的可行性与准确性。患者每次治疗时进行实时测量,第1次测量结果作为参考剂量,利用γ分析比较分次间剂量误差。结果采用3%3 mm 标准,Cheese 模体 VMAT 计划的γ通过率为98%左右,食管癌、前列腺癌和肝癌患者实时照射γ通过率分别约为92%、92%和94%。整个治疗过程中

  1. Investigation of pellet acceleration by an arc heated gas gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work on pellet acceleration by means of an arc heated gas gun. Preliminary results were described in Riso-M-2536 and in Riso-M-2650. This final report describes the work carried out from 1987.03.31 to 1988.09.30. An arc heated hydrogen gas source, for pneumatic acceleration of deuterium pellets to velocities above 2 km/s, was developed. Experiments were performed with an arc chamber to which different methods of hydrogen supply were possible, and to which the input of electrical power could be programmed. Results in terms of pressure transients and acceleration curves are presented. Maximum pellet velocities approaching 2 km/s were obtained. This limit is discussed in relation to the presented data. Finally this report contains a summary and a conclusion for the entire project. (author) 34 ills., 3 refs

  2. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  3. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  4. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of four recent crisis management publications: (1) "Crisis Intervention for Children/Caregivers Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence," summarized by Donna DeVaughn Kreskey; (2) "Predictors of Trauma Reactions Following the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks," summarized by Kelly O'Connor; (3) "Cognitive Coping Styles and PTSD…

  5. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this column, members of the NASP Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group provide summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among rescue workers. The second article explored the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention, which is…

  6. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  7. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "The Impact of School Violence on School Personnel," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux; (2) "Children Exposed to War/Terrorism," summarized by Jennifer DeFago; and (3) "Suicide Survivors Seeking Mental Health Services," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux. The first…

  8. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  9. Dosimetric study of multicriteria optimization volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning for prostate cancer%前列腺癌多目标优化VMAT计划剂量学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昊; 邱杰; 全红; 杨波; 庞廷田; 刘峡; 刘楠; 张福泉

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨多目标优化在前列腺癌VMAT计划中的应用.方法 随机抽取已接受治疗的14例前列腺癌患者VMAT计划资料.这些计划基于单目标优化,保持优化条件不变,改用多目标优化.配对t检验两种计划剂量学参数差异.结果 两种计划均满足临床要求,与单目标计划相比,多目标计划PTV 95%、100%处方剂量覆盖度增加(P =0.000、0.000),105%处方剂量覆盖度降低(P =0.000),Dmax降低0.35 Gy (P=0.063);直肠V20、V30、V40、V50和Dmean分别降低24.7%、36.8%、31.1%、20.5%和6.8 Gy (P =0.000、0.000、0.000、0.001、0.000),D2cc增加1.4 Gy (P=0.000);膀胱V10、V20、V30、V40、V50和Dmean分别降低5.7%、18.5%、20.9%、12.5%、5.4%和3.5 Gy (P=0.006、0.000、0.000、0.000、0.002、0.000);小肠V10、V20、V30和Dmean多目标计划有优势.结论 多目标计划在满足靶区剂量情况下可以进一步降低OAR剂量,但结果还需进一步研究和评估.%Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the multicriteria optimization (MCO) in planning volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer.Methods 14 prostate patients VMAT plans with single criteria optimization,while keeping optimization conditions,new plans were then optimized with MCO,dosimetry parameters comparison were made between both kinds of plans.Results Two kinds of VMAT plans satisfied clinical requirements.To compare with SCO plans,PTV 95% and PTV 100% prescription dose coverage of MCO plans increased (P =0.000,0.000),PTV 105% dose coverage became lower (P =0.000),Dmax decreased 0.35 Gy (P=0.063).V20,V30,V40,V50 and Dme.of the rectum were reduced by about 24.7%,36.8%,31.1%,20.5% and 6.8 Gy respectively (P =0.000,0.000,0.000,0.001,0.000),D2 cc increased 1.4 Gy (P =0.000) ;V10,V20,V30,V40,V50 and D mean of the bladder were reduced by about 5.7 %,18.5 %,20.9%,12.5 %,5.4% and 3.5 Gy respectively (P =0.006,0.000,0.000,0.000,0.002,0.000) ; V10,V20

