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Sample records for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

  1. Phosphorus and nitrogen regulate arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Petunia hybrida.

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    Eva Nouri

    Full Text Available Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis, the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  2. DELLA proteins regulate arbuscule formation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Daniela S; Levy, Julien G; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J

    2013-12-17

    Most flowering plants are able to form endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this mutualistic association, the fungus colonizes the root cortex and establishes elaborately branched hyphae, called arbuscules, within the cortical cells. Arbuscule development requires the cellular reorganization of both symbionts, and the resulting symbiotic interface functions in nutrient exchange. A plant symbiosis signaling pathway controls the development of the symbiosis. Several components of the pathway have been identified, but transcriptional regulators that control downstream pathways for arbuscule formation are still unknown. Here we show that DELLA proteins, which are repressors of gibberellic acid (GA) signaling and function at the nexus of several signaling pathways, are required for arbuscule formation. Arbuscule formation is severely impaired in a Medicago truncatula Mtdella1/Mtdella2 double mutant; GA treatment of wild-type roots phenocopies the della double mutant, and a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) enables arbuscule formation in the presence of GA. Ectopic expression of della1-Δ18 suggests that DELLA activity in the vascular tissue and endodermis is sufficient to enable arbuscule formation in the inner cortical cells. In addition, expression of della1-Δ18 restores arbuscule formation in the symbiosis signaling pathway mutant cyclops/ipd3, indicating an intersection between DELLA and symbiosis signaling for arbuscule formation. GA signaling also influences arbuscule formation in monocots, and a Green Revolution wheat variety carrying dominant DELLA alleles shows enhanced colonization but a limited growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  3. Protocol: using virus-induced gene silencing to study the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Olsen, Anne; Johansen, Elisabeth;

    2010-01-01

    , the available PEBV-VIGS protocols are inadequate for studying genes involved in the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Here we describe a PEBV-VIGS protocol suitable for reverse genetics studies in pea of genes involved in the symbiosis with AMF and show its effectiveness in silencing genes...... involved in the early and late stages of AMF symbiosis....

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis induces strigolactone biosynthesis under drought and improves drought tolerance in lettuce and tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Lozano, J.M.; Aroca, R.; Zamarreno, A.M.; Molina, S.; Andreo Jimenez, B.; Porcel, R.; Garcia-Mina, J.M.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Lopez-Raez, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates drought stress in plants. However, the intimate mechanisms involved, as well as its effect on the production of signalling molecules associated with the host plant–AM fungus interaction remains largely unknown. In the present work, the effects of drou

  5. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Diesel Toxicity on Melilotus albus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ortega, H. A.; Alarcon, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.; Zavaleta-Mancera, H. A.

    2009-07-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) affect plant growth and development by limiting water absorption and nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been demonstrated to increase plant tolerance of grass species to PH, but the performance of AMF on legume species during phytorremediation of PH-contaminated soils has been scarcely understood. Thus, this research evaluated the effects of AMF on tolerance and growth of Melilotus albus in a diesel-contaminated soil. (Author)

  6. Carbon availability triggers fungal nitrogen uptake and transport in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellbaum, Carl R; Gachomo, Emma W; Beesetty, Yugandhar; Choudhari, Sulbha; Strahan, Gary D; Pfeffer, Philip E; Kiers, E Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-02-14

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, formed between the majority of land plants and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, is responsible for massive nutrient transfer and global carbon sequestration. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them against photosynthetically fixed carbon (C) from the host. Recent studies have demonstrated that reciprocal reward strategies by plant and fungal partners guarantee a "fair trade" of phosphorus against C between partners [Kiers ET, et al. (2011) Science 333:880-882], but whether a similar reward mechanism also controls nitrogen (N) flux in the AM symbiosis is not known. Using mycorrhizal root organ cultures, we manipulated the C supply to the host and fungus and followed the uptake and transport of N sources in the AM symbiosis, the enzymatic activities of arginase and urease, and fungal gene expression in the extraradical and intraradical mycelium. We found that the C supply of the host plant triggers the uptake and transport of N in the symbiosis, and that the increase in N transport is orchestrated by changes in fungal gene expression. N transport in the symbiosis is stimulated only when the C is delivered by the host across the mycorrhizal interface, not when C is supplied directly to the fungal extraradical mycelium in the form of acetate. These findings support the importance of C flux from the root to the fungus as a key trigger for N uptake and transport and provide insight into the N transport regulation in the AM symbiosis.

  7. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

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    Cinta Calvet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72 and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5 media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment.

  8. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences sulfur starvation responses of Medicago truncatula.

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    Sieh, Daniela; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Devers, Emanuel A; Brueckner, Franziska; Hoefgen, Rainer; Krajinski, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is a mutualistic interaction that occurs between the large majority of vascular plants and fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. In addition to other nutrients, sulfur compounds are symbiotically transferred from AM fungus to host plants; however, the physiological importance of mycorrhizal-mediated sulfur for plant metabolism has not yet been determined. We applied different sulfur and phosphate fertilization treatments to Medicago truncatula and investigated whether mycorrhizal colonization influences leaf metabolite composition and the expression of sulfur starvation-related genes. The expression pattern of sulfur starvation-related genes indicated reduced sulfur starvation responses in mycorrhizal plants grown at 1 mM phosphate nutrition. Leaf metabolite concentrations clearly showed that phosphate stress has a greater impact than sulfur stress on plant metabolism, with no demand for sulfur at strong phosphate starvation. However, when phosphate nutrition is high enough, mycorrhizal colonization reduces sulfur stress responses, probably as a result of symbiotic sulfur uptake. Mycorrhizal colonization is able to reduce sulfur starvation responses in M. truncatula when the plant's phosphate status is high enough that sulfur starvation is of physiological importance. This clearly shows the impact of mycorrhizal sulfur transfer on plant metabolism.

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis-mediated tomato tolerance to drought.

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    Chitarra, Walter; Maserti, Biancaelena; Gambino, Giorgio; Guerrieri, Emilio; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2016-07-01

    A multidisciplinary approach, involving eco-physiological, morphometric, biochemical and molecular analyses, has been used to study the impact of two different AM fungi, i.e. Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices, on tomato response to water stress. Overall, results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to drought in tomato with a different plant response depending on the involved AM fungal species. PMID:27359066

  10. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

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    Giovannetti Marco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis.

  11. Protein actors sustaining arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: underground artists break the silence.

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    Recorbet, Ghislaine; Abdallah, Cosette; Renaut, Jenny; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane

    2013-07-01

    The roots of most land plants can enter a relationship with soil-borne fungi belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota. This symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi belongs to the so-called biotrophic interactions, involving the intracellular accommodation of a microorganism by a living plant cell without causing the death of the host. Although profiling technologies have generated an increasing depository of plant and fungal proteins eligible for sustaining AM accommodation and functioning, a bottleneck exists for their functional analysis as these experiments are difficult to carry out with mycorrhiza. Nonetheless, the expansion of gene-to-phenotype reverse genetic tools, including RNA interference and transposon silencing, have recently succeeded in elucidating some of the plant-related protein candidates. Likewise, despite the ongoing absence of transformation tools for AM fungi, host-induced gene silencing has allowed knockdown of fungal gene expression in planta for the first time, thus unlocking a technological limitation in deciphering the functional pertinence of glomeromycotan proteins during mycorrhizal establishment. This review is thus intended to draw a picture of our current knowledge about the plant and fungal protein actors that have been demonstrated to be functionally implicated in sustaining AM symbiosis mostly on the basis of silencing approaches.

  12. Diversity and Spatial Structure of Belowground Plant–Fungal Symbiosis in a Mixed Subtropical Forest of Ectomycorrhizal and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S

    2014-01-01

    Plant–mycorrhizal fungal interactions are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems. While ectomycorrhizal plants and their fungi generally dominate temperate forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is common in the tropics. In subtropical regions, however, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants co-occur at comparable abundances in single forests, presumably generating complex community structures of root-associated fungi. To reveal root-associated fungal community structure in a mixed for...

  13. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti Marco; Balestrini Raffaella; Volpe Veronica; Guether Mike; Straub Daniel; Costa Alex; Ludewig Uwe; Bonfante Paola

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus...

  14. Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisserant, Emilie; Malbreil, Mathilde; Kuo, Alan; Kohler, Annegret; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Balestrini, Raffaella; Charron, Philippe; Duensing, Nina; Frei dit Frey, Nicolas; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Gilbert, Luz B; Handa, Yoshihiro; Herr, Joshua R; Hijri, Mohamed; Koul, Raman; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Krajinski, Franziska; Lammers, Peter J; Masclaux, Frederic G; Murat, Claude; Morin, Emmanuelle; Ndikumana, Steve; Pagni, Marco; Petitpierre, Denis; Requena, Natalia; Rosikiewicz, Pawel; Riley, Rohan; Saito, Katsuharu; San Clemente, Hélène; Shapiro, Harris; van Tuinen, Diederik; Bécard, Guillaume; Bonfante, Paola; Paszkowski, Uta; Shachar-Hill, Yair Y; Tuskan, Gerald A; Young, J Peter W; Young, Peter W; Sanders, Ian R; Henrissat, Bernard; Rensing, Stefan A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Corradi, Nicolas; Roux, Christophe; Martin, Francis

    2013-12-10

    The mutualistic symbiosis involving Glomeromycota, a distinctive phylum of early diverging Fungi, is widely hypothesized to have promoted the evolution of land plants during the middle Paleozoic. These arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) perform vital functions in the phosphorus cycle that are fundamental to sustainable crop plant productivity. The unusual biological features of AMF have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. The coenocytic hyphae host a community of hundreds of nuclei and reproduce clonally through large multinucleated spores. It has been suggested that the AMF maintain a stable assemblage of several different genomes during the life cycle, but this genomic organization has been questioned. Here we introduce the 153-Mb haploid genome of Rhizophagus irregularis and its repertoire of 28,232 genes. The observed low level of genome polymorphism (0.43 SNP per kb) is not consistent with the occurrence of multiple, highly diverged genomes. The expansion of mating-related genes suggests the existence of cryptic sex-related processes. A comparison of gene categories confirms that R. irregularis is close to the Mucoromycotina. The AMF obligate biotrophy is not explained by genome erosion or any related loss of metabolic complexity in central metabolism, but is marked by a lack of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and of genes involved in toxin and thiamine synthesis. A battery of mycorrhiza-induced secreted proteins is expressed in symbiotic tissues. The present comprehensive repertoire of R. irregularis genes provides a basis for future research on symbiosis-related mechanisms in Glomeromycota.

  15. The bifunctional plant receptor, OsCERK1, regulates both chitin-triggered immunity and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice.

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    Miyata, Kana; Kozaki, Toshinori; Kouzai, Yusuke; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Ishii, Kazuo; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Umehara, Yosuke; Miyamoto, Ayano; Kobae, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Kohki; Kaku, Hanae; Nishizawa, Yoko; Shibuya, Naoto; Nakagawa, Tomomi

    2014-11-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to threats from pathogenic microbes and thus developed an innate immune system to protect themselves. On the other hand, many plants also have the ability to establish endosymbiosis with beneficial microbes such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi or rhizobial bacteria, which improves the growth of host plants. How plants evolved these systems managing such opposite plant-microbe interactions is unclear. We show here that knockout (KO) mutants of OsCERK1, a rice receptor kinase essential for chitin signaling, were impaired not only for chitin-triggered defense responses but also for AM symbiosis, indicating the bifunctionality of OsCERK1 in defense and symbiosis. On the other hand, a KO mutant of OsCEBiP, which forms a receptor complex with OsCERK1 and is essential for chitin-triggered immunity, established mycorrhizal symbiosis normally. Therefore, OsCERK1 but not chitin-triggered immunity is required for AM symbiosis. Furthermore, experiments with chimeric receptors showed that the kinase domains of OsCERK1 and homologs from non-leguminous, mycorrhizal plants could trigger nodulation signaling in legume-rhizobium interactions as the kinase domain of Nod factor receptor1 (NFR1), which is essential for triggering the nodulation program in leguminous plants, did. Because leguminous plants are believed to have developed the rhizobial symbiosis on the basis of AM symbiosis, our results suggest that the symbiotic function of ancestral CERK1 in AM symbiosis enabled the molecular evolution to leguminous NFR1 and resulted in the establishment of legume-rhizobia symbiosis. These results also suggest that OsCERK1 and homologs serve as a molecular switch that activates defense or symbiotic responses depending on the infecting microbes. PMID:25231970

  16. Upscaling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Related Agroecosystems Services in Smallholder Farming Systems

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    Marjorie Bonareri Oruru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smallholder farming systems form unique ecosystems that can protect beneficial soil biota and form an important source of useful genetic resources. They are characterized by high level of agricultural diversity mainly focused on meeting farmers’ needs. Unfortunately, these systems often experience poor crop production mainly associated with poor planning and resource scarcity. Soil fertility is among the primary challenges faced by smallholder farmers, which necessitate the need to come up with affordable and innovative ways of replenishing soils. One such way is the use of microbial symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, a beneficial group of soil microbiota that form symbiotic associations with majority of cultivated crops and play a vital role in biological soil fertility, plant nutrition, and protection. AMF can be incorporated in smallholder farming systems to help better exploit chemical fertilizers inputs which are often unaffordable to many smallholder farmers. The present review highlights smallholder farming practices that could be innovatively redesigned to increase AMF symbiosis and related agroecosystem services. Indeed, the future of global food security depends on the success of smallholder farming systems, whose crop productivity depends on the services provided by well-functioning ecosystems, including soil fertility.

  17. Upscaling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Related Agroecosystems Services in Smallholder Farming Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruru, Marjorie Bonareri; Njeru, Ezekiel Mugendi

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming systems form unique ecosystems that can protect beneficial soil biota and form an important source of useful genetic resources. They are characterized by high level of agricultural diversity mainly focused on meeting farmers' needs. Unfortunately, these systems often experience poor crop production mainly associated with poor planning and resource scarcity. Soil fertility is among the primary challenges faced by smallholder farmers, which necessitate the need to come up with affordable and innovative ways of replenishing soils. One such way is the use of microbial symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a beneficial group of soil microbiota that form symbiotic associations with majority of cultivated crops and play a vital role in biological soil fertility, plant nutrition, and protection. AMF can be incorporated in smallholder farming systems to help better exploit chemical fertilizers inputs which are often unaffordable to many smallholder farmers. The present review highlights smallholder farming practices that could be innovatively redesigned to increase AMF symbiosis and related agroecosystem services. Indeed, the future of global food security depends on the success of smallholder farming systems, whose crop productivity depends on the services provided by well-functioning ecosystems, including soil fertility. PMID:26942194

  18. Upscaling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Related Agroecosystems Services in Smallholder Farming Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruru, Marjorie Bonareri; Njeru, Ezekiel Mugendi

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming systems form unique ecosystems that can protect beneficial soil biota and form an important source of useful genetic resources. They are characterized by high level of agricultural diversity mainly focused on meeting farmers' needs. Unfortunately, these systems often experience poor crop production mainly associated with poor planning and resource scarcity. Soil fertility is among the primary challenges faced by smallholder farmers, which necessitate the need to come up with affordable and innovative ways of replenishing soils. One such way is the use of microbial symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a beneficial group of soil microbiota that form symbiotic associations with majority of cultivated crops and play a vital role in biological soil fertility, plant nutrition, and protection. AMF can be incorporated in smallholder farming systems to help better exploit chemical fertilizers inputs which are often unaffordable to many smallholder farmers. The present review highlights smallholder farming practices that could be innovatively redesigned to increase AMF symbiosis and related agroecosystem services. Indeed, the future of global food security depends on the success of smallholder farming systems, whose crop productivity depends on the services provided by well-functioning ecosystems, including soil fertility. PMID:26942194

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of night warming on physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L.

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    Hu, Yajun; Wu, Songlin; Sun, Yuqing; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Caiyan; Lin, Ge; Chen, Baodong

    2015-02-01

    Elevated night temperature, one of the main climate warming scenarios, can have profound effects on plant growth and metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to the potential role of mycorrhizal associations in plant responses to night warming, although it is well known that symbiotic fungi can protect host plants against various environmental stresses. In the present study, physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L. in association with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis were investigated under simulated night warming. A constant increase in night temperature of 1.53 °C significantly reduced plant shoot and root biomass, flower and seed number, leaf sugar concentration, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. However, the AM association essentially mitigated these negative effects of night warming by improving plant growth, especially through increased root biomass, root to shoot ratio, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. A significant interaction was observed between R. irregularis inoculation and night warming in influencing both root sucrose concentration and expression of sucrose synthase (SusS) genes, suggesting that AM symbiosis and increased night temperature jointly regulated plant sugar metabolism. Night warming stimulated AM fungal colonization but did not influence arbuscule abundance, symbiosis-related plant or fungal gene expression, or growth of extraradical mycelium, indicating little effect of night warming on the development or functioning of AM symbiosis. These findings highlight the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis in assisting plant resilience to climate warming. PMID:25033924

  20. Enhanced production of steviol glycosides in mycorrhizal plants: a concerted effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on transcription of biosynthetic genes.

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    Mandal, Shantanu; Upadhyay, Shivangi; Singh, Ved Pal; Kapoor, Rupam

    2015-04-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) produces steviol glycosides (SGs)--stevioside (stev) and rebaudioside-A (reb-A) that are valued as low calorie sweeteners. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) augments SGs production, though the effect of this interaction on SGs biosynthesis has not been studied at molecular level. In this study transcription profiles of eleven key genes grouped under three stages of the SGs biosynthesis pathway were compared. The transcript analysis showed upregulation of genes encoding 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway enzymes viz.,1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phospate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phospate reductoisomerase (DXR) and 2-C-methyl-D-erytrithol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (MDS) in mycorrhizal (M) plants. Zn and Mn are imperative for the expression of MDS and their enhanced uptake in M plants could be responsible for the increased transcription of MDS. Furthermore, in the second stage of SGs biosynthesis pathway, mycorrhization enhanced the transcription of copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPPS) and kaurenoic acid hydroxylase (KAH). Their expression is decisive for SGs biosynthesis as CPPS regulates flow of metabolites towards synthesis of kaurenoid precursors and KAH directs these towards steviol synthesis instead of gibberellins. In the third stage glucosylation of steviol to reb-A by four specific uridine diphosphate (UDP)-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs) occurs. While higher transcription of all the three characterized UGTs in M plants explains augmented production of SGs; higher transcript levels of UGT76G1, specifically improved reb-A to stev ratio implying increased sweetness. The work signifies that AM symbiosis upregulates the transcription of all eleven SGs biosynthesis genes as a result of improved nutrition and enhanced sugar concentration due to increased photosynthesis in M plants. PMID:25734328

  1. Plant potassium content modifies the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on root hydraulic properties in maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mesbahi, Mohamed Najib; Azcón, Rosario; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aroca, Ricardo

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis helps the host plant to overcome several abiotic stresses including drought. One of the mechanisms for this drought tolerance enhancement is the higher water uptake capacity of the mycorrhizal plants. However, the effects of the AM symbiosis on processes regulating root hydraulic properties of the host plant, such as root hydraulic conductivity and plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression, and protein abundance, are not well defined. Since it is known that K(+) status is modified by AM and that it regulates root hydraulic properties, it has been tested how plant K(+) status could modify the effects of the symbiosis on root hydraulic conductivity and plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression and protein abundance, using maize (Zea mays L.) plants and Glomus intraradices as a model. It was observed that the supply of extra K(+) increased root hydraulic conductivity only in AM plants. Also, the different pattern of plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression and protein abundance between AM and non-AM plants changed with the application of extra K(+). Thus, plant K(+) status could be one of the causes of the different observed effects of the AM symbiosis on root hydraulic properties. The present study also highlights the critical importance of AM fungal aquaporins in regulating root hydraulic properties of the host plant. PMID:22370879

  2. Expanding Genomics of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

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    Alan eKuo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant and soil health, and carbon and nutrient cycles. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphological types (e.g. arbuscular [AM], ectomycorrhizal [ECM] in multiple fungal clades (e.g. phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota. The accessibility and culturability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first 3 mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing 3 fungal phyla and 2 mycorrhizal types. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolve through loss of plant-degrading enzymes (PDEs and expansion of lineage-specific gene families, including short secreted protein (SSP effectors and other symbiosis genes. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of gene families in contrast to Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other 2 fungi, the symbiosis can involve similar solutions as loss of PDEs and mycorrhiza-induced SSPs. The mycorrhizal community is building on these studies with 3 large-scale initiatives. The Mycorrhizal Genomics Initiative (MGI is sequencing 35 genomes of multiple fungal clades and mycorrhizal types for phylogenomic and population analyses. 17 MGI species whose symbiosis is reconstitutable in vitro are targeted for comprehensive transcriptomics of mycorrhiza formation. MGI genomes are seeding a set of 50+ reference fungal genomes for annotating metatranscriptomes sampled from 7 diverse well-described soil sites. These 3 projects address fundamental questions about the nature and role of a

  3. The role of carbon in fungal nutrient uptake and transport: implications for resource exchange in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellbaum, Carl R; Mensah, Jerry A; Pfeffer, Philip E; Kiers, E Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-11-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which forms between plant hosts and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, plays a key role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many economically important crop species. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them for photosynthetically fixed carbon from the host. While our understanding of the exact mechanisms controlling carbon and nutrient exchange is still limited, we recently demonstrated that (i) carbon acts as an important trigger for fungal N uptake and transport, (ii) the fungus changes its strategy in response to an exogenous supply of carbon, and that (iii) both plants and fungi reciprocally reward resources to those partners providing more benefit. Here, we summarize recent research findings and discuss the implications of these results for fungal and plant control of resource exchange in the AM symbiosis.

  4. Root endophyte symbiosis in vitro between the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Tricholoma matsutake and the arbuscular mycorrhizal plant Prunus speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Hitoshi; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Yokota, Satoru; Maruyama, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kohei; Ohira, Tatsuro; Neda, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported that Tricholoma matsutake and Tricholoma fulvocastaneum, ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes that associate with Pinaceae and Fagaceae, respectively, in the Northern Hemisphere, could interact in vitro as a root endophyte of somatic plants of Cedrela odorata (Meliaceae), which naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in South America, to form a characteristic rhizospheric colony or "shiro". We questioned whether this phenomenon could have occurred because of plant-microbe interactions between geographically separated species that never encounter one another in nature. In the present study, we document that these fungi formed root endophyte interactions and shiro within 140 days of inoculation with somatic plants of Prunus speciosa (=Cerasus speciosa, Rosaceae), a wild cherry tree that naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Japan. Compared with C. odorata, infected P. speciosa plants had less mycelial sheath surrounding the exodermis, and the older the roots, especially main roots, the more hyphae penetrated. In addition, a large number of juvenile roots were not associated with hyphae. We concluded that such root endophyte interactions were not events isolated to the interactions between exotic plants and microbes but could occur generally in vitro. Our pure culture system with a somatic plant allowed these fungi to express symbiosis-related phenotypes that varied with the plant host; these traits are innately programmed but suppressed in nature and could be useful in genetic analyses of plant-fungal symbiosis. PMID:24158697

  5. Diversity and spatial structure of belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in a mixed subtropical forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Toju

    Full Text Available Plant-mycorrhizal fungal interactions are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems. While ectomycorrhizal plants and their fungi generally dominate temperate forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is common in the tropics. In subtropical regions, however, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants co-occur at comparable abundances in single forests, presumably generating complex community structures of root-associated fungi. To reveal root-associated fungal community structure in a mixed forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants, we conducted a massively-parallel pyrosequencing analysis, targeting fungi in the roots of 36 plant species that co-occur in a subtropical forest. In total, 580 fungal operational taxonomic units were detected, of which 132 and 58 were probably ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal, respectively. As expected, the composition of fungal symbionts differed between fagaceous (ectomycorrhizal and non-fagaceous (possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants. However, non-fagaceous plants were associated with not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also several clades of ectomycorrhizal (e.g., Russula and root-endophytic ascomycete fungi. Many of the ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi were detected from both fagaceous and non-fagaceous plants in the community. Interestingly, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were concurrently detected from tiny root fragments of non-fagaceous plants. The plant-fungal associations in the forest were spatially structured, and non-fagaceous plant roots hosted ectomycorrhizal fungi more often in the proximity of ectomycorrhizal plant roots. Overall, this study suggests that belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in subtropical forests is complex in that it includes "non-typical" plant-fungal combinations (e.g., ectomycorrhizal fungi on possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants that do not fall within the conventional classification of mycorrhizal symbioses, and in

  6. Diversity and spatial structure of belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in a mixed subtropical forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S

    2014-01-01

    Plant-mycorrhizal fungal interactions are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems. While ectomycorrhizal plants and their fungi generally dominate temperate forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is common in the tropics. In subtropical regions, however, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants co-occur at comparable abundances in single forests, presumably generating complex community structures of root-associated fungi. To reveal root-associated fungal community structure in a mixed forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants, we conducted a massively-parallel pyrosequencing analysis, targeting fungi in the roots of 36 plant species that co-occur in a subtropical forest. In total, 580 fungal operational taxonomic units were detected, of which 132 and 58 were probably ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal, respectively. As expected, the composition of fungal symbionts differed between fagaceous (ectomycorrhizal) and non-fagaceous (possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal) plants. However, non-fagaceous plants were associated with not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also several clades of ectomycorrhizal (e.g., Russula) and root-endophytic ascomycete fungi. Many of the ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi were detected from both fagaceous and non-fagaceous plants in the community. Interestingly, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were concurrently detected from tiny root fragments of non-fagaceous plants. The plant-fungal associations in the forest were spatially structured, and non-fagaceous plant roots hosted ectomycorrhizal fungi more often in the proximity of ectomycorrhizal plant roots. Overall, this study suggests that belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in subtropical forests is complex in that it includes "non-typical" plant-fungal combinations (e.g., ectomycorrhizal fungi on possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants) that do not fall within the conventional classification of mycorrhizal symbioses, and in that

  7. Modelling Spatial Interactions in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis using the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagno, Cristina; Damiani, Ferruccio; Drocco, Maurizio; Sciacca, Eva; Spinella, Salvatore; Troina, Angelo; 10.4204/EPTCS.67.3

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Investigating this kind of symbiosis is considered one of the most promising ways to develop methods to nurture plants in more natural manners, avoiding the complex chemical productions used nowadays to produce artificial fertilizers. In previous work we used the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments (CWC) to investigate different phases of the AM symbiosis. In this paper, we continue this line of research by modelling the colonisation of the plant root cells by the fungal hyphae spreading in the soil. This study requires the description of some spatial interaction. Although CWC has no explicit feature modelling a spatial geometry, the compartment labelling feature can be effectively exploited to define a discrete surface topology outlining the relevant sectors which determine the spatial properties of the system under consideration. Different situations and interesting spatial properties can be modelled and analysed in such a ligh...

  8. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoqiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme, and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA, mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD. Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention.

  9. Evolutionary conservation of a phosphate transporter in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandashov, Vladimir; Nagy, Réka; Wegmüller, Sarah; Amrhein, Nikolaus; Bucher, Marcel

    2004-04-20

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae are ancient symbioses that are thought to have originated >400 million years ago in the roots of plants, pioneering the colonization of terrestrial habitats. In these associations, a key process is the transfer of phosphorus as inorganic phosphate to the host plant across the fungus-plant interface. Mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporter genes and their regulation are conserved in phylogenetically distant plant species, and they are activated selectively by fungal species from the phylum Glomeromycota. The potato phosphate transporter gene StPT3 is expressed in a temporally defined manner in root cells harboring various mycorrhizal structures, including thick-coiled hyphae. The results highlight the role of different symbiotic structures in phosphorus transfer, and they indicate that cell-cell contact between the symbiotic partners is required to induce phosphate transport.

  10. Extraradical development and contribution to plant performance of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis exposed to complete or partial rootzone drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Elke; Schmid, Barbara; Römheld, Volker; George, Eckhard

    2009-11-01

    Sweet potato plants were grown with or without Glomus intraradices in split-root pots with adjacent root compartments containing a soil with a low availability of phosphate. One fungal tube, from which root growth was excluded, was inserted into each root compartment. During 4 weeks before harvest, the soil moisture level in either both or only one of the two root-compartments of each pot was decreased. Controls remained well watered. Low soil moisture generally had a negative effect on the amount of extraradical mycelium of G. intraradices extracted from the fungal tubes. Sporulation in the fungal tubes was much higher compared with the soil in the root compartment, but remained unaffected by the soil moisture regime. Concentrations of P in extraradical mycelium were much lower than usually found in plants and fungi, while P concentrations in associated mycorrhizal host plant tissues were in an optimum range. This suggests efficient transfer of P from the extraradical mycelium to the host plant. Despite the negative effect of a low soil moisture regime on extraradical G. intraradices development, the symbiosis indeed contributed significantly to P uptake of plants exposed to partial rootzone drying. The possibility that extraradical arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal development was limited by P availability under dry soil conditions is discussed. PMID:19499252

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and active ingredients of medicinal plants: current research status and prospectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Guo, Lan-Ping; Chen, Bao-Dong; Hao, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Ji-Yong; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiu-Ming; Yang, Li; Wu, Zhao-Xiang; Chen, Mei-Lan; Zhang, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Medicinal plants have been used world-wide for thousands of years and are widely recognized as having high healing but minor toxic side effects. The scarcity and increasing demand for medicinal plants and their products have promoted the development of artificial cultivation of medicinal plants. Currently, one of the prominent issues in medicinal cultivation systems is the unstable quality of the products. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) affects secondary metabolism and the production of active ingredients of medicinal plants and thus influence the quality of herbal medicines. In this review, we have assembled, analyzed, and summarized the effects of AM symbioses on secondary metabolites of medicinal plants. We conclude that symbiosis of AM is conducive to favorable characteristics of medicinal plants, by improving the production and accumulation of important active ingredients of medicinal plants such as terpenes, phenols, and alkaloids, optimizing the composition of different active ingredients in medicinal plants and ultimately improving the quality of herbal materials. We are convinced that the AM symbiosis will benefit the cultivation of medicinal plants and improve the total yield and quality of herbal materials. Through this review, we hope to draw attention to the status and prospects of, and arouse more interest in, the research field of medicinal plants and mycorrhiza.

  12. Medicago truncatula and Glomus intraradices gene expression in cortical cells harboring arbuscules in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most vascular flowering plants have the capacity to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots where AM fungi colonize the root cortex and form arbuscules within the cortical cells. Arbuscules are enveloped in a novel plant membrane and their establishment requires the coordinated cellular activities of both symbiotic partners. The arbuscule-cortical cell interface is the primary functional interface of the symbiosis and is of central importance in nutrient exchange. To determine the molecular events the underlie arbuscule development and function, it is first necessary to identify genes that may play a role in this process. Toward this goal we used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array to document the M. truncatula transcript profiles associated with AM symbiosis, and then developed laser microdissection (LM of M. truncatula root cortical cells to enable analyses of gene expression in individual cell types by RT-PCR. Results This approach led to the identification of novel M. truncatula and G. intraradices genes expressed in colonized cortical cells and in arbuscules. Within the arbuscule, expression of genes associated with the urea cycle, amino acid biosynthesis and cellular autophagy was detected. Analysis of gene expression in the colonized cortical cell revealed up-regulation of a lysine motif (LysM-receptor like kinase, members of the GRAS transcription factor family and a symbiosis-specific ammonium transporter that is a likely candidate for mediating ammonium transport in the AM symbiosis. Conclusion Transcript profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array provided new insights into gene expression in M. truncatula roots during AM symbiosis and revealed the existence of several G. intraradices genes on the M. truncatula GeneChip®. A laser microdissection protocol that incorporates low-melting temperature Steedman's wax, was

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbiosis with Sorbus torminalis does not vary with soil nutrients and enzyme activities across different sites

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    Moradi M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of soil chemical properties on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF symbiosis with wild service tree (Sorbus torminalis L. Crantz were examined for study the rates of root colonization at three forest sites: Kheiroud, Lalis, and Takrin in northern Iran. Soil characteristics including pH, available phosphorus (P, potassium (K, organic matter, total nitrogen, acid and alkaline phosphatase activities, CaCO3, spore density (SD and AMF colonization of soil and root samples were analyzed. The study sites were investigated in spring and autumn to highlight the effects of soil chemical properties on AMF statues for better nurseries and reforestation management of this rare tree species in forests. Changes in soil pH, P, K, organic matter, total nitrogen, acid and alkaline phosphatase, CaCO3, SD, and AMF colonization of soil and root samples were analyzed at the study sites. K, pH, root colonization, SD and acid phosphatase activity showed no significant differences among sites in spring and autumn, while total nitrogen, P, organic matter and alkaline phosphatase activities showed significant differences among sites and seasons. AMF colonization rates were more than 51% and 32% of roots in spring and autumn, respectively. No correlation between root colonization and soil chemical parameters in spring and autumn were detected. There was no correlation between percentage of AM root colonization and SD nor other soil parameters in spring and autumn. SD and CaCO3 were significantly negatively correlated in spring and autumn. Despite differences in soil characteristics, the results showed that SD and root colonization were not significantly different among the sites. They also showed that wild service trees had strong symbiosis with AMF, while soil properties might not have a significant effect on this symbiosis. Therefore, colonized seedlings can be considered as an appropriated method for reforestation and conservation of this rare tree species.

