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Sample records for arc radiation delivery

  1. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT

  2. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Douglas A., E-mail: douglas.hoover@lhsc.on.ca; Chen, Jeff Z. [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); MacFarlane, Michael [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Oncology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Battista, Jerry J. [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  3. On the tradeoff between treatment time and plan quality in rotational arc radiation delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Craft, David

    2009-01-01

    A new delivery option for cancer centers equipped with linear accelerators fitted with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) -- i.e. centers which can perform intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) -- is rotational delivery. In rotational delivery, the beam is on while the gantry is rotating and the MLC leaves are moving, thus treating the patient more efficiently (regarding time) than in IMRT. A consideration that should be examined when evaluating this new type of delivery method is the tradeoff between treatment plan quality and delivery time: what do we sacrifice in terms of plan quality by guaranteeing a 2 minute delivery, for example? In this paper we examine this question by studying a simplified 2D phantom where leaf and gantry motion are directly included in the optimization model. We formulate the model as a linear mixed integer program. Because of the difficulty in solving to optimality, we employ additional models which allow us to trap the true optimal solution between upper and lower bounds. The lo...

  4. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT

  5. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J; Hoover, D [Department of Oncology, Department of Medical Biophysics, London Health Science Centre, London, ON (Canada); MacFarlane, M [London Health Science Centre, London, ON (Canada); Wong, E [Department of Oncology, Department of Medical Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  6. Target splitting non-coplanar RapidArc radiation therapy for a diffuse sebaceous carcinoma of the scalp: a novel delivery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare conventional lateral photon-electron, fixed-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), coplanar and non-coplanar RapidArc for the treatment of a diffuse sebaceous gland carcinoma of the scalp. Comprehensive dosimetry comparisons were performed among 3D-CRT, IMRT and various RapidArc plans. Target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and doses to organs at risk (OAR) were calculated. Monitor unites (MUs) and delivery time of each treatment were also recorded to evaluate the execution efficiency. The influence of target splitting technique and non-coplanar planning on plan quality was discussed. IMRT was superior to 3D-CRT concerning targets’ coverage at the sacrifice of larger irradiated brain volumes to low doses. CIs and HIs were better in coplanar RapidArc and non-coplanar RapidArc plans than 3D-CRT and IMRT. Best dose coverage and sparing of OARs were achieved in non-coplanar plans using target splitting technique. Treatment delivery time was longest in the IMRT plan and shortest in the coplanar RapidArc plan without target splitting. The 3%/3 mm gamma test pass rates were above 95% for all the plans. Target splitting technique and non-coplanar arcs are recommended for total scalp irradiation

  7. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 deg. continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 deg. split arc proton therapy (two 90 degree sign arcs) using CT profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  8. Dosimetric and delivery characterizations of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy for maxillary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the efficiency and accuracy of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for maxillary cancer. Plans for gantry rotation angles of 360deg and 180deg (full-arc and half-arc VMAT) were created for six maxillary cancer cases with the Monaco treatment planning system, and delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Full-arc and half-arc VMAT were compared with regard to homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose to normal brain, total monitor units (MU), delivery times, root mean square (r.m.s.) gantry accelerations (deg/s2), and r.m.s. gantry angle errors (deg). The half-arc VMAT plans achieved comparable HI and CI to the full-arc plans. Mean doses to the normal brain and brainstem with the half-arc VMAT plans were on average 16% and 17% lower than those with the full-arc VMAT plans. For other organs at risk (OARs), no significant dose volume histogram (DVH) differences were observed between plans. Half-arc VMAT resulted in 11% less total MU and 20% shorter delivery time than the full-arc VMAT, while r.m.s. gantry acceleration and r.m.s. gantry angle error during half-arc VMAT delivery were 30% and 23% less than those during full-arc VMAT delivery, respectively. Furthermore, the half-arc VMAT plans were comparable with the full-arc plans regarding dose homogeneity and conformity in maxillary cancer, and provided a statistical decrease in mean dose to OAR, total MU, delivery time and gantry angle error. Half-arc VMAT plans may be a suitable treatment option in radiotherapy for maxillary cancer. (author)

  9. Dosimetric verification of RapidArc treatment delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine; Medin, Joakim; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently, Varian Medical Systems have announced the introduction of a new treatment technique, in which dose is delivered over a single gantry rotation with variable MLC positions, dose rate and gantry speed. In February 2008, a preclinical installation of the RapidArc beam delivery...... approach was carried out on a Varian Clinac at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen. The purpose of the installation was to perform measurements to verify the correctness of doses delivered with the RapidArc technique. In May 2008, the clinical release of the RapidArc application was installed at Rigshospitalet...

  10. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  11. Effect of arc on radiation thermometry in welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮玉; 王燕; 武宝林

    2002-01-01

    The effect of arc on radiation thermometry is analyzed in a field close to the arc during the welding process, and the ratio of signal to noise and other factors are obtained for a small current arc .The method of the temperature measurement is feasible when the arc current is decreased to a smaller value in the welding process.

  12. Comparison of plan optimization for single and dual volumetric-modulated arc therapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy during post-mastectomy regional irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Li-Rong; ZHOU, YI-BING; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with single arc (1ARC) and dual arc (2ARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate the quality and delivery efficiency of post-mastectomy regional irradiation. A total of 24 female patients who required post-mastectomy regional irradiation were enrolled into the current study, and 1ARC, 2ARC and IMRT plans were designed for each individual patient. The quality of these plans was ...

  13. Feasibility of dose painting using volumetric modulated arc optimization and delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine; Ulrich, Silke; Bowen, Stephen;

    2010-01-01

    Dose painting strategies are limited by optimization algorithms in treatment planning systems and physical constraints of the beam delivery. We investigate dose conformity using the RapidArc optimizer and beam delivery technique. Furthermore, robustness of the plans with respect to positioning un...

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Craig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yangy2@upmc.edu; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc

  15. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H and N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used

  16. Fast Arc Delivery for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Vertebral and Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Flattening filter–free (FFF) beams with higher dose rates and faster delivery are now clinically available. The purpose of this planning study was to compare optimized non-FFF and FFF RapidArc plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and to validate the accuracy of fast arc delivery. Methods and Material: Ten patients with peripheral lung tumors and 10 with vertebral metastases were planned using RapidArc with a flattened 6-MV photon beam and a 10-MV FFF beam for fraction doses of 7.5–18 Gy. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OAR), number of monitor units (MU), and beam delivery times were assessed. GafChromic EBT2 film measurements of FFF plans were performed to compare calculated and delivered dose distributions. Results: No major dosimetric differences were seen between the two delivery techniques. For lung SBRT plans, conformity indices and OAR doses were similar, although the average MU required were higher with FFF plans. For vertebral SBRT, FFF plans provided comparable PTV coverage, with no significant differences in OAR doses. Average beam delivery times were reduced by a factor of up to 2.5, with all FFF fractions deliverable within 4 min. Measured FFF plans showed high agreement with calculated plans, with more than 99% of the area within the region of interest fulfilling the acceptance criterion. Conclusion: The higher dose rate of FFF RapidArc reduces delivery times significantly, without compromising plan quality or accuracy of dose delivery.

  17. Statistical quality control for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery using machine log data

    CERN Document Server

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Han, Tae Jin; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up statistical quality control for monitoring of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery error using machine log data. Eclipse and Clinac iX linac with the RapidArc system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) is used for delivery of the VMAT plan. During the delivery of the RapidArc fields, the machine determines the delivered motor units (MUs) and gantry angle position accuracy and the standard deviations of MU (sigma_MU; dosimetric error) and gantry angle (sigma_GA; geometric error) are displayed on the console monitor after completion of the RapidArc delivery. In the present study, first, the log data was analyzed to confirm its validity and usability; then, statistical process control (SPC) was applied to monitor the sigma_MU and sigma_GA in a timely manner for all RapidArc fields: a total of 195 arc fields for 99 patients. The sigma_MU and sigma_GA were determined twice for all fields, that is, first during the patient-specific plan QA and then again during th...

  18. Reabsorption of Radiation in Water-Vortex Stabilized Electric arc and Influence on arc Performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří

    Vol. 2. Brno: Department of Power Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Brno University of Technology, 2003 - (Gross, B.; Vávra, Z.; Bartl, J.), s. 312-315. (2). ISBN 80-214-2307-2. [Symposium on Physics of Switching arc/15th./. Nové Město na Moravě (CZ), 22.09.2003-26.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/1027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : electric arc, reabsorption, radiation model Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  19. In-vitro investigation of out-of-field cell survival following the delivery of conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to determine the out-of-field survival of cells irradiated with either the primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication following delivery of conformal, IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. Single beam, conformal, IMRT and VMAT plans were created to deliver 3 Gy to half the area of a T80 flask containing either DU-145 or AGO-1522 cells allowing intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. The same plans were delivered to a similar custom made phantom used to hold two T25 culture flasks, one flask in-field and one out-of-field to allow comparison of cell survival responses when intercellular communication is physically inhibited. Plans were created for the delivery of 8 Gy to the more radio-resistant DU-145 cells only in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay. In both cell lines, the out-of-field survival was not statistically different between delivery techniques for either cell line or dose. There was however, a statistically significant difference between survival out-of-field when intercellular communication was intact (single T80 culture flask) or inhibited (multiple T25 culture flasks) to in-field for all plans. No statistically significant difference was observed in-field with or without cellular communication to out-of-field for all plans. These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields when cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations is present. This data is further evidence that refinement of existing radiobiological models to include indirect cell killing effects is required. (paper)

  20. Radiation Transfer in SF6 and PTFE Arc Plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Vladimír; Bartlová, M.; de Hesselle, M.

    Brno : FEI VUT Brno, 2001, s. 12-17. ISBN 80-214-1600-9. [IVth Symposium on Physics of Switching Arc. Brno (CZ), 10.09.2001-14.09.2001] Grant ostatní: ÚT AV ČR(XC) PP52015 Keywords : plasma * radiation * SF6 +PTFE Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  1. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Dávid, E-mail: Papp.David@mgh.harvard.edu; Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. Methods: In this model, a 360° arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multileaf collimator constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. Results: The authors demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. The authors first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using fluence map optimization and 20 intensity-modulated fields in equally spaced beam directions, which is beyond the standard of care. Modeling the typical clinical setup for the treatment sites considered, IMRT plans using seven or nine beams are also computed. Subsequently, VMAT plans are optimized by dividing the 360° arc into 20 corresponding arc segments. Assuming typical machine parameters (a dose rate of 600 MU/min, and a maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s), it is demonstrated that the optimized VMAT plans with 2–3 min delivery time are of noticeably better quality than the 7–9 beam IMRT plans. The VMAT plan quality approaches the quality of the 20-beam IMRT benchmark plan for delivery times between 3 and 4 min. Conclusions: The results indicate that high quality treatments can be delivered in a single arc with 20 arc segments if sufficient time is allowed for modulation in each segment.

  2. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. Methods: In this model, a 360° arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multileaf collimator constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. Results: The authors demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. The authors first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using fluence map optimization and 20 intensity-modulated fields in equally spaced beam directions, which is beyond the standard of care. Modeling the typical clinical setup for the treatment sites considered, IMRT plans using seven or nine beams are also computed. Subsequently, VMAT plans are optimized by dividing the 360° arc into 20 corresponding arc segments. Assuming typical machine parameters (a dose rate of 600 MU/min, and a maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s), it is demonstrated that the optimized VMAT plans with 2–3 min delivery time are of noticeably better quality than the 7–9 beam IMRT plans. The VMAT plan quality approaches the quality of the 20-beam IMRT benchmark plan for delivery times between 3 and 4 min. Conclusions: The results indicate that high quality treatments can be delivered in a single arc with 20 arc segments if sufficient time is allowed for modulation in each segment

  3. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, Dávid

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. In this model, a 360-degree arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multi-leaf collimator (MLC) constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. We demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. For that purpose, we first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated...

  4. Turbulence and radiation behaviours in large-scale arc heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulent plasma flow in large-scale arc heaters such as JAXA 750 kW and NASA 20 MW facilities was investigated and distributions of flow-field properties were successfully obtained. The turbulent flow field was described by the Navier-Stokes equations with a multitemperature model, which was tightly coupled with electric-field and radiation-field calculations. An accurate and low-cost radiation model, and a low Reynolds number two-equation turbulence model were introduced into the flow-field simulation. It was confirmed that the plasma flows in the arc-heating facilities were in a highly thermochemical nonequilibrium state in the expansion section and that the arc discharge plays a critical role in the heating section. It was quantitatively clarified that radiation and turbulence phenomena were very important in transferring heat and momentum from the high-temperature flow near the core to the cold gas region near the facility wall. To confirm the effectiveness of the present numerical model, the obtained results were compared with experimental data for the arc voltage, mass-averaged enthalpy, chamber pressure and heat efficiency. The present flow-field model was found to give good agreement for various operating conditions of the facilities.

  5. Radiation in SF6 + PTFE Arc Plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Vladimír; Bartlová, M.

    Liverpool : University of Liverpool, 2002, s. 47-50. ISBN 0-9539105-1-2. [International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications GD 2002 /14./. Liverpool (GB), 02.09.2002-06.09.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : plasma * radiation * SF6 Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  6. Self-consistent radiation-based simulation of electric arcs: II. Application to gas circuit breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanidis, A. A.; Franck, C. M.

    2008-07-01

    An accurate and robust method for radiative heat transfer simulation for arc applications was presented in the previous paper (part I). In this paper a self-consistent mathematical model based on computational fluid dynamics and a rigorous radiative heat transfer model is described. The model is applied to simulate switching arcs in high voltage gas circuit breakers. The accuracy of the model is proven by comparison with experimental data for all arc modes. The ablation-controlled arc model is used to simulate high current PTFE arcs burning in cylindrical tubes. Model accuracy for the lower current arcs is evaluated using experimental data on the axially blown SF6 arc in steady state and arc resistance measurements close to current zero. The complete switching process with the arc going through all three phases is also simulated and compared with the experimental data from an industrial circuit breaker switching test.

  7. Self-consistent radiation-based simulation of electric arcs: II. Application to gas circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate and robust method for radiative heat transfer simulation for arc applications was presented in the previous paper (part I). In this paper a self-consistent mathematical model based on computational fluid dynamics and a rigorous radiative heat transfer model is described. The model is applied to simulate switching arcs in high voltage gas circuit breakers. The accuracy of the model is proven by comparison with experimental data for all arc modes. The ablation-controlled arc model is used to simulate high current PTFE arcs burning in cylindrical tubes. Model accuracy for the lower current arcs is evaluated using experimental data on the axially blown SF6 arc in steady state and arc resistance measurements close to current zero. The complete switching process with the arc going through all three phases is also simulated and compared with the experimental data from an industrial circuit breaker switching test

  8. Radiation Power Affected by Current and Wall Radius in Water Cooled Vortex Wall-stabilized Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Toru; Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the arc lamp mixed with metal vapor for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The metal vapor can emit the high intense radiation. In addition, the radiation is derived from the high temperature medium. Because the arc temperature can be controlled by current and arc radius, the radiation can be controlled by the current and arc radius. This research elucidates the radiation power affected by the current and wall radius in wall-stabilized arc of water-cooled vortex type. As a result, the radiation power increases with increasing the square of current / square of wall radius because of the temperature distribution which is derived from the current density at the simulation.

  9. Multigroup Approximation of Radiation Transfer in SF6 Arc Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada Bartlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first order of the method of spherical harmonics (P1-approximation has been used to evaluate the radiation properties of arc plasmas of various mixtures of SF6 and PTFE ((C2F4n, polytetrafluoroethylene in the temperature range (1000 ÷ 35 000 K and pressures from 0.5 to 5 MPa. Calculations have been performed for isothermal cylindrical plasma of various radii (0.01 ÷ 10 cm. The frequency dependence of the absorption coefficients has been handled using the Planck and Rosseland averaging methods for several frequency intervals. Results obtained using various means calculated for different choices of frequency intervals are discussed.

  10. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B.; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds’ degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%–8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (> 4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measurement also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single element point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  11. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

     Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds' degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%-8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (> 4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measure-ment also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single ele-ment point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  12. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  13. Feasibility of dose painting using volumetric modulated arc optimization and delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korreman, Stine S.; Ulrich, Silke; Bowen, Steve; Deveau, Michael; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jeraj, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Dose painting strategies are limited by optimization algorithms in treatment planning systems and physical constraints of the beam delivery. We investigate dose conformity using the RapidArc optimizer and beam delivery technique. Furthermore, robustness of the plans with respect to positioning uncertainties are evaluated. Methods A head&neck cancer patient underwent a [61Cu]Cu-ATSM PET/CT-scan. PET-SUVs were converted to prescribed dose with a base dose of 60Gy, and target mean dose 90Gy. The voxel-based prescription was converted into 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 discrete prescription levels. Optimization was performed in Eclipse, varying the following parameters: MLC leaf width (5mm and 2.5mm), number of arcs (1 and 2) and collimator rotation (0, 15, 30 and 45 degrees). Dose conformity was evaluated using quality volume histograms (QVHs), and relative volumes receiving within ±5% of prescribed dose (Q0.95–1.05). Deliverability was tested using a Delta4 phantom. Robustness was tested by shifting the isocenter 1mm and 2mm in all directions, and recalculating the dose. Results Good conformity was obtained using MLC leaf width 2.5mm, two arcs, and collimators 45/315 degrees, with Q0.95–1.05=92.8%, 91.6%, 89.7% and 84.6%. Using only one arc or increasing the MLC leaf width had a small deteriorating effect of 2–5%. Small changes in collimator angle gave small changes, but large changes in collimator angle gave a larger decrease in plan conformity; for angles of 15 and 0 degrees (two arcs, 2.5 mm leaf width), Q0.95–1.05 decreased by up to 15%. Consistency between planned and delivered dose was good, with ~90% of gamma values <1. For 1mm shift, Q0.95–1.05 was decreased by 5–15%, while for 2mm shift, Q0.95–1.05 was decreased to 55–60%. Conclusions Results demonstrate feasibility of planning of prescription doses with multiple levels for dose painting using RapidArc, and plans were deliverable. Robustness to positional error was low. PMID:20831483

  14. Effects of flattening filter-free and volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery on treatment efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan M; Popple, Richard A; Prendergast, Brendan M; Clark, Grant M; Dobelbower, Michael C; Fiveash, John B

    2013-01-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are available on an increasing number of commercial linear accelerators. FFF beams have higher dose rates than flattened beams of equivalent energy which can lead to increased efficiency of treatment delivery, especially in conjunction with increased FFF beam energy and arc-based delivery configurations. The purpose of this study is to quantify and assess the implications of improved treatment efficiency for several FFF delivery options on common types of linac applicable radiotherapy. Eleven characteristic cases representative of a variety of clinical treatment sites and prescription doses were selected from our patient population. Treatment plans were generated for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. For each case, a reference plan was created using DMLC IMRT with 6MV flat beams. From the same initial objectives, plans were generated using DMLC IMRT and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 6 MV FFF and 10 MV FFF beams (max. dose rates of 1400 and 2400 MU/min, respectively). The plans were delivered to a phantom; beam-on time, total treatment delivery time, monitor units (MUs), and integral dose were recorded. For plans with low dose fractionations (1.8-2.0 & 3.85 Gy/fraction), mean beam-on time difference between reference plan and most efficient FFF plan was 0.56 min (41.09% decrease); mean treatment delivery time difference between the reference plan and most efficient FFF plan was 1.54 min (range: 0.31-3.56 min), a relative improvement of 46.1% (range: 29.2%-59.2%). For plans with high dose fractionations (16-20 Gy/fraction), mean beam-on time difference was 6.79 min (74.9% decrease); mean treatment delivery time difference was 8.99 min (range: 5.40-13.05 min), a relative improvement of 71.1% (range: 53.4%- 82.4%). 10 MV FFF VMAT beams generated the most efficient plan, except in the spine SBRT case. The distribution of monitor unit counts did not vary by plan type. In cases where respiratory motion management would

  15. Development of a novel ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} insert for routine quality assurance of VMAT delivery including dose calculation with inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakir, H.; Gaede, S.; Mulligan, M.; Chen, J. Z. [Department of Physics, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To design a versatile, nonhomogeneous insert for the dose verification phantom ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} (Sun Nuclear Corp., FL) and to demonstrate its usefulness for the verification of dose distributions in inhomogeneous media. As an example, we demonstrate it can be used clinically for routine quality assurance of two volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) systems for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT): SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} (Pinnacle{sup 3}, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} (Eclipse{sup Trade-Mark-Sign }, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: The cylindrical detector array ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} has a retractable homogeneous acrylic insert. In this work, we designed and manufactured a customized heterogeneous insert with densities that simulate soft tissue, lung, bone, and air. The insert offers several possible heterogeneity configurations and multiple locations for point dose measurements. SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans for lung SBRT were generated and copied to ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} for each inhomogeneity configuration. Dose delivery was done on a Varian 2100 ix linac. The evaluation of dose distributions was based on gamma analysis of the diode measurements and point doses measurements at different positions near the inhomogeneities. Results: The insert was successfully manufactured and tested with different measurements of VMAT plans. Dose distributions measured with the homogeneous insert showed gamma passing rates similar to our clinical results ({approx}99%) for both treatment-planning systems. Using nonhomogeneous inserts decreased the passing rates by up to 3.6% in the examples studied. Overall, SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans showed better gamma passing rates for nonhomogeneous measurements. The discrepancy between calculated and measured point doses was increased up to 6.5% for the nonhomogeneous

  16. Prediction of radiative heat transfer in argon arc plasmas using the method of partial characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Vladimír

    Brno : VUT, 2003, s. 13-16 ISBN 80-214-2307-2. [Symposium on Physics of Switching Arc /15./. Brno (CZ), 22.09.2003-26.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/03/0813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : plasma radiation * argon arc Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  17. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Spine Radiosurgery: Superior Treatment Planning and Delivery Compared to Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leor Zach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS delivers an accurate and efficient high radiation dose to vertebral metastases in 1–5 fractions. We aimed to compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to static beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for spine SRS. Methods and Materials. Ten spine lesions of previously treated SRS patients were planned retrospectively using both IMRT and VMAT with a prescribed dose of 16 Gy to 100% of the planning target volume (PTV. The plans were compared for conformity, homogeneity, treatment delivery time, and safety (spinal cord dose. Results. All evaluated parameters favored the VMAT plan over the IMRT plans. Dmin in the IMRT was significantly lower than in the VMAT plan (7.65 Gy/10.88 Gy, p<0.001, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC was found to be significantly better for the VMAT plans compared to the IMRT plans (0.77/0.58, resp., p  value<0.01, and an almost 50% reduction in the net treatment time was calculated for the VMAT compared to the IMRT plans (6.73 min/12.96 min, p<0.001. Conclusions. In our report, VMAT provides better conformity, homogeneity, and safety profile. The shorter treatment time is a major advantage and not only provides convenience to the painful patient but also contributes to the precision of this high dose radiation therapy.

  18. The role of radiation losses in high-pressure blasted electrical arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with experiments carried out on an arc heater where the electric arc is stabilised by flowing working gas. Measured quantities (especially arc current, voltage drop, gas flow rate, and energy loss) serve as input data for a mathematical model of the arc inside a cylindrical anode channel. Previously, the losses of cathode and anode spots were assumed to be negligible in comparison with the total loss. In the new sets of experiments, a modular structure of the arc heater has made it possible to separate the losses of anode and cathode from the energy losses of the arc itself. Furthermore, the losses caused by radial conduction have been introduced into the model. The most significant change of the model concerns the computation of radiation losses of the arc. In the original model, radiation losses were taken as a portion ε of the total input power. In the modified model, the radiation loss is expressed using a theoretically calculated net emission coefficient of argon (by V. Aubrecht and M. Bartlova). This approach is possible due to a more precise determination of the arc net energy loss which results in flatter radial temperature profiles. Axial distribution of energy loss for the original and modified model is given in figures.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery using COMPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikraman, Subramani; Manigandan, Durai; Karrthick, Karukkupalayam Palaniappan; Sambasivaselli, Raju; Senniandavar, Vellaingiri; Ramu, Mahendran; Rajesh, Thiyagarajan; Lutz, Muller; Muthukumaran, Manavalan; Karthikeyan, Nithyanantham; Tejinder, Kataria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the patient-specific 3D dosimetry tool COMPASS with 2D array MatriXX detector for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery. Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures from different sites (brain, head & neck, thorax, abdomen, and spine) were taken from CyberKnife Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in CyberKnife. For each patient, linac based volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20 Gy per fraction. Target prescription and critical organ constraints were tried to match the delivered treatment plans. Each plan quality was analyzed using conformity index (CI), conformity number (CN), gradient Index (GI), target coverage (TC), and dose to 95% of volume (D95). Monaco Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated treatment plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS-calculated (CCA) dose and COMPASS indirectly measured (CME) dose based on dose-volume histogram metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using MultiCube phantom. Routine quality assurance of absolute point dose verification was performed to check the overall delivery accuracy. Quantitative analyses of dose delivery verification were compared with pass and fail criteria of 3 mm and 3% distance to agreement and dose differences. Gamma passing rate was compared with 2D fluence verification from MatriXX with MultiCube. Comparison of COMPASS reconstructed dose from measured fluence and COMPASS computed dose has shown a very good agreement with TPS calculated dose. Each plan was evaluated based on dose volume parameters for target volumes such as dose at 95% of volume (D95) and average dose. For critical organs dose at 20% of volume (D20), dose

  20. Optimal beam arrangement for stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery in lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To compare the different beam arrangement and delivery techniques for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung lesions using the criteria of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol. Material and methods. Thirty-seven medically inoperable lung cancers were evaluated with various planning techniques including multiple coplanar multiple static beams, multiple non-coplanar static beams and arc delivery. Twelve plans were evaluated for each case, including five plans using coplanar fixed beams, six plans using non-coplanar fixed beams and one plan using arc therapy. These plans were compared using the target prescription isodose coverage, high and low dose volumes, and critical organ dose-volume limits. Results. The prescription isodose coverage, high dose evaluation criteria and dose to critical organs were similar among treatment delivery techniques. However, there were differences in low dose criteria, especially in the ratio of the volume of 50% isodose of the prescription dose to the volume of planning treatment volume (R50%). The R50% in plans using non-coplanar static beams was lower than other plans in 30 of 37 cases (81%). Conclusion. Based on the dosimetric criteria outlined in RTOG 0236, the treatment technique using non-coplanar static beams showed the most preferable results for SBRT of lung lesions

  1. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia and King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia); Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  2. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  3. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in anal canal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aillères Norbert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans in anal canal cancers. Methods Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1 and a double (RA2 modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2 based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1 was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU and delivery treatment time were also reported. Results All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p Conformity index (CI95% for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2, 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT, and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1. Homogeneity (D5% - D95% for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2, 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT, and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1. RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted

  4. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans in anal canal cancers. Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1) and a double (RA2) modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2) based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1) was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue) were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU) and delivery treatment time were also reported. All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p < 0.05). Conformity index (CI95%) for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2), 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT), and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1). Homogeneity (D5% - D95%) for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2), 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT), and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1). RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted in comparable sparing for

  5. Experience in verification of radiation technique VMat - Rapid Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to describe an extension of the QA program for linear accelerators and Rapid Arc system for program verification for each dose of irradiation plans formed by this technique for radiotherapy work-place Multiscan Ltd., RC Pardubice. (authors)

  6. Proton Arc Reduces Range Uncertainty Effects and Improves Conformality Compared With Photon Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gu, Guan; Marcelos, Tiago; Kooy, Hanne; Willers, Henning [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To describe, in a setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the theoretical dosimetric advantages of proton arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in which the beam penumbra of a rotating beam is used to reduce the impact of range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with proton SBRT underwent repeat planning with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (Photon-VMAT) and an in-house-developed arc planning approach for both proton passive scattering (Passive-Arc) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT-Arc). An arc was mimicked with a series of beams placed at 10° increments. Tumor and organ at risk doses were compared in the context of high- and low-dose regions, represented by volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In the high-dose region, conformality index values are 2.56, 1.91, 1.31, and 1.74, and homogeneity index values are 1.29, 1.22, 1.52, and 1.18, respectively, for 3 proton passive scattered beams, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT. Therefore, proton arc leads to a 30% reduction in the 95% isodose line volume to 3-beam proton plan, sparing surrounding organs, such as lung and chest wall. For chest wall, V30 is reduced from 21 cm{sup 3} (3 proton beams) to 11.5 cm{sup 3}, 12.9 cm{sup 3}, and 8.63 cm{sup 3} (P=.005) for Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. In the low-dose region, the mean lung dose and V20 of the ipsilateral lung are 5.01 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), 4.38 Gy(RBE), 4.91 Gy(RBE), and 5.99 Gy(RBE) and 9.5%, 7.5%, 9.0%, and 10.0%, respectively, for 3-beam, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy with proton arc and Photon-VMAT generate significantly more conformal high-dose volumes than standard proton SBRT, without loss of coverage of the tumor and with significant sparing of nearby organs, such as chest wall. In addition

  7. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by...... MLC tracking delivery of an inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan can be improved by incorporating leaf position constraints in the objective function without otherwise affecting the plan quality. The dosimetric robustness may be estimated prior to delivery by evaluating the ALDw of the plan....

  8. A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle3 Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle3 Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume

  9. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59–95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40–1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications

  10. A Two-Flux Radiation Model for Helical Instability of Arcs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Ye; ZHENG Shu; XU Xiang; ZOU Xiu; LIU Jin-Yuan; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ A two-flux radiation model of the helical instability of arcs in axial magnetic field is presented. The temperature (and electrical conductivity) is approximated in a more realistic way (parabolic instead of flat profile) and a simplified term of radiation losses is included in the energy equation. The magnetohydrodynamic equations in an electrostatic approximation serve as the starting point of the theory. Using a linear time-dependent perturbation theory, the corresponding equations and an explicit analytic expression that corresponds to the term of radiation losses are derived in the presence of the radiation transfer energy, from which the marginal Maecker number and the growth rate of the helical instability can be given. It is found that, in comparison with the results without radiation, the arc stable area is reduced.

  11. Critical Appraisal of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastases to Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A planning study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs, RapidArc (RA), fixed beam IMRT (IM), and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with multiple static fields or short conformal arcs in a series of patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solitary or oligo-metastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were included in the study. Dose prescription was set to 45 Gy (mean dose to clinical target volume [CTV]) in six fractions of 7.5 Gy. Objectives for CTV and planning target volume (PTV) were as follows: Dosemin >95%, Dosemax 15Gy 36Gy 36Gy 15Gy 3) for liver. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated to assess plan quality. Results: Planning objectives on CTV and PTV were achieved by all techniques. Use of RA improved PTV coverage (V95% = 90.2% ± 5.2% for RA compared with 82.5% ± 9.6% and 84.5% ± 8.2% for CRT and IM, respectively). Most planning objectives for organs at risk were met by all techniques except for the duodenum, small bowel, and stomach, in which the CRT plans exceeded the dose/volume constraints in some patients. The MU/fraction values were as follows: 2186 ± 211 for RA, 2583 ± 699 for IM, and 1554 ± 153 for CRT. Effective treatment time resulted as follows: 3.7 ± 0.4 min for RA, 10.6 ± 1.2 min for IM, and 6.3 ± 0.5 min for CRT. Conclusions: Delivery of SBRT by RA showed improvements in conformal avoidance with respect to standard conformal irradiation. Delivery parameters confirmed logistical advantages of RA, particularly compared with IM.

  12. Measurement comparison and Monte Carlo analysis for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery verification using the ArcCHECK dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Koren, Sion; Veltchev, Iavor; Li, Jinsheng; Wang, Lu; Price, Robert A; Ma, C-M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate the capabilities of a cylindrical diode array system for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment quality assurance (QA). The VMAT plans were generated by the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for dose calculation. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized as a validation tool for the TPS calculations and the ArcCHECK measurements. The megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) of the ArcCHECK system was adopted for the geometry reconstruction in the TPS and for MC simulations. A 10 × 10 cm2 open field validation was performed for both the 6 and 10 MV photon beams to validate the absolute dose calibration of the ArcCHECK system and also the TPS dose calculations for this system. The impact of the angular dependency on noncoplanar deliveries was investigated with a series of 10 × 10 cm2 fields delivered with couch rotation 0° to 40°. The sensitivity of detecting the translational (1 to 10 mm) and the rotational (1° to 3°) misalignments was tested with a breast VMAT case. Ten VMAT plans (six prostate, H&N, pelvis, liver, and breast) were investigated to evaluate the agreement of the target dose and the peripheral dose among ArcCHECK measurements, and TPS and MC dose calculations. A customized acrylic plug holding an ion chamber was used to measure the dose at the center of the ArcCHECK phantom. Both the entrance and the exit doses measured by the ArcCHECK system with and without the plug agreed with the MC simulation to 1.0%. The TPS dose calculation with a 2.5 mm grid overestimated the exit dose by up to 7.2% when the plug was removed. The agreement between the MC and TPS calculations for the ArcCHECK without the plug improved significantly when a 1 mm dose calculation grid was used in the TPS. The noncoplanar delivery test demonstrated that the angular dependency has limited impact on the gamma passing rate (< 1.2% drop) for the 2%-3% dose and 2mm-3 mm

  13. Detection and correction for EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery using cine EPID imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been studied and used for pretreatment and in-vivo dosimetry applications for many years. The application of EPIDs for dosimetry in arc treatments requires accurate characterization of the mechanical sag of the EPID and gantry during rotation. Several studies have investigated the effects of gravity on the sag of these systems but each have limitations. In this study, an easy experiment setup and accurate algorithm have been introduced to characterize and correct for the effect of EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery. Methods: Three metallic ball bearings were used as markers in the beam: two of them fixed to the gantry head and the third positioned at the isocenter. EPID images were acquired during a 360 deg. gantry rotation in cine imaging mode. The markers were tracked in EPID images and a robust in-house developed MATLAB code was used to analyse the images and find the EPID sag in three directions as well as the EPID + gantry sag by comparison to the reference gantry zero image. The algorithm results were then tested against independent methods. The method was applied to compare the effect in clockwise and counter clockwise gantry rotations and different source-to-detector distances (SDDs). The results were monitored for one linear accelerator over a course of 15 months and six other linear-accelerators from two treatment centers were also investigated using this method. The generalized shift patterns were derived from the data and used in an image registration algorithm to correct for the effect of the mechanical sag in the system. The Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) technique was used to investigate the improvement in alignment of cine EPID images of a fixed field, by comparing both individual images and the sum of images in a series with the reference gantry zero image. Results: The mechanical sag during gantry rotation was dependent on the gantry angle and was larger in the in-plane direction, although

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 ± 0.3 to 9.2 ± 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 ± 3.8 to 98.3 ± 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Bignardi, Mario; Alongi, Filippo; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Castiglioni, Simona; Pentimalli, Sara; Tozzi, Angelo (IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy)), e-mail: pietro.mancosu@humanitas.it; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca (Oncology Inst. of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 +- 0.3 to 9.2 +- 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 +- 3.8 to 98.3 +- 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  16. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Fu; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Yeh, Hui-Ling; Chang, Chen-Fa; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)) and 5 Gy (V(5 Gy)) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. PMID:26116150

  17. Hollow-duct radiation delivery system investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fibrich, Martin; Rus, Bedřich; Kramer, Daniel

    Praha : IPP AS CR - TOPTEC, 2012 - (Vít, T.; Kovačičinová, J.; Lédl, V.), 13-16 ISBN 978-80-87026-02-1. [OaM 2012 International Conference on Optics and Measurement. Liberec (CZ), 16.10.2012-18.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0091 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OP VK 1 LaserSys(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0091 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser * diode-array-radiation * hollow -duct radiation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  18. Order Reduction of the Radiative Heat Transfer Model for the Simulation of Plasma Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Fagiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    An approach to derive low-complexity models describing thermal radiation for the sake of simulating the behavior of electric arcs in switchgear systems is presented. The idea is to approximate the (high dimensional) full-order equations, modeling the propagation of the radiated intensity in space, with a model of much lower dimension, whose parameters are identified by means of nonlinear system identification techniques. The low-order model preserves the main structural aspects of the full-order one, and its parameters can be straightforwardly used in arc simulation tools based on computational fluid dynamics. In particular, the model parameters can be used together with the common approaches to resolve radiation in magnetohydrodynamic simulations, including the discrete-ordinate method, the P-N methods and photohydrodynamics. The proposed order reduction approach is able to systematically compute the partitioning of the electromagnetic spectrum in frequency bands, and the related absorption coefficients, tha...

  19. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm3 ± 1.0 cm3 and 28.52 cm3 ± 3.22 cm3, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D2% and D98% were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D100% mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met

  20. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Bender, Edward [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Basavatia, Amar; Hong, Linda; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Tomé, Wolfgang A., E-mail: wtome@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm{sup 3} ± 1.0 cm{sup 3} and 28.52 cm{sup 3} ± 3.22 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D{sub 100%} mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met.

  1. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was evaluated in comparison to non interrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds). The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to non interrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater

  2. Radiative Transport of Energy in SF6 Arc Plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Vladimír; Protasevich, E. T.

    Tomsk : Izdatelstvo Tomskogo politechnitschekogo universiteta, 1999, s. 1-100 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/1586; GA AV ČR KSK1076602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 262200010 Keywords : method of partial characteristics * plasma * radiative heat transfer Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. Thermal radiation effect on the extinction properties of electric arcs in HV circuit breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziani Abderrahmane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the formation of the electric arc at the opening of a high voltage circuit breaker, the generated plasma will be the seat of a very important thermal exchange. Models founded only on conduction and convection thermal transfers don't reproduce the whole thermal exchanges that are governing the extinction process. This paper is devoted to the development of a model of the electric arc extinction in a high voltage circuit breaker taking in account the thermal radiation of the plasma, in addition to the conduction and convection phenomena. The Stefan-Boltzman equation is coupled with the heat equation, and both equations are solved simultaneously in order to follow the evolution of the arc voltage and the conductance of the thermal plasma. The obtained results are found in good agreement with experimental recordings.

  4. Feasibility study of a periodic arc compressor in the presence of coherent synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mitri, S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of short electron bunches in high brightness linear accelerators has raised the awareness of the accelerator community to the degradation of the beam transverse emittance by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted in magnetic bunch length compressors, transfer lines and turnaround arcs. Beam optics control has been proposed to mitigate that CSR effect. In this article, we enlarge on the existing literature by reviewing the validity of the linear optics approach in a periodic, achromatic arc compressor. We then study the dependence of the CSR-perturbed emittance to beam optics, mean energy, and bunch charge. The analytical findings are compared with particle tracking results. Practical considerations on CSR-induced energy loss and nonlinear particle dynamics are included. As a result, we identify the range of parameters that allows feasibility of an arc compressor for driving, for example, a free electron laser or a linear collider.

  5. Feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and high intensity photon beams for hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report technical features, early outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients (22 lesions) were prospectively enrolled in a feasibility study. Dose prescription was 50Gy in 10 fractions. Seven patients (35%) were classified as AJCC stage I-II while 13 (65%) were stages III-IV. Eighteen patients (90%) were Child-Pugh stage A, the remaining were stage B. All patients were treated with RapidArc technique with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of 10MV from a TrueBeam linear accelerator. Technical, dosimetric and early clinical assessment was performed to characterize treatment and its potential outcome. Median age was 68 years, median initial tumor volume was 124 cm3 (range: 6–848). Median follow-up time was 7.4 months (range: 3–13). All patients completed treatment without interruption. Mean actuarial overall survival was of 9.6 ± 0.9 months (95%C.L. 7.8-11.4), median survival was not reached; complete response was observed in 8/22 (36.4%) lesions; partial response in 7/22 (31.8%), stable disease in 6/22 (27.3%), 1/22 (4.4%) showed progression. Toxicity was mild with only 1 case of grade 3 RILD and all other types were not greater than grade 2. Concerning dosimetric data, Paddick conformity index was 0.98 ± 0.02; gradient index was 3.82 ± 0.93; V95% to the clinical target volume was 93.6 ± 7.7%. Mean dose to kidneys resulted lower than 3.0Gy; mean dose to stomach 4.5 ± 3.0Gy; D1cm3 to spinal cord was 8.2 ± 4.5Gy; D1% to the esophagus was 10.2 ± 9.7Gy. Average beam on time resulted 0.7 ± 0.2 minutes (range: 0.4-1.4) with the delivery of an average of 4.4 partial arcs (range: 3–6) of those 86% non-coplanar. Clinical results could suggest to introduce VMAT-RapidArc as an appropriate SBRT technique for patients with HCC in view of a prospective dose escalation trial

  6. Radiation Fluxes in SF6 and Argon Arc Plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Vladimír; Bartlová, M.

    Vol. I. Minsk : Trovant (Trojsk), 2000, s. 212-215. ISBN 5-89513-04-8. [International Conference on Plasma Physics and Plasma Technology (PPPT-3) /3./. Minsk (BY), 18.09.2000-22.09.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/1586 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 262200010 Keywords : fluxes * radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  7. The role of radiation loses in high-pressure blasted electrical arcs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, J.; Jakubová, I.; Šenk, J.; Mašláni, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 275, č. 1 (2011), 012007-012007. E-ISSN 1742-6596. [European Conference on High-Technology Plasma Processes (HTPP 11)/11th./. Brussels, 27.06.2010-02.07.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : High-pressure electrical arc * radiation loss * mathematical model Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/275/1/012007/pdf/1742-6596_275_1_012007.pdf

  8. Radiation shielding properties of concrete with electric arc furnace slag aggregates and steel shots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Industrial waste products were used to produce radiation shielding concrete. ► The mechanical and radiation shielding properties were evaluated. ► The developed concrete is cheaper and conserves the natural resources. - Abstract: Heavyweight concrete, prepared with a mixture of concrete and heavyweight aggregates or metallic components, is generally used for radiation shielding purposes. In the present study the radiation shielding properties of concrete prepared with electric arc furnace slag aggregates (EAFSAs) and steel shots, was investigated. The results indicated that concrete mixed with 50% EAFSA and 50% steel shots meets the weight and radiation requirements. The use of 50% EAFSA results in a decrease in the cost of concrete and also conserves a useful material, such as iron ore

  9. Comparison of Calculated Radiation Delivery Versus Actual Radiation Delivery in Military Macaws (Ara militaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Daniel C; Shiomitsu, Keijiro; Liu, Chin-Chi; Nevarez, Javier G

    2016-03-01

    The skin and oral cavity are common sites of neoplasia in avian species. Radiation therapy has been described for the treatment of these tumors in birds; however, its observed effectiveness has been variable. One possible explanation for this variability when radiation is used to treat the head is the unique anatomy of the avian skull, which contains an elaborate set of sinuses not found in mammalian species. To compare a calculated dose of radiation intended to be administered and the actual amount of radiation delivered to the target area of the choana in 3 adult military macaws (Ara militaris), computed tomography scans were obtained and the monitor unit was calculated to deliver 100 cGy (1Gy) by using radiation planning software. The birds received 3-4 radiation treatments each from a megavoltage radiation therapy unit. A thermoluminescent dosimetry chip (TLD) placed in the choana of the birds was used to measure the amount of ionizing radiation delivered at each treatment. The TLDs were kept in place using Play-Doh as a tissue analog. The actual dose of radiation delivered was lower than the 100-cGy calculated dose, with the 95% confidence limits of predicted bias values between 2.35 and 5.39 (radiation dose from 94.61 to 97.65 cGy). A significant difference was identified between the actual amount of radiation delivered and the calculated radiation goal (P < .001). None of the TLDs received the intended dose of 100 cGy of radiation. The results revealed that the amount of radiation delivered did not reach intended levels. Because the combination of the significance of this discrepancy and the standard dose inhomogeneity could lead to greater than 10% dose inhomogeneity, future investigation is warranted for accurate dose calculation and efficacy of radiation therapy for neoplasia at the lumen of the choana in birds. PMID:27088738

  10. Simulation of Fault Arc Based on Different Radiation Models in a Closed Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Junpeng; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Hantian; Wu, Yifei

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of a fault arc in a closed tank based on the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) method, in which a comparative study of three radiation models, including net emission coefficients (NEC), semi-empirical model based on NEC as well as the P1 model, is developed. The pressure rise calculated by the three radiation models are compared to the measured results. Particularly when the semi-empirical model is used, the effect of different boundary temperatures of the re-absorption layer in the semi-empirical model on pressure rise is concentrated on. The results show that the re-absorption effect in the low-temperature region affects radiation transfer of fault arcs evidently, and thus the internal pressure rise. Compared with the NEC model, P1 and the semi-empirical model with 0.7<α<0.83 are more suitable to calculate the pressure rise of the fault arc, where is an adjusted parameter involving the boundary temperature of the re-absorption region in the semi-empirical model. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51177124), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University and Shaanxi Province Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2013JM-7010)

  11. Simulation of Fault Arc Based on Different Radiation Models in a Closed Tank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei; ZHANG Junpeng; HU Yang; ZHANG Hantian; WU Yifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of a fault arc in a closed tank based on the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) method,in which a comparative study of three radiation models,including net emission coefficients (NEC),semi-empirical model based on NEC as well as the P1 model,is developed.The pressure rise calculated by the three radiation models are compared to the measured results.Particularly when the semi-empirical model is used,the effect of different boundary temperatures of the re-absorption layer in the semi-empirical model on pressure rise is concentrated on.The results show that the re-absorption effect in the low-temperature region affects radiation transfer of fault arcs evidently,and thus the internal pressure rise.Compared with the NEC model,P1 and the semi-empirical model with 0.7 < α < 0.83 are more suitable to calculate the pressure rise of the fault arc,where is an adjusted parameter involving the boundary temperature of the re-absorption region in the semi-empirical model.