  10. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  11. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  12. Of Eggs and Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  13. Dosimetry study on conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy and intensity modulated arc radiotherapy in middle thoracic esophageal cancer%胸中段食管癌三维适形放疗、调强放疗及旋转调强放疗的剂量学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙尧; 刘希军; 刘同海; 于甬华; 尹勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetry of three different radiation therapy plans [threedimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT),intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT),intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (IMAT)].Methods Selected 15 cases with middle thoracic esophageal cancer,Varian Eclipse 8.6 planning systems were designed with 3DCRT,IMRT,IMAT,3DCRT using 5-8 coplanar radiation fields,IMRT using 7 coplanar radiation fields,IMAT using 2 radians.Three planned dose difference were compared.Results Compared with 3DCRT,IMRT and IMAT were better with heterogeneity index (HI),conformality index (CI),VPTV 95 %,V5,V20,V35 of total lung,and V30 of heart (t =2.531,P< 0.05).There was no statistically significant difference for the V10,V15,V25,V30 mean dose of total lung,the mean dose of heart,the maximum dose of spinal cord,and the minimum dose of PTV among the three plans (t =1.325,P >0.05).Conclusion IMAT and IMRT are similar in the middle thoracic esophageal cancer radiotherapy target volume dose coverage and organs at risk protection,they are better than 3DCRT.IMAT in the monitor units and delivery time are less than IMRT.%目的 研究胸中段食管癌三维适形放疗(3DCRT)、调强放疗(IMRT)、旋转调强放疗(IMAT)3种放疗计划的剂量差异.方法 选取胸中段食管癌患者15例,以Varian Eclipse 8.6计划系统分别设计3DCRT、IMRT、IMAT 3种放疗计划,其中3DCRT采用5~8个共面射野,IMRT采用7个共面射野,IMAT采用2个弧度.比较3种计划的剂量学差异.结果 IMRT、IMRT的靶区均匀指数(HI)、适形指数(CI)、95%计划靶体积(PTV)体积剂量均优于3DCRT,全肺V5、V20、V35、心脏V30受照剂量低于3DCRT(t=2.531,P< 0.05),而在全肺V10、V15、V25、V30、全肺平均、心脏平均、脊髓Dmax剂量之间三者的差异均无统计学意义(t=1.325,P>0.05).结论 IMAT与IMRT在胸中段食管癌放疗靶区体积剂量覆盖和危及器官保护方面相似,二者均优于3DCRT.IMAT

  14. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  15. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 18 May 2001, the Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, within the municipality of Eurajoki. The Municipality Council and the government has made positive decisions earlier, at the end of 2000, and in compliance with the Nuclear Energy Act, Parliament's ratification was then required. The decision is valid for the spent fuel generated by the existing Finnish nuclear power plants and means that the construction of the final disposal facility is considered to be in line with the overall good of society. Earlier steps included, amongst others, the approval of the technical project by the Safety Authority. Future steps include construction of an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO (2003-2004), and application for separate construction and operating licences for the final disposal facility (from about 2010). How did this political and societal decision come about? The FSC Workshop provided the opportunity to present the history leading up to the Decision in Principle (DiP), and to examine future perspectives with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It presents, for the most part, a factual account of the individual presentations and of the discussions that took place. It relies importantly on the notes that were taken at the meeting. Most materials are elaborated upon in a fuller way in the texts that the various speakers and session moderators contributed for these proceedings. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's perspective aiming to place the results of all discussions, feedback and site visit into an international perspective. (authors)

  16. High current electric arcs; Les arcs electriques a fort courant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delalondre, C.; Simonin, O. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d' Hydraulique; Mineau, L. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Dept. Systemes Energetiques; Verite, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Dept. Cables, Condensateurs, Materiel d' Automatisme et Materiaux

    1999-07-01

    The mechanisms called into play through the interaction between a high current electric arc and the surrounding environment have an essential role to play in the performance of arc furnaces and high voltage circuit breakers. Our knowledge of them remains poor, and because of the very high temperatures and speeds involved, experimental investigation is particularly difficult. What can numerical modelling teach us about these phenomena? (authors)

  17. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 03: Dosmetric evaluation of single versus multi-arc VMAT for lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karan, T; Taremi, M; Comsa, D [Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontatio (Canada); Allibhai, Z; Ryan, M; Le, K [Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Five non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy using the VMAT (volumetric modulated arc therapy) technique were selected for this retrospective study. Plans were re-optimized using Pinnacle treatment planning system (v9.0, Philips Medical), with the basis for comparison a two-arc plan involving a 360° arc in addition to a 90° arc with a couch kick. Additionally a single 360° arc was optimized for comparison, as well as a partial arc covering ∼230°, avoiding the contralateral lung. All plans met target coverage criteria as dictated by RTOG0236. Plans were evaluated based on conformity, sparing of organs at risk and practical considerations of delivery. Conformity was best in the two-arc plan; however the decrease seen in one- and partial arc plans was not statistically significant as tested by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The partial-arc plan resulted in the lowest esophagus and trachea dose and the highest heart dose, however none of the plans exceeded organ at risk tolerances for lung SBRT. Partial arcs resulted in plans with slightly cooler dose distributions, a decrease in low dose spillage and an overall lower mean lung dose. The decrease in treatment time was on average 36 and 40 seconds for single and partial arcs, respectively, with partial arcs requiring the lowest number of MUs. The slight decrease in conformity seen in one-arc plans is offset by an increase in efficiency (optimization and treatment time, MUs) making the implementation of a single or partial-arc treatment technique clinically desirable.