  14. Cooperation through Competition-Dynamics and Microeconomics of a Minimal Nutrient Trade System in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Stephan; Valdebenito, Braulio; Bustos, Daniel; Gomez-Porras, Judith L; Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, fungi and plants exchange nutrients (sugars and phosphate, for instance) for reciprocal benefit. Until now it is not clear how this nutrient exchange system works. Here, we used computational cell biology to simulate the dynamics of a network of proton pumps and proton-coupled transporters that are upregulated during AM formation. We show that this minimal network is sufficient to describe accurately and realistically the nutrient trade system. By applying basic principles of microeconomics, we link the biophysics of transmembrane nutrient transport with the ecology of organismic interactions and straightforwardly explain macroscopic scenarios of the relations between plant and AM fungus. This computational cell biology study allows drawing far reaching hypotheses about the mechanism and the regulation of nutrient exchange and proposes that the "cooperation" between plant and fungus can be in fact the result of a competition between both for the same resources in the tiny periarbuscular space. The minimal model presented here may serve as benchmark to evaluate in future the performance of more complex models of AM nutrient exchange. As a first step toward this goal, we included SWEET sugar transporters in the model and show that their co-occurrence with proton-coupled sugar transporters results in a futile carbon cycle at the plant plasma membrane proposing that two different pathways for the same substrate should not be active at the same time. PMID:27446142

  15. Cooperation through Competition—Dynamics and Microeconomics of a Minimal Nutrient Trade System in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Stephan; Valdebenito, Braulio; Bustos, Daniel; Gomez-Porras, Judith L.; Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, fungi and plants exchange nutrients (sugars and phosphate, for instance) for reciprocal benefit. Until now it is not clear how this nutrient exchange system works. Here, we used computational cell biology to simulate the dynamics of a network of proton pumps and proton-coupled transporters that are upregulated during AM formation. We show that this minimal network is sufficient to describe accurately and realistically the nutrient trade system. By applying basic principles of microeconomics, we link the biophysics of transmembrane nutrient transport with the ecology of organismic interactions and straightforwardly explain macroscopic scenarios of the relations between plant and AM fungus. This computational cell biology study allows drawing far reaching hypotheses about the mechanism and the regulation of nutrient exchange and proposes that the “cooperation” between plant and fungus can be in fact the result of a competition between both for the same resources in the tiny periarbuscular space. The minimal model presented here may serve as benchmark to evaluate in future the performance of more complex models of AM nutrient exchange. As a first step toward this goal, we included SWEET sugar transporters in the model and show that their co-occurrence with proton-coupled sugar transporters results in a futile carbon cycle at the plant plasma membrane proposing that two different pathways for the same substrate should not be active at the same time. PMID:27446142

  16. Cloning of cDNAs encoding SODs from lettuce plants which show differential regulation by arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and by drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, J M; Collados, C; Barea, J M; Azcón, R

    2001-11-01

    In the present study three cDNA fragments were cloned using degenerate primers for Mn-sod genes and PCR: two showed a high degree of identity with Mn-sods from plants and the third with Fe-sod. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis down-regulated their expression pattern under well-watered conditions. In contrast, AM symbiosis in combination with drought stress considerably increased the expression of the Mn-sod II gene and this correlated well with plant tolerance to drought. These results would suggest that mycorrhizal protection against oxidative stress caused by drought may be an important mechanism by which AM fungi protect the host plant against drought. PMID:11604465

  17. The symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis drives root water transport in flooded tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Polanco, Monica; Molina, Sonia; Zamarreño, Angel María; García-Mina, Jose María; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within the plant roots enhances the tolerance of the host plant to different environmental stresses, although the positive effect of the fungi in plants under waterlogged conditions has not been well studied. Tolerance of plants to flooding can be achieved through different molecular, physiological and anatomical adaptations, which will affect their water uptake capacity and therefore their root hydraulic properties. Here, we investigated the root hydraulic properties under non-flooded and flooded conditions in non-mycorrhizal tomato plants and plants inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Only flooded mycorrhizal plants increased their root hydraulic conductivity, and this effect was correlated with a higher expression of the plant aquaporin SlPIP1;7 and the fungal aquaporin GintAQP1. There was also a higher abundance of the PIP2 protein phoshorylated at Ser280 in mycorrhizal flooded plants. The role of plant hormones (ethylene, ABA and IAA) in root hydraulic properties was also taken into consideration, and it was concluded that, in mycorrhizal flooded plants, ethylene has a secondary role regulating root hydraulic conductivity whereas IAA may be the key hormone that allows the enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity in mycorrhizal plants under low oxygen conditions.

  18. Communities, populations and individuals of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota are found globally in most vegetation types, where they form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots. Despite their wide distribution, only relatively few species are described. The taxonomy is based on morphological characters...

  19. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants. PMID:25535196

  20. New insights into the regulation of aquaporins by the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in maize plants under drought stress and possible implications for plant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárzana, Gloria; Aroca, Ricardo; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between modulation by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) of aquaporin expression in the host plant and changes in root hydraulic conductance, plant water status, and performance under stressful conditions is not well known. This investigation aimed to elucidate how the AM symbiosis modulates the expression of the whole set of aquaporin genes in maize plants under different growing and drought stress conditions, as well as to characterize some of these aquaporins in order to shed further light on the molecules that may be involved in the mycorrhizal responses to drought. The AM symbiosis regulated a wide number of aquaporins in the host plant, comprising members of the different aquaporin subfamilies. The regulation of these genes depends on the watering conditions and the severity of the drought stress imposed. Some of these aquaporins can transport water and also other molecules which are of physiological importance for plant performance. AM plants grew and developed better than non-AM plants under the different conditions assayed. Thus, for the first time, this study relates the well-known better performance of AM plants under drought stress to not only the water movement in their tissues but also the mobilization of N compounds, glycerol, signaling molecules, or metalloids with a role in abiotic stress tolerance. Future studies should elucidate the specific function of each aquaporin isoform regulated by the AM symbiosis in order to shed further light on how the symbiosis alters the plant fitness under stressful conditions.

  1. Auxin influences strigolactones in pea mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, E

    2013-03-15

    Hormone interactions are essential for the control of many developmental processes, including intracellular symbioses. The interaction between auxin and the new plant hormone strigolactone in the regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was examined in one of the few auxin deficient mutants available in a mycorrhizal species, the auxin-deficient bsh mutant of pea (Pisum sativum). Mycorrhizal colonisation with the fungus Glomus intraradices was significantly reduced in the low auxin bsh mutant. The bsh mutant also exhibited a reduction in strigolactone exudation and the expression of a key strigolactone biosynthesis gene (PsCCD8). Strigolactone exudation was also reduced in wild type plants when the auxin content was reduced by stem girdling. Low strigolactone levels appear to be at least partially responsible for the reduced colonisation of the bsh mutant, as application of the synthetic strigolactone GR24 could partially rescue the mycorrhizal phenotype of bsh mutants. Data presented here indicates root auxin content was correlated with strigolactone exudation in both mutant and wild type plants. Mutant studies suggest that auxin may regulate early events in the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by controlling strigolactone levels, both in the rhizosphere and possibly during early root colonisation. PMID:23219475

  2. Difference in Striga-susceptibility is reflected in strigolactone secretion profile, but not in compatibility and host preference in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in two maize cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Kaori; Arakawa, Ryota; Ishimoto, Keiko; Kim, Hyun Il; Kisugi, Takaya; Xie, Xiaonan; Nomura, Takahito; Kanampiu, Fred; Yokota, Takao; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    Strigolactones released from plant roots trigger both seed germination of parasitic weeds such as Striga spp. and hyphal branching of the symbionts arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Generally, strigolactone composition in exudates is quantitatively and qualitatively different among plants, which may be involved in susceptibility and host specificity in the parasite-plant interactions. We hypothesized that difference in strigolactone composition would have a significant impact on compatibility and host specificity/preference in AM symbiosis. Strigolactones in root exudates of Striga-susceptible (Pioneer 3253) and -resistant (KST 94) maize (Zea mays) cultivars were characterized by LC-MS/MS combined with germination assay using Striga hermonthica seeds. Levels of colonization and community compositions of AM fungi in the two cultivars were investigated in field and glasshouse experiments. 5-Deoxystrigol was exuded exclusively by the susceptible cultivar, while the resistant cultivar mainly exuded sorgomol. Despite the distinctive difference in strigolactone composition, the levels of AM colonization and the community compositions were not different between the cultivars. The present study demonstrated that the difference in strigolactone composition has no appreciable impact on AM symbiosis, at least in the two maize cultivars, and further suggests that the traits involved in Striga-resistance are not necessarily accompanied by reduction in compatibility to AM fungi. PMID:25754513

  3. Mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) from different genera: form function and detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodd, J.C.; Boddington, C.L.; Rodriguez, A.; Gonzalez-Chavez, C.; Marsur, I.

    2000-01-01

    It is often assumed that all species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have the same function because of the ubiquity of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and the fact that all AMF occupy the same plant/soil niche. Despite apparent differences in the timing of evolutionary divergence and the

  4. Microarray analysis and functional tests suggest the involvement of expansins in the early stages of symbiosis of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermatsev, Vladimir; Weingarten-Baror, Carmiya; Resnick, Nathalie; Gadkar, Vijay; Wininger, Smadar; Kolotilin, Igor; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Zilberstein, Avia; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram

    2010-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis occurs between fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota and most terrestrial plants. However, little is known about the molecular symbiotic signalling between AM fungi (AMFs) and non-leguminous plant species. We sought to further elucidate the molecular events occurring in tomato, a non-leguminous host plant, during the early, pre-symbiotic stage of AM symbiosis, i.e. immediately before and after contact between the AMF (Glomus intraradices) and the host. We adopted a semi-synchronized AMF root infection protocol, followed by genomic-scale, microarray-based, gene expression profiling at several defined time points during pre-symbiotic AM stages. The microarray results suggested differences in the number of differentially expressed genes and in the differential regulation of several functional groups of genes at the different time points examined. The microarray results were validated and one of the genes induced during contact between AMF and tomato, the expansin-like EXLB1, was functionally analysed. Expansins, encoded by a large multigene family, facilitate plant cell expansion. However, no biological or biochemical function has yet been established for plant-originated expansin-like proteins. EXLB1 transcripts were localized early during the association to cells that may perceive the fungal signal, and later during the association in close proximity to sites of AMF hypha-root colonization. Moreover, in transgenic roots, we demonstrated that a reduction in the steady-state level of EXLB1 transcript was correlated with a reduced rate of infection, reduced arbuscule expansion and reduced AMF spore formation.

  5. Communities, populations and individuals of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota are found globally in most vegetation types, where they form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots. Despite their wide distribution, only relatively few species are described. The taxonomy is based on morphological characters of the asexual resting spores, but molecular approaches to community ecology have revealed a considerable unknown diversity from colonized roots. Although the lack of genetic recombination is not unique in the fungal kingdom, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are probably ancient asexuals. The long asexual evolution of the fungi has resulted in considerable genetic diversity within morphologically recognizable species, and challenges our concepts of individuals and populations. This review critically examines the concepts of species, communities, populations and individuals of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  6. Nonredundant Regulation of Rice Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis by Two Members of the Phosphate Transporter 1 Gene Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Shu-Yi; Grønlund, Mette; Jakobsen, Iver;

    2012-01-01

    symbiotic route. To better understand this pathway, we combined genetic, molecular, and physiological approaches to determine the specific functions of two symbiosis-specific members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) gene family from rice, ORYsa;PHT1;11 (PT11) and ORYsa;PHT1;13 (PT13). The PT11 lineage...... of proteins from mono- and dicotyledons is most closely related to homologs from the ancient moss, indicating an early evolutionary origin. By contrast, PT13 arose in the Poaceae, suggesting that grasses acquired a particular strategy for the acquisition of symbiotic Pi. Surprisingly, mutations in...

  7. Epiparasitic plants specialized on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidartondo, Martin I; Redecker, Dirk; Hijri, Isabelle; Wiemken, Andres; Bruns, Thomas D; Domínguez, Laura; Sérsic, Alicia; Leake, Jonathan R; Read, David J

    2002-09-26

    Over 400 non-photosynthetic species from 10 families of vascular plants obtain their carbon from fungi and are thus defined as myco-heterotrophs. Many of these plants are epiparasitic on green plants from which they obtain carbon by 'cheating' shared mycorrhizal fungi. Epiparasitic plants examined to date depend on ectomycorrhizal fungi for carbon transfer and exhibit exceptional specificity for these fungi, but for most myco-heterotrophs neither the identity of the fungi nor the sources of their carbon are known. Because many myco-heterotrophs grow in forests dominated by plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota), we proposed that epiparasitism would occur also between plants linked by AMF. On a global scale AMF form the most widespread mycorrhizae, thus the ability of plants to cheat this symbiosis would be highly significant. We analysed mycorrhizae from three populations of Arachnitis uniflora (Corsiaceae, Monocotyledonae), five Voyria species and one Voyriella species (Gentianaceae, Dicotyledonae), and neighbouring green plants. Here we show that non-photosynthetic plants associate with AMF and can display the characteristic specificity of epiparasites. This suggests that AMF mediate significant inter-plant carbon transfer in nature.

  8. Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and organic material substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations are widespread and form between ca. two-thirds of all land plants and fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota. The association is a mutualistic symbiosis with the fungi enhancing nutrient capture for the plant while obtaining carbon in return. Although arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) lack any substantial saprophytic capability they do preferentially associate with various organic substrates and respond by hyphal proliferation, indicating the fungus derives a benefit from the organic substrate. AMF may also enhance decomposition of the organic material. The benefit to the host plant of this hyphal proliferation is not always apparent, particularly regarding nitrogen (N) transfer, and there may be circumstances under which both symbionts compete for the N released given both have a large demand for N. The results of various studies examining AMF responses to organic substrates and the interactions with other members of the soil community will be discussed.

  9. Aquaporin-mediated long-distance polyphosphate translocation directed towards the host in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: application of virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Hijikata, Nowaki; Ohtomo, Ryo; Handa, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Saito, Katsuharu; Masuta, Chikara; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi translocate polyphosphate through hyphae over a long distance to deliver to the host. More than three decades ago, suppression of host transpiration was found to decelerate phosphate delivery of the fungal symbiont, leading us to hypothesize that transpiration provides a primary driving force for polyphosphate translocation, probably via creating hyphal water flow in which fungal aquaporin(s) may be involved. The impact of transpiration suppression on polyphosphate translocation through hyphae of Rhizophagus clarus was evaluated. An aquaporin gene expressed in intraradical mycelia was characterized and knocked down by virus-induced gene silencing to investigate the involvement of the gene in polyphosphate translocation. Rhizophagus clarus aquaporin 3 (RcAQP3) that was most highly expressed in intraradical mycelia encodes an aquaglyceroporin responsible for water transport across the plasma membrane. Knockdown of RcAQP3 as well as the suppression of host transpiration decelerated polyphosphate translocation in proportion to the levels of knockdown and suppression, respectively. These results provide the first insight into the mechanism underlying long-distance polyphosphate translocation in mycorrhizal associations at the molecular level, in which host transpiration and the fungal aquaporin play key roles. A hypothetical model of the translocation is proposed for further elucidation of the mechanism. PMID:27136716

  10. Community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in undisturbed vegetation revealed by analyses of LSU rdna sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren; Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots and are found in most ecosystems. In this study the community structure of AMF in a clade of the genus Glomus was examined in undisturbed costal grassland using LSU rDNA sequences amplified from roots of Hieracium pi...

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect phytophagous insect specialism

    OpenAIRE

    Gange, Alan; Stagg, P.G.; Ward, L. K.

    2002-01-01

    The majority of phytophagous insects eat very few plant species, yet the ecological and evolutionary forces that have driven such specialism are not entirely understood. The hypothesis that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can determine phytophagous insect specialism, through differential effects on insect growth, was tested using examples from the British flora. In the UK, plant families and species in the family Lamiaceae that are strongly mycorrhizal have higher proportions of specialist ...

  12. Phylogeonomics and Ecogenomics of the Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2013-05-23

    Mycorrhizal fungi play critical roles in host plant health, soil community structure and chemistry, and carbon and nutrient cycling, all areas of intense interest to the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To this end we are building on our earlier sequencing of the Laccaria bicolor genome by partnering with INRA-Nancy and the mycorrhizal research community in the MGI to sequence and analyze 2 dozen mycorrhizal genomes of numerous known mycorrhizal orders and several ecological types (ectomycorrhizal [ECM], ericoid, orchid, and arbuscular). JGI has developed and deployed high-throughput pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and re-sequencing, and platforms for assembly, annotation, and analysis. In the last 2 years we have sequenced 21 genomes of mycorrhizal fungi, and resequenced 6 additional strains of L. bicolor. Most of this data is publicly available on JGI MycoCosm?s Mycorrhizal Fungi Portal (http://jgi.doe.gov/Mycorrhizal_fungi/), which provides access to both the genome data and tools with which to analyze the data. These data allow us to address long-standing issues in mycorrhizal evolution and ecology. For example, a major observation of mycorrhizal evolution is that each of the major ecological types appears to have evolved independently in multiple fungal clades. Using an ecogenomic approach we provide preliminary evidence that 2 clades (Cantharellales and Sebacinales) of a single symbiotic ecotype (orchid) utilize some common regulatory (protein tyrosine kinase) and metabolic (lipase) paths, the latter of which may be the product of HGT. Using a phylogenomic approach we provide preliminary evidence that a particular ecotype (ericoid) may have evolved more than once within a major clade (Leotiomycetes).

  13. Chasing the structures of small molecules in arbuscular mycorrhizal signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Marcel; Wegmüller, Sarah; Drissner, David

    2009-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is a symbiosis between most terrestrial plants and fungi of the ancient phylum Glomeromycota. AM improves the uptake of water and mineral nutrients, such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), of the host plant in exchange for photosynthetically fixed carbon. Successful colonization and a functional interaction between host plant and mycobiont are based upon exchange of signaling molecules at different stages of symbiosis development. Strigolactones, a novel class of plant hormones, are secreted by plant roots stimulating presymbiotic growth of AM fungi. Fungi release soluble signaling molecules, the enigmatic 'Myc factors', that activate early symbiotic root responses. Lysophosphatidylcholine is a lipophilic intraradical mycorrhizal signal triggering plant phosphate transporter gene expression late in AM development through a P-controlled transcriptional mechanism. This enables uptake of orthophosphate released from the AM fungus.

  14. Regulation of the nitrogen transfer pathway in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: gene characterization and the coordination of expression with nitrogen flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunjie; Kasiborski, Beth; Koul, Raman; Lammers, Peter J; Bücking, Heike; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2010-07-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) brings together the roots of over 80% of land plant species and fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota and greatly benefits plants through improved uptake of mineral nutrients. AM fungi can take up both nitrate and ammonium from the soil and transfer nitrogen (N) to host roots in nutritionally substantial quantities. The current model of N handling in the AM symbiosis includes the synthesis of arginine in the extraradical mycelium and the transfer of arginine to the intraradical mycelium, where it is broken down to release N for transfer to the host plant. To understand the mechanisms and regulation of N transfer from the fungus to the plant, 11 fungal genes putatively involved in the pathway were identified from Glomus intraradices, and for six of them the full-length coding sequence was functionally characterized by yeast complementation. Two glutamine synthetase isoforms were found to have different substrate affinities and expression patterns, suggesting different roles in N assimilation. The spatial and temporal expression of plant and fungal N metabolism genes were followed after nitrate was added to the extraradical mycelium under N-limited growth conditions using hairy root cultures. In parallel experiments with (15)N, the levels and labeling of free amino acids were measured to follow transport and metabolism. The gene expression pattern and profiling of metabolites involved in the N pathway support the idea that the rapid uptake, translocation, and transfer of N by the fungus successively trigger metabolic gene expression responses in the extraradical mycelium, intraradical mycelium, and host plant.

  15. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and local adaptation in Aster amellus: a field transplant experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Pánková

    Full Text Available Many plant populations have adapted to local soil conditions. However, the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is often overlooked in this context. Only a few studies have used reciprocal transplant experiments to study the relationships between soil conditions, mycorrhizal colonisation and plant growth. Furthermore, most of the studies were conducted under controlled greenhouse conditions. However, long-term field experiments can provide more realistic insights into this issue. We conducted a five-year field reciprocal transplant experiment to study the relationships between soil conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth in the obligate mycotrophic herb Aster amellus. We conducted this study in two regions in the Czech Republic that differ significantly in their soil nutrient content, namely Czech Karst (region K and Ceske Stredohori (region S. Plants that originated from region S had significantly higher mycorrhizal colonisation than plants from region K, indicating that the percentage of mycorrhizal colonisation has a genetic basis. We found no evidence of local adaptation in Aster amellus. Instead, plants from region S outperformed the plants from region K in both target regions. Similarly, plants from region S showed more mycorrhizal colonisation in all cases, which was likely driven by the lower nutrient content in the soil from that region. Thus, plant aboveground biomass and mycorrhizal colonisation exhibited corresponding differences between the two target regions and regions of origin. Higher mycorrhizal colonisation in the plants from region with lower soil nutrient content (region S in both target regions indicates that mycorrhizal colonisation is an adaptive trait. However, lower aboveground biomass in the plants with lower mycorrhizal colonisation suggests that the plants from region K are in fact maladapted by their low inherent mycorrhizal colonization. We conclude that including mycorrhizal symbiosis in local

  16. Common and divergent roles of plant hormones in nodulation and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses

    OpenAIRE

    Foo, Eloise; Ferguson, Brett J; Reid, James B.

    2014-01-01

    All of the classical plant hormones have been suggested to influence nodulation, including some that interact with the Autoregulation of Nodulation (AON) pathway. Leguminous plants strictly regulate the number of nodules formed through this AON pathway via a root-shoot-root loop that acts to suppress excessive nodulation. A related pathway, the Autoregulation of Mycorrhization (AOM) pathway controls the more ancient, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. A comparison of the published respons...

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in maize genotypes grown under contrasted P-regimes in a long-term field experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Campos-Soriano, Lidia; Bach, Marcel; Arnal, Didier; Souche, Gerard; Hinsinger, Philippe; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Most terrestrial flowering plants have the ability to establish symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The fungus improves the uptake of water and mineral nutrients in the host plant, mainly phosphorus and nitrogen, in exchange of photoassimilates. AM symbiosis not only promotes plant growth through facilitation of nutrient uptake, but it might also protect the plant from abiotic and/or biotic stresses. The benefits received by the AM symbiosis vary depending on the ho...

  18. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil. PMID:22512871

  19. Host plant quality mediates competition between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Knegt; J. Jansa; O. Franken; D.J.P. Engelmoer; G.D.A. Werner; H. Bücking; E.T. Kiers

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi exchange soil nutrients for carbon from plant hosts. Empirical works suggests that hosts may selectively provide resources to different fungal species, ultimately affecting fungal competition. However, fungal competition may also be mediated by colonization strategies of

  20. Selection of Infective Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Isolates for Field Inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Pellegrino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi play a key role in host plant growth and health, nutrient and water uptake, plant community diversity and dynamics. AM fungi differ in their symbiotic performance, which is the result of the interaction of two fungal characters, infectivity and efficiency. Infectivity is the ability of a fungal isolate to establish rapidly an extensive mycorrhizal symbiosis and is correlated with pre-symbiotic steps of fungal life cycle, such as spore germination and hyphal growth. Here, different AM fungal isolates were tested, with the aim of selecting infective endophytes for field inoculation. Greenhouse and microcosm experiments were performed in order to assess the ability of 12 AM fungal isolates to produce spores, colonize host roots and to perform initial steps of symbiosis establishment, such as spore germination and hyphal growth. AM fungal spore production and root colonization were significantly different among AM fungal isolates. Spore and sporocarp densities ranged from 0.8 to 7.4 and from 0.6 to 2.0 per gram of soil, respectively, whereas root colonization ranged from 2.9 to 72.2%. Percentage of spore or sporocarp germination ranged from 5.8 to 53.3% and hyphal length from 4.7 to 79.8 mm. The ordination analysis (Redundancy Analysis, RDA showed that environmental factors explained about 60% of the whole variance and their effect on fungal infectivity variables was significant (P = 0.002. The biplot clearly showed that variables which might be used to detect infective AM fungal isolates were hyphal length and root colonization. Such analysis may allow the detection of the best parameters to select efficient AM fungal isolates to be used in agriculture.

  1. 丛枝菌根影响纳米 ZnO 对玉米的生物效应%Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Influences the Biological Effects of Nano-ZnO on Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫中; 王发园; 李帅; 刘雪琴

    2014-01-01

    人工纳米颗粒(engineered nanoparticles, ENPs)能被植物吸收、积累,随食物链进入人体而引起健康风险。丛枝菌根(arbuscular mycorrhizal, AM)真菌可与陆地生态系统中绝大多数高等植物互惠共生,可能影响 ENPs 的生物效应。在温室土壤盆栽条件下研究了施加不同水平纳米 ZnO(0、500、1000、2000、3000 mg•kg -1)和接种 AM 真菌 Acaulospora mellea 对玉米生长和营养状况的影响。结果表明,随土壤中纳米 ZnO 施加水平的增加,菌根侵染率和玉米生物量均呈降低趋势,根系总长、总表面积及总体积降低,植株体内 Zn 含量和吸收量逐渐增加,地上部分 P、 N、 K、 Fe、 Cu 吸收量逐渐降低。与对照相比,接种AM 真菌均促进玉米的生长,改善 P、 N、 K 营养,根系总长、总表面积及总体积增加,并在施加纳米 ZnO 时增加 Zn 在玉米根系中的分配比例。本结果首次表明,土壤中纳米 ZnO 对丛枝菌根具有一定毒性,而接种 AM 真菌能够减轻其毒性,对宿主植物起到保护作用。%Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) can be taken up and accumulated in plants, then enter human bodies via food chain, and thus cause potential health risk. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi form mutualistic symbioses with the majority of higher plants in terrestrial ecosystems, and potentially influence the biological effects of ENPs. The present greenhouse pot culture experiment studied the effects of inoculation with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Acaulospora mellea on growth and nutritional status of maize under different nano-ZnO levels (0, 500, 1 000, 2 000 and 3 000 mg•kg - 1 ) artificially added into soil. Results showed that with the increasing nano-ZnO levels in soil, mycorrhizal colonization rate and biomass of maize plants showed a decreasing trend, total root length, total surface area and total volume reduced, while Zn concentration and uptake in plants gradually increased, and P, N, K, Fe

  2. Something old, something new: auxin and strigolactone interact in the ancient mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Eloise

    2013-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, formed between more than 80% of land plants and fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota, is an ancient association that is believed to have evolved as plants moved onto land more than 400 mya. Similarly ancient, the plant hormones auxin and strigolactone are thought to have been present in the plant lineage since before the divergence of the bryophytes in the case of auxin and before the colonisation of land in the case of strigolactones. The discovery of auxin in the 1930s predates the discovery of strigolactones as a plant hormone in 2008 by over 70 y. Recent studies in pea suggest that these two signals may interact to regulate mycorrhizal symbiosis. Furthermore, the first quantitative studies are presented that show that low auxin content of the root is correlated with low strigolactone production, an interaction that has implications for how these plant hormones regulate several developmental programs including shoot branching, secondary growth and root development. With recent advances in our understanding of auxin and strigolactone biosynthesis, together with the discovery of the fungal signals that activate the plant host, the stage is set for real breakthroughs in our understanding of the interactions between plant and fungal signals in mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  3. Something old, something new: auxin and strigolactone interact in the ancient mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Eloise

    2013-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, formed between more than 80% of land plants and fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota, is an ancient association that is believed to have evolved as plants moved onto land more than 400 mya. Similarly ancient, the plant hormones auxin and strigolactone are thought to have been present in the plant lineage since before the divergence of the bryophytes in the case of auxin and before the colonisation of land in the case of strigolactones. The discovery of auxin in the 1930s predates the discovery of strigolactones as a plant hormone in 2008 by over 70 y. Recent studies in pea suggest that these two signals may interact to regulate mycorrhizal symbiosis. Furthermore, the first quantitative studies are presented that show that low auxin content of the root is correlated with low strigolactone production, an interaction that has implications for how these plant hormones regulate several developmental programs including shoot branching, secondary growth and root development. With recent advances in our understanding of auxin and strigolactone biosynthesis, together with the discovery of the fungal signals that activate the plant host, the stage is set for real breakthroughs in our understanding of the interactions between plant and fungal signals in mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:23333973

  4. Rice arbuscular mycorrhiza as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms of fungal symbiosis and a potential target to increase productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tomomi; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko

    2015-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a monocot model crop for cereal molecular biology. Following the emergence of molecular genetics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in model legumes in the 1990s, studies on rice genetic resources have considerably contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolution of root intracellular symbioses.In this review, we trace the history of these studies and suggest the potential utility of AM symbiosis for improvement in rice productivity.

  5. Diversity of morphology and function in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeon J; Park, Yong-Soon; Bravo, Armando; Bhattarai, Kishor K; Daniels, Dierdra A; Harrison, Maria J

    2012-09-01

    Brachypodium distachyon is a grass species that serves as a useful model for wheat and also for many of the grass species proposed as feedstocks for bioenergy production. Here, we monitored B. distachyon symbioses with five different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and identified symbioses that vary functionally with respect to plant performance. Three symbioses promoted significant increases in shoot phosphorus (P) content and shoot growth of Brachypodium, while two associations were neutral. The Brachypodium/Glomus candidum symbiosis showed a classic 'Paris-type' morphology. In the other four AM symbioses, hyphal growth was exclusively intracellular and linear; hyphal coils were not observed and arbuscules were abundant. Expression of the Brachypodium ortholog of the symbiosis-specific phosphate (Pi) transporter MtPT4 did not differ significantly in these five interactions indicating that the lack of apparent functionality did not result from a failure to express this gene or several other AM symbiosis-associated genes. Analysis of the expression patterns of the complete PHT1 Pi transporter gene family and AMT2 gene family in B. distachyon/G. intraradices mycorrhizal roots identified additional family members induced during symbiosis and again, transcript levels were similar in the different Brachypodium AM symbioses. This initial morphological, molecular and functional characterization provides a framework for future studies of functional diversity in AM symbiosis in B. distachyon.

  6. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas in Plant Phosphorus Nutrition: Interactions between Pathways of Phosphorus Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots Have Important Implications for Understanding and Manipulating Plant Phosphorus Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, S.E.; Jakobsen, Iver; Grønlund, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    In this Update, we review new findings about the roles of the arbuscular mycorrhizas (mycorrhiza = fungus plus root) in plant growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition. We focus particularly on the function of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses with different outcomes for plant growth (from positive...... to negative) and especially on the interplay between direct P uptake via root epidermis (including root hairs when present) and uptake via the AM fungal pathway. The results are highly relevant to many aspects of AM symbiosis, ranging from signaling involved in the development of colonization...

  7. Intraradical colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi triggers induction of a lipochitooligosaccharide receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, S. R.; Füchtbauer, W.; Novero, M.; Volpe, V.; Malkov, N.; Genre, A.; Bonfante, P.; Stougaard, J.; Radutoiu, S.