  12. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per [Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology - 3994, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK - 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark) and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark); Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark) and Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark) and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  13. Properties of Arc Discharge with Hybrid Stabilization for Different Radiation Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    Praha: CZECH TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY, PRAGUE, INSTITUTE OF PLASMA PHYSICS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, PRAGUE, 2008 - (Khun, J.; Kříha, V.; Píchal, J.; Píchal, M.). s. 62-63 ISBN 978-80-01-04030-0. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /23rd./. 16.06.2008-19.06.2008, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : arc discharge * divergence of radiation flux * partial characteristics * radiation model * reabsorption Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  14. Dosimetric study comparing volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and fixed dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric are modulation with RapidArc and fixed field dynamic IMRT for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with early left-sided breast cancer received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. After target definition, treatment planning was performed by RapidArc and two fixed fields dynamic IMRT respectively on the same CT scan. The target dose distribution, homogeneity of the breast, and the irradiation dose and volume for the lungs, heart, and contralateral breast were read in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and compared between RapidArc and IMRT. The treatment delivery time and monitor units were also compared. Results: In comparison with the IMRT planning,the homogeneity of clinical target volume (CTV), the volume proportion of 95% prescribed dose (V95%) was significantly higher by 0.65% in RapidArc (t=5.16, P=0.001), and the V105% and V110% were lower by 10.96% and 1.48 % respectively, however, without statistical significance (t=-2.05, P=0.055 and t=-1.33, P=0.197). The conformal index of planning target volume (PTV) by the RapidArc planning was (0.88±0.02), significantly higher than that by the IMRT planning [(0.74±0.03), t=18.54, P<0.001]. The homogeneity index (HI) of PTV by the RapidArc planning was 1.11±0.01, significantly lower than that by the IMRT planning (1.12±0.02, t=-2.44, P=0.02). There were no significant differences in the maximum dose (Dmax) and V20 for the ipsilateral lung between the RapidArc and IMRT planning, but the values of V10, V5, Dmin and Dmean by RapidArc planning were all significantly higher than those by the IMRT planning (all P<0.01). The values of max dose and V30 for the heart were similar by both techniques, but the values of V10 and V5 by the RapidArc planning were significantly higher (by 18% and 50%, respectively). The V5 of the contralateral breast and lung by the RapidArc planning were increased by 9

  15. Theoretical investigation of coherent synchrotron radiation induced microbunching instability in transport and recirculation arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as recirculation or transport arcs, may lead to the microbunching instability. We extend and develop a semi-analytical approach of the CSR-induced microbunching instability for a general lattice, based on the previous formulation with 1-D CSR model [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 064401 (2002)] and apply it to investigate the physical processes of microbunching amplification for two example transport arc lattices. We find that the microbunching instability in transport arcs has a distinguishing feature of multistage amplification (e.g, up to 6th stage for our example arcs in contrast to two stage amplification for a 3-dipole chicane). By further extending the concept of stage gain as proposed by Huang and Kim [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 074401 (2002)], we developed a method to quantitatively characterize the microbunching amplification in terms of iterative or staged orders that allows the compar...

  16. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-03-28

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc. PMID:26632121

  17. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jia-Fu [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Dah-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Hui-Ling, E-mail: hlyeh@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen-Fa [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]{sub 50.4} {sub Gy} and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV{sub 62} {sub Gy}). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) and 5 Gy (V{sub 5} {sub Gy}) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer.

  18. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]50.4 Gy and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV62 Gy). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V20 Gy) and 5 Gy (V5 Gy) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer

  19. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  20. Single-Arc IMRT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator in a continuous dynamic mode during a single rotation of the gantry has recently gained momentum both in research and industry. In this note we investigate the potential of this Single-Arc IMRT technique at a conceptual level. We consider the original theoretical example case from Brahme et al that got the field of IMRT started. Using analytical methods, we derive deliverable intensity 'landscapes' for Single-Arc as well as standard IMRT and Tomotherapy. We find that Tomotherapy provides the greatest flexibility in shaping intensity landscapes and that it allows one to deliver IMRT in a way that comes close to the ideal case in the transverse plane. Single-Arc and standard IMRT make compromises in different areas. Only in relatively simple cases that do not require substantial intensity modulation will Single-Arc be dosimetrically comparable to Tomotherapy. Compared with standard IMRT, Single-Arc could be dosimetrically superior in certain cases if one is willing to accept the spreading of low dose values over large volumes of normal tissue. In terms of treatment planning, Single-Arc poses a more challenging optimization problem than Tomotherapy or standard IMRT. We conclude that Single-Arc holds potential as an efficient IMRT technique especially for relatively simple cases. In very complex cases, Single-Arc may unduly compromise the quality of the dose distribution, if one tries to keep the treatment time below 2 min or so. As with all IMRT techniques, it is important to explore the tradeoff between plan quality and the efficiency of its delivery carefully for each individual case. (note)

  1. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  2. Geometric Verification of Dynamic Wave Arc Delivery With the Vero System Using Orthogonal X-ray Fluoroscopic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghelea, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.buleteanu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Faculty of Physics, Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); R& D Radiosurgery, BrainLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Gevaert, Thierry [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Depuydt, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Tournel, Koen [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hung, Cecilia [R& D Radiosurgery, BrainLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Simon, Viorica; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Ridder, Mark de [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to define an independent verification method based on on-board orthogonal fluoroscopy to determine the geometric accuracy of synchronized gantry–ring (G/R) rotations during dynamic wave arc (DWA) delivery available on the Vero system. Methods and Materials: A verification method for DWA was developed to calculate O-ring-gantry (G/R) positional information from ball-bearing positions retrieved from fluoroscopic images of a cubic phantom acquired during DWA delivery. Different noncoplanar trajectories were generated in order to investigate the influence of path complexity on delivery accuracy. The G/R positions detected from the fluoroscopy images (DetPositions) were benchmarked against the G/R angulations retrieved from the control points (CP) of the DWA RT plan and the DWA log files recorded by the treatment console during DWA delivery (LogActed). The G/R rotational accuracy was quantified as the mean absolute deviation ± standard deviation. The maximum G/R absolute deviation was calculated as the maximum 3-dimensional distance between the CP and the closest DetPositions. Results: In the CP versus DetPositions comparison, an overall mean G/R deviation of 0.13°/0.16° ± 0.16°/0.16° was obtained, with a maximum G/R deviation of 0.6°/0.2°. For the LogActed versus DetPositions evaluation, the overall mean deviation was 0.08°/0.15° ± 0.10°/0.10° with a maximum G/R of 0.3°/0.4°. The largest decoupled deviations registered for gantry and ring were 0.6° and 0.4° respectively. No directional dependence was observed between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Doubling the dose resulted in a double number of detected points around each CP, and an angular deviation reduction in all cases. Conclusions: An independent geometric quality assurance approach was developed for DWA delivery verification and was successfully applied on diverse trajectories. Results showed that the Vero system is capable of following complex

  3. Geometric Verification of Dynamic Wave Arc Delivery With the Vero System Using Orthogonal X-ray Fluoroscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to define an independent verification method based on on-board orthogonal fluoroscopy to determine the geometric accuracy of synchronized gantry–ring (G/R) rotations during dynamic wave arc (DWA) delivery available on the Vero system. Methods and Materials: A verification method for DWA was developed to calculate O-ring-gantry (G/R) positional information from ball-bearing positions retrieved from fluoroscopic images of a cubic phantom acquired during DWA delivery. Different noncoplanar trajectories were generated in order to investigate the influence of path complexity on delivery accuracy. The G/R positions detected from the fluoroscopy images (DetPositions) were benchmarked against the G/R angulations retrieved from the control points (CP) of the DWA RT plan and the DWA log files recorded by the treatment console during DWA delivery (LogActed). The G/R rotational accuracy was quantified as the mean absolute deviation ± standard deviation. The maximum G/R absolute deviation was calculated as the maximum 3-dimensional distance between the CP and the closest DetPositions. Results: In the CP versus DetPositions comparison, an overall mean G/R deviation of 0.13°/0.16° ± 0.16°/0.16° was obtained, with a maximum G/R deviation of 0.6°/0.2°. For the LogActed versus DetPositions evaluation, the overall mean deviation was 0.08°/0.15° ± 0.10°/0.10° with a maximum G/R of 0.3°/0.4°. The largest decoupled deviations registered for gantry and ring were 0.6° and 0.4° respectively. No directional dependence was observed between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Doubling the dose resulted in a double number of detected points around each CP, and an angular deviation reduction in all cases. Conclusions: An independent geometric quality assurance approach was developed for DWA delivery verification and was successfully applied on diverse trajectories. Results showed that the Vero system is capable of following complex

  4. On the coherent radiation of an electron bunch moving in an arc of a circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existing theories of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) are related to the motion of an electron bunch on a circular orbit and do not describe the case of finite magnet length. We present the CSR theory for a bunch of any length moving in an arc of a finite angle. The radiative interaction of the electrons in the bunch is analyzed for a line charge distribution using ultrarelativistic approximation. It is shown in particular that this interaction is important not only inside the magnet but also on the straight part of the trajectory after the magnet. Detailed analytical study of the CSR effects in the electron bunch with a stepped distribution of the charge density has been performed. The simple analytical technique of the radiative force calculation has been developed. The analytical solutions in the form of elementary functions are obtained for the radiative interaction force, for the energy loss distribution along the bunch and for the total energy loss of the bunch. The latter result is confirmed with calculation of the energy of coherent radiation in far zone. The criterion for the applicability region of the preceding theories to the case of a finite magnet length is obtained

  5. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)–conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08–0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique

  6. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalit, Danielle N., E-mail: dmargalit@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K. [Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique

  7. Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: A Fully Dynamic Delivery With Synchronized Couch and Gantry Motion Significantly Improves Dosimetric Indices Correlated With Poor Cosmesis in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jieming; Atwood, Todd; Eyben, Rie von; Fahimian, Benjamin; Chin, Erika; Horst, Kathleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States); Otto, Karl [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dimitre.hristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To develop planning and delivery capabilities for linear accelerator–based nonisocentric trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) and to evaluate the benefit of TMAT for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with the patient in prone position. Methods and Materials: An optimization algorithm for volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was generalized to allow for user-defined nonisocentric TMAT trajectories combining couch rotations and translations. After optimization, XML scripts were automatically generated to program and subsequently deliver the TMAT plans. For 10 breast patients in the prone position, TMAT and 6-field noncoplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated under equivalent objectives and constraints. These plans were compared with regard to whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. Results: For TMAT APBI, nonisocentric collision-free horizontal arcs with large angular span (251.5 ± 7.9°) were optimized and delivered with delivery time of ∼4.5 minutes. Percentage changes of whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose for TMAT relative to IMRT were −10.81% ± 6.91%, −27.81% ± 7.39%, −14.82% ± 9.67%, and 39.40% ± 10.53% (P≤.01). Conclusions: This is a first demonstration of end-to-end planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT. Compared with IMRT, TMAT resulted in marked reduction of the breast tissue volume irradiated at high doses.

  8. Developing system for delivery of optical radiation in medicobiological researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschenov, Victor B.; Taraz, Majid

    2004-06-01

    Methods of optical diagnostics and methods of photodynamic therapy are actively used in medico-biological researches. The system for delivery of optical radiation is one of the key methods in these researches. Usually these systems use flexible optical fibers with diameters from 200 to 1000 micron. Two types of systems for delivery are subdivided, first for diagnostic researches, second for therapeutic procedures. Existing diagnostic catheters, which have most widely applied in medicine, have bifurcated with diameter of the tip equal 1.8 mm. These devices, which are called fiber-optical catheters, satisfy the majority endoscopes researches. However, till now the problem of optical-diagnostics inside tissue is not soled. Especially it is important at diagnostics of a mammary gland, livers, thyroid glands tumor, tumor of a brain and some other studies connected with punctures. In these cases, it is necessary that diameter of fiber-optical catheters be less than one millimeter. This work is devoted to the development of these catheters. Also in clinical procedures such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP), cylindrical light diffusing tips are rapidly becoming a popular device for the administration of the desired light dose for the illumination of hollow organs, such as bronchus, trachea and oesophagus. This work is devoted to the development of these catheters.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for adult craniospinal irradiation—A comparison with traditional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) poses a challenging planning process because of the complex target volume. Traditional 3D conformal CSI does not spare any critical organs, resulting in toxicity in patients. Here the dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are compared with classic conformal planning in adults for both cranial and spine fields to develop a clinically feasible technique that is both effective and efficient. Ten adult patients treated with CSI were retrospectively identified. For the cranial fields, 5-field IMRT and dual 356° VMAT arcs were compared with opposed lateral 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) fields. For the spine fields, traditional posterior-anterior (PA) PA fields were compared with isocentric 5-field IMRT plans and single 200° VMAT arcs. Two adult patients have been treated using this IMRT technique to date and extensive quality assurance, especially for the junction regions, was performed. For the cranial fields, the IMRT technique had the highest planned target volume (PTV) maximum and was the least efficient, whereas the VMAT technique provided the greatest parotid sparing with better efficiency. 3D-CRT provided the most efficient delivery but with the highest parotid dose. For the spine fields, VMAT provided the best PTV coverage but had the highest mean dose to all organs at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT had the highest PTV and OAR maximum doses but was the most efficient. IMRT provides the greatest OAR sparing but the longest delivery time. For those patients with unresectable disease that can benefit from a higher, definitive dose, 3D-CRT–opposed laterals are the most clinically feasible technique for cranial fields and for spine fields. Although inefficient, the IMRT technique is the most clinically feasible because of the increased mean OAR dose with the VMAT technique. Quality assurance of the beams, especially the junction regions, is essential

  10. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for adult craniospinal irradiation—A comparison with traditional techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shen, Xinglei; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Ying; Shi, Wenyin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Biswas, Tithi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) poses a challenging planning process because of the complex target volume. Traditional 3D conformal CSI does not spare any critical organs, resulting in toxicity in patients. Here the dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are compared with classic conformal planning in adults for both cranial and spine fields to develop a clinically feasible technique that is both effective and efficient. Ten adult patients treated with CSI were retrospectively identified. For the cranial fields, 5-field IMRT and dual 356° VMAT arcs were compared with opposed lateral 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) fields. For the spine fields, traditional posterior-anterior (PA) PA fields were compared with isocentric 5-field IMRT plans and single 200° VMAT arcs. Two adult patients have been treated using this IMRT technique to date and extensive quality assurance, especially for the junction regions, was performed. For the cranial fields, the IMRT technique had the highest planned target volume (PTV) maximum and was the least efficient, whereas the VMAT technique provided the greatest parotid sparing with better efficiency. 3D-CRT provided the most efficient delivery but with the highest parotid dose. For the spine fields, VMAT provided the best PTV coverage but had the highest mean dose to all organs at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT had the highest PTV and OAR maximum doses but was the most efficient. IMRT provides the greatest OAR sparing but the longest delivery time. For those patients with unresectable disease that can benefit from a higher, definitive dose, 3D-CRT–opposed laterals are the most clinically feasible technique for cranial fields and for spine fields. Although inefficient, the IMRT technique is the most clinically feasible because of the increased mean OAR dose with the VMAT technique. Quality assurance of the beams, especially the junction regions, is essential.

  11. Effect of high power CO2 and Yb:YAG laser radiation on the characteristics of TIG arc in atmospherical pressure argon and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shikai; Xiao, Rongshi

    2015-04-01

    The effects of laser radiation on the characteristics of the DC tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc were investigated by applying a high power slab CO2 laser and a Yb:YAG disc laser. Experiment results reveal that the arc voltage-current curve shifts downwards, the arc column expands, and the arc temperature rises while the high power CO2 laser beam vertically interacts with the TIG arc in argon. With the increase of the laser power, the voltage-current curve of the arc shifts downwards more significantly, and the closer the laser beam impingement on the arc to the cathode, the more the decrease in arc voltage. Moreover, the arc column expansion and the arc temperature rise occur mainly in the region between the laser beam incident position and the anode. However, the arc characteristics hardly change in the cases of the CO2 laser-helium arc and YAG laser-arc interactions. The reason is that the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption coefficients are greatly different due to the different electron densities of the argon and helium arcs and the different wave lengths of CO2 and YAG lasers.

  12. Optical absorption spectroscopy on a metal-halide high intensity discharge arc lamp using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvallet, G A; Lawler, J E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2003-07-07

    A sensitive, spatially resolved optical absorption spectroscopy experiment using synchrotron radiation on metal-halide high intensity discharge (MH-HID) lamps was performed. This experiment was used to measure the absolute column densities of ground and excited level Sc atoms, ground level Sc{sup +} ions, and ground level Na atoms in a 250 W MH-HID lamp during operation. The column densities were Abel inverted and used to determine the arc temperature as a function of radius and the absolute electron density as a function of radius. Although most of these measurements were made using a one-dimensional spectrally-multiplexed experiment, a two-dimensional spatially and spectrally multiplexed experiment has also been demonstrated. The absolute density and temperature maps from this experiment were used to determine the absolute near-infrared output power from the MH-HID lamp as described in the companion paper (Smith et al 2003)

  13. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-independent comparison of radiotherapy treatment planning of IMRT and VMAT for head-and-neck cancer performed by several institutes and based on the same CT- and contouring data. Five institutes generated IMRT and VMAT plans for five oropharyngeal cancer patients using either Pinnacle3 or Oncentra Masterplan to be delivered on Elekta linear accelerators. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT plans within the same patient and institute showed significantly better sparing for almost all OARs with VMAT. The average mean dose to the parotid glands and oral cavity was reduced from 27.2 Gy and 39.4 Gy for IMRT to 25.0 Gy and 36.7 Gy for VMAT, respectively. The dose conformity at 95% of the prescribed dose for PTVboost and PTVtotal was 1.45 and 1.62 for IMRT and 1.37 and 1.50 for VMAT, respectively. The average effective delivery time was reduced from 13:15 min for IMRT to 5:54 min for VMAT. Independently of institution-specific optimization strategies, the quality of the VMAT plans including double arcs was superior to step-and-shoot IMRT plans including 5–9 beam ports, while the effective treatment delivery time was shortened by ~50% with VMAT

  14. Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior–posterior direction, with systematic (∑) and random (σ) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%±19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to ∑=0.01 mm and σ = 0.55 mm in the anterior–posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%±4.6% and 99.7%±0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a γ index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

  15. Application of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique on liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning following RTOG 0438 guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chengyu, E-mail: shicy1974@yahoo.com; Chen, Yong; Fang, Deborah; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique has comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number.

  16. Has the use of computers in radiation therapy improved the accuracy in radiation dose delivery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is well recognized that computer technology has had a major impact on the practice of radiation oncology. This paper addresses the question as to how these computer advances have specifically impacted the accuracy of radiation dose delivery to the patient. Methods: A review was undertaken of all the key steps in the radiation treatment process ranging from machine calibration to patient treatment verification and irradiation. Using a semi-quantitative scale, each stage in the process was analysed from the point of view of gains in treatment accuracy. Results: Our critical review indicated that computerization related to digital medical imaging (ranging from target volume localization, to treatment planning, to image-guided treatment) has had the most significant impact on the accuracy of radiation treatment. Conversely, the premature adoption of intensity-modulated radiation therapy has actually degraded the accuracy of dose delivery compared to 3-D conformal radiation therapy. While computational power has improved dose calibration accuracy through Monte Carlo simulations of dosimeter response parameters, the overall impact in terms of percent improvement is relatively small compared to the improvements accrued from 3-D/4-D imaging. Conclusions: As a result of computer applications, we are better able to see and track the internal anatomy of the patient before, during and after treatment. This has yielded the most significant enhancement to the knowledge of 'in vivo' dose distributions in the patient. Furthermore, a much richer set of 3-D/4-D co-registered dose-image data is thus becoming available for retrospective analysis of radiobiological and clinical responses.

  17. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  18. Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for dosimetric evaluations of intrafraction motion for gated and ungated intensity modulated arc therapy deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mike; Gladwish, Adam; Staruch, Robert; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2008-11-01

    Respiratory gated radiation therapy allows for a smaller margin expansion for the planning target volume (PTV) to account for respiratory induced motion and is emerging as a common method to treat lung and liver tumors. We investigated the dosimetric effect of free motion and gated delivery for intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of PTV margin and duty cycle for gated delivery is studied with Monte Carlo simulations. A motion phantom is used for this study. Two sets of contours were drawn on the mid-inspiration CT scan of this motion phantom. For each set of contours, an IMAT plan to be delivered with constant dose rate was created. The plans were generated on a CT scan of the phantom in the static condition with 3 mm PTV margin and applied to the motion phantom under four conditions: static, full superior-inferior (SI) motion (A = 1 cm, T = 4 s) and gating conditions (25% and 50% duty cycles) with full SI motion. A 6 by 15 cm piece of radiographic film was placed in the sagittal plane of the phantom and then irradiated under all measurement conditions. Film calibration was performed with a step-wedge method to convert optical density to dose. Gated IMAT delivery was first validated in 2D by comparing static film with that from gating and full motion. A previously verified simulation tool for IMRT that takes the log files from the multileaf collimator (MLC) controller and the gating system were adapted to simulate the delivered IMAT treatment for full 3D dosimetric analysis. The IMAT simulations were validated against the 2D film measurements. The resultant IMAT simulations were evaluated with dose criteria, dose-volume histograms and 3D gamma analysis. We validated gated IMAT deliveries when we compared the static film with the one from gating using 25% duty cycle using 2D gamma analysis. Within experimental and setup uncertainties, film measurements agreed with their corresponding simulated

  19. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Delivery of Prostate Radiotherapy: Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation of up to 360o, using either a constant dose rate (cdr-VMAT) or variable dose rate (vdr-VMAT) during rotation. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT prostate RT plans with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and IMRT plans. Patients and Methods: The 3D-CRT, five-field IMRT, cdr-VMAT, and vdr-VMAT RT plans were created for 10 computed tomography data sets from patients undergoing RT for prostate cancer. The parameters evaluated included the doses to organs at risk, equivalent uniform doses, dose homogeneity and conformality, and monitor units required for delivery of a 2-Gy fraction. Results: The IMRT and both VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than 3D-CRT plans for nearly all dosimetric endpoints analyzed. The lowest doses to organs at risk and most favorable equivalent uniform doses were achieved with vdr-VMAT, which was significantly better than IMRT for the rectal and femoral head dosimetric endpoints (p < 0.05) and significantly better than cdr-VMAT for most bladder and rectal endpoints (p < 0.05). The vdr-VMAT and cdr-VMAT plans required fewer monitor units than did the IMRT plans (relative reduction of 42% and 38%, respectively; p = 0.005) but more than for the 3D-CRT plans (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The IMRT and VMAT techniques achieved highly conformal treatment plans. The vdr-VMAT technique resulted in more favorable dose distributions than the IMRT or cdr-VMAT techniques, and reduced the monitor units required compared with IMRT

  20. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient׳s neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient׳s data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain. PMID:26235550

  1. The Use of Medical Images in Planning and Delivery of Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kalet, Ira J; Austin-Seymour, Mary M.

    1997-01-01

    The authors provide a survey of how images are used in radiation therapy to improve the precision of radiation therapy plans, and delivery of radiation treatment. In contrast to diagnostic radiology, where the focus is on interpretation of the images to decide if disease is present, radiation therapy quantifies the extent of the region to be treated, and relates it to the proposed treatment using a quantitative modeling system called a radiation treatment planning (RTP...

  2. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  3. Cherenkov imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy for real-time radiation beam tracking and treatment response monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    External beam radiotherapy utilizes high energy radiation to target cancer with dynamic, patient-specific treatment plans. The otherwise invisible radiation beam can be observed via the optical Cherenkov photons emitted from interaction between the high energy beam and tissue. Using a specialized camera-system, the Cherenkov emission can thus be used to track the radiation beam on the surface of the patient in real-time, even for complex cases such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two patients undergoing VMAT of the head and neck were imaged and analyzed, and the viability of the system to provide clinical feedback was established.

  4. Accuracy of treatment planning and quality control of radiation therapy delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate radiation therapy delivery to the target volume depends on appropriate treatment planning, daily patient set-up with minimum localization errors and performed treatment equipments. The present report describes 1) acquisition of patient data by CT and transfers axial tomography, 2) physiological movements of target volume due to respiration and swallowing during irradiation and 3) quality control of radiation therapy delivery by detection of localization errors in daily set-up. (author)

  5. Radiation measurements in the North arc: November 1986 through April 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an effort to share preliminary data on radiation measurements. Measurements were made using passive lithium-flouride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) placed in the North arc during the start-up period of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Li-7 dosimeters were used for ionizing radiation measurements, and Li-6 dosimeters moderated by polyethylene were used for measuring neutrons. In addition, some measurements were made near alcove N-6 using a Cs-137 gamma-ray source in order to determine the effectiveness of the 2 inch lead wall placed at the entrance to the alcove. When it became apparent that significant doses were being recorded at some alcoves, Pb walls were put in front of those electronic racks and Pb was put in the magnets. The Pb (approximately 1/2 inch square) in the magnet gaps was placed only on those magnets where the gap faces the aisle, and typically was put on four such magnets upbeam of each alcove and three such magnets downbeam of the alcoves. Vertical profiles were made on the photon dose at the entrance to alcove N-3 before and after the Pb was added to the magnets. Measurements were also made in front of and behind the 2 inch thick Pb wall. In addition, measurements were made of the transmission of photons in Pb using spheres of different wall thickness. Finally, neutron fluences were measured at a few selected alcoves (N-1, N-3 and N-15T). Only one of these was made in the shadow of a Pb wall

  6. Total Body Irradiation using VMAT (RapidArc): A Planning Study of a novel treatment delivery method

    OpenAIRE

    Santam Chakraborty; Suja Cheruliyil; Resmi Bharathan; Geetha Muttath

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using RapidArc to deliver total body irradiation (TBI) treatment. Methods: VMAT planning was performed a whole body computed tomography (CT) data set using Rapid Arc. The planning target volumes included entire body trimmed to 3 mm below the skin. The organs at risk included the lungs and kidneys. A dose of 12 Gy in 10 fractions was prescribed to the target volume. The VMAT-TBI technique consisted of three i...

  7. Reducing the low-dose lung radiation for central lung tumors by restricting the IMRT beams and arc arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Florin; Kirk, Michael; Soto, Daniel; Sall, Walter; McIntyre, James

    2012-01-01

    To compare the extent to which 7 different radiotherapy planning techniques for mediastinal lung targets reduces the lung volume receiving low doses of radiation. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients with targets, including the mediastinal nodes, were identified. Treatment plans were generated to both 60- and 74-Gy prescription doses using 7 different planning techniques: conformal, hybrid conformal/intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), 7 equidistant IMRT beams, 2 restricted beam IMRT plans, a full (360°) modulated arc, and a restricted modulated arc plan. All plans were optimized to reduce total lung V5, V10, and V20 volumes, while meeting normal tissue and target coverage constraints. The mean values for the 13 patients are calculated for V5, V10, V20, V(ave), V0-20, and mean lung dose (MLD) lung parameters. For the 74-Gy prescription dose, the mean lung V10 was 42.7, 43.6, 48.2, 56.6, 57, 55.8, and 54.1% for the restricted ±36° IMRT, restricted modulated arc, restricted ±45° IMRT, full modulated arc, hybrid conformal/IMRT, equidistant IMRT, and conformal plans, respectively. A similar lung sparing hierarchy was found for the 60-Gy prescription dose. For the treatment of central lung targets, the ±36° restricted IMRT and restricted modulated arc planning techniques are superior in lowering the lung volume treated to low dose, as well as in minimizing MLD, followed by the ±45° restricted IMRT plan. All planning techniques that allow the use of lateral or lateral/oblique beams result in spreading the low dose over a higher lung volume. The area under the lung dose-volume histogram curve below 20 Gy, V0-20, is proposed as an alternative to individual V(dose) parameters, both as a measure of lung sparing and as a parameter to be minimized during IMRT optimization. PMID:22189028

  8. Total Body Irradiation using VMAT (RapidArc: A Planning Study of a novel treatment delivery method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santam Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT using RapidArc to deliver total body irradiation (TBI treatment. Methods: VMAT planning was performed a whole body computed tomography (CT data set using Rapid Arc. The planning target volumes included entire body trimmed to 3 mm below the skin. The organs at risk included the lungs and kidneys. A dose of 12 Gy in 10 fractions was prescribed to the target volume. The VMAT-TBI technique consisted of three isocentres and three overlapping arcs: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of 12 Gy was 95% and maximum dose of 109.8%. Mean dose to lung was restricted at 8.6Gy. Results: The total body volume in the study was 15469cm3 and the PTV volume was 11322cm3. The mean dose to PTV was 104%. The homogeneity index was 0.09. Sparing of normal tissues with adequate coverage of skeletal bones was shown to be feasible with Rapid Arc. The study demonstrates that VMAT is feasible for TBI treatment. Unlike conventional TBI chest wall boost with electrons was not required. Conclusion: The technique for total body irradiation using RapidArc VMAT was found feasible and is undergoing further studies prior to clinical use.

  9. Motion as a perturbation: Measurement-guided dose estimates to moving patient voxels during modulated arc deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey; Hunt, Dylan; Opp, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Wolf, Theresa K. [Live Oak Technologies LLC, Kirkwood, Missouri 63122 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To present a framework for measurement-guided VMAT dose reconstruction to moving patient voxels from a known motion kernel and the static phantom data, and to validate this perturbation-based approach with the proof-of-principle experiments. Methods: As described previously, the VMAT 3D dose to a static patient can be estimated by applying a phantom measurement-guided perturbation to the treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated dose grid. The fraction dose to any voxel in the presence of motion, assuming the motion kernel is known, can be derived in a similar fashion by applying a measurement-guided motion perturbation. The dose to the diodes in a helical phantom is recorded at 50 ms intervals and is transformed into a series of time-resolved high-density volumetric dose grids. A moving voxel is propagated through this 4D dose space and the fraction dose to that voxel in the phantom is accumulated. The ratio of this motion-perturbed, reconstructed dose to the TPS dose in the phantom serves as a perturbation factor, applied to the TPS fraction dose to the similarly situated voxel in the patient. This approach was validated by the ion chamber and film measurements on four phantoms of different shape and structure: homogeneous and inhomogeneous cylinders, a homogeneous cube, and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. A 2D motion stage was used to simulate the motion. The stage position was synchronized with the beam start time with the respiratory gating simulator. The motion patterns were designed such that the motion speed was in the upper range of the expected tumor motion (1-1.4 cm/s) and the range exceeded the normally observed limits (up to 5.7 cm). The conformal arc plans for X or Y motion (in the IEC 61217 coordinate system) consisted of manually created narrow (3 cm) rectangular strips moving in-phase (tracking) or phase-shifted by 90 Degree-Sign (crossing) with respect to the phantom motion. The XY motion was tested with the computer-derived VMAT

  10. Roll and pitch set-up errors during volumetric modulated arc delivery. Can adapting gantry and collimator angles compensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmans-Holtzer, Nienke A.; Hoffmans, Daan; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-28

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether adapting gantry and collimator angles can compensate for roll and pitch setup errors during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery. Previously delivered clinical plans for locally advanced head-and-neck (H and N) cancer (n = 5), localized prostate cancer (n = 2), and whole brain with simultaneous integrated boost to 5 metastases (WB + 5M, n = 1) were used for this study. Known rigid rotations were introduced in the planning CT scans. To compensate for these, in-house software was used to adapt gantry and collimator angles in the plan. Doses to planning target volumes (PTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) were calculated with and without compensation and compared with the original clinical plan. Measurements in the sagittal plane in a polystyrene phantom using radiochromic film were compared by gamma (γ) evaluation for 2 H and N cancer patients. For H and N plans, the introduction of 2 -roll and 3 -pitch rotations reduced mean PTV coverage from 98.7 to 96.3 %. This improved to 98.1 % with gantry and collimator compensation. For prostate plans respective figures were 98.4, 97.5, and 98.4 %. For WB + 5M, compensation worked less well, especially for smaller volumes and volumes farther from the isocenter. Mean comparative γ evaluation (3 %, 1 mm) between original and pitched plans resulted in 86 % γ < 1. The corrected plan restored the mean comparison to 96 % γ < 1. Preliminary data suggest that adapting gantry and collimator angles is a promising way to correct roll and pitch set-up errors of < 3 during VMAT for H and N and prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, zu untersuchen, ob Anpassungen von Gantry- und Kollimatorwinkeln Positionierungsfehler in VMAT-Bestrahlungsplaenen kompensieren koennen. Fuer diese Studie wurden zuvor angefertigte klinische Bestrahlungsplaene von lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNO, n = 5), Prostatatumoren (n = 2) und ganzen Schaedeln mit

  11. Simulating Proton Synchrotron Radiation in the Arcs of the LHC, HL-LHC, and FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Canton, Gerardo Guillermo; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    At high proton-beam energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, of beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and of primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distributions in the arcs of the LHC, HL-LHC, and FCC-hh. Specifically, for the LHC we study the effect of the “sawtooth” chamber, for the HL-LHC the consequences of the ATS optics with large beta beating in the arcs, and for the FCC-hh the effect of a novel beam-screen design, with a long slit surrounded by a “folded” antechamber.

  12. Dosimetric effects of weight loss or gain during volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight loss or gain during the course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can alter the planned dose to the target volumes and critical organs. Typically, source-to-surface distance (SSD) measurements are documented by therapists on a weekly basis to ensure that patients' exterior surface and isocenter-to-skin surface distances remain stable. The radiation oncology team then determines whether the patient has undergone a physical change sufficient to require a new treatment plan. The effect of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetry is not well known, and it is unclear when rescanning or replanning is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on IMRT or VMAT dose delivery in patients with prostate cancer and to determine the SSD change threshold for replanning. Whether IMRT or VMAT provides better dose stability under weight change conditions was also determined. We generated clinical IMRT and VMAT prostate and seminal vesicle treatment plans for varying SSDs for 10 randomly selected patients with prostate cancer. The differences due to SSD change were quantified by a specific dose change for a specified volume of interest. The target mean dose, decreased or increased by 2.9% per 1-cm SSD decrease or increase in IMRT and by 3.6% in VMAT. If the SSD deviation is more than 1 cm, the radiation oncology team should determine whether to continue treatment without modifications, to adjust monitor units, or to resimulate and replan

  13. The effect of the target-organ geometric complexity on the choice of delivery between RapidArc and sliding-window IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempted to assess the effect of target-organ geometric complexity on the plan quality of sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), double-arc (RA2), and triple-arc (RA3) RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Plans for 9-field sliding-window IMRT, RA2, and RA3 were optimized for 36 patients with NPC ranging from T1 to T4 tumors. Initially the patients were divided into 2 groups, with group A representing the most simple early stage (T1 and T2) cases, whereas group B represented the more complex advanced cases (T3 and T4). Evaluation was performed based on target conformity, target dose homogeneity, organ-sparing capability, and delivery efficiency. Based on the plan quality results, a subgroup of advanced cases, group B2, representing the most demanding task was distinguished and reported separately from the rest of the group B cases, B1. Detailed analysis was performed on the anatomic features for each group of cases, so that planners can easily identify the differences between B1 and B2. For the group A cases, RA3 plans were superior to the IMRT plans in terms of organ sparing, whereas target conformity and dose homogeneity were similar. For the group B1 cases, the RA3 plans produced almost equivalent plan quality as the IMRT plans. For the group B2 cases, for most of which large target volumes were adjacent to (5 mm or less) and wrapping around the brain stem, RA2 and RA3 were inferior to the IMRT regarding both target dose homogeneity and conformity. RA2 plans were slightly inferior to IMRT and RA3 plans for most cases. The plan comparison results depend on the target to brain stem distances and the target sizes. The plan quality results together with the anatomic information may allow the evaluation of the 3 treatment options before actual planning

  14. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA (United States); Otto, K [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  15. Reducing the low-dose lung radiation for central lung tumors by restricting the IMRT beams and arc arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosca, Florin, E-mail: frosca@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mass General/North Shore, Danvers, MA (United States); Kirk, Michael; Soto, Daniel; Sall, Walter; McIntyre, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mass General/North Shore, Danvers, MA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    To compare the extent to which 7 different radiotherapy planning techniques for mediastinal lung targets reduces the lung volume receiving low doses of radiation. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients with targets, including the mediastinal nodes, were identified. Treatment plans were generated to both 60- and 74-Gy prescription doses using 7 different planning techniques: conformal, hybrid conformal/intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), 7 equidistant IMRT beams, 2 restricted beam IMRT plans, a full (360 Degree-Sign ) modulated arc, and a restricted modulated arc plan. All plans were optimized to reduce total lung V5, V10, and V20 volumes, while meeting normal tissue and target coverage constraints. The mean values for the 13 patients are calculated for V5, V10, V20, V{sub ave}, V0-20, and mean lung dose (MLD) lung parameters. For the 74-Gy prescription dose, the mean lung V10 was 42.7, 43.6, 48.2, 56.6, 57, 55.8, and 54.1% for the restricted {+-}36 Degree-Sign IMRT, restricted modulated arc, restricted {+-}45 Degree-Sign IMRT, full modulated arc, hybrid conformal/IMRT, equidistant IMRT, and conformal plans, respectively. A similar lung sparing hierarchy was found for the 60-Gy prescription dose. For the treatment of central lung targets, the {+-}36 Degree-Sign restricted IMRT and restricted modulated arc planning techniques are superior in lowering the lung volume treated to low dose, as well as in minimizing MLD, followed by the {+-}45 Degree-Sign restricted IMRT plan. All planning techniques that allow the use of lateral or lateral/oblique beams result in spreading the low dose over a higher lung volume. The area under the lung dose-volume histogram curve below 20 Gy, V0-20, is proposed as an alternative to individual V{sub dose} parameters, both as a measure of lung sparing and as a parameter to be minimized during IMRT optimization.

  16. SU-E-T-62: Cardiac Toxicity in Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, X; Zhang, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Feng, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhou, L [West China Hospital, Sichuan (China); Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States); Deng, J [Yale University, New Haven, CT, US (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The cardiac toxicity for lung cancer patients, each treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DAT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is investigated. Methods: 120 lung patients were selected for this study: 25 treated with DAT, 50 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. For comparison, all plans were generated in the same treatment planning system, normalized such that the 100% isodose lines encompassed 95% of planning target volume. The plan quality was evaluated in terms of homogeneity index (HI) and 95% conformity index (%95 CI) for target dose coverage and mean dose, maximum dose, V{sub 30} Gy as well as V{sub 5} Gy for cardiac toxicity analysis. Results: When all the plans were analyzed, the VMAT plans offered the best target coverage with 95% CI = 0.992 and HI = 1.23. The DAT plans provided the best heart sparing with mean heart dose = 2.3Gy and maximum dose = 11.6Gy, as compared to 5.7 Gy and 31.1 Gy by IMRT as well as 4.6 Gy and 30.9 Gy by VMAT. The mean V30Gy and V5Gy of the heart in the DAT plans were up to 11.7% lower in comparison to the IMRT and VMAT plans. When the tumor volume was considered, the VMAT plans spared up to 70.9% more doses to the heart when the equivalent diameter of the tumor was larger than 4cm. Yet the maximum dose to the heart was reduced the most in the DAT plans with up to 139.8% less than that of the other two plans. Conclusion: Overall, the VMAT plans achieved the best target coverage among the three treatment modalities, and would spare the heart the most for the larger tumors. The DAT plans appeared advantageous in delivering the least maximum dose to the heart as compared to the IMRT and VMAT plans.

  17. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhengzheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is to report 1 the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2 the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery.

  18. Impacts Of Radiatively-Active Aerosols On Mars’ Current Climate: Simulation Results With The NASA ARC Mars GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Herin, B.; Laamoumi, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Schaeffer, J.