  18. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 03: Dosmetric evaluation of single versus multi-arc VMAT for lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy using the VMAT (volumetric modulated arc therapy) technique were selected for this retrospective study. Plans were re-optimized using Pinnacle treatment planning system (v9.0, Philips Medical), with the basis for comparison a two-arc plan involving a 360° arc in addition to a 90° arc with a couch kick. Additionally a single 360° arc was optimized for comparison, as well as a partial arc covering ∼230°, avoiding the contralateral lung. All plans met target coverage criteria as dictated by RTOG0236. Plans were evaluated based on conformity, sparing of organs at risk and practical considerations of delivery. Conformity was best in the two-arc plan; however the decrease seen in one- and partial arc plans was not statistically significant as tested by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The partial-arc plan resulted in the lowest esophagus and trachea dose and the highest heart dose, however none of the plans exceeded organ at risk tolerances for lung SBRT. Partial arcs resulted in plans with slightly cooler dose distributions, a decrease in low dose spillage and an overall lower mean lung dose. The decrease in treatment time was on average 36 and 40 seconds for single and partial arcs, respectively, with partial arcs requiring the lowest number of MUs. The slight decrease in conformity seen in one-arc plans is offset by an increase in efficiency (optimization and treatment time, MUs) making the implementation of a single or partial-arc treatment technique clinically desirable

  19. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  20. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  1. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2000-09-01

    This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed by some personal reminiscences that go back a significant fraction of the century. I conclude in the form of a poem about this memorable conference in honor of the centennial anniversary of the Kodaikanal Observatory.

  2. Dosimetric comparison of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy techniques for early-stage lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huan, E-mail: huan.liu@ynhh.org; Ye, Jingjing; Kim, John J.; Deng, Jun; Kaur, Monica S.; Chen, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dosimetric and delivery characteristics of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques for early-stage lung cancer treatment. SBRT treatment plans for lung tumors of different sizes and locations were designed using a single-isocenter multisegment dynamic conformal arc technique (SiMs-arc) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy technique (RapidArc) for 5 representative patients treated previously with lung SBRT. The SiMs-arc plans were generated with the isocenter located in the geometric center of patient's axial plane (which allows for collision-free gantry rotation around the patient) and 6 contiguous 60° arc segments spanning from 1° to 359°. 2 RapidArc plans, one using the same arc geometry as the SiMs-arc and the other using typical partial arcs (210°) with the isocenter inside planning target volume (PTV), were generated for each corresponding SiMs-arc plan. All plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (V10.0) and were normalized with PTV V{sub 100} to 95%. PTV coverage, dose to organs at risk, and total monitor units (MUs) were then compared and analyzed. For PTV coverage, the RapidArc plans generally produced higher PTV D{sub 99} (by 1.0% to 3.3%) and higher minimum dose (by 2.7% to 12.7%), better PTV conformality index (by 1% to 8%), and less volume of 50% dose outside 2 cm from PTV (by 0 to 20.8 cm{sup 3}) than the corresponding SiMs-arc plans. For normal tissues, no significant dose differences were observed for the lungs, trachea, chest wall, and heart; RapidArc using partial arcs produced lowest maximum dose to spinal cord. For dose delivery, the RapidArc plans typically required 50% to 90% more MUs than SiMs-arc plans to deliver the same prescribed dose. The additional intensity modulation afforded by variable gantry speed and dose rate and by overlapping arcs enabled RapidArc plans to produce dosimetrically improved plans for lung SBRT, but required more MUs (by a factor > 1

  3. STUDY ON THE PRESSURE IN PLASMA ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The axial pressure in plasma arc is measured under different conditions. The effects of the parameters, such as welding current, plasma gas flow rate, electrode setback and arc length, on the pressure in plasma arc are investigated and quantitative analyzed to explain the relationship between the quality of weld and the matching of parameters in plasma arc welding process.