    2016-07-01

    Functional divergence of paralogs following gene duplication is one of the mechanisms leading to evolution of novel pathways and traits. Here we show that divergence of Lys11 and Nfr5 LysM receptor kinase paralogs of Lotus japonicus has affected their specificity for lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) decorations, while the innate capacity to recognize and induce a downstream signalling after perception of rhizobial LCOs (Nod factors) was maintained. Regardless of this conserved ability, Lys11 was found neither expressed, nor essential during nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, providing an explanation for the determinant role of Nfr5 gene during Lotus-rhizobia interaction. Lys11 was expressed in root cortex cells associated with intraradical colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Detailed analyses of lys11 single and nfr1nfr5lys11 triple mutants revealed a functional arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, indicating that Lys11 alone, or its possible shared function with the Nod factor receptors is not essential for the presymbiotic phases of AM symbiosis. Hence, both subfunctionalization and specialization appear to have shaped the function of these paralogs where Lys11 acts as an AM-inducible gene, possibly to fine-tune later stages of this interaction.

  8. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the expression of K+/Cs+ transporters on the accumulation of caesium by plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesel, Lea

    2011-01-01

    Radiocaesium (134Cs, 137Cs) is of environmental concern because of its incorporation into the food chain and prolonged emission of harmful radiation. Plants take up caesium via cation transporters which cannot discriminate between radioactive and stable caesium (133Cs). Around 80% of angiosperms live in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that deliver mineral nutrients to their hosts. Contrasting effects of AM fungi on caesium accumulation by plants have been reported. The ultima...

  9. Depletion of soil mineral N by roots of ¤Cucumis sativus¤ L. colonized or not by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted where Cucumis sativus were grown in uncompartmented pots either alone or in symbiosis with Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith (Experiment 1) or Glomus sp. (Experiment 2) in order to investigate if root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has an effect...

  10. Nitrate regulates rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kalpana Nanjareddy; Lourdes Blanco; Manoj-Kumar Arthikala; Xochitl Alvarado Affantrange; Federico Snchez; Miguel Lara

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-limited conditions are considered to be a prerequisite for legume-rhizobial symbiosis, but the effects of nitrate-rich conditions on symbiotic status remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by examining rhizobial (Rhizobim tropici) and arbusclar mycorrhizal (Glomus intraradices) symbiosis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Negro Jamapa under nitrate pre-incubation and continuous nitrate conditions. Our results indicate that nitrate pre-incubation, independent of the concentration, did not affect nodule development. However, the continuous supply of nitrate at high concentrations impaired nodule maturation and nodule numbers. Low nitrate conditions, in addition to positively regulating nodule number, biomass, and nitrogenase activity, also extended the span of nitrogen-fixing activity. By contrast, for arbuscular mycorrhizae, continuous 10 and 50 mmol/L nitrate increased the percent root length colonization, concomitantly reduced arbuscule size, and en-hanced ammonia transport without affecting phosphate transport. Therefore, in this manuscript, we have proposed the importance of nitrate as a positive regulator in promoting both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in the common bean.

  11. Effect of plant species, soil and environmental factors on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and nutrient uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) system should meaningfully be considered as a 3-way interaction between plant, soil and fungus. By disassembling the complex VA mycorrhizal symbiosis and considering each component in turn, it has become evident that many factors, such as plant species, soil and environmental conditions can affect the overall balance of the complete system. For the plant to gain maximum benefits from the association, the best possible contribution of plant, fungus and environmental conditions need to be identified and maintained. (author)

  12. Chromium immobilization by extra- and intraradical fungal structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhen, Xiangjun; Chen, Baodong

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can enhance plant Cr tolerance through immobilizing Cr in mycorrhizal roots. However, the detailed processes and mechanisms are unclear. The present study focused on cellular distribution and speciation of Cr in both extraradical mycelium (ERM) and mycorrhizal roots exposed to Cr(VI) by using field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FE-SEM-EDS), scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy techniques. We found that amounts of particles (possibly extracellular polymeric substances, EPS) were produced on the AM fungal surface upon Cr(VI) stress, which contributed greatly to Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. With EDS of the surface of AM fungi exposed to various Cr(VI) levels, a positive correlation between Cr and P was revealed, suggesting that phosphate groups might act as counter ions of Cr(III), which was also confirmed by the XAFS analysis. Besides, STXM and XAFS analyses showed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) in AM fungal structures (arbuscules, intraradical mycelium, etc.) and cell walls in mycorrhizal roots, and complexed possibly with carboxyl groups or histidine analogues. The present work provided evidence of Cr immobilization on fungal surface and in fungal structures in mycorrhizal roots at a cellular level, and thus unraveled the underlying mechanisms by which AM symbiosis immobilize Cr. PMID:27209517

  13. Chromium immobilization by extra- and intraradical fungal structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhen, Xiangjun; Chen, Baodong

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can enhance plant Cr tolerance through immobilizing Cr in mycorrhizal roots. However, the detailed processes and mechanisms are unclear. The present study focused on cellular distribution and speciation of Cr in both extraradical mycelium (ERM) and mycorrhizal roots exposed to Cr(VI) by using field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FE-SEM-EDS), scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy techniques. We found that amounts of particles (possibly extracellular polymeric substances, EPS) were produced on the AM fungal surface upon Cr(VI) stress, which contributed greatly to Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. With EDS of the surface of AM fungi exposed to various Cr(VI) levels, a positive correlation between Cr and P was revealed, suggesting that phosphate groups might act as counter ions of Cr(III), which was also confirmed by the XAFS analysis. Besides, STXM and XAFS analyses showed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) in AM fungal structures (arbuscules, intraradical mycelium, etc.) and cell walls in mycorrhizal roots, and complexed possibly with carboxyl groups or histidine analogues. The present work provided evidence of Cr immobilization on fungal surface and in fungal structures in mycorrhizal roots at a cellular level, and thus unraveled the underlying mechanisms by which AM symbiosis immobilize Cr.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi protect a native plant from allelopathic effects of an invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barto, Kathryn; Friese, Carl; Cipollini, Don

    2010-04-01

    The allelopathic potential of the Eurasian invasive plant Alliaria petiolata has been well documented, with the bulk of the effects believed to be mediated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We exposed the herbaceous annual Impatiens pallida, which is native to North America, to fractionated A. petiolata extracts at four developmental stages (germination, presymbiosis growth, symbiosis formation, and symbiosis growth) by using exposure levels expected to be similar to field levels. Surprisingly, we found strong direct effects on I. pallida germination and growth, but no indirect effects on I. pallida growth mediated by AMF. We also observed strong synergistic effects with a complete A. petiolata extract that inhibited I. pallida germination and presymbiosis root growth more than either a glucosinolate or flavonoid enriched fraction alone. In fact, the flavonoid enriched fraction tended to stimulate germination and presymbiosis root growth. In contrast to these strong direct effects, I. pallida plant growth during both the symbiosis formation and symbiosis growth phases was unaffected by A. petiolata extracts. We also found no inhibition of AMF colonization of roots or soils by A. petiolata extracts. We show that AMF can actually ameliorate allelopathic effects of an invasive plant, and suggest that previously observed allelopathic effects of A. petiolata may be due to direct inhibition of plant and fungal growth before symbiosis formation. PMID:20229215

  15. 丛枝菌根真菌-豆科植物-根瘤菌共生体系的研究进展%Research advances in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-legumes-rhizobia symbiosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹丹; 李涛; 赵之伟

    2006-01-01

    丛枝菌根真菌(Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi,AMF)-豆科植物-根瘤菌(Rhizobia)三者形成的共生体,是植物与微生物共生中的一种特殊类型.本文对这种共生体中微生物与植物之间的营养关系;AMF和根瘤菌双接种豆科植物的效应以及影响双接种效应的因素;AMF和根瘤菌在与豆科植物形成共生过程中的分子互作机制等进行了综述.同时对这种共生体还需进一步研究的问题及其在基础研究和实践应用方面的前景进行了讨论.

  16. Evaluation of some fungicides on mycorrhizal symbiosis between two Glomus species from commercial inocula and Allium porrum L. seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Dorrego, A.; Mestre Pares, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the effect of twenty-five commonly used fungicides in agriculture on two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) present in commercial products of ATENS, S.L.: Glomus intra radices (Schenck and Smith) and Glomus mosseae [(Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe], forming the symbiosis with leek plants. Systemic fungicides (Aliette, Beltanol, Caddy 10, Forum, Moncut, Ortiva, Previcur, Ridomil Gold MZ, Ridomil Gold SL, Rubigan, Sinthane, Stroby, Swich, Tachigarem, Teldor, Topas 10 EC, Frupica) and non systemic fungicides (Daconil 75%, Ditiver, Euparem, INACOP, Octagon, Parmex, Terrazole and Metaram), started to be applied to soil and leaves at recommended concentrations and frequencies 4 weeks after transplant and AMF inoculation. The effect of the fungicides was assessed by comparing treated and untreated plants that were inoculated with the AMF through quantification of root mycorrhizal colonization. Among the fungicides applied to the soil, Octagon, Ditiver, Parmex and Metaram virtually eliminated the mycorrhizal symbiosis in treated plants, while the mycorrhizal colonization was not affected by the soil treatment with Beltanol, INACOP and Previcur. Three fungicides of foliar recommended application: Rubigan, Frupica, and Sinthane, strongly inhibited mycorrhizal colonization, but Aliette, Forum, Teldor, Swich and Ortiva, did not seem to reduce it substantially. In addition, the work describes the individual effect of each fungicide applied on both, foliage and soil. (Author) 29 refs.

  17. Uptake of Organic Phosphorus by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Red Clover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The capacities of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, Glomus mosseae and Glomus versiforme, to mineralize added organic P were studied in a sterilized calcareous soil. Mycorrhizal (inoculated with either of the AM fungi) and non-mycorrhizal red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) plants were grown for eight weeks in pots with upper root, central hyphal and lower soil compartments. The hyphal and soil compartments received either organic P (as Na-phytate) or inorganic P (as KH2PO4) at the rate of 50 mg P kg-1. No P was added to the root compartments. Control pots received no added P. Yields were higher in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal clover. Mycorrhizal inoculation doubled shoot P concentration and more than doubled total P uptake of plants in P-amended soil, irrespective of the form of applied P. The mycorrhizal contribution to inorganic P uptake was 80% or 76% in plants inoculated with G. mosseae or G. versiforme, respectively.Corresponding values were 74% and 82% when Na-phytate was applied. In the root compartments of the mycorrhizal treatments, the proportion of root length infected, hyphal length density and phosphatase activity were all higher when organic P was applied than when inorganic P was added.

  18. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota associated with roots of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Kowalczyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies of the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and arbuscular mycorrhizae of the phylum Glomeromycota associated with roots of 31 cultivated, uncultivated and protected plant species growing at 103 sites of the Lubuskie province NW Poland are presented and discussed. The AMF most frequently found were members of the genus Glomus. Other relatively frequently revealed fungi were Scutellospora spp. Spore populations of AMF generally were more abundant and diverse in cultivated soils. Most protected plant species harboured AMF.

  20. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Dark Septate Endophyte Fungal Associations in South Indian Aquatic and Wetland Macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Seerangan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the prevalence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM and dark septate endophyte (DSE fungal symbioses are limited for plants growing in tropical aquatic and wetland habitats compared to those growing on terrestrial moist or dry habitats. Therefore, we assessed the incidence of AM and DSE symbiosis in 8 hydrophytes and 50 wetland plants from four sites in south India. Of the 58 plant species examined, we found AM and DSE fungal symbiosis in 21 and five species, respectively. We reported for the first time AM and DSE fungal symbiosis in seven and five species, respectively. Intermediate-type AM morphology was common, and AM morphology is reported for the first time in 16 plant species. Both AM and DSE fungal colonization varied significantly across plant species and sites. Intact and identifiable AM fungal spores occurred in root zones of nine plant species, but AM fungal species richness was low. Though no clear relationship between AM and DSE fungal colonization was recognized, a significant negative correlation between AM colonization and spore numbers was established. Our study suggests that the occurrence of AM and DSE fungal symbiosis in plants growing in hydrophytic and wetland habitats is not as common as in terrestrial habitats.

  1. Colonization of new land by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Brian; Kjøller, Rasmus; Bruun, Hans Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    was significantly lower on the artificial island than on the neighboring natural island, indicating that richness of the colonizing AM fungal community is restricted by limited dispersal. The AM fungal communities colonizing the new island appeared to be a non-random subset of communities on the natural and much......The study describes the primary assembly of arbuscular mycorrhizal communities on a newly constructed island Peberholm between Denmark and Sweden. The AM fungal community on Peberholm was compared with the neighboring natural island Saltholm. The structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal communities...... was assessed through 454 pyrosequencing. Internal community structure was investigated through fitting the rank-abundance of Operational Taxonomic Units to different models. Heterogeneity of communities within islands was assessed by analysis of group dispersion. The mean OTU richness per sample...

  2. When do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi protect plant roots from pathogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Sikes, Benjamin A

    2010-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are mainly thought to facilitate phosphorus uptake in plants, but they can also perform several other functions that are equally beneficial. Our recent study sheds light on the factors determining one such function, enhanced plant protection from root pathogens. Root infection by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum was determined by both plant susceptibility and the ability of an AM fungal partner to suppress the pathogen. The non-susceptible plant species...

  3. Investigating the Endobacteria Which Thrive in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desirò, Alessandro; Salvioli, Alessandra; Bonfante, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The study of the so-called unculturable bacteria is still considered a challenging task. However, given recent improvements in the sensitivity of culture-free approaches, the identification and characterization of such microbes in complex biological samples is now possible. In this chapter we report how endobacteria thriving inside arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which are themselves obligate biotrophs of plants, can be studied using a combination of in vitro culture, molecular biology, and microscopy techniques. PMID:26791495

  4. Prospects for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to assist in phytoremediation of soil hydrocarbon contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtor, Monika; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form mutualistic associations with the roots of 80-90% of vascular plant species and may constitute up to 50% of the total soil microbial biomass. AMF have been considered to be a tool to enhance phytoremediation, as their mycelium create a widespread underground network that acts as a bridge between plant roots, soil and rhizosphere microorganisms. Abundant extramatrical hyphae extend the rhizosphere thus creating the hyphosphere, which significantly increases the area of a plant's access to nutrients and contaminants. The paper presents and evaluates the role and significance of AMF in phytoremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites. We focused on (1) an impact of hydrocarbons on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, (2) a potential of AMF to enhance phytoremediation, (3) determinants that influence effectiveness of hydrocarbon removal from contaminated soils. This knowledge may be useful for selection of proper plant and fungal symbionts and crucial to optimize environmental conditions for effective AMF-mediated phytoremediation. It has been concluded that three-component phytoremediation systems based on synergistic interactions between plant roots, AMF and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms demonstrated high effectiveness in dissipation of organic pollutants in soil. PMID:27487095

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal association enhances drought tolerance potential of promising bioenergy grass (Saccharum arundinaceum retz.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshad, P P; Puthur, Jos T

    2016-07-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Glomus spp.) on some physiological and biochemical characteristics of bioenergy grass Saccharum arundinaceum subjected to drought stress was studied. The symbiotic association of Glomus spp. was established with S. arundinaceum, a potential bioenergy grass as evident from the increase in percentage of root infection and distribution frequency of vesicles when compared with non-arbuscular mycorrhizal plants. AMF-treated plants exhibited an enhanced accumulation of osmolytes such as sugars and proline and also increased protein content under drought. AMF association significantly increased the accumulation of non-enzymatic antioxidants like phenols, ascorbate and glutathione as well as enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD (superoxide dismutase), APX (ascorbate peroxidase) and GPX (guaiacol peroxidase) resulting in reduced lipid peroxidation in S. arundinaceum. AMF symbiosis also ameliorated the drought-induced reduction of total chlorophyll content and activities of photosystem I and II. The maximum quantum efficiency of PS II (F v/F m) and potential photochemical efficiency (F v/F o) were higher in AMF plants as compared to non-AMF plants under drought stress. These results indicate that AMF association alleviate drought stress in S. arundinaceum by the accumulation of osmolytes and non-enzymatic antioxidants and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes, and hence, the photosynthetic efficiency is improved resulting in increased biomass production. AMF association with energy grasses also improves the acclimatization of S. arundinaceum for growing in marginal lands of drought-affected soils.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal association enhances drought tolerance potential of promising bioenergy grass (Saccharum arundinaceum retz.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshad, P P; Puthur, Jos T

    2016-07-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Glomus spp.) on some physiological and biochemical characteristics of bioenergy grass Saccharum arundinaceum subjected to drought stress was studied. The symbiotic association of Glomus spp. was established with S. arundinaceum, a potential bioenergy grass as evident from the increase in percentage of root infection and distribution frequency of vesicles when compared with non-arbuscular mycorrhizal plants. AMF-treated plants exhibited an enhanced accumulation of osmolytes such as sugars and proline and also increased protein content under drought. AMF association significantly increased the accumulation of non-enzymatic antioxidants like phenols, ascorbate and glutathione as well as enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD (superoxide dismutase), APX (ascorbate peroxidase) and GPX (guaiacol peroxidase) resulting in reduced lipid peroxidation in S. arundinaceum. AMF symbiosis also ameliorated the drought-induced reduction of total chlorophyll content and activities of photosystem I and II. The maximum quantum efficiency of PS II (F v/F m) and potential photochemical efficiency (F v/F o) were higher in AMF plants as compared to non-AMF plants under drought stress. These results indicate that AMF association alleviate drought stress in S. arundinaceum by the accumulation of osmolytes and non-enzymatic antioxidants and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes, and hence, the photosynthetic efficiency is improved resulting in increased biomass production. AMF association with energy grasses also improves the acclimatization of S. arundinaceum for growing in marginal lands of drought-affected soils. PMID:27329476

  7. Breakdown and delayed cospeciation in the arbuscular mycorrhizal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Vincent; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2008-05-01

    The ancient arbuscular mycorrhizal association between the vast majority of plants and the fungal phylum Glomeromycota is a dominant nutritional mutualism worldwide. In the mycorrhizal mutualism, plants exchange photosynthesized carbohydrates for mineral nutrients acquired by fungi from the soil. This widespread cooperative arrangement is broken by 'cheater' plant species that lack the ability to photosynthesize and thus become dependent upon three-partite linkages (cheater-fungus-photosynthetic plant). Using the first fine-level coevolutionary analysis of mycorrhizas, we show that extreme fidelity towards fungi has led cheater plants to lengthy evolutionary codiversification. Remarkably, the plants' evolutionary history closely mirrors that of their considerably older mycorrhizal fungi. This demonstrates that one of the most diffuse mutualistic networks is vulnerable to the emergence, persistence and speciation of highly specific cheaters.

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal responses to abiotic stresses: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Ingrid; Fontaine, Joël; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2016-03-01

    The majority of plants live in close collaboration with a diversity of soil organisms among which arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an essential role. Mycorrhizal symbioses contribute to plant growth and plant protection against various environmental stresses. Whereas the resistance mechanisms induced in mycorrhizal plants after exposure to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and pollution, are well documented, the knowledge about the stress tolerance mechanisms implemented by the AMF themselves is limited. This review provides an overview of the impacts of various abiotic stresses (pollution, salinity, drought, extreme temperatures, CO2, calcareous, acidity) on biodiversity, abundance and development of AMF and examines the morphological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms implemented by AMF to survive in the presence of these stresses. PMID:26803396

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi decrease radiocesium accumulation in Medicago truncatula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyuricza, Veronika; Declerck, Stephane [Universite catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute (ELI), Laboratoire de Mycologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Dupre de Boulois, Herve, E-mail: herve.dupre@uclouvain.b [Universite catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute (ELI), Laboratoire de Mycologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in plant radiocesium uptake and accumulation remains ambiguous. This is probably due to the presence of other soil microorganisms, the variability of soil characteristics and plant nutritional status or the availability of its chemical analogue, potassium (K). Here, we used an in vitro culture system to study the impact of increased concentration of K on radiocesium accumulation in non K-starved mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Medicago truncatula plants. In the presence of AMF radiocesium uptake decreased regardless of the concentration of K, and its translocation from root to shoot was also significantly lower. Potassium also reduced the accumulation of radiocesium in plants but to a lesser extent than mycorrhization, and without any effect on translocation. These results suggest that AMF in combination with K can play a key role in reducing radiocesium uptake and its subsequent translocation to plant shoots, thereby representing good potential for improved phytomanagement of contaminated areas.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal infection in two morphological root types of Araucaria araucana (Molina) K. Koch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, P; Fontenla, S B

    2010-01-01

    Araucaria araucana (Molina) K. Koch is a conifer distributed in the Andean-Patagonian forests in the south of Argentina and Chile. The main objective of this work was to relate the different root classes appearing in A. araucana to mycorrhizal behavior. Samples were collected in three different sites in the Lanín National Park (NW Patagonia, Argentina). Two different root classes were present in A. araucana: longitudinal fine roots (LFR) and globular short roots (GSR). Both had extensive mycorrhizal arbuscular symbiosis (AM) and presented abundant hyphae and coils in root cells, a characteristic of the anatomical Paris-type. Dark septate fungal endophytes were also observed. Values of total AM colonization were high, with similar partial AM% values for each root class. Seasonal differences were found for total and partial colonization, with higher values in spring compared to autumn. Regarding the percentage of fungal structures between root classes, values were similar for vesicles and arbuscules, but higher coil percentages were observed in GSR compared to LFR. The percentages of vesicles increased in autumn, whereas the arbuscule percentages increased in spring, coinciding with the plant growth peak. Results show that both root classes of A. araucana in Andean-Patagonian forests are associated with AM fungi, which may have ecological relevance in terms of the importance of this symbiosis, in response to soil nutrient-deficiencies, especially high P-retention. PMID:20589337

  11. Options of partners improve carbon for phosphorus trade in the arbuscular mycorrhizal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, Alicia; O'Brien, Michael J; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Wiemken, Andres; Schmid, Bernhard; Niklaus, Pascal A

    2016-06-01

    The mutualism between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is widespread and has persisted for over 400 million years. Although this mutualism depends on fair resource exchange between plants and fungi, inequality exists among partners despite mechanisms that regulate trade. Here, we use (33) P and (14) C isotopes and a split-root system to test for preferential allocation and reciprocal rewards in the plant-AMF symbiosis by presenting a plant with two AMF that differ in cooperativeness. We found that plants received more (33) P from less cooperative AMF in the presence of another AMF species. This increase in (33) P resulted in a reduced (14) C cost per unit of (33) P from less cooperative AMF when alternative options were available. Our results indicate that AMF diversity promotes cooperation between plants and AMF, which may be an important mechanism maintaining the evolutionary persistence of and diversity within the plant-AMF mutualism. PMID:27074533

  12. Nursery inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus viscosum and its effect on the growth and physiology of hybrid artichoke seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Campanelli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most nurseries operating in Italy adopt high technologies and produce transplants that well suit and satisfy the grower’s need to produce high value crops. Mycorrhizas are discussed as a tool for improving and developing plant production in the nursery. Much research has been carried out on mycorrhizal symbiosis and we now know more about the symbiontic relationship between fungi and host plants. Plants receive numerous benefits from this symbiosis which are more macroscopic the earlier in the ontogenetic cycle this symbiosis is established. Therefore, it appears that the most effective period in which the inoculum should be made corresponds to the in-nursery growing stage. The earlier the plant is inoculated, the more evident the effect will be. In this study, several aspects related to the physiological foundations of arbuscular mycorrhiza in artichoke plants are presented. The main goal was to study the effects of mycorrhiza on the growth and physiological parameters of three hybrids of artichokes growing in the nursery. The experimental 3¥2 design included two treatments (with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and three hybrids of artichokes marketed by Nunhems (Opal F1, Madrigal F1, Concerto F1. Mycorrhizal plants have greater shoot length, leaf area, shoot and root fresh and dry mass, and root density. This also corresponded with increased photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance of mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal colonization improves relative water content and increases proline concentration in vegetal tissue. Inoculation produced the most beneficial effect on hybrid Madrigal F1 and on hybrid Opal F1; the best mycorrhizal affinity was enhanced when compared to hybrid Concerto F1. The results showed that mycorrhizal symbiosis stimulated the growth of inoculated seedlings providing a qualitatively good propagation material.

  13. Reduced germination of Orobanche cumana seeds in the presence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi or their exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louarn, Johann; Carbonne, Francis; Delavault, Philippe; Bécard, Guillaume; Rochange, Soizic

    2012-01-01

    Broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp) are parasitic plants responsible for important crop losses, and efficient procedures to control these pests are scarce. Biological control is one of the possible strategies to tackle these pests. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are widespread soil microorganisms that live symbiotically with the roots of most plant species, and they have already been tested on sorghum for their ability to reduce infestation by witchweeds, another kind of parasitic plants. In this work AM fungi were evaluated as potential biocontrol agents against Orobanche cumana, a broomrape species that specifically attacks sunflower. When inoculated simultaneously with O. cumana seeds, AM fungi could offer a moderate level of protection against the broomrape. Interestingly, this protection did not only rely on a reduced production of parasitic seed germination stimulants, as was proposed in previous studies. Rather, mycorrhizal root exudates had a negative impact on the germination of O. cumana induced by germination stimulants. A similar effect could be obtained with AM spore exudates, establishing the fungal origin of at least part of the active compounds. Together, our results demonstrate that AM fungi themselves can lead to a reduced rate of parasitic seed germination, in addition to possible effects mediated by the mycorrhizal plant. Combined with the other benefits of AM symbiosis, these effects make AM fungi an attractive option for biological control of O. cumana. PMID:23145139

  14. Changes in carbon and nitrogen allocation, growth and grain yield induced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) subjected to a period of water deficit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qin; Ravnskov, Sabine; Jiang, Dong;

    2015-01-01

    Drought is a major abiotic factor limiting agricultural crop production. One of the effective ways to increase drought resistance in plants could be to optimize the exploitation of symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Hypothesizing that alleviation of water deficits by AMF in wheat ...

  15. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on arsenic accumulation by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lin, Xiangui; Yin, Rui; Jiang, Qian; Shao, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (from contaminated or uncontaminated soils) on arsenic (As) uptake of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in As-contaminated soil. Mycorrhizal colonization rate, dry weight, As and P uptake by plants, concentrations of water-extractable As and As fractions were determined. A low mycorrhizal colonization rate (fungi isolated from polluted soils were no more effective than those from unpolluted soils when grown in symbiosis with tobacco. No significant differences were observed in roots and stalks dry weights among all treatments. Leaves and total plant dry weights were much higher in Glomus versiforme treatment than that in control treatment. As contents in roots and stalks from mycorrhizal treatments were much lower than that from control treatment. Total plant As content exhibited the same trend. P concentrations in tobacco were not affected by colonization, nor were stalks, leaves and total plant P contents. Roots P contents were remarkably lower in HN treatments than in other treatments. Meanwhile, decreased soil pH and lower water-extractable As concentrations and higher levels of As fraction bound to well-crystallized hydrous oxides of Fe and Al were found in mycorrhizal treatments than in controls. The protective effect of mycorrhiza against plant As uptake may be associated with changes in As solubility mediated by changing soil pH. These results indicated that under As stress, proper mechanisms employed by AM fungi can protect tobacco against As uptake. Results confirmed that AM fungi can play an important role in food quality and safety. PMID:19999968

  16. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of Lotus japonicus mutants specifically defective in arbuscular mycorrhizal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Tomoko; Saito, Katsuharu; Oba, Hirosuke; Yoshida, Yuma; Terasawa, Junya; Umehara, Yosuke; Suganuma, Norio; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Ohtomo, Ryo

    2014-05-01

    Several symbiotic mutants of legume plants defective in nodulation have also been shown to be mutants related to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. The origin of the AM symbiosis can be traced back to the early land plants. It has therefore been postulated that the older system of AM symbiosis was partially incorporated into the newer system of legume-rhizobium symbiosis. To unravel the genetic basis of the establishment of AM symbiosis, we screened about 34,000 plants derived from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-mutagenized Lotus japonicus seeds by microscopic observation. As a result, three lines (ME778, ME966 and ME2329) were isolated as AM-specific mutants that exhibit clear AM-defective phenotypes but form normal effective root nodules with rhizobial infection. In the ME2329 mutant, AM fungi spread their hyphae into the intercellular space of the cortex and formed trunk hyphae in the cortical cells, but the development of fine branches in the arbuscules was arrested. The ME2329 mutant carried a nonsense mutation in the STR-homolog gene, implying that the line may be an str mutant in L. japonicus. On the ME778 and ME966 mutant roots, the entry of AM fungal hyphae was blocked between two adjacent epidermal cells. Occasionally, hyphal colonization accompanied by arbuscules was observed in the two mutants. The genes responsible for the ME778 and ME966 mutants were independently located on chromosome 2. These results suggest that the ME778 and ME966 lines are symbiotic mutants involved in the early stage of AM formation in L. japonicus.

  17. Enhanced Tomato Disease Resistance Primed by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan eSong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and lipoxygenase (LOX in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR proteins, PR1, PR2 and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT plant, a jasmonate (JA biosynthesis mutant (spr2, and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for

  18. Enhanced tomato disease resistance primed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanyuan; Chen, Dongmei; Lu, Kai; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-01

    Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza) with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins, PR1, PR2, and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC, and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT) plant, a jasmonate (JA) biosynthesis mutant (spr2), and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for mycorrhiza

  19. [Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in special habitats: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Mei; Wang, Yin-Qiao; Liu, Run-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are one of the important components in ecosystems, which not only have the diversity in genetics, species composition, and function, but also have the diversity in distribution and habitat. AMF infect plant root, form mycorrhiza, and nourish as obligate biotroph symbiont, with strong ecological adaptability. They not only distribute in forest, prairie, and farm land, but also distribute in the special habitats with less plant species diversity, such as commercial greenhouse soil, saline-alkali soil, mining pollution land, petroleum-contaminated land, pesticide-polluted soil, desert, dry land, wetland, marsh, plateau, volcanic, cooler, and arctic tundra, composing a unique community structure and playing an important irreplaceable role in the physiological and ecological functions. This paper summarized the species diversity and mycorrhizal morphological features of AMF in special habitats, aimed to provide essential information for the further studies on the AMF in these special habitats and extreme environments.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  1. The role of mycorrhizal symbiosis in aluminum and phosphorus interactions in relation to aluminum tolerance in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Guihua; Wang, Xiurong; Liao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi protect plants against aluminum (Al) toxicity, but the mechanisms of Al and phosphorus (P) interactions in relation to Al tolerance in mycorrhizal plants are only poorly understood. In this study, varying Al and P treatments were applied to soybean plants cultivated in the presence or absence of three different AM fungi. The results showed that plants in symbiotic association with Gigaspora margarita displayed higher Al tolerance than Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus claroideum. The effectiveness of G. margarita appeared to be associated with more abundant arbuscules and less affected intraradical hyphae compared to no Al controls. The highest levels of Al toxicity mitigation were observed with the combination of high P availability and AM fungal inoculation, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the expression of the AM-inducible phosphate (Pi) transporter gene GmPT9 in soybean. Taken together, these results suggest that AM symbiosis can alleviate Al toxicity in soybean through enhanced P nutrition, as well as, the alteration of the abundance of mycorrhizal infection structures. These findings highlight the importance of P nutrition status in ameliorating Al toxicity in mycorrhizal plants. PMID:26278539

  2. Effect of Various Organic Matter stimulates Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Plantations on Eroded Slopes in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha Vaidya, G.; Shrestha, K.; Wallander, H.

    2009-04-01

    Erosion resulting from landslides is a serious problem in mountainous countries such as Nepal. To restore such sites it is essential to establish plant cover that protects the soil and reduces erosion. Trees and shrubs on the lower hillsides in Nepal form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and these fungi are important for the uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil. In addition, the mycelia formed by these fungi have an important function in stabilizing the soil. The success of plantations of these eroded slopes is therefore highly dependent on the extent of mycorrhizal colonization of the plants. Mycorrhizal fungi growing in symbiosis with plants are essential in this respect because they improve both plant and nutrient uptake and soil structure. We investigated the influence of organic matter and P amendment on recently produced biomass of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in eroded slopes in Nepal. Eroded soil mixed with different types of organic matter was placed in mesh bags which were buried around the trees of Bauhinia purpurea and Leucaena diversifolia .This experiment were done in two seasons ( (the wet and the dry season). Signature fatty acids were used to determine bacterial and AM fungal biomass after the six month intervals. The amount and composition of AM fungal spores were analyzed in the mesh bags from the wet and dry seasons. More microbial biomass was produced during wet season than during dry season. Further more, organic matter addition enhanced the production of AM fungal and bacterial biomass during both seasons. The positive influence of organic matter addition on AM fungi could be an important contribution to plant survival, growth and nutrient composition in the soil in plantations on eroded slopes. Different AM spore communities and bacterial profiles were obtained with different organic amendments and this suggests a possible way of selecting for specific microbial communities in the management of eroded

  3. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem.