    2010-10-01

    Recent upgrades to the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Mars general circulation model (GCM) include a fundamentally new and modernized radiative transfer package which permits radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and their mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating rate within the atmosphere. Such aerosols are critically important in determining the nature of atmospheric thermal structure and hence the overall climate of the planet. Our Mars GCM simulations indicate that radiatively-active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate in a variety of ways. In particular, preliminary results suggest that the bulk thermal structure and resultant (i.e., balanced) circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Generally speaking, we find a bulk warming of the atmosphere in upper layers, a cooling of the atmosphere in the lower and near-surface regions, and, increases in the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrasts (i.e., stronger mean polar vortices). A variety of results from our baseline and control simulations (i.e., where the radiative/physical effects are examined in isolation and when combined) will be presented. Comparisons with MGS/TES and MRO/MCS measurements indicate better agreement between the model's simulated climate compared to that observed. Using a state-of-the-art Mars GCM, these results highlight important effects radiatively-active aerosols have on physical and dynamical processes active in the current climate of Mars.

  19. Simultaneous MV-kV imaging for intrafractional motion management during volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Margie A; Sonnick, Mark; Pham, Hai; Regmi, Rajesh; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Morf, Daniel; Mageras, Gig S; Zelefsky, Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical feasibility of a motion monitoring method employing simultaneously acquired MV and kV images during volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Short-arc digital tomosynthesis (SA-DTS) is used to improve the quality of the MV images that are then combined with orthogonally acquired kV images to assess 3D motion. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold seeds was used to assess accuracy of the method under static, typical prostatic, and respiratory motion scenarios. Automatic registra-tion of kV images and single MV frames or MV SA-DTS reconstructed with arc lengths from 2° to 7° with the appropriate reference fiducial template images was performed using special purpose-built software. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by retrospectively analyzing images acquired over four or five sessions for each of three patients undergoing hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. The standard deviation of the registration error in phantom using MV SA-DTS was similar to single MV images for the static and prostate motion scenarios (σ = 0.25 mm). Under respiratory motion conditions, the standard deviation of the registration error increased to 0.7mm and 1.7 mm for single MV and MV SA-DTS, respectively. Registration failures were observed with the respiratory scenario only and were due to motion-induced fiducial blurring. For the three patients studied, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between automatic registration using 4° MV SA-DTS and manual registration using single MV images results was 0.07±0.52mm. The MV SA-DTS results in patients were, on average, superior to single-frame MV by nearly 1 mm - significantly more than what was observed in phantom. The best MV SA-DTS results were observed with arc lengths of 3° to 4°. Registration failures in patients using MV SA-DTS were primarily due to blockage of the gold seeds by the MLC. The failure rate varied from 2% to 16%. Combined MV SA

  20. Simultaneous MV-kV imaging for intrafractional motion management during volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Margie A.; Sonnick, Mark; Pham, Hai; Regmi, Rajesh; Xiong, Jian-ping; Morf, Daniel; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical feasibility of a motion monitoring method employing simultaneously acquired MV and kV images during volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Short-arc digital tomosynthesis (SA-DTS) is used to improve the quality of the MV images that are then combined with orthogonally acquired kV images to assess 3D motion. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold seeds was used to assess accuracy of the method under static, typical prostatic, and respiratory motion scenarios. Automatic registration of kV images and single MV frames or MV SA-DTS reconstructed with arc lengths from 2° to 7° with the appropriate reference fiducial template images was performed using special purpose-built software. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by retrospectively analyzing images acquired over four or five sessions for each of three patients undergoing hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. The standard deviation of the registration error in phantom using MV SA-DTS was similar to single MV images for the static and prostate motion scenarios (σ = 0.25 mm). Under respiratory motion conditions, the standard deviation of the registration error increased to 0.7mm and 1.7 mm for single MV and MV SA-DTS, respectively. Registration failures were observed with the respiratory scenario only and were due to motion-induced fiducial blurring. For the three patients studied, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between automatic registration using 4° MV SA-DTS and manual registration using single MV images results was 0.07±0.52mm. The MV SA-DTS results in patients were, on average, superior to single-frame MV by nearly 1 mm — significantly more than what was observed in phantom. The best MV SA-DTS results were observed with arc lengths of 3° to 4°. Registration failures in patients using MV SA-DTS were primarily due to blockage of the gold seeds by the MLC. The failure rate varied from 2% to 16%. Combined MV SA

  1. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV-WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV-Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV-Pelvis: Dmax < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV-WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV-Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean). U5-95% for PTV-WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV-Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  2. Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer incidence is increasing in developed as well as in developing countries. Cancer may be expected to become a prominent problem and this will result in public pressure for higher priorities on cancer care. In some relatively advanced developing countries radiation therapy is applied in about 50% of all detected cancer cases. Approximately half of these treatments have curative intent. Surgery and radiotherapy applied individually or combined result in the cure of about 40% of all patients. The application of chemotherapy alone has curative effects only on a small percentage of cancer patients. It is encouraging to note that the results achieved by radiation therapy show continuous improvement. This can be traced back to a number of developments: increased knowledge regarding tumour and normal tissue response to radiation, early diagnosis with improved tumour localisation, improved dosimetry and dose planning. The introduction of modern equipment has been crucial in these developments and makes possible a more accurate target delineation, better treatment planning resulting in irradiation of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) with a highly uniform dose and, simultaneously, a reduction in dose to healthy tissues outside the PTV. Experience shows that high quality radiotherapy can only be achieved if its conducted by a skilled team working closely together with good communication between various categories of staff. Therefore, seminars and training courses covering all aspects of radiotherapy and dosimetry are of great importance and should be held regionally or nationally on a regular basis. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. SU-E-P-14: Dosimetric Effects of Magnetic Field in MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy Delivery for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G; Currey, A; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided radiation therapy (RT) delivery would be beneficial for breast irradiation. The electron return effect due to the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF) may cause dosimetric issues on dose on skin and at the lung-tissue interface. The purpose of this study is to investigate these issues. Methods: IMRT plans with tangential beams and VMAT plans with 200 degree arcs to cover ipsilateral breast were generated for 10 randomly selected breast cancer cases using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) utilizing Monte Carlo dose calculation with or without a TMF of 1.5 T. Plans were optimized to deliver uniform dose to the whole breast with an exclusion of 5 mm tissue under the skin (PTV-EVAL). All four plans for each patient were re-scaled to have the same PTV-EVAL volume to receive the same prescription dose. The skin is defined as the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions in the surrounding region. Results: The presence of 1.5 T TMF resulted in (1)increased skin dose, with the mean and maximum skin dose increase of 5% and 9%, respectively; (2) similar dose homogeneity within the PTV-EVAL; (3) the slightly improved (3%) dose homogeneity in the whole breast; (4) Averages of 9 and 16% increases in V5 and V20, respectively, for ipsilateral lung; and (5) increased the mean heart dose by 34%. VMAT plans don’t improve whole breast dose uniformity as compared that to the tangential plans. Conclusion: The presence of transverse magnetic field in MRI-guided RT delivery for whole breast irradiation can Result in slightly improved dose homogeneity in the whole breast, increased dose to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and skin. Plan optimization with additional specific dose volume constraints may eliminate/reduce these dose increases. This work is partially supported by Elekta Inc.

  4. Radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive hydrogels and the application to intelligent drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-prepared synthetic and natural polyelectrolyte and polyampholite hydrogels were applied to the intelligent drug delivery systems (DDS). The intelligent membranes and chips were prepared by nano-porous fabrication with Eximalaser and ion-beam irradiations and the coating of stimuli-responsive hydrogels. This coating was efficiently carried out by curing processing with conveyer system. Computer programming control of intelligent drug releases was studied for the design of DDS chips to carry out the multiple drug delivery in response to multiple environmental changes. (author)

  5. Hypofractionation does not increase radiation pneumonitis risk with modern conformal radiation delivery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Westerly, David C; Cannon, George M;

    2010-01-01

    To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models.......To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models....

  6. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Kang, Shengwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Lin, Mu-han; Chen, Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, Fu; Guo, Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Lili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  7. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  8. Critical appraisal of the accuracy of Acuros-XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm compared to measurement and calculations with the compass system in the delivery of RapidArc clinical plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the two dose calculation engines available for RapidArc planning (both released for clinical use) is investigated in comparison to the COMPASS data. Two dose calculation algorithms (Acuros-XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA)) were used to calculate RA plans and compared to calculations with the Collapsed Cone Convolution algorithm (CC) from the COMPASS system (IBA Dosimetry). CC calculations, performed on patient data, are based on experimental fluence measurements with a 2D array of ion chambers mounted on the linac head. The study was conducted on clinical cases treated with RA. Five cases for each of the following groups were included: Brain, Head and Neck, Thorax, Pelvis and stereotactic body radiation therapy for hypo-fractionated treatments with small fields. COMPASS measurements were performed with the iMatrixx-2D array. RapidArc plans were optimized for delivery using 6MV photons from a Clinac-iX (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). Accuracy of the RA calculation was appraised by means of: 1) comparison of Dose Volume histograms (DVH) metrics; 2) analysis of differential dose distributions and determination of mean dose differences per organ; 3) 3D gamma analysis with distance-to-agreement and dose difference thresholds set to 3%/3 mm or 2%/2 mm for targets, organs at risks and for the volumes encompassed by the 50 and 10% isodoses. For almost all parameters, the better agreement was between Acuros-XB and COMPASS independently from the anatomical site and fractionation. The same result was obtained from the mean dose difference per organ with Acuros-CC average differences below 0.5% while for AAA-CC data, average deviations exceeded 0.5% and in the case of the pelvis 1%. Relevance of observed differences determined with the 3D gamma analysis resulted in a pass rate exceeding 99.5% for Acuros-CC and exceeding 97.5% for AAA-CC. This study demonstrated that i) a good agreement exists between COMPASS-CC calculations based on measured fluences with

  9. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  10. Direct Plan Comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young Eun; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-01-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-Trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan using analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both CK and RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended ...

  11. Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a known fact that an increasing percentage of the population in developed as well as developing countries contract cancer. However, in some advanced countries the cancer mortality rate is no longer increasing, which can be attributed to an improvement in therapy. In some developing countries radiation therapy is currently applied in 50-60% of all cancer cases. About half of these treatments are with curative aims. Surgery and radiotherapy applied individually or concurrently result in the cure of about 40-50% of all patients. In addition, the application of chemotherapy has curative effects on small percentage of cancer cases. Radiotherapy is also an excellent palliative agent and often prolongs and enhances the quality of life of a patient. In some countries, resources are too scarce to secure adequate treatments. When this happens, it is of great importance that they learn to utilize the available resources in the most effective way. One of the aims of this seminar is to deal with this issue. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications

  13. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications.

  14. SU-E-T-624: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D Versus 3D Dosimetry for Stereotactic Volumetric Modulated Arc Delivery Using COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikraman, S; Karrthick, K; Rajesh, T; Sambasivaselli, R; Senniandanvar, V; Kataria, T [Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Manigandan, D [Sri Siddhivinayak Ganapathi Cancer hospital, Miraj, Maharastra (India); Karthikeyan, N [St Johns Medical College, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Muthukumaran, M [Apollo Super Speciality Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated arc delivery using COMPASS with 2D array. Methods: Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures of different sites like brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen and spine were taken from Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in Cyberknife. For each patient, linac based VMAT stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v 3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20Gy/fraction.TPS calculated VMAT plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS measured dose and calculated dose based on DVH metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using Multicube. Results: For each site, D{sub 9} {sub 5} was achieved with 100% of prescription dose with maximum 0.05SD. Conformity index (CI) was observed closer to 1.15 in all cases. Maximum deviation of 2.62 % was observed for D{sub 9} {sub 5} when compared TPS versus COMPASS measured. Considerable deviations were observed in head and neck cases compare to other sites. The maximum mean and standard deviation for D{sub 9} {sub 5}, average target dose and average gamma were -0.78±1.72, -1.10±1.373 and 0.39±0.086 respectively. Numbers of pixels passing 2D fluence verification were observed as a mean of 99.36% ±0.455 SD with 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA. For critical organs in head and neck cases, significant dose differences were observed in 3D dosimetry while the target doses were matched well within limit in both 2D and 3D dosimetry. Conclusion: The quantitative evaluations of 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated plans showed the potential of highlighting the delivery errors. This study reveals that COMPASS 3D dosimetry is an effective tool for patient

  15. Gene therapy delivery of endostatin enhances the treatment efficacy of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate whether sustained expression of mouse endostatin by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer can enhance the treatment efficacy of ionizing radiation. Materials and methods: Mouse endostatin was cloned into recombinant AAV (rAAV) under the control of CMV β-actin promoter. Recombinant mouse endostatin expressed via AAV gene transfer was tested for biological activity in endothelial cells. The impact of elevated serum levels of endostatin on tumor-induced angiogenesis was evaluated using an in vivo angiogenesis assay. The anti-tumor efficacy of combining rAAV-mediated endostatin delivery with radiation was evaluated in a human colorectal tumor model (HT29). Results: Recombinant mouse endostatin expressed through an AAV vector (rAAV-mEndo) inhibited endothelial cell proliferation (by 40-45%) and migration (by 22-33%). Intramuscular injection of rAAV-mEndo (1x109 i.u.) led to a sustained serum endostatin level of ∼500 ng/ml. Compared to control animals this endostatin level was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell-induced vessel formation (37 vs. 28.5, P3, 21 vs. 34.5 days, P3 (radiation, 34 days; endostatin plus radiation, 50 days, P<0.05). Conclusion: The delivery of endostatin via rAAV vectors may provide an effective means of enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy of radiation therapy

  16. Static characteristics of a conduction and radiation dominated electric arc in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent energy and circuit equations are solved numerically to obtain temperature profiles, current-voltage characteristics and electric field strength vs. axis temperature diagrams in the asymptotic region of a wall-stabilized electric arc operated in nitrogen. The numerical calculations demonstrate the splitting of the rising branch of the stationary solutions in the current-voltage characteristic. This phenomenon was earlier found experimentally for air. The computations were made for various channel radii and for various series resistances. The steady-state characteristics and convergence to the single branch of solutions is explained on the basis of the linearized Lyapunov stability theory (LIST). Comparison with available results of other authors shows that the analytical solution based on simple polynomial approximation to thermodynamic and transport functions differs significantly from numerical computations. (author) 20 figs., 21 refs

  17. Drug release control in delivery system for biodegradable polymer drugs by γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterizations of the drug release from microsphere and hydrogel preparation made from biodegradable polymers were investigated aiming at development of a drug delivery system which allows an optimum drug delivery and the identification of the factors which control its delivery. Poly-lactic acid microspheres containing 10% of progesterone were produced from poly DL-lactic acid and exposed to γ-ray at 5-1000 kGy. And its glass transition temperature (Tg) was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature was gradually lowered with an increase in the dose of radiation. Tg of the microsphere exposed at 1000 kGy was lower by 10degC compared with the untreated one, showing that Tg control is possible without changing the size distribution of microsphere. Then, the amount of progesterone released from microsphere was determined. The release rate of the drug linearly increased with a square root of radiation time. These results indicate that the control of drug release rate is possible through controling the microsphere's Tg by γ-ray radiation. (M.N.)

  18. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 43.9 ± 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 49.1 ± 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 ± 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 ± 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 7.4 ± 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 ± 0.05 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  19. Direct plan comparison of RapidArc and CyberKnife for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Eun; Kwak, Jungwon; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-07-01

    We compared the treatment planning performance of RapidArc (RA) vs. CyberKnife (CK) for spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Ten patients with spinal lesions who had been treated with CK were re-planned with RA, which consisted of two complete arcs. Computed tomography (CT) and volumetric dose data of CK, generated using the Multiplan (Accuray) treatment planning system (TPS) and the Ray-trace algorithm, were imported to Varian Eclipse TPS in Dicom format, and the data were compared with the RA plan by using an analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) dose calculation. The optimized dose priorities for both the CK and the RA plans were similar for all patients. The highest priority was to provide enough dose coverage to the planned target volume (PTV) while limiting the maximum dose to the spinal cord. Plan quality was evaluated with respect to PTV coverage, conformity index (CI), high-dose spillage, intermediate-dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), and maximum dose to the spinal cord, which are criteria recommended by the RTOG 0631 spine and 0915 lung SBRT protocols. The mean CI' SD values of the PTV were 1.11' 0.03 and 1.17' 0.10 for RA and CK ( p = 0.02), respectively. On average, the maximum dose delivered to the spinal cord in CK plans was approximately 11.6% higher than that in RA plans, and this difference was statistically significant ( p < 0.001). High-dose spillages were 0.86% and 2.26% for RA and CK ( p = 0.203), respectively. Intermediate-dose spillage characterized by D2cm was lower for RA than for CK; however, R50% was not statistically different. Even though both systems can create highly conformal volumetric dose distributions, the current study shows that RA demonstrates lower high- and intermediate-dose spillages than CK. Therefore, RA plans for spinal SBRT may be superior to CK plans.

  20. Delivery of 3-5 μm laser radiation by a hollow waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němec, M.; Jelínková, H.; Miyagi, M.; Iwai, K.; Doroshenko, M.

    2014-04-01

    Radiation delivery is required for various applications—mainly in medicine or industry. Due to the necessity of delivering IR, UV or powerful radiation, its transfer by hollow waveguides was investigated because standard glass fibers cause serious losses. Our special waveguide was based on a fused silica glass capillary tube with an inner silver layer and dielectric film (cyclic olefin polymer (COP)). Three lasers were designed and constructed as mid-infrared sources, namely Er:YAG (2.94 μm), Dy: PbGa2S4 (4.3 μm) and Fe:ZnSe (4.45 μm). The delivered spatial beam profile and transfer capability of 3-5 μm radiation by the COP/Ag hollow glass waveguide were characterized.

  1. Polymer matrices obtained by ionizing radiation for using in controlled drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of controlled drug delivery system were obtained by gamma radiation induced polymerization. One of the system was obtained from an acrylic derivative of acetaminophen (40-hydroxyacetanilide), by copolymerization of 4-(acryloyloxy) acetanilide and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in dimethylformamide solution with 0,16 kGy/h dose rate and 54 Gy dose. The values of reactivity rate, r-DMAA = 0,31 ± 0,02 e rAOA -0,07 ± 0,12, were determined by Fineman-Ross method. The acetaminophen hydrolysis was carried out in alkaline and enzymatic (trypsin) media. Another kind of drug delivery system studied was solvent controlled type, being the drug immobilized in the hydrogel,. The hydrogels prepared by radiation polymerization of acryloyl-L-propine methylester (A-Pro-OMe) with 10 Gy dose, showed thermosensible property, swelling or shrinking in water with decreased or increased temperatures. The hydrogels were obtained with different crosslink density, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, and the monomers N, N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and 2-cyanoethyl acrylate to study the influence of the composition in the drug delivery rate. It was verified that the porous size besides being a characteristic of the matrix composition, it was also temperature dependent (thermosensible). The analgesic drug acetaminophen was immobilized by entrapment and by physical adsorption into the hydrogels matrices for 'in vitro' study. The insulin was immobilized by adsorption for 'in vivo' study. (author)

  2. Large planning target volume in whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers - a comparison between volumetric arc and fixed beam based intensity modulation in ovarian cancers: a comparison between volumetric arc and fixed beam based intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this study is to assess dosimetric characteristics of multiple iso-centre volumetric-modulated arc therapy for the treatment of a large PTV in whole abdomen and ovarian cancers and in comparison with IMRT. Two patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) underwent CT-simulation in supine position with vacuum cushion and acquired CT-image with 3 mm slice thickness. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated with multiple isocenter using Eclipse Planning System (V10.0.39) for (6 MV photon) Varian UNIQUE Performance Linac equipped with a Millennium-120 MLC and optimised with Progressive Resolution optimizer (PRO3) for prescription 36 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTVWAR) and 45 Gy with daily fraction of 1.8 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTVPelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost and calculated with AAA algorithm in 2.5 mm grid resolution. Mean, V95%, V90%, V107% and uniformity number (Uniformity was defined as US-95%=D5%-D95%/Dmean) was calculated for Planning Target Volumes (PTVs). Organs at Risk (OAR's) were analysed statistically in terms of dose and volume. MU and delivery time were compared. Pre-treatment quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAl) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds with EPID as well as corresponding Dynalog files were generated and analysed. Feasibility and deliverability of VMAT plans showed to be a solution for the treatment planning and delivery for a large PTV volume (PTV-WAR) treatments, surrounded by critical structures such as liver, spinal canal, and kidneys, offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT. VMAT combines the advantages of faster delivery and lower number of monitor units (MU). It would help to reduce potential risk of secondary malignancy. VMAT(RapidArc) showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT

  3. Drug delivery observation of hydrophobe ferrofluid and magnetite nanoparticals by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, D Y; Bian, P; Kumazawa, T; Nakano, M; Matsuura, H; Umetani, K; Komdo, T; Uozumi, Y; Makino, K; Noda, N; Koide, K; Akutsu, M; Masuyama, K

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the composite magnetic nanoparticles of coated SiO nano film with about 8 nm size and high saturation magnetization value, were synthesized by liquid phase precipitation method. The magnetic nanoparticles can be dispersed in various liquid media, widely known as magnetic fluids or ferrofluids with both magnetic and liquid properties. The materials been collected great interests and more and more attentions to focus into Drug Delivery System (DDS) as a new technology in this paper. We use the composite nanoparticles to disperse H2O and inject the solutions into rat's in-vivo organs. And, in the experiments by using a strong photon beam of SPring-8 Synchrotron Radiation facility, the distribution stat and the effects of magnetic field as well as drug delivery behaviour of nanoparticles in the rat' kidney are verified by the in-vivo observations. PMID:22400252

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Bragg Fibers for Delivery of Laser Radiation at 1064 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matejec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bragg fibers offer new performance for transmission of high laser energies over long distances. In this paper theoretical modeling, preparation and characterization of Bragg fibers for delivery laser radiation at 1064 nm are presented. Investigated Bragg fibers consist of the fiber core with a refractive index equal to that of silica which is surrounded by three pairs of circular layers. Each pair is composed of one layer with a high and one layer with a low refractive index and characterized by a refractive-index difference around 0.03. Propagation constants and radiation losses of the fundamental mode in such a structure were calculated on the basis of waveguide optics. Preforms of the Bragg fibers were prepared by the MCVD method using germanium dioxide, phosphorous pentoxide and fluorine as silica dopants. The fibers with a diameter of 170 m were drawn from the preforms. Refractive-index profiles, angular distributions of the output power and optical losses of the prepared fibers were measured. Results of testing the fibers for delivery radiation of a pulse Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm are also shown.

  5. Vision 20/20: Positron emission tomography in radiation therapy planning, delivery, and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Katia

    2015-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly considered as an effective imaging method to support several stages of radiation therapy. The combined usage of functional and morphological imaging in state-of-the-art PET/CT scanners is rapidly emerging to support the treatment planning process in terms of improved tumor delineation, and to assess the tumor response in follow-up investigations after or even during the course of fractionated therapy. Moreover, active research is being pursued on new tracers capable of providing different insights into tumor function, in order to identify areas of the planning volume which may require additional dosage for improved probability of tumor control. In this respect, major progresses in the next years will likely concern the development and clinical investigation of novel tracers and image processing techniques for reliable thresholding and segmentation, of treatment planning and beam delivery approaches integrating the PET imaging information, as well as improved multimodal clinical instrumentation such as PET/MR. But especially in the rapidly emerging case of ion beam therapy, the usage of PET is not only limited to the imaging of external tracers injected to the patient. In fact, a minor amount of positron emitters is formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions between the impinging ions and the tissue, bearing useful information for confirmation of the delivered treatment during or after therapeutic irradiation. Different implementations of unconventional PET imaging for therapy monitoring are currently being investigated clinically, and major ongoing research aims at new dedicated detector technologies and at challenging applications such as real-time imaging and time-resolved in vivo verification of motion compensated beam delivery. This paper provides an overview of the different areas of application of PET in radiation oncology and discusses the most promising perspectives in the years to come for radiation therapy

  6. Vision 20/20: Positron emission tomography in radiation therapy planning, delivery, and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly considered as an effective imaging method to support several stages of radiation therapy. The combined usage of functional and morphological imaging in state-of-the-art PET/CT scanners is rapidly emerging to support the treatment planning process in terms of improved tumor delineation, and to assess the tumor response in follow-up investigations after or even during the course of fractionated therapy. Moreover, active research is being pursued on new tracers capable of providing different insights into tumor function, in order to identify areas of the planning volume which may require additional dosage for improved probability of tumor control. In this respect, major progresses in the next years will likely concern the development and clinical investigation of novel tracers and image processing techniques for reliable thresholding and segmentation, of treatment planning and beam delivery approaches integrating the PET imaging information, as well as improved multimodal clinical instrumentation such as PET/MR. But especially in the rapidly emerging case of ion beam therapy, the usage of PET is not only limited to the imaging of external tracers injected to the patient. In fact, a minor amount of positron emitters is formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions between the impinging ions and the tissue, bearing useful information for confirmation of the delivered treatment during or after therapeutic irradiation. Different implementations of unconventional PET imaging for therapy monitoring are currently being investigated clinically, and major ongoing research aims at new dedicated detector technologies and at challenging applications such as real-time imaging and time-resolved in vivo verification of motion compensated beam delivery. This paper provides an overview of the different areas of application of PET in radiation oncology and discusses the most promising perspectives in the years to come for radiation therapy

  7. Vision 20/20: Positron emission tomography in radiation therapy planning, delivery, and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parodi, Katia, E-mail: Katia.parodi@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Faculty of Physics, Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munich 85748 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly considered as an effective imaging method to support several stages of radiation therapy. The combined usage of functional and morphological imaging in state-of-the-art PET/CT scanners is rapidly emerging to support the treatment planning process in terms of improved tumor delineation, and to assess the tumor response in follow-up investigations after or even during the course of fractionated therapy. Moreover, active research is being pursued on new tracers capable of providing different insights into tumor function, in order to identify areas of the planning volume which may require additional dosage for improved probability of tumor control. In this respect, major progresses in the next years will likely concern the development and clinical investigation of novel tracers and image processing techniques for reliable thresholding and segmentation, of treatment planning and beam delivery approaches integrating the PET imaging information, as well as improved multimodal clinical instrumentation such as PET/MR. But especially in the rapidly emerging case of ion beam therapy, the usage of PET is not only limited to the imaging of external tracers injected to the patient. In fact, a minor amount of positron emitters is formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions between the impinging ions and the tissue, bearing useful information for confirmation of the delivered treatment during or after therapeutic irradiation. Different implementations of unconventional PET imaging for therapy monitoring are currently being investigated clinically, and major ongoing research aims at new dedicated detector technologies and at challenging applications such as real-time imaging and time-resolved in vivo verification of motion compensated beam delivery. This paper provides an overview of the different areas of application of PET in radiation oncology and discusses the most promising perspectives in the years to come for radiation therapy

  8. A software tool to automatically assure and report daily treatment deliveries by a Cobalt-60 radiation therapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deshan; Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Li, Harold H; Liu, Shi; Li, Xiaoling; Rodriguez, Vivian; Mutic, Sasa; Kashani, Rojano

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a method for automatic and immediate verification of treatment delivery after each treatment fraction in order to detect and correct errors, and to develop a comprehensive daily report which includes delivery verification results, daily image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) review, and information for weekly physics reviews. After systematically analyzing the requirements for treatment delivery verification and understanding the available information from a commercial MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment machine, we designed a procedure to use 1) treatment plan files, 2) delivery log files, and 3) beam output information to verify the accuracy and completeness of each daily treatment delivery. The procedure verifies the correctness of delivered treatment plan parameters including beams, beam segments and, for each segment, the beam-on time and MLC leaf positions. For each beam, composite primary fluence maps are calculated from the MLC leaf positions and segment beam-on time. Error statistics are calculated on the fluence difference maps between the plan and the delivery. A daily treatment delivery report is designed to include all required information for IGRT and weekly physics reviews including the plan and treatment fraction information, daily beam output information, and the treatment delivery verification results. A computer program was developed to implement the proposed procedure of the automatic delivery verification and daily report generation for an MRI guided radiation therapy system. The program was clinically commissioned. Sensitivity was measured with simulated errors. The final version has been integrated into the com-mercial version of the treatment delivery system. The method automatically verifies the EBRT treatment deliveries and generates the daily treatment reports. Already in clinical use for over one year, it is useful to facilitate delivery error detection, and to expedite physician daily IGRT review and

  9. Potential for Improved Intelligence Quotient Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared With Conventional 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation for Whole-Ventricular Radiation in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Method and Materials: Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. Conclusion: For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children.

  10. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, Dante E., E-mail: droa@uci.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Irvine-Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States); Schiffner, Daniel C.; Zhang Juying; Dietrich, Salam N.; Kuo, Jeffrey V.; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.A.L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Irvine-Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI{sub RTOG}), homogeneity index (HI{sub RTOG}), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D{sub mean} and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D{sub max} and D{sub mean}. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times {+-} SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 {+-} 7.3, 2.6 {+-} 1.6, and 3.0 {+-} 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery

  11. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CIRTOG), homogeneity index (HIRTOG), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), Dmean and D5–D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of Dmax and Dmean. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times ± SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 ± 7.3, 2.6 ± 1.6, and 3.0 ± 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery of SRS and SBRT to intracranial and

  12. TH-C-12A-02: Comparison of Two RapidArc Delivery Strategies in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Stage I and II Peripheral Lung Tumors with Unflattened Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The full arcs strategy used in SBRT with RapidArc and unflattened (FFF) beams in large and heterogeneous peripheral non-smallcell lung cancer (NSCLC) appears to be suboptimal as it increases the disadvantageous dose to the contralateral lung, which potentially increases the toxicity to surrounding tissues. In this study, we investigated, for the first time, the dose delivery strategies using partial arcs (PA) and the fully rotational arcs with avoidance sectors (FAAS) for SBRT with FFF beams in peripheral NSCLC patients. Methods: Eighteen patients with NSCLC (stage I and II) were selected for this study. Nine patients with a GTV <= 10cc were designated as the small tumor group. The remaining nine patients with a GTV between 10 cc and 44 cc were assigned to the large tumor group. The treatment plans were generated in eighteen patients using PA and FAAS, respectively, and delivered with a Varian TrueBeam Linac. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OAR), total MU, out-of-field dose, and delivery time were analyzed. Delta4 and Portal dosimetry were employed to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Results: or the small tumor group, the FAAS plans significantly achieved a better conformity index, the lower total MU and out-of-field dose, a shorter treatment time, and the reduced doses to cord, heart, and lung (p < 0.05). But the target doses were slightly higher than that delivered by PA plans. For the large tumor group, the PA plans significantly attained a better conformity index and a shorter treatment time (p < 0.05). Furthermore, all plans achieved a high pass rate, with all the gamma indices greater than 97% at the Γ3mm, 3% threshold. Conclusion: This study suggests that FAAS strategy is more beneficial for small tumor patients undergoing lung SBRT with FFF beams. However, for large tumor patients, PA strategy is recommended. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship

  13. Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, Static Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and 3D Conformal Planning for the Treatment of a Right-Sided Reconstructed Chest Wall and Regional Nodal Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared 3D conformal planning, static field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to investigate the suitable treatment plan and delivery method for a right-sided reconstructed chest wall and nodal case. The dose prescribed for the reconstructed chest wall and regional nodes was 50.4 Gy. Plans were compared for target coverage and doses of the lungs, heart, contralateral breast, and healthy tissue. All plans achieved acceptable coverage of the target and IMNs. The best right lung sparing achieved with 3D was a V20 Gy of 31.09%. Compared to it, VMAT reduced the same by 10.85% and improved the CI and HI over 3D by 18.75% and 2%, respectively. The ipsilateral lung V5 Gy to V20 Gy decreased with VMAT over IMRT by as high as 17.1%. The contralateral lung V5 Gy was also lowered with VMAT compared to IMRT by 16.22%. The MU and treatment beams were lowered with VMAT over IMRT by 30% and 10, respectively, decreasing the treatment time by >50%. VMAT was the treatment plan and delivery method of choice for this case due to a combination of improved lung sparing and reduced treatment time without compromising target coverage.

  14. Air core Bragg fibers for delivery of near-infrared laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Michal; Frank, Milan; Kubeček, Václav; Matějec, Vlastimil; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-12-01

    Optical fibers designed for high power laser radiation delivery represent important tools in medicine, solar systems, or industry. For such purposes several different types of glass optical fibers such as silica, sapphire, or chalcogenide ones as well as hollow-glass fibers, photonic crystal fibers and Bragg fibers have been investigated. Air-core Bragg fibers or photonic crystal fibers offer us the possibility of light transmission in a low dispersive material - air having a high damage threshold and small non-linear coefficient. However, preforms for drawing Bragg fibers can be fabricated by MCVD method similarly as preforms of standard silica fibers. In this paper we present fundamental characteristics of laboratory-designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air cores intended for delivery of laser radiation at a wavelength range from 0.9 to 1.5 μm. Bragg fibers with different air core diameters of 5, 45 and 73 mm were prepared. The fiber core was surrounded by three pairs of circular Bragg layers. Each pair was composed of one layer with a high and one layer with a low refractive index with a contrast up to 0.03. Several laser sources emitting at 0.975, 1.06, and 1.55 μm were used as radiation sources. Attenuation coefficients, overall transmissions, bending losses, and spatial profiles of output beams from fibers were determined at these wavelengths. The lowest attenuation coefficient of 70 dB/km was determined for the 45 μm and 73 mm air-core fiber when radiation from a laser was launched into the fibers by using optical lenses. However, multimodal transmission has been observed in such condition. It has also been found that bending losses of such fibers are negligible for bending diameters higher than 15 mm.

  15. Radiation dose delivery verification in the treatment of carcinoma-cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, D.; Kumar, S.; Srivastava, R. N. L.

    2015-06-01

    The accurate dose delivery to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy can be affected by various pelvic tissues heterogeneities. An in-house heterogeneous woman pelvic phantom was designed and used to verify the consistency and computational capability of treatment planning system of radiation dose delivery in the treatment of cancer cervix. Oncentra 3D-TPS with collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithm was used to generate AP/PA and box field technique plan. the radiation dose was delivered by Primus Linac (Siemens make) employing high energy 15 MV photon beam by isocenter technique. A PTW make, 0.125cc ionization chamber was used for direct measurements at various reference points in cervix, bladder and rectum. The study revealed that maximum variation between computed and measured dose at cervix reference point was 1% in both the techniques and 3% and 4% variation in AP/PA field and 5% and 4.5% in box technique at bladder and rectum points respectively.

  16. Radiation dose delivery verification in the treatment of carcinoma-cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrotriya, D., E-mail: shrotriya2007@gmail.com; Srivastava, R. N. L. [Department of Radiotherapy, J.K. Cancer Institute Kanpur-208019 (India); Kumar, S. [Department of Physics, Christ Church College, Kanpur-208001 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The accurate dose delivery to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy can be affected by various pelvic tissues heterogeneities. An in-house heterogeneous woman pelvic phantom was designed and used to verify the consistency and computational capability of treatment planning system of radiation dose delivery in the treatment of cancer cervix. Oncentra 3D-TPS with collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithm was used to generate AP/PA and box field technique plan. the radiation dose was delivered by Primus Linac (Siemens make) employing high energy 15 MV photon beam by isocenter technique. A PTW make, 0.125cc ionization chamber was used for direct measurements at various reference points in cervix, bladder and rectum. The study revealed that maximum variation between computed and measured dose at cervix reference point was 1% in both the techniques and 3% and 4% variation in AP/PA field and 5% and 4.5% in box technique at bladder and rectum points respectively.

  17. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  18. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D30%, D60%, D90%, V30%, V60%, V90%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor

  20. SU-E-T-442: Sensitivity of Quality Assurance Tools to Delivery Errors On a Magnetic Resonance-Imaging Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the sensitivity of the quality assurance (QA) tools actively used on a clinical MR-IGRT system for potential delivery errors. Methods: Patient-specific QA procedures have been implemented for a commercially available Cobalt-60 MR-IGRT system. The QA tools utilized were a MR-compatible cylindrical diode-array detector (ArcCHECK) with a custom insert which positions an ionization chamber (Exradin A18) in the middle of the device, as well as an in-house treatment delivery verification program. These tools were tested to investigate their sensitivity to delivery errors. For the ArcCHECK and ion chamber, a baseline was established with a static field irradiation to a known dose. Variations of the baseline were investigated which included rotated gantry, altered field size, directional shifts, and different delivery time. In addition, similar variations were tested with the automated delivery verification program that compared the treatment parameters in the machine delivery logs to the ones in the plan. To test the software, a 3-field conformal plan was generated as the baseline. Results: ArcCHECK noted at least a 13% decrease in passing rate from baseline in the following scenarios: gantry rotation of 1 degree from plan, 5mm change in field size, 2mm lateral shift, and delivery time decrease. Ion chamber measurements remained consistent for these variations except for the 5 second decrease in delivery time scenario which resulted in an 8% difference from baseline. The delivery verification software was able to detect and report the simulated errors such as when the gantry was rotated by 0.6 degrees, the beam weighting was changed by a percent, a single multileaf collimator was moved by 1cm, and the dose was changed from 2 to 1.8Gy. Conclusion: The results show that the current tools used for patient specific QA are capable of detecting small errors in RT delivery with presence of magnetic field

  1. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Seol, Dong Rim [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Mohapatra, Sucheta [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Sunderland, John J. [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Schultz, Michael K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Domann, Frederick E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lim, Tae-Hong [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  2. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  3. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Preparation and delivery of ion beams for space radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was commissioned in October 2002 and became operational in July 2003. The NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing space radiation research as part of the NASA space program. The NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's Collider Accelerator Department (CAD) Booster accelerator. These ion beams are extracted from the accelerator with kinetic energies ranging from 0.05 to 3 GeV/nucleon. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL. The facilities at BNL and the design of the NSRL facility permit a wide variety of beams to be produced with a great degree of flexibility in the delivery of ion beams to experiments. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

  4. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Delivery of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve the quality and safety of our practice of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), we analyzed the process following the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method. Methods: The FMEA was performed by a multidisciplinary team. For each step in the SBRT delivery process, a potential failure occurrence was derived and three factors were assessed: the probability of each occurrence, the severity if the event occurs, and the probability of detection by the treatment team. A rank of 1 to 10 was assigned to each factor, and then the multiplied ranks yielded the relative risks (risk priority numbers). The failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers were then considered to implement process improvement measures. Results: A total of 28 occurrences were derived, of which nine events scored with significantly high risk priority numbers. The risk priority numbers of the highest ranked events ranged from 20 to 80. These included transcription errors of the stereotactic coordinates and machine failures. Conclusion: Several areas of our SBRT delivery were reconsidered in terms of process improvement, and safety measures, including treatment checklists and a surgical time-out, were added for our practice of gantry-based image-guided SBRT. This study serves as a guide for other users of SBRT to perform FMEA of their own practice.

  5. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the treatment planning among all three modalities with identical patient contouring and treatment planning goal. A proton therapy plan was generated in XiO treatment planning system (TPS using 2 fields for each target. For a comparative purpose, IMRT and RapidArc plans were generated in Eclipse TPS. Treatment plans were generated for a total dose of 74 CGE or Gy prescribed to each planning target volume (PTV (left and right with 2 CGE or Gy per fraction. In IMRT and RapidArc plans, normalization was done based on PTV coverage values in proton plans. Results: The mean PTV dose deviation from the prescription dose was lower in proton plan (within 3.4%, but higher in IMRT (6.5% to 11.3% and RapidArc (3.8% to 11.5% plans. Proton therapy produced lower mean dose to the total lung, heart, and esophagus when compared to IMRT and RapidArc. The relative volume of the total lung receiving 20, 10, and 5 CGE or Gy (V20, V10, and V5, respectively were lower using proton therapy than using IMRT, with absolute differences of 9.71%, 22.88%, and 39.04%, respectively. The absolute differences in the V20, V10, and V5 between proton and RapidArc plans were 4.84%, 19.16%, and 36.8%, respectively, with proton therapy producing lower dosimetric values. Conclusion: Based on the results presented in this case study, uniform scanning proton therapy has a dosimetric advantage over both IMRT and RapidArc for a synchronous bi-lateral NSCLC, especially for the normal lung tissue, heart, and

  6. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 03: Dosmetric evaluation of single versus multi-arc VMAT for lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karan, T; Taremi, M; Comsa, D [Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontatio (Canada); Allibhai, Z; Ryan, M; Le, K [Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Five non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy using the VMAT (volumetric modulated arc therapy) technique were selected for this retrospective study. Plans were re-optimized using Pinnacle treatment planning system (v9.0, Philips Medical), with the basis for comparison a two-arc plan involving a 360° arc in addition to a 90° arc with a couch kick. Additionally a single 360° arc was optimized for comparison, as well as a partial arc covering ∼230°, avoiding the contralateral lung. All plans met target coverage criteria as dictated by RTOG0236. Plans were evaluated based on conformity, sparing of organs at risk and practical considerations of delivery. Conformity was best in the two-arc plan; however the decrease seen in one- and partial arc plans was not statistically significant as tested by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The partial-arc plan resulted in the lowest esophagus and trachea dose and the highest heart dose, however none of the plans exceeded organ at risk tolerances for lung SBRT. Partial arcs resulted in plans with slightly cooler dose distributions, a decrease in low dose spillage and an overall lower mean lung dose. The decrease in treatment time was on average 36 and 40 seconds for single and partial arcs, respectively, with partial arcs requiring the lowest number of MUs. The slight decrease in conformity seen in one-arc plans is offset by an increase in efficiency (optimization and treatment time, MUs) making the implementation of a single or partial-arc treatment technique clinically desirable.

  7. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 03: Dosmetric evaluation of single versus multi-arc VMAT for lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy using the VMAT (volumetric modulated arc therapy) technique were selected for this retrospective study. Plans were re-optimized using Pinnacle treatment planning system (v9.0, Philips Medical), with the basis for comparison a two-arc plan involving a 360° arc in addition to a 90° arc with a couch kick. Additionally a single 360° arc was optimized for comparison, as well as a partial arc covering ∼230°, avoiding the contralateral lung. All plans met target coverage criteria as dictated by RTOG0236. Plans were evaluated based on conformity, sparing of organs at risk and practical considerations of delivery. Conformity was best in the two-arc plan; however the decrease seen in one- and partial arc plans was not statistically significant as tested by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The partial-arc plan resulted in the lowest esophagus and trachea dose and the highest heart dose, however none of the plans exceeded organ at risk tolerances for lung SBRT. Partial arcs resulted in plans with slightly cooler dose distributions, a decrease in low dose spillage and an overall lower mean lung dose. The decrease in treatment time was on average 36 and 40 seconds for single and partial arcs, respectively, with partial arcs requiring the lowest number of MUs. The slight decrease in conformity seen in one-arc plans is offset by an increase in efficiency (optimization and treatment time, MUs) making the implementation of a single or partial-arc treatment technique clinically desirable

  8. Development of hydrogels by radiation induced polymerization for use in slow drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, in order to improve the drug release profile of indinavir sulfate, a potent inhibitor of HIV protease, controlled drug delivery systems in the form of hydrogels have been designed by a radiation graft polymerization method. These hydrogels have been prepared by using dietary fiber psyllium and binary monomers mixture of acrylamide (AAm) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA). These polymers have been characterized with cryo-SEMs, FTIR, XRD and swelling studies. The swelling of hydrogels has been determined in solution of different pH, temperature and [NaCl]. in vitro release studies of model drug indinavir sulfate in different pH have been carried out to determine the drug release mechanism. The release of dug occurred through non-Fickian mechanism. - Highlights: • Swelling of hydrogels decreased with increase in radiation dose. • Swelling increased with increase in hydrophillicity of hydrogels. • Slow release of indinavir from sulfated hydrogels. • Drug release followed non-Fickian mechanism

  9. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Rana; Shyam Pokharel; Yuanshui Zheng; Li Zhao; Dina Risalvato; Carlos Vargas; Nancy Cersonsky

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT) scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the tre...