  4. 灸法治疗高血压的研究概述%Research summaries of moxibustion therapy on essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李美罗; 李垠和; 吴焕淦; 常小荣; 刘慧荣; 王晓梅

    2012-01-01

    原发性高血压已成为影响人类健康的最主要原因之一,到目前为止并无根治的方法.对艾灸疗法治疗高血压的文献进行综述发现,近年来研究者临床多选用足三里、涌泉、石门、曲池、百会等穴位,采用单穴、穴位配伍等选穴方法,采用温和灸、直接灸、温针灸等方法.艾灸治疗高血压病操作简单、无副作用,艾灸可以使高血压患者异常的血压降低,并可在一定程度上改善高血压患者的临床症状;从艾灸治疗高血压的机理研究来看,艾灸降压效应与改善高血压模型大鼠的血管内皮细胞内分泌功能,抑制肾素、血管紧张素活性,以及血液流变学、内分泌等因素有关.%Essential hypertension has become one of the most important reason to affect the human health. So far there is no complete cure of it. Reviewing on moxibustion to treat essential hypertension, many researchers in recent years have selected single acupoint, such as Zusanli, Yongquan, Shimen, Quchi, Baihui, and etc, using mild moxibustion, direct moxibustion and needle warming moxibustion therapy, or meridians compatibility to treat essential hypertension patients. Results showed that moxibustion therapy is an effective therapy for hypertension with easy operation and less side effects. Moxibustion can not only lower abnormal blood pressure, but also improve the clinical symptoms of patients. The antihypertensive effect of moxibustion may be related to endocrine function of vascular endothelial cells improvement, rennin and angiotensin activity snppression, and the body hemorheology and endocrine system repair.

  5. Total scalp irradiation using fixed photon and arc electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The main difficulty encountered for radical radiotherapy to the whole scalp is reducing the dose to normal brain tissue, while maintaining uniform dose coverage to the entire scalp. Complicating this is the fact that multiple portals need to be employed (Able C, et al. Int. J. Rad. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 21 :1065- 1072; 1991). The technique adopted at the Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre is the one developed at the University of California, San Francisco (Akazawa C, Med. Dos. 14:129-131, 1989). Lateral opposed photon fields and abutting electron fields are used with the same field centre for reproducibility. We employed this technique in the treatment of angiosarcoma of the scalp for one patient and produced acceptable clinical results. This study assesses the radiation dosimetry of two new techniques utilising electron arc therapy. The first technique treats the apex of the head with laterally opposed photon fields and the remaining area with an electron arc beam. The photon fields are used asymmetrically to counteract beam divergence effects and hence improve the dose uniformity in the junction region. The second technique solely employs electrons. A fixed electron field treats the apex of the head, while the arc electron beam covers the remaining scalp region. Arc electron beams were commissioned on the Varian Cadplan treatment planning system and the algorithm was then employed to calculate dosage distributions for the two new treatment techniques

  6. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise 3 drugs, namely, 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and 1 drug from another family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further 6 regimens, which are based on an INSTI, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir (PI/COBI, PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated. PMID:27068257

  7. Evidence for exercise therapy in the treatment of chronic disease based on at least three randomized controlled trials--summary of published systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Urho M

    2004-12-01

    Final evidence for the overall benefits of exercise therapy in the treatment/rehabilitation of specific chronic disease comes from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This paper summarizes current evidence that is based on a systematic review including data from at least three RCTs with contrast for exercise only. The quality of specific RCTs as well as the quality of systematic reviews varies, the newest ones usually being of higher quality than the older ones. The most consistent finding of the studies is that aerobic capacity and muscular strength of patients can be improved without causing detrimental effects on disease progression. Severe complications during these carefully tailored programs were rare. The treatment periods and follow-up times of the majority of the RCTs are of a too short duration to document group differences in disease progression. However, exercise reduces disease-related symptoms in many diseases, such as osteoarthritis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. Also, RCTs studying patients with coronary heart disease as well as patients with heart failure show that all-cause mortality is lower in exercisers than in controls. PMID:15546328

  8. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of disposal facilities is controversial and more important

  9. Fear extinction requires Arc/Arg3.1 expression in the basolateral amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Onoue, Kousuke; Nakayama, Daisuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged re-exposure to a fear-eliciting cue in the absence of an aversive event extinguishes the fear response to the cue, and has been clinically used as an exposure therapy. Arc (also known as Arg3.1) is implicated in synaptic and experience-dependent plasticity. Arc is regulated by the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein, which is upregulated with and necessary for fear extinction. Because Arc expression is also activated with fear extinction, we hypothe...