  4. The potential role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in protecting endangered plants and habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Hermann; Turnau, Katarzyna; Regvar, Marjana

    2010-10-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened with the extinction of plants and, at the same time, invasion by new species. Plant invasiveness and loss of species can be caused by similar but opposing pressures on the community structures. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can have multiple positive effects on plant growth, productivity, health, and stress relief. Many endangered species live in symbiosis with AMF. However, the list of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) indicates that the mycorrhizal status of most of the threatened species has not been assessed. Rare plants often occur in specialized and also endangered habitats and might utilize specialized or unique AMF. The specificity of any endangered plant to its AMF population has not been investigated. Because most of the current AMF isolates that are available colonize a broad range of plant species, selected inocula could be used to promote growth of endangered plants before the proper and more effective indigenous AMF are characterized. Application of AMF in field sites to protect endangered plants is hardly feasible due to the complexity of plant community structures and the large amount of fungal inocula needed. Endangered plants could, however, be grown as greenhouse cultures together with appropriate fungi, and, at the relevant developmental stage, they could be re-planted into native sites to prevent extinction and to preserve plant community ecology. PMID:20652364

  5. Gold Nanomaterial Uptake from Soil Is Not Increased by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization of Solanum Lycopersicum (Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Judy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioaccumulation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs by plants has been demonstrated in numerous studies over the past 5–10 years. However, the overwhelming majority of these studies were conducted using hydroponic systems and the degree to which the addition of the biological and chemical components present in the soil might fundamentally alter the potential of plant bioaccumulation of ENMs is unclear. Here, we used two genotypes of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato, reduced mycorrhizal colonization (rmc, a mutant which does not allow arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF colonization, and its progenitor, 76R, to examine how colonization by AMF alters trends of gold ENM bioaccumulation from a natural soil. Gold was taken up and bioaccumulated by plants of both genotypes. Gold concentrations were significantly higher in the rmc treatment although this was likely attributable to the large differences in biomass between the 76R and rmc plants. Regardless, there was little evidence that AMF played a significant role in trafficking Au ENMs into the plants. Furthermore, despite very low NH4NO3 extractable Au concentrations, Au accumulated at the root-soil interface. Although this observation would seem to suggest that ENMs may have potential to influence this particularly biologically active and important soil compartment, we observed no evidence of this here, as the 76R plants developed a robust AMF symbiosis despite accumulation of Au ENMs at the rhizoplane.

  6. A dipeptide transporter from the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis is upregulated in the intraradical phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmondo, Simone; Fiorilli, Valentina; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ferrol, Nuria; Marmeisse, Roland; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which form an ancient and widespread mutualistic symbiosis with plants, are a crucial but still enigmatic component of the plant micro biome. Nutrient exchange has probably been at the heart of the success of this plant-fungus interaction since the earliest days of plants on land. To characterize genes from the fungal partner involved in nutrient exchange, and presumably important for the functioning of the AM symbiosis, genome-wide transcriptomic data obtained from the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis were exploited. A gene sequence, showing amino acid sequence and transmembrane domains profile similar to members of the PTR2 family of fungal oligopeptide transporters, was identified and called RiPTR2. The functional properties of RiPTR2 were investigated by means of heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in either one or both of its di/tripeptide transporter genes PTR2 and DAL5. These assays showed that RiPTR2 can transport dipeptides such as Ala-Leu, Ala-Tyr or Tyr-Ala. From the gene expression analyses it seems that RiPTR2 responds to different environmental clues when the fungus grows inside the root and in the extraradical phase. PMID:25232358

  7. Interaction of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi with Erosion in an Oxisol †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, M.; Fox, R. L.; Aziz, T.; El-Swaify, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) symbiosis was monitored in Leucaena leucocephala grown in an Oxisol subjected to incremental simulated erosion. The density of VAM infective propagules in the soil diminished as the level of simulated erosion (removal of surface soil) was increased from 0 to 50 cm. The level of infection on L. leucocephala roots observed at harvest was not significantly influenced by simulated erosion unless removal of surface soil exceeded 25 cm. Inoculation of this soil and the uneroded soil with Glomus aggregatum enhanced the early onset of infection but did not significantly influence the level of infection observed at the time of harvest. Simulated erosion in excess of 7.5 cm of surface soil removal significantly delayed the development of VAM effectiveness monitored in terms of the P status of L. leucocephala subleaflets and also curtailed the level of maximum effectiveness observed. Decreases in VAM effectiveness were significantly correlated with decreases in soil chemical constituents. However, VAM effectiveness in a soil subjected to 30 cm of surface soil removal was not restored to a significant extent unless the soil was amended with P, even though other nutrients were restored to sufficiency levels. Our results demonstrate that the development of VAM effectiveness is the phase of the VAM symbiosis that is most adversely influenced by simulated erosion and that this effect appears to be caused primarily by insufficient P in the soil solution. PMID:16347615

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidinger, S.; Eschen, R.; Gange, A.C.; Finch, P.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi counteract the Janzen-Connell effect of soil pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Etienne, Rampal S; Huang, Fengmin; Wang, Yongfan; Yu, Shixiao

    2015-01-01

    Soilborne pathogens can contribute to diversity maintenance in tree communities through the Janzen-Connell effect, whereby the pathogenic reduction of seedling performance attenuates with distance from conspecifics. By contrast, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been reported to promote seedli

  10. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza–Specific Signaling in Rice Transcends the Common Symbiosis Signaling Pathway[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Banba, Mari; Croset, Vincent; An, Kyungsook; Miyao, Akio; An, Gynheung; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Paszkowski, Uta

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about signaling in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses is currently restricted to the common symbiosis (SYM) signaling pathway discovered in legumes. This pathway includes calcium as a second messenger and regulates both AM and rhizobial symbioses. Both monocotyledons and dicotyledons form symbiotic associations with AM fungi, and although they differ markedly in the organization of their root systems, the morphology of colonization is similar. To identify and dissect AM-specific signaling in rice (Oryza sativa), we developed molecular phenotyping tools based on gene expression patterns that monitor various steps of AM colonization. These tools were used to distinguish common SYM-dependent and -independent signaling by examining rice mutants of selected putative legume signaling orthologs predicted to be perturbed both upstream (CASTOR and POLLUX) and downstream (CCAMK and CYCLOPS) of the central, calcium-spiking signal. All four mutants displayed impaired AM interactions and altered AM-specific gene expression patterns, therefore demonstrating functional conservation of SYM signaling between distant plant species. In addition, differential gene expression patterns in the mutants provided evidence for AM-specific but SYM-independent signaling in rice and furthermore for unexpected deviations from the SYM pathway downstream of calcium spiking. PMID:19033527

  11. When do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi protect plant roots from pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Benjamin A

    2010-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are mainly thought to facilitate phosphorus uptake in plants, but they can also perform several other functions that are equally beneficial. Our recent study sheds light on the factors determining one such function, enhanced plant protection from root pathogens. Root infection by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum was determined by both plant susceptibility and the ability of an AM fungal partner to suppress the pathogen. The non-susceptible plant species (Allium cepa) had limited F. oxysporum infection even without AM fungi. In contrast, the susceptible plant species (Setaria glauca) was heavily infected and only AM fungi in the family Glomeraceae limited pathogen abundance. Plant susceptibility to pathogens was likely determined by contrasting root architectures between plants, with the simple rooted plant (A. cepa) presenting fewer sites for infection.AM fungal colonization, however, was not limited in the same way in part because plants with fewer, simple roots are more mycorrhizal dependent. Protection only by Glomus species also indicates that whatever the mechanism(s) of this function, it responds to AM fungal families differently. While poor at pathogen protection, AM fungal species in the family Gigasporaceae most benefited the growth of the simple rooted plant species. Our research indicates that plant trait differences, such as root architecture can determine how important each mycorrhizal function is to plant growth but the ability to provide these functions differs among AM fungi. PMID:20400855

  12. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by arbuscular mycorrhizal leek plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.; Dalpe, Y. [Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Grain and Oilseeds Branch

    2005-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), nutrient uptake, and leek growth under greenhouse conditions. This experiment included 3 mycorrhizal treatments, 2 microorganism treatments, 2 PAH chemicals, and 4 concentrations of PAHs. Plant growth was greatly reduced by the addition of anthracene or phenanthrene in soil, whereas mycorrhizal inoculation not only increased plant growth, but also enhanced uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus. PAH concentrations in soil was lowered through the inoculation of two different strains of the species G. intraradices and G. versiforme. In 12 weeks of pot cultures, anthracene and phenanthrene concentrations decreased for all 3 PAH levels tested. However, the reduced amount of phenanthrene in soil was greater than that of anthracene. The addition of a soil microorganism extract into pot cultures accelerated the PAH degradation. The inoculation of AMF in a hydrocarbon contaminated soil was shown to enhance PAHs soil decontamination. It was concluded that a soil colonized with AMF can not only improve plant growth but can also stimulate soil microflora abundance and diversity. AMF may therefore directly influence PAH soil decontamination through plant growth enhancement.

  13. [Effect of five fungicides on growth of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Xiu-teng; Zhou, Liane-yun; Shao, Ai-juan; Chen, Mei-lan

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain the fungicides with minimal impact on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, the effect of five fungicides including polyoxins, jinggangmycins, thiophanate methylate, chlorothalonil and carbendazim on the growth of medicinal plant and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis were studied. Pot cultured Glycyrrhiza uralensis was treated with different fungicides with the concentration that commonly used in the field. 60 d after treated with fungicides, infection rate, infection density, biomass indexes, photosyn- thetic index and the content of active component were measured. Experimental results showed that carbendazim had the strongest inhibition on mycorrhizal symbiosis effect. Carbendazim significantly inhibited the mycorrhizal infection rate, significantly suppressed the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. Polyoxins showed the lowest inhibiting affection. Polyoxins had no significant effect on mycorrhizal infection rate, the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. The other three fungicides also had an inhibitory effect on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, and the inhibition degrees were all between polyoxins's and carbendazim's. The author considered that fungicide's inhibition degree on mycorrhizal effect might be related with the species of fungicides, so the author suggested that the farmer should try to choose bio-fungicides like polyoxins. PMID:27141668

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced shifts in foliar metabolism and photosynthesis mirror the developmental stage of the symbiosis and are only partly driven by improved phosphate uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Rabea; Baier, Markus C; Müller, Caroline

    2014-12-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) plants, the plant delivers photoassimilates to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF), whereas the mycosymbiont contributes, in addition to other beneficial effects, to phosphate (PO4(3-)) uptake from the soil. Thereby, the additional fungal carbon (C) sink strength in roots and improved plant PO4(3-) nutrition may influence aboveground traits. We investigated how the foliar metabolome of Plantago major is affected along with the development of root symbiosis, whether the photosynthetic performance is affected by AM, and whether these effects are mediated by improved PO4(3-) nutrition. Therefore, we studied PO4(3-)-limited and PO4(3-)-supplemented controls in comparison with mycorrhizal plants at 20, 30, and 62 days postinoculation with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis. Foliar metabolome modifications were determined by the developmental stage of symbiosis, with changes becoming more pronounced over time. In a well-established stage of mature mutualism, about 60% of the metabolic changes and an increase in foliar CO2 assimilation were unrelated to the significantly increased foliar phosphorus (P) content. We propose a framework relating the time-dependent metabolic changes to the shifts in C costs and P benefits for the plant. Besides P-mediated effects, the strong fungal C sink activity may drive the changes in the leaf traits. PMID:25162317

  15. Native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the Yungas forests, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Alejandra G; Cabello, Marta N; Bartoloni, Norberto J

    2011-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities from the Yungas forests of Argentina were studied. The AMF species present in the rhizosphere of some dominant native plants (one tree: Alnus acuminata; three herbaceous species: Duchesnea indica, Oxalis conorrhiza, Trifolium aff. repens; and one shrub: Sambucus peruviana) from two sites (Quebrada del Portugués and Narváez Range) of the Yungas forests were isolated, identified and quantified during the four seasons of the year. Twenty-two AMF morphotaxa were found. Spore density of some AMF species at each site varied among seasons. The genera that most contributed to the biodiversity index were Acaulospora for Quebrada del Portugués and Glomus for Narváez Range. High diversity values were observed in the Yungas forests, particularly in the spring (rainy season). We concluded AMF differed in species composition and seasonal sporulation dynamics in the Yungas forests. PMID:21415289

  16. Alleviation of drought stress of marigold (Tagetes erecta) plants by using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Asrar, Abdul-Wasea A.; Elhindi, Khalid M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus “AMF” (Glomus constrictum Trappe) on growth, pigments, and phosphorous content of marigold (Tagetes erecta) plant grown under different levels of drought stress was investigated. The applied drought stress levels reduced growth vigor (i.e. plant height, shoot dry weight, flower diameter as well as its fresh and dry weights) of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plant as compared to control plant (non-drought stressed plant). The presence of mycorrhi...

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota of soils of the Lubuskie province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Kowalczyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2003, the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the phylum Glomeromycota in cultivated and uncultivated soils of the Lubuskie province was investigated. The occurrence of AMF was examined based on 56 root and rhizosphere soils collected under 7 species of cultivated and uncultivated plants growing in 28 localities. Spores of AMF were isolated from both field-collected samples and trap cultures. They were revealed in 100% of field soils and 93.8% of trap cultures and represented 7 of the 8 recognized genera of the Glomeromycota. The arbuscular fungi occurring distinctly more frequently in the soil and root samples examined were members of the genus Glomus. The species of AMF most frequently occurring in cultivated soils of the Lubuskie province were G. claroideum, G. constrictum, G. deserticola and G. mosseae, whereas G. claroideum, G. constrictum, G. deserticola, G. mosseae, and S. dipurpurescens were more frequently found in uncultivated sites. The analysis of similarity of the species composition of AMF populations in sites of the Lubuskie province and the Western Pomeranian province earlier examined showed that (1 the occurrence in Poland of most taxa of these fungi detected in the study presented here is even and does not change with time, (2 the communities of AMF area are stable, despite the arduousness resulting from the agricultural and chemical practices conducted, and (3 the species diversity of the plants cultivated in a long period of time has no influence on the species composition of populations of AMF.

  18. Spore communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and mycorrhizal associations in different ecosystems, south Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. I. Antoniolli

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF were surveyed in different South Australian ecosystems. The soil was wet-sieved for spore extraction, followed by the determination of presence and abundance of AMF species as well as the percentage of root colonization. Mycorrhizal associations were common and there was substantial fungal diversity in different ecosystems. Spores were most abundant in the permanent pasture system and less abundant under continuous wheat. The incidence of mycorrhizal associations in different plant species and the occurrence of Arum and Paris type colonization generally conformed with previous information. Spores of seventeen AMF were verified throughout seasonal changes in 1996 and 1997 in the permanent pasture and on four host species (Lolium perenne, Plantago lanceolata, Sorghum sp. and Trifolium subterraneum , set up with the same soils under greenhouse conditions. Glomus mosseae was the dominant spore type at all sampling times and in all trap cultures. Mycorrhizal diversity was significantly affected by different sampling times in trap cultures but not in field-collected soil. P. lanceolata, Sorghum sp. and T. subterraneum as hosts for trap cultures showed no differences in richness and diversity of AMF spores that developed in association with their roots. Abundance and diversity were lowest, however, in association with L. perenne , particularly in December 1996. Results show that the combination of spore identification from field-collected soil and trap cultures is essential to study population and diversity of AMF. The study provides baseline data for ongoing monitoring of mycorrhizal populations using conventional methods and material for the determination of the symbiotic effectiveness of AMF key members.

  19. Rapid assessment of acid phosphatase activity in the mycorrhizosphere and in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A pot experiment has been carried out under controlled conditions to study the possibility of applying the technique of in vivo staining for acid phosphatase activity on the roots of mycorrhizal plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae. The pots had 5 compartments. The central root compartment was separated from the two adjacent hyphal compartments using nylon nets of 30 m m mesh, and the two hyphal compartments were separated from the two outermost compartments with 0.45 m m membranes. Red clover was grown in the root compartment and was either inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus mosseae or uninoculated. Sodium phytate was applied to all compartments. The results show that AMF can increase acid phosphatase activity of clover roots. The plant roots acquired deep red "mycorrhizal prints". The external hyphae also had obvious "hyphal prints" on the test papers, indicating the ability of mycorrhizal hyphae to release acid phosphatase.

  20. Effect of chromium contaminated soil on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation of roots and metal uptake by Plantago lanceolata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estaun, V.; Cortes, A.; Velianos, K.; Camprubi, A.; Calvet, C.

    2010-07-01

    Industrial practices are the primary causes for the accumulation of chromium in the environment, an element considered as a toxic heavy metal when present in high concentrations. The beneficial contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to plant nutrition and growth has been acknowledged, however, results of heavy metal uptake by plants under mycorrhizal symbiosis vary. The AMF Glomus intraradices (BEG 72) was used with Plantago lanceolata as a host plant in three experiments. In the first one, devised to assess the plant tolerance to Cr(III) in the soil, four levels of chromium concentration were applied in a sterile soil mix, placed in pots with inoculated and non inoculated plant treatments. Plant survival, shoot weight and AMF root colonisation were measured. In the second experiment which was designed in order to determine the effect of the symbiosis on the chromium uptake, similar treatments were used, and in addition, the heavy metal plant tissue content was measured and the bioconcentration factors calculated. In the third experiment the chromium uptake from an industrial chromium waste contaminated soil was assessed using treatments with and without the AMF. Results showed that chromium has a severe impact on the survival of non inoculated plants, however, plants inoculated with AMF in moderately contaminated soil, perform in terms of growth and survival rate, as well as the non inoculated plants in soil with no chromium added, suggesting a buffering effect of the AMF by decreased intake of the toxic element in the roots and its translocation to the shoot. (Author) 28 refs.

  1. The Combined Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF and Lead (Pb Stress on Pb Accumulation, Plant Growth Parameters, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Yang

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are considered as a potential biotechnological tool for improving phytostabilization efficiency and plant tolerance to heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the mechanisms through which AMF help to alleviate metal toxicity in plants are still poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two AMF species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices on the growth, Pb accumulation, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of a leguminous tree (Robinia pseudoacacia L. at Pb addition levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg kg(-1 soil. AMF symbiosis decreased Pb concentrations in the leaves and promoted the accumulation of biomass as well as photosynthetic pigment contents. Mycorrhizal plants had higher gas exchange capacity, non-photochemistry efficiency, and photochemistry efficiency compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, ascorbate peroxidases (APX and glutathione peroxidase (GPX were enhanced, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA contents were reduced in mycorrhizal plants. These findings suggested that AMF symbiosis could protect plants by alleviating cellular oxidative damage in response to Pb stress. Furthermore, mycorrhizal dependency on plants increased with increasing Pb stress levels, indicating that AMF inoculation likely played a more important role in plant Pb tolerance in heavily contaminated soils. Overall, both F. mosseae and R. intraradices were able to maintain efficient symbiosis with R. pseudoacacia in Pb polluted soils. AMF symbiosis can improve photosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging capabilities and decrease Pb concentrations in leaves to alleviate Pb toxicity in R. pseudoacacia. Our results suggest that the application of the two AMF species associated with R. pseudoacacia could be a promising strategy for enhancing the phytostabilization efficiency of Pb

  2. The Combined Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Lead (Pb) Stress on Pb Accumulation, Plant Growth Parameters, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yurong; Han, Xiaozhen; Liang, Yan; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Jie; Tang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered as a potential biotechnological tool for improving phytostabilization efficiency and plant tolerance to heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the mechanisms through which AMF help to alleviate metal toxicity in plants are still poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two AMF species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on the growth, Pb accumulation, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of a leguminous tree (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) at Pb addition levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg kg(-1) soil. AMF symbiosis decreased Pb concentrations in the leaves and promoted the accumulation of biomass as well as photosynthetic pigment contents. Mycorrhizal plants had higher gas exchange capacity, non-photochemistry efficiency, and photochemistry efficiency compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidases (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were enhanced, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were reduced in mycorrhizal plants. These findings suggested that AMF symbiosis could protect plants by alleviating cellular oxidative damage in response to Pb stress. Furthermore, mycorrhizal dependency on plants increased with increasing Pb stress levels, indicating that AMF inoculation likely played a more important role in plant Pb tolerance in heavily contaminated soils. Overall, both F. mosseae and R. intraradices were able to maintain efficient symbiosis with R. pseudoacacia in Pb polluted soils. AMF symbiosis can improve photosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capabilities and decrease Pb concentrations in leaves to alleviate Pb toxicity in R. pseudoacacia. Our results suggest that the application of the two AMF species associated with R. pseudoacacia could be a promising strategy for enhancing the phytostabilization efficiency of Pb

  3. Recombination in Glomus intraradices, a supposed ancient asexual arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Ian R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are important symbionts of most plant species, promoting plant diversity and productivity. This symbiosis is thought to have contributed to the early colonisation of land by plants. Morphological stasis over 400 million years and the lack of an observed sexual stage in any member of the phylum Glomeromycota led to the controversial suggestion of AMF being ancients asexuals. Evidence for recombination in AMF is contradictory. Results We addressed the question of recombination in the AMF Glomus intraradices by sequencing 11 polymorphic nuclear loci in 40 morphologically identical isolates from one field. Phylogenetic relationships among genotypes showed a reticulate network pattern providing a rationale to test for recombination. Five statistical tests predicted multiple recombinant regions in the genome of a core set of isolates. In contrast, five clonal lineages had fixed a large number of differences. Conclusion Our data show that AMF from one field have undergone recombination but that clonal lineages coexist. This finding has important consequences for understanding AMF evolution, co-evolution of AMF and plants and highlights the potential for commercially introduced AMF inoculum recombining with existing local populations. Finally, our results reconcile seemingly contradictory studies on whether AMF are clonal or form recombining populations.

  4. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL IN NATIVE WOODY SPECIES OF TIBAGI RIVER BASIN, PARANÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia M. Nakano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM and response to inoculation of 81 native woody species from Tibagi river basin, Paraná State, South Brazil, under greenhouse conditions are reported. The AM colonization incidence of 51 native woody species collected in the area at the beginning of arboreal succession and in the interior of the forest of the Parque Estadual Mata dosGodoy (23° 27' S e 51o 15' W is also analysed. The response to inoculation and AM colonization in greenhouse were in general high between the pioneer and early secondary species, and low between the late secondary and climax species. In nine arboreal species belonging to the late secondary and climax species did not show response to inoculation. The incidence of AM colonization in root samples collected in the field was high to intermediate among the pioneer and early secondary species and was low to very low between the late secondary and climax species. Peltophorum dubium (canafístula, Zeyheria tuberculosa (ipê-felpudo e Aspidosperma polyneuron (peroba-rosa did not have response to inoculation and AM colonization of the roots from both the greenhouse and field. All other species showed AM colonization which changed from very high to very low, indicating that the occurrence of AM colonization is generalized among native woody species. The woody species belonging to the early phases of succession were more susceptible to AM symbiosis than later successional species.

  5. Effect of different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolates on growth and arsenic accumulation in Plantago lanceolata L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of indigenous and non-indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on As uptake by Plantago lanceolata L. growing on substrate originating from mine waste rich in As was assessed in a pot experiment. P. lanceolata inoculated with AMF had higher shoot and root biomass and lower concentrations of As in roots than the non-inoculated plants. There were significant differences in As concentration and uptake between different AMF isolates. Inoculation with the indigenous isolate resulted in increased transfer of As from roots to shoots; AMF from non-polluted area apparently restricted plants from absorbing As to the tissue; and plants inoculated with an AMF isolate from Zn–Pb waste showed strong As retainment within the roots. Staining with dithizone indicated that AMF might be actively involved in As accumulation. The mycorrhizal colonization affected also the concentration of Cd and Zn in roots and Pb concentration, both in shoots and roots. - Highlights: ► The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in As uptake was studied. ► Growth of Plantago lanceolata was significantly enhanced by mycorrhizal inoculation. ► Arsenic concentration and uptake significantly depended on the AMF isolate. ► Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi may be useful for bioremediation of As contaminated wastes. - Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on As uptake by Plantago lanceolata strongly depends on the origin of fungal isolates.

  6. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and seedling performance of the frankincense tree (Boswellia papyrifera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hizikias, E.B.

    2011-01-01

    Arid areas are characterized by a seasonal climate with a long dry period. In such stressful environment, resource availability is driven by longterm and shorterm rainfall pulses. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enhance access to moisture and nutrients and thereby influence plant performance. I

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alleviate oxidative stress induced by ADOR and enhance antioxidant responses of tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Palma, José Manuel; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet

    2014-03-15

    The behaviour of tomato plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi grown in the presence of aqueous extracts from dry olive residue (ADOR) was studied in order to understand how this symbiotic relationship helps plants to cope with oxidative stress caused by ADOR. The influence of AM symbiosis on plant growth and other physiological parameters was also studied. Tomato plants were inoculated with the AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae and were grown in the presence of ADOR bioremediated and non-bioremediated by Coriolopsis floccosa and Penicillium chrysogenum-10. The antioxidant response as well as parameters of oxidative damage were examined in roots and leaves. The data showed a significant increase in the biomass of AM plant growth in the presence of ADOR, regardless of whether it was bioremediated. The establishment and development of the symbiosis were negatively affected after plants were exposed to ADOR. No differences were observed in the relative water content (RWC) or PS II efficiency between non-AM and AM plants. The increase in the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) were simultaneous to the reduction of MDA levels and H2O2 content in AM root growth in the presence of ADOR. Similar H2O2 levels were observed among non-AM and AM plants, although only AM plants showed reduced lipid peroxidation content, probably due to the involvement of antioxidant enzymes. The results highlight how the application of both bioremediated ADOR and AM fungi can alleviate the oxidative stress conditions, improving the growth and development of tomato plants. PMID:24594394

  8. Application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the production of cut flower roses under commercial-like conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmendia, I.; Mangas, V. J.

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the influence of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, and G. intraradices (Schenck and Smith) on cut flower yield of rose (Rosa hybrida L. cv. Grand Gala) under commercial-like greenhouse conditions. Flower production was positively influenced by G. mosseae inoculation. Both inocula tested caused low levels of mycorrhizal root colonization, with higher percentages in Rosa associated with G. mosseae. Significant improvement of plant biomass, leaf nutritional status or flower quality was not detected in inoculated plants probably due to the low symbiosis establishment. However, G. mosseae reduced by one month the time needed for 80% of the plants to flower and slightly increased number of cut flowers relative to non-mycorrhizal controls on the fourth, sixth and eighth months after transplanting. It is suggested that an altered carbohydrate metabolism could contribute to this positive effect. Low colonization of rose roots supports the idea that more effort is required to ensure successful application of AMF in ornamental production systems. (Author) 40 refs.

  9. Metal toxicity differently affects the Iris pseudacorus-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi symbiosis in terrestrial and semi-aquatic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wężowicz, K; Turnau, K; Anielska, T; Zhebrak, I; Gołuszka, K; Błaszkowski, J; Rozpądek, P

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation offers an environmental friendly alternative to conventional cleanup techniques. In this study, mycorrhizal fungi isolated from the roots of Mentha longifolia grown in the basin of the Centuria River (S Poland) were used. Iris pseudacorus was grown in substratum from an industrial waste, enriched in Pb, Fe, Zn, and Cd in a terrestrial and water-logged habitat. Plant yield and photosynthetic performance was the highest in the aquatic environment; however, the presence of toxic metals (TM) negatively affected photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry as shown by the JIP test. Fungi colonization and Cd accumulation within plant tissues was decreased. In the terrestrial habitat, neither arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) nor metal toxicity affected plant growth, although metal uptake, Cd in particular, as well as photosynthesis were affected. Inoculated plants accumulated significantly more Cd, and photosynthesis was downregulated. The results presented in this study clearly indicate that the I. pseudacorus-AMF symbiosis adapts itself to the presence of toxic metals in the environment, optimizing resource supply, energy fluxes, and possibly stress tolerance mechanisms. Plant/AMF consortia grown in terrestrial and water-logged habitats utilize different strategies to cope with metal toxicity. The use of AMF in improving the phytoremediation potential of I. pseudacorus needs, however, further research.

  10. Metal toxicity differently affects the Iris pseudacorus-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi symbiosis in terrestrial and semi-aquatic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wężowicz, K; Turnau, K; Anielska, T; Zhebrak, I; Gołuszka, K; Błaszkowski, J; Rozpądek, P

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation offers an environmental friendly alternative to conventional cleanup techniques. In this study, mycorrhizal fungi isolated from the roots of Mentha longifolia grown in the basin of the Centuria River (S Poland) were used. Iris pseudacorus was grown in substratum from an industrial waste, enriched in Pb, Fe, Zn, and Cd in a terrestrial and water-logged habitat. Plant yield and photosynthetic performance was the highest in the aquatic environment; however, the presence of toxic metals (TM) negatively affected photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry as shown by the JIP test. Fungi colonization and Cd accumulation within plant tissues was decreased. In the terrestrial habitat, neither arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) nor metal toxicity affected plant growth, although metal uptake, Cd in particular, as well as photosynthesis were affected. Inoculated plants accumulated significantly more Cd, and photosynthesis was downregulated. The results presented in this study clearly indicate that the I. pseudacorus-AMF symbiosis adapts itself to the presence of toxic metals in the environment, optimizing resource supply, energy fluxes, and possibly stress tolerance mechanisms. Plant/AMF consortia grown in terrestrial and water-logged habitats utilize different strategies to cope with metal toxicity. The use of AMF in improving the phytoremediation potential of I. pseudacorus needs, however, further research. PMID:26585452

  11. Identification of genes that regulate phosphate acquisition and plant performance during arbuscular my corrhizal symbiosis in medicago truncatula and brachypodium distachyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Maria J [Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, NY (United States); Hudson, Matthew E [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-11-24

    Most vascular flowering plants have the ability to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots and can have a profound effect on plant productivity, largely through improvements in plant mineral nutrition. Within the root cortical cells, the plant and fungus create novel interfaces specialized for nutrient transfer, while the fungus also develops a network of hyphae in the rhizosphere. Through this hyphal network, the fungus acquires and delivers phosphate and nitrogen to the root. In return, the plant provides the fungus with carbon. In addition, to enhancing plant mineral nutrition, the AM symbiosis has an important role in the carbon cycle, and positive effects on soil health. Here we identified and characterized plant genes involved in the regulation and functioning of the AM symbiosis in Medicago truncatula and Brachypodium distachyon. This included the identification and and characterization of a M. truncatula transcription factors that are required for symbiosis. Additionally, we investigated the molecular basis of functional diversity among AM symbioses in B. distachyon and analysed the transcriptome of Brachypodium distachyon during symbiosis.