  10. Stimuli-responsive hydrogels for drug delivery obtained by radiation copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation and characterization of different smart hydrogels were prepared for drug delivery systems by using gamma irradiation. The factors affecting the preparation and homogeneity of prepared hydrogels were thoroughly investigated. pH-sensitive hydrogels were prepared by radiation copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAAc)/ Butyl acrylate (BA) and ketoprofene was used as a drug model. BA/MAAc copolymer gels showed a good sensitivity to pH. The aqueous equilibrium swelling properties of these copolymers were investigated. It was found that the percent swelling for copolymers prepared in acetone is higher than that prepared in other solvents at different pH's. However, the percent swelling of the copolymer prepared in ethanol or ethanol /water is very low at lower pH's. Therefore, the suitable solvent to meet the required properties for drug delivery to colon is ethanol and its mixture with water. The effect of water/ethanol composition on the swelling behavior was also studied to find out that the maximum swelling is obtained at (40/60 wt%). The extent of the transition from the collapsed hydrophobic state to hydrophilic one is depending on comonomer compositions. The release of ketoprofene -loaded during radiation process- under different pH's from gel was determined. it was found that at pH 7, the release of ketoprofene increases as its concentration in the gel increases, but it decreases with increasing irradiation dose. However, at pH 1 the release of drug has no significant value. The release of loaded ketoprofene that immersed in the copolymer after irradiation was found to be much higher than that released from gel loaded drug during irradiation process. Swelling of (MAAc/ BA) copolymer is a highly pH dependent, at low pH the swelling is less than 10%, but at high pH is higher than 300%. This property candidate such copolymer to be pH-sensitive hydrogel for the use in drug-delivery systems. Intelligent hydrogels capable of swelling or collapsing in water

  11. The Impact of Advanced Technologies on Treatment Deviations in Radiation Treatment Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the impact of new technologies on deviation rates in radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Treatment delivery deviations in RT were prospectively monitored during a time of technology upgrade. In January 2003, our department had three accelerators, none with 'modern' technologies (e.g., without multileaf collimators [MLC]). In 2003 to 2004, we upgraded to five new accelerators, four with MLC, and associated advanced capabilities. The deviation rates among patients treated on 'high-technology' versus 'low-technology' machines (defined as those with vs. without MLC) were compared over time using the two-tailed Fisher's exact test. Results: In 2003, there was no significant difference between the deviation rate in the 'high-technology' versus 'low-technology' groups (0.16% vs. 0.11%, p = 0.45). In 2005 to 2006, the deviation rate for the 'high-technology' groups was lower than the 'low-technology' (0.083% vs. 0.21%, p = 0.009). This difference was caused by a decline in deviations on the 'high-technology' machines over time (p = 0.053), as well as an unexpected trend toward an increase in deviations over time on the 'low-technology' machines (p = 0.15). Conclusions: Advances in RT delivery systems appear to reduce the rate of treatment deviations. Deviation rates on 'high-technology' machines with MLC decline over time, suggesting a learning curve after the introduction of new technologies. Associated with the adoption of 'high-technology' was an unexpected increase in the deviation rate with 'low-technology' approaches, which may reflect an over-reliance on tools inherent to 'high-technology' machines. With the introduction of new technologies, continued diligence is needed to ensure that staff remain proficient with 'low-technology' approaches

  12. SU-E-T-248: Near Real-Time Analysis of Radiation Delivery and Imaging, Accuracy to Ensure Patient Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop and optimize an effective software method for comparing planned to delivered control point machine parameters for all VARIAN TrueBeam treatments so as to permit (1) assessment of a large patient pool throughout their treatment course to quantify treatment technique specific systematic and random uncertainty of observables, (2) quantify the site specific daily imaging shifts required for target alignment, and (3) define tolerance levels for mechanical parameters and imaging parameters based on statistical analysis data gathered, and the dosimetric impact of variations. Methods: Treatment and imaging log files were directly compared to plan parameters for Eclipse and Pinnacle planned treatments via 3D, IMRT, control point, RapidArc, and electrons. Each control point from all beams/arcs (7984) for all fractions (1940) of all patients treated over six months were analyzed. At each control point gantry angle, collimator angle, couch angle, jaw positions, MLC positions, MU were compared. Additionally per-treatment isocenter shifts were calculated. Results were analyzed as a whole in treatment type subsets: IMRT, 3D, RapidArc; and in treatment site subsets: brain, chest/mediastinum, esophagus, H and N, lung, pelvis, prostate. Results: Daily imaging isocenter shifts from initial external tattoo alignment were dependent on the treatment site with < 0.5 cm translational shifts for H and N, Brain, and lung SBRT, while pelvis, esophagus shifts were ∼1 cm. Mechanical delivery parameters were within tolerance levels for all sub-beams. The largest variations were for RapidArc plans: gantry angle 0.11±0.12,collimator angle 0.00±0.00, jaw positions 0.48±0.26, MLC leaf positions 0.66±0.08, MU 0.14±0.34. Conclusion: Per-control point validation reveals deviations between planned and delivered parameters. If used in a near real-time error checking system, patient safety can be improved by equipping the treatment delivery system with additional forcing

  13. SU-E-T-248: Near Real-Time Analysis of Radiation Delivery and Imaging, Accuracy to Ensure Patient Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesooriya, K; Seitter, K; Desai, V; Read, P; Larner, J [University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and optimize an effective software method for comparing planned to delivered control point machine parameters for all VARIAN TrueBeam treatments so as to permit (1) assessment of a large patient pool throughout their treatment course to quantify treatment technique specific systematic and random uncertainty of observables, (2) quantify the site specific daily imaging shifts required for target alignment, and (3) define tolerance levels for mechanical parameters and imaging parameters based on statistical analysis data gathered, and the dosimetric impact of variations. Methods: Treatment and imaging log files were directly compared to plan parameters for Eclipse and Pinnacle planned treatments via 3D, IMRT, control point, RapidArc, and electrons. Each control point from all beams/arcs (7984) for all fractions (1940) of all patients treated over six months were analyzed. At each control point gantry angle, collimator angle, couch angle, jaw positions, MLC positions, MU were compared. Additionally per-treatment isocenter shifts were calculated. Results were analyzed as a whole in treatment type subsets: IMRT, 3D, RapidArc; and in treatment site subsets: brain, chest/mediastinum, esophagus, H and N, lung, pelvis, prostate. Results: Daily imaging isocenter shifts from initial external tattoo alignment were dependent on the treatment site with < 0.5 cm translational shifts for H and N, Brain, and lung SBRT, while pelvis, esophagus shifts were ∼1 cm. Mechanical delivery parameters were within tolerance levels for all sub-beams. The largest variations were for RapidArc plans: gantry angle 0.11±0.12,collimator angle 0.00±0.00, jaw positions 0.48±0.26, MLC leaf positions 0.66±0.08, MU 0.14±0.34. Conclusion: Per-control point validation reveals deviations between planned and delivered parameters. If used in a near real-time error checking system, patient safety can be improved by equipping the treatment delivery system with additional forcing

  14. Impact of prolonged fraction dose-delivery time modeling intensity-modulated radiation therapy on hepatocellular carcinoma cell killing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Kang Zheng; Long-Hua Chen; Xiao Yan; Hong-Mei Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the impact of prolonged fraction dosedelivery time modeling intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on cell killing of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 and Hep3B cell lines.METHODS: The radiobiological characteristics of human HCC HepG2 and Hep3b cell lines were studied with standard clonogenic assays, using standard linear-quadratic model and incomplete repair model to fit the dose-survival curves. The identical methods were also employed to investigate the biological effectiveness of irradiation protocols modeling clinical conventional fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, fraction delivery time 3 min) and IMRT with different prolonged fraction delivery time (15, 30, and 45 min). The differences of cell surviving fraction irradiated with different fraction delivery time were tested with paired t-test. Factors determining the impact of prolonged fraction delivery time on cell killing were analyzed.RESULTS: The α/β and repair half-time (T1/2) of HepG2and Hep3b were 3.1 and 7.4 Gy, and 22 and 19 min respectively. The surviving fraction of HepG2 irradiated modeling IMRT with different fraction delivery time was significantly higher than irradiated modeling EBRT and the cell survival increased more pronouncedly with the fraction delivery time prolonged from 15 to 45 min,while no significant differences of cell survival in Hep3b were found between different fraction delivery time protocols.CONCLUSION: The prolonged fraction delivery time modeling IMRT significantly decreased the cell killing in HepG2 but not in Hep3b. The capability of sub-lethal damage repair was the predominant factor determining the cell killing decrease. These effects, if confirmed by clinical studies, should be considered in designing IMRT treatments for HCC.

  15. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume–individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350° clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45° and 315° were compared with 90° on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V107%, D1%, conformality index (CI95%), and heterogeneity index (D5%–D95%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D1%, Dmean, and V5 Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90° on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, RapidArc was selected as the optimal solution. Individualized collimator angle solutions

  16. The geometric calibration of cone-beam imaging and delivery systems in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Matsinos, E; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Matsinos, Evangelos

    2006-01-01

    We propose a method to achieve the geometric calibration of cone-beam imaging and delivery systems in radiation therapy; our approach applies to devices where an X-ray source and a flat-panel detector, facing each other, move in circular orbits around the irradiated object. In order to extract the parameters of the geometry from the data, we use a light needle phantom which is easy to manufacture. A model with ten free parameters (spatial lengths and distortion angles) has been put forth to describe the geometry and the mechanical imperfections of the units being calibrated; a few additional parameters are introduced to account for residual effects (small effects which lie beyond our model). The values of the model parameters are determined from one complete scan of the needle phantom via a robust optimisation scheme. The application of this method to two sets of five counterclockwise (ccw) and five clockwise (cw) scans yielded consistent and reproducible results. A number of differences have been observed be...

  17. Radiation synthesis of multifunctional polymeric hydrogels for oral delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Taleb, Manal F

    2013-11-01

    Polyelectrolyte crosslinked hydrogel was synthesized using gamma radiation-induced copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA), N,N-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) in aqueous solution to utilize for oral delivery of insulin. The influence of copolymer composition and pH value of the surrounding medium on the type of water diffusion in the glassy polymer was discussed. In addition, the swelling kinetics tests on MAA/DMAEMA (90/10) reveal that the swelling kinetics of the proposed hydrogel follows a Fickian diffusion process in media of pH 5, and an anomalous diffusion process in media of pH 1.5 and 7.2. The cross-linked three-dimensional polymers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FT-IR. In the matrices with increase in the content of MAA had shown increased bioadhesivity. Insulin was entrapped in these gels and the in vitro release profiles were established separately in both (SGF, pH 1.5) and (SIF, pH 7.2). The release profile of insulin showed negligible release in acidic media (SGF, pH 1.5) and sustained release in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.2). Drug release studies showed that the increasing content of MAA in the copolymer enhances release in SIF to design and improve insulin release behavior from these carriers. PMID:24055698

  18. Pilot Study of the Delivery of Microcollimated Pars Plana External Beam Radiation in Porcine Eyes: 270-Day Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi P. Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the dose response and toxicity threshold of micro-collimated X-rays delivered to porcine maculae by a stereotactic radiosurgical system after 270 days. Methods. Twelve eyes of six Yucatan mini-swine were randomized to receive up to 90 Gy to the retina, using an office-based trans-pars plana delivery system. To determine the safety profile of this radiation delivery, ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography (FA, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT were obtained at multiple time points up to 270 days post treatment. Results. No abnormalities were noted on external examination. Cataracts were noted in 4 of 12 eyes. Dose and time-dependent changes were noted on fundus examination, FA, ICG and SD-OCT. No significant abnormalities were seen in the control, 16 Gy or 24 Gy groups using any modality. Histopathology revealed a dose response effect with no discernable lesions in the 16 Gy group. Conclusion. The X-ray delivery system precisely targets the porcine retina in vivo with little effect on surrounding structures. No ophthalmic or intracranial adverse effects were noted at clinically relevant doses at 270 days following radiation delivery.

  19. Error in the delivery of radiation therapy: Results of a quality assurance review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine error rates in the delivery of radiation therapy (RT), technical factors associated with RT errors, and the influence of a quality improvement intervention on the RT error rate. Methods and materials: We undertook a review of all RT errors that occurred at the Princess Margaret Hospital (Toronto) from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2002. Errors were identified according to incident report forms that were completed at the time the error occurred. Error rates were calculated per patient, per treated volume (≥1 volume per patient), and per fraction delivered. The association between tumor site and error was analyzed. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between technical factors and the risk of error. Results: Over the study interval, there were 555 errors among 28,136 patient treatments delivered (error rate per patient = 1.97%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81-2.14%) and among 43,302 treated volumes (error rate per volume = 1.28%, 95% CI, 1.18-1.39%). The proportion of fractions with errors from July 1, 2000, to December 31, 2002, was 0.29% (95% CI, 0.27-0.32%). Patients with sarcoma or head-and-neck tumors experienced error rates significantly higher than average (5.54% and 4.58%, respectively); however, when the number of treated volumes was taken into account, the head-and-neck error rate was no longer higher than average (1.43%). The use of accessories was associated with an increased risk of error, and internal wedges were more likely to be associated with an error than external wedges (relative risk = 2.04; 95% CI, 1.11-3.77%). Eighty-seven errors (15.6%) were directly attributed to incorrect programming of the 'record and verify' system. Changes to planning and treatment processes aimed at reducing errors within the head-and-neck site group produced a substantial reduction in the error rate. Conclusions: Errors in the delivery of RT are uncommon and usually of little clinical significance. Patient subgroups and

  20. MO-G-BRD-01: Point/Counterpoint Debate: Arc Based Techniques Will Make Conventional IMRT Obsolete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques have been developed that have provided clinicians with the ability to deliver highly conformal dose distributions. The delivery techniques include compensators, step-and-shoot IMRT, sliding window IMRT, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and tomotherapy. A key development in the field of IMRT was the introduction of new planning algorithms and delivery control systems in 2007 that made it possible to coordinate the gantry rotation speed, dose rate, and multileaf collimator leaf positions during the delivery of arc therapy. With these developments, VMAT became a routine clinical tool. The use of VMAT has continued to grow in recent years and some would argue that this will soon make conventional IMRT obsolete, and this is the premise of this debate. To introduce the debate, David Shepard, Ph.D. will provide an overview of IMRT delivery techniques including historical context and how they are being used today. The debate will follow with Richard Popple, Ph.D. arguing FOR the Proposition and Peter Balter, Ph.D. arguing AGAINST it. Learning Objectives: Understand the different delivery techniques for IMRT. Understand the potential benefits of conventional IMRT. Understand the potential benefits of arc-based IMRT delivery

  1. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  2. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  3. Arc Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Dahle, H; Limousin, M

    2013-01-01

    The existence of an arc statistics problem was at the center of a strong debate in the last fifteen years. With the aim to clarify if the optical depth for giant gravitational arcs by galaxy clusters in the so called concordance model is compatible with observations, several studies were carried out which helped to significantly improve our knowledge of strong lensing clusters, unveiling their extremely complex internal structure. In particular, the abundance and the frequency of strong lensing events like gravitational arcs turned out to be a potentially very powerful tool to trace the structure formation. However, given the limited size of observational and theoretical data-sets, the power of arc statistics as a cosmological tool has been only minimally exploited so far. On the other hand, the last years were characterized by significant advancements in the field, and several cluster surveys that are ongoing or planned for the near future seem to have the potential to make arc statistics a competitive cosmo...

  4. Axisymmetric arc in a supersonic nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisymmetric arc burning in a supersonic nozzle has wide technical applications (eg in gas blast circuit breaker, arc heaters etc.). Mathematical modelling of such an arc is usually based on boundary-layer assumption which assumes a known pressure distribution imposed on the arc or based on the integral method of arc analysis. Thus, the flow outside of the arc's thermal influence is assumed to be one dimensional. In practice, this is not the case as the nozzle is not sufficiently gentle in the axial direction or the presence of the upstream electrode makes the assumption of one-dimensional flow invalid. The purpose of the present investigation is to model the arc based on Navier-Stokes equations which are modified to take into account of electrical power input and radiation transport. The arcing gas is SF6, the transport properties of which (electrical conductivity, viscosity, thermal conductivity etc.) are highly nonlinear functions of temperature but only weakly dependent on the pressure

  5. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  6. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy in lung cancer: Current literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT is a novel radiation technique that delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target by allowing the simultaneous variation of gantry rotation speed, dose rate and multiple-leaf collimators leaf positions. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on two VMAT systems, RapidArc and SmartArc with main focus on planning studies of lung cancer. A systematic review of available data was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed with the keywords ′′lung′′ and "VMAT". The published data show that VMAT techniques have clear superiority over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with regard to improving dose conformity and sparing of organs at risks (OARs. The data indicates that for lung tumor VMAT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT provide equivalent dose homogeneity, dose conformity and target volume coverage; however, contradictory results were obtained in terms of OARs sparing. The major advantages of VMAT over IMRT are the reduction in the number of monitor units and faster treatment delivery times without compromising the quality of the treatment plans. Moreover, faster delivery time is more patient-friendly and it minimizes intra-fractional patient motion allowing treatment volumes stay within their respective treatment margins. Current literature data shows that VMAT can be a good option to treat lung cancer; however, data on clinical trials are still lacking. The clinical trials are essential to confirm the safety and efficacy of VMAT techniques.

  7. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  8. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality

  9. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  10. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Larson, D; Ma, L [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  11. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  12. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elith, Craig A [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Dempsey, Shane E; Warren-Forward, Helen M [School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time.

  13. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time

  14. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  15. Impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy plan delivery using the pretreatment portal dosimetry quality assurance and setting up the workflow at hospital levels

    OpenAIRE

    Karunakaran Kaviarasu; N Arunai Nambi Raj; Krishna Murthy, K.; A Ananda Giri Babu; Bhaskar Laxman Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan delivery by comparing the gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses by pretreatment quality assurance (QA) using electronic portal imaging device dosimetry and creating a workflow for the pretreatment IMRT QA at hospital levels. As the improvement in gamma agreement leads to increase in the quality of IMRT treatment delivery, gamma evaluation was...

  16. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) at two years

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carey F; Zuber, Alexandra; Kelley, Maureen A; Verani, Andre R; Riley, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    Background The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) for nurses and midwives was created in response to the increasing reliance on shifting HIV tasks to nurses and midwives without the necessary regulation supporting this enhanced professional role. ARC Approach The ARC initiative comprises regional meetings, technical assistance, and regulatory improvement grants which enhance HIV service delivery by nurses and midwives, and systematic evaluation of project impact. Results Eight of 11 countries funded by ARC advanced a full stage in regulatory capacity during their 1-year project period. Countries in ARC also demonstrated increased capacity in project management and proposal writing. Discussion The progress of country teams thus far suggests ARC is a successful model for regulation strengthening and capacity building, as well as presenting a novel approach for sustainability and country ownership. The ARC platform has been a successful vehicle for regional harmonisation of updated regulations and promises to help facilitate the enhancement of HIV service delivery by nurses and midwives. PMID:27066113

  17. Radiotherapy for unresectable sinonasal cancers: Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation therapy with coplanar and non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for treatment of unresectable paranasal sinuses cancers (PNSCs) with different clinical presentations. Material and methods: Four patients treated for primary target volume only (group 1), four requiring elective nodal irradiation (group 2) and four with positive nodes in macroscopic disease (group 3) were selected. For each patient were generated 7 fields IMRT, coplanar VMAT (c-VMAT) and non-coplanar VMAT (nc-VMAT) treatment plans. Total doses were 70 Gy and 54 Gy to high dose planning target volume (HD-PTV) and low-dose-PTV, respectively. Dose–volume histogram, conformity and homogeneity index (CI and HI), and monitor units (MUs) per Gy were evaluated. Results: VMAT provided significantly better target coverage, in terms of V100% (Volume encompassed by the isodose 100%), than IMRT, in particular when nc-VMAT was used. In general, organ at risk sparing is similar with the three approaches, although nc-VMAT can allow a statistically significant reduction of dose to contralateral parotid gland and cochlea for all three groups. Conclusions: VMAT can offer significant improvement of treatment for all unresectable PNSCs over existing IMRT techniques. In particular, nc-VMAT may be a further advantage for those patients with sinonasal cancers and involvement of the nodes in whom large volumes and complex/irregular shape have to be irradiated, even if clinical benefits should be established in the future

  18. Radiation Synthesis of Functional Nanoparticles for Imaging, Sensing and Drug Delivery Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present report we describe nanoparticle synthesis by ionizing radiation from globular proteins and methacrylate monomers. Dynamic light scattering and other spectroscopic methods were performed to characterize this new material

  19. Use of portal radiography to increase accuracy of dose delivery in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Port films were acquired for all radiation therapy patients (n = 132) treated over a thirteen month period to 1) assist in initial treatment field set-up on Day 1, 2) for quality assurance with a second port film taken on Day 7 of radiation therapy, and 3) as a means to document the radiation treatment field as a part of the patients permanent medical record. Port films were used for both patients treated with a definitive course of radiation (n = 97 patients), and those treated palliatively (n = 35 patients). The portal radiographs were valuable in terms of the initial set-up, and to correct for any positioning or other errors at the time of the one week recheck. Changes were made, based on the initial port film on Day 1, in 53 % and 57% of treatment fields for palliative and definitive radiation patients, respectively. The changes made in both definitively and palliatively irradiated patients were usually in field position, an increase in field size to include all of the tumor, or a decrease in field size to spare normal tissue. Fewer changes were necessary based on the Day 7 recheck port films, but these day-7 rechecks are recommended for quality control. Based on the high frequency of changes introduced because of the initial port film findings, it is recommended. that port films be incorporated on a routine basis in veterinary radiation therapy

  20. Clinical usefulness of the management and delivery of radiation dose-distribution images using the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Onogi, Y; Aoki, Y; Kozuka, T; Ohtomo, K

    1998-01-01

    Dose distribution images in radiation therapy play important roles in the management of cancer patients. To date, hard copies of these images have been stored for referral by radiation oncologists as needed. In most cases, these images are not available to medical personnel outside the radiation oncology department. We have developed a means to access these dose distribution images from the hospital via the World-Wide Web (WWW). A screen snapshot of a dose distribution image on the CRT of a treatment planning unit is copied to the WWW server and converted to a GIF (graphic interchange format) image. Similarly, we can register dose volume histograms and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) on the WWW. Medical personnel can view these images through the WWW browser from anywhere in the hospital. As a result, radiation oncologists are given detailed information on target definition in treatment planning by expert physicians. The system also helps co-medical personnel in understanding dose distribution and predicting radiation injury. At the same time, it actualizes an electronic archive of dose distribution images, which is a database for quick and reliable review, evaluation, and comparison of treatment plans. This technique also fosters closer relationships among radiation oncologists, physicians, and co-medical personnel. PMID:9814423

  1. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of benign skull-base tumors: a dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with Rapidarc® versus non-coplanar dynamic arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benign tumors of the skull base are a challenge when delivering radiotherapy. An appropriate choice of radiation technique may significantly improve the patient’s outcomes. Our study aimed to compare the dosimetric results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between non-coplanar dynamic arcs and coplanar volumetric modulated arctherapy (Rapidarc®). Thirteen patients treated with Novalis TX® were analysed: six vestibular schwannomas, four pituitary adenomas and three meningioma. Two treatment plans were created for each case: dynamic arcs (4–5 non coplanar arcs) and Rapidarc® (2 coplanar arcs). All tumors were >3 cm and accessible to both techniques. Patients had a stereotactic facemask (Brainlab) and were daily repositioned by Exactrac®. GTV and CTV were contoured according to tumor type. A 1-mm margin was added to the CTV to obtain PTV. Radiation doses were 52.2–54 Gy, using 1.8 Gy per fraction. Treatment time was faster with Rapidarc®. The mean PTV V95 % was 98.8 for Rapidarc® and 95.9 % for DA (p = 0.09). Homogeneity index was better with Rapidarc®: 0.06 vs. 0.09 (p = 0.01). Higher conformity index values were obtained with Rapidarc®: 75.2 vs. 67.9 % (p = 0.04). The volume of healthy brain that received a high dose (V90 %) was 0.7 % using Rapidarc® vs. 1.4 % with dynamic arcs (p = 0.05). Rapidarc® and dynamic arcs gave, respectively, a mean D40 % of 10.5 vs. 18.1 Gy (p = 0.005) for the hippocampus and a Dmean of 25.4 vs. 35.3 Gy (p = 0.008) for the ipsilateral cochlea. Low-dose delivery with Rapidarc® and dynamic arcs were, respectively, 184 vs. 166 cm3 for V20 Gy (p = 0.14) and 1265 vs. 1056 cm3 for V5 Gy (p = 0.67). Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using Rapidarc® for large benign tumors of the skull base provided target volume coverage that was at least equal to that of dynamics arcs, with better conformity and homogeneity and faster treatment time. Rapidarc® also offered better sparing of the ipsilateral cochlea and hippocampus

  2. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330o arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of ≥12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  3. Preparation of poly(polyethylene glycol methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels by radiation and their physical properties[Radiation; pH-responsive; Hydrogels; Insulin; Oral delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.-E.; Nho, Y.-C. E-mail: ycnho@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, H.-I

    2004-02-01

    The pH-responsive copolymer hydrogels were prepared with the monomers of polyethylene glycol methacrylate and acrylic acid based on {gamma}-ray irradiation technique. The gel content of these copolymer hydrogels varied depending on both the composition of monomers and the radiation dose. Maximum gel percent and degree of crosslinking were obtained at the composition of equal amount of comonomers. These copolymer hydrogels did not show any noticeable change in swelling at lower pH range. However they showed an abrupt increase in swelling at higher pH range due to the ionization of carboxyl groups. This pH-responsive swelling behavior was applied for the insulin carrier via oral delivery. Insulin-loaded copolymer hydrogels released most of their insulin in the simulated intestinal fluid which had a pH of 6.8 but not in the simulated gastric fluid which had a pH of 1.2.

  4. [Management and delivery of radiation dose distribution images using the Internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onogi, Y; Nakagawa, K; Aoki, Y; Kozuka, T; Toyoda, T; Sasaki, Y

    1998-01-01

    Dose distribution images play important roles in the management of cancer patients. To date hard copies of these images have been stored and referred to by radiation oncologists as needed. In most cases, these images were not available to medical personnel outside the radiation oncology department. We have developed a mechanism in the hospital to access these dose distribution images via WWW (World Wide Web). A screen snapshot of a dose distribution image on the CRT of a treatment planning machine is copied to the WWW server and converted to a GIF image. Similarly, we can register dose volume histograms and digitally reconstructed radiographs on the WWW. Medical personnel throughout the hospital can access the images through the WWW browser. As a result, radiation oncologists are given detailed information on target definition in treatment planning by expert physicians. The system also helps co-medical staff in understanding dose distributions and predicting radiation injuries. At the same time, it actualizes an electronic archive of dose distribution images, which is a database for quick and reliable review, evaluation and comparison of treatment plans. This technique also furthers a close relationship among radiation oncologists, physicians, and co-medical personnel. PMID:9493431

  5. Electrode Evaporation Effects on Air Arc Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingwen; CHEN Degui; LI Rui; WU Yi; NIU Chunping

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of copper and silver vapours on the air arc behavior is performed. The commercial software FLUENT is adapted and modified to develop a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) models of arc with the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients, net emission coefficient for the radiation model of 99% ai-1% Cu, 99% air-1% Ag, and pure air, respectively. The simulation result demonstrates that vaporization of the electrode material may cool the arc center region and reduce the arc velocity. The effects of Ag vapour are stronger compared to those of Cu vapour.

  6. Interval From Imaging to Treatment Delivery in the Radiation Surgery Age: How Long Is Too Long?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, Zachary A., E-mail: seymourz@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Fogh, Shannon E.; Westcott, Sarah K.; Braunstein, Steve [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Larson, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Barani, Igor J.; Nakamura, Jean; Sneed, Penny K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate workflow and patient outcomes related to frameless stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed all treatment demographics, clinical outcomes, and workflow timing, including time from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) simulation, insurance authorization, and consultation to the start of SRS for brain metastases. Results: A total of 82 patients with 151 brain metastases treated with SRS were evaluated. The median times from consultation, insurance authorization, CT simulation, and MRI for treatment planning were 15, 7, 6, and 11 days to SRS. Local freedom from progression (LFFP) was lower in metastases with MRI ≥14 days before treatment (P=.0003, log rank). The 6- and 12-month LFFP rate were 95% and 75% for metastasis with interval of <14 days from MRI to treatment compared to 56% and 34% for metastases with MRI ≥14 days before treatment. On multivariate analysis, LFFP remained significantly lower for lesions with MRI ≥14 days at SRS (P=.002, Cox proportional hazards; hazard ratio: 3.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.6-7.3). Conclusions: Delay from MRI to SRS treatment delivery for brain metastases appears to reduce local control. Future studies should monitor the timing from imaging acquisition to treatment delivery. Our experience suggests that the time from MRI to treatment should be <14 days.

  7. Drug delivery system prepared by ionizing radiation of the N,N-dimethyl acrylamide with acryloyloxy-acetanilide copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced polymerization has been used in biomaterials used in systems which such as drug delivery (DDS). This work describes the copolymerization of the monomers by gamma rays N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and acryloyloxy-acetanilide (AOA) for the immobilization of paracetamol, an analgesic and anti thermic drug. Dimethylformamide solutions were used in two concentrations of DMAA and AOA (FDMAA/AOA = 0,85/015 and 0,70/0,30, where F = molar fraction in the monomer feed). The samples were irradiated in the dose range of 30-800 Gy. The copolymer poly(DMAA-co-AOA) characterization was carried out by FTIR and 1HRMN. The hydrolysis was studied considering the formation of sodium salts of 4-hydroxy acetanilide at different times of treatment using colorimetric assay. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  8. Quality keeping and upgrading technique on delivery of raw fodder and so forth by using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed at examining chemical and microbiological changes of feed raw materials caused by γ-ray radiation and obtaining some fundamental informations for development of new preparation and storage technique using radiation. In previous results, it could be estimated that the γ-ray radiation showed an effect to protect quality decrease of the silage. In particular, a product with good chemical compositions and sheep fondness and excellent quality on blended silage with pasture and beer cake could be obtained. In 1997 fiscal year, on bean curd refuse with fast putrefaction, a relationship between time length from production to closed sealing for blended silage and quality after preparation was examined. (G.K.)

  9. Fabrication and in vitro characterization of gadolinium-based nanoclusters for simultaneous drug delivery and radiation enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Shannon S; Guo, Linghong; Sun, Xuejun; Shaw, Andrew R; Yuan, Zhipeng; Löbenberg, Raimar; Roa, Wilson H

    2016-09-23

    We report the synthesis of a gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH)3) nanorod based doxorubicin (Dox) delivery system that can enhance both magnetic resonance imaging contrast and radiation sensitivity. A simple and cost effective wet-chemical method was utilized in the presence of manganese (Mn) ions and Dox to produce the Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster structure. The Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster was composed of Mn-doped Gd(OH)3 nanorods arranged in parallel with Dox as a linker molecule between the adjacent nanorods. No other studies have utilized Dox as both the linker and therapeutic molecule in a nanostructure to date. The Gd(OH)3 nanorod is reported to have no significant cellular or in vivo toxicity, which makes it an ideal base material for this biomedical application. The Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster exhibited paramagnetic behavior and was stable in a colloidal solution. The nanocluster also enabled high Dox loading capacity and specifically released Dox in a sustained and pH-dependent manner. The positively charged Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanoclusters were readily internalized into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via endocytosis, which resulted in intracellular release of Dox. The released Dox in cells was effective in conferring cytotoxicity and inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells. Furthermore, a synergistic anticancer effect could be observed with radiation treatment. Overall, the Gd(OH)3:Mn·Dox nanocluster drug delivery system described herein may have potential utility in clinics as a multifunctional theranostic nanoparticle with combined benefits in both diagnosis and therapy in the management of cancer. PMID:27533280

  10. Contactless and non-invasive delivery of micro-particles lying on a non-customized rigid surface by using acoustic radiation force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing; Jia, Kun; Fan, Zongwei; Yang, Keji

    2014-07-01

    In the existing acoustic micro-particle delivery methods, the micro-particles always lie and slide on the surface of platform in the whole delivery process. To avoid the damage and contamination of micro-particles caused by the sliding motion, this paper deals with a novel approach to trap micro-particles from non-customized rigid surfaces and freely manipulate them. The delivery process contains three procedures: detaching, transporting, and landing. Hence, the micro-particles no longer lie on the surface, but are levitated in the fluid, during the long range transporting procedure. It is very meaningful especially for the fragile and easily contaminated targets. To quantitatively analyze the delivery process, a theoretical model to calculate the acoustic radiation force exerting upon a micro-particle near the boundary in half space is built. An experimental device is also developed to validate the delivery method. A 100 μm diameter micro-silica bead adopted as the delivery target is detached from the upper surface of an aluminum platform and levitated in the fluid. Then, it is transported along the designated path with high precision in horizontal plane. The maximum deviation is only about 3.3 μm. During the horizontal transportation, the levitation of the micro-silica bead is stable, the maximum fluctuation is less than 1 μm. The proposed method may extend the application of acoustic radiation force and provide a promising tool for microstructure or cell manipulation. PMID:24568691

  11. In Vivo Delivery of Tinospora cordifolia Root Extract Preventing Radiation-Induced Dystrophies in Mice Ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddhi Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unconscious and unplanned radiation exposures are a severe threat to gonads particularly ovaries. The present study aims at finding radioprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd. Miers root extract (TCRE in ovaries. Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as “normal” and is administered double distilled water and Group 2 is given TCRE with optimum dosage selected as 75 mg/mice. Group 3 serving the purpose of “irradiated control” were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Group 4 (experimental were administered optimum dosage of TCRE with prior exposure to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Follicle cell counts were scored at autopsy intervals of 24 hrs, 3 days, 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days after gamma irradiation. To understand the mechanism of radioprotection, lipid peroxidation (LPO and glutathione (GSH levels were also measured in all groups. TCRE supplementation rendered significant protection to ovaries by restoring follicle counts; it also reduced LPO levels and increased GSH levels in ovaries. It implies that TCRE administration protects ovaries against radiation exposure.

  12. In Vivo Delivery of Tinospora cordifolia Root Extract Preventing Radiation-Induced Dystrophies in Mice Ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Riddhi

    2015-01-01

    Unconscious and unplanned radiation exposures are a severe threat to gonads particularly ovaries. The present study aims at finding radioprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers root extract (TCRE) in ovaries. Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as "normal" and is administered double distilled water and Group 2 is given TCRE with optimum dosage selected as 75 mg/mice. Group 3 serving the purpose of "irradiated control" were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Group 4 (experimental) were administered optimum dosage of TCRE with prior exposure to 2.5 Gy gamma radiation. Follicle cell counts were scored at autopsy intervals of 24 hrs, 3 days, 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days after gamma irradiation. To understand the mechanism of radioprotection, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels were also measured in all groups. TCRE supplementation rendered significant protection to ovaries by restoring follicle counts; it also reduced LPO levels and increased GSH levels in ovaries. It implies that TCRE administration protects ovaries against radiation exposure. PMID:26357520

  13. Design of a Solar Greenhouse with Energy Delivery by the Conversion of Near Infrared Radiation - Part 1 Optics and PV-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, Piet; Swinkels, Gert-Jan; Bot, G.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for reflecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system is described. Especially the optical parts as the spectral selective film, the properties of the circular reflector and the e

  14. Design of a Solar Greenhouse with energy Delivery by the Conversion of Near Infrared Radiation. Part 1. Optics and PV-Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for reflecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system is described. Especially the optical parts as the spectral selective film, the properties of the circular reflector and the e

  15. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  16. Quality keeping and upgrading technique on delivery of raw fodder and so forth by using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As most of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic spore bacteria, molds and yeasts died owing to 8 to 16 kGy of γ-ray irradiation, it was found that butyric acid fermentation and aerobic putrefaction in silage did not form. As the lactobacilli bringing good fermentation quality died as well at such radiation dose, on a case of a mixed silage using the dregs, in which lactic acid was present, quality of its fermentation was good. And, many informations on changes in fatty quality and yeast activity in the silage formed by irradiation could also be obtained. As the dregs had a large difference in physical and chemical components, quality after preparation of the silage was not uniform. Materials suitable for γ-ray irradiation and radiation dose suitable for each material was found to be clarified. (G.K.)

  17. Effects of radiation type and delivery mode on a radioresistant eukaryote Cryptococcus neoformans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Most research on radioresistant fungi, particularly on human pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans, involves sparsely-ionizing radiation. Consequently, fungal responses to densely-ionizing radiation, which can be harnessed to treat life-threatening fungal infections, remain incompletely understood. Methods: We addressed this issue by quantifying and comparing the effects of densely-ionizing α-particles (delivered either by external beam or by 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibodies), and sparsely-ionizing 137Cs γ-rays, on Cryptococus neoformans. Results: The best-fit linear-quadratic parameters for clonogenic survival were the following: α = 0.24 × 10−2 Gy−1 for γ-rays and 1.07 × 10−2 Gy−1 for external-beam α-particles, and β = 1.44 × 10−5 Gy−2 for both radiation types. Fungal cell killing by radiolabeled antibodies was consistent with predictions based on the α-particle dose to the cell nucleus and the linear-quadratic parameters for external-beam α-particles. The estimated RBE (for α-particles vs. γ-rays) at low doses was 4.47 for the initial portion of the α-particle track, and 7.66 for the Bragg peak. Non-radiological antibody effects accounted for up to 23% of cell death. Conclusions: These results quantify the degree of C. neoformans resistance to densely-ionizing radiations, and show how this resistance can be overcome with fungus-specific radiolabeled antibodies

  18. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  19. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D0 = 4.13 ± 1.0 Gy; α/β = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D0 = 4.91 ± 1.0 Gy; α/β = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  20. Radiation studies for the environmental protection at the beam delivery system of the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of induced radionuclides in the soil and groundwater around, and air inside, the collimation section of the beam delivery system of the Next Linear Collider are calculated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The concentration of 3H and 22Na in groundwater are comparable to the drinking water limits. The fluence of particles (photon, neutron, proton and pion) in the air inside the tunnel for the collimation section is also calculated with FLUKA. The induced activities of 3H, 7Be, 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar are then estimated by folding the particle fluences with various nuclear cross-sections. The worker exposure during access after accelerator shutdown and the general public dose from radioactivity released to the environment are studied. The concern is for the short-lived radioisotopes of 13N and 15O, produced mainly by photons, and 41Ar produced by thermal neutrons. The results show that the radiological consequences from the air activation are minor. (authors)

  1. In Vivo Delivery of Tinospora cordifolia Root Extract Preventing Radiation-Induced Dystrophies in Mice Ovaries

    OpenAIRE

    Riddhi Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Unconscious and unplanned radiation exposures are a severe threat to gonads particularly ovaries. The present study aims at finding radioprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers root extract (TCRE) in ovaries. Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group 1 served as “normal” and is administered double distilled water and Group 2 is given TCRE with optimum dosage selected as 75 mg/mice. Group 3 serving the purpose of “irradiated control” were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma r...

  2. Delivery of intraoperative radiation therapy after pneumonectomy: experimental observations and early clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is capable of delivering high doses of radiation to mediastinal structures while sparing lung parenchyma, heart, and other locoregional tissues. A canine model of pulmonary resection and IORT was investigated by performing a pneumonectomy in 15 adult foxhounds followed by 0 cGy, 2000 cGy, 3000 cGy, 4000 cGy. No clinical complications developed in 4 animals in the 2000-cGy group. However, 2 of the 8 animals given a high dose died of esophageal hemorrhage or carinal necrosis. Esophagitis occurred in 10 of 12 animals, and none of the animals experienced bronchial stump dehiscence. In a limited Phase I protocol, 4 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were treated with resection and 2500 cGy of IORT to two separate ports encompassing the superior and inferior mediastinum. Two patients experienced life-threatening bronchopleural fistulas, and 2 patients died as a consequence of esophageal problems. One patients had recurrence with brain metastases, and the 1 long-term survivor is free from disease. As opposed to the animal model of thoracic IORT, the clinical study demonstrated major toxicity with respiratory and esophageal morbidity. The therapeutic usefulness of thoracic IORT in the management of lung cancer must be questioned in view of this small but consistent series of patients. Further carefully designed clinical studies using lower doses of IORT are needed

  3. Contamination dose from photoneutron processes in bodily tissues during therapeutic radiation delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose to the total body from induced radiation resulting from primary exposure to radiotherapeutic beams is not detailed in routine treatment planning though this information is potentially important for better estimates of health risks including secondary cancers. This information can also allow better management of patient treatment logistics, suggesting better timing, sequencing, and conduct of treatment. Monte Carlo simulations capable of taking into account all interactions contributing to the dose to the total body, including neutron scattering and induced radioactivity, provide the most versatile and accurate tool for investigating these effects. MCNPX code version 2.2.6 with full IAEA library of photoneutron cross sections is particularly suited to trace not only photoneutrons but also protons and heavy ion particles that result from photoneutron interactions. Specifically, the MCNPX code is applied here to the problem of dose calculations in traditional (non-IMRT) photon beam therapy. Points of calculation are located in the head, where the primary irradiation has been directed, but also in the superior portion of the torso of the ORNL Mathematical Human Phantom. We calculated dose contributions from neutrons, protons, deutrons, tritons and He-3 that are produced at the time of photoneutron interactions in the body and that would not have been accounted for by conventional radiation oncology dosimetry

  4. Radiation-grafting of acrylamide onto silicone rubber films for diclofenac delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Hector; Palomino, Kenia; Cornejo-Bravo, Jose M.; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel; Bucio, Emilio

    2015-02-01

    This work focuses on the pre-irradiation grafting of acrylamide (AAm) onto silicone rubber films (SR) and evaluates the effect of gamma-ray radiation conditions on the grafting yield, which in turn may influence the performance of the grafted materials as components of drug-eluting devices. Pristine and modified SR were characterized using FTIR-ATR, DSC, TGA, swelling, and water contact angle analysis in order to elucidate the effects of AAm grafting onto SR. Grafted films with content in AAm ranging from 0.81% to 22.20% showed excellent cytocompatibility against fibroblasts, and capability to uptake the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac. Amount of drug loaded directly correlated with the grafting degree of the films. Drug release studies were performed at pH 7.4 and 37 °C (physiological conditions). Most grafted films released the drug in a sustained way for at least three hours.