  10. Theory summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a summary of the advances in magnetic fusion energy theory research presented at the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference from 19 24 October, 1998 in Yokohama, Japan. Theory and simulation results from this conference provided encouraging evidence of significant progress in understanding the physics of thermonuclear plasmas. Indeed, the grand challenge for this field is to acquire the basic understanding that can readily enable the innovations which would make fusion energy practical. In this sense, research in fusion energy is increasingly able to be categorized as fitting well the 'Pasteur's Quadrant' paradigm, where the research strongly couples basic science ('Bohr's Quadrant') to technological impact ('Edison's Quadrant'). As supported by some of the work presented at this conference, this trend will be further enhanced by advanced simulations. Eventually, realistic three-dimensional modeling capabilities, when properly combined with rapid and complete data interpretation of results from both experiments and simulations, can contribute to a greatly enhanced cycle of understanding and innovation. Plasma science theory and simulation have provided reliable foundations for this improved modeling capability, and the exciting advances in high-performance computational resources have further accelerated progress. There were 68 papers presented at this conference in the area of magnetic fusion energy theory

  11. Symposium summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is provided of the issues discussed at the climate change implications for water and ecological resources conference, and recommendations that came out of the conference. The objectives of the meeting were to present and discuss results of recent climate change experiments undertaken in Canada; evaluate a variety of climate models and impact analyses and to develop methods and strategies for future study; and to establish working linkages between modellers and analysts in the fields of climate, hydrology, and ecosystem research, as well as between social scientists and policy makers interested in the implications of climate change. Recommendations were made in the five areas of research, monitoring, risk assessment, policy and information dissemination. Additional research should be undertaken to foster improved understanding of relationships between climate, climate change, and ecological and human processes. A suitable monitoring program, including a national wetlands monitoring program, should be established. Risk assessments should be undertaken to evaluate vulnerabilities of ecosystem components, to assess options, and to provide the information required to develop and implement appropriate policy objectives. The impacts of a range of public policy responses and feedbacks should be assessed. The dissemination of well-targeted and accurate information is vital if basic societal attitudes regarding the value of water and ecosystems are to be changed

  12. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  13. Feasibility of the partial-single arc technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh Rana; ChihYao Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, in the form of RapidArc, is widely used to treat prostate cancer. The full-single arc (f-SA) technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment provides efficient treatment, but it also delivers a higher radiation dose to the rectum. This study aimed to compare the dosimetric results from the new partial-single arc (p-SA) technique with those from the f-SA technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. In this study, 10 patients with low-risk prostate cancer were selected. For each patient, two sets of RapidArc plans (f-SA and p-SA) were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The f-SA plan was created using one ful arc, and the p-SA plan was created using planning parameters identical to those of the f-SA plan but with anterior and posterior avoidance sectors. Various dosimetric parameters of the f-SA and p-SA plans were evaluated and compared for the same target coverage and identical plan optimization parameters. The f-SA and p-SA plans showed an average difference of ±1% for the doses to the planning target volume (PTV), and there were no clear differences in dose homogeneity or plan conformity. In comparison to the f-SA technique, the p-SA technique reduced the doses to the rectum by approximately 6.1% to 21.2%, to the bladder by approximately 10.3%to 29.5%, and to the penile bulb by approximately 2.2%. In contrast, the dose to the femoral heads, the integral dose, and the number of monitor units were higher in the p-SA plans by approximately 34.4%, 7.7%, and 9.2%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use the p-SA technique for RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. For the same PTV coverage and identical plan optimization parameters, the p-SA technique is better in sparing the rectum and bladder without compromising plan conformity or target homogeneity when compared to the f-SA technique.

  14. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  15. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included.

  16. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    OpenAIRE

    Helfgott, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number n>=7 is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form \\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p), \\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2), has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required q or x to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all n feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. This is part of the author's proof of the ternar...

  17. Comparative study of dosimetry between volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for brain metastases%多发脑转移癌容积弧形调强与适形调强的剂量学对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙斌; 谢悦; 蒋勇; 李淑杰; 邱大; 王颖

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare volumetric‐modulated arc therapy(VMAT) with intensity‐modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for brain metastases with regard to the dosimetric character .Methods Sixty patients who were diagnosed with brain me‐tastases were included in this study .The target area received two dose levels using late addition amount technique ,WBRT (30 Gy/10 F) with following addition (20 Gy/10 F) to 59 Gy .For a fair comparison ,VMAT and IMRT treatment plans were respectively designed for every patient with the same dosimetric constraints .Dosimetric comparisons between VMAT and IMRT plans were ana‐lyzed to evaluate :target coverage and homogeneity ,conformity of PTV ;sparing of OARs ;monitor units (MUs) .Results Two treatment plans all reached the treatment need .When compared with IMRT ,there was no significant difference in Dmean of eyeball , len ,optic never ,visual chiasma ,parotid ,brain stem ,and external auditory canal of VMAT (P>0 .05) .The Dmax of eyeball ,len ,pa‐rotid ,and external auditory canal of VMAT were lower than that in IMRT group (P<0 .05) .The VMAT group has the less MUs (P=0 .017) and less treatment time .Conclusion VMAT can reach the big‐dose radiotherapy need on brain metastases clinically . There are no significant diffference between VMAT and IMRT on Dmax ,Dmean ,CI ,and HI .The Dmax of eyeball ,len ,parotid ,and external auditory canal of VMAT were lower than that in IMRT group .The VMAT can reduce the radiotherapy time .%目的:探讨多发脑转移癌在治疗中容积弧形调强放疗(VMAT)与适形调强放疗(IMRT)的剂量学特点。方法选择60例确诊的多发脑转移癌患者纳入本研究。所有患者均采用全脑放疗加肿瘤靶区后期加量技术给予处方剂量,全脑放疗30 Gy/10F ,病灶加量20 Gy/10F至生物学剂量59 Gy。每例患者采用同样的剂量学条件限制,分别进行两弧容积弧形调强计划与调强计划设计。通过其剂量学分析评估:

  18. Axisymmetric arc in a supersonic nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisymmetric arc burning in a supersonic nozzle has wide technical applications (eg in gas blast circuit breaker, arc heaters etc.). Mathematical modelling of such an arc is usually based on boundary-layer assumption which assumes a known pressure distribution imposed on the arc or based on the integral method of arc analysis. Thus, the flow outside of the arc's thermal influence is assumed to be one dimensional. In practice, this is not the case as the nozzle is not sufficiently gentle in the axial direction or the presence of the upstream electrode makes the assumption of one-dimensional flow invalid. The purpose of the present investigation is to model the arc based on Navier-Stokes equations which are modified to take into account of electrical power input and radiation transport. The arcing gas is SF6, the transport properties of which (electrical conductivity, viscosity, thermal conductivity etc.) are highly nonlinear functions of temperature but only weakly dependent on the pressure

  19. A rotating arc plasma invertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device is described for the inversion of direct current to alternating current. The main feature is the use of a rotating plasma arc in crossed electric and magnetic fields as a switch. This device may provide an economic alternative to other inversion methods in some circumstances

  20. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of uses...... the next-generation ARC middleware, implemented as Web Services with the aim of standard-compliant interoperability....

  1. Stability of alternating current gliding arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    on Ohm’s law indicates that the critical length of alternating current (AC) gliding arc discharge columns can be larger than that of a corresponding direct current (DC) gliding arc. This finding is supported by previously published images of AC and DC gliding arcs. Furthermore, the analysis shows...

  2. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  3. Application of the thermoluminescent (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry techniques to determinate the isodose curves in a cancer treatment planning simulation using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy - VMAT; Aplicacao das tecnicas de dosimetria termoluminescente (TL) e luminescencia opticamente estimulada (OSL) na determinacao de curvas de isodose em uma simulacao de tratamento de cancer pela tecnica de radioterapia em arco modulado volumetrico - VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravim, Amanda

    2015-07-01

    The Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an advance technique of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). This progress is due to the continuous gantry rotation with the radiation beam modulation providing lower time of the patient treatment. This research aimed the verification of the isodose curves in a simulation of a vertebra treatment with spinal cord protection using the thermoluminescent (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry techniques and the LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100), CaS0{sub 4}:Dy and Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}:C dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Ti micro dosimeters (TLD-100). The dosimeters were characterized using PMMA plates of 30 x 30 x 30 cm{sup 3} and different thickness. All irradiations were done using Truebeam STx linear accelerator of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, with 6 MV photons beam. After the dosimeter characterization, they were irradiated according the specific planning simulation and using a PMMA phantom developed to VMAT measurements. This irradiation aimed to verify the isodose curves of the treatment simulation using the two dosimetry techniques. All types of dosimeters showed satisfactory results to determine the dose distribution but analysing the complexity of the isodose curves and the proximity of them, the LiF:Mg,Ti micro dosimeter showed the most appropriate for use due to its small dimensions. Regarding the best technique, as both technique showed satisfactory results, the TL technique presents less complex to be used because the most of the radiotherapy departments already have a TL laboratory. The OSL technique requires more care and greater investment in the hospital. (author)

  4. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (II-3) - Uncertainty analysis of the steady state benchmark. It should be recognized that the purpose of this benchmark is not only to compare currently available macroscopic approaches but above-all to encourage the development of novel next-generation approaches that focus on more microscopic processes. Thus, the benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitized computer graphic images are the microscopic data. The technical topics to be addressed at the workshop include: - Review of the benchmark activities after the 4. Workshop; - Presentation and discussion of summary of comparisons of final submitted results for Exercise 1 of Phase I (I-1); for Exercise 0 of Phase II (II-0); and for Exercise 1 of Phase II (II-1); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase I (I-2); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 3 of Phase I (I-3); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase II (II-2); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 4 of Phase I (I-4); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 3 of Phase II (II-3); - Preparing a special issue in a journal with participants' BFBT papers; - Defining a work plan and schedule outlining actions to advance the two phases of the benchmark activities