  12. Changes in arbuscular mycorrhizal associations and fine root traits in sites under different plant successional phases in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangaro, Waldemar; de Assis, Rafael Leandro; Rostirola, Leila Vergal; de Souza, Priscila Bochi; Gonçalves, Melissa Camargo; Andrade, Galdino; Nogueira, Marco Antonio

    2008-12-01

    Fine root morphological traits and distribution, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, soil fertility, and nutrient concentration in fine root tissue were compared in sites under different successional phases: grass plants, secondary forest, and mature forest in Londrina county, Paraná state, southern Brazil. Soil cores were collected randomly at the 0-10- and 10-20-cm depths in three quadrants (50 m2) in each site. Plants from the different successional stages displayed high differences in fine root distribution, fine root traits, and mycorrhizal root colonization. There were increases in the concentration of nutrients both in soil and fine roots and decrease of bulk soil density along the succession. The fine root biomass and diameter increased with the succession progress. The total fine root length, specific root length, root hair length, and root hair incidence decreased with the succession advance. Similarly, the mycorrhizal root colonization and the density of AM fungi spores in the soil decreased along the succession. Mycorrhizal root colonization and spore density were positively correlated with fine root length, specific root length, root hair length, root hair incidence, and bulk density and negatively correlated with fine root diameter and concentration of some nutrients both in soil and root tissues. Nutrient concentration in root tissue and in soil was positively correlated with fine root diameter and negatively correlated with specific root length, root hair length, and root hair incidence. These results suggest different adaptation strategies of plant roots for soil exploration and mineral acquisition among the different successional stages. Early successional stages displayed plants with fine root morphology and AM fungi colonization to improve the root functional efficiencies for uptake of nutrients and faster soil resource exploration. Late successional stages displayed plants with fine root morphology and mycorrhizal symbiosis for both a lower

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities are phylogenetically clustered at small scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sebastian; Caruso, Tancredi; Verbruggen, Erik; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies with markers covering the full Glomeromycota phylum were used to uncover phylogenetic community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with Festuca brevipila. The study system was a semi-arid grassland with high plant diversity and a steep environmental gradient in pH, C, N, P and soil water content. The AMF community in roots and rhizosphere soil were analyzed separately and consisted of 74 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in total. Community-level variance partitioning showed that the role of environmental factors in determining AM species composition was marginal when controlling for spatial autocorrelation at multiple scales. Instead, phylogenetic distance and spatial distance were major correlates of AMF communities: OTUs that were more closely related (and which therefore may have similar traits) were more likely to co-occur. This pattern was insensitive to phylogenetic sampling breadth. Given the minor effects of the environment, we propose that at small scales closely related AMF positively associate through biotic factors such as plant-AMF filtering and interactions within the soil biota.

  14. Soil characteristics driving arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi communities in semiarid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecillas, Emma; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Torres, Pilar; Díaz, Gisela; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Montesinos, Alicia; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are an important soil microbial group that affects multiple ecosystems functions and processes, including nutrient cycling, plant productivity and competition, and plant diversity. We carried out a study to investigate AMF communities in the roots and the rhizosphere of Brachypodium retusum (Pers.) Beauv., a common plant species of great ecological importance that grows in different type of soils in semiarid Mediterranean areas with similar climatic conditions. We hypothesized that if both factors, host plant species and climatic conditions, cannot influence the differences in AMF communities in the roots and in the rhizosphere of Brachypodium retusum, variances in AMF richness and diversity could be due to soil characteristics. Hence we study the relationships between physical, chemical and biological soil characteristics and AMF community composition found in the roots and in the rhizospheres. We recorded sixty-seven AMF operational taxonomical units (OTUs). Each soil type presented a different AMF community composition and thus, can be characterized by its own AMF communities. A combination among some of the soil parameters could define the AMF species present in the roots and the rhizosphere of B. retusum. It was the case for calcium, urease, protease and ß-glucosidase which explained the variation in the AMF communities. In conclusion, soil charactristics can be decisive in the assembling of the AMF communities, managing the diversity and composition of these communities.

  15. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Associations in Biofuel Cropping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K.

    2012-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are soil microorganisms that play an important role in delivering nutrients to plant roots via mutualistic symbiotic relationships. AMF root colonization was compared between four different biofuel cropping systems in an effort to learn more about the factors that control colonization. The four biofuel systems sampled were corn, switchgrass, prairie, and fertilized prairie. We hypothesized that prairie systems would have the highest levels of AMF colonization and that fertilization would result in lower AMF colonization rates. Roots were sampled from each system in early June and mid-July. Soil P and pH were also measured. In contrast to our hypothesis, corn systems had 70-80% colonization and the unfertilized prairie system had ~35% (P=0.001) in June. In July, all systems saw an increase in colonization rate, but corn roots still had significantly more AMF colonization than unfertilized prairie (P=0.001). AMF colonization in the unfertilized prairie system increased ~55% from June to July. In contrast to previous work, AMF colonization rates were highest in systems with the greatest availability on P and N (corn systems). These results indicate that seasonal differences in root growth were more influential to AMF root colonization than soil nutrient availability.

  16. Augmented growth of long pepper in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.K.Singh; P.Gogoi

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) technology is a soil-based fertilization practice for sustainable crop productivity.We evaluated six indigenous Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) strains for their symbiotic response with Piper longum (long pepper),a non-timber forest product holding promise as a commercial crop for its medicinal fruits and roots.Piper saplings were raised in a 10 cm thick sand and soil mix inoculated with various AMF.Under field conditions,plants inoculated with AMF demonstrated better survival (≥80%) than non mycorrhizal plants (58%).Almost all the studied AMF strains increased the plant growth,biomass and nutrient content (N and P) over the uninoculated control.Mycorrhizal inoculation with four AMF species,viz:Glomus fasciculatum,G.clarum,G.etunicatum and G.versiforme greatly enhanced long pepper growth both in the nursery and field conditions.

  17. Transcriptomes of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and litchi host interaction after tree girdling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eShu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trunk girdling can increase carbohydrate content above the girdling site and is an important strategy for inhibiting new shoot growth to promote flowering in cultivated litchi (Litchi chinenis Sonn.. However, girdling inhibits carbohydrate transport to the root in nearly all of the fruit development periods and consequently decreases root absorption. The mechanism through which carbohydrates regulate root development in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM remains largely unknown. Carbohydrate content, AM colonization, and transcriptome in the roots were analyzed to elucidate the interaction between host litchi and AM fungi when carbohydrate content decreases. Girdling decreased glucose, fructose, sucrose, quebrachitol and starch contents in the litchi mycorrhizal roots, thereby reducing AM colonization. RNA-seq achieved approximately 60 million reads of each sample, with an average length of reads reaching 100 bp. Assembly of all the reads of the 30 samples produced 671,316 transcripts and 381,429 unigenes, with average lengths of 780 and 643 bp, respectively. Litchi (54,100 unigenes and AM fungi unigenes (33,120 unigenes were achieved through sequence annotation during decreased carbohydrate content. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG showed that flavonoids, alpha-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid are the main factors that regulate AM colonization in litchi. However, flavonoids may play a role in detecting the stage at which carbohydrate content decreases; alpha-linolenic acid or linoleic acid may affect AM formation under the adaptation process. Litchi trees stimulated the expression of defense-related genes and downregulated symbiosis signal-transduction genes to inhibit new AM colonization. Moreover, transcription factors of the AP2, ERF, Myb, WRKY, bHLH families, and lectin genes altered maintenance of litchi mycorrhizal roots in the post-symbiotic stage for carbohydrate starvation. Similar to those of the litchi host, the E3 ubiquitin

  18. Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal mixture induces changes in heavy metal and nutrient uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Pongrac, Paula; Kump, Peter; Necemer, Marijan; Regvar, Marjana

    2006-01-01

    Plants of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen (Brassicaceae) inoculated or not with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mixture were grown in a highly Cd, Zn and Pb contaminated substrate in order to evaluate the functionality of symbiosis and assess the possible impact of AM colonisation on heavy metal uptake and tolerance. The results suggest AM development in the metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox is favoured at elevated nutrient demands, e.g. during the reproductive period. AM colonisation parameters positively correlated with total soil Cd and Pb. Colonised plants showed significantly improved nutrient and a decreased Cd and Zn uptake as revealed by TRXRF, thus confirming the functionality of the symbiosis. Reduced heavy metal uptake, especially at higher soil metal contents, indicates a changed metal tolerance strategy in colonised T. praecox plants. This is to our knowledge the first report on AM colonisation of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator T. praecox in a greenhouse experiment. PMID:15998561

  19. Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal mixture induces changes in heavy metal and nutrient uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pongrac, Paula [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kump, Peter [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Necemer, Marijan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Regvar, Marjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: marjana.regvar@bf.uni-lj.si

    2006-01-15

    Plants of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox Wulfen (Brassicaceae) inoculated or not with indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mixture were grown in a highly Cd, Zn and Pb contaminated substrate in order to evaluate the functionality of symbiosis and assess the possible impact of AM colonisation on heavy metal uptake and tolerance. The results suggest AM development in the metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox is favoured at elevated nutrient demands, e.g. during the reproductive period. AM colonisation parameters positively correlated with total soil Cd and Pb. Colonised plants showed significantly improved nutrient and a decreased Cd and Zn uptake as revealed by TRXRF, thus confirming the functionality of the symbiosis. Reduced heavy metal uptake, especially at higher soil metal contents, indicates a changed metal tolerance strategy in colonised T. praecox plants. This is to our knowledge the first report on AM colonisation of the Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator T. praecox in a greenhouse experiment. - Colonisation of a Zn, Cd and Pb hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi resulted in improved nutrient and reduced Cd and Zn uptake.

  20. Plant interspecific differences in arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization as a result of soil carbon addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschen, René; Müller-Schärer, Heinz; Schaffner, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Soil nutrient availability and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are important and potentially interacting factors shaping vegetation composition and succession. We investigated the effect of carbon (C) addition, aimed at reducing soil nutrient availability, on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Seedlings of 27 plant species with different sets of life-history traits (functional group affiliation, life history strategy and nitrophilic status) were grown in pots filled with soil from a nutrient-rich set-aside field and amended with different amounts of C. Mycorrhizal colonization was progressively reduced along the gradient of increasing C addition in 17 out of 27 species, but not in the remaining species. Grasses had lower colonization levels than forbs and legumes and the decline in AM fungal colonization was more pronounced in legumes than in other forbs and grasses. Mycorrhizal colonization did not differ between annual and perennial species, but decreased more rapidly along the gradient of increasing C addition in plants with high Ellenberg N values than in plants with low Ellenberg N values. Soil C addition not only limits plant growth through a reduction in available nutrients, but also reduces mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots. The effect of C addition on mycorrhizal colonization varies among plant functional groups, with legumes experiencing an overproportional reduction in AM fungal colonization along the gradient of increasing C addition. We therefore propose that for a better understanding of vegetation succession on set-aside fields one may consider the interrelationship between plant growth, soil nutrient availability and mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots.

  1. Spore development and nuclear inheritance in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijri Mohamed

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A conventional tenet of classical genetics is that progeny inherit half their genome from each parent in sexual reproduction instead of the complete genome transferred to each daughter during asexual reproduction. The transmission of hereditary characteristics from parents to their offspring is therefore predictable, although several exceptions are known. Heredity in microorganisms, however, can be very complex, and even unknown as is the case for coenocytic organisms such as Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF. This group of fungi are plant-root symbionts, ubiquitous in most ecosystems, which reproduce asexually via multinucleate spores for which sexuality has not yet been observed. Results We examined the number of nuclei per spore of four AMF taxa using high Z-resolution live confocal microscopy and found that the number of nuclei was correlated with spore diameter. We show that AMF have the ability, through the establishment of new symbioses, to pass hundreds of nuclei to subsequent generations of multinucleated spores. More importantly, we observed surprising heterogeneity in the number of nuclei among sister spores and show that massive nuclear migration and mitosis are the mechanisms by which AMF spores are formed. We followed spore development of Glomus irregulare from hyphal swelling to spore maturity and found that the spores reached mature size within 30 to 60 days, and that the number of nuclei per spores increased over time. Conclusions We conclude that the spores used for dispersal of AMF contain nuclei with two origins, those that migrate into the spore and those that arise by mitosis in the spore. Therefore, these spores do not represent a stage in the life cycle with a single nucleus, raising the possibility that AMF, unlike all other known eukaryotic organisms, lack the genetic bottleneck of a single-nucleus stage.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota of the Vistula Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the, phylum Glomeromycota associated with plants of maritime sand dunes of the Vistula Bar localed in north-eastern Poland was investigated. The presence of AMF was revealed based on spores isolated from field-collected root-rhizosphere soil mixtures and two-cycle pot trap cultures established with parts of these mixtures. The mixtures came from under five species in four plant families. Spores of AMF occurred in 54.8% of the field samples and belonged to eight species. Additionally, culturing of root-soil mixtures in trap cultures revealed nine species and three undescribed morphotypes carlier not found in the field samples. Considering the number of records of species and morphotypes in the field samples and trap cultures, the fungal species most frequently occurring in dunes of the Vistula Bar is Scutellospora dipurpurescens, followed by Archaeospora trappei, Glomus laccatum, and Scu. armeniaca. The overall average spore abundance in the field samples is low (4.48, range O-3l in 100g dry soil. The ovcrall average species richness determined based on spores from both the field and trap cultures was 2 l and ranged from 0 lo 7 in 100g dry soil. The plant harbouring the highest number of species of AMF was Festuca rubra. Of the maritime dune sites of Poland examined to date, the species composition of AMF of the Vistula Bar is most similar to that of the Słowiński National Park. When the comparisons included 15 maritime dune areas located outside Poland, the highest similarity occurred in the Vistula Bar/Canada comparison.

  3. Comparison of communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots of two Viola species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opik, M; Moora, Mari; Liira, Jaan;

    2006-01-01

    The composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities in roots of rare Viola elatior and common V. mirabilis was investigated using PCR with primers specific for Glomus and common was investigated using PCR with primers specific for group A, followed by single-stranded conformation po...

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal associations in Boswellia papyrifera (frankincense-tree) dominated dry deciduous woodlands of Northern Ethiopia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emiru Birhane, E.B.; Kuyper, T.W.; Sterck, F.J.; Bongers, F.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) status of Boswellia papyrifera (frankincense-tree) dominated dry deciduous woodlands in relation to season, management and soil depth in Ethiopia. We studied 43 woody species in 52 plots in three areas. All woody species were colonized by AM fungi,

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation of peanut in low-fertile tropical soil. II. Alleviation of drought stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quilambo, OA; Weissenhorn, I.; Doddema, H; Kuiper, PJC; Stulen, I.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of drought stress and inoculation with an indigenous Mozambican and a commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inoculant on root colonization and plant growth and yield was studied in two peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars-a traditional, low-yielding Mozambican landrace (Local) and a mo

  6. The effect of turf cutting on plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal spore recolonisation: Implications for heathland restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, P.; Berg, van den L.J.L.; Baar, J.; Ouborg, N.J.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In two natural heathland vegetations, we analysed the effect of turf cutting on spore numbers of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Next to this, we performed a controlled factorial experiment to examine the role of AMF for germination and establishment of Arnica montana in both turf cut and non-tu

  7. Glomus eburneum and Scutellospora fulgida, species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota new for Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characters of spores and mycorrhizae of Glomus eburneum and spores of Scutellospora fulgida, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, are described and illustrated. Additionally, the known distribution of these species in both Poland and other regions of the world is presented. Both species were not earlier reported from Europe.

  8. The scion/rootstock genotypes and habitats affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community in citrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Fang; Pan, Zhiyong; Bai, Fuxi; An, Jianyong; Liu, Jihong; Guo, Wenwu; Bisseling, Ton; Deng, Xiuxin; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus roots have rare root hairs and thus heavily depend on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for mineral nutrient uptake. However, the AMF community structure of citrus is largely unknown. By using 454-pyrosequencing of 18S rRNA gene fragment, we investigated the genetic diversity of AMF colon

  9. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Alleviates Chilling Stress by Boosting Redox Poise and Antioxidant Potential of Tomato Seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Airong; Chen, Shuangchen; Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Dilin; Chang, Rui; Wang, Zhonghong; Lin, Xiaomin; Bai, Bing; Ahammed, Golam Jalal

    2016-01-01

    The universal symbiotic associations between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots remarkably stimulate plant growth, nutrient uptake, and stress responses. The present study investigated the stress ameliorative potential of the AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae against chilling in tom

  10. Taxon-specific PCR primers to detect two inconspicuous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from temperate agricultural grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamper, H.A.; Leuchtmann, A.

    2007-01-01

    Taxon-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers enable detection of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) in plant roots where the fungi lack discriminative morphological and biochemical characters. We designed and validated pairs of new PCR primers targeted to the flanking region

  11. Community analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with Ammophila arenaria in Dutch coastal sand dunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; De Souza, F.A.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) approach for the detection and characterization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was developed and applied to the study of AMF communities associated with the main sand-stabilizing plant spec

  12. Biology, ecology and evolution of the family Gigasporaceae, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, Francisco Adriano de

    2005-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focused on biological, ecological and evolutionary aspects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF), and in particular of the family Gigasporaceae (Gigaspora and Scutellospora, genera). This study had two major objectives. The first objective was to obtain better knowl

  13. Genome-wide analysis of copper, iron and zinc transporters in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Gómez-Gallego, Tamara; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Ferrol, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), belonging to the Glomeromycota, are soil microorganisms that establish mutualistic symbioses with the majority of higher plants. The efficient uptake of low mobility mineral nutrients by the fungal symbiont and their further transfer to the plant is a major feature of this symbiosis. Besides improving plant mineral nutrition, AMF can alleviate heavy metal toxicity to their host plants and are able to tolerate high metal concentrations in the soil. Nevertheless, we are far from understanding the key molecular determinants of metal homeostasis in these organisms. To get some insights into these mechanisms, a genome-wide analysis of Cu, Fe and Zn transporters was undertaken, making use of the recently published whole genome of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis. This in silico analysis allowed identification of 30 open reading frames in the R. irregularis genome, which potentially encode metal transporters. Phylogenetic comparisons with the genomes of a set of reference fungi showed an expansion of some metal transporter families. Analysis of the published transcriptomic profiles of R. irregularis revealed that a set of genes were up-regulated in mycorrhizal roots compared to germinated spores and extraradical mycelium, which suggests that metals are important for plant colonization. PMID:25352857

  14. Role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus custos in the dissipation of PAHs under root-organ culture conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the most common contaminants in soil. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi make host plants resistant to pollutants. This study aims to evaluate the impact of anthracene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene on the AM fungus Rhizophagus custos, isolated from soil contaminated by heavy metals and PAHs, under monoxenic conditions. We found a high level of tolerance in R. custos to the presence of PAHs, especially in the case of anthracene, in which no negative effect on AM-colonized root dry weight (root yield) was observed, and also a decrease in the formation of anthraquinone was detected. Increased PAH dissipation in the mycorrhizal root culture medium was observed; however, dissipation was affected by the level of concentration and the specific PAH, which lead us to a better understanding of the possible contribution of AM fungi, and in particular R. custos, to pollutant removal. -- Highlights: •The AM fungus R. custos contributes to PAH dissipation and removal from the medium. •R. custos showed high levels of tolerance to high concentrations of anthracene. •Phenanthrene negatively affects the functionality of the symbiosis. •R. custos accumulates PAHs in spores and extraradical mycelia. •R. custos is able to prevent PAHs from entering roots. -- The AM fungus Rhizophagus custos is involved in PAH dissipation in absence of other microorganisms and could be potentially effective in protecting anthracene exposed plants

  15. A roadmap of cell-type specific gene expression during sequential stages of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background About 80% of today’s land plants are able to establish an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis with Glomeromycota fungi to improve their access to nutrients and water in the soil. On the molecular level, the development of AM symbioses is only partly understood, due to the asynchronous development of the microsymbionts in the host roots. Although many genes specifically activated during fungal colonization have been identified, genome-wide information on the exact place and time point of their activation remains limited. Results In this study, we relied on a combination of laser-microdissection and the use of Medicago GeneChips to perform a genome-wide analysis of transcription patterns in defined cell-types of Medicago truncatula roots mycorrhized with Glomus intraradices. To cover major stages of AM development, we harvested cells at 5-6 and at 21 days post inoculation (dpi). Early developmental stages of the AM symbiosis were analysed by monitoring gene expression in appressorial and non-appressorial areas from roots harbouring infection units at 5-6 dpi. Here, the use of laser-microdissection for the first time enabled the targeted harvest of those sites, where fungal hyphae first penetrate the root. Circumventing contamination with developing arbuscules, we were able to specifically detect gene expression related to early infection events. To cover the late stages of AM formation, we studied arbusculated cells, cortical cells colonized by intraradical hyphae, and epidermal cells from mature mycorrhizal roots at 21 dpi. Taken together, the cell-specific expression patterns of 18014 genes were revealed, including 1392 genes whose transcription was influenced by mycorrhizal colonization at different stages, namely the pre-contact phase, the infection of roots via fungal appressoria, the subsequent colonization of the cortex by fungal hyphae, and finally the formation of arbuscules. Our cellular expression patterns identified distinct groups of AM

  16. The impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant growth following herbivory: A search for pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Victoria A.

    2013-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can facilitate nutrient uptake and increase host plant growth but also place constraints on the host's carbon budget. When plants are stressed by herbivory the net effect of the symbiosis may be altered tolerance. Individual experiments manipulating AM fungi and herbivory have demonstrated increased, decreased, and no effect on tolerance but patterns with respect to plant, herbivore, or fungus characteristics have not emerged. Meta-analysis of published results from factorial experiments was used to describe the size of the effects of herbivory and of AM fungi on host growth when factors such as cause of damage, inoculum, and host characteristics are considered, and to determine whether AM fungi alter the effects of herbivory. Also, the correlation between the effect of AM fungi on tolerance and resistance was tested with data from studies that examined insect performance. Herbivory strongly and consistently reduced shoot and root growth, especially in perennial plants and crops. AM fungi increased shoot growth of perennials but not annuals, and when insects caused damage but not when artificial defoliation was applied. Root growth was consistently greater with AM fungi. The interaction of AM fungi and herbivory, which indicates whether AM fungi alter the effects of herbivory, was variable and never significant overall but homogeneity tests indicated underlying structure. In experiments that used single species inoculum, Glomus intraradices increased, whereas Glomus mosseae reduced, effects of herbivory on shoot growth. Multispecies inocula magnified effects of herbivory on root growth whereas single species inocula ameliorated effects. The impact of AM fungi on resistance to herbivory was positively correlated with the impact on tolerance; however AM fungi reduced both tolerance and resistance in many cases. Review of these results with respect to the types of systems studied suggests directions for future investigation.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with the clonal plants in Mu Us sandland of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Clonal plants in Mu Us sandland change the sandy enviroment. The clonal plant is a kind of resource in restoration of the Mu Us sandy landscape. Soil samples at depth of 50 cm in the rhizosphere of the clonal plants were collected in 4 replicates at each location and divided into sections corresponding to 0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40 and 40-50 cm depths in two representative sites from north to south in Mu Us sandland, northwestern China, in July 2005. Clonal plants included Psammochloa villosa and Hedysarum laeve.The colonization and ecological distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi were investigated in the rhizosphere of clonal plants in Mu Us sandland. The results showed that the clonal plants established well symbiosis with AM fungi; AM fungal species and spatial distribution were significantly related with the host plants and soil factors. Of 16 AM fungal taxa in three genera isolated and identified, Glomus multicaule was only observed in the rhizosphere of Psammochloa villosa ; Glomus aggregatum, Glomus h ydembadensis, Glomus constrictum and Acaulospora rehmii only appeared in the rhizosphere of Hedysarum leave. The depth of soil layers observably affected the spore density and the frequency of colonization ( % F). The maximal % F and spore density occurred in the 10-20 cm layer at the site of Ordos Sandy Land Ecological Station, but which occurred in the 0-10 cm layer in Shanxi Yulin Rare Sandy-plants Conversation Field.AM fungal status and colonization might be used to monitor desertification and soil degradation.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis induces a major transcriptional reprogramming of the potato SWEET sugar transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin eManck-Götzenberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the twelve induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10 corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical

  19. The PAM1 gene of petunia, required for intracellular accommodation and morphogenesis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, encodes a homologue of VAPYRIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddermann, Nadja; Muni, Rajasekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Zeier, Tatyana; Stuurman, Jeroen; Ercolin, Flavia; Schorderet, Martine; Reinhardt, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Most terrestrial plants engage into arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. The initial recognition of the fungal symbiont results in the activation of a symbiosis signalling pathway that is shared with the root nodule symbiosis (common SYM pathway). The subsequent intracellular accommodation of the fungus, and the elaboration of its characteristic feeding structures, the arbuscules, depends on a genetic programme in the plant that has recently been shown to involve the VAPYRIN gene in Medicaco truncatula. We have previously identified a mutant in Petunia hybrida, penetration and arbuscule morphogenesis 1 (pam1), that is defective in the intracellular stages of AM development. Here, we report on the cloning of PAM1, which encodes a VAPYRIN homologue. PAM1 protein localizes to the cytosol and the nucleus, with a prominent affinity to mobile spherical structures that are associated with the tonoplast, and are therefore referred to as tonospheres. In mycorrhizal roots, tonospheres were observed in the vicinity of intracellular hyphae, where they may play an essential role in the accommodation and morphogenesis of the fungal endosymbiont.

  20. Status and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its role in natural regeneration on limestone mined spoils

    OpenAIRE

    ANUJ KUMAR SINGH; JAMALUDDIN

    2011-01-01

    Singh AK, Jamaluddin (2011) Status and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its role in natural regeneration on limestone mined spoils. Biodiversitas 12: 107-111. Limestone mined spoils are devoid of adequate population of beneficial microbial flora. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are very important constituent of plant- soil-microbe system. In mined spoils the population of AMF is greatly reduced and hence the spoils become very inhospitable for establishment of vegetation. In t...

  1. Reduction of bacterial growth by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in the rhizosphere of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Jakobsen, I.

    1993-01-01

    Cucumber was grown in a partially sterilized sand-soil mixture with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum or left uninoculated. Fresh soil extract was places in polyvinyl chloride tubes without propagules of mycorrhizal fungi. Root tips and root segments...

  2. Septoglomus fuscum and S. furcatum, two new species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaszkowski, Janusz; Chwat, Gerad; Kovacs, Gábor M;

    2013-01-01

    Two new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, (Glomeromycota) Septoglomus fuscum and S. furcatum, are described and illustrated. Spores of S. fuscum usually occur in loose hypogeous clusters, rarely singly in soil or inside roots, and S. furcatum forms only single spores in soil. Spores of S. fu...... as host plant, S. fuscum and S. furcatum formed arbuscular mycorrhizae. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU, ITS and LSU nrDNA sequences placed the two new species in genus Septoglomus and both new taxa were separated from described Septoglomus species....

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus-promoted accumulation of two new triterpenoids in cucumber roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Kohki; Hayashi, Hideo

    2002-04-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) roots were analyzed by HPLC and TLC for their levels of secondary metabolites upon inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus caledonium. Three compounds in EtOAc extracts from the mycorrhizal roots showed significant increases six weeks after inoculation. These compounds were isolated by column chromatography and determined to be two novel triterpenes, 2beta-hydroxybryonolic acid (2beta,3beta-dihydroxy-D:C-friedoolean-8-en-29-oic acid) and 3beta-bryoferulic acid [3beta-O-trans-ferulyl-D:C-friedooleana-7,9(11)-diene-29-oic acid], and the known triterpene, bryonolic acid, by spectroscopic methods. Time-course experiments showed that the levels of the three terpenoids in cucumber roots were significantly increased by the application of a 53-microm sieving from a soil inoculum of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus containing soil microbes but no mycorrhizal fungi, and that mycorrhizal colonization further promoted the terpenoid accumulation. Inoculation with Glomus mosseae also enhanced the accumulation of the triterpenes, whereas no accumulation was observed by inoculating with the fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum. 2Beta-hydroxybryonolic acid was also isolated from the roots of melon and watermelon. PMID:12036048

  4. The arbuscular mycorrhizal status of poplar clones selected for phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacs, T.; Radimszky, L.; Nemeth, T. [Research Inst. for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the colonization of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in fine-roots of poplar clones. Roots of 7 poplar clones were sampled from a 1-year-old trial established at an industrial site strongly polluted with heavy metals at Balatonfuezfoe, Hungary. The poplar clones have shown variable degrees of colonization by AMF, suggesting differential host susceptibility or mycorrhizal dependency. After outplanting the percentage of poplar survival was strongly correlated with the frequency of AMF infection. Two clones that survived at the lowest ratio after outplanting had not been colonized by AMF in contrast to those which survived to a much higher extent. (orig.)

  5. Effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the degradation of DEHP in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-guang; LIN Xian-gui; YIN Rui; HOU Yan-lin

    2004-01-01

    The effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhiza(AM) fungi(Acaulospora lavis) on the degradation of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate(DEHP) in soil was studies. Cowpea plants(Pigna sinensis) were used as host plants and grown in a specially designed rhizobox. The experimental results indicated that, both in sterile and non-sterile soil, mycorrhizal colonization rates were much higher in the mycorrhizal plants than in the non-mycorrhizal plants. Addition of 4 mg/kg DEHP slightly affected mycorrhizal colonization, but the addition of 100 mg/kg DEHP significantly decreased mycorrhizal colonization. DEHP degradation in the mycorrhizosphere(Ms) and hyphosphere(Hs), especially in the Hs, increased after inoculation with Acaulospora lavis. It is concluded that mycorrhizal hyphae play an important role in the plant uptake, degradation and translocation of DEHP. The mechanism might be attributed to increased numbers of bacteria and actinomycetes and activity of dehydrogenase, urease and acid phosphatase in the Ms and Hs by mycorrhizal fungi.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization improves growth and biochemical profile in Acacia arabica under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promita Datta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study elucidated the individual and mixed mycorrhizal effects of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM isolates on growth and biochemical status of Acacia arabica under salinity stress gradients. Salt treatment provided in soil hampered legume growth and its biochemical status. But, mycorrhizal colonizations in plant root system reduced the extent of deleterious salt effect and also helped in plant growth enhancement. Additionally, mixed mycorrhizal association (Glomus mosseae + Glomus fasciculatum responded better towards osmolyte accumulation and in salt stress alleviation. Due to individual and mixed mycorrhizal colonizations in A. arabica; protein, carbohydrate and reducing sugar acquisitions were found maximum at soil salinity of 5.94 dS/m over corresponding non-mycorrhizal plant. However, mixed AM inoculation accumulated proline content and improved dry biomass to a higher magnitude at the highest soil salinity level. Mixed AM (G. mosseae + G. fasciculatum colonization improved maximum amount of total chlorophyll (20.94%, protein (19.72%, carbohydrate (23.83%, reducing sugar (17.60% at soil salinity of 5.94 dS/m and dry biomass (20.35%, proline content (10.99% at salinity level of 8.26 dS/m when compared with non-mycorrhizal counterpart. Greater magnitude of AM root colonization was found in mixed AM treated plant and may be responsible for more improvement in growth and biochemical status and consequently mitigated adverse salt effect better.