  5. Simulation of the Effects of Several Factors on Arc Plasma Behavior in Low Voltage Circuit Breaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the properties of the arc plasma and the electromagnetic, heat and radiative phenomena, commercial computational fluid dynamics software PHOENICS has been adapted and modified to develop the three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD)model of arc in a low voltage circuit breaker. The effects of the arc ignition location, venting size and gassing material on arc behavior have been investigated. The analysis of the results show that the arc velocity accelerates with the increase in the distance between arc ignition location and of the venting size, and the existence of the gassing material is beneficial to improving the arc voltage and reducing the arc temperature.

  6. Radiation-grafting of acrylamide onto silicone rubber films for diclofenac delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on the pre-irradiation grafting of acrylamide (AAm) onto silicone rubber films (SR) and evaluates the effect of gamma-ray radiation conditions on the grafting yield, which in turn may influence the performance of the grafted materials as components of drug-eluting devices. Pristine and modified SR were characterized using FTIR-ATR, DSC, TGA, swelling, and water contact angle analysis in order to elucidate the effects of AAm grafting onto SR. Grafted films with content in AAm ranging from 0.81% to 22.20% showed excellent cytocompatibility against fibroblasts, and capability to uptake the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac. Amount of drug loaded directly correlated with the grafting degree of the films. Drug release studies were performed at pH 7.4 and 37 °C (physiological conditions). Most grafted films released the drug in a sustained way for at least three hours. - Highlights: • SR–g-AAm depends on dose, monomer concentration, and reaction time and temperature. • Diclofenac sodium salt is loaded and released in a sustained way from SR–g-AAm films. • SR–g-AAm films are cytocompatible and have potential as components of drug–device

  7. Production of pure quasi-monochromatic {sup 11}C beams for accurate radiation therapy and dose delivery verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzeroni, Marta, E-mail: Marta.Lazzeroni@ki.se; Brahme, Anders

    2015-09-15

    In the present study we develop a new technique for the production of clean quasi-monochromatic {sup 11}C positron emitter beams for accurate radiation therapy and PET–CT dose delivery imaging and treatment verification. The {sup 11}C ion beam is produced by projectile fragmentation using a primary {sup 12}C ion beam. The practical elimination of the energy spread of the secondary {sup 11}C fragments and other beam contaminating fragments is described. Monte Carlo calculation with the SHIELD-HIT10+ code and analytical methods for the transport of the ions in matter are used in the analysis. Production yields, as well as energy, velocity and magnetic rigidity distributions of the fragments generated in a cylindrical target are scored as a function of the depth within 1 cm thick slices for an optimal target consisting of a fixed 20 cm section of liquid hydrogen followed by a variable thickness section of polyethylene. The wide energy and magnetic rigidity spread of the {sup 11}C ion beam can be reduced to values around 1% by using a variable monochromatizing wedge-shaped degrader in the beam line. Finally, magnetic rigidity and particle species selection, as well as discrimination of the particle velocity through a combined Time of Flight and Radio Frequency-driven Velocity filter purify the beam from similar magnetic rigidity contaminating fragments (mainly {sup 7}Be and {sup 3}He fragments). A beam purity of about 99% is expected by the combined method.

  8. Production of pure quasi-monochromatic 11C beams for accurate radiation therapy and dose delivery verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we develop a new technique for the production of clean quasi-monochromatic 11C positron emitter beams for accurate radiation therapy and PET–CT dose delivery imaging and treatment verification. The 11C ion beam is produced by projectile fragmentation using a primary 12C ion beam. The practical elimination of the energy spread of the secondary 11C fragments and other beam contaminating fragments is described. Monte Carlo calculation with the SHIELD-HIT10+ code and analytical methods for the transport of the ions in matter are used in the analysis. Production yields, as well as energy, velocity and magnetic rigidity distributions of the fragments generated in a cylindrical target are scored as a function of the depth within 1 cm thick slices for an optimal target consisting of a fixed 20 cm section of liquid hydrogen followed by a variable thickness section of polyethylene. The wide energy and magnetic rigidity spread of the 11C ion beam can be reduced to values around 1% by using a variable monochromatizing wedge-shaped degrader in the beam line. Finally, magnetic rigidity and particle species selection, as well as discrimination of the particle velocity through a combined Time of Flight and Radio Frequency-driven Velocity filter purify the beam from similar magnetic rigidity contaminating fragments (mainly 7Be and 3He fragments). A beam purity of about 99% is expected by the combined method

  9. Air and silica core Bragg fibers for radiation delivery in the wavelength range 0.6-1.5 μ m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Milan; Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Matějec, Vlastimil

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents fundamental characteristics of laboratory designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air and silica cores at wavelengths of 632, 975, 1064 and 1550 nm. Fibers with the 26- μ m-silica core and 5- or 73- μ m-air cores in diameters and claddings of 3 pairs of Bragg layers were prepared from one preform. The overall transmittance, attenuation coefficients, coupling losses, bending losses, and damage-intensity thresholds were determined using four continuous-wave laser sources with the maximum output power of 300 mW and a pulsed 9 ns laser with the maximum output energy up to 1 mJ. The lowest attenuation coefficient of about 70 dB/km was determined at 1064 nm with the 73- μ m-air-core Bragg fiber. All fibers have been found to exhibit negligible bending losses down to the bending diameters of 5 cm. In comparison with the conventional gradient optical fiber, all the prepared Bragg fibers have approximately six times higher damage intensity threshold of about 30 GWcm-2 and therefore they are very suitable for high power laser radiation delivery.

  10. Production of pure quasi-monochromatic 11C beams for accurate radiation therapy and dose delivery verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeroni, Marta; Brahme, Anders

    2015-09-01

    In the present study we develop a new technique for the production of clean quasi-monochromatic 11C positron emitter beams for accurate radiation therapy and PET-CT dose delivery imaging and treatment verification. The 11C ion beam is produced by projectile fragmentation using a primary 12C ion beam. The practical elimination of the energy spread of the secondary 11C fragments and other beam contaminating fragments is described. Monte Carlo calculation with the SHIELD-HIT10+ code and analytical methods for the transport of the ions in matter are used in the analysis. Production yields, as well as energy, velocity and magnetic rigidity distributions of the fragments generated in a cylindrical target are scored as a function of the depth within 1 cm thick slices for an optimal target consisting of a fixed 20 cm section of liquid hydrogen followed by a variable thickness section of polyethylene. The wide energy and magnetic rigidity spread of the 11C ion beam can be reduced to values around 1% by using a variable monochromatizing wedge-shaped degrader in the beam line. Finally, magnetic rigidity and particle species selection, as well as discrimination of the particle velocity through a combined Time of Flight and Radio Frequency-driven Velocity filter purify the beam from similar magnetic rigidity contaminating fragments (mainly 7Be and 3He fragments). A beam purity of about 99% is expected by the combined method.

  11. Radiation syntheses of Pectin/acrylamide (PEC/PAM) and Pectin/Diethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PEC/DEAMA) hydrogels as drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different pH responsive copolymer hydrogels based on pectin were prepared by the effect of radiation. The physical and chemical properties of prepared hydrogels were studied by FTIR, and TGA. Also, the prepared hydrogels were evaluated for the possible use as drug delivery system for chlortetracycline HCL as model drug. The results revealed that the swelling ratios and the release behavior of hydrogels depend mainly on the pH of the medium and the hydrogel composition. (author)

  12. Aerosol delivery of beclin1 enhanced the anti-tumor effect of radiation in the lungs of K-rasLA1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy alone has several limitations for treating lung cancer. Inhalation, a non-invasive approach for direct delivery of therapeutic agents to the lung, may help to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of radiation. Up-regulating beclin1, known as a tumor suppressor gene that plays a major role in autophagy, may sensitize tumors and lead to tumor regression in lungs of K-rasLA1 lung cancer model mice. To minimize the side-effects of radiotherapy, fractionated exposures (five times, 24-h interval) with low dose (2 Gy) of radiation to the restricted area (thorax, 2 cm) were conducted. After sensitizing the lungs with radiation, beclin1, complexed with a nano-sized biodegradable poly (ester amine), was prepared and delivered into the murine lung via aerosol three times/week for four weeks. In a histopathological analysis, animals treated with beclin1 and radiation showed highly significant tumor regression and low progression to adenocarcinoma. An increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles and secondary lysosomes was detected. Dissociation of beclin1-bcl2 stimulated autophagy activation and showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect by inhibiting the Akt-mTOR pathway, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The combination of radiation with non-invasive aerosol delivery of beclin1 may provide a prospect for developing novel therapy regimens applicable in clinics. (author)

  13. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvill, Emma [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); O' Brien, Ricky T. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eade, Thomas N.; Kneebone, Andrew B. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia); Poulsen, Per R. [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. Methods and Materials: Multileaf collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction (multiple isocenter shift method) to calculate the treated dose (with MLC tracking) and the dose that would have been delivered had MLC tracking not been applied (without MLC tracking). The percentage difference from planned for target and normal tissue dose-volume points were calculated. The hypothesis was tested for each dose-volume value via analysis of variance using the F test. Results: Of the 513 fractions delivered, 475 (93%) were suitable for analysis. The mean difference and standard deviation between the planned and treated MLC tracking doses and the planned and without-MLC tracking doses for all 475 fractions were, respectively, PTV D{sub 99%} −0.8% ± 1.1% versus −2.1% ± 2.7%; CTV D{sub 99%} −0.6% ± 0.8% versus −0.6% ± 1.1%; rectum V{sub 65%} 1.6% ± 7.9% versus −1.2% ± 18%; and bladder V{sub 65%} 0.5% ± 4.4% versus −0.0% ± 9.2% (P<.001 for all dose-volume results). Conclusion: This study shows that MLC tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered doses compared with the modeled doses without MLC tracking. The implications of this finding are potentially improved patient outcomes, as well as more reliable dose-volume data for radiobiological parameter determination.

  14. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. Methods and Materials: Multileaf collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction (multiple isocenter shift method) to calculate the treated dose (with MLC tracking) and the dose that would have been delivered had MLC tracking not been applied (without MLC tracking). The percentage difference from planned for target and normal tissue dose-volume points were calculated. The hypothesis was tested for each dose-volume value via analysis of variance using the F test. Results: Of the 513 fractions delivered, 475 (93%) were suitable for analysis. The mean difference and standard deviation between the planned and treated MLC tracking doses and the planned and without-MLC tracking doses for all 475 fractions were, respectively, PTV D99% −0.8% ± 1.1% versus −2.1% ± 2.7%; CTV D99% −0.6% ± 0.8% versus −0.6% ± 1.1%; rectum V65% 1.6% ± 7.9% versus −1.2% ± 18%; and bladder V65% 0.5% ± 4.4% versus −0.0% ± 9.2% (P<.001 for all dose-volume results). Conclusion: This study shows that MLC tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered doses compared with the modeled doses without MLC tracking. The implications of this finding are potentially improved patient outcomes, as well as more reliable dose-volume data for radiobiological parameter determination

  15. Dosimetry study on conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy and intensity modulated arc radiotherapy in middle thoracic esophageal cancer%胸中段食管癌三维适形放疗、调强放疗及旋转调强放疗的剂量学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙尧; 刘希军; 刘同海; 于甬华; 尹勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetry of three different radiation therapy plans [threedimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT),intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT),intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (IMAT)].Methods Selected 15 cases with middle thoracic esophageal cancer,Varian Eclipse 8.6 planning systems were designed with 3DCRT,IMRT,IMAT,3DCRT using 5-8 coplanar radiation fields,IMRT using 7 coplanar radiation fields,IMAT using 2 radians.Three planned dose difference were compared.Results Compared with 3DCRT,IMRT and IMAT were better with heterogeneity index (HI),conformality index (CI),VPTV 95 %,V5,V20,V35 of total lung,and V30 of heart (t =2.531,P< 0.05).There was no statistically significant difference for the V10,V15,V25,V30 mean dose of total lung,the mean dose of heart,the maximum dose of spinal cord,and the minimum dose of PTV among the three plans (t =1.325,P >0.05).Conclusion IMAT and IMRT are similar in the middle thoracic esophageal cancer radiotherapy target volume dose coverage and organs at risk protection,they are better than 3DCRT.IMAT in the monitor units and delivery time are less than IMRT.%目的 研究胸中段食管癌三维适形放疗(3DCRT)、调强放疗(IMRT)、旋转调强放疗(IMAT)3种放疗计划的剂量差异.方法 选取胸中段食管癌患者15例,以Varian Eclipse 8.6计划系统分别设计3DCRT、IMRT、IMAT 3种放疗计划,其中3DCRT采用5~8个共面射野,IMRT采用7个共面射野,IMAT采用2个弧度.比较3种计划的剂量学差异.结果 IMRT、IMRT的靶区均匀指数(HI)、适形指数(CI)、95%计划靶体积(PTV)体积剂量均优于3DCRT,全肺V5、V20、V35、心脏V30受照剂量低于3DCRT(t=2.531,P< 0.05),而在全肺V10、V15、V25、V30、全肺平均、心脏平均、脊髓Dmax剂量之间三者的差异均无统计学意义(t=1.325,P>0.05).结论 IMAT与IMRT在胸中段食管癌放疗靶区体积剂量覆盖和危及器官保护方面相似,二者均优于3DCRT.IMAT

  16. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: Retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient's sex; patient's age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient's medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards

  17. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: Retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: MGossman@TSRCC.com [Regulation Directive Medical Physics, Russell, KY (United States); Wilkinson, Jeffrey D. [Medtronic, Inc., Mounds View, MN (United States); Mallick, Avishek [Department of Mathematics, Marshall University, Huntington, WV (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient's sex; patient's age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient's medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards.

  18. Radiation Synthesis and Characterization of Polyvinyl alcohol/Acrylic acid Hydrogel and its Amoxicillin drug Delivery application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyvinyl alcohol /Acrylic acid based hydrogels can be synthesized by Gamma radiation technique using 60Co irradiation cell at irradiation dose rate 1.8 Gray/second. The optimum conditions of hydrogel preparation takes place at different factors such as composition ratios of PVA/AAc, different comonomer concentration and different irradiation doses resulting in hydrogel with maximum gel percent as it obtained 98%. The structures of hydrogels were characterized by FTIR analysis. The results can be confirmed the expected structures as well as free radical copolymerization. According to the swelling studies, hydrogels with high content of AAc gave relatively high swelling percent. The hydrogel showed a super adsorbent with swelling capacity 10320 %. Water diffusion into such prepared hydrogel showed a non-Fickian type where a Fickian number was 0.77. This hydrogel was used for the adsorption of amoxicillin drug from their aqueous solutions. The factors affected on the uptake conditions such as ph, time and initial feed concentration on the amoxicillin adsorption capacity of hydrogel was studied depending on Freundlish model of adsorption isotherm.. It was observed that the interaction between drug and ionic comonomers was enhanced in alkaline medium and high initial feed concentration of the drug. The ability of the hydrogel and the affinity of the drug to be adsorbed can be cleared by determining the empirical constants n and k respectively from the logarithmic form of Freundlish equation. The recovery of drug was also investigated in different ph values to study the suitable condition of drug release as drug delivery system.

  19. Rotating arc spark plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  20. Clinical Applications of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present treatment planning case studies for several treatment sites for which volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) could have a positive impact; and to share an initial clinical experience with VMAT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Four case studies are presented to show the potential benefit of VMAT compared with conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in pediatric cancer, bone marrow-sparing whole-abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI), and SBRT of the lung and spine. Details of clinical implementation of VMAT for SBRT are presented. The VMAT plans are compared with conventional techniques in terms of dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency. Results: Volumetric modulated arc therapy reduced the treatment time of spine SBRT by 37% and improved isodose conformality. Conformal and VMAT techniques for lung SBRT had similar dosimetric quality, but VMAT had improved target coverage and took 59% less time to deliver, although monitor units were increased by 5%. In a complex pediatric pelvic example, VMAT reduced treatment time by 78% and monitor units by 25% compared with IMRT. A double-isocenter VMAT technique for WAPI can spare bone marrow while maintaining good delivery efficiency. Conclusions: Volumetric modulated arc therapy is a new technology that may benefit different patient populations, including pediatric cancer patients and those undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and WAPI. Volumetric modulated arc therapy has been used and shown to be beneficial for significantly improving delivery efficiency of lung and spine SBRT.

  1. Determination of prospective displacement-based gate threshold for respiratory-gated radiation delivery from retrospective phase-based gate threshold selected at 4D CT simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    and delivery gate thresholds to within 0.3%. For patient data analysis, differences between simulation and delivery gate thresholds are reported as a fraction of the total respiratory motion range. For the smaller phase interval, the differences between simulation and delivery gate thresholds are 8±11% and 14±21% with and without audio-visual biofeedback, respectively, when the simulation gate threshold is determined based on the mean respiratory displacement within the 40%-60% gating phase interval. For the longer phase interval, corresponding differences are 4±7% and 8±15% with and without audio-visual biofeedback, respectively. Alternatively, when the simulation gate threshold is determined based on the maximum average respiratory displacement within the gating phase interval, greater differences between simulation and delivery gate thresholds are observed. A relationship between retrospective simulation gate threshold and prospective delivery gate threshold for respiratory gating is established and validated for regular and nonregular respiratory motion. Using this relationship, the delivery gate threshold can be reliably estimated at the time of 4D CT simulation, thereby improving the accuracy and efficiency of respiratory-gated radiation delivery

  2. Dosimetric impact of geometric errors due to respiratory motion prediction on dynamic multileaf collimator-based four-dimensional radiation delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchronization of dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) response with respiratory motion is critical to ensure the accuracy of DMLC-based four dimensional (4D) radiation delivery. In practice, however, a finite time delay (response time) between the acquisition of tumor position and multileaf collimator response necessitates predictive models of respiratory tumor motion to synchronize radiation delivery. Predicting a complex process such as respiratory motion introduces geometric errors, which have been reported in several publications. However, the dosimetric effect of such errors on 4D radiation delivery has not yet been investigated. Thus, our aim in this work was to quantify the dosimetric effects of geometric error due to prediction under several different conditions. Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for a lung patient were generated for anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) beam arrangements at 6 and 18 MV energies to provide planned dose distributions. Respiratory motion data was obtained from 60 diaphragm-motion fluoroscopy recordings from five patients. A linear adaptive filter was employed to predict the tumor position. The geometric error of prediction was defined as the absolute difference between predicted and actual positions at each diaphragm position. Distributions of geometric error of prediction were obtained for all of the respiratory motion data. Planned dose distributions were then convolved with distributions for the geometric error of prediction to obtain convolved dose distributions. The dosimetric effect of such geometric errors was determined as a function of several variables: response time (0-0.6 s), beam energy (6/18 MV), treatment delivery (3D/4D), treatment type (conformal/IMRT), beam direction (AP/PA), and breathing training type (free breathing/audio instruction/visual feedback). Dose difference and distance-to-agreement analysis was employed to quantify results. Based on our data, the

  3. Guidance document on delivery, treatment planning, and clinical implementation of IMRT: Report of the IMRT subcommittee of the AAPM radiation therapy committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) represents one of the most significant technical advances in radiation therapy since the advent of the medical linear accelerator. It allows the clinical implementation of highly conformal nonconvex dose distributions. This complex but promising treatment modality is rapidly proliferating in both academic and community practice settings. However, these advances do not come without a risk. IMRT is not just an add-on to the current radiation therapy process; it represents a new paradigm that requires the knowledge of multimodality imaging, setup uncertainties and internal organ motion, tumor control probabilities, normal tissue complication probabilities, three-dimensional (3-D) dose calculation and optimization, and dynamic beam delivery of nonuniform beam intensities. Therefore, the purpose of this report is to guide and assist the clinical medical physicist in developing and implementing a viable and safe IMRT program. The scope of the IMRT program is quite broad, encompassing multileaf-collimator-based IMRT delivery systems, goal-based inverse treatment planning, and clinical implementation of IMRT with patient-specific quality assurance. This report, while not prescribing specific procedures, provides the framework and guidance to allow clinical radiation oncology physicists to make judicious decisions in implementing a safe and efficient IMRT program in their clinics

  4. Numerical investigations of arc behaviour in gas metal arc welding using ANSYS CFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-06-01

    Current numerical models of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are trying to combine magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models of the arc and volume of fluid (VoF) models of metal transfer. They neglect vaporization and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as it is common practice for models of gas tungsten arc welding. These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to tungsten inert gas (TIG) arcs. However, current spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to TIG arcs they found a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. The paper presents a GMAW arc model that considers metal vapour and which is in a very good agreement with experimentally observed temperatures. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial temperature and the radial electric current density distributions for the first time. The axially symmetric model of the welding torch, the work piece, the wire and the arc (fluid domain) implements MHD as well as turbulent mixing and thermal demixing of metal vapour in argon. The mass fraction of iron vapour obtained from the simulation shows an accumulation in the arc core and another accumulation on the fringes of the arc at 2000 to 5000 K. The demixing effects lead to very low concentrations of iron between these two regions. Sensitive analyses demonstrate the influence of the transport and radiation properties of metal vapour, and the evaporation rate relative to the wire feed. Finally the model predictions are compared with the measuring results of Zielińska et al.

  5. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrle, A; Schnick, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E; Fuessel, U, E-mail: achim.mahrle@iws.fraunhofer.de [Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, PO Box, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  6. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrle, A.; Schnick, M.; Rose, S.; Demuth, C.; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  7. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  8. Simulation of arc-electrode interaction using sheath modelling in SF6 circuit-breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruzewski, P.; Martin, A.; Reggio, M.; Trépanier, J.-Y.

    2002-05-01

    The transition layer, or sheath, located at the interface between the electrode and the electric arc plasma in circuit-breaker arcs is modelled and integrated into software for the simulation of arcs. The sheath model includes the equation of the continuity of electrons, the generalized Ohm's law and the equation of conservation of total energy. The latter equation takes into account Joule heating, the radiation from the arc and phenomena on the surface of the electrode such as thermionic and radiative cooling by thermal emission. The resulting arc model can predict electrode and arc temperatures simultaneously.

  9. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated arc treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young-Nam; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were made in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre-study was conducted to find the best plan condition for mARC treatment, and the usefulness of the mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with other Arc treatment plans such as tomotherapy and RapidArc plans. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans developed by using various parameters, which included the photon energy (6 MV, 10 MV), the optimization point angle (6°- 10°intervals), and the total number of segments (36 - 59 segments). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at a 10 MV photon energy, a point angle 6 degrees, and 59 segments. The treatment plans for the three different techniques were compared by using the following parameters: the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), the target coverage, the dose to the OARs, the number of monitor units (MU), the beam on time, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). As a result, the three different treatment techniques showed similar target coverages. The mARC plan had the lowest V20 (volume of lung receiving > 20 Gy) and MU per fraction compared with both the RapidArc and the tomotherapy plans. The mARC plan reduced the beam on time as well. Therefore, the results of this study provide satisfactory evidence that the mARC technique can be considered as a useful clinical technique for radiation treatment.

  10. Physics of arcs in circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some typical examples of circuit breakers are shown. Common to all these devices is that an electric arc is formed when the breaker operates which is responsible for the current interruption. The physics of those arcs can be described by the simplest single-fluid model of plasma physics which differs from the set of gas dynamic equations only by the following three terms: radiative energy transfer magnetic force and Joulean heating. These terms describe typical circuit breaker arc phenomena. This is discussed by means of three examples. The first example treats the influence of the radiative energy transfer on the temperature distribution of high-voltage circuit-breaker arcs. The second example is a discussion of the magnetic stability of circuit breaker arcs and the third example is concerned with the problem of flow turbulence produced at the arc boundary. The last effect is closely related to the current interruption process in high-voltage circuit breakers. A semi-empirical description of the turbulent heat exchange leads to a prediction of the breaking capacity for this type of circuit breaker. (author)

  11. The role of Cobalt-60 source in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: From modeling finite sources to treatment planning and conformal dose delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep Kaur

    Cobalt-60 (Co-60) units played an integral role in radiation therapy from the mid-1950s to the 1970s. Although they continue to be used to treat cancer in some parts of the world, their role has been significantly reduced due to the invention of medical linear accelerators. A number of groups have indicated a strong potential for Co-60 units in modern radiation therapy. The Medical Physics group at the Cancer Center of the Southeastern Ontario and Queen's University has shown the feasibility of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) via simple conformal treatment planning and dose delivery using a Co-60 unit. In this thesis, initial Co-60 tomotherapy planning investigations on simple uniform phantoms are extended to actual clinical cases based on patient CT data. The planning is based on radiation dose data from a clinical Co-60 unit fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and modeled in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. An in house treatment planning program is used to calculate IMRT dose distributions. Conformal delivery in a single slice on a uniform phantom based on sequentially delivered pencil beams is verified by Gafchromic film. Volumetric dose distributions for Co-60 serial tomotherapy are then generated for typical clinical sites that had been treated at our clinic by conventional 6MV IMRT using Varian Eclipse treatment plans. The Co-60 treatment plans are compared with the clinical IMRT plans using conventional matrices such as dose volume histograms (DVH). Dose delivery based on simultaneously opened MLC leaves is also explored and a novel MLC segmentation method is proposed. In order to increase efficiency of dose calculations, a novel convolution based fluence model for treatment planning is also proposed. The ion chamber measurements showed that the Monte Carlo modeling of the beam data under the MIMiC MLC is accurate. The film measurements from the uniform phantom irradiations confirm that IMRT plans from our in-house treatment planning system

  12. Peek Arc Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Bodirsky, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies peek arc consistency, a reasoning technique that extends the well-known arc consistency technique for constraint satisfaction. In contrast to other more costly extensions of arc consistency that have been studied in the literature, peek arc consistency requires only linear space and quadratic time and can be parallelized in a straightforward way such that it runs in linear time with a linear number of processors. We demonstrate that for various constraint languages, peek arc consistency gives a polynomial-time decision procedure for the constraint satisfaction problem. We also present an algebraic characterization of those constraint languages that can be solved by peek arc consistency, and study the robustness of the algorithm.

  13. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  14. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  15. Radiosurgery of multiple brain metastases with single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (SIDCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose single-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (SIDCA), a novel technique for radiosurgery of multiple brain metastases, and to compare SIDCA with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and multiple-isocenter dynamic conformal arcs (MIDCA) for plan quality. Methods and materials: SIDCA, MIDCA, and VMAT plans were created on 6 patients with 3–5 metastases. Plans were evaluated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (RCI), Paddick conformity index (PCI), gradient index (GI), volumes that received more than 100% (V100%), 50% (V50%), 25% (V25%) and 10% (V10%) of prescription dose, total monitor units (MUs), and delivery time (DT). Results: SIDCA achieved conformal plans (RCI = 1.38 ± 0.12, PCI = 0.72 ± 0.06) with steep dose fall-off (GI = 3.97 ± 0.51). MIDCA plans had comparable plan quality and MUs as SIDCA, but 52% longer DT. The VMAT plans had better conformity (RCI = 1.15 ± 0.09, p < 0.01 and PCI = 0.86 ± 0.06, p < 0.01) than SIDCA, worse GI (4.34 ± 0.46, p < 0.01), higher V25% (p = 0.05) and V10% (p = 0.02), 49% less MUs and 46% shorter DT. Conclusions: All three techniques achieved conformal plans with steep dose fall-off from targets. SIDCA plans had similar plan quality as MIDCA but more efficient to delivery. SIDCA plans had lower peripheral dose spread than VMAT; VMAT plans had better conformity and faster delivery time than SIDCA

  16. TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiamas, P; Czerminska, M; Makrigiorgos, G; Karen, M; Zygmanski, P [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/ Dana-Farber Institute/ Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A simplified Total Body Irradiation (TBI) was developed to work with minimal requirements in a compact linac room without custom motorized TBI couch. Results were compared to our existing fixed-gantry double 4 MV linac TBI system with prone patient and simultaneous AP/PA irradiation. Methods: Modulated arc irradiates patient positioned in prone/supine positions along the craniocaudal axis. A simplified inverse planning method developed to optimize dose rate as a function of gantry angle for various patient sizes without the need of graphical 3D treatment planning system. This method can be easily adapted and used with minimal resources. Fixed maximum field size (40×40 cm2) is used to decrease radiation delivery time. Dose rate as a function of gantry angle is optimized to result in uniform dose inside rectangular phantoms of various sizes and a custom VMAT DICOM plans were generated using a DICOM editor tool. Monte Carlo simulations, film and ionization chamber dosimetry for various setups were used to derive and test an extended SSD beam model based on PDD/OAR profiles for Varian 6EX/ TX. Measurements were obtained using solid water phantoms. Dose rate modulation function was determined for various size patients (100cm − 200cm). Depending on the size of the patient arc range varied from 100° to 120°. Results: A PDD/OAR based beam model for modulated arc TBI therapy was developed. Lateral dose profiles produced were similar to profiles of our existing TBI facility. Calculated delivery time and full arc depended on the size of the patient (∼8min/ 100° − 10min/ 120°, 100 cGy). Dose heterogeneity varied by about ±5% − ±10% depending on the patient size and distance to the surface (buildup region). Conclusion: TBI using simplified modulated arc along craniocaudal axis of different size patients positioned on the floor can be achieved without graphical / inverse 3D planning.

  17. Passive breath gating equipment for cone beam CT-guided RapidArc gastric cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To report preliminary results of passive breath gating (PBG) equipment for cone-beam CT image-guided gated RapidArc gastric cancer treatments. Material and methods: Home-developed PBG equipment integrated with the real-time position management system (RPM) for passive patient breath hold was used in CT simulation, online partial breath hold (PBH) CBCT acquisition, and breath-hold gating (BHG) RapidArc delivery. The treatment was discontinuously delivered with beam on during BH and beam off for free breathing (FB). Pretreatment verification PBH CBCT was obtained with the PBG-RPM system. Additionally, the reproducibility of the gating accuracy was evaluated. Results: A total of 375 fractions of breath-hold gating RapidArc treatments were successfully delivered and 233 PBH CBCTs were available for analysis. The PBH CBCT images were acquired with 2–3 breath holds and 1–2 FB breaks. The imaging time was the same for PBH CBCT and conventional FB CBCT (60 s). Compared to FB CBCT, the motion artifacts seen in PBH CBCT images were remarkably reduced. The average BHG RapidArc delivery time was 103 s for one 270-degree arc and 269 s for two full arcs. Conclusions: The PBG-RPM based PBH CBCT verification and BHG RapidArc delivery was successfully implemented clinically. The BHG RapidArc treatment was accomplished using a conventional RapidArc machine with high delivery efficiency

  18. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  19. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  20. Feasibility of single-isocenter, multi-arc non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy for multiple brain tumors using a linear accelerator with a 160-leaf multileaf collimator: a phantom study

    OpenAIRE

    Iwai, Yoshio; Ozawa, Shuichi; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Pellegrini, Roberto; Yoda, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of single isocenter, multi-arc non-coplanar volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for multiple brain tumors was studied using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with an Agility multileaf collimator and a Monaco treatment planning system. Two VMAT radiosurgery plans consisting of a full arc and three half arcs were created with a prescribed dose of 20 Gy in a single fraction. After dose delivery to a phantom, ionization chambers and radiochromic films were used for dose mea...

  1. Policy, development and delivery of education and training programmes in radiation protection: a crucial contribution to the safe use of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Need for radiation protection knowledge, skills and competences: Today’s situation - Over past years: decrease in number of high-level competences in radiation protection. However, increased attention to RP is needed: more technologies (and more frequently used) rely on ionizing radiation. Actions: Fill the gap - Increase awareness that knowledge of RP science and adequate skills are important (at all levels in medical, industry, research, …). Prepare for future needs - Support of young students and professionals in their need to gain and maintain high level radiation protection competences. Attract new people: Provide adequate E and T - Develop good infrastructure for education and training: → to combat the decline in expertise; → to assure high level of future RP knowledge and skills; → Overall safe use of ionizing radiation

  2. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  3. A fully electronic intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) process implemented in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify, and delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to implement an electronic method to perform and analyze intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) using an aSi megavoltage electronic portal imaging device in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify (R&V), and delivery systems. A verification plan was generated in the treatment planning system using the actual treatment plan of a patient. After exporting the treatment fields to the R&V system, the fields were delivered in QA mode with the aSi imager deployed. The resulting dosimetric images are automatically stored in a DICOM-RT format in the delivery system treatment console computer. The relative dose density images are subsequently pushed to the R&V system. The absolute dose images are then transferred electronically from the treatment console computer to the treatment planning system and imported into the verification plan in the dosimetry work space for further analysis. Screen shots of the gamma evaluation and isodose comparison are imported into the R&V system as an electronic file (e.g. PDF) to be reviewed prior to initiation of patient treatment. A relative dose image predicted by the treatment planning system can also be sent to the R&V system to be compared with the relative dose density image measured with the aSi imager. Our department does not have integrated planning, R&V, and delivery systems. In spite of this, we are able to fully implement a paperless and filmless IMRT QA process, allowing subsequent analysis and approval to be more efficient, while the QA document is directly attached to its specific patient chart in the R&V system in electronic form. The calculated and measured relative dose images can be compared electronically within the R&V system to analyze the density differences and ensure proper dose delivery to patients. In the absence of an integrated planning, verifying, and delivery system, we have shown that it is nevertheless possible to develop a

  4. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  5. Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Johansen, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    named SmartArc and its capability to generate treatment plans for head and neck cancer was tested. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma, previously treated with IMRT by means of Pinnacle and Elekta accelerators, were replanned with single arc VMAT. The VMAT......BACKGROUND: The quality of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plans is highly dependent on the performance of the optimization algorithm used. Recently new algorithms have become available which are capable of generating VMAT plans for Elekta accelerators. The VMAT algorithm in Pinnacle is...... planning objectives were to achieve clinical target coverage and sparing of the organs at risk (OAR). Comparison with the original clinically used IMRT was made by evaluating (1) dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for PTVs, (2) DVHs for OARs, (3) delivery time and monitor units (MU), and (4) treatment accuracy...

  6. Evaluation the implementation of volumetric modulated arc therapy QA in the radiation therapy treatment according to various factors by using the portal dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Hyeon; Bae, Sun Myung; Seo, Dong Rin; Kang, Tae Young; Baek, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The pre-treatment QA using Portal dosimetry for Volumetric Arc Therapy To analyze whether maintaining the reproducibility depending on various factors. Test was used for TrueBeam STx{sup TM} (Ver.1.5, Varian, USA). Varian Eclipse Treatment planning system(TPS) was used for planning with total of seven patients include head and neck cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer was established for a Portal dosimetry QA plan. In order to measure these plans, Portal Dosimetry application (Ver.10) (Varian) and Portal Vision aS1000 Imager was used. Each Points of QA was determined by dividing, before and after morning treatment, and the after afternoon treatment ended (after 4 hours). Calibration of EPID(Dark field correction, Flood field correction, Dose normalization) was implemented before Every QA measure points. MLC initialize was implemented after each QA points and QA was retried. Also before QA measurements, Beam Ouput at the each of QA points was measured using the Water Phantom and Ionization chamber(IBA dosimetry, Germany). The mean values of the Gamma pass rate(GPR, 3%, 3mm) for every patients between morning, afternoon and evening was 97.3%, 96.1%, 95.4% and the patient's showing maximum difference was 95.7%, 94.2% 93.7%. The mean value of GPR before and after EPID calibration were 95.94%, 96.01%. The mean value of Beam Output were 100.45%, 100.46%, 100.59% at each QA points. The mean value of GPR before and after MLC initialization were 95.83%, 96.40%. Maintain the reproducibility of the Portal Dosimetry as a VMAT QA tool required management of the various factors that can affect the dosimetry.

  7. Use of FDG-PET to guide dose prescription heterogeneity in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancers with volumetric modulated arc therapy: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess if FDG-PET could guide dose prescription heterogeneity and decrease arbitrary location of hotspots in SBRT. For three patients with stage I lung cancer, a CT-simulation and a FDG-PET were registered to define respectively the PTVCT and the biological target volume (BTV). Two plans involving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were calculated. The first plan delivered 4 × 12 Gy within the PTVCT and the second plan, with SIB, 4 × 12 Gy and 13.8 Gy (115% of the prescribed dose) within the PTVCT and the BTV respectively. The Dmax-PTVCT had to be inferior to 60 Gy (125% of the prescribed dose). Plans were evaluated through the D95%, D99% and Dmax-PTVCT, the D2 cm, the R50% and R100% and the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the isodose 115% and BTV. DSC allows verifying the location of the 115% isodose (ideal value = 1). The mean PTVCT and BTV were 36.7 (±12.5) and 6.5 (±2.2) cm3 respectively. Both plans led to similar target coverage, same doses to the OARs and equivalent fall-off of the dose outside the PTVCT. On the other hand, the location of hotspots, evaluated through the DSC, was improved for the SIB plans with a mean DSC of 0.31 and 0.45 for the first and the second plans respectively. Use of PET to decrease arbitrary location of hotspots is feasible with VMAT and SIB for lung cancer

  8. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm2 and 3×10 cm2 for a 15×15 cm2 applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min−1). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors. (paper)

  9. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  10. Is a single arc sufficient in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for complex-shaped target volumes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for complex-shaped target volumes with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Materials and methods: This retrospective planning study was based on 20 patients composed of prostate cancer (n = 5), postoperative (n = 5) or primary (n = 5) radiotherapy for pharyngeal cancer and for cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 5); a SIB with two or three dose levels was planned in all patients. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan with direct-machine-parameter optimization (DMPO) and VMAT plans with one to three arcs (SmartArc technique) were generated in the Pinnacle planning system. Results: Single arc VMAT improved target coverage and dose homogeneity in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Two and three VMAT arcs were required to achieve equivalent results compared to ss-IMRT in postoperative and primary radiotherapy for pharyngeal cancer, respectively. In radiotherapy for cancer of the paranasal sinuses, multiarc VMAT resulted in increased spread of low doses to the lenses and decreased target coverage in the region between the orbits. Conclusions: The complexity of the target volume determined whether single arc VMAT was equivalent to ss-IMRT. Multiple arc VMAT improved results compared to single arc VMAT at cost of increased delivery times, increased monitor unites and increased spread of low doses.

  11. Daily Orthogonal Kilovoltage Imaging Using a Gantry-Mounted On-Board Imaging System Results in a Reduction in Radiation Therapy Delivery Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether the use of routine image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) using pretreatment on-board imaging (OBI) with orthogonal kilovoltage X-rays reduces treatment delivery errors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of documented treatment delivery errors from 2003 to 2009 was performed. Following implementation of IGRT in 2007, patients received daily OBI with orthogonal kV X-rays prior to treatment. The frequency of errors in the pre- and post-IGRT time frames was compared. Treatment errors (TEs) were classified as IGRT-preventable or non-IGRT-preventable. Results: A total of 71,260 treatment fractions were delivered to 2764 patients. A total of 135 (0.19%) TEs occurred in 39 (1.4%) patients (3.2% in 2003, 1.1% in 2004, 2.5% in 2005, 2% in 2006, 0.86% in 2007, 0.24% in 2008, and 0.22% in 2009). In 2007, the TE rate decreased by >50% and has remained low (P = .00007, compared to before 2007). Errors were classified as being potentially preventable with IGRT (e.g., incorrect site, patient, or isocenter) vs. not. No patients had any IGRT-preventable TEs from 2007 to 2009, whereas there were 9 from 2003 to 2006 (1 in 2003, 2 in 2004, 2 in 2005, and 4 in 2006; P = .0058) before the implementation of IGRT. Conclusions: IGRT implementation has a patient safety benefit with a significant reduction in treatment delivery errors. As such, we recommend the use of IGRT in routine practice to complement existing quality assurance measures.

  12. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH). Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients). All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16). Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88). According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation). No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50) compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. The 3-week course of postoperative radiation using VMAT with SIB showed to be

  13. ALICE - ARC integration

    OpenAIRE

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva; Peters, Andreas; Siaz, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Gridware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructur...

  14. Calculation of radiative corrections to virtual compton scattering - absolute measurement of the energy of Jefferson Lab. electron beam (hall A) by a magnetic method: arc project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the radiative corrections to the virtual compton scattering and the magnetic method adopted in the Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory, to measure the electrons beam energy with an accuracy of 104. The virtual compton scattering experiments allow the access to the generalised polarizabilities of the protons. The extraction of these polarizabilities is obtained by the experimental and theoretical cross sections comparison. That's why the systematic errors and the radiative effects of the experiments have to be controlled very seriously. In this scope, a whole calculation of the internal radiative corrections has been realised in the framework of the quantum electrodynamic. The method of the dimensional regularisation has been used to the treatment of the ultraviolet and infra-red divergences. The absolute measure method of the energy, takes into account the magnetic deviation, made up of eight identical dipoles. The energy is determined from the deviation angle calculation of the beam and the measure of the magnetic field integral along the deviation

  15. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Wala, Jeremiah; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. Methods and materials: A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Results: Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 seconds. Treatment times...

  16. The time-dependent prize-collecting arc routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Dan; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2013-01-01

    A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change with the...

  17. Commissioning and quality assurance of Dynamic WaveArc irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sayaka; Miyabe, Yuki; Takahashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Yokota, Kenji; Kaneko, Shuji; Mizowaki, Takashi; Monzen, Hajime; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional unicursal irradiation technique "Dynamic WaveArc" (DWA), which employs simultaneous and continuous gantry and O-ring rotation during dose delivery, has been implemented in Vero4DRT. The purposes of this study were to develop a commissioning and quality assurance procedure for DWA irradiation, and to assess the accuracy of the mechanical motion and dosimetric control of Vero4DRT. To determine the mechanical accuracy and the dose accuracy with DWA irradiation, 21 verification test patterns with various gantry and ring rotational directions and speeds were generated. These patterns were irradiated while recording the irradiation log data. The differences in gantry position, ring position, and accumulated MU (EG, ER, and EMU, respectively) between the planned and actual values in the log at each time point were evaluated. Furthermore, the doses delivered were measured using an ionization chamber and spherical phantom. The constancy of radiation output during DWA irradiation was examined by comparison with static beam irradiation. The mean absolute error (MAE) of EG and ER were within 0.1° and the maximum error was within 0.2°. The MAE of EMU was within 0.7 MU, and maximum error was 2.7 MU. Errors of accumulated MU were observed only around control points, changing gantry, and ring velocity. The gantry rotational range, in which EMU was greater than or equal to 2.0 MU, was not greater than 3.2%. It was confirmed that the extent of the large differences in accumulated MU was negligibly small during the entire irradiation range. The variation of relative output value for DWA irradiation was within 0.2%, and this was equivalent to conventional arc irradiation with a rotating gantry. In conclusion, a verification procedure for DWA irradiation was designed and implemented. The results demonstrated that Vero4DRT has adequate mechanical accuracy and beam output constancy during gantry and ring rotation. PMID:26103177

  18. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorayski, Peter; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Barry, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Foote, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI.