  5. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume–individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350° clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45° and 315° were compared with 90° on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V107%, D1%, conformality index (CI95%), and heterogeneity index (D5%–D95%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D1%, Dmean, and V5 Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90° on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, RapidArc was selected as the optimal solution. Individualized collimator angle solutions

  6. Relationship between arc voltage current and arc length in TIG welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between arc voltage, arc length and current in Tungsten Inert Gas welding has been investigated. It was not possible to determine a correlation between arc voltage, current and arc length because of the inherent variability in the experimental results. A typical value for the error in controlling the arc length using arc voltage was calculated and found to be ± 0.5mm. The variation in arc voltage at constant conditions has two components, long term and short term. Long term is the variation in voltage between welds, short term is voltage variation within a few seconds. Both are about 5% of the total arc voltage. Since only a fraction of the arc voltage depends on arc length, this leads to a much larger variation in arc length if Arc Voltage Control (AVC) is used to control arc length (about 15% in each case at 3mm arc length). A weld procedure based on AVC is likely to yield a different variability in weld bead geometry from one based on constant arc length. (author)

  7. Simulation of Magnetically Dispersed Arc Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白冰; 查俊; 张晓宁; 王城; 夏维东

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically dispersed arc plasma exhibits typically dispersed uniform arc column as well as diffusive cathode root and diffusive anode root. In this paper magnetically dispersed arc plasma coupled with solid cathode is numerically simulated by the simplified cathode sheath model of LOWKE . The numerical simulation results in argon show that the maximum value of arc root current density on the cathode surface is 3.5×10^7 A/m^2), and the maximum value of energy flux on the cathode surface is 3× 10^7 J/m^2, both values are less than the average values of a contracted arc, respectively.

  8. A mechanism that triggers double arcing during plasma arc cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian, E-mail: nemchinsky@bellsouth.ne [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (United States)

    2009-10-21

    Double arcing (DA) is a phenomenon when a transferred arc, flowing inside an electrically insulated nozzle, breaks into two separate arcs: one that connects the cathode and the nozzle and another that connects the nozzle and a work-piece. It is a commonly accepted opinion that the reason for DA is high voltage drop in the plasma inside the nozzle. However, the specific mechanism that triggers the DA development is not clear. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism. Dielectric films deposited inside the nozzle's orifice play the key role in this mechanism. These films are charged by ion current from plasma. A strong electric field is created inside the film and at the boundary of the film and clean metal of the nozzle. This gives rise to a thermo-field electron emission from the clean metal that borders the film. Emitted electrons are accelerated at the voltage drop between the nozzle and plasma. These electrons produce extra ions, which in turn move back to the film and additionally charge it. This sequence of events leads to explosive instability if the voltage drop inside the nozzle is high enough. Experiments to check the proposed mechanism are suggested.

  9. Parametric Study on Arc Behavior of Magnetically Diffused Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tang; Li, Hui; Bai, Bing; Liao, Mengran; Xia, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A model coupling the plasma with a cathode body is applied in the simulation of the diffuse state of a magnetically rotating arc. Four parametric studies are performed: on the external axial magnetic field (AMF), on the cathode shape, on the total current and on the inlet gas velocity. The numerical results show that: the cathode attachment focuses in the center of the cathode tip with zero AMF and gradually shifts off the axis with the increase of AMF; a larger cathode conical angle corresponds to a cathode arc attachment farther away off axis; the maximum values of plasma temperature increase with the total current; the plasma column in front of the cathode tip expands more severely in the axial direction, with a higher inlet speed; the cathode arc attachment shrinks towards the tip as the inlet speed increases. The various results are supposed to be explained by the joint effect of coupled cathode surface heating and plasma rotating flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475174, 11035005 and 50876101)

  10. Models of plasma arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex model of energy transfer from ionized gas through a weld-pool to a heat affected zone (HAZ) is considered here. The model consists of three sub-models: a model of the arc column with skin layers - sheaths coating electrodes, a model of liquid metal flow in a weld-pool, and a model of coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical processes in HAZ. These sub-models are descried in three reports. The first report is devoted to a short review of welding plasma models based mostly on the Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD) theory successfully applied to the simulation of welding process. This report is illustrated by arc models for TIG and PAW welding. The description of thermal energy transfer between three sub-regions of the complex welding domain refers to a large number of processes observed in gaseous electronics, thermodynamics of reacting gases, electro-dynamics of fluid, micro-metallurgy. (author)

  11. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically Tzrnsat [3]. A corollary is that slightly older zircon antecrysts that are common in the inner units of the TIS could be considered inherited if they are derived from remelting of slightly older intrusions. Remelting at such low temperatures in the arc would require a source of external water. Refs: [1] Sawyer, J.Pet 32:701-738; [2] Fraser et al, Geology 25:607-610; [3] Harrison et al, Geology 35:635- 638