  7. The Genome of Laccaria Bi color Provides Insights into Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F [UMR, France; Aerts, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ahren, D [Lund University, Sweden; Brun, A [UMR, France; Duchaussoy, F [UMR, France; Gibon, J [UMR, France; Kohler, A [UMR, France; Lindquist, E [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pereda, V [UMR, France; Salamov, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Shapiro, HJ [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wuyts, J [UMR, France; Blaudez, D [UMR, France; Buee, M [UMR, France; Brokstein, P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Canbeck, B [Lund University, Sweden; Cohen, D [UMR, France; Courty, PE [UMR, France; Coutinho, PM [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Danchin, E [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Delaruelle, C [UMR, France; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deveau, A [UMR, France; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Duplessis, S [UMR, France; Fraissinet-Tachet, L [Universite de Lyon, France; Lucic, E [UMR, France; Frey-Klett, P [UMR, France; Fourrey, C [UMR, France; Feussner, I [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Gay, G [Universite de Lyon, France; Grimwood, Jane [Stanford University; Hoegger, P J [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Jain, P [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Kilaru, S [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Labbe, J [UMR, France; Lin, Y C [Ghent University, Belgium; Legue, V [UMR, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Marmeisse, R [Universite de Lyon, France; Melayah, D [Universite de Lyon, France; Montanini, B [UMR, France; Muratet, M [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Nehls, U [Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany; Niculita-Hirzel, H [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Oudot-Le Secq, M P [UMR, France; Peter, M [UMR, France; Quesneville, H [Unite de Recherches en Genomique-Info,Evry Cedex; Rajashekar, B [Lund University, Sweden; Reich, M [UMR, France; Rouhler, N [UMR, France; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Chalot, M [UMR, France; Henrissat, B [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Kues, U [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Lucas, S [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Van de Peer, Y [Ghent University, Belgium; Podila, G [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Polle, A [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Pukkila, P J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rouze, P [Ghent University, Belgium; Sanders, I R [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stajich, J E [University of California, Berkeley; Tunlid, A [Lund University, Sweden; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Grigoriev, I. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and

  8. Mycorrhizal fungi symbiosis as a strategy against oxidative stress in soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressano, Marina; Curetti, Mariela; Giachero, Lorena; Gil, Silvina Vargas; Cabello, Marta; March, Guillermo; Ducasse, Daniel A; Luna, Celina M

    2010-12-15

    Oxidative stress responses generated by paraquat (PQ), an herbicide that triggers an oxidative stress reaction in leaves, were studied in non-arbuscular mycorrhizal (non-AM) and in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) soybean plants inoculated with Glomus mosseae (Gm) or Glomus intraradices (Gi). Some oxidative stress symptoms were evident in non-AM after 6 d of PQ application on leaves. Oxidative damage, measured as malondialdehyde content (MDA), was significantly higher, and although no changes were evident in total catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) and total superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) activity, total ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) activity was significantly reduced. These effects were correlated with a significant decrease in growth parameters. By contrast, in both AM plants, foliar MDA content was reduced or unaltered and, interestingly, after PQ stress, its level was unchanged and significantly lower than in PQ non-AM plants. Unlike PQ stress in non-AM plants, total APX activity was unaltered or induced by AM plants, while total SOD activity was unchanged and no consistent effects were detected in total CAT activity. All these events coincided with no changes or a significant increase in growth parameters. Since oxidative stress is a common phenomenon triggered by several environmental stresses, these results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal fungi in oxidative stress regulation as a general strategy to protect plants from abiotic and biotic stress. PMID:20801548

  9. Effect of potassium and phosphorus on the transport of radiocesium by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyuricza, Veronika; Dupre de Boulois, Herve [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite de microbiologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Declerck, Stephane, E-mail: stephan.declerck@uclouvain.b [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite de microbiologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Potassium, a chemical analogue of cesium, and phosphorus, an essential macronutrient transported by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), have been suggested to influence the transport of radiocesium by AMF. However, no study investigated the effects of increasing concentrations of both elements on the importance of this transport. Here, the arbuscular mycorrhizal-plant (AM-P) in vitro culture system associating Medicago truncatula plantlets with Glomus intraradices was used to evaluate this effect. Using three concentrations of K (0, 1, 10 mM) and two concentrations of P (30 and 3000 muM) added to a compartment only accessible to the AMF, we demonstrated that K and P individually and in combination significantly influenced radiocesium transport by AMF. Whilst increased concentration of K decreased the amount of radiocesium transported, the opposite was observed for P. Although the exact mechanisms involved need to be assessed, both elements were identified as important factors influencing the transport of radiocesium by AMF.

  10. Experimental warming decreases arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization in prairie plants along a Mediterranean climate gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Hannah; Johnson, Bart R.; Bohannan, Brendan; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Mueller, Rebecca; Bridgham, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide numerous services to their plant symbionts. Understanding climate change effects on AMF, and the resulting plant responses, is crucial for predicting ecosystem responses at regional and global scales. We investigated how the effects of climate change on AMF-plant symbioses are mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics. Methods: We used a combination of a greenhouse experiment and a manipulati...

  11. Inoculant of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus clarus) increase yield of soybean and cotton under field conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Viviana Torres Cely; Admilton Gonçalves Oliveira; Vanessa Fogaça Freitas; Marcelo Benite de Luca; André Riedi Barazetti; Igor Matheus Oliveira Santos; Bárbara eGionco; Guilherme Volante Garcia; Cássio Egidio Cavenaghi Prete; Galdino eAndrade

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient availability is an important factor in crop production, and regular addition of chemical fertilizers is the most common practice to improve yield in agrosystems for intensive crop production. The use of some groups of microorganisms that have specific activity providing nutrients to plants is a good alternative, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance plant nutrition by providing especially phosphorus (P), improving plant growth and increasing crop production. Unfortunately, t...

  12. Glomus intraradices and Pacispora robiginia, species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota new for Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characters of spores and mycorrhizae of Glomus intraradices, as well as spores of Pacispora robiginia, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, were described and illustrated. Additionally, the known distribution of these species in both Poland and other regions of the world was presented. Both the species were not so far recorded in Poland and this paper is the second report of the finding of P. robiginia in the

  13. Carbon cycling by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soil-plant systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Y.-G.; Miller, R. M.; Environmental Research; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2003-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an important role in regulating carbon fluxes between the biosphere and the atmosphere. A recent study showed that live hyphae can turn over rapidly, in five to six days on average, suggesting that carbon flow to AMF hyphae might be respired back to the atmosphere quickly. However, that study gives a limited view of the residence time of AMF hyphae in soils. AMF hyphae can also contribute to soil carbon storage through other mechanisms.

  14. A biological market analysis of the plant-mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gregory A K; Kiers, E Toby; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    It has been argued that cooperative behavior in the plant-mycorrhizal mutualism resembles trade in a market economy and can be understood using economic tools. Here, we assess the validity of this "biological market" analogy by investigating whether a market mechanism--that is, competition between partners over the price at which they provide goods--could be the outcome of natural selection. Then, we consider the conditions under which this market mechanism is sufficient to maintain mutualistic trade. We find that: (i) as in a market, individuals are favored to divide resources among trading partners in direct relation to the relative amount of resources received, termed linear proportional discrimination; (ii) mutualistic trade is more likely to be favored when individuals are able to interact with more partners of both species, and when there is a greater relative difference between the species in their ability to directly acquire different resources; (iii) if trade is favored, then either one or both species is favored to give up acquiring one resource directly, and vice versa. We then formulate testable predictions as to how environmental changes and coevolved responses of plants and mycorrhizal fungi will influence plant fitness (crop yields) in agricultural ecosystems.

  15. Zn, Cd and Pb accumulation and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation of pennycress Thlaspi praecox Wulf. (Brassicaceae) from the vicinity of a lead mine and smelter in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: katarina.vogel@uni-lj.si; Drobne, Damjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Regvar, Marjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-01-01

    Significant hyperaccumulation of Zn, Cd and Pb in field samples of Thlaspi praecox Wulf. collected from a heavy metal polluted area in Slovenia was found, with maximal shoot concentrations of 14590 mg kg{sup -1} Zn, 5960 mg kg{sup -1} Cd and 3500 mg kg{sup -1} Pb. Shoot/root ratios of 9.6 for Zn and 5.6 for Cd show that the metals were preferentially transported to the shoots. Shoot bioaccumulation factors exceeded total soil Cd levels 75-fold and total soil Zn levels 20-fold, further supporting the hyperaccumulation of Cd and Zn. Eighty percent of Pb was retained in roots, thus indicating exclusion as a tolerance strategy for Pb. Low level colonisation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of a Paris type was observed at the polluted site, whereas at the non-polluted site Arum type colonisation was more common. To our knowledge this is the first report of Cd hyperaccumulation and AMF colonisation in metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox. - Thlaspi praecox Wulf. (Brassicaceae) is a newly discovered Cd, Zn and Pb hyperaccumulator able to form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  16. Linking root traits to nutrient foraging in arbuscular mycorrhizal trees in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, David M; Kucharski, Joshua M; Zadworny, Marcin; Adams, Thomas S; Koide, Roger T

    2015-10-01

    The identification of plant functional traits that can be linked to ecosystem processes is of wide interest, especially for predicting vegetational responses to climate change. Root diameter of the finest absorptive roots may be one plant trait that has wide significance. Do species with relatively thick absorptive roots forage in nutrient-rich patches differently from species with relatively fine absorptive roots? We measured traits related to nutrient foraging (root morphology and architecture, root proliferation, and mycorrhizal colonization) across six coexisting arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) temperate tree species with and without nutrient addition. Root traits such as root diameter and specific root length were highly correlated with root branching intensity, with thin-root species having higher branching intensity than thick-root species. In both fertilized and unfertilized soil, species with thin absorptive roots and high branching intensity showed much greater root length and mass proliferation but lower mycorrhizal colonization than species with thick absorptive roots. Across all species, fertilization led to increased root proliferation and reduced mycorrhizal colonization. These results suggest that thin-root species forage more by root proliferation, whereas thick-root species forage more by mycorrhizal fungi. In mineral nutrient-rich patches, AM trees seem to forage more by proliferating roots than by mycorrhizal fungi.

  17. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, S; Akgun, A

    2006-07-01

    The experiment was undertaken to test the efficiency of inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species used as rootstocks. The stratified Pistacia seeds were inoculated with VAM fungi. The highest rate of inoculated roots was 96.7% in P. khinjuck seedlings with G. clarum and G. etunicatum, 83.3% in P. vera seedlings with G. caledonium and 73.3% in P. terebinthus seedlings with G. caledonium. Mycorrhizal inoculations improved seedling height only in P. terebinthus. Certain mycorrhizal inoculations increased the leaf N, but not P and K contents. Seedlings inoculated with G. caledonium had higher reducing sugar contents. It was concluded that pre-inoculated Pistacia seedlings could have a better growth in the harsh field conditions. PMID:17402238

  18. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonising roots and root nodules of New Zealand kauri Agathis australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Mahajabeen; Johansen, Renee B; Stuckey, S Alexander; Williams, Stephen E; Hooker, John E; Burns, Bruce R; Bellgard, Stanley E

    2016-05-01

    As the only endemic member in New Zealand of the ancient conifer family, Araucariaceae, Agathis australis is an ideal species to study putatively long-evolved mycorrhizal symbioses. However, little is known about A. australis root and nodular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and how mycorrhizal colonisation occurs. We used light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy to characterise colonisation, and 454-sequencing to identify the AMF associated with A. australis roots and nodules. We interpreted the results in terms of the edaphic characteristics of the A. australis-influenced ecosystem. Representatives of five families of Glomeromycota were identified via high-throughput pyrosequencing. Imaging studies showed that there is abundant, but not ubiquitous, colonisation of nodules, which suggests that nodules are mostly colonised by horizontal transmission. Roots were also found to harbour AMF. This study is the first to demonstrate the multiple Glomeromycota lineages associated with A. australis including some that may not have been previously detected. PMID:27109376

  19. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in grassland spontaneously developed on area polluted by a fertilizer plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renker, C. [Institute of Ecology, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Jena, Dornburger Str. 159, D-07743 Jena (Germany)]. E-mail: crenker@uni-leipzig.de; Blanke, V. [Institute of Ecology, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Jena, Dornburger Str. 159, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Buscot, F. [Institute of Ecology, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Jena, Dornburger Str. 159, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Mycorrhizal colonization and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were analyzed in a calcareous grassland with residual phosphate contamination 10 years after the closure of a pollutant fertilizer plant in Thuringia (Germany). AMF were detected in 21 of 22 plant species analyzed. Mean mycorrhization levels reached up to 74.5% root length colonized. AMF diversity was analyzed based on 104 sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a total of 6 species all belonging to the genus Glomus. There was no overlap between species detected as active mycorrhizas on roots (2 taxa) or as spores (4 taxa). Compared to the regional context, the diversity of AMF at our field site was reduced, which may reflect a residual disturbance effect. However, none of the detected species was exclusive to the polluted site as they are commonly found in the region. - Almost all plant species were mycorrhizal.

  20. Growth and extracellular phosphatase activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae as influenced by soil organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joner, E.J.; Jakobsen, I.

    1995-01-01

    length density was twice as high in soil with added straw compared to the two other treatments. Mycorrhizal colonization resulted in lower activity of acid phosphatase in the HC for two out of three treatments. Alkaline phosphatase activity was only decreased by mycorrhiza in soil without organic matter...... additions. In soil with added clover alkaline phosphatase activity increased due to the presence of mycorrhizal hyphae. We suggest that mycorrhizas may influence the exudation of acid phosphatase by roots. Hyphae of G. invermaium did apparently not excrete extracellular phosphatases, but their presence may......Two experiments were set up to investigate the influence of soil organic matter on growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphae and concurrent changes in soil inorganic P, organic P and phosphatase activity. A sandy loam soil was kept for 14 months under two regimes (outdoor where surplus...

  1. A molecular approach to study the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi community in a typical Piedmont grapevine cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magurno, F.; Bughi Peruglia, G.; Lumini, E.; Bianciotto, V.; Balestrini, R.

    2009-04-01

    Viticulture and wine production represent one of the most relevant agro-food sectors for the Piedmont Region (Italy) in terms of value, with more than 400 millions € a year (12 % of total agricultural production of the Region and the 10 % of the national grape and wine production). The soil where grapevines (Vitis spp.) grow is one of the first parameters influencing the complex grapevine-wine chain. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMFs), a main component of soil microbiota in most agrosystems, are considered crucial biomarkers of soil quality because of their biofertilisers role. As mutualistic symbionts, they colonize the roots of the majority of plants. Benefits in symbiosis are well showed as an improvement in shoot/root growth, mineral transport, water-stress tolerance and resistance to certain diseases. Grapevines roots are often heavily colonized by AMFs under field conditions and in some cases AMFs appear to be necessary for their normal growth and survival. Even so, little information are until now available about composition of AMFs communities living in the vineyards soil and in associations with grapevine roots, mainly related to morphological characterization. Vineyard of Nebbiolo, one of the most important Piedmont cultivar, was selected in order to study the AMFs community using a molecular approach. Soil samples and roots from an experimental vineyard located in Lessona (Biella, Piedmont, Italy) were analyzed using AM fungal-specific primers to partially amplify the small subunit (SSU) of the ribosomal DNA genes. Much more than 650 clones were sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses identified 32 OTUs from soil, clustered into Glomus groups Aa, Ab, Ad and B, Diversisporaceae and Gigasporaceae families. Thirteen OTUs from roots were determined, clustered into Glomus groups Ab, Ad and B, and Gigasporaceae family. In particular, Glomus group Ad was the best represented in both compartments, suggesting a correlation between intra and extra radical communities

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in black poplar roots after defoliation by a non-native and a native insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zampieri E

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A major goal in ecology is to understand how interactions among organisms influence ecosystem services. This work compares the effects of two Lepidoptera defoliators, one non-native (Hyphantria cunea and one native (Lymantria dispar to Europe, on the colonization of black poplar (the Populus nigra clone “Jean Pourtet” roots by an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiotic fungus (Funneliformis mosseae in a pot experiment. The effects of defoliation have also been assessed on the expression of fungal and plant genes playing a role during symbiosis. Both control and defoliated poplars have shown a low level of mycorrhization. Additionally, neither the non-native nor the native insect seem to strongly affect the AM colonization, at least at the time of observation (eight days from the end of the defoliation. Concerning the gene expression analysis, our results suggest that defoliation does not influence neither the expression of genes coding for a fungal and a plant phosphate transporter nor that of a gene coding for a fungal ATPase, and that there were no differences between defoliation carried out by the non-native and the native insect.

  3. Soil and geography are more important determinants of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal communities than management practices in Swiss agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansa, Jan; Erb, Angela; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Smilauer, Petr; Egli, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous soil fungi, forming mutualistic symbiosis with a majority of terrestrial plant species. They are abundant in nearly all soils, less diverse than soil prokaryotes and other intensively studied soil organisms and thus are promising candidates for universal indicators of land management legacies and soil quality degradation. However, insufficient data on how the composition of indigenous AMF varies along soil and landscape gradients have hampered the definition of baselines and effect thresholds to date. Here, indigenous AMF communities in 154 agricultural soils collected across Switzerland were profiled by quantitative real-time PCR with taxon-specific markers for six widespread AMF species. To identify the key determinants of AMF community composition, the profiles were related to soil properties, land management and site geography. Our results indicate a number of well-supported dependencies between abundances of certain AMF taxa and soil properties such as pH, soil fertility and texture, and a surprising lack of effect of available soil phosphorus on the AMF community profiles. Site geography, especially the altitude and large geographical distance, strongly affected AMF communities. Unexpected was the apparent lack of a strong land management effect on the AMF communities as compared to the other predictors, which could be due to the rarity of highly intensive and unsustainable land management in Swiss agriculture. In spite of the extensive coverage of large geographical and soil gradients, we did not identify any taxon suitable as an indicator of land use among the six taxa we studied.

  4. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce Cd uptake and alleviate Cd toxicity of Lonicera japonica grown in Cd-added soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiu-Yun; Zhuo, Feng; Long, Shi-Hui; Zhao, Hai-Di; Yang, Dan-Jing; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Li, Shao-Shan; Jing, Yuan-Xiao

    2016-02-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi‑Glomus versiforme (Gv) and Rhizophagus intraradices (Ri) on the growth, Cd uptake, antioxidant indices [glutathione reductase (GR), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate (ASA), glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA)] and phytochelatins (PCs) production of Lonicera japonica in Cd-amended soils. Gv and Ri significantly increased P acquisition, biomass of shoots and roots at all Cd treatments. Gv significantly decreased Cd concentrations in shoots and roots, and Ri also obviously reduced Cd concentrations in shoots but increased Cd concentrations in roots. Meanwhile, activities of CAT, APX and GR, and contents of ASA and PCs were remarkably higher in Gv/Ri-inoculated plants than those of uninoculated plants, but lower MDA and GSH contents in Gv/Ri-inoculated plants were found. In conclusion, Gv and Ri symbiosis alleviated Cd toxicity of L. japonica through the decline of shoot Cd concentrations and the improvement of P nutrition, PCs content and activities of GR, CAT, APX in inoculated plants, and then improved plant growth. The decrease of shoot Cd concentrations in L. japonica inoculated with Gv/Ri would provide a clue for safe production of this plant from Cd-contaminated soils.

  5. Effect of different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth and physiology of maize at ambient and low temperature regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Fulai; Tian, Chunjie; Liu, Shengqun; Xu, Hongwen; Zhu, Xiancan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of four different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the growth and lipid peroxidation, soluble sugar, proline contents, and antioxidant enzymes activities of Zea mays L. was studied in pot culture subjected to two temperature regimes. Maize plants were grown in pots filled with a mixture of sandy and black soil for 5 weeks, and then half of the plants were exposed to low temperature for 1 week while the rest of the plants were grown under ambient temperature and severed as control. Different AMF resulted in different root colonization and low temperature significantly decreased AM colonization. Low temperature remarkably decreased plant height and total dry weight but increased root dry weight and root-shoot ratio. The AM plants had higher proline content compared with the non-AM plants. The maize plants inoculated with Glomus etunicatum and G. intraradices had higher malondialdehyde and soluble sugar contents under low temperature condition. The activities of catalase (CAT) and peroxidase of AM inoculated maize were higher than those of non-AM ones. Low temperature noticeably decreased the activities of CAT. The results suggest that low temperature adversely affects maize physiology and AM symbiosis can improve maize seedlings tolerance to low temperature stress.

  6. Effect of Different Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Physiology of Maize at Ambient and Low Temperature Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of four different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the growth and lipid peroxidation, soluble sugar, proline contents, and antioxidant enzymes activities of Zea mays L. was studied in pot culture subjected to two temperature regimes. Maize plants were grown in pots filled with a mixture of sandy and black soil for 5 weeks, and then half of the plants were exposed to low temperature for 1 week while the rest of the plants were grown under ambient temperature and severed as control. Different AMF resulted in different root colonization and low temperature significantly decreased AM colonization. Low temperature remarkably decreased plant height and total dry weight but increased root dry weight and root-shoot ratio. The AM plants had higher proline content compared with the non-AM plants. The maize plants inoculated with Glomus etunicatum and G. intraradices had higher malondialdehyde and soluble sugar contents under low temperature condition. The activities of catalase (CAT and peroxidase of AM inoculated maize were higher than those of non-AM ones. Low temperature noticeably decreased the activities of CAT. The results suggest that low temperature adversely affects maize physiology and AM symbiosis can improve maize seedlings tolerance to low temperature stress.

  7. Spore population, colonization, species diversity and factors influencing the association of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with litchi trees in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajit; Anal, Dubedi

    2016-01-01

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in association with litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) trees were studied during 2012-2013, where orchard soil had high pH (7.42-9.53) and salinity (0.07- 0.39 dSm(-1)). A total of 105 rhizospheric soil and root samples were collected considering variables like location, age of tree, cultivar and production management. Results showed that spore count was in the range of 1-22 g(-1) soil. All the examined root segments had colonization of AMF, which ranged between 3.3 to 90.0%. AMF community comprised of Glomus mosseae, G. intaradices, G. constricta, G. coronatum, G. fasciculatum, G. albidum, G. hoi, G. multicauli, Acaulospora scrobiculata, A. laevis, Rhizophagus litchi and Entrophosphora infrequens. Higher spore density and AMF colonization were observed at medium level (13-28 kg ha(-1)) of available phosphorus that decreased ('r' = -0.21 for spore density, -0.48 for root colonization) with increasing soil phosphorus. While nitrogen did not influence the AMF association, a weak negative linear relationship with AMF colonization ('r' = -0.30) was apparent in the medium level (112-200 kg ha(-1)) of potash. Micronutrients (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn and B) did not affect spore density (zero or a very weak linear correlation) but influenced root colonization ('r' = -0.53 to -0.44), the effect being more prominent above critical limits. Nutritionally sufficient, irrigated litchi orchards had greater spore count (46% samples having 5-22 spores g(-1) soil) and colonization (> 50% in 37.4% roots examined) than nutrient deficient, non-irrigated orchards, indicating essentiality of a threshold nutrients and moisture regime for the association. AMF symbiosis was influenced by cultivar (greater in 'China'), but tree age was not correlated to mycorrhizal association. A consortium of native species coupled with the understanding of nutrient effects on AMF would be useful for field application in litchi. PMID:26930865

  8. GintAMT3 – a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a Vmax of 240 nmol-1 min-1 108 cells-1, which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply. PMID:27252708

  9. Regulation of plant growth, photosynthesis, antioxidation and osmosis by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in watermelon seedlings under well-watered and drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling eMo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress has become an increasingly serious environmental issue that influences the growth and production of watermelon. Previous studies found that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM colonization improved the fruit yield and water use efficiency of watermelon grown under water stress; however, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, the effects of Glomus versiforme symbiosis on the growth, physio-biochemical attributes, and stress-responsive gene expressions of watermelon seedlings grown under well-watered and drought conditions were investigated. The results showed that AM colonization did not significantly influence the shoot growth of watermelon seedlings under well-watered conditions but did promote root development irrespective of water treatment. Drought stress decreased the leaf relative water content and chlorophyll concentration, but to a lesser extent in the AM plants. Compared with the non-mycorrhizal seedlings, mycorrhizal plants had higher non-photochemical quenching values, which reduced the chloroplast ultrastructural damage in the mesophyll cells and thus maintained higher photosynthetic efficiency. Moreover, AM inoculation led to significant enhancements in the enzyme activities and gene expressions of SOD, CAT, APX, GR and MDHAR in watermelon leaves upon drought imposition. Consequently, AM plants exhibited lower accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and O2- compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Under drought stress, the soluble sugar and proline contents were significantly increased, and further enhancements were observed by pre-treating the drought-stressed plants with AM. Taken together, our findings indicate that mycorrhizal colonization enhances watermelon drought tolerance through a stronger root system, greater protection of photosynthetic apparatus, a more efficient antioxidant system and improved osmoregulation. This study contributes to advances in the knowledge of AM-induced drought tolerance.

  10. Do fungivores trigger the transfer of protective metabolites from host plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Marie; Pel, Roel; Ooms, Astra; Bücking, Heike; Jansa, Jan; Ellers, Jacintha; van Straalen, Nico M; Wouda, Tjalf; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Kiers, E Toby

    2013-09-01

    A key objective in ecology is to understand how cooperative strategies evolve and are maintained in species networks. Here, we focus on the tri-trophic relationship between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, host plants, and fungivores to ask if host plants are able to protect their mutualistic mycorrhizal partners from being grazed. Specifically, we test whether secondary metabolites are transferred from hosts to fungal partners to increase their defense against fungivores. We grew Plantago lanceolata hosts with and without mycorrhizal inoculum, and in the presence or absence of fungivorous springtails. We then measured fungivore effects on host biomass and mycorrhizal abundance (using quantitative PCR) in roots and soil. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to measure host metabolites in roots, shoots, and hyphae, focusing on catalpol, aucubin, and verbascoside. Our most striking result was that the metabolite catalpol was consistently found in AM fungal hyphae in host plants exposed to fungivores. When fungivores were absent, catalpol was undetectable in hyphae. Our results highlight the potential for plant-mediated protection of the mycorrhizal hyphal network. PMID:24279273

  11. A meta-analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal effects on plants grown under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Boughattas, Sonia; Hu, Shuijin; Oh, Sang-Hyon; Sa, Tongmin

    2014-11-01

    Salt stress limits crop yield and sustainable agriculture in most arid and semiarid regions of the world. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered bio-ameliorators of soil salinity tolerance in plants. In evaluating AMF as significant predictors of mycorrhizal ecology, precise quantifiable changes in plant biomass and nutrient uptake under salt stress are crucial factors. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to analyze the magnitude of the effects of AMF inoculation on growth and nutrient uptake of plants under salt stress through meta-analyses. For this, data were compared in the context of mycorrhizal host plant species, plant family and functional group, herbaceous vs. woody plants, annual vs. perennial plants, and the level of salinity across 43 studies. Results indicate that, under saline conditions, AMF inoculation significantly increased total, shoot, and root biomass as well as phosphorous (P), nitrogen (N), and potassium (K) uptake. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase also increased significantly in mycorrhizal compared to nonmycorrhizal plants growing under salt stress. In addition, sodium (Na) uptake decreased significantly in mycorrhizal plants, while changes in proline accumulation were not significant. Across most subsets of the data analysis, identities of AMF (Glomus fasciculatum) and host plants (Acacia nilotica, herbs, woody and perennial) were found to be essential in understanding plant responses to salinity stress. For the analyzed dataset, it is concluded that under salt stress, mycorrhizal plants have extensive root traits and mycorrhizal morphological traits which help the uptake of more P and K, together with the enhanced production of antioxidant enzymes resulting in salt stress alleviation and increased plant biomass.

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) as bio protector agents against wilt induced by Verticillium spp. in pepper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goicoechea, N.; Garmendia, I.; Sanchez-Diaz, M.; Aguirreolea, J.

    2010-07-01

    Verticillium dahliae Kleb. is a vascular pathogen that alters water status and growth of pepper plants and causes drastic reductions in yield. Its control is difficult because it can survive in field soil for several years. The application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) as bio protector agents against V. dahliae is an alternative to the use of chemicals which, in addition, is more respectful with the environment. The establishment of the mutualistic association of plant roots and AMF involves a continuous cellular and molecular dialogue between both symbionts that includes the pre activation of plant defense responses that may enhance the resistance or tolerance of mycorrhizal plants to soil-borne pathogens. Some AMF can improve the resistance of Capsicum annuum L. against V. dahliae. This is especially relevant for pepper cultivars (i.e. cv. Piquillo) that exhibit high susceptibility to this pathogen. Compared with non-mycorrhizal plants, mycorrhizal pepper can exhibit more balanced antioxidant metabolism in leaves along the first month after pathogen inoculation, which may contribute to delay both the development of disease symptoms and the decrease of photosynthesis in Verticillium-inoculated plants with the subsequent benefit for yield. In stems, mycorrhizal pepper show earlier and higher deposition of lignin in xylem vessels than non mycorrhizal plants, even in absence of the pathogen. Moreover, AMF can induce new isoforms of acidic chitinases and superoxide dismutase in roots. Mycorrhizal-specific induction of these enzymatic activities together with enhanced peroxidase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in roots may also be involved in the bio protection of Verticillium-induced wilt in pepper by AMF. (Author) 81 refs.

  13. Microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants in lead contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella S Gattai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this study were to evaluate the microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants (Caesalpinia ferrea, Mimosa tenuiflora and Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil from the semi-arid region of northeastern of Brazil (Belo Jardim, Pernambuco. Dilutions were prepared by adding lead contaminated soil (270 mg Kg-1 to uncontaminated soil (37 mg Pb Kg soil-1 in the proportions of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% (v:v. The increase of lead contamination in the soil negatively influenced the amount of carbon in the microbial biomass of the samples from both the dry and rainy seasons and the metabolic quotient only differed between the collection seasons in the 30% contaminated soil. The average value of the acid phosphatase activity in the dry season was 2.3 times higher than observed during the rainy season. There was no significant difference in the number of glomerospores observed between soils and periods studied. The most probable number of infective propagules was reduced for both seasons due to the excess lead in soil. The mycorrhizal colonization rate was reduced for the three plant species assayed. The inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi benefited the growth of Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil.

  14. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Inoculation on Plant Growth and Phthalic Ester Degradation in Two Contaminated Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rui-Rui; YIN Rui; LIN Xian-Gui; CAO Zhi-Hong

    2005-01-01

    A 60-day pot experiment was carried out using di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) as a typical organic pollutant phthalic ester and cowpea (Vigna sinensis) as the host plant to determine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation on plant growth and degradation of DEHP in two contaminated soils, a yellow-brown soil and a red soil. The air-dried soils were uniformly sprayed with different concentrations of DEHP, inoculated or left uninoculated with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, and planted with cowpea seeds. After 60 days the positive impact of AM inoculation on the growth of cowpea was more pronounced in the red soil than in the yellow-brown soil, with significantly higher (P < 0.01)mycorrhizal colonization rate, shoot dry weight and total P content in shoot tissues for the red soil. Both in the yellowbrown and red soils, AM inoculation significantly (P < 0.01) reduced shoot DEHP content, implying that AM inoculation could inhibit the uptake and translocation of DEHP from roots to the aboveground parts. However, with AM inoculation no positive contribution to the degradation of DEHP was found.

  15. RNA-seq Transcriptional Profiling of an Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Provides Insights into Regulated and Coordinated Gene Expression in Lotus japonicus and Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Yoshihiro; Nishide, Hiroyo; Takeda, Naoya; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Saito, Katsuharu

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression during arbuscular mycorrhizal development is highly orchestrated in both plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. To elucidate the gene expression profiles of the symbiotic association, we performed a digital gene expression analysis of Lotus japonicus and Rhizophagus irregularis using a HiSeq 2000 next-generation sequencer with a Cufflinks assembly and de novo transcriptome assembly. There were 3,641 genes differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal development in L. japonicus, approximately 80% of which were up-regulated. The up-regulated genes included secreted proteins, transporters, proteins involved in lipid and amino acid metabolism, ribosomes and histones. We also detected many genes that were differentially expressed in small-secreted peptides and transcription factors, which may be involved in signal transduction or transcription regulation during symbiosis. Co-regulated genes between arbuscular mycorrhizal and root nodule symbiosis were not particularly abundant, but transcripts encoding for membrane traffic-related proteins, transporters and iron transport-related proteins were found to be highly co-up-regulated. In transcripts of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, expansion of cytochrome P450 was observed, which may contribute to various metabolic pathways required to accommodate roots and soil. The comprehensive gene expression data of both plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi provide a powerful platform for investigating the functional and molecular mechanisms underlying arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  16. Possible Benefits of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis, in Reducing CO2 from Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a fact that the relationship between a fungus and a plant can have a great impact on the environment, especially under drought conditions. Experiments conducted at the laboratory scale suggested that in mycorrhizal symbiosis; plants usually provide their fungal partners with carbohydrates from photosynthesis and receive mineral nutrients. It is observed that mycorrhizal inoculated plants observed large surface area of leaves and outsized root sections which were helpful in increasing the rate of photosynthetic processes. This may be attributed to the rapid production of carbohydrate for their fungal mate. The same phenomena can be observed in environments of high traffic density or waste burning, industrial zones (where there are emissions of CO2 from chimneys) or the areas that are lack nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. It may be observed that the plants that have this association with mycorrhizal fungi may obligate a better chance in inhabiting this area. These plants can be helpful in reducing the CO2 from the polluted atmosphere. The large length of the roots were related to the absorption of water molecules for survival as well as formation of first organic complex CHO for providing the energy to the plant in biotic stress and C and nutrient exchange between fungal partner and plants

  17. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI FROM THE RfflZOSPHERES OF SOYBEAN CROPS IN LAMPUNG AND WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. KRAMADIBRATA

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi in the rhizospheres of field-grown soybean crops in the provinces of Lampung and West Java was examined. Nineteen taxa of AM fungi were identified as follows: Acaulospora delicata, A. Foveata, A. rehmii, A. scrobiculata and A. tuberculata; Gigaspora cf. gigantea and Gigaspora sp. 1; Glomus clavisporum; Glomus cf. fasciculatum, Glomus micro-aggregatum, Glomus sp. 1, Glomus sp. 2, Glomus sp. 3 and Glomus sp. 4; Scutellospora cf. heterogama, Scutellospora cf. pellucida, Scutellospora sp. 1. Scutellospora sp.2. and Scutellospora sp. 3.