  19. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ%≤1, γavg < 0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  20. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI

  1. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  2. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  3. Modeling of Arc Force in Plasma Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhonglin; HU Shengsun; YIN Fengliang; WANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    A three. dimensional mathematical model for the transferred-type argon arc was developed to describe arc force on the anode surface. The software ANSYS was employed to solve the model. The model includes a part of torch and tungsten electrode to achieve m ore reasonable results. The arc temperature and flow fields were derived. And the influences of welding parameters on arc force were also studied. The simulated results show that arc pressure at the anode are dependent on the welding current, plasma gas flow rate and electrode neck-in, while not sensitive to arc length.

  4. Hydration characteristics of water in radiation polymerized hema-co- ionomeric controlled drug delivery matrices: a DSC study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in the bulk (freezable) and bound (non-freezable) water contents of radiation polymerized (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) containing two different types of ionomers have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that introduction of 5-10% of acrylic acid into PHEMA matrix affects mainly the bulk water content whereas introduction of sodium para styrene sulphonate affects both types of water significantly. (author)

  5. ALICE-ARC integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites

  6. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy techniques for early-stage lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huan, E-mail: huan.liu@ynhh.org; Ye, Jingjing; Kim, John J.; Deng, Jun; Kaur, Monica S.; Chen, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dosimetric and delivery characteristics of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques for early-stage lung cancer treatment. SBRT treatment plans for lung tumors of different sizes and locations were designed using a single-isocenter multisegment dynamic conformal arc technique (SiMs-arc) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy technique (RapidArc) for 5 representative patients treated previously with lung SBRT. The SiMs-arc plans were generated with the isocenter located in the geometric center of patient's axial plane (which allows for collision-free gantry rotation around the patient) and 6 contiguous 60° arc segments spanning from 1° to 359°. 2 RapidArc plans, one using the same arc geometry as the SiMs-arc and the other using typical partial arcs (210°) with the isocenter inside planning target volume (PTV), were generated for each corresponding SiMs-arc plan. All plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (V10.0) and were normalized with PTV V{sub 100} to 95%. PTV coverage, dose to organs at risk, and total monitor units (MUs) were then compared and analyzed. For PTV coverage, the RapidArc plans generally produced higher PTV D{sub 99} (by 1.0% to 3.3%) and higher minimum dose (by 2.7% to 12.7%), better PTV conformality index (by 1% to 8%), and less volume of 50% dose outside 2 cm from PTV (by 0 to 20.8 cm{sup 3}) than the corresponding SiMs-arc plans. For normal tissues, no significant dose differences were observed for the lungs, trachea, chest wall, and heart; RapidArc using partial arcs produced lowest maximum dose to spinal cord. For dose delivery, the RapidArc plans typically required 50% to 90% more MUs than SiMs-arc plans to deliver the same prescribed dose. The additional intensity modulation afforded by variable gantry speed and dose rate and by overlapping arcs enabled RapidArc plans to produce dosimetrically improved plans for lung SBRT, but required more MUs (by a factor > 1

  8. Flexible delivery of Er:YAG radiation at 2.94 μm with novel hollow-core silica glass fibres: demonstration of tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urich, Artur; Maier, Robert R. J.; Knight, Jonathan C.; Yu, Fei; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present the delivery of high energy Er:YAG laser pulses operating at 2.94 μm through a hollow-core negative curvature fibre (HC-NCF) and a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) and their use for the ablation of biological tissue. In HC-NCF fibres, which have been developed recently, the laser radiation is confined in a hollow core and by an anti-resonant or reflection principle (also known as ARROW). Both fibres are made of fused silica which has high mechanical and chemical durability, is bio-inert and results in a fibre with the flexibility that lends itself to easy handling and minimally invasive procedures. The HC-NCF structure consists of only one ring of capillaries around a realtively large core, followed by a protecting outer layer, hence the preform is relatively easy to build compared to traditional HC-PCF. The measured attenuation at 2.94 μm is 0.06 dB/m for the HC-NCF and 1.2 dB/m for the HC-PCF. Both fibres have a single mode output beam profile which can be advantageous for surgical applications as the beam profile is maintained during fibre movement. We demonstrate delivery of high energy pulses through both fibres, well above the thresholds needed for the ablation of biological tissue in non-contact and contact mode. Delivered energy densities reached > 750 J/cm-2 after 10 m of HC-NCF and > 3400 J/cm2 through a 44 cm HC-PCF.

  9. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  10. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cooper, D; Lachaine, M [Elekta Inc., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  11. An optimal algorithm for configuring delivery options of a one-dimensional intensity-modulated beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of generating delivery options for one-dimensional intensity-modulated beams (1D IMBs) arises in intensity-modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present an algorithm with the optimal running time, based on the 'rightmost-preference' method, for generating all distinct delivery options for an arbitrary 1D IMB. The previously best known method for generating delivery options for a 1D IMB with N left leaf positions and N right leaf positions is a 'brute-force' solution, which first generates all N! possible combinations of the left and right leaf positions and then removes combinations that are not physically allowed delivery options. Compared with the brute-force method, our algorithm has several advantages: (1) our algorithm runs in an optimal time that is linearly proportional to the total number of distinct delivery options that it actually produces. Note that for a 1D IMB with multiple peaks, the total number of distinct delivery options in general tends to be considerably smaller than the worst case N!. (2) Our algorithm can be adapted to generating delivery options subject to additional constraints such as the 'minimum leaf separation' constraint. (3) Our algorithm can also be used to generate random subsets of delivery options; this feature is especially useful when the 1D IMBs in question have too many delivery options for a computer to store and process. The key idea of our method is that we impose an order on how left leaf positions should be paired with right leaf positions. Experiments indicated that our rightmost-preference algorithm runs dramatically faster than the brute-force algorithm. This implies that our algorithm can handle 1D IMBs whose sizes are substantially larger than those handled by the brute-force method. Applications of our algorithm in therapeutic techniques such as intensity-modulated arc therapy and 2D modulations are also discussed

  12. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  13. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  14. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  15. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic-based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT. PMID:27067229

  16. Designing tragacanth gum based sterile hydrogel by radiation method for use in drug delivery and wound dressing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljit; Varshney, Lalit; Francis, Sanju; Rajneesh

    2016-07-01

    Present article discusses synthesis and characterization of the sterile and pure hydrogel wound dressings which were prepared through radiation method by using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), tragacanth gum (TG) and sodium alginate (SA). The polymer films were characterized by SEM, Cryo-SEM, FTIR, solid state C(13) NMR and XRD, TGA, and DSC. Some important biological properties such as O2 permeability, water vapor transmission rate, microbial permeability, haemolysis, thrombogenic behavior, antioxidant activity, bio-adhesion and mechanical properties were also studied. The hydrogel film showed thrombogenicity (82.43±1.54%), haemolysis (0.83±0.09%), oxygen permeability (6.433±0.058mg/L) and water vapor permeability (197.39±25.34g/m(2)/day). Hydrogel films were found biocompatible and impermeable to microbes. The release of antibiotic drug moxifloxacin occurred through non-Fickian mechanism and release profile was best fitted in Hixson-Crowell model for drug release. Overall, these results indicate the suitability of these hydrogels in wound dressing applications. PMID:27020943

  17. Clinical utility of RapidArcTM radiotherapy technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Infusino E

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Erminia Infusino Department of Radiotherapy, Campus Bio-Medico University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: RapidArcTM is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360° and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords "RapidArc", "Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy", and "Intensity-modulated radiotherapy". Keywords: IMRT, VMAT, SBRT, SRS, treatment planning software 

  18. Detailed analysis of multi-leaf collimator movement during radiation delivery using an in-house-developed program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) are used to modulate intensity during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Evaluation of MLC movement in IMRT is important, since the accuracy of MLC movements affects the dose distribution. This evaluation is conventionally performed using an attached Dynalog File Viewer (DFV). However, due to its being an overall evaluation, it is not possible to discover significant errors. In this study, we developed software that permits easy analysis of MLC movements that can be used to retrospectively evaluate MLC movement during irradiation. We also evaluated the usefulness of our in-house program and confirmed its potential for use in clinical scenarios. We created a program that can read MLC logfiles using Visual Basic 6.0 and visualize the temporal changes and movements of the MLC. To evaluate our in-house program's efficacy in analyzing dynamic MLC-QA (quality assurance), we compared the numerical results yielded by our in-house program and the DFV. The results showed that our in-house program was able to reveal errors below the error root mean square (RMS) values obtained using the DFV. Using irregular surface compensator (ISC) irradiation conditions in a clinical context, we compared our in-house program with the DFV and, using RMS analysis, identified cases that showed excessive error. Our in-house program can also be used to investigate whether unacceptable errors are present, as well as their cause, when using the MLC, as it allows easy real-time observation and evaluation of MLC movements. An additional benefit is that collecting the MLC logfile during actual treatment also allows it to be evaluated retrospectively after continuous MLC operation. (author)

  19. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions

  20. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Siu, Zhuo, E-mail: a0018876@nus.edu.sg [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Advanced Concepts and Nanotechnology, Data Storage Institute, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1 (Off Kent Ridge Crescent, NUS), Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Jalil, Mansoor B. A. [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Ghee Tan, Seng [Advanced Concepts and Nanotechnology, Data Storage Institute, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1 (Off Kent Ridge Crescent, NUS), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  1. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  2. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the sourc...

  3. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  4. The Effect of Flattening Filter Free on Three-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Plans for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-Wan; Lai, You-Qun; Lin, Qin; Ha, Hui-Ming; Fu, Li-Rong

    2015-07-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) may affect outcome measures of radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters in three types of radiotherapy plans, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), with or without the flattening filter (FF), developed for the treatment of metastatic brain tumors from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From July 2013 to October 2013, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT treatment plans were designed using 6 MV and 10 MV, with and without FF, for 10 patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC. The evaluation of the treatment plans included homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), monitor units (MU), mean dose (Dmean), treatment time, and the influence of FFF on volumes. There was no difference in CI or HI between FFF and FF models with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans. At 6 MV, a lower Dmean was seen in the FFF model of 3D-CRT and in the VMAT plan at 10 MV. In the IMRT 6 MV, IMRT 10 MV, and VMAT 10 MV plans, higher MUs were seen in the FFF models. FFF treatments are similar in quality to FF plans, generally lead to more monitor units, and are associated with shorter treatment times. FFF plans ranked by the order of superiority in terms of a time advantage are VMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT. PMID:26011493

  5. Advanced SLARette delivery machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SLARette 1 equipment, comprising of a SLARette Delivery Machine, SLAR Tools, SLAR power supplies and SLAR Inspection Systems was designed, developed and manufactured to service fuel channels of CANDU 6 stations during the regular yearly station outages. The Mark 2 SLARette Delivery Machine uses a Push Tube system to provide the axial and rotary movements of the SLAR Tool. The Push Tubes are operated remotely but must be attached and removed manually. Since this operation is performed at the Reactor face, there is radiation dose involved for the workers. An Advanced SLARette Delivery Machine which incorporates a computer controlled telescoping Ram in the place of the Push Tubes has been recently designed and manufactured. Utilization of the Advanced SLARette Delivery Machine significantly reduces the amount of radiation dose picked up by the workers because the need to have workers at the face of the Reactor during the SLARette operation is greatly reduced. This paper describes the design, development and manufacturing process utilized to produce the Advanced SLARette Delivery Machine and the experience gained during the Gentilly-2 NGS Spring outage. (author)

  6. Arc-preserving subsequences of arc-annotated sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-01

    Arc-annotated sequences are useful in representing the structural information of RNA and protein sequences. The longest arc-preserving common subsequence problem has been introduced as a framework for studying the similarity of arc-annotated sequences. In this paper, we consider arc-annotated sequences with various arc structures. We consider the longest arc preserving common subsequence problem. In particular, we show that the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(crossing,chain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(crossing,chain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete for some fixed alphabet $\\Sigma$ such that $|\\Sigma| = 2$. Also we show that if $|\\Sigma| = 1$, then the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete.

  7. Development of Analysis Program for SF6 Arc Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong C; Ahn, Heui Sub; Choi, Jong Ung; Kim, Young Geun; Oh, Il Sung [Electrotechnology R and D Center, LG Industrial System (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    Because there is a strong interaction between the arc discharge and their surroundings, it is not easy to predict the characteristics of industrial arc plasma systems such as gas circuit breakers. The design procedure of these systems is still largely based on trial and error, although the situation is rapidly improving because of the available computational power at a cost in which is still coming down. The desire to predict the behavior of arc plasma systems, thus optimizing and reducing the development cost, has been the motivation of these arc researches. In this paper, we have simulated the switching operation of a gas circuit breaker during high current area using a computational fluid dynamics considered the electric field analysis, the radiation model and effects of turbulence. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Comparative analysis of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the various dosimetric parameters of dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans for base of tongue cases. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta synergy linear accelerator with 80 MLC. IMRT plans were planned with nine stationary beams, and VMAT plans were done for 360° arc with single arc or dual arc. The dose to the planning target volumes (PTV for 70, 63, and 56 Gy was compared. The dose to 95, 98, and 50% volume of PTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and the conformity index (CI of the PTV 70 were also analyzed. IMRT and VMAT plan showed similar dose coverage, HI, and CI. Maximum dose and dose to 1-cc volume of spinal cord, planning risk volume (PRV cord, and brain stem were compared. IMRT plan and VMAT plan showed similar results except for the 1 cc of PRV cord that received slightly higher dose in VMAT plan. Mean dose and dose to 50% volume of right and left parotid glands were analyzed. VMAT plan gave better sparing of parotid glands than IMRT. In normal tissue dose analyses VMAT was better than IMRT. The number of monitor units (MU required for delivering the good quality of the plan and the time required to deliver the plan for IMRT and VMAT were compared. The number of MUs for VMAT was higher than that of IMRT plans. However, the delivery time was reduced by a factor of two for VMAT compared with IMRT. VMAT plans yielded good quality of the plan compared with IMRT, resulting in reduced treatment time and improved efficiency for base of tongue cases.

  9. Optimal set of grid size and angular increment for practical dose calculation using the dynamic conformal arc technique: a systematic evaluation of the dosimetric effects in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To recommend the optimal plan parameter set of grid size and angular increment for dose calculations in treatment planning for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) considering both accuracy and computational efficiency. Dose variations with varying grid sizes (2, 3, and 4 mm) and angular increments (2°, 4°, 6°, and 10°) were analyzed in a thorax phantom for 3 spherical target volumes and in 9 patient cases. A 2-mm grid size and 2° angular increment are assumed sufficient to serve as reference values. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using dose–volume histograms, monitor units (MUs), and dose to organs at risk (OARs) for a definite volume corresponding to the dose–volume constraint in lung SBRT. The times required for dose calculations using each parameter set were compared for clinical practicality. Larger grid sizes caused a dose increase to the structures and required higher MUs to achieve the target coverage. The discrete beam arrangements at each angular increment led to over- and under-estimated OARs doses due to the undulating dose distribution. When a 2° angular increment was used in both studies, a 4-mm grid size changed the dose variation by up to 3–4% (50 cGy) for the heart and the spinal cord, while a 3-mm grid size produced a dose difference of <1% (12 cGy) in all tested OARs. When a 3-mm grid size was employed, angular increments of 6° and 10° caused maximum dose variations of 3% (23 cGy) and 10% (61 cGy) in the spinal cord, respectively, while a 4° increment resulted in a dose difference of <1% (8 cGy) in all cases except for that of one patient. The 3-mm grid size and 4° angular increment enabled a 78% savings in computation time without making any critical sacrifices to dose accuracy. A parameter set with a 3-mm grid size and a 4° angular increment is found to be appropriate for predicting patient dose distributions with a dose difference below 1% while reducing the

  10. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  11. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  12. Simulation and Experimental Analysis of Arc Motion Characteristics in Air Circuit Breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chunping; Ding, Juwen; Wu, Yi; Yang, Fei; Dong, Delong; Fan, Xingyu; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, to simulate the arc motion in an air circuit breaker (ACB), a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed, considering the influence of thermal radiation, the change of physical parameters of arc plasma and the nonlinear characteristic of ferromagnetic material. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in the arc region are calculated. The simulation results show some phenomena which discourage arc interruption, such as back commutation and arc burning at the back of the splitter plate. To verify the simulation model, the arc motion is studied experimentally. The influences of the material and position of the innermost barrier plate are analyzed mainly. It proved that the model developed in this paper can efficiently simulate the arc motion. The results indicate that the insulation barrier plate close to the top of the splitter plate is conducive to the arc splitting, which leads to the significant increase of the arc voltage, so it is better for arc interruption. The research can provide methods and references to the optimization of ACB design. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Nos. 2015CB251002, 6132620303), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51377128, 51577144), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China

  13. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the VMAT case

    OpenAIRE

    Balvert, Marleen; Craft, David

    2016-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. This model was presented for the single map case in a companion paper (Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the ...

  14. Capacitated arc routing problem and its extensions in waste collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadzli, Mohammad; Najwa, Nurul [Institut Matematik Kejuruteraan, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Kampus Pauh Putra, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Luis, Martino [Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010 Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) is the youngest generation of graph theory that focuses on solving the edge/arc routing for optimality. Since many years, operational research devoted to CARP counterpart, known as vehicle routing problem (VRP), which does not fit to several real cases such like waste collection problem and road maintenance. In this paper, we highlighted several extensions of capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) that represents the real-life problem of vehicle operation in waste collection. By purpose, CARP is designed to find a set of routes for vehicles that satisfies all pre-setting constraints in such that all vehicles must start and end at a depot, service a set of demands on edges (or arcs) exactly once without exceeding the capacity, thus the total fleet cost is minimized. We also addressed the differentiation between CARP and VRP in waste collection. Several issues have been discussed including stochastic demands and time window problems in order to show the complexity and importance of CARP in the related industry. A mathematical model of CARP and its new version is presented by considering several factors such like delivery cost, lateness penalty and delivery time.

  15. Capacitated arc routing problem and its extensions in waste collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) is the youngest generation of graph theory that focuses on solving the edge/arc routing for optimality. Since many years, operational research devoted to CARP counterpart, known as vehicle routing problem (VRP), which does not fit to several real cases such like waste collection problem and road maintenance. In this paper, we highlighted several extensions of capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) that represents the real-life problem of vehicle operation in waste collection. By purpose, CARP is designed to find a set of routes for vehicles that satisfies all pre-setting constraints in such that all vehicles must start and end at a depot, service a set of demands on edges (or arcs) exactly once without exceeding the capacity, thus the total fleet cost is minimized. We also addressed the differentiation between CARP and VRP in waste collection. Several issues have been discussed including stochastic demands and time window problems in order to show the complexity and importance of CARP in the related industry. A mathematical model of CARP and its new version is presented by considering several factors such like delivery cost, lateness penalty and delivery time

  16. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  17. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  18. An oblique arc capable patient positioning system for sequential tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new patient positioning system has been designed and manufactured, allowing for the accurate delivery of obliquely oriented intensity modulated treatment arcs via a commercially available IMRT system. The ability to deliver such obliquely oriented intensity modulated arcs allows the commercial system to more closely approach a 4π pencil beam delivery geometry which, in turn, allows for significant improvements in conformality for many tumor geometries. While the IMRT system delivered to this institution in the fall of 1996 was capable of planning for nonparallel plane delivery schemes, it proved incapable of delivering such treatments with acceptable accuracy. Because our early clinical experience revealed that certain patients could benefit significantly from such a delivery scheme we endeavored to design and manufacture an alternative treatment couch/patient positioning system (Xlator) which could overcome the limitations of the vendor supplied system. We present our initial evidence for the benefits of obliquely oriented intensity modulated treatment arcs, along with data demonstrating the inability of the original vendor supplied system to deliver such treatments with acceptable accuracy. The design of our new system is presented, as well as data demonstrating its ability to accurately deliver obliquely oriented intensity-modulated arcs. A detailed comparison of the performance of the Xlator and the vendor-supplied system is presented with regard to match line repeatability and hysteresis. Finally, the ability of the Xlator to deliver multiple couch angle sequential tomotherapy with spatial accuracy necessary to radiosurgical applications is demonstrated via a AAPM Report 54,TG-42 hidden target test. Readers note: The Xlator patient positioning system designed and patented here has recently come to be commercially available, and is currently marketed by the vendor under the name Crane II

  19. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  20. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A dosimetric comparison with TomoTherapy and step-and-shoot IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a novel technique, employs a linear accelerator to conduct dynamic modulation rotation radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT with helical tomotherapy (HT) and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with regard to the sparing effect on organs at risk (OARs), dosimetric quality, and efficiency of delivery. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with NPC treated by HT were re-planned by VMAT (two arcs) and IMRT (7–9 fields) for dosimetric comparison. The target area received three dose levels (70, 60, and 54 Gy) in 33 fractions using simultaneous integrated boosts technique. The Philips Pinnacle Planning System 9.0 was adopted to design VMAT, using SmartArc as the planning algorithm. For a fair comparison, the planning target volume (PTV) coverage of the 3 plans was normalized to the same level. Dosimetric comparisons between VMAT, HT, and IMRT plans were analyzed to evaluate (1) coverage, homogeneity, and conformity of PTV, (2) sparing of OARs, (3) delivery time, and (4) monitor units (MUs). Results: The VMAT, HT, and IMRT plans had similar PTV coverage with an average of 96%. There was no significant difference between VMAT and HT in homogeneity, while the homogeneity indices of VMAT (1.06) and HT (1.06) were better than IMRT plans (1.07, p < 0.05). HT plans provided a better conformity index (1.17) than VMAT (1.28, p = 0.01) and IMRT (1.36, p = 0.02). When compared with IMRT, VMAT and HT had a better sparing effect on brain stem and spinal cord (p < 0.05). The effect of parotid sparing was similar between VMAT (mean = 26.3 Gy) and HT (mean = 27.5 Gy), but better than IMRT (mean = 31.3 Gy, p < 0.01). The delivery time per fraction for VMAT (5.7 min) were much lower than for HT (9.5 min, p < 0.01) and IMRT (9.2 min, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Our results indicate that VMAT provides better sparing of normal tissue, homogeneity, and

  1. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Z.W.; Zhu, J.J.; Li, Z.S.;

    2013-01-01

    path triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH......Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera...... with framing rates of tens to hundreds of kHz, showing details of ignition, motion, pulsation, short-cutting, and extinction of the plasma column. The ignition of a new discharge occurs before the extinction of the previous discharge. The developed, moving plasma column often short-cuts its current...

  2. Polymer matrices obtained by ionizing radiation for using in controlled drug delivery systems; Matrizes polimericas obtidas mediante radiacao ionizante para sua utilizacao como sistemas de liberacao controlada de farmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martellini, Flavia

    1998-07-01

    Two kinds of controlled drug delivery system were obtained by gamma radiation induced polymerization. One of the system was obtained from an acrylic derivative of acetaminophen (40-hydroxyacetanilide), by copolymerization of 4-(acryloyloxy) acetanilide and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in dimethylformamide solution with 0,16 kGy/h dose rate and 54 Gy dose. The values of reactivity rate, r-D{sub MAA} = 0,31 {+-} 0,02 e r{sub AOA} -0,07 {+-} 0,12, were determined by Fineman-Ross method. The acetaminophen hydrolysis was carried out in alkaline and enzymatic (trypsin) media. Another kind of drug delivery system studied was solvent controlled type, being the drug immobilized in the hydrogel,. The hydrogels prepared by radiation polymerization of acryloyl-L-propine methylester (A-Pro-OMe) with 10 Gy dose, showed thermosensible property, swelling or shrinking in water with decreased or increased temperatures. The hydrogels were obtained with different crosslink density, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, and the monomers N, N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and 2-cyanoethyl acrylate to study the influence of the composition in the drug delivery rate. It was verified that the porous size besides being a characteristic of the matrix composition, it was also temperature dependent (thermosensible). The analgesic drug acetaminophen was immobilized by entrapment and by physical adsorption into the hydrogels matrices for 'in vitro' study. The insulin was immobilized by adsorption for 'in vivo' study. (author)

  3. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy vs. c-IMRT for the Treatment of Upper Thoracic Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu-Zhe Zhang; Tian-Tian Zhai; Jia-Yang Lu; Jian-Zhou Chen; Zhi-Jian Chen; De-Rui Li; Chuang-Zhen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare plans using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with conventional sliding window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (c-IMRT) to treat upper thoracic esophageal cancer (EC). Methods CT datasets of 11 patients with upper thoracic EC were identified. Four plans were generated for each patient: c-IMRT with 5 fields (5F) and VMAT with a single arc (1A), two arcs (2A), or three arcs (3A). The prescribed doses were 64 Gy/32 F for the primary tumor (PTV64). The dose-volume...

  4. Heat Transfer Analysis for Industrial AC Electric Arc Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (U)nal (C)amdali; Murat Tun(c)

    2005-01-01

    The heat transfer analysis was performed for an AC electric arc furnace (EAF). Heat losses by conduction, convection and radiation from outer surface, roof, bottom and electrodes of EAF were determined in detail. Some suggestions about decreasing heat losses were presented.

  5. SU-E-T-136: Dosimetric Robustness of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the radiation delivery robustness of the first MR-IGRT system using a commercial cylindrical diode array detector (ArcCHECK) and an ionization thimble chamber (Exradin A18). Methods: The MR-IGRT system is composed of three evenly spaced Co-60 sources on a rotating gantry located between two magnet halves. The collimator for each source consists of 30 doubly-focused leaf pairs that allow the system to deliver both conformal and intensity modulated (IMRT) treatment plans. The system's delivery robustness was tested over a span of 6 months from September 2013 through February 2014. This was achieved by repeatedly delivering 10 patient plans. These plans consisted of 2 conformal prostates, 2 IMRT prostates, 2 IMRT head and neck, 2 IMRT breast, 1 IMRT pancreas, and 1 IMRT bladder. The plans were generated with the system's treatment planning software. Once the plans were generated, quality assurance plans were created on a digital ArcCHECK dataset. The ArcCHECK used for testing was specially designed to be MR-compatible by moving the power supply outside of the magnetic field. The A18 ionization chamber was placed in a custom plastic plug insert in the center of the ArcCHECK. Gamma analysis was used with the ArcCHECK for relative dose evaluating both 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm. Absolute point dose was compared between ion chamber measurement and treatment plan. Results: The ArcCHECK passing rate remained constant over the 6 month period. The average passing rate for 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm analysis was 98.6% ± 0.7 and 88.8% ± 2.9, respectively. The ion chamber measurements showed little variation with an average percent difference between planned dose verses measured dose of 0.9% ± 0.7. Conclusion: Minimal differences were noted in the delivery of the 10 patient plans. Over a period that included acceptance testing, commissioning, and clinical deliveries, the MR-IGRT system remained consistent in radiation delivery

  6. An experimental evaluation of the Agility MLC for motion-compensated VMAT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm for dynamic multileaf-collimator (dMLC) tracking of a target performing a known a priori, rigid-body motion during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), has been experimentally validated and applied to investigate the potential of the Agility (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) multileaf-collimator (MLC) for use in motion-compensated VMAT delivery. For five VMAT patients, dosimetric measurements were performed using the Delta4 radiation detector (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden) and the accuracy of dMLC tracking was evaluated using a gamma-analysis, with threshold levels of 3% for dose and 3 mm for distance-to-agreement. For a motion trajectory with components in two orthogonal directions, the mean gamma-analysis pass rate without tracking was found to be 58.0%, 59.0% and 60.9% and was increased to 89.1%, 88.3% and 93.1% with MLC tracking, for time periods of motion of 4 s, 6 s and 10 s respectively. Simulations were performed to compare the efficiency of the Agility MLC with the MLCi MLC when used for motion-compensated VMAT delivery for the same treatment plans and motion trajectories. Delivery time increases from a static-tumour to dMLC-tracking VMAT delivery were observed in the range 0%–20% for the Agility, and 0%–57% with the MLCi, indicating that the increased leaf speed of the Agility MLC is beneficial for MLC tracking during lung radiotherapy. (paper)

  7. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  8. Of Eggs and Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  9. Use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in patients where conventional radiotherapy was not deliverable. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for a twelve-year-old boy with Stage IIIB nodular sclerosing HL postchemotherapy with positive positron emission tomography scan. VMAT was used for Phase 1 (19.8 Gy in 11 fractions) and Phase 2 (10.8 Gy in 6 fractions) treatment plans. Single anticlockwise arc plans were constructed using SmartArc (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with control points spaced at 4°. The inverse-planning objectives were to uniformly irradiate the planning target volume (PTV) with the prescription dose while keeping the volume of lung receiving greater than 20 Gy (V20Gy) to less than 30% and minimize the dose to the other adjacent organs at risk (OAR). Pretreatment verification was conducted and the treatment delivery was on an MLCi Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK). The planning results were retrospectively confirmed in a further 4 patients using a single PTV with a prescribed dose of 19.8 Gy in 11 fractions. Acceptable dose coverage and homogeneity were achieved for both Phase 1 and 2 plans while keeping the lung V20Gy at 22.5% for the composite plan. The beam-on times for Phase 1 and Phase 2 plans were 109 and 200 seconds, respectively, and the total monitor units were 337.2 MU and 292.5 MU, respectively. The percentage of measured dose points within 3% and 3 mm for Phase 1 and Phase 2 were 92% and 98%, respectively. Both plans were delivered successfully. The retrospective planning study showed that VMAT improved PTV dose uniformity and reduced the irradiated volume of heart and lung, although the volume of lung irradiated to low doses increased. Two-phased VMAT offers an attractive option for large volume sites, such as HL, giving a high level of target coverage and significant OAR sparing together with efficient delivery

  10. Use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young K., E-mail: Young.Lee@rmh.nhs.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bedford, James L. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taj, Mary [Paediatric Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Saran, Frank H. [Radiotherapy Department, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in patients where conventional radiotherapy was not deliverable. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for a twelve-year-old boy with Stage IIIB nodular sclerosing HL postchemotherapy with positive positron emission tomography scan. VMAT was used for Phase 1 (19.8 Gy in 11 fractions) and Phase 2 (10.8 Gy in 6 fractions) treatment plans. Single anticlockwise arc plans were constructed using SmartArc (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with control points spaced at 4°. The inverse-planning objectives were to uniformly irradiate the planning target volume (PTV) with the prescription dose while keeping the volume of lung receiving greater than 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) to less than 30% and minimize the dose to the other adjacent organs at risk (OAR). Pretreatment verification was conducted and the treatment delivery was on an MLCi Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK). The planning results were retrospectively confirmed in a further 4 patients using a single PTV with a prescribed dose of 19.8 Gy in 11 fractions. Acceptable dose coverage and homogeneity were achieved for both Phase 1 and 2 plans while keeping the lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy} at 22.5% for the composite plan. The beam-on times for Phase 1 and Phase 2 plans were 109 and 200 seconds, respectively, and the total monitor units were 337.2 MU and 292.5 MU, respectively. The percentage of measured dose points within 3% and 3 mm for Phase 1 and Phase 2 were 92% and 98%, respectively. Both plans were delivered successfully. The retrospective planning study showed that VMAT improved PTV dose uniformity and reduced the irradiated volume of heart and lung, although the volume of lung irradiated to low doses increased. Two-phased VMAT offers an attractive option for large volume sites, such as HL, giving a high level of target coverage and significant OAR sparing together with

  11. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  12. Extinction properties of electric arcs in high voltage circuit breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziani, A.; Moulai, H.

    2009-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the development of a 0D model of the electric arc extinction in SF6 high voltage circuit breakers taking into account the thermal radiation of the plasma, in addition to the conduction and convection phenomena. The Stefan-Boltzmann equation is coupled with the heat equation, and both equations are solved simultaneously in order to follow the evolution of the arc voltage and the conductance of the thermal plasma as functions of time. The obtained results are found to be in good agreement with experimental recordings.

  13. Numaerical simulation of a SF6 circuit-breaker arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and the validation of high-voltage circuit breaker require more and more physical models which take into account complex phenomenae. We present here a numerical simulation of an SF6 arc established in a simplified geometry of a circuit breaker prototype. Our study deals specially with the turbulent flow, the boundary conditions of the arc roots on the electrodes, the influence of the electromagnetic strengths and the radiative transfer. The results concern a stationary state with fixed geometry and current intensity (I=2000 A)

  14. High current electric arcs; Les arcs electriques a fort courant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delalondre, C.; Simonin, O. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d' Hydraulique; Mineau, L. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Dept. Systemes Energetiques; Verite, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Dept. Cables, Condensateurs, Materiel d' Automatisme et Materiaux

    1999-07-01

    The mechanisms called into play through the interaction between a high current electric arc and the surrounding environment have an essential role to play in the performance of arc furnaces and high voltage circuit breakers. Our knowledge of them remains poor, and because of the very high temperatures and speeds involved, experimental investigation is particularly difficult. What can numerical modelling teach us about these phenomena? (authors)

  15. STUDY ON THE PRESSURE IN PLASMA ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The axial pressure in plasma arc is measured under different conditions. The effects of the parameters, such as welding current, plasma gas flow rate, electrode setback and arc length, on the pressure in plasma arc are investigated and quantitative analyzed to explain the relationship between the quality of weld and the matching of parameters in plasma arc welding process.

  16. Safety and health for welding. ; Skin and eye protections for arc welding light. Yosetsu no anzen eisei. ; Arc ko kara no me oyobi hifu no hogo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogasawara, H. (Fujiki Tekko Co. Ltd., Niigata (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    Arc welding, such as CO {sub 2} arc welding and shielding arc welding, generates welding arc light during the welding work, which is hazardous as it may cause injuries in eyes and skin of a human body. This paper describes the injuries and symptoms caused by this welding arc light, and eye protectors. The lights radiated from welding include ultraviolet rays of 280 mm or less, and are visible and infrared rays. The ultraviolet light is an electromagnetic wave easily absorbable into eyes, causing injuries on the surface layer of a cornea. The light is thought to have some relation with skin cancers. The blue light with wave length from 400 to 570 nm in the visible light is under discussion for its relation with retina injuries. The symptoms of injuries from ultraviolet rays appear in several hours to ten and odd hours after an exposure, while those from the blue light and infrared rays appear much later. The paper also describes the relationship between arc current values used in various arc welding processes and the radiation amount of ultraviolet rays, as well as the ultraviolet ray transmitting rate of filter lenses used for light shielding goggles. 7 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Helical tomotherapy quality assurance with ArcCHECK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To design a quality assurance (QA) procedure for helical tomotherapy that measures multiple beam parameters with 1 delivery and uses a rotating gantry to simulate treatment conditions. The customized QA procedure was preprogrammed on the tomotherapy operator station. The dosimetry measurements were performed using an ArcCHECK diode array and an A1SL ion chamber inserted in the central holder. The ArcCHECK was positioned 10 cm above the isocenter so that the 21-cm diameter detector array could measure the 40-cm wide tomotherapy beam. During the implementation of the new QA procedure, separate comparative measurements were made using ion chambers in both liquid and solid water, the tomotherapy onboard detector array, and a MapCHECK diode array for a period of 10 weeks. There was good agreement (within 1.3%) for the beam output and cone ratio obtained with the new procedure and the routine QA measurements. The measured beam energy was comparable (0.3%) to solid water measurement during the 10-week evaluation period, excluding 2 of the 10 measurements with unusually high background. The symmetry reading was similarly compromised for those 2 weeks, and on the other weeks, it deviated from the solid water reading by ∼2.5%. The ArcCHECK phantom presents a suitable alternative for performing helical tomotherapy QA, provided the background is collected properly. The proposed weekly procedure using ArcCHECK and water phantom makes the QA process more efficient

  18. TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: A TECHNICAL WRITEUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Yadav

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery is another system which provides controlled and continuous delivery of the drug through the skin into the systemic circulation. Topical application which involves drug transport to viable epidermal and/or dermal tissues of the skin for local therapeutic effect while a very major fraction of drug is transported into the systemic blood circulation. Transdermal route provides many advantages over conventional oral and invasive methods of drug delivery such as avoids first pass metabolism, improve patient compliance, maintance steady state plasma concentration. This article provides an overview of skin permeation pathways, types of transdermal drug delivery system, methods of preparation with different methods of evaluation, and the recent advancement in transdermal drug delivery, which includes Transfersomes, Magnetophoresis, Controlled Heat Aided Drug Delivery System, Laser Radiation, Medicated Tattoos, Laser radiation.

  19. Is high–dose rate RapidArc-based radiosurgery dosimetrically advantageous for the treatment of intracranial tumors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yangy2@upmc.edu; Li, Xiang; Li, Tianfang; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2015-04-01

    In linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT), circular cone(s) or conformal arc(s) are conventionally used to treat intracranial lesions. However, when the target is in close proximity to critical structures, it is frequently quite challenging to generate a quality plan using these techniques. In this study, we investigated the dosimetric characteristics of using high–dose rate RapidArc (RA) technique for radiosurgical treatment of intracranial lesions. A total of 10 intracranial SRS/SRT cases previously planned using dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or cone-based techniques have been included in this study. For each case, 3 treatment plans were generated: (1) a DCA plan with multiple noncoplanar arcs, (2) a high–dose rate RA plan with arcs oriented the same as DCA (multiple-arc RA), and 3) a high–dose rate RA plan with a single coplanar arc (single-arc RA). All treatment plans were generated under the same prescription and similar critical structure dose limits. Plan quality for different plans was evaluated by comparing various dosimetric parameters such as target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), critical structures, and normal brain tissue doses as well as beam delivery time. With similar critical structure sparing, high–dose rate RA plans can achieve much better target coverage, dose conformity, and dose homogeneity than the DCA plans can. Plan quality indices CI and HI, for the DCA, multiple-arc RA, and single-arc RA techniques, were measured as 1.67 ± 0.39, 1.32 ± 0.28, and 1.38 ± 0.30 and 1.24 ± 0.11, 1.10 ± 0.04, and 1.12 ± 0.07, respectively. Normal brain tissue dose (V{sub 12} {sub Gy}) was found to be similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but much larger for the single-arc RA plans. Beam delivery was similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but shorter with single-arc RA plans. Multiple-arc RA SRS/SRT can provide better treatment plans than conventional DCA plans, especially for complex cases.

  20. Is high–dose rate RapidArc-based radiosurgery dosimetrically advantageous for the treatment of intracranial tumors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT), circular cone(s) or conformal arc(s) are conventionally used to treat intracranial lesions. However, when the target is in close proximity to critical structures, it is frequently quite challenging to generate a quality plan using these techniques. In this study, we investigated the dosimetric characteristics of using high–dose rate RapidArc (RA) technique for radiosurgical treatment of intracranial lesions. A total of 10 intracranial SRS/SRT cases previously planned using dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or cone-based techniques have been included in this study. For each case, 3 treatment plans were generated: (1) a DCA plan with multiple noncoplanar arcs, (2) a high–dose rate RA plan with arcs oriented the same as DCA (multiple-arc RA), and 3) a high–dose rate RA plan with a single coplanar arc (single-arc RA). All treatment plans were generated under the same prescription and similar critical structure dose limits. Plan quality for different plans was evaluated by comparing various dosimetric parameters such as target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), critical structures, and normal brain tissue doses as well as beam delivery time. With similar critical structure sparing, high–dose rate RA plans can achieve much better target coverage, dose conformity, and dose homogeneity than the DCA plans can. Plan quality indices CI and HI, for the DCA, multiple-arc RA, and single-arc RA techniques, were measured as 1.67 ± 0.39, 1.32 ± 0.28, and 1.38 ± 0.30 and 1.24 ± 0.11, 1.10 ± 0.04, and 1.12 ± 0.07, respectively. Normal brain tissue dose (V12 Gy) was found to be similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but much larger for the single-arc RA plans. Beam delivery was similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but shorter with single-arc RA plans. Multiple-arc RA SRS/SRT can provide better treatment plans than conventional DCA plans, especially for complex cases

  1. Protection against arc erosion of 316 stainless steel by plasma source nitridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of surface nitridation of 316 SS on protection against arc erosion and on suppression of plasma cooling were investigated by using thermal shock loading of 75 J/cm2. The volume loss by arcing was remarkably reduced by nitridation to about 1/6. Meanwhile, the mass loss increased by nitridation to about 4 times as much as for the non-nitrided sample. It was understood by XMA analysis of the nitrided sample before and after arcing that the increased mass loss was mainly due to nitrogens released from the nitrided sample by arcing. The nitrided to non-nitrided ratio of the total radiated power of impurities released from the samples by arcing was roughly estimated to be about 0.47 despite the increase of the mass loss by nitridation. (orig.)

  2. Arc modelling in SF6 circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the work done by an operator, EDF and two manufacturers to improve the physical models and numerical methods used to simulate the behavior of the plasma and cold gas around it in a breaking chamber of the HV SF6 circuit breaker, during the high-current phase. This work concerns flow phenomena, in particular incorporating compressibility and the study of turbulence, the coupling between these flow phenomena and electromagnetic phenomena, and finally, radiation - which plays an essential role in energy transfer during the high-current phase. For this latter aspect, emission but also absorption were proven to play a major role, and the two were introduced into the models. The paper presents the models developed and the results obtained with them for simulation of two circuit breaker mock-ups (a double-pressure circuit breaker mock-up and a self-expanding and rotating arc circuit breaker mock-up). (author)

  3. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  4. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included.

  5. The ARC-EN-CIEL FEL Proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Couprie, M E

    2005-01-01

    ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator-Radiation for Enhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light), the French project of a fourth generation light source aims at providing the user community with coherent femtosecond light pulses covering from UV to soft X ray. It is based on a CW 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator delivering high charge, subpicosecond, low emittance electron bunches with a high repetition rate. The FEL is based on in the injection of High Harmonics in Gases in a High Gain Harmonic Generation scheme, leading to a rather compact solution. The produced radiation extending down to 0.8 nm with the Non Linear Harmonic reproduces the good longitudinal and transverse coherence of the harmonics in gas. Optional beam loops are foreseen to increase the beam current or the energy. They will accommodate fs synchrotron radiation sources in the IR, VUV and X ray ranges and a FEL oscillator in the 10 nm range. An important synergy is expected between accelerator and laser communities. Indeed, electron plasma accelerat...

  6. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    OpenAIRE

    Helfgott, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number n>=7 is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form \\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p), \\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2), has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required q or x to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all n feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. This is part of the author's proof of the ternar...