  12. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    CERN Document Server

    Helfgott, H A

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number $n\\geq 7$ is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form $\\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p)$, $\\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2)$, has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required $q$ or $x$ to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all $n$ feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. For $q\\geq 4\\cdot 10^6$, these bounds are of the strength needed to solve the ternary Goldbach conjecture. Only the range $q\\in \\lbrack 10^5, 4\\cdot 10^6\\rbrack$ remains to be checked, possibly by brute force, before the conjecture is proven for all $n$. The new bounds are due to several qualitative improvements. In particular, this paper presents a general method for reducing the cost of Vaughan's identity, as well as a way to exploit the tails of minor arcs in the context of the large sieve.

  13. 4.11 Summary and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.11 Summary and Conclusions' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  14. Dosimetric study of thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiotherapy using RapidArc combined with active breathing coordinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare and analyze the dosimetric characteristics of the intensity-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) combined with active breathing coordinator (ABC) in the thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiation therapy. Methods: Ten thoracic esophageal carcinoma patients undergoing radiotherapy were selected for this study. The CT simulations were performed under three breath patterns respectively: moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC aid; Set the trigger threshold to 80% of the peak of the respiration curve; and free breathing (FB). Based on the corresponding CT image sets, three treatment plans were generated for each patient respectively: Arc-ABC (three small arcs), Arc-FB (consisted of two coplanar full arcs) and IMRT-FB plan. The following dosimetric parameters were compared among different plans: D2%, D98%, V95, homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (CI) the percentage of volume receiving dose of over x Gy (Vx), monitor unit (MU), control points and treatment time. Results: The planning target volume (PTV) of FB was 376 cm3 which decreased to 260 cm3 after using ABC. For mDIBH and FB patients, the total lung volumes were 5964.6 cm3 (35% more than FB) and 3838.8 cm3 respectively; the heart volumes were 524.4 cm3 and 642.7 cm3 respectively. No significant difference was observed among Arc-ABC, IMRT-FB and Arc-FB in terms of D2, D98, V95, CI and HI.For Arc-ABC plans,there were significant decreases of radiation dose in total-lung's V10, V20, V30, V40 and mean lung dose (F=4.38, 5.34, 4.07, 3.89, 4.28, P<0.05). Various dose decreases of heart V20, V3, V40, Dmean and spinal cord Dmax were observed,yet no statistically significant difference existed. The MUs and total control points of Arc-ABC plans were significantly lower than other plans (F=26.86, 12.56, P<0.05). Conclusions: When thoracic esophageal carcinoma patients were treated with radiotherapy, the combined utilization of RapidArc and ABC can potentially decrease the volume of

  15. ARC length control for plasma welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  16. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  17. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  18. FASTER MUSE CSP ARC CONSISTENCY ALGORITHMS

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Mary P.; White, Christopher M.; Helzerman, Randall A.; Hockema, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    MUSE CSP (Multiply SEgmented Constraint Satisfaction Problem) [5, 61 is an extension to the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) which is especially useful for problems that segment into riultiple instances of CSP that share variables. In Belzerman and Harper [6], the concepts of MUSE node, arc, and path consistency were defined and algorithms for MUSE arc consistency, MUSE AC-1, and MUSE path consistency were developed. MUSE AC-1 is similar to the CSP arc consistency algorithm AC-4 [ l j ] ...

  19. Effect of Gravity on Arc Shape in GTA Welding-for Low Electric Arc Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidetoshi FUJII; Yosuke SUMI; Manabu TANAKA; Kiyoshi NOGI

    2003-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding was performed both in a microgravity environment and in a terrestrial environment,and the arc shapes in both environments were compared. A microgravity condition was obtained using the free fallsystem at the Japan Microgravi

  20. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  1. High dose for prostate irradiation with image guided radiotherapy: Contribution of intensity modulation arc-therapy; Haute dose dans la prostate par radiotherapie guidee par l'image: apport de l'arctherapie avec modulation d'intensite du faisceau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouyaux, B.; De Crevoisier, R.; Manens, J.P.; Bellec, J.; Chira, C.; Le Prise, E.; Lafond, C. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); De Crevoisier, R.; Manens, J.P.; Cazoulat, G.; Haigron, P.; Lafond, C. [Inserm, U642, 35 - Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes-1, LTSI, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To compare two Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for prostate cancer: the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and the 'Step and Shoot' technique (S and S). Materials and methods: VMAT and S and S plans (RX 18 MV) were created and compared (Wilcoxon test) for 10 patients. The dosimetric goal of both treatments was to delive