  18. Arsenic uptake in upland rice inoculated with a combination or single arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, W F; Li, H; Wu, F Y; Wu, S C; Wong, M H

    2013-11-15

    A pot trial was conducted to investigate the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on arsenic (As) uptake of upland rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar, Zhonghan 221; where the following 3 species of Glomus geosporum (Gg), G. mosseae (Gm) and G. versiforme (Gv) were applied as single or combined inoculations. In general, Gm significantly enhanced (p63% when grown in As80 soil. There was a significant difference (p 0.01) and total P (r = 0.002, p > 0.01) were observed.

  19. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on young vines in copper-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Gabriel Ambrosini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High copper (Cu levels in uprooted old vineyard soils may cause toxicity in transplanted young vines, although such toxicity may be reduced by inoculating plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of AMF on the plant growth, chlorophyll contents, mycorrhizal colonization, and Cu and phosphorus (P absorption in young vines cultivated in a vineyard soil contaminated by Cu. Commercial vineyard soil with high Cu levels was placed in plastic tubes and transplanted with young vines, which were inoculated with six AMF species (Dentiscutata heterogama, Gigaspora gigantea, Acaulospora morrowiae, A. colombiana, Rhizophagus clarus, R. irregularis and a control treatment on randomized blocks with 12 replicates. After 130 days, the mycorrhizal colonization, root and shoot dry matter (DM, height increment, P and Cu absorption, and chlorophyll contents were evaluated. The height increment, shoot DM and chlorophyll contents were not promoted by AMF, although the root DM was increased by R. clarus and R. irregularis, which had the greatest mycorrhizal colonization and P uptake. AMF increased Cu absorption but decreased its transport to shoots. Thus, AMF species, particularly R. clarus and R. irregularis, contribute to the establishment of young vines exposed to high Cu levels.

  20. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on young vines in copper-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Vítor Gabriel; Voges, Joana Gerent; Canton, Ludiana; Couto, Rafael da Rosa; Ferreira, Paulo Ademar Avelar; Comin, Jucinei José; de Melo, George Wellington Bastos; Brunetto, Gustavo; Soares, Cláudio Roberto Fonsêca Sousa

    2015-01-01

    High copper (Cu) levels in uprooted old vineyard soils may cause toxicity in transplanted young vines, although such toxicity may be reduced by inoculating plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of AMF on the plant growth, chlorophyll contents, mycorrhizal colonization, and Cu and phosphorus (P) absorption in young vines cultivated in a vineyard soil contaminated by Cu. Commercial vineyard soil with high Cu levels was placed in plastic tubes and transplanted with young vines, which were inoculated with six AMF species (Dentiscutata heterogama, Gigaspora gigantea, Acaulospora morrowiae, A. colombiana, Rhizophagus clarus, R. irregularis) and a control treatment on randomized blocks with 12 replicates. After 130 days, the mycorrhizal colonization, root and shoot dry matter (DM), height increment, P and Cu absorption, and chlorophyll contents were evaluated. The height increment, shoot DM and chlorophyll contents were not promoted by AMF, although the root DM was increased by R. clarus and R. irregularis, which had the greatest mycorrhizal colonization and P uptake. AMF increased Cu absorption but decreased its transport to shoots. Thus, AMF species, particularly R. clarus and R. irregularis, contribute to the establishment of young vines exposed to high Cu levels. PMID:26691462

  1. Influence of salinity on the development of the banana colonised by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldênia Mendes Mascena de Almeida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the effect of salt stress on the growth of banana seedling colonized with mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on a substrate from a Quartzipsamment. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, using a completely randomized design in split plots; the plots had 5 levels of salinity in irrigation water (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4 5 dS m-1 and the subplots of four collection periods (40, 60, 80 and 100 days after transplanting, with 4 repetitions, totaling 80 experimental units. The seedlings of banana cv. "Prata" was produced by micropropagation and inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal and acclimatization for 40 days. Evaluations were made of leaf gas exchange, shoot dry mass, nutrient content, mycorrhizal root colonization and spore density. Increased levels of salinity caused reduction in dry matter production and photosynthetic rate, which may be associated with osmotic effects of salts in the soil, the increase in sodium and reduced the levels of N in leaves. Salinity reduced root mycorrhizal colonization, but did not influence the density of AMF spores under the conditions of this study.

  2. Status and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its role in natural regeneration on limestone mined spoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANUJ KUMAR SINGH

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Singh AK, Jamaluddin (2011 Status and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its role in natural regeneration on limestone mined spoils. Biodiversitas 12: 107-111. Limestone mined spoils are devoid of adequate population of beneficial microbial flora. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are very important constituent of plant- soil-microbe system. In mined spoils the population of AMF is greatly reduced and hence the spoils become very inhospitable for establishment of vegetation. In the present investigation, status of AMF population and its effect on natural regeneration process is studied. It is well known fact that the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi play very important role in establishment of vegetation in degraded lands. Plantation of seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi provide favorable soil conditions for naturally growing vegetation in the mined overburden spoils. Physico-chemical properties of soil are converted suitable for planted species and thus it allows other species to grow and also provide shade to protect the herbaceous vegetation. Introduction of plant species attracts immigration of other species and if they established, may result into a very distinctive floral cover on disturbed lands. Thus, invasion of native plant species along with planted species may play a significant role in increasing the plant diversity on mined

  3. Chemotactic response of plant-growth-promoting bacteria towards roots of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta Sood, Sushma

    2003-08-01

    The chemotactic responses of the plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria Azotobacter chroococcum and Pseudomonas fluorescens to roots of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (Glomus fasciculatum) tomato plants were determined. A significantly (P=0.05) greater number of bacterial cells of wild strains were attracted towards vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots compared to non-vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots. Substances exuded by roots served as chemoattractants for these bacteria. P. fluorescens was strongly attracted towards citric and malic acids, which were predominant constituents in root exudates of tomato plants. A. chroococcum showed a stronger response towards sugars than amino acids, but the response was weakest towards organic acids. The effects of temperature, pH, and soil water matric potential on bacterial chemotaxis towards roots were also investigated. In general, significantly (P=0.05) greater chemotactic responses of bacteria were observed at higher water matric potentials (0, -1, and -5 kPa), slightly acidic to neutral pH (6, 6.5 and 7), and at 20-30 degrees C (depending on the bacterium) than in other environmental conditions. It is suggested that chemotaxis of P. fluorescens and A. chroococcum towards roots and their exudates is one of the several steps in the interaction process between bacteria and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal roots. PMID:19719591

  4. The effect of agricultural practices on the development of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. II. Studies in experimental microcorms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddington, C.L.; Dodd, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Two glasshouse experiments were performed to assess the development and metabolic activity of mycorrhizas formed by isolates of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) from three different genera, Acaulospora, Gigaspora and Glomus on Desmodium ovalifolium L. plants. In the first experiment the effect of

  5. Influence of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth, nutrition and phytochemical constituents of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran Srinivasan; Chinnavenkataraman Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the isolation, identification, mass production and the effect of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM fungi) on growth parameters of the Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus). Methods: A total of nine different AM fungi species such as Acaulospora scrobiculata, Acaulospora marrowae, Glomus aggregatum (G. aggregatum), Glomus fasciculatum, Glomus geosporum, Gigaspora margarita, Gigaspora nigra, Scutellospora heterogama and Scutellospora pellucida were isolated...

  6. Influence of cultivation regime of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolate on its symbiotic efficacy in phyto restoration of disturbed ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R. S.; Vosatka, M.; Castro, P. M. L.; Dodd, J. C.

    2009-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), from the Phylum Glomeromycota, are a group of soil organisms that forms symbiotic associations with plant roots and can contribute to increase plant biomass and promote phyto restoration of disturbed ecosystems. The influence of cultivation regime of a Glomus geosporum isolate, obtained from a highly alkaline anthropogenic sediment, on its symbiotic efficacy was investigated. (Author)

  7. Distribution of dominant arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi among five plant species in undisturbed vegetation of a coastal grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva; Rosendahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Most plant species in mixed grassland vegetation are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Previous studies have reported differences in host preferences among AM fungi, although the fungi are known to lack host specificity. In the present study, the distribution of phylogenetic groups ...

  8. Clonal diversity and population genetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus spp.) studied by multilocus genotyping of single spores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva; Rosendahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    A nested multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction) approach was used for multilocus genotyping of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal populations. This method allowed us to amplify multiple loci from Glomus single spores in a single PCR amplification. Variable introns in the two protein coding genes Gm...

  9. Soil bacteria respond to presence of roots but not to mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, P.A.; Bååth, E.; Jakobsen, I.;

    1996-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) cucumber seedlings and uncolonized controls were grown in growth chambers which allowed separation of compartments with roots from compartments with the extraradical mycelium alone. Two fungi, Glomus invermaium Hall and G. caledonium (Nicol. and Gerd.) Trappe and Gerde......Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) cucumber seedlings and uncolonized controls were grown in growth chambers which allowed separation of compartments with roots from compartments with the extraradical mycelium alone. Two fungi, Glomus invermaium Hall and G. caledonium (Nicol. and Gerd.) Trappe...... and Gerdemann, were used. Bacterial numbers (direct and viable count) and activities (thymidine incorporation) were highest in the root compartment, but were not affected by the AM mycelium after 30 days of plant growth. The soil was stored after harvest for 16 d at 13°C to study the effect of disconnected......) pattern. The bacteria specific PLFAs cy17:0 and cy19:0 increased in both experiments in the root compartments. The PLFAs 15:0 and 17:0, which are usually considered to be bacteria specific, also increased due to the presence of roots, but it was shown that these fatty acids were present in aseptically...

  10. Grassland Degradation Decrease the Diversity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Species in Tibet Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bu CAI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi play a vital role in restoration of an ecosystem. Grassland degradation in alpine steppe is severe, but the influence of grassland degradation on AM fungi composition in Tibetan Plateau is still not well understood. This research studied the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in degraded alpine steppe, dominated by Stipa purpurea. The results showed that the species richness and abundance of AM fungi in degraded grasslands significantly decreased. In different typical grasslands species, diversity of AM fungi genus Glomus was much higher than other genera (Acaulospora and Scutellospora. Compared with normal grassland, the AM fungal species diversity in moderately degraded grassland decreased by 30%, but in lightly degraded and severely degraded grassland, it highly increased with 15.3% and 13.3%, respectively. The species diversity of genus Glomus in moderately degraded grassland and lightly degraded grassland were higher than for normal grassland. Significant differences were observed in a relative abundance of common dominant species among different degraded grasslands. The proportion of dominant species highly increased with the aggravation of grassland degradation. The results suggest that the grassland mild degradation increased the adaptability and stress resistance of species.

  11. Improvement of nutritional quality of greenhouse-grown lettuce by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is conditioned by the source of phosphorus nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslam, Marouane; Pascual, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Erro, Javier; García-Mina, José María; Goicoechea, Nieves

    2011-10-26

    The improvement of the nutritional quality of lettuce by its association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) has been recently reported in a previous study. The aim of this research was to evaluate if the fertilization with three P sources differing in water solubility affects the effectiveness of AMF for improving lettuce growth and nutritional quality. The application of either water-soluble P sources (Hewitt's solution and single superphosphate) or the water-insoluble (WI) fraction of a "rhizosphere-controlled fertilizer" did not exert negative effects on the establishment of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. AMF improved lettuce growth and nutritional quality. Nevertheless, the effect was dependent on the source of P and cultivar. Batavia Rubia Munguía (green cultivar) benefited more than Maravilla de Verano (red cultivar) in terms of mineral nutrients, total soluble sugars, and ascorbate contents. The association of lettuce with AMF resulted in greater quantities of anthocyanins in plants fertilized with WI, carotenoids when plants received either Hewitt's solution or WI, and phenolics regardless of the P fertilizer applied. PMID:21913649

  12. The Interaction between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Endophytic Bacteria Enhances Plant Growth of Acacia gerrardii under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Huqail, Asma A.; Wirth, Stephan; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2016-01-01

    Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg, and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance. PMID:27486442

  13. The Interaction between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Endophytic Bacteria Enhances Plant Growth of Acacia gerrardii under Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, Elsayed F; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A; Al-Huqail, Asma A; Wirth, Stephan; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2016-01-01

    Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg, and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance. PMID:27486442

  14. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Janos

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  15. Diversity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and its Influence on Soil Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2002-12-01

    The diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) has been correlated with increased plant biodiversity, productivity, and fecundity. However, the influence of AMF diversity on below-ground ecosystem characteristics has yet to be determined. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to examine these interactions. Pot cultures containing equal numbers of four common grass species were either inoculated with one of four AMF species, a mixture of all four species, or were not inoculated, for a total of six different community compositions. After two months of growth, the pot cultures were harvested. Results indicated both individual species effects and diversity effects on factors controlling ecosystem-level processes. Bacterial abundance, bacterial diversity, glomalin concentration, hyphal colonization of roots, and above ground plant biomass exhibited significant differences among treatments. However, N mineralization rates, nitrification rates, and levels of organic matter did not respond significantly to treatments. Bacterial diversity, bacterial abundance, and above ground biomass displayed a similar pattern across treatments, and this may indicate potential interactions among AMF, bacteria, and plants. Specifically, the non-mycorrhizal treatment produced the highest values for all three of these characters while the Glomus intraradices monoculture produced the lowest values. Species also varied in production of glomalin, a compound associated with carbon sequestration, with Gigaspora gigantea producing the highest concentration of 1.67mg/g soil and Glomus etunicatumproducing the lowest concentration of 0.63 mg/g soil. Arbuscular mycorrhizal diversity significantly effected the total amount of fungal root colonization (high diversity: 70.9 percent; monocultures: 46.1-63.3 percent) and fungal fecundity and had a marginally significant influence on the abundance of external hyphae. This increased fungal abundance suggested niche complimentarity and positive species

  16. Application ofArbuscular Mycorrhizal Inocula Might Be A Promising Method in the Restoration of Severely Degraded Wetlands%Application of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Inocula Might Be A Promising Method in the Restoration of Severely Degraded Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Gao

    2013-01-01

    The application of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inocula in severely degraded wetlands could ensure success in restoration.Mycorrhizal fungi play an important role in plant individual' s survival and development in a low nutrient condition.Based on the importance that mycorrhizal fungi have to their host plants,mycorrhizal inocula have been produced and applied in terrestrial ecosystems in order to let the plants become mycorrhizal.However,mycorrhizal inocula have not been used in wetland restorations,despite increasing evidence that mycorrhizal fungi are commonly found in various wetland systems and have the ability to survive under anoxic conditions.Evidence also shows that mycorrhizal fungal inocula in the soil could have been destroyed in the degraded wetland or could be destroyed during traditional wetland restoration process.Therefore,AM inocula production is strongly recommended for wetland restoration.In this paper,I will argue that AM inocula production is required when introduced recovery is necessary,and aeroponic culture technique is a preferable method to produce AM inocula.Last,a renewed wetland restoration flow chart is summarized.

  17. Role of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Growth and Salt Avoidance of Pistachio Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Shamshiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a greenhouse experiment, plant growth and rates of uptake and root to shoot transport of chloride and sodium were investigated in seedlings of pistachio (Pistacia vera cv. Badami-Riz-Zarand inoculated with Glomus mosseae and exposed for 21 and 42 days with four salinity levels (0.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0 dSm-1. Mycorrhizal (+M plants maintained greater root and shoot biomass at all salinity levels compared to non-mycorrhizal (-M plants. In -M plants, salt intensity had no significant effect on shoot dry weight (SDW and leaf dry weight (LDW on each of harvesting dates but root dry weight (RDW showed a significant decrease at the highest salinity level 42 days after the start of salt treatment (DAT in comparison with control (EC of 0.5 dSm-1. In +M plants, SDW was increased with an increase in salt intensity especially in the first harvesting date. The same increase was observed in RDW of +M plants while LDW was not affected by salt stress levels. Rates of uptake and root to shoot transport of Cl- and Na+ were markedly lower in +M than in -M plants leading to decrease in accumulation of them. In conclusion, the study indicates that pistachio tolerance to salt stress is improved by mycorrhizal colonization, although the salinity levels used in this work could not induce biomass reduction in -M pistachio plants, higher levels of salinity should be investigated in order to optimize the effect of this symbiosis.

  18. Suppression of allene oxide synthase 3 in potato increases degree of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Rafael Jorge León; Navarrete, María Isabel Tamayo; Bote, Juan Antonio Ocampo; Monguio, Salomé Prat; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2016-01-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) is a mutually beneficial interaction among higher plants and soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Numerous studies have pointed that jasmonic acid plays an important role in the development of the intraradical fungus. This compound belongs to a group of biologically active compounds known as oxylipins which are derived from the oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies of the regulatory role played by oxylipins in AM colonization have generally focused on jasmonates, while few studies exist on the 9-LOX pathway of oxylipins during AM formation. Here, the cDNA of Allene oxide synthase 3 (AOS3), a key enzyme in the 9-LOX pathway, was used in the RNA interference (RNAi) system to transform potato plants in order to suppress its expression. Results show increases in AOS3 gene expression and 9-LOX products in roots of wild type potato mycorrhizal plants. The suppression of AOS3 gene expression increases the percentage of root with mycorrhizal colonization at early stages of AM formation. AOS3 RNA interference lead to an induction of LOXA and 13-LOX genes, a reduction in AOS3 derived 9-LOX oxylipin compounds and an increase in jasmonic acid content, suggesting compensation between 9 and 13-LOX pathways. The results in a whole support the hypothesis of a regulatory role for the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway during mycorrhization.

  19. Suppression of allene oxide synthase 3 in potato increases degree of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Rafael Jorge León; Navarrete, María Isabel Tamayo; Bote, Juan Antonio Ocampo; Monguio, Salomé Prat; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2016-01-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) is a mutually beneficial interaction among higher plants and soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Numerous studies have pointed that jasmonic acid plays an important role in the development of the intraradical fungus. This compound belongs to a group of biologically active compounds known as oxylipins which are derived from the oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies of the regulatory role played by oxylipins in AM colonization have generally focused on jasmonates, while few studies exist on the 9-LOX pathway of oxylipins during AM formation. Here, the cDNA of Allene oxide synthase 3 (AOS3), a key enzyme in the 9-LOX pathway, was used in the RNA interference (RNAi) system to transform potato plants in order to suppress its expression. Results show increases in AOS3 gene expression and 9-LOX products in roots of wild type potato mycorrhizal plants. The suppression of AOS3 gene expression increases the percentage of root with mycorrhizal colonization at early stages of AM formation. AOS3 RNA interference lead to an induction of LOXA and 13-LOX genes, a reduction in AOS3 derived 9-LOX oxylipin compounds and an increase in jasmonic acid content, suggesting compensation between 9 and 13-LOX pathways. The results in a whole support the hypothesis of a regulatory role for the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway during mycorrhization. PMID:26629611

  20. [Change of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi community in response to elevational gradients on the Tibetan Plateau, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-bu; Peng, Yue-lin

    2015-09-01

    The community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and mycorrhizal infection in the main herbaceous plants were studied along the elevational gradients on the Tibetan Plateau, and AMF community was characterized based on spore morphology. Community of AMF at lower elevations (2200-3400 m) in southeast Tibetan Plateau included 11 genera, covering 31 species, whereas AMF at intermediate elevations (3400-3900 m) in central Tibet included 11 genera, covering 20 species, and that at higher elevations (4300-5300 m) in northern Tibet included 6 genera, covering 14 species. With the increase of elevation, both spore density (r = 0.978, P 0.05) tended to increase. The proportion of dominant species and endemic species increased substantially, while the Shannon index (r = -0.945, P AMF community and mycorrhizal infection, and the effect differed among the three elevational sites. The results demonstrated that AMF community on the Tibetan Plateau tends to be habitat specific. The water and thermal environment as well as soil environment are the driving forces for shaping AMF community assemblages. PMID:26785564

  1. Two Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Colonizing Maize Under Different Phosphorus Regimes in a Compartment Cultivation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A modified glass bead compartment cultivation system was used to compare some chemical and biological properties of the two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus mosseae and Glomus versiforme using maize (Zea mays) as the host plant with four added levels of available phosphorus (P). The proportion of host plant root length infected was determined at harvest. Shoot and root yields and nutrient concentrations were determined, together with the nutrient concentrations in the AM fungal external mycelium. The morphology of various mycorrhizal structures of the two AM fungi was also compared by microscopic observation. Inoculation with G. mosseae gave higher plant yields than that with G. versiforme, and the two fungi responded differently in infection rate to available phosphorus level. Root infection rate of mycorrhizal maize colonized by G. mosseae decreased markedly with increasing P level, and there was very poor development of the extraradical mycelium at the highest rate of P addition. In contrast, G. versiforme showed greater tolerance to increasing P level. Elemental analysis showed that phosphorus, copper and zinc concentrations in the external mycelium differed between the two fungi and were much higher than those in the host plant.Differences in the morphology of the two fungi were also observed.

  2. Arginine bi-directional translocation and breakdown into ornithine along the arbuscular mycorrhizal mycelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN HaiRu

    2009-01-01

    Bi-directional translocatlon and degradation of Arginine (Arg) along the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mycellum were testified through 15N and/or 13C isotopic labeling. In vitro mycorrhizas of Glomus intraradices and Ri T-DNA-transformed carrot roots were grown in dual compartment Petri dishes. [15N-and/or13C]Arg was supplied to either the fungal compartment or the mycorrhizal compartment or separate dishes containing the uncolonized roots. The levels and labeling of free amino acids (AAs) in the mycorrhizal roots and in the extraradical mycelia(ERM) were measured by gas chromatogra-phy/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The ERM of AM fungi exposed in either NH4+ or urea as sole external nitrogen source had much higher 15N enrichment of Arg, compared with those In nitrate or exogenous Arg; however, glycerol supplied as an external car-bon source to the ERM had no significant effect on the level of Arg in the ERM. Meanwhile, Arg bio-synthesized In the ERM could be translocated intact to the mycorrhizal roots and thereby the level of Arg in the mycorrhizal roots increased to about 20% after culture of ERM in 4 mmol/L NH4+ for 6 weeks.Also Arg was found to be bi-directionally transported along the AM fungal mycelium through [U-13C]Arg labeling either In the mycorrhizal compartment or in the fungal compartment. Once Arg was translo-cated to the potential N-limited sites, it would be further degraded into ornithine (Orn) and urea since either [U-13C] or [U-15N/U-13C]Orn was apparently shown up in the mycorrhizal root tissues when [U-13C] or [U-15N/U-13C]Arg was labeled In the fungal compartment, respectively. Evidently Orn formation indi-cated the ongoing activities of Arg translocation and degradation through the urea cycle in AM fungal mycelium.

  3. Arginine bi-directional translocation and breakdown into ornithine along the arbuscular mycorrhizal mycelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Bi-directional translocation and degradation of Arginine (Arg) along the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mycelium were testified through 15N and/or 13C isotopic labeling. In vitro mycorrhizas of Glomus intraradices and Ri T-DNA-transformed carrot roots were grown in dual compartment Petri dishes. [15N- and/or13C]Arg was supplied to either the fungal compartment or the mycorrhizal compartment or separate dishes containing the uncolonized roots. The levels and labeling of free amino acids (AAs) in the mycorrhizal roots and in the extraradical mycelia(ERM) were measured by gas chromatogra- phy/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The ERM of AM fungi exposed in either NH4+ or urea as sole external nitrogen source had much higher 15N enrichment of Arg, compared with those in nitrate or exogenous Arg; however, glycerol supplied as an external car- bon source to the ERM had no significant effect on the level of Arg in the ERM. Meanwhile, Arg bio- synthesized in the ERM could be translocated intact to the mycorrhizal roots and thereby the level of Arg in the mycorrhizal roots increased to about 20% after culture of ERM in 4 mmol/L NH4+ for 6 weeks. Also Arg was found to be bi-directionally transported along the AM fungal mycelium through [U-13C]Arg labeling either in the mycorrhizal compartment or in the fungal compartment. Once Arg was translo- cated to the potential N-limited sites, it would be further degraded into ornithine (Orn) and urea since either [U-13C] or [U-15N/U-13C]Orn was apparently shown up in the mycorrhizal root tissues when [U-13C] or [U-15N/U-13C]Arg was labeled in the fungal compartment, respectively. Evidently Orn formation indi- cated the ongoing activities of Arg translocation and degradation through the urea cycle in AM fungal mycelium.

  4. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Antioxidant Activity in Gmelina arborea Roxb. under Salt Stress Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayura Prakash DUDHANE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gmelina arborea Roxb. is medicinally and economically important tree species were selected for study. An experiment was conducted to determine the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungus Glomus fasciculatum on salt stress tolerance of tree species Gmelina arborea. Mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal seedlings were treated with 100 mM and 200 mM concentration of NaCl. G. fasciculatum treated plant showed increase in fresh and dry weight, greater percentage of mycorrhizal colonization, higher accumulation of proline and chlorophyll content with increasing levels of salinity. G. fasciculatum colonization significantly increased tolerance of salinity, acid phosphatases, and Proline content and also antioxidant enzymes like peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase at all levels of salinity treatments of Gmelina plants in comparison with non-mycorrhizal salinity treated plants. These results demonstrate that AM fungus (G. fasciculatum is very effective in strengthening the tolerance of Gmelina arborea grown in arid and semi arid areas.

  5. Establishment of Dual Culture System of Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]Hairy Roots and Vesicular-Arbuscular (VA) Mycorrhizal Fungi%大豆毛状根-VA菌根真菌双重培养体系的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李欣欣; 赵静; 廖红

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the processes of establishment of dual culture system of soybean hairy roots and vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi Gigaspora margarita under axenic conditions. Soybean hairy roots were used as host to be infected by G. margarita. After 3.5 months of dual culture, the infection of transformed soybean hairy roots by VA mycorrhizal fungi was observed, subsequently auxiliary cells were formed and mature spores of G. margarita were obtained. The successful establishment of dual culture system of soybean and VA mycorrhizal fungi provides an effective method to study the mechanisms of symbiosis between soybean roots and VA mycorrhizal fungi and related molecular researches.%以大豆毛状根为宿主,接种VA菌根真菌珠状巨孢囊霉(Glgaspora margarita),经过3.5个月的双重培养,观察到VA菌根真菌珠状巨孢囊霉对大豆毛状根的侵染,辅助细胞形成,并获得VA菌根真菌成熟孢子,在无菌条件下建立了大豆毛状根-VA菌根真菌双重培养体系,为研究茵根真菌侵染大豆根部形成共生体系及相关分子机制提供了一种有效的研究方法.

  6. 454-sequencing reveals stochastic local reassembly and high disturbance tolerance within arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekberg, Karin Ylva Margareta; Schnoor, Tim; Kjøller, Rasmus;

    2012-01-01

    1. Disturbance is assumed to be a major driver of plant community composition, but whether similar processes operate on associated soil microbial communities is less known. Based on the assumed trade-off between disturbance tolerance and competiveness, we hypothesize that a severe disturbance...... applied within a semi-natural grassland would shift the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal community towards disturbance-tolerant fungi that are rare in undisturbed soils. 2. We used 454-sequencing of the large subunit rDNAregion to characterizeAMfungal communities in Plantago lanceolata roots grown...... in the field for 4 months and exposed either to no disturbance or to severe disturbance where fungi from undisturbed soil were either permitted or prevented from re-colonizing the disturbed area. This allowed for a distinction between AM fungi that survived the disturbance and those that quickly re...

  7. Mechanical soil disturbance as a determinant of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in semi-natural grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnoor, Tim Krone; Lekberg, Ylva; Rosendahl, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    to Diversisporaceae. Only three phylotypes were closely related to known morphospecies. Soil disturbance significantly reduced phylotype richness and changed the AM fungal community composition. Most phylotypes, even closely related ones, showed little or no overlap in their distribution and occurred in either......While the effect of disturbance on overall abundance and community composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has been researched in agricultural fields, less is known about the impact in semi-natural grasslands. We sampled two AM plant species, Festuca brevipila and Plantago lanceolata, from...... the control or disturbed plots. We found no evidence of host preference in this system, except for one phylotype that preferentially seemed to colonize Festuca. Our results show that disturbance imposed a stronger structuring force for AM fungal communities than did host plants in this semi-natural grassland....

  8. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) Diversity in Prosopis cineraria (L.) Druce Under Arid Agroecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neelam Verma; Jagadish Chandra Tarafdar; Krishna Kant Srivastava; Jitendra Panwar

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi associated with Prosopis cineraria (Khejri) were assessed for their qualitative and quantitative distribution from eight districts of Rajasthan. A total of three species of Acaulospora, one species of Entrophospora, two species of Gigaspora, twenty-one species of Glomus, seven species of Sclerocystis and three species of Scutellospora were recorded. A high diversity of AM fungi was observed and it varied at different study sites. Among these six genera, Glomus occurred most frequently. Glomus fasciculatum, Glomus aggregatum, and Glomus mosseae were found to be the most predominant AM fungi in infecting Prosopis cineraria. Acaulospora, G. fasciculatum, Sclerocystis was found in all the fields studied, while Scutellospora species were found only in few sites. A maximum of thirty-six AM fungal species were isolated and identified from Jodhpur, whereas only thirteen species were found from Jaisalmer. Spores of Glomus fasciculatum were found to be most abundant under Prosopis cineraria.

  9. Detection and characterization of mycoviruses in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by deep-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezawa, Tatsuhiro; Ikeda, Yoji; Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Fungal viruses (mycoviruses) often have a significant impact not only on phenotypic expression of the host fungus but also on higher order biological interactions, e.g., conferring plant stress tolerance via an endophytic host fungus. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota associate with most land plants and supply mineral nutrients to the host plants. So far, little information about mycoviruses has been obtained in the fungi due to their obligate biotrophic nature. Here we provide a technical breakthrough, "two-step strategy" in combination with deep-sequencing, for virological study in AM fungi; dsRNA is first extracted and sequenced using material obtained from highly productive open pot culture, and then the presence of viruses is verified using pure material produced in the in vitro monoxenic culture. This approach enabled us to demonstrate the presence of several viruses for the first time from a glomeromycotan fungus.

  10. Glomus claroideum and G. spurcum, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota new for Poland and Europe, respectively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic development and morphological properties of spores of two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota of the genus Glomus, G. claroideum and G. spurcum, are described and illustrated. Spores of the two species were not earlier found in Poland, and this paper is the first report of the occurrence of G. spurcum in Europe. In one-species pot cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the host plant, the mycorrhizae of G. claroideum consist of arbuscules, vesicles, as well as intra- and extraradical hyphae staining intensively with trypan blue. Glomus spurcum mycorrhizae were not recognized, because many attempts to establish one-species cultures of this fungus failed. Additionally, the distribution of both the fungi in the world is presented.

  11. Genetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal populations in fallow and cultivated soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren; Matzen, Hans

    2008-01-01

    •  The impact of fallowing on the genetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was studied by hierarchical sampling of spores from four plots in a fallow and a cultivated field. •  A nested multiplex PCR approach was used to assign the spores to genotypes. Variable introns of the two...... be attributed to variation between plots rather than subplots, suggesting that the lack of soil cultivation resulted in more heterogeneous population genetic structures. Analyses of haplotype networks of the fungi suggested a subdivision of G. mosseae haplotypes between the two fields, whereas no such division...... was seen in G. geosporum and G. caledonium. The results show that agricultural practices differently affect both the abundance and the population structure of different AMF species....