  7. Feasibility of the partial-single arc technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh Rana; ChihYao Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, in the form of RapidArc, is widely used to treat prostate cancer. The full-single arc (f-SA) technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment provides efficient treatment, but it also delivers a higher radiation dose to the rectum. This study aimed to compare the dosimetric results from the new partial-single arc (p-SA) technique with those from the f-SA technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. In this study, 10 patients with low-risk prostate cancer were selected. For each patient, two sets of RapidArc plans (f-SA and p-SA) were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The f-SA plan was created using one ful arc, and the p-SA plan was created using planning parameters identical to those of the f-SA plan but with anterior and posterior avoidance sectors. Various dosimetric parameters of the f-SA and p-SA plans were evaluated and compared for the same target coverage and identical plan optimization parameters. The f-SA and p-SA plans showed an average difference of ±1% for the doses to the planning target volume (PTV), and there were no clear differences in dose homogeneity or plan conformity. In comparison to the f-SA technique, the p-SA technique reduced the doses to the rectum by approximately 6.1% to 21.2%, to the bladder by approximately 10.3%to 29.5%, and to the penile bulb by approximately 2.2%. In contrast, the dose to the femoral heads, the integral dose, and the number of monitor units were higher in the p-SA plans by approximately 34.4%, 7.7%, and 9.2%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use the p-SA technique for RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. For the same PTV coverage and identical plan optimization parameters, the p-SA technique is better in sparing the rectum and bladder without compromising plan conformity or target homogeneity when compared to the f-SA technique.

  8. Analysis of Fault Arc in High-Speed Switch Applied in Hybrid Circuit Breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifei; Ren, Zhigang; Feng, Ying; Li, Mei; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of fault arc in a high-speed switch (HSS) has been studied theoretically and experimentally. A simplified HSS setup is designed to support this work. A two-dimensional arc model is developed to analyze the characteristics of fault arc based on magnetic-hydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The advantage of such a model is that the thermal transfer coefficient can be determined by depending on the numerical method alone. The influence of net emission coefficients (NEC) radiation model and P1 model on fault arc is analyzed in detail. Results show that NEC model predicts more radiation energy and less pressure rise without the re-absorption effect considered. As a consequence, P1 model is more suitable to calculate the pressure rise caused by fault arc. Finally, the pressure rise during longer arcing time for different arc currents is predicted. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2015CB251001), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51177124, 51377128, 51323012), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation SGSNKYOOKJJS1501564 and Shaanxi Province Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2013JM-7010)

  9. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 140 consecutive patients treated from 1980 to 1993. Materials and Methods: Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 (1(2)) weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. Patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year after completion of radiation treatment, and a mean follow up interval of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (range, 0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n=90), residual disease (positive margin, n=15, and primary radiation, n=2), or recurrent disease (n=33). Results: Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. A total of 26% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local-regional control, freedom from distant failure, and cause-specific survival was 91%, 64%, and 75% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 32% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate Cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (P=0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 11% of patients having arm edema, 17% hyperpigmentation, and 13

  10. Drug delivery system prepared by ionizing radiation of the N,N-dimethyl acrylamide with acryloyloxy-acetanilide copolymerization; Sistema de liberacao de droga obtido via radiacao ionizante pela copolimerizacao do N,N-dimetilacrilamida com 4-acriloiloxiacetanilida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martellini, Flavia; Higa, Olga Z. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Alvaro A.A. de [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Rodighiero, Paolo [Universidade de Padova (Italy). Inst. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    1995-12-31

    Radiation induced polymerization has been used in biomaterials used in systems which such as drug delivery (DDS). This work describes the copolymerization of the monomers by gamma rays N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAA) and acryloyloxy-acetanilide (AOA) for the immobilization of paracetamol, an analgesic and anti thermic drug. Dimethylformamide solutions were used in two concentrations of DMAA and AOA (F{sub DMAA/AOA} = 0,85/015 and 0,70/0,30, where F = molar fraction in the monomer feed). The samples were irradiated in the dose range of 30-800 Gy. The copolymer poly(DMAA-co-AOA) characterization was carried out by FTIR and {sup 1}HRMN. The hydrolysis was studied considering the formation of sodium salts of 4-hydroxy acetanilide at different times of treatment using colorimetric assay. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A.; Yu, Cedric X.

    2009-11-01

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc™ deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was delivered with a different dose rate, extra mode-up time (xMOT) was needed between the transitions of the successive sectors during delivery. On average, the delivery times of the CDR plans were approximately less than 1 min longer than the treatment times of the VDR plans, with an average of about 0.33 min of xMOT per

  12. High dose for prostate irradiation with image guided radiotherapy: Contribution of intensity modulation arc-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare two Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for prostate cancer: the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and the 'Step and Shoot' technique (S and S). Materials and methods: VMAT and S and S plans (RX 18 MV) were created and compared (Wilcoxon test) for 10 patients. The dosimetric goal of both treatments was to deliver 46 Gy to the seminal vesicles and 80 Gy to the prostate, while respecting the dose constrains in the organs at risk of toxicity. For one patient, the two techniques were compared for dose painting and escalation in target volumes defined on MRI and registered thanks to intra-prostatic fiducial. Results: VMAT, compared to S and S, offered: an increase of the PTV2s (prostate) volume receiving 77 to 80 Gy and a decrease of V82 and V83; a decrease of V4 to V6, V16 to V23, and V69 to V73 for the rectal wall; a decrease of V25 for the bladder wall; a decrease of V21 to V43 for the femoral heads; a decrease of V26 to V44 and V72 to V80 but an increase of V1 to V21 and V49 to V60 for the healthy tissues. The Conformal Index 'COIN' was better with VMAT than S and S (0.60 to 0.66). The delivered MU were significantly reduced with VMAT (8% mean) as well as the delivery time (4 min to 1.5 min). VMAT allowed delivering theoretically 90 Gy in the peripheral zone and 100 Gy in the tumor. Conclusion: In case of prostate irradiation, VMAT shows improvement compared with S and S. In particular, organs at risk are better spared, the delivery time is shortened and the number of delivered UM is decreased. (authors)

  13. Premature delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardita Donoso Bernales

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Preterm delivery is the single most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. In Chile, preterm births have increased in the past decade, although neonatal morbidity and mortality attributable to it shows a downward trend, thanks to improvements in neonatal care of premature babies, rather than the success of obstetric preventive and therapeutic strategies. This article describes clinical entities, disease processes and conditions that constitute predisposing factors of preterm birth, as well as an outline for the prevention and clinical management of women at risk of preterm birth.

  14. Craniospinal irradiation using Rapid Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Marino, A.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Losada, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.

    2013-07-01

    Cranio-Spinal Irradiation is technically very challenging, historically field edge matching is needed because of the mechanical limitations of standard linear accelerators. The purpose of this study is to assess the Volumetric Arc Therapy as a competitive technique for Cranio-Spinal Irradiation compared to the conventional 3D Conformal Radiotherapy technique. (Author)

  15. A rotating arc plasma invertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device is described for the inversion of direct current to alternating current. The main feature is the use of a rotating plasma arc in crossed electric and magnetic fields as a switch. This device may provide an economic alternative to other inversion methods in some circumstances

  16. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of uses...... the next-generation ARC middleware, implemented as Web Services with the aim of standard-compliant interoperability....

  17. Stability of alternating current gliding arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    on Ohm’s law indicates that the critical length of alternating current (AC) gliding arc discharge columns can be larger than that of a corresponding direct current (DC) gliding arc. This finding is supported by previously published images of AC and DC gliding arcs. Furthermore, the analysis shows...

  18. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  19. Dust in the arcs of Methone and Anthe

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Kai-Lung; Spahn, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Methone and Anthe are two tiny moons (with diameter $<3$ km) in the inner part of Saturn's E ring. Both moons are embedded in an arc of dust particles. To understand the amount of micron-sized dust and their spatial distribution in these arcs, we model the source, dynamical evolution, and sinks of these dust in the arc. We assume hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids on the moons as source of these dust (Hedman et al., 2009), the so called impact-ejecta process (Krivov et al., 2003; Spahn et al., 2006). After ejecting and escaping from the moons, these micron-sized particles are subject to several perturbing forces, including gravitational perturbation from Mimas, oblateness of Saturn, Lorentz force, solar radiation pressure, and plasma drag. Particles can be either confined in the arcs due to corotational resonance with Mimas, as their source moons (Spitale et al., 2006; Cooper et al., 2008; Hedman et al., 2009), or pushed outward by plasma drag. Particle sinks are recollisions with the source moon, co...

  20. Total scalp irradiation using fixed photon and arc electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The main difficulty encountered for radical radiotherapy to the whole scalp is reducing the dose to normal brain tissue, while maintaining uniform dose coverage to the entire scalp. Complicating this is the fact that multiple portals need to be employed (Able C, et al. Int. J. Rad. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 21 :1065- 1072; 1991). The technique adopted at the Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre is the one developed at the University of California, San Francisco (Akazawa C, Med. Dos. 14:129-131, 1989). Lateral opposed photon fields and abutting electron fields are used with the same field centre for reproducibility. We employed this technique in the treatment of angiosarcoma of the scalp for one patient and produced acceptable clinical results. This study assesses the radiation dosimetry of two new techniques utilising electron arc therapy. The first technique treats the apex of the head with laterally opposed photon fields and the remaining area with an electron arc beam. The photon fields are used asymmetrically to counteract beam divergence effects and hence improve the dose uniformity in the junction region. The second technique solely employs electrons. A fixed electron field treats the apex of the head, while the arc electron beam covers the remaining scalp region. Arc electron beams were commissioned on the Varian Cadplan treatment planning system and the algorithm was then employed to calculate dosage distributions for the two new treatment techniques

  1. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at the our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 150 consecutive patients from 1980 to 1994. Materials and Methods: Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations in all patients. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 (1(2)) weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. The 10 most recently treated patients were censored for disease progression, survival, and late effects calculations, thus giving a mean follow up of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Results: Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. 27% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local control, freedom from distant failure and overall survival was 91%, 64%, and 67% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 30% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (p<0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 10% of patients having arm edema, 15% hyperpigmentation

  2. Dosimetry Comparison between Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with RapidArc and Fixed Field Dynamic IMRT for Local-Regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-min Zheng; Xiao-xia Dong; Hao Wu; You-jia Duan; Shu-kui Han; Yan Sun

    2011-01-01

    Objective:A dosimetric study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy with RapidArc on locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).Methods:The CT scan data sets of 20 patients of locally advanced NPC were selected randomly.The plans were managed using volumetric modulated arc with RapidArc and fixed nine-field coplanar dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for these patients.The dosimetry of the planning target volumes (PTV),the organs at risk (OARs) and the healthy tissue were evaluated.The dose prescription was set to 70 Gy to the primary tumor and 60 Gy to the clinical target volumes (CTV) in 33 fractions.Each fraction applied daily,five fractions per week.The monitor unit (MU) values and the delivery time were scored to evaluate the expected treatment efficiency.Results:Both techniques had reached clinical treatment's requirement.The mean dose (Dmean),maximum dose (Dmax) and minimum dose (Dmin) in RapidArc and fixed field IMRT for PTV were 68.4±0.6 Gy,74.8±0.9 Gy and 56.8±1.1 Gy; and 67.6±0.6 Gy,73.8±0.4 Gy and 57.5±0.6 Gy (P<0.05),respectively.Homogeneity index was 78.85±1.29 in RapidArc and 80.34±0.54 (P<0.05) in IMRT.The conformity index (CI:95%) was 0.78±0.01 for both techniques (P>0.05).Compared to IMRT,RapidArc allowed a reduction of Dmean to the brain stem,mandible and optic nerves of 14.1% (P<0.05),5.6% (P<0.05) and 12.2% (P<0.05),respectively.For the healthy tissue and the whole absorbed dose,Dmean of RapidArc was reduced by 3.6% (P<0.05),and 3.7% (P<0.05),respectively.The Dmean to the parotids,the spinal cord and the lens had no statistical difference among them.The mean MU values of RapidArc and IMRT were 550 and 1,379.The mean treatment time of RapidArc and IMRT was 165 s and 447 s.Compared to IMRT,the delivery time and the MU values of RapidArc were reduced by 63% and 60%,respectively.Conclusion:For locally advanced NPC,both RapidArc and IMRT reached

  3. SU-E-T-586: Optimal Determination of Tolerance Level for Radiation Dose Delivery Verification in An in Vivo Dosimetry System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To statistically determine the optimal tolerance level in the verification of delivery dose compared to the planned dose in an in vivo dosimetry system in radiotherapy. Methods: The LANDAUER MicroSTARii dosimetry system with screened nanoDots (optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters) was used for in vivo dose measurements. Ideally, the measured dose should match with the planned dose and falls within a normal distribution. Any deviation from the normal distribution may be redeemed as a mismatch, therefore a potential sign of the dose misadministration. Randomly mis-positioned nanoDots can yield a continuum background distribution. A percentage difference of the measured dose to its corresponding planned dose (ΔD) can be used to analyze combined data sets for different patients. A model of a Gaussian plus a flat function was used to fit the ΔD distribution. Results: Total 434 nanoDot measurements for breast cancer patients were collected across a period of three months. The fit yields a Gaussian mean of 2.9% and a standard deviation (SD) of 5.3%. The observed shift of the mean from zero is attributed to the machine output bias and calibration of the dosimetry system. A pass interval of −2SD to +2SD was applied and a mismatch background was estimated to be 4.8%. With such a tolerance level, one can expect that 99.99% of patients should pass the verification and at most 0.011% might have a potential dose misadministration that may not be detected after 3 times of repeated measurements. After implementation, a number of new start breast cancer patients were monitored and the measured pass rate is consistent with the model prediction. Conclusion: It is feasible to implement an optimal tolerance level in order to maintain a low limit of potential dose misadministration while still to keep a relatively high pass rate in radiotherapy delivery verification

  4. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  5. Relationship between arc voltage current and arc length in TIG welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between arc voltage, arc length and current in Tungsten Inert Gas welding has been investigated. It was not possible to determine a correlation between arc voltage, current and arc length because of the inherent variability in the experimental results. A typical value for the error in controlling the arc length using arc voltage was calculated and found to be ± 0.5mm. The variation in arc voltage at constant conditions has two components, long term and short term. Long term is the variation in voltage between welds, short term is voltage variation within a few seconds. Both are about 5% of the total arc voltage. Since only a fraction of the arc voltage depends on arc length, this leads to a much larger variation in arc length if Arc Voltage Control (AVC) is used to control arc length (about 15% in each case at 3mm arc length). A weld procedure based on AVC is likely to yield a different variability in weld bead geometry from one based on constant arc length. (author)

  6. Simulation of Magnetically Dispersed Arc Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白冰; 查俊; 张晓宁; 王城; 夏维东

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically dispersed arc plasma exhibits typically dispersed uniform arc column as well as diffusive cathode root and diffusive anode root. In this paper magnetically dispersed arc plasma coupled with solid cathode is numerically simulated by the simplified cathode sheath model of LOWKE . The numerical simulation results in argon show that the maximum value of arc root current density on the cathode surface is 3.5×10^7 A/m^2), and the maximum value of energy flux on the cathode surface is 3× 10^7 J/m^2, both values are less than the average values of a contracted arc, respectively.

  7. A mechanism that triggers double arcing during plasma arc cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian, E-mail: nemchinsky@bellsouth.ne [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (United States)

    2009-10-21

    Double arcing (DA) is a phenomenon when a transferred arc, flowing inside an electrically insulated nozzle, breaks into two separate arcs: one that connects the cathode and the nozzle and another that connects the nozzle and a work-piece. It is a commonly accepted opinion that the reason for DA is high voltage drop in the plasma inside the nozzle. However, the specific mechanism that triggers the DA development is not clear. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism. Dielectric films deposited inside the nozzle's orifice play the key role in this mechanism. These films are charged by ion current from plasma. A strong electric field is created inside the film and at the boundary of the film and clean metal of the nozzle. This gives rise to a thermo-field electron emission from the clean metal that borders the film. Emitted electrons are accelerated at the voltage drop between the nozzle and plasma. These electrons produce extra ions, which in turn move back to the film and additionally charge it. This sequence of events leads to explosive instability if the voltage drop inside the nozzle is high enough. Experiments to check the proposed mechanism are suggested.

  8. Parametric Study on Arc Behavior of Magnetically Diffused Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tang; Li, Hui; Bai, Bing; Liao, Mengran; Xia, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A model coupling the plasma with a cathode body is applied in the simulation of the diffuse state of a magnetically rotating arc. Four parametric studies are performed: on the external axial magnetic field (AMF), on the cathode shape, on the total current and on the inlet gas velocity. The numerical results show that: the cathode attachment focuses in the center of the cathode tip with zero AMF and gradually shifts off the axis with the increase of AMF; a larger cathode conical angle corresponds to a cathode arc attachment farther away off axis; the maximum values of plasma temperature increase with the total current; the plasma column in front of the cathode tip expands more severely in the axial direction, with a higher inlet speed; the cathode arc attachment shrinks towards the tip as the inlet speed increases. The various results are supposed to be explained by the joint effect of coupled cathode surface heating and plasma rotating flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475174, 11035005 and 50876101)

  9. A comparison of measurement techniques for quality assurance of RapidArc treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Jeff

    A new form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the Varian RapidArc® treatment system has the potential to improve cancer treatments by delivering comparable dose distributions as TomoTherapy ®1 at a rate that is 5 to 15 times faster 2. The goal of this thesis was to compare the sensitivity of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), film, and the ArcCheck™ device as tools for evaluation of IMRT treatments. To accomplish this, we introduced systematic errors in MLC leaf position and perform theoretical and experimental evaluations. The comparisons were made by analyzing changes in the gamma function as systematic MLC gap errors were introduced into the patient treatment plan. To study this, dynamic prostate Rapidarc™ plans were developed in Eclipse™ using the RANDO anthropomorphic phantom. After the plans were developed, the files were exported in DICOM-RT (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine — Radiation Therapy) format, and a program was written to modify the MLC leaf position. The files were imported back into Eclipse and recalculated using simulated film, EPID, and ArcCheck phantoms. Before measuring the plans with the devices, each instrument was calibrated and repeatability tests were performed to determine the variation in a single plan. After the delivery of the same plan eight times, film was found to have the largest variation in average gamma of 0.31 ± 0.13. When the setup was not moved in between measurements, the ArcCheck and EPID had significantly smaller variations in average gamma of 0.10 ± 0.04 and 0.07 ± 0.03 respectively. When the setup was moved and realigned in between measurements, the average gamma variation was found to be 0.22 ± 0.10 and 0.11 ± 0.05 for the ArcCheck and EPID. As a result of the higher variation, it was decided that testing should be performed without moving the detector during the course of the measurements. Film, unfortunately, had to be changed in between tests, which resulted

  10. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  11. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bree, Ingrid de, E-mail: i.de.bree@zrti.nl [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands); Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  12. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  13. Models of plasma arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex model of energy transfer from ionized gas through a weld-pool to a heat affected zone (HAZ) is considered here. The model consists of three sub-models: a model of the arc column with skin layers - sheaths coating electrodes, a model of liquid metal flow in a weld-pool, and a model of coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical processes in HAZ. These sub-models are descried in three reports. The first report is devoted to a short review of welding plasma models based mostly on the Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD) theory successfully applied to the simulation of welding process. This report is illustrated by arc models for TIG and PAW welding. The description of thermal energy transfer between three sub-regions of the complex welding domain refers to a large number of processes observed in gaseous electronics, thermodynamics of reacting gases, electro-dynamics of fluid, micro-metallurgy. (author)

  14. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically Tzrnsat [3]. A corollary is that slightly older zircon antecrysts that are common in the inner units of the TIS could be considered inherited if they are derived from remelting of slightly older intrusions. Remelting at such low temperatures in the arc would require a source of external water. Refs: [1] Sawyer, J.Pet 32:701-738; [2] Fraser et al, Geology 25:607-610; [3] Harrison et al, Geology 35:635- 638

  15. Minor arcs for Goldbach's problem

    CERN Document Server

    Helfgott, H A

    2012-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number $n\\geq 7$ is the sum of three primes. The estimation of sums of the form $\\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p)$, $\\alpha = a/q + O(1/q^2)$, has been a central part of the main approach to the conjecture since (Vinogradov, 1937). Previous work required $q$ or $x$ to be too large to make a proof of the conjecture for all $n$ feasible. The present paper gives new bounds on minor arcs and the tails of major arcs. For $q\\geq 4\\cdot 10^6$, these bounds are of the strength needed to solve the ternary Goldbach conjecture. Only the range $q\\in \\lbrack 10^5, 4\\cdot 10^6\\rbrack$ remains to be checked, possibly by brute force, before the conjecture is proven for all $n$. The new bounds are due to several qualitative improvements. In particular, this paper presents a general method for reducing the cost of Vaughan's identity, as well as a way to exploit the tails of minor arcs in the context of the large sieve.

  16. Oral delivery of insulin using pH-sensitive hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol grafted with acrylic acid/methacrylic acid by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pH-responsive hydrogels were studied as a drug carrier for the protection of insulin from the acidic environment of the stomach before releasing in the small intestine. Hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol) networks grafted with acrylic acid or methacrylic acid were prepared via a two-step process. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels were prepared by gamma ray irradiation (50 kGy) and then followed by grafting either acrylic acid or methacrylic acid onto this poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with subsequent irradiation (5-20 kGy). These graft hydrogels showed pH-sensitive swelling behavior. These hydrogels were used as carrier for the controlled release of insulin. The in vitro release of insulin was observed for the insulin-loaded hydrogels in a simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) but not in a simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2). The release behavior of insulin in vivo in a rat model confirmed the effectiveness of the oral delivery of insulin to control the level of glucose

  17. General Color Rendering Index of Wall-stabilized Arc of Water-cooled Vortex Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp which is one of the arc lamp with metal vapor, and the line spectrum emitted from the metal vapor is used for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The broad spectrum emitted from continuous spectrum is needed for improvement of color rendering spectrum. It is necessary to perform the calculation using the wall-stabilized arc to equalize the contribution to the temperature distribution which the convection gives it to bell-shaped form in the gas flow-stabilized arc for the axial distance. This research elucidates the development of the argon wall-stabilized arc in order to control the spectrum for improvement of color rendering spectrum with controlling the current and radius. The color rendering is measured by the general color rendering index. As a result, the general color rendering index increases with increasing the current and radius of the wall-stabilized arc in the case of simulation. However, it doesn't change so much in the case of experiment. Therefore, the radius, i.e. the arc temperature distribution, is more important factor.

  18. Intracerebral delivery of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine in combination with synchrotron stereotactic radiation for the therapy of the F98 glioma.

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Julia; Adam, Jean-François; Deman, Pierre; Wu, Ting Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Gouget, Barbara; Barth, Rolf,; Estève, François; Elleaume, Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Iodine-enhanced synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy takes advantage of the radiation dose-enhancement produced by high-Z elements when irradiated with mono-energetic beams of synchrotron X-rays. In this study it has been investigated whether therapeutic efficacy could be improved using a thymidine analogue, 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUdR), as a radiosentizing agent. IUdR was administered intracerebrally over six days to F98 glioma-bearing rats using Alzet osmotic pumps, beginning seven days a...

  19. Dead cells in melanoma tumors provide abundant antigen for targeted delivery of ionizing radiation by a mAb to melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Shi, Li; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Frenkel, Annie; Nosanchuk, Jerome S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma is a cancer with a rising incidence, and metastatic disease is almost always lethal. We investigated the feasibility of targeting melanin, an intracellular melanocyte pigment, to deliver cytotoxic radiation to human melanoma cells in vivo by using a melanin-binding mAb (6D2). Nude mice bearing MNT1 pigmented human melanoma tumors were treated with mAb 6D2 labeled with 1.5 mCi (1 Ci = 37 GBq) of the β-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and manifested inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged ...

  20. Multistage CSR microbunching gain development in transport or recirculation arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced microbunching instability has been one of the most challenging issues in the design of modern accelerators. A linear Vlasov solver has been developed [1] and applied to investigate the physical processes of microbunching gain amplification for several example lattices [2]. In this paper, by further extending the concept of stage gain as proposed by Huang and Kim [3], we develop a method to characterize the microbunching development in terms of stage orders that allow the quantitative comparison of optics impacts on microbunching gain for different lattices. We find that the microbunching instability in our demonstrated arcs has a distinguishing feature of multistage amplification (e.g, up to 6th stage amplification for our example transport arcs, in contrast to two-stage amplification for a typical 4-dipole bunch compressor chicane). We also try to connect lattice optics pattern with the obtained stage gain functions by a physical interpretation. This Vlasov analys...

  1. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  2. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Alex [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States) and The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion Science (United States)

    2012-06-15

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ('heavy-ion fusion'). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly 'wobbling' each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  3. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-01

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ("heavy-ion fusion"). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly "wobbling" each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  4. A comparison of liver protection among 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis was designed to compare dosimetric parameters among 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and RapidArc (RA) to identify which can achieve the lowest risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients with HCC were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and RA were calculated for total dose of 50 Gy/25f. The percentage of the normal liver volume receiving >40, >30, >20, >10, and >5 Gy (V40, V30, V20, V10 and V5) were evaluated to determine liver toxicity. V5, V10, V20, V30 and Dmean of liver were compared as predicting parameters for RILD. Other parameters included the conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and hot spot (V110%) for the planned target volume (PTV) as well as the monitor units (MUs) for plan efficiency, the mean dose (Dmean) for the organs at risk (OARs) and the maximal dose at 1% volume (D1%) for the spinal cord. The Dmean of IMRT was higher than 3DCRT (p = 0.045). For V5, there was a significant difference: RA > IMRT >3DCRT (p <0.05). 3DCRT had a lower V10 and higher V20, V30 values for liver than RA (p <0.05). RA and IMRT achieved significantly better CI and lower V110% values than 3DCRT (p <0.05). RA had better HI, lower MUs and shorter delivery time than 3DCRT or IMRT (p <0.05). For right lobe tumors, RapidArc may have the lowest risk of RILD with the lowest V20 and V30 compared with 3DCRT or IMRT. For diameters of tumors >8 cm in our study, the value of Dmean for 3DCRT was lower than IMRT or RapidArc. This may indicate that 3DCRT is more suitable for larger tumors

  5. Guidelines for radiation oncology centres in AFRA Member States intending to make a transition from 2-D to 3-D treatment planning and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Regional Technical Cooperation Project RAF/6/031 on Medical Physics in Support of Cancer Management aims to strengthen national and regional medical physics capabilities to sustain radiotherapy treatments in the AFRA1 Member States. In particular, it aims at increasing the number of qualified medical physicists in the region as well as improving the level of medical physics by establishing regional training and continuous development programmes. Eighteen National Project Coordinators (NPCs) nominated by participating AFRA Member States are engaged in the project. RAF/6/031 was approved by the IAEA in 2005 for an initial five year duration. A coordination meeting is held every two years where the NPCs and IAEA Technical and Project Management Officers establish the project's training and development programmes. During the first coordination meeting at Cape Town in November 2005, it was decided to convene a Task Force Meeting to review the status of treatment planning in radiotherapy in AFRA Member States and prepare a guidance document on the transition from 2-D to 3-D treatment planning. This Task Force Meeting took place at the IAEA's Headquarters in Vienna on 23-26 April 2007. The resulting guidance document highlights the milestones that have to be achieved by radiotherapy centres routinely implementing 2-D computerized treatment planning before making a transition to 3-D treatment planning and delivery. The implementation of 3-D planning by radiotherapy centres that have not yet met these milestones could lead to serious mistakes in treatments. A self-assessment questionnaire was also prepared during the Task Force Meeting. Member States that are planning to make a transition to 3-D planning are advised to assess their existing capabilities through this questionnaire. The same questionnaire could also be useful for the IAEA staff and external experts when assessing the readiness of a radiotherapy centre to make a safe and effective transition to 3-D

  6. Contouring Guidelines for the Axillary Lymph Nodes for the Delivery of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer: Evaluation of the RTOG Breast Cancer Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, Michelle S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Usman, Asad A.; Neuschler, Erin I. [Department of Radiology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Small, William, E-mail: WMSMALL@lumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the axillary lymph nodes on pretreatment diagnostic computed tomography (CT) of the chest to determine their position relative to the anatomic axillary borders as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans available for 30 breast cancer patients with clinically involved lymph nodes were fused with simulation CT. Contouring of axillary levels I, II, and III according to the RTOG guidelines was performed. Measurements were made from the area of distal tumor to the anatomic borders in 6 dimensions for each level. Results: Of the 30 patients, 100%, 93%, and 37% had clinical involvement of levels I, II, and III, respectively. The mean number of lymph nodes dissected was 13.6. The mean size of the largest lymph node was 2.4 cm. Extracapsular extension was seen in 23% of patients. In 97% of patients, an aspect of the involved lymph node lay outside of the anatomic border of a level. In 80% and 83% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the cranial (1.78 ± 1.0 cm; range, 0.28-3.58 cm) and anterior (1.27 ± 0.92 cm; range, 0.24-3.58 cm) borders of level I, respectively. In 80% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the caudal border of level II (1.36 ± 1.0 cm, range, 0.27-3.86 cm), and 0% to 33% of patients had tumor extension outside the remaining borders of all levels. Conclusions: To cover 95% of lymph nodes at the cranial and anterior borders of level I, an additional clinical target volume margin of 3.78 cm and 3.11 cm, respectively, is necessary. The RTOG guidelines may be insufficient for coverage of axillary disease in patients with clinical nodal involvement who are undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, incomplete axillary dissection, or treatment with intensity modulated radiation therapy. In patients with pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans, fusion with

  7. Contouring Guidelines for the Axillary Lymph Nodes for the Delivery of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer: Evaluation of the RTOG Breast Cancer Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the axillary lymph nodes on pretreatment diagnostic computed tomography (CT) of the chest to determine their position relative to the anatomic axillary borders as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans available for 30 breast cancer patients with clinically involved lymph nodes were fused with simulation CT. Contouring of axillary levels I, II, and III according to the RTOG guidelines was performed. Measurements were made from the area of distal tumor to the anatomic borders in 6 dimensions for each level. Results: Of the 30 patients, 100%, 93%, and 37% had clinical involvement of levels I, II, and III, respectively. The mean number of lymph nodes dissected was 13.6. The mean size of the largest lymph node was 2.4 cm. Extracapsular extension was seen in 23% of patients. In 97% of patients, an aspect of the involved lymph node lay outside of the anatomic border of a level. In 80% and 83% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the cranial (1.78 ± 1.0 cm; range, 0.28-3.58 cm) and anterior (1.27 ± 0.92 cm; range, 0.24-3.58 cm) borders of level I, respectively. In 80% of patients, tumor extension was seen outside the caudal border of level II (1.36 ± 1.0 cm, range, 0.27-3.86 cm), and 0% to 33% of patients had tumor extension outside the remaining borders of all levels. Conclusions: To cover 95% of lymph nodes at the cranial and anterior borders of level I, an additional clinical target volume margin of 3.78 cm and 3.11 cm, respectively, is necessary. The RTOG guidelines may be insufficient for coverage of axillary disease in patients with clinical nodal involvement who are undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, incomplete axillary dissection, or treatment with intensity modulated radiation therapy. In patients with pretreatment diagnostic CT chest scans, fusion with

  8. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. Methods The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV and high (18 MV beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. Results The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively. For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%: GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. Conclusion The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid

  9. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV) and high (18 MV) beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees) gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees) to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD) of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively). For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%): GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid Quality Assurance tool for the verification of RapidArc fields

  10. Application of Steenbeck's minimum principle for three-dimensional modelling of DC arc plasma torches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, physical/mathematical models for the three-dimensional, quasi-steady modelling of the plasma flow and heat transfer inside a non-transferred DC arc plasma torch are described in detail. The Steenbeck's minimum principle (Finkelnburg W and Maecker H 1956 Electric arcs and thermal plasmas Encyclopedia of Physics vol XXII (Berlin: Springer)) is employed to determine the axial position of the anode arc-root at the anode surface. This principle postulates a minimum arc voltage for a given arc current, working gas flow rate, and torch configuration. The modelling results show that the temperature and flow fields inside the DC non-transferred arc plasma torch show significant three-dimensional features. The predicted anode arc-root attachment position and the arc shape by employing Steenbeck's minimum principle are reasonably consistent with experimental observations. The thermal efficiency and the torch power distribution are also calculated in this paper. The results show that the thermal efficiency of the torch always ranges from 30% to 45%, i.e. more than half of the total power input is taken away by the cathode and anode cooling water. The special heat transfer mechanisms at the plasma-anode interface, such as electron condensation, electron enthalpy and radiative heat transfer from the bulk plasma to the anode inner surface, are taken into account in this paper. The calculated results show that besides convective heat transfer, the contributions of electron condensation, electron enthalpy and radiation to the anode heat transfer are also important (∼30% for parameter range of interest in this paper). Additional effects, such as the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium plasma state near the electrodes, the transient phenomena, etc, need to be considered in future physical/mathematical models, including corresponding measurements

  11. ARC length control for plasma welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  12. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  13. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the VMAT case

    CERN Document Server

    Balvert, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. This model was presented for the single map case in a companion paper (Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the single map case). The resulting large-scale, non-convex optimization problem was solved using a heuristic approach. The single-map approach cannot directly be applied to the full arc case due to the large increase in model size, the issue of allocating delivery times to each of the arc segments, and the fact that the ending leaf positions for one map will be the starting leaf positions for the next map. In this article the method proposed in \\cite{dm1} is extended to solve the full map treatment planning problem. We test ...

  14. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  15. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  16. FASTER MUSE CSP ARC CONSISTENCY ALGORITHMS

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Mary P.; White, Christopher M.; Helzerman, Randall A.; Hockema, Stephen A.

    1997-01-01

    MUSE CSP (Multiply SEgmented Constraint Satisfaction Problem) [5, 61 is an extension to the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) which is especially useful for problems that segment into riultiple instances of CSP that share variables. In Belzerman and Harper [6], the concepts of MUSE node, arc, and path consistency were defined and algorithms for MUSE arc consistency, MUSE AC-1, and MUSE path consistency were developed. MUSE AC-1 is similar to the CSP arc consistency algorithm AC-4 [ l j ] ...

  17. Effect of Gravity on Arc Shape in GTA Welding-for Low Electric Arc Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidetoshi FUJII; Yosuke SUMI; Manabu TANAKA; Kiyoshi NOGI

    2003-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding was performed both in a microgravity environment and in a terrestrial environment,and the arc shapes in both environments were compared. A microgravity condition was obtained using the free fallsystem at the Japan Microgravi

  18. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  19. MO-C-BRD-01: SBRT I: Overview of Simulation, Planning, and Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SBRT is having a dramatic impact on radiation therapy of early-stage, locally advanced cancers. Treatment planning of SBRT is characterized by precise target volume delineation, highly conformal dose distribution, sharp dose gradient outside the target volume, and meticulous tumor motion management. Stringent dose volume constraints of SBRT require the treatment planning to be highly personalized. Not only the complete patient's medical information (anatomy, tumor size/shape/location/motion, breathing pattern, health status) should be taken into consideration during planning, but also a wide range of factors including imaging techniques (imaging modality, breathing control, immobilization, patient position, etc.), treatment planning techniques (3D-conformal, dynamic conformal arcs, IMRT, VMAT, etc.), image guidance techniques (CBCT, orthogonal X-Ray, fiducial marker tracking, fluoroscopy, etc.), and delivery techniques (FFF, gating, tracking, etc.). In addition, potential pitfalls may exist in SBRT techniques and processes, such as target volume error in 4DCT and image registration error in image guidance. How to manage these affecting factors to achieve optimal, personalized SBRT treatment plans remains a great challenge. In this proposal, we will review technologies, share experiences, and discuss strategies concerning SBRT simulation, planning, and delivery. Learning Objectives: Understand requirements and challenges of SBRT treatment planning Discuss information-driven strategies of developing optimal SBRT plans Discuss practical considerations and potential pitfalls of SBRT treatment planning

  20. MO-C-BRD-01: SBRT I: Overview of Simulation, Planning, and Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Wijesooriya, K [University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    SBRT is having a dramatic impact on radiation therapy of early-stage, locally advanced cancers. Treatment planning of SBRT is characterized by precise target volume delineation, highly conformal dose distribution, sharp dose gradient outside the target volume, and meticulous tumor motion management. Stringent dose volume constraints of SBRT require the treatment planning to be highly personalized. Not only the complete patient's medical information (anatomy, tumor size/shape/location/motion, breathing pattern, health status) should be taken into consideration during planning, but also a wide range of factors including imaging techniques (imaging modality, breathing control, immobilization, patient position, etc.), treatment planning techniques (3D-conformal, dynamic conformal arcs, IMRT, VMAT, etc.), image guidance techniques (CBCT, orthogonal X-Ray, fiducial marker tracking, fluoroscopy, etc.), and delivery techniques (FFF, gating, tracking, etc.). In addition, potential pitfalls may exist in SBRT techniques and processes, such as target volume error in 4DCT and image registration error in image guidance. How to manage these affecting factors to achieve optimal, personalized SBRT treatment plans remains a great challenge. In this proposal, we will review technologies, share experiences, and discuss strategies concerning SBRT simulation, planning, and delivery. Learning Objectives: Understand requirements and challenges of SBRT treatment planning Discuss information-driven strategies of developing optimal SBRT plans Discuss practical considerations and potential pitfalls of SBRT treatment planning.

  1. Major arcs for Goldbach's problem

    OpenAIRE

    Helfgott, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The ternary Goldbach conjecture states that every odd number $n\\geq 7$ is the sum of three primes. The estimation of the Fourier series $\\sum_{p\\leq x} e(\\alpha p)$ and related sums has been central to the study of the problem since Hardy and Littlewood (1923). Here we show how to estimate such Fourier series for $\\alpha$ in the so-called major arcs, i.e., for $\\alpha$ close to a rational of small denominator. This is part of the author's proof of the ternary Goldbach conjecture. In contrast ...

  2. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  3. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  4. Performance tracking under ARCS contracts. Directive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The directive discusses the development of a non-resource intensive method for reporting performance based work allocation results under the ARCS (Alternative Remedial Contracting Strategy) contractors

  5. Generalized hyperfocused arcs in $PG(2,p)$

    OpenAIRE

    Blokhuis, A Aart; Marino, G.; Mazzocca, F.

    2013-01-01

    A {\\em generalized hyperfocused arc} $\\mathcal H $ in $PG(2,q)$ is an arc of size $k$ with the property that the $k(k-1)/2$ secants can be blocked by a set of $k-1$ points not belonging to the arc. We show that if $q$ is a prime and $\\mathcal H$ is a generalized hyperfocused arc of size $k$, then $k=1,2$ or 4. Interestingly, this problem is also related to the (strong) cylinder conjecture [Ball S.: The polynomial method in Galois geometries, in Current research topics in Galois geometry, Chap...

  6. Micro-arcing and arc erosion minimization using a DC hybrid switching device

    OpenAIRE

    Swingler, J.; McBride, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid switching devices utilize the advantages of both conventional electrical contacts and solid state electronics to minimize arcing during opening and closing operations. This can result in higher reliability and reduces the need for high cost specialist contact materials. The hybrid switch does not eliminate arcing completely, due to the inductive nature of circuits; micro-arcing is known to occur. An experimental dc hybrid switching device is introduced which minimizes arcing for 42 ...

  7. TH-C-12A-01: Develop a Patient-Specific QA Program for Radiation Therapy with On-Board MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work describes development of the first patient-specific quality assurance (QA) program for magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT). Methods: The program consisted of following components: 1) multipoint ionization chamber (IC) measurement using a 15 cm3 cubic phantom, 2) 2D stacked radiographic film dosimetry using a 30×30×20 cm3 phantom with multiple inserted ICs, 3) 3D ArcCHECK measurement with a centrally inserted IC, 4) machine delivery file verification, 5) 3D Monte-Carlo dose re-calculation with machine delivery file and phantom CT, 6) 2-head mode delivery validation in case of a malfunctioning head, and 7) independent beam-on time calculation for non-IMRT fields. Both ADCL calibrated ICs and ArcCHECK were MRI compatible. Experimental data were analyzed for the first 10 patients treated at our institution. Results: The customized phantoms allowed measuring multiple points with ICs in one delivery. Absolute IC measurements were all within 3% in all phantom geometry/shape/material combinations. Despite known uncertainty associated with film dosimetry, passing rates greater than 90% were achieved in both absolute and composite modes using TG-129 criteria. Due to the simultaneous irradiation by three radiation sources, ArcCHECK was used as a 3D relative dosimeter with angular and energy dependences uncorrected. 95–100% passing rates were obtained and the centrally inserted IC measurement assured that the overall dose normalization was within 3%. Machine delivery file verification and MC recalculated dose to the phantom results showed 98–100% passing rates, providing opportunity of moving from gamma passing rates to patient DVHbased QA metrics. Same results were obtained for the 2-head delivery mode. Manual beam-on time calculation for non-IMRT fields showed better than 5% agreement. Conclusion: We have successfully developed the first MRIGRT patient specific QA program by adopting experimental and computational dosimetry

  8. Intracerebral delivery of 5-iodo-2 '-deoxyuridine in combination with synchrotron stereotactic radiation for the therapy of the F98 glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-enhanced synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy takes advantage of the radiation dose-enhancement produced by high-Z elements when irradiated with mono-energetic beams of synchrotron X-rays. In this study it has been investigated whether therapeutic efficacy could be improved using a thymidine analogue, 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUdR), as a radio-sensitizing agent. IUdR was administered intra-cerebrally over six days to F98 glioma-bearing rats using Alzet osmotic pumps, beginning seven days after tumor implantation. On the 14. day, a single 15 Gy dose of 50 keV synchrotron X-rays was delivered to the brain. Animals were followed until the time of death and the primary endpoints of this study were the mean and median survival times. The median survival times for irradiation alone, chemotherapy alone or their combination were 44, 32 and 46 days, respectively, compared with 24 days for untreated controls. Each treatment alone significantly increased the rats' survival in comparison with the untreated group. Their combination did not, however, significantly improve survival compared with that of X-irradiation alone or chemotherapy alone. Further studies are required to understand why the combination of chemoradiotherapy was no more effective than X-irradiation alone. (authors)

  9. Dosimetric study of thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiotherapy using RapidArc combined with active breathing coordinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare and analyze the dosimetric characteristics of the intensity-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) combined with active breathing coordinator (ABC) in the thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiation therapy. Methods: Ten thoracic esophageal carcinoma patients undergoing radiotherapy were selected for this study. The CT simulations were performed under three breath patterns respectively: moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC aid; Set the trigger threshold to 80% of the peak of the respiration curve; and free breathing (FB). Based on the corresponding CT image sets, three treatment plans were generated for each patient respectively: Arc-ABC (three small arcs), Arc-FB (consisted of two coplanar full arcs) and IMRT-FB plan. The following dosimetric parameters were compared among different plans: D2%, D98%, V95, homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (CI) the percentage of volume receiving dose of over x Gy (Vx), monitor unit (MU), control points and treatment time. Results: The planning target volume (PTV) of FB was 376 cm3 which decreased to 260 cm3 after using ABC. For mDIBH and FB patients, the total lung volumes were 5964.6 cm3 (35% more than FB) and 3838.8 cm3 respectively; the heart volumes were 524.4 cm3 and 642.7 cm3 respectively. No significant difference was observed among Arc-ABC, IMRT-FB and Arc-FB in terms of D2, D98, V95, CI and HI.For Arc-ABC plans,there were significant decreases of radiation dose in total-lung's V10, V20, V30, V40 and mean lung dose (F=4.38, 5.34, 4.07, 3.89, 4.28, P<0.05). Various dose decreases of heart V20, V3, V40, Dmean and spinal cord Dmax were observed,yet no statistically significant difference existed. The MUs and total control points of Arc-ABC plans were significantly lower than other plans (F=26.86, 12.56, P<0.05). Conclusions: When thoracic esophageal carcinoma patients were treated with radiotherapy, the combined utilization of RapidArc and ABC can potentially decrease the volume of

  10. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug...

  11. An EPID-based method for comprehensive verification of gantry, EPID and the MLC carriage positional accuracy in Varian linacs during arc treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; McGarry, Conor; Barnes, Michael P.; Sabet, Mahsheed; Ebert, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Background]In modern radiotherapy, it is crucial to monitor the performance of all linac components including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method has been introduced in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems during arc treatments with the aim of ensuring the accuracy of linac mechanical performance. Methods The Varian EPID sag, gantry sag, chang...

  12. Analysis of radial energy loss in an arc heater channel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, J.; Jakubová, I.; Šenk, J.; Mašláni, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2009), s. 179-188. ISSN 1093-3611. [European High Temperature Plasma Processes (HTPP)/10th./. Patras (Patras University), 07.07.2008-11.07.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : arc heater * argon * radiation * experiment * mathematical model Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.333, year: 2009 http://www.begellhouse.com/journals/57d172397126f956,4e2a92412d8c6bb5,161d9fdc35c6e905.html

  13. Some experiences from the commissioning program of the SLC arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLC Arc System is designed to transport beams of electrons and positrons from the end of the SLAC Linac to the beginning of the Final Focus System where they are made to collide head on. To minimize phase space dilution caused by quantum processes in the synchrotron radiation energy loss mechanism, the bending radii are large (279 m) and very high gradient (n = 32824) AG cells are arranged in trains of low dispersion, terrain following achromats. First experiences in operating a system of over 900 magnets, each with beam position monitors and corrector magnet movers, spanning 9000 feet, are described

  14. Nonthermal radio emission from the galactic center arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusef-zadeh, F.; Morris, M.; Slee, O.B.; Nelson, G.J.

    1986-11-01

    Observations at three frequencies - 160 MHz, 327 MHz, and 4.8 GHz - of the continuum arc near the galactic center are presented and discussed. A map of the 160 MHz radio continuum and another of the polarized 4.8 GHz emission indicate clearly that nonthermal processes are responsible for the emission arising from one limited segment of the arc: that arising from G0.16-0.15, a broad intensity maximum situated on the southern half of the system of parallel filaments oriented perpendicular to the galactic plane. Other portions of this vertical system of filaments have radio characteristics consistent with thermal emission. A model is developed in which the filaments forming the core of the arc are uniformly nonthermal emitters, but are surrounded by a nonuniform distribution of thermal plasma which preferentially absorbs low-frequency radiation, thus flattening the nonthermal spectrum, and depolarizes the nonthermal emission from the filaments everywhere except in the vicinity of G0.16-0.15. 23 references.

  15. Nonthermal radio emission from the galactic center arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations at three frequencies - 160 MHz, 327 MHz, and 4.8 GHz - of the continuum arc near the galactic center are presented and discussed. A map of the 160 MHz radio continuum and another of the polarized 4.8 GHz emission indicate clearly that nonthermal processes are responsible for the emission arising from one limited segment of the arc: that arising from G0.16-0.15, a broad intensity maximum situated on the southern half of the system of parallel filaments oriented perpendicular to the galactic plane. Other portions of this vertical system of filaments have radio characteristics consistent with thermal emission. A model is developed in which the filaments forming the core of the arc are uniformly nonthermal emitters, but are surrounded by a nonuniform distribution of thermal plasma which preferentially absorbs low-frequency radiation, thus flattening the nonthermal spectrum, and depolarizes the nonthermal emission from the filaments everywhere except in the vicinity of G0.16-0.15. 23 references

  16. Emission Spectroscopic Measurements with an Optical Probe in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Raiche, George A.; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Hui, Frank C. L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical probe was designed to measure radiation (from inside the arc heater) incident on a test sample immersed in the arc-heated stream. Currently, only crude estimates are available for this incident radiation. Unlike efforts of the past, where the probe line of sight was inclined to the nozzle centerline, the present development focuses on having the probe line of sight coincide with the nozzle centerline. A fiber-coupled spectrometer was used to measure the spectral distribution of incident radiation in the wavelength range of 225 to 900 nm. The radiation heat flux in this wavelength range was determined by integration of measured emission spectral intensity calibrated to incident irradiance from an integrating sphere. Two arc-heater conditions, corresponding to stream bulk enthalpy levels of 12 and 22 MJ/kg, were investigated in the 13-inch diameter nozzle of the Interaction Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. With the probe placed at a distance of 10 inches from the nozzle exit plane, total radiative heat fluxes were measured to be 3.3 and 8.4 W/sq cm for the 12 and 22 MJ/kg conditions, respectively. About 17% of these radiative fluxes were due to bound-bound radiation from atoms and molecules, while the remaining 83% could be attributed to continua (bound-free and/or free-free). A comparison with spectral simulation based on CFD solutions for the arc-heater flow field and with spectroscopic measurements in the plenum region indicates that more than 95% of the measured radiation is generated in the arc region. The total radiative heat flux from the line radiation could increase by a factor of two through contributions from wavelengths outside the measured range, i.e., from the vacuum ultraviolet (wavelengths less than 225 nm) and the infrared (wavelengths greater than 900 nm). An extrapolation of the continuum radiation to these two wavelength regions was not attempted. In the tested configuration, the measured radiative heat flux accounts for

  17. SU-E-J-269: Assessing the Precision of Dose Delivery in CBCT-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung and Soft Tissue Metastatic Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, S; Dalhart, A; Chen, C; Parsai, E; Pearson, D; Sperling, N; Reddy, K [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ensuring reproducibility of target localization is critical to accurate stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) for lung and soft tissue metastatic lesions. To characterize interfraction variability in set-up and evaluate PTV margins utilized for SBRT, daily CBCTs were used to calculate delivered target and OAR doses compared to those expected from planning. Methods: CBCT images obtained prior to each fraction of SBRT for a lung and thyroid metastatic lesion were evaluated. The target CTV/ITV and OARs on each of 8 CBCT data sets were contoured. Using MIM fusion software and Pinnacle{sup 3} RTP system, delivered dose distribution was reconstructed on each CBCT, utilizing translational shifts performed prior to treatment. Actual delivered vs. expected doses received by target CTV/ITV and adjacent critical structures were compared to characterize accuracy of pre-treatment translational shifts and PTV margins. Results: The planned CTV/ITV D95% and V100% were 4595cGy and 91.47% for the lung lesion, and 3010cGy and 96.34% for the thyroid lesion. Based on CBCT analysis, actual mean D95% and V100% for lung ITV were 4542±344.4cGy and 91.54±3.45%; actual mean D95% and V100% for thyroid metastasis CTV were 3005±25.98cGy and 95.20±2.522%. For the lung lesion, ipsilateral lung V20, heart V32 (cc) and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 110.15cc, 3.33cc, and 1680cGy vs. 110.27±14.79cc, 6.74±3.76cc, and 1711±46.56cGy for planned vs. delivered doses, respectively. For the thyroid metastatic lesion, esophagus V18, trachea (.03 cc) max, and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 0.35cc, 2555cGy, and 850cGy vs. 0.16±0.13cc, 2147±367cGy, and 838±45cGy for planned vs. delivered treatments, respectively. Conclusion: Minimal variability in SBRT target lesion dose delivered based on pre-treatment CBCT-based translational shifts suggests tighter PTV margins may be considered to further decrease dose to surrounding critical structures. Guidelines for optimal target alignment during

  18. SU-E-J-81: Interplay Effect in Non-Gated Dynamic Treatment Delivery of a Lung Phantom with Simulated Respiratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, V; Fagerstrom, J; Bayliss, A; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interplay effect in non-gated VMAT external beam delivery using realistic, clinically relevant 3D motion in an anthropomorphic lung phantom, and to determine if adding margins is sufficient to account for motion or if gating is required in all cases. Methods: A 4D motion stage was used to move a Virtual Water (VW) lung target containing a piece of radiochromic EBT3 film in an anthropomorphic chest phantom. A five-arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment was planned using a CT scan of the phantom in its stationary position, using planning parameters chosen to push the optimizer to achieve a highly-modulated plan. Two scenarios were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam: the first was delivered with the phantom and target both stationary and the second was delivered with the phantom stationary but the target moving in a realistic, irregular 3D elliptical pattern. A single piece of 4×4 cm{sup 2} film was used per fraction, located in the central coronal plane of the target. Film was calibrated on a 6 MV beam with dose values from 0.20 to 20 Gy. Results: Preliminary test films were analyzed in ImageJ and MatLab software. Dose maps were calculated on a central region of interest (ROI) delineated on both the motion-induced and stationary films. Both static and dynamic film dose maps agreed with planning values within acceptable uncertainty. Conclusion: Including a large number of arcs in a clinically realistic SBRT treatment could reduce the effect of motion interplay due to averaging. Because all clinics do not employ multiple arcs for SBRT lung treatments, it is still important to consider the effects of motion on treatment delivery. Further analysis on the treatment films, as well as a broader investigation other planning parameters, will be conducted.

  19. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer: a treatment planning comparison with fixed Beam IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Mok, E; Wang, L; Chen, C; Le, Q-T

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the dose distribution, monitor units (MUs) and radiation delivery time between volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) and fix-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (FB-IMRT) in skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer (HNC). CT datasets of 8 skull-base and 7 non-skull-base HNC were identified. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated. The prescription dose ranged 45-70 Gy (1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction). The VMAT delivery time was measured when these plans were delivered to the patients. The FB-IMRT delivery time was generated on a phantom. Comparison of dose-volume histogram data, MUs, and delivery times was performed using T-test. Our results show that both plans yield similar target volume coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. In skull-base cases, compared to FB-IMRT, VMAT generated significantly smaller hot-spot inside PTV (2.0% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.031), lower maximum chiasm dose (32 ± 11 Gy vs. 41 ± 15 Gy, p = 0.026), lower ipsilateral temporal-mandibular joint dose (D33: 41.4 Gy vs. 46.1 Gy, p = 0.016), lower mean ipsilateral middle ear dose (43 ± 9 Gy vs. 38 ± 10 Gy, p = 0.020) and a trend for lower optic nerve, temporal lobe, parotid, and oral cavity dose. In non-skull-base cases, doses to normal tissues were similar between the two plans. There was a reduction of 70% in MUs (486 ± 95 vs. 1614 ± 493, p VMAT. We conclude that VMAT appears to spare more normal tissues from high radiation dose for the tested skull-base tumors. Dosimetrically, both approaches were equivalent for non-skull-base tumor with VMAT using fewer MUs and shorter delivery time. PMID:22905805

  20. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  1. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  2. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F;

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto) I...

  3. Characterization of Micro-arc Oxidized Titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the sparkling discharges during the micro-arc oxidation process in KOH aqueous electrolyte was achieved. The change of surface morphology was progressively observed and a plausible pore formation mechanism is proposed. Cell proliferation and ALP activity of micro-arc oxidized titanium was evaluated by human body derived osteoblasts and slightly better than those of blasted surface.

  4. JEMMRLA - Electron Model of a Muon RLA with Multi-pass Arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Roblin, Yves R.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a demonstration experiment for a new concept of a 'dogbone' RLA with multi-pass return arcs -- JEMMRLA (Jlab Electron Model of Muon RLA). Such an RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was introduced for rapid acceleration of muons for the next generation of Muon Facilities. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Here we describe a test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected in the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available 1.5 GHz. The hardware requirements are not very demanding making it straightforward to implement. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration: in medical isotope production, radiation cancer therapy and homeland security.

  5. Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

  6. A real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool for patient specific VMAT QA and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool to identify and quantify sources of errors during patient specific volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery and quality assurance. Methods: The authors develop a VMAT delivery monitor tool called linac data monitor that connects to the linac in clinical mode and records, displays, and compares real time machine parameters with the planned parameters. A new measure, called integral error, keeps a running total of leaf overshoot and undershoot errors in each leaf pair, multiplied by leaf width, and the amount of time during which the error exists in monitor unit delivery. Another tool reconstructs Pinnacle3™ format delivered plan based on the saved machine logfile and recalculates actual delivered dose in patient anatomy. Delivery characteristics of various standard fractionation and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) VMAT plans delivered on Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs were quantified. Results: The MLC and gantry errors for all the treatment sites were 0.00 ± 0.59 mm and 0.05 ± 0.31°, indicating a good MLC gain calibration. Standard fractionation plans had a larger gantry error than SBRT plans due to frequent dose rate changes. On average, the MLC errors were negligible but larger errors of up to 6 mm and 2.5° were seen when dose rate varied frequently. Large gantry errors occurred during the acceleration and deceleration process, and correlated well with MLC errors (r= 0.858, p= 0.0004). PTV mean, minimum, and maximum dose discrepancies were 0.87 ± 0.21%, 0.99 ± 0.59%, and 1.18 ± 0.52%, respectively. The organs at risk (OAR) doses were within 2.5%, except some OARs that showed up to 5.6% discrepancy in maximum dose. Real time displayed normalized total positive integral error (normalized to the total monitor units) correlated linearly with MLC (r= 0.9279, p < 0.001) and gantry errors (r= 0.742, p= 0.005). There is a strong correlation between total integral

  7. Numerical Study on Arc Plasma Behavior During Arc Commutation Process in Direct Current Circuit Breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc plasma behavior during arc commutation process in a medium-voltage direct current circuit breaker (DCCB) contact system. A three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model of air arc plasma in the contact system of a DCCB is developed, based on commercial software FLUENT. Coupled electromagnetic and gas dynamic interactions are considered as usual, and a thin layer of nonlinear electrical resistance elements is used to represent the voltage drop of plasma sheath and the formation of new arc root. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in arc region are calculated. The simulation results indicate that the pressure distribution related to the contact system has a strong effect on the arc commutation process, arising from the change of electrical conductivity in the arc root region. In DCCB contact system, the pressure of arc root region will be concentrated and higher if the space above the moving contact is enclosed, which is not good for arc root commutation. However, when the region is opened, the pressure distribution would be lower and more evenly, which is favorable for the arc root commutation.

  8. Arc flash hazard analysis and mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Das, J C

    2012-01-01

    "All the aspects of arc flash hazard calculations and their mitigation have been covered. Knowledge of electrical power systems up to undergraduate level is assumed. The calculations of short-circuits, protective relaying and varied electrical system configurations in industrial power systems are addressed. Protection systems address differential relays, arc flash sensing relays, protective relaying coordination, current transformer operation and saturation and applications to major electrical equipments from the arc flash considerations. Current technologies and strategies for arc flash mitigation have been covered. A new algorithm for the calculation of arc flash hazard accounting for the decaying nature of the short-circuit currents is included. There are many practical examples and study cases. Review questions and references follow each chapter"--

  9. Sensor Control of Robot Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for using computer vision as sensory feedback for robot gas-tungsten arc welding is investigated. The basic parameters that must be controlled while directing the movement of an arc welding torch are defined. The actions of a human welder are examined to aid in determining the sensory information that would permit a robot to make reproducible high strength welds. Special constraints imposed by both robot hardware and software are considered. Several sensory modalities that would potentially improve weld quality are examined. Special emphasis is directed to the use of computer vision for controlling gas-tungsten arc welding. Vendors of available automated seam tracking arc welding systems and of computer vision systems are surveyed. An assessment is made of the state of the art and the problems that must be solved in order to apply computer vision to robot controlled arc welding on the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  10. Modeling and measurements of the arc plasma in a mixture of gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wall-stabilized arc is a useful source of the radiation emitted by excited atoms and ions. This plasma has been widely applied in the spectroscopic research, e. g. for measurements of atomic and ionic structure data, such as spectral line strengths or Stark shifts and widths. The wall-stabilized arc and similar plasma sources are also used in many other industrial and scientific applications - especially as the plasma generators in various plasma torches and jets. In most of the applications the plasma is generated in a mixture of gases. As the wall-stabilized cascade arc exhibits the rather strong temperature gradients, the diffusion effects due to the temperature and molar gradients (in the cases of the molecular gases) are prominent, and strongly affect the arc parameters. In this work we present the comparison of the results of the measurements of the plasma parameters in the wall-stabilized arc working in the mixture of argon and nitrogen with the theoretical calculations of the plasma temperatures and molar ratios. The gas mixture is introduced uniformly along the arc column between each of the stabilizing plates. From measured lateral distribution of radiation (NI, HI, ArI line intensity and width measurements), after Abel inversion the radial temperature and species distributions were obtained at various positions of the arc column. As the atomic lines can be measured only close to the plasma axis (the Boltzmann plot of the atomic argon or nitrogen lines is reliable only if the sufficiently highly excited states are present), for the measurement of the fringe temperatures the molecular spectroscopy was also performed (measurements of the bands of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecular ion). The model consisted of one-dimensional calculations of all plasma parameters (both temperature and demixing), based on the theory developed by Murphy. The results show that even the relatively simple model can predict the molecular ratio distributions in the gas

  11. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  12. Dosimetric benefit of DMLC tracking for conventional and sub-volume boosted prostate intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the dosimetric impact of uncompensated motion and motion compensation with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate intensity modulated arc therapy. Two treatment approaches were investigated; a conventional approach with a uniform radiation dose to the target volume and an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) boosted approach with an increased dose to a subvolume of the prostate. The impact on plan quality of optimizations with a leaf position constraint, which limited the distance between neighbouring adjacent MLC leaves, was also investigated. Deliveries were done with and without DMLC tracking on a linear acceleration with a high-resolution MLC. A cylindrical phantom containing two orthogonal diode arrays was used for dosimetry. A motion platform reproduced six patient-derived prostate motion traces, with the average displacement ranging from 1.0 to 8.9 mm during the first 75 s. A research DMLC tracking system was used for real-time motion compensation with optical monitoring for position input. The gamma index was used for evaluation, with measurements with a static phantom or the planned dose as reference, using 2% and 2 mm gamma criteria. The average pass rate with DMLC tracking was 99.9% (range 98.7–100%, measurement as reference), whereas the pass rate for untracked deliveries decreased distinctly as the average displacement increased, with an average pass rate of 61.3% (range 32.7–99.3%). Dose–volume histograms showed that DMLC tracking maintained the planned dose distributions in the presence of motion whereas traces with >3 mm average displacement caused clear plan degradation for untracked deliveries. The dose to the rectum and bladder had an evident dependence on the motion direction and amplitude for untracked deliveries, and the dose to the rectum was slightly increased for IPL boosted plans compared to conventional plans for anterior motion with large amplitude. In conclusion, optimization using a leaf position

  13. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Iris Z.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is to report 1) the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2) the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery. Materials and methods. Eleven VMAT plans were selected and modified using an in-house developed software. For each control point of a VMAT arc, MLC leaves with the highest speed (1.87-1.95 cm/s) were set to move at the maximal allowable speed (2.3 cm/s), which resulted in a leaf position difference of less than 2 mm. The modified plans were considered as ‘standard’ plans, and the original plans were treated as the ‘slowing MLC’ plans for simulating ‘standard’ plans with leaves moving at relatively lower speed. The measurement of each ‘slowing MLC’ plan using MapCHECK®2 was compared with calculated planar dose of the ‘standard’ plan with respect to absolute dose Van Dyk distance-to-agreement (DTA) comparisons using 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. Results All ‘slowing MLC’ plans passed the 90% pass rate threshold using 3%/3 mm criteria while one brain and three anal VMAT cases were below 90% with 2%/2 mm criteria. For ten out of eleven cases, DVH comparisons between ‘standard’ and ‘slowing MLC’ plans demonstrated minimal dosimetric changes in targets and organs-at-risk. Conclusions For highly modulated VMAT plans, pass rate threshold (90%) using 3%/3mm criteria is not sensitive in detecting MLC leaf errors that will not trigger the MLC leaf interlock. However, the consequential effects of non-beam hold MLC errors on target and OAR doses are negligible, which supports the reliability of current patient-specific IMRT quality assurance (QA) method for VMAT plans. PMID:27069458

  14. Role of arc mode in laser-metal active gas arc hybrid welding of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pulsed arc is more effective to improve the stability of laser-arc hybrid welding. • LCHW has the highest fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries. • Grain refinement depends on effective current of the arc. • LSHW has the most apparent vestige of texture components. • The microstructure and microtexture formation mechanisms were summarized. - Abstract: Arc mode plays an important role in joint characterizations of arc welding, but it has been seldom considered in laser-arc hybrid welding. This paper investigated the role of arc mode on laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding of mild steel. Three arc modes were employed, which were cold metal transfer (CMT), pulsed spray arc and standard short circuiting arc. Microtexture of the joints were observed and measured via electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) system to reveal the effect of arc mode on microstructure. Mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by tensile and Charpy V-notch impact tests. It was found that both the stability and mechanical properties of laser-CMT hybrid welding (LCHW) is the best, while those of laser-standard short circuiting arc welding (LSHW) is the worst. OM and EBSD results showed that the fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries in fusion zone decreases gradually in the sequence of LCHW, laser-pulsed spray arc welding and LSHW, while the mean grain size increases gradually. Finally, the microstructure formation mechanisms and the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties were summarized by the loss of alloying element and the stirring effect in molten pool

  15. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  16. Computer simulation to arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志芳; 李午申; 王迎娜

    2004-01-01

    The arc spraying process is divided into two stages: the first stage is atomization-spraying stream (ASS) and the second one is spraying deposition (SD). Then study status is described of both stages' physical model and corresponding controlling-equation. Based on the analysis of study status, the conclusion as follows is got. The heat and mass transfer models with two or three dimensions in ASS stage should be established to far deeply analyses the dynamical and thermal behavior of the overheat droplet. The statistics law of overheated droplets should be further studied by connecting simulation with experiments. More proper validation experiments should be designed for flattening simulation to modify the models in SD stage.

  17. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated Arc treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; PARK, SUNG KWANG; Kim, Jin Young; Kang, Young-Nam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were performed in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre study was conducted to find the most competent plan condition of mARC treatment and the usefulness of mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with the other Arc treatment plans such as Tomotherapy and RapidArc. In the case of m...

  18. SU-E-T-213: Initial Experience with VMAT Plan and Delivery Verification Using a DICOM-RT Framework and Linac Delivery Log Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R; Pompos, A; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Stojadinovic, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Mobius3D/MobiusFX (M3D/MFX), a commercial DICOM-RT based plan and delivery verification system, was used to compare calculated and delivered volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose distributions using TrueBeam delivery log files (TrajectoryLogs). Methods: M3D/MFX utilizes measured linac commissioning data to generate institution specific beam models for evaluating planned and delivered dose distributions. 30 RapidArc prostate plans and 30 head and neck SmartArc plans were used in this study. For every plan, CT images, contoured structure sets, RT-plan, and RT-dose files were exported to M3D, which recalculated the patients’ planning CT dose distributions using a collapsed-cone-convolutionsuperposition algorithm. MFX utilized the acquired TrajectoryLogs to compute patients’ delivered dose distributions based on actual treatment delivery parameters. The agreement between computed and delivered dose distributions was evaluated utilizing a (3%, 3mm) global 3D-gamma analysis and dose-volume histogram changes for targets and organs at risk. Results: Excellent 3D-gamma agreements were observed for all VMAT plans. On average, for computed and delivered RapidArc and SmartArc plans the gamma passing rates were (99.0%±1.4%) and (96.8%±1.8%), respectively. The average difference for primary target prescription dose percent-coverage between calculated and delivered plans was (− 0.09%±2.52%) for RapidArc and (−2.71%±4.62%) for SmartArc cases. Similarly, the planning target mean dose differences were (1.38%±0.96%) for RapidArc and (1.17%±0.72%) for SmartArc plans. For the prostate plans, the calculated and delivered variations of the maximum dose for a 2cc volume for bladder and rectum were (1.32%±1.26%) and (0.65%±1.44%), respectively. The spinal-cord 2cc maximum dose differences of (3.26%±1.68%) were observed for the SmartArc plans. Conclusions: Clinical quality assurance practice based on linac treatment log files for verification of delivered 3D

  19. SU-E-T-213: Initial Experience with VMAT Plan and Delivery Verification Using a DICOM-RT Framework and Linac Delivery Log Files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Mobius3D/MobiusFX (M3D/MFX), a commercial DICOM-RT based plan and delivery verification system, was used to compare calculated and delivered volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose distributions using TrueBeam delivery log files (TrajectoryLogs). Methods: M3D/MFX utilizes measured linac commissioning data to generate institution specific beam models for evaluating planned and delivered dose distributions. 30 RapidArc prostate plans and 30 head and neck SmartArc plans were used in this study. For every plan, CT images, contoured structure sets, RT-plan, and RT-dose files were exported to M3D, which recalculated the patients’ planning CT dose distributions using a collapsed-cone-convolutionsuperposition algorithm. MFX utilized the acquired TrajectoryLogs to compute patients’ delivered dose distributions based on actual treatment delivery parameters. The agreement between computed and delivered dose distributions was evaluated utilizing a (3%, 3mm) global 3D-gamma analysis and dose-volume histogram changes for targets and organs at risk. Results: Excellent 3D-gamma agreements were observed for all VMAT plans. On average, for computed and delivered RapidArc and SmartArc plans the gamma passing rates were (99.0%±1.4%) and (96.8%±1.8%), respectively. The average difference for primary target prescription dose percent-coverage between calculated and delivered plans was (− 0.09%±2.52%) for RapidArc and (−2.71%±4.62%) for SmartArc cases. Similarly, the planning target mean dose differences were (1.38%±0.96%) for RapidArc and (1.17%±0.72%) for SmartArc plans. For the prostate plans, the calculated and delivered variations of the maximum dose for a 2cc volume for bladder and rectum were (1.32%±1.26%) and (0.65%±1.44%), respectively. The spinal-cord 2cc maximum dose differences of (3.26%±1.68%) were observed for the SmartArc plans. Conclusions: Clinical quality assurance practice based on linac treatment log files for verification of delivered 3D

  20. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc(TM) deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to ≤± 5 deg. This restriction requires the treatment arc to be broken into multiple sectors such that the local MU fluctuation within each sector is reduced, thereby lowering the angular deviation of the segments during redistribution. The converted CDR plans were delivered with a single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was

  1. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A; Yu, Cedric X [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)], E-mail: cyu002@umaryland.edu

    2009-11-07

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc(TM) deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to {<=}{+-} 5 deg. This restriction requires the treatment arc to be broken into multiple sectors such that the local MU fluctuation within each sector is reduced, thereby lowering the angular deviation of the segments during redistribution. The converted CDR plans were delivered with a single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was

  2. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequently, three-dimensional (3D) conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT) plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI) treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI), which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN) which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI) which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD). Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p < 0.05). V5 and V20 show statistically significant improvement for the FFF-VMAT plans compared with 3D (p < 0.001). GI is improved for the FFF-VMAT and the non-coplanar VMAT plans (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively

  3. Propagation of back-arc extension into the arc lithosphere in the southern New Hebrides volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L.; Fabre, M.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M.; Fournier, M.

    2015-09-01

    New geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor in the southern part of the North Fiji Basin allow us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone, where it bends eastward along the Hunter Ridge. Unlike the northern end of the Tonga subduction zone, on the other side of the North Fiji Basin, the 90° bend does not correspond to the transition from a subduction zone to a transform fault, but it is due to the progressive retreat of the New Hebrides trench. The subduction trench retreat is accommodated in the upper plate by the migration toward the southwest of the New Hebrides arc and toward the south of the Hunter Ridge, so that the direction of convergence remains everywhere orthogonal to the trench. In the back-arc domain, the active deformation is characterized by propagation of the back-arc spreading ridge into the Hunter volcanic arc. The N-S spreading axis propagates southward and penetrates in the arc, where it connects to a sinistral strike-slip zone via an oblique rift. The collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides arc, less than two million years ago, likely initiated this deformation pattern and the fragmentation of the upper plate. In this particular geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a highly sheared volcanic arc, a wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas has been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction-related lavas.

  4. Impact of complexity and computer control on errors in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraass, B A

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent publications in both the lay and scientific press have described major errors in patient radiation treatments, and this publicity has galvanised much work to address and mitigate potential safety issues throughout the radiation therapy planning and delivery process. The complexity of modern radiotherapy techniques and equipment, including computer-controlled treatment machines and treatment management systems, as well as sophisticated treatment techniques that involve intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, respiratory gating, and others, leads to concern about safety issues related to that complexity. This article illustrates the relationship between complexity and computer control, and various safety problems and errors that have been reported, and describes studies that address the issue of these modern techniques and whether their complexity does, in fact, result in more errors or safety-related problems. Clinical implications of these results are discussed, as are some of the ways in which the field should respond to the ongoing concerns about errors and complexity in radiation therapy. PMID:23089018

  5. eDelivery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — eDelivery provides the electronic packaging and delivery of closed and complete OPM investigation files to government agencies, including USAID, in a secure manner....

  6. Verification of dose distribution for volumetric modulated arc therapy total marrow irradiation in a humanlike phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning studies have been reported to provide good target coverage and organs at risk (OARs) sparing in total marrow irradiation (TMI). A comprehensive dosimetric study simulating the clinical situation as close as possible is a norm in radiotherapy before a technique can be used to treat a patient. Without such a study, it would be difficult to make a reliable and safe clinical transition especially with a technique as complicated as VMAT-TMI. To this end, the dosimetric feasibility of VMAT-TMI technique in terms of treatment planning, delivery efficiency, and the most importantly three dimensional dose distribution accuracy was investigated in this study. The VMAT-TMI dose distribution inside a humanlike Rando phantom was measured and compared to the dose calculated using RapidArc especially in the field junctions and the inhomogeneous tissues including the lungs, which is the dose-limiting organ in TMI. Methods: Three subplans with a total of nine arcs were used to treat the planning target volume (PTV), which was determined as all the bones plus the 3 mm margin. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at 39 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated plan doses. Planar dose for each arc was verified using mapcheck. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of 0.5% (range: -4.3% and 6.6%) from the calculated dose in the junctions and in the inhomogeneous medium including the lungs. Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that RapidArc VMAT technique is dosimetrically accurate, safe, and efficient in delivering TMI within clinically acceptable time frame.

  7. NEW DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar Biresh K; Jain Devananda; Banerjee Angshu

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating an existing medicine into a new drug delivery system can significantly improve its performance in terms of efficacy, safety, and improved patient compliance. The need for delivering drugs to patients efficiently and with fewer side effects has prompted pharmaceutical companies to engage in the development of new drug delivery systems. Today, drug delivery companies are engaged in the development of multiple platform technologies for controlled release, delivery of large molecule...

  8. Characteristics of acoustic-controlled arc in ultrasonic wave-assisted arc%超声复合电弧声调控特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢伟峰; 范成磊; 杨春利; 林三宝; 张玉岐

    2015-01-01

    As a new welding method, ultrasound has been successfully introduced into the pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. However, the interaction mechanism between the ultrasound and the arc plasma is not clear, thus preventing the new technique from engineering applications. In this paper, the characteristic of arc regulation by external ultrasonic field is investigated based on the experimental data and the corresponding theory. In order to figure out the characteristics of arc, the arc images obtained by high-speed camera are processed. Compared with the conventional welding arc, ultrasonic wave-assisted arc is more contracted and becomes brighter, the high-temperature region in an arc column greatly expands, and there are internal particle agglomerations shaking up and down at a constant frequency. The arc shape varies with ultrasound excitation current and the height of ultrasonic radiator. In the vicinity of the resonance point, the straight-degree of the arc is the strongest and the ripple frequency is also the largest. Results show that the purpose of using external ultrasound field to regulate the thermal plasma has basically achieved. Analyzing the acoustic pressure wave equation for the neutral component shows that the spatial distribution of acoustic wave can be generated in the arc and its intensity is proportional to the local amplitude of acoustic waves. Acoustic pressure field can be calculated based on the dependence of the electron temperature and density on time and space. In addition to the action of acoustic field within the arc, the arc plasma is also controlled by the acoustic field structure. A two-cylinder model incorporating boundary element method is developed, establishing a relationship between the binding capability and the geometric parameters of an ultrasonic radiator with reference to wavelength. This model is successful in predicting resonant modes of the acoustic field and explaining the influences of the ultrasonic

  9. Comparing four volumetric modulated arc therapy beam arrangements for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compared four different volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam arrangements for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer examining plan quality and the impact on a radiotherapy department's resources. Twenty prostate cases were retrospectively planned using four VMAT beam arrangements (1) a partial arc (PA), (2) one arc (1A), (3) one arc plus a partial arc (1A + PA) and (4) two arcs (2A). The quality of the dose distributions generated were compared by examining the overall plan quality, the homogeneity and conformity to the planning target volume (PTV), the number of monitor units and the dose delivered to the organs at risk. Departmental resources were considered by recording the planning time and beam delivery time. Each technique produced a plan of similar quality that was considered adequate for treatment; though some differences were noted. The 1A, 1A + PA and 2A plans demonstrated a better conformity to the PTV which correlated to improved sparing of the rectum in the 60–70 Gy range for the 1A + PA and 2A techniques. The time needed to generate the plans was different for each technique ranging from 13.1 min for 1A + PA to 17.8 min for 1A. The PA beam delivery time was fastest with a mean time of 0.9 min. Beam-on times then increased with an increase in the number of arcs up to an average of 2.2 min for the 2A technique. Which VMAT technique is best suited for clinical implementation for the treatment of prostate cancer may be dictated by the individual patient and the availability of departmental resources

  10. Measurement of cathode surface temperature using the method of CCD imaging in arc discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-wavelength pyrometry device using ordinary array CCD (charge coupled device) to collect the radiation data in the horizontal and vertical directions has been developed for measuring the cathode surface temperature during the arc discharge. Analyses of experimental results show that the device can make the measurement of the cathode surface temperature feasible. The cathode surface temperatures measured are lower than the melting point of tungsten (3653 K), and the arc current, cathode diameter, and the cathode length are the main influencing factors of the cathode surface temperature.

  11. Investigation of Metal Puff Z pinch Based on Multichannel Vacuum Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Baksht, R. B.; Mitrofanov, K. N.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a metal double puff Z-pinch system has been studied experimentally. In this type of system, the outer and inner cylindrical shells were produced by ten plasma guns. Each gun initiates a vacuum arc operating between aluminum electrodes. The net current of the guns was 80 kA. The arc-produced plasma shells were compressed by using a 450-kA, 450-ns driver, and as a result, a plasma column 0.2 cm in diameter was formed. The power of the Al K-line radiation emitted by the plasma for 7 ns was 800 MW/cm.

  12. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response

  13. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorek, Daniel L.J., E-mail: dthorek1@jhmi.edu [Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Robin M. [Tri-Institutional Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve [Department of Medicine, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Ulmert, David [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Russell, James, E-mail: russellj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  14. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels;

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied with....... With the addition of a plasma arc, the hardness could overall be reduced to between 200 and 220 HV1, i.e. about 27 percent. In the seam middle, the reduction was 36 percent....

  15. Arc saw and its application to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arc saw is a toothless, circular saw that cuts by arc erosion. A model was built to study the arc saw's usefulness in cutting up radioactively contaminated metal scrap. It was chosen because it cuts with very little contact to the work piece and because cutting is not affected by material hardness. After installation of several improvements it was found it could cut almost any combination of metals and that clamping or fixturing requirements were minimum. Cutting proceeds rapidly and efficiently. 10 figures

  16. Nonlinear Study of Industrial Arc Spring Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said; Santos, Ilmar; Hartmann, Henning

    2011-01-01

    for varying the damping characteristics of the SFD as well as the dynamic forces acting on the SFD. Phase plane orbits together with Poincar´e maps are given for different arc spring damping and static and dynamic load cases. Besides, bifurcation diagrams as a function of the arc spring damping and...... forces acting on the SFD are presented. It is worth mentioning, that the maps and diagrams can be used as design guidance. Finally, a comparison between the numerical results and experimental result is facilitated in form of waterfall diagrams. For this, a full scale model of the arc-spring damper was...

  17. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  18. Formation of the G-ring arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  19. Arc pressure control in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relationships are established between the peak current of a pulsed, rectangular current waveform and the pulse current duty cycle under conditions of constant arc power. By appropriate choice of these interrelated parameters, it is shown that the arc pressure may be varied over a wide range even though the arc power is held constant. The methodology is suggested as a means of countering the effect of gravity in 5-G welding, while maintaining constant heat input to the weld. Combined with appropriate penetration sensors, the methodology is additionally suggested as a means of controlling penetration

  20. Formation of the G-ring arc

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, N C S; Foryta, D W

    2016-01-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  1. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick (/similar to/1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target (/similar to/1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs

  2. Developing a class solution for Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To develop a class solution for prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Materials and methods: Seven datasets were used to compare plans using one 360° arc (1FA), one 210° arc (1PA), two full arcs and two partial arcs. Subsequently using 1PA, fifteen datasets were compared using (i) 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, (ii) 8 mm CTV–PTV margins and (iii) including the proximal SV within the CTV. Monaco™ 3.2 (Elekta™) was used for planning with the Agility™ MLC system (Elekta™). Results: Highly conformal plans were produced using all four arc arrangements. Compared to 1FA, 1PA resulted in significantly reduced rectal doses, and monitor units and estimated delivery times were reduced in six of seven cases. Using 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, planning constraints were met for all fifteen datasets. Using 8 mm margins required relaxation of the uppermost bladder constraint in three cases to achieve adequate coverage, and, compared to 6 mm margins, rectal and bladder doses significantly increased. Including the proximal SV required relaxation of the uppermost bladder and rectal constraints in two cases, and rectal and bladder doses significantly increased. Conclusions: Prostate SABR VMAT is optimal using 1PA. 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, compatible with daily fiducial-based IGRT, are consistently feasible in terms of target objectives and OAR constraints

  3. NEW DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Biresh K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating an existing medicine into a new drug delivery system can significantly improve its performance in terms of efficacy, safety, and improved patient compliance. The need for delivering drugs to patients efficiently and with fewer side effects has prompted pharmaceutical companies to engage in the development of new drug delivery systems. Today, drug delivery companies are engaged in the development of multiple platform technologies for controlled release, delivery of large molecules, liposome, taste-masking, oral fast- dispersing dosage forms, technology for in- soluble drugs, and delivery of drugs through intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal, vaginal, colon, and transmucosal routes.

  4. Diagnosis of TIG welding based on ultraviolet radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhiyong; Gu Xiaoyan; Wang Bao

    2009-01-01

    Through collecting the radiation of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding arc, the radiation distribution in ultraviolet zone is analyzed in order to study the variation rule of ultraviolet radiation versus welding condition. The explanation for the variation is also provided bused on spectral radiation theory of arc light. Furthermore, through analysis of disturbanee factors, the integral intensity signal of radiation in ultraviolet zone is applied for diagnosis of welding process. The spectral signal of ultraviolet radiation can reflect the disturbance factors and welding conditions, which can be used for online diagnosis of welding process.

  5. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Seppala Jan; Suilamo Sami; Kulmala Jarmo; Mali Pekka; Minn Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the prob...

  6. Prostate treatments, 1MRT o RapidArc; Tratamiento de prostata, IMART o RapidArc?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro novais, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Pardo Perez, E.; Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Cerro Penalver, E.

    2015-07-01

    Techniques that modulate the dose (as IMRT or RapidArcTM) improve dose homogeneity within the target volume decreasing the dose in healthy organs. The aim of this work is to study the dosimetric differences in prostate radiotherapy treatments with IMRT and RapidArcTM. The results of the 109 patients studied show that plans to RapidArcTM have better coverage, compliance and dose gradient outside the target volume. (Author)

  7. Sitka, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  8. Sitka, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  9. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost. PMID:25638080

  10. Magneto-plasma-dynamic arc thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, J. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The performance of a magnetoplasmadynamic arc thruster, in the 600 to 2,100 seconds specific impulse range, was improved by locating its cathode in the exhaust beam downstream of the anode and main propellant injection point.

  11. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.;

    2015-01-01

    . Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed for......An alternating current (AC) gliding arc can be conveniently operated at atmospheric pressure and efficiently elongated into the ambient air by an air flow and thus is useful for surface modification. A high speed camera was used to capture dynamics of the AC gliding arc in the presence of polymer...... surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface...

  12. Archival Research Catalog (ARC) Archival Descriptions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The Archival Research Catalog (ARC) data set provides archival descriptions of the permanent holdings of the federal government in the custody of the National...

  13. Seward, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  14. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of benign skull-base tumors: a dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with Rapidarc® versus non-coplanar dynamic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Fanny; Magnier, Florian; Berger, Lucie; Miroir, Jessica; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre; Lapeyre, Michel; Biau, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign tumors of the skull base are a challenge when delivering radiotherapy. An appropriate choice of radiation technique may significantly improve the patient’s outcomes. Our study aimed to compare the dosimetric results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between non-coplanar dynamic arcs and coplanar volumetric modulated arctherapy (Rapidarc®). Methods Thirteen patients treated with Novalis TX® were analysed: six vestibular schwannomas, four pituitary adenomas and three m...

  15. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  16. Numerical predictions of railgun performance including the effects of ablation and arc drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, N. M.; Kerrisk, J. F.; Parker, J. V.

    Thermal radiation from plasma armatures in railguns may cause vaporization and partial ionization of the rail and insulator materials. This causes an increase in mass of the arc, which has an adverse effect on projectile velocity. Viscous drag on the arc also has a deleterious effect, particularly at high velocities. These loss mechanisms are modeled in the Los Alamos Railgun Estimator code. Simulations were performed and numerical results were compared with experimental data for a wide range of tests performed at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the Ling Temco Vought Aerospace and Defense Company, and the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin. The effects of ablation and arc drag on railgun performance are discussed. Parametric studies illustrate the effects of some design parameters on projectile velocity and launcher efficiency. Some strategies for reducing the effects of ablation are proposed.

  17. Dynamics of vaporization and dissociation during transient surface heating, with application to vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a model of vaporization and dissociation occurring as a result