  12. DNA-Based Characterization and Identification of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senés-Guerrero, Carolina; Schüßler, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate symbionts of most land plants. They have great ecological and economic importance as they can improve plant nutrition, plant water supply, soil structure, and plant resistance to pathogens. We describe two approaches for the DNA-based characterization and identification of AMF, which both can be used for single fungal spores, soil, or roots samples and resolve closely related AMF species: (a) Sanger sequencing of a 1.5 kb extended rDNA-barcode from clone libraries, e.g., to characterize AMF isolates, and (b) high throughput 454 GS-FLX+ pyrosequencing of a 0.8 kb rDNA fragment, e.g., for in-field monitoring. PMID:26791499

  13. A critical review on the nutrition role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Alizadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though many factors influence the accession of mineral nutrients required for plantgrowth, arbuscular mycorrhizal-roots can greatly enhance the accession of mineral nutrients in hostplants. The nutrients enhanced most by AM are those that are of low mobility or sparingly soluble. Withother factors being equal in specific environments, AM may be the difference between whether plants willsurvive and/or have the ability to obtain the required mineral nutrients for sustainability. Although themost commonly reported mineral nutrient enhanced in host plants with AM-roots is P, accession of manyother mineral nutrients (e.g., Zn, Cu, N, S, Ca, Mg, K may be enhanced in plants by AM. Severalreviews about accession of mineral nutrients in AM plants have been published fairly recently. Some ofthe concepts mentioned with P accession may be applicable to the other mineral nutrients. This reviewgives an overview on the role of mycorrhizae in nutrition.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai;

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... and subsequently subjected to two temperature treatments (158C, low temperature; 258C, ambient control) for 2 weeks. Low-temperature stress significantly decreasedAMcolonisation, plant height and biomass. TotalNcontent and activities of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase of AM...... plants were higher than those of non-AM plants. AM plants had a higher net photosynthetic rate (Pn) than non-AM plants, although low temperature inhibited the Pn. Compared with non-AM plants, AM plants exhibited higher leaf soluble sugars, reducing sugars, root sucrose and fructose contents, and sucrose...

  15. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on root system morphology and sucrose and glucose contents of Poncirus trifoliata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Yong-Ming

    2014-04-01

    The effects of inoculation with Glomus mosseae, G. versiforme, and their mixture on plant growth, root system morphology, and sucrose and glucose contents of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L.) were studied by pot culture. The results showed that all the inoculated treatments significantly increased the plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, and shoot and root biomass. In addition, the mycorrhizal treatments significantly increased the number of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd lateral roots. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly increased the root projected area, surface area, volume, and total root length (mainly 0-1 cm root length), but decreased the root average diameter. Meanwhile, G. versiforme showed the best effects. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased the leaf sucrose and root glucose contents, but decreased the leaf glucose and root sucrose contents. Owing to the 'mycorrhizal carbon pool' in roots, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi resulted in high glucose content and low sucrose content of roots, which would facilitate the root growth and development, thereby the establishment of better root system morphology of host plants.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non......-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter the response of growth and nutrient uptake of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuguang Wang; Zhaozhong Feng; Xiaoke Wang; Wenliang Gong

    2011-01-01

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus mosseae on the responses to elevated O3 in growth and nutrition of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Guangzhouyuan) were investigated. Exposure was conducted in growth chambers by using three O3 concentrations (20 (CF), 80 (CFO1) and 120 nL/L (CFO2); 8 hr/day for 75 days). Results showed that elevated O3 slightly impacted overall mycorrhizal colonization, but significantly decreased the proportional frequency of hypha and increased the proportional frequency of spores and vesicles, suggesting that O3 had significant effects on mycorrhizal structure. Elevated O3 significantly decreased yield, dry mass and nutrient contents (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) in both non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal plants. However, significant interactive effects were found in most variables due to that the reduction by O3 in the mycorrhizal plants was less than that in the non-mycorrhizal plants. Additionally, AMF increased the concentrations of N, P, Ca, and Mg in shoot and root. It can be concluded that AMF alleviated detrimental effects of increasing O3 on host plant through improving plant nutrition and growth.

  18. [Arbuscular mycorrhizal bioremediation and its mechanisms of organic pollutants-contaminated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuling; Ling, Wanting; Gao, Yanzheng; Li, Fuchun; Xiong, Wei

    2006-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), the symbiont of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plant root, has been proved to be able to improve soil structure and enhance the plant resistance to environmental stress. There are more than 170 kinds of AMF worldwide. Recently, the promoted degradation of organic pollutants in soils in the presence of AM was observed, and AM bioremediation (AMB) is becoming a promising and perspective remediation technique for organic pollutants-contaminated soils. This paper reviewed the research progress on the AMB of soils contaminated by typical organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAEs, petroleum, and pesticides. The mechanisms of AMB mainly include the metabolism of organic pollutants by AM fungi, the degradation of these pollutants by the enzymes derived from AM exudation and by the enhanced root exudation and rhizospheric microbial activity in the presence of AM, and the removal of the pollutants by plant uptake and accumulation. As a new approach for the remediation of contaminated soils, some aspects involved in AMB, e.g., the screening of high efficient AM fungi, efficacy of co-existing AM fungi, soil ageing, and plant uptake of organic pollutants from soils in the presence of AM, still need to be further investigated.

  19. Glomus drummondii and G. walkeri, two new species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszkowski, Janusz; Renker, Carsten; Buscot, François

    2006-05-01

    Two new ectocarpic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, Glomus drummondii and G. walkeri (Glomeromycota), found in maritime sand dunes of northern Poland and those adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea are described and illustrated. Mature spores of G. drummondii are pastel yellow to maize yellow, globose to subglobose, (58-)71(-85) micromdiam, or ovoid, 50-80x63-98 microm. Their wall consists of three layers: an evanescent, hyaline, short-lived outermost layer, a laminate, smooth, pastel yellow to maize yellow middle layer, and a flexible, smooth, hyaline innermost layer. Spores of G. walkeri are white to pale yellow, globose to subglobose, (55-)81(-95) micromdiam, or ovoid, 60-90x75-115 microm, and have a spore wall composed of three layers: a semi-permanent, hyaline outermost layer, a laminate, smooth, white to pale yellow middle layer, and a flexible, smooth, hyaline innermost layer. In Melzer's reagent, only the inner- and outermost layers stain reddish white to greyish rose in G. drummondii and G. walkeri, respectively. Both species form vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in one-species cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the host plant. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and parts of the LSU of the nrDNA of spores placed both species in Glomus Group B sensu Schüssler et al. [Schüssler A, Schwarzott D, Walker C, 2001. A new fungal phylum, the Glomeromycota: phylogeny and evolution. Mycolological Research 105: 1413-1421.].

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect glucosinolate and mineral element composition in leaves of Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Marco; Franken, Philipp; Mewis, Inga; Baldermann, Susanne; Wurst, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Moringa is a mycorrhizal crop cultivated in the tropics and subtropics and appreciated for its nutritive and health-promoting value. As well as improving plant mineral nutrition, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect plant synthesis of compounds bioactive against chronic diseases in humans. Rhizophagus intraradices and Funneliformis mosseae were used in a full factorial experiment to investigate the impact of AMF on the accumulation of glucosinolates, flavonoids, phenolic acids, carotenoids, and mineral elements in moringa leaves. Levels of glucosinolates were enhanced, flavonoids and phenolic acids were not affected, levels of carotenoids (including provitamin A) were species-specifically reduced, and mineral elements were affected differently, with only Cu and Zn being increased by the AMF. This study presents novel results on AMF effects on glucosinolates in leaves and supports conclusions that the impacts of these fungi on microelement concentrations in edible plants are species dependent. The nonspecific positive effects on glucosinolates and the species-specific negative effects on carotenoids encourage research on other AMF species to achieve general benefits on bioactive compounds in moringa. PMID:24706008

  1. Growth responses of maritime sand dune plant species to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Tadych

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a greenhouse, the response of 6 plant species dominating in the succession of vegetation of a deflation hollow of the Łeba Bar to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was investigated. The inoculum was a mixture of soil, roots and spores of 5 species of AMF with the dominant species Glomus aggregatum. Except for Corynephorus canescens and Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria, both the growth and the dry matter of above-ground parts of plants of Agrostis stolonifera, Ammophila arenaria, Corynephorus canescens, Juncus articulatus and J. balticus inoculated with AMF were higher than those growing in soils lacking infection propagules of these fungi. Inoculation with AMF decreased the dry matter of root: shoot ratios in 5 plant species. This property was not determined in Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria due to the death of all control plants. The level of mycorrhizal infection was low and did not correlate with the growth responses found. The high growth reaction of Juncus spp. to AMF found in this study suggests that the opinion of non-mycotrophy or low dependence of plants of Juncaceae on AMF was based on results of investigations of plants growing in wet sites known to inhibit the formation of mycorrhizae.

  2. Plant growth depressions in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses: not just caused by carbon drain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiying; Smith, F Andrew; Dickson, Sandy; Holloway, Robert E; Smith, Sally E

    2008-01-01

    * This study investigated effects of plant density and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization on growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition of a cultivar of wheat (Triticum aestivum) that often shows early AM-induced growth depressions. * Two experiments were conducted. Expt 1 had three plant densities and one soil P concentration. Expt 2 had two plant densities and two P concentrations. Plants were grown in calcareous P-fixing soil, inoculated with Glomus intraradices or Gigaspora margarita, or noninoculated (nonmycorrhizal (NM)). Glomus intraradices colonized well and caused a growth depression only in Expt 1. Gigaspora margarita caused large growth depressions in both experiments even though it colonized poorly. * The results showed that growth depressions were mitigated by changes in relative competition for soil P by NM and AM plants, and probably by decreasing carbon costs of the fungi. * The different effects of the two fungi appear to be attributable to differences in the balance between P uptake by the fungal pathway and direct uptake via the roots. These differences may be important in other AM symbioses that result in growth depressions. The results show that mycorrhizal growth responses of plants grown singly may not apply at the population or community level.

  3. Transcriptional responses of Medicago truncatula upon sulfur deficiency stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eWipf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur plays an essential role in plants’ growth and development and in their response to various abiotic and biotic stresses despite its leachability and its very low abundance in the only form that plant roots can uptake (sulfate. It is part of amino acids, glutathione (GSH, thiols of proteins and peptides, membrane sulfolipids, cell walls and secondary products, so reduced availability can drastically alter plant growth and development. The nutritional benefits of symbiotic interactions can help the plant in case of S deficiency. In particular the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM interaction improves N, P and S plant nutrition, but the mechanisms behind these exchanges are not fully known yet. Although the transcriptional changes in the leguminous model plant Medicago truncatula have been already assessed in several biotic and/or abiotic conditions, S deficiency has not been considered so far. The aim of this work is to get a first overview on S-deficiency responses in the leaf and root tissues of plants interacting with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.Several hundred genes displayed significantly different transcript accumulation levels. Annotation and GO ID association were used to identify biological processes and molecular functions affected by sulfur starvation. Beside the beneficial effects of AM interaction, plants were greatly affected by the nutritional status, showing various differences in their transcriptomic footprints. Several pathways in which S plays an important role appeared to be differentially affected according to mycorrhizal status, with a generally reduced responsiveness to S deficiency in mycorrhized plants.

  4. Symbiont dynamics during ecosystem succession: co-occurring plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de León, David; Moora, Mari; Öpik, Maarja; Neuenkamp, Lena; Gerz, Maret; Jairus, Teele; Vasar, Martti; Bueno, C Guillermo; Davison, John; Zobel, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Although mycorrhizas are expected to play a key role in community assembly during ecological succession, little is known about the dynamics of the symbiotic partners in natural systems. For instance, it is unclear how efficiently plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi disperse into early successional ecosystems, and which, if either, symbiotic partner drives successional dynamics. This study describes the dynamics of plant and AM fungal communities, assesses correlation in the composition of plant and AM fungal communities and compares dispersal limitation of plants and AM fungi during succession. We studied gravel pits 20 and 50 years post abandonment and undisturbed grasslands in Western Estonia. The composition of plant and AM fungal communities was strongly correlated, and the strength of the correlation remained unchanged as succession progressed, indicating a stable dependence among mycorrhizal plants and AM fungi. A relatively high proportion of the AM fungal taxon pool was present in early successional sites, in comparison with the respective fraction of plants. These results suggest that AM fungi arrived faster than plants and may thus drive vegetation dynamics along secondary vegetation succession. PMID:27162183

  5. A unique mitovirus from Glomeromycota, the phylum of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Ryoko; Ikeda, Yoji; Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota associate with most land plants and supply mineral nutrients to the host plants. One of the four viral segments found by deep-sequencing of dsRNA in the AM fungus Rhizophagus clarus strain RF1 showed similarity to mitoviruses and is characterized in this report. The genome segment is 2,895 nucleotides in length, and the largest ORF was predicted by applying either the mold mitochondrial or the universal genetic code. The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 820 amino acids with a molecular mass of 91.2 kDa and conserves the domain of the mitovirus RdRp superfamily. Accordingly, the dsRNA was designated as R. clarus mitovirus 1 strain RF1 (RcMV1-RF1). Mitoviruses are localized exclusively in mitochondria and thus generally employ the mold mitochondrial genetic code. The distinct codon usage of RcMV1-RF1, however, suggests that the virus is potentially able to replicate not only in mitochondria but also in the cytoplasm. RcMV1-RF1 RdRp showed the highest similarity to the putative RdRp of a mitovirus-like ssRNA found in another AM fungus, followed by RdRp of a mitovirus in an ascomycotan ectomycorrhizal fungus. The three mitoviruses found in the three mycorrhizal fungi formed a deeply branching clade that is distinct from the two major clades in the genus Mitovirus.

  6. Diversity and zonal distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the northern slopes of the Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI ZhaoYong; CHEN ZhiChao; ZHANG LiYun; FENG Gu; CHRISTIE Peter; TIAN ChangYan; LI XiaoLin

    2007-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal status of the 20 most common plant species distributed in 4 vegetation types (meadow steppe, desert steppe, steppe desert and typical desert) on the northern slopes of the Tianshan Mountains was investigated. Samples of the plant species and their rhizosphere soils were collected from the 4 vegetation zones and examined to compare their mycorrhizal status, AM fungal spore densities, biovolumes, and community structures. 28 AM fungal species were isolated from the rhizosphere soils: of these, 5 belonged to Acaulospora, 1 to Archaeospora and 22 to Glomus.5 AM fungi, Glomus aggregatum, G. claroideum, G. deserticola, G. etunicatum and G. sinuosum, were observed in all 4 zonal types. No significant differences were observed in mean proportion of root length colonized by AM fungi among the plant species within each zonal type. Comparing the 4 zonal types, Plantago minuta (84.5%)in steppe desert and Eremopyrum orientale (83.1%) in typical desert showed the highest root colonizatsion rates. AM fungal spore densities and biovolumes were significantly different in the different zonal types. AM fungal spore d ensities and biovolumes, species richness and diversity were highest in meadow steppe and lowest in typical desert.

  7. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on 137Cs uptake by plants grown on different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential use of mycorrhiza as a bioremediation agent for soils contaminated by radiocesium was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment. The uptake of 137Cs by cucumber, perennial ryegrass, and sunflower after inoculation with a commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) product in soils contaminated with 137Cs was investigated, with non-mycorrhizal quinoa included as a “reference” plant. The effect of cucumber and ryegrass inoculation with AM fungi on 137Cs uptake was inconsistent. The effect of AM fungi was most pronounced in sunflower: both plant biomass and 137Cs uptake increased on loamy sand and loamy soils. The total 137Cs activity accumulated within AM host sunflower on loamy sand and loamy soils was 2.4 and 3.2-fold higher than in non-inoculated plants. Although the enhanced uptake of 137Cs by quinoa plants on loamy soil inoculated by the AM fungi was observed, the infection of the fungi to the plants was not confirmed. - Highlights: ► Effect of soil inoculation on 137Cs uptake by crops was studied in greenhouse. ► 137Cs uptake by inoculated sunflower plants was most pronounced. ► The higher 137Cs uptake by inoculated sunflower due to presence of mycorrhiza. ► Studies suggest potential for use of mycorrhiza on contaminated sites.

  8. Colonization with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Promotes the Growth of Morus alba L. Seedlings under Greenhouse Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Morus alba L. is an important tree species planted widely in China because of its economic value. In this report, we investigated the influence of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF species, Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices, alone and together, on the growth of M. alba L. seedlings under greenhouse conditions. The growth parameters and physiological performance of M. alba L. seedlings were evaluated 90 days after colonization with the fungi. The growth and physiological performance of M. alba L. seedlings were significantly affected by the AMF species. The mycorrhizal seedlings were taller, had longer roots, more leaves and a greater biomass than the non-mycorrhizae-treated seedlings. In addition, the AMF species-inoculated seedlings had increased root activity and a higher chlorophyll content compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Furthermore, AMF species colonization increased the phosphorus and nitrogen contents of the seedlings. In addition, simultaneous root colonization by the two AMF species did not improve the growth of M. alba L. seedlings compared with inoculation with either species alone. Based on these results, these AMF species may be applicable to mulberry seedling cultivation.

  9. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice with different radial oxygen loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Man, Y B; Ye, Z H; Wu, C; Wu, S C; Wong, M H

    2013-11-15

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the temporal variation of arsenic (As) speciation and accumulation in two paddy rice cultivars (TD 71 and Xiushui 11) with different degrees of radial oxygen loss (ROL) at three growth periods (day 7, day 35, day 63 after flooding the soil) were investigated in soil, spiked with and without 30 mg As kg(-1). The results showed that TD 71 with high ROL colonized by Glomus intraradices led to higher root colonization rates than Xiushui 11 at three growth periods, both in soil with or without 30 mg As kg(-1) (p<0.05). Mycorrhizal inoculation led to elevated (p<0.05) root ratios of arsenite (As(III)) conc./arsenate (As(V)) conc. (concentration) in TD 71 with high ROL at three growth periods in As contaminated flooding soils. Furthermore, the ratios of As(III) conc./As(V) conc. in roots of TD71 were significantly more than Xiushui 11 when colonized by AMF at three growth periods in 30 mg As kg(-1) soil (p<0.05). Therefore, rice with high ROL can favor AM fungal infection and enhance root ratio of As(III) conc./As(V) conc. in the presence of AMF.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect glucosinolate and mineral element composition in leaves of Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Marco; Franken, Philipp; Mewis, Inga; Baldermann, Susanne; Wurst, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Moringa is a mycorrhizal crop cultivated in the tropics and subtropics and appreciated for its nutritive and health-promoting value. As well as improving plant mineral nutrition, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect plant synthesis of compounds bioactive against chronic diseases in humans. Rhizophagus intraradices and Funneliformis mosseae were used in a full factorial experiment to investigate the impact of AMF on the accumulation of glucosinolates, flavonoids, phenolic acids, carotenoids, and mineral elements in moringa leaves. Levels of glucosinolates were enhanced, flavonoids and phenolic acids were not affected, levels of carotenoids (including provitamin A) were species-specifically reduced, and mineral elements were affected differently, with only Cu and Zn being increased by the AMF. This study presents novel results on AMF effects on glucosinolates in leaves and supports conclusions that the impacts of these fungi on microelement concentrations in edible plants are species dependent. The nonspecific positive effects on glucosinolates and the species-specific negative effects on carotenoids encourage research on other AMF species to achieve general benefits on bioactive compounds in moringa.

  11. Dynamics of phoxim residues in green onion and soil as influenced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fa Yuan; Shi, Zhao Yong; Tong, Rui Jian; Xu, Xiao Feng

    2011-01-15

    Organophosphorus pesticides in crops and soil pose a serious threat to public health and environment. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may make a contribution to organophosphate degradation in soil and consequently decrease chemical residues in crops. A pot culture experiment was conducted to investigate the influences of Glomus caledonium 90036 and Acaulospora mellea ZZ on the dynamics of phoxim residues in green onion (Allium fistulosum L.) and soil at different harvest dates after phoxim application. Results show that mycorrhizal colonization rates of inoculated plants were higher than 70%. Shoot and root fresh weights did not vary with harvest dates but increased significantly in AM treatments. Phoxim residues in plants and soil decreased gradually with harvest dates, and markedly reduced in AM treatments. Kinetic analysis indicated that phoxim degradation in soil followed a first-order kinetic model. AM inoculation accelerated the degradation process and reduced the half-life. G. caledonium 90036 generally produced more pronounced effects than A. mellea ZZ on both the plant growth and phoxim residues in plants and soil. Our results indicate a promising potential of AM fungi for the control of organophosphate residues in vegetables, as well as for the phytoremediation of organophosphorus pesticide-contaminated soil. PMID:20870354

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for the biocontrol of plant-parasitic nematodes: a review of the mechanisms involved

    OpenAIRE

    Nele eSchouteden; Dirk eDe Waele; Bart ePanis; Christine M Vos

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant parasitic nematode (PPN) infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and dis...

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for the biocontrol of plant-parasitic nematodes: a review of the mechanisms involved

    OpenAIRE

    Schouteden, Nele; de Waele, Dirk; Panis, Bart; Christine M Vos

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant-parasitic nematode (PPN) infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and dis...

  14. Diversity patterns of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with rhizosphere of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) in Benin, West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. M.; Houngnandan, P.; A. Kane; Sanon, K. B.; Neyra, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of diversity and understanding factors underlying species distribution are fundamental themes in ecology. However, the diversity of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in African tropical agro-ecosystems remains weakly known. This research was carried out to assess the morphological diversity of indigenous AMF species associated with rhizosphere of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp.) in different agro-ecological zones (AEZ) of Benin and to examine the effects of soil...

  15. Impact of an invasive nitrogen-fixing tree on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the development of native species

    OpenAIRE

    Guisande-Collazo, Alejandra; González, Luís; Souza-Alonso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes to knowledge on the effect of the invasive N2-fixing tree, Acacia dealbata, on soil microbial communities and consequences on plant species that are dependent on symbiotic relationships as in the case of Plantago lanceolata. The main results of this work indicate that Acacia dealbata modifies the structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the invaded shrublands and consequently the growth and development of plants that depend on AMF. Plantago lanceolata showed a subst...

  16. Phosphate transport by hyphae of field communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi at two levels of P fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingstrup, I.; Kahiluoto, H.; Jakobsen, I.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate the effect of P fertilisation on the function of field communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) measured as P transport to flax. Two methods were applied to soil from a long-term field experiment with NaHCO3-extractable soil P levels of 24 and 50 mg kg...... was largely similar in both fertilization treatments, indicating that the capacity for P uptake and transport by hyphae of the two AMF communities was similar....

  17. Variability in growth, nutrition and phytochemical constituents of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour) Spreng. as influenced by indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Sevanan Rajeshkumar

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted under greenhouse nursery condition on the efficacy of seven indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in the improvement of growth, biomass, nutrition and phytochemical constituents, namely total phenols, ortho dihydroxy phenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins and saponins, in the roots and leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour) Spreng. Seedlings were raised in polythene bags containing soil inoculated with isolates of seven different indigenous AM fungi, viz. Acaul...

  18. The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on yam (Dioscorea spp.) tuber weights and secondary metabolite content

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Fun-Chi; Lee, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are widely distributed in nature. They live in the roots of higher plants, in a symbiotic relationship. In this study, five commercial species of yams (Dioscorea spp.) were inoculated with six species of AMF, Glomus clarum, G. etunicatum, G. fasciculatum, Gigaspora sp., G. mosseae, and Acaulospora sp., in field cultivation conditions to investigate the influence of AMF inoculation on tuber weights and secondary metabolite content in yam tubers. The results s...

  19. Inoculations with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Increase Vegetable Yields and Decrease Phoxim Concentrations in Carrot and Green Onion and Their Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Fa Yuan Wang; Rui Jian Tong; Zhao Yong Shi; Xiao Feng Xu; Xin Hua He

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As one of the most widely used organophosphate insecticides in vegetable production, phoxim (C(12)H(15)N(2)O(3)PS) is often found as residues in crops and soils and thus poses a potential threat to public health and environment. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may make a contribution to the decrease of organophosphate residues in crops and/or the degradation in soils, but such effects remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A greenhouse pot experiment studied the influen...

  20. [Effect of Ryegrass and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal on Cd Absorption by Varieties of Tomatoes and Cadmium Forms in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-qin; Jiang, Ling; Xu, Wei-hong; Chi, Sun-lin; Chen, Xu-gen; Xie, Wen-wen; Xiong, Shi- juan; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Xiong, Zhi-ting

    2015-12-01

    Field trial was carried out to investigate the effects of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhizal single or compound treatment to two varieties of tomato ("Defu mm-8" and "Luobeiqi") on the plant growth, concentrations and accumulations of Cd as well as the impact on microorganisms, enzyme activities, pH and Cd forms in soil when exposed to Cd (5.943 mg · kg⁻¹). The results showed that dry weights of fruit, root, stem, leaf and plant significantly increased by single or compound treatment of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhizal by 14.1%-38.4% and 4.2%-18.3%, 20.9%-31.5% and 8.4%-10.3%, 13.0%-16.8% and 3.0%-9.5%, 10.7%- 16.8% and 2.7%-7.6%, 14.3%-36.6% and 4.5%-16.8%, respectively. The amounts of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes of soil and the activities of urease, invertase, acid phosphatase, catalase in soil were increased by single or compound treatment of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhizal, and the soil microorganism amounts and enzyme activities significantly differed between the two varieties of tomato and treatments (P Cd, CAB-Cd, Fe-Mn-Cd and total Cd in soil were decreased, and the total Cd content was decreased by 16.9%-27.8%. Cadmium concentrations in fruit, leaf, stem and root of both varieties were significantly decreased by 6.9%-40.9%, 5.7%-40.1%, 4.6%-34.7% and 9.8%-42.4%, respectively. Cadmium accumulations in tomato were in order of leaf > stem > root > fruit. Comparing the two tomato varieties, Cd concentrations and Cd accumulations in fruit and plant were in order of "Luobeiqi" < "Defu mm-8" in the presence or absence of single or compound treatment of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhizal.

  1. Modularity Reveals the Tendency of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi To Interact Differently with Generalist and Specialist Plant Species in Gypsum Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Torrecillas, Emma; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Roldán, Antonio; Díaz, Gisela; Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Torres, Maria Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Patterns in plant–soil biota interactions could be influenced by the spatial distribution of species due to soil conditions or by the functional traits of species. Gypsum environments usually constitute a mosaic of heterogeneous soils where gypsum and nongypsum soils are imbricated at a local scale. A case study of the interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in gypsum environments can be illustrative of patterns in biotic interactions. We hypothesized that (i) soil char...

  2. Indetification of Symbiotic Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Korea by Morphological and DNA Sequencing Features of Their Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-hun; Eom, An-Heum; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Leonowicz, Andrzej; Ohaga, Shoji

    2006-01-01

    In order to clarify the diversity of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, 9 individual plant roots and soils were randomly chosen at 27 sites in the general cultivation fields in the Chungbuk- and Chungnam- provinces, middle parts of Korea. In terms of height growth of Sorghum bicolor, the soil in Cheongwon site (host plant Fagopyrum esculentum) resulted in the best growth, and the order of growth was Platycodon grandiflorus, Miscanthus sinensis, Sesamum indicum, and Capsicum annuum. It represen...

  3. Growth, Cadmium Accumulation and Physiology of Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) as Affected by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling-Zhi; GONG Zong-Qiang; ZHANG Yu-Long; LI Pei-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study the effects of three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), including Glomus intraradices, Glomus constrictum and Glomus mosseae, on the growth, root colonization and Cd accumulation of marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) at Cd addition levels of 0, 5 and 50 mg kg-1 in soil. The physiological characteristics, such as chlorophyll content, soluble sugar content, soluble protein content and antioxidant enzyme activity, of Tagetes erecta L. were also investigated. The symbiotic relationship between the marigold plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was well established under Cd stress. The symbiotic relationship was reflected by the better physiobiochemical parameters of the marigold plants inoculated with the three AMF isolates where the colonization rates in the roots were between 34.3% and 88.8%. Compared with the non-inoculated marigold plants, the shoot and root biomass of the inoculated marigold plants increased by 15.2%-47.5% and 47.8%-130.1%, respectively, and the Cd concentration and accumulation decreased. The chlorophyll and soluble sugar contents in the mycorrhizal marigold plants increased with Cd addition, indicating that AMF inoculation helped the marigold plants to grow by resisting Cd stress. The antioxidant enzymes reacted differently with the three AMF under Cd stress. For plants inoculated with G. constrictum and G. mosseae, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased with increasing Cd addition, but peroxidase (POD) activity decreased with increasing Cd addition. For plants inoculated with G. intruradices, three of the antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly decreased at high levels of Cd addition. Overall, the activities of the three antioxidant enzymes in the plants inoculated with AMF were higher than those of the plants without AMF inoculation under Cd stress. Our results support the view that antioxidant enzymes have a great influence on the biomass of plants

  4. Impact of an invasive nitrogen-fixing tree on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the development of native species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisande-Collazo, Alejandra; González, Luís; Souza-Alonso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate soil biotrophs that establish intimate relationships with 80 % of terrestrial plant families. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi obtain carbon from host plants and contribute to the acquisition of mineral nutrients, mainly phosphorus. The presence of invasive plants has been identified as a soil disturbance factor, often conditioning the structure and function of soil microorganisms. Despite the investigation of many aspects related to the invasion ofAcacia dealbata, the effect produced on the structure of AMF communities has never been assessed. We hypothesize thatA. dealbatamodifies the structure of AMF community, influencing the establishment and growth of plants that are dependent on these mutualisms. To validate our hypothesis, we carried out denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and also grew plants ofPlantago lanceolatain pots using roots of native shrublands or fromA. dealbata, as inoculum of AMF. Cluster analyses from DGGE indicated an alteration in the structure of AMF communities in invaded soils. After 15 weeks, we found that plants grown in pots containing native roots presented higher stem and root growth and also produced higher biomass in comparison with plants grown withA. dealbatainoculum. Furthermore, plants that presented the highest biomass and growth exhibited the maximum mycorrhizal colonization and phosphorus content. Moreover, fluorescence measurements indicated that plants grown withA. dealbatainoculum even presented higher photosynthetic damage. Our results indicate that the presence of the invaderA. dealbatamodify the composition of the arbuscular fungal community, conditioning the establishment of native plants. PMID:26984185

  5. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on net ion fluxes in the roots of trifoliate orange(Poncirus trifoliata) and mineral nutrition in seedlings under zinc contamination%丛枝菌根真菌对枳根净离子流及锌污染下枳苗矿质营养的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖家欣; 杨慧; 张绍铃

    2012-01-01

    concentrations in the roots of plants in medium with 600 mg/kg of added zinc and phosphorus concentrations in roots of plants in medium with 300 mg/kg added zinc were higher in arbuscular myeorrhizal seedlings. Arbuscular myeorrhizal colonization had no significant effects on calcium concentrations in seedlings. Copper and phosphorus concentrations gradually decreased in both arbuscular mycorrhizal and non-arbuscular mycorrhizal seedlings with increasing zinc levels, which demonstrated that zinc levels in seedlings are negatively correlated with copper or phosphorus. With no added zinc, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and copper uptake was promoted by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus infection. Under zinc contamination, phosphorus, and copper uptake was still accelerated by mycorrhizal colonization. Thus, the effects of mycorrhizal colonization were not only related to the degree of zinc pollution, but were also correlated with the species of fungi and host plants. Additionally, net Ca2+ efflux atO ujn and 600 pjn, net H+ influx at 600 jjum, and net NO3 influx at 2400 u.m from the root tip of arbuscular mycorrhizal seedlings in medium with no added zinc were significantly higher than those of non-arbuscular mycorrhizal seedlings. These results suggest that mycorrhizal symbiosis activates Ca2+-ATPase, Ca2+/H+ antiporters and Noj/rT symporters in root plasma membranes. Nutrient uptake and stimulation of growth are mediated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Furthermore, the variations detected in arbuscular mycorrhizal roots for Ca2+, H+ and NO3 fluxes point to a significant involvement of the fungus.%盆栽实验研究了不同施Zn水平(0、300 mg/kg和600 mg/kg)下,接种丛枝菌根真菌Glomus intraradices对枳苗生长、Zn、Cu、P、K、Ca、Mg分布的影响,并采用非损伤微测技术测定分析了菌根化与非菌根化枳根净Ca2+、H+、NO3-离子流动态.结果表明:(1)在不同施Zn水平下,接种菌根真菌显著提高了枳苗地上部及根部鲜重;

  6. Bacteria associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within roots of plants growing in a soil highly contaminated with aliphatic and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffis, Bachir; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) belong to phylum Glomeromycota, an early divergent fungal lineage forming symbiosis with plant roots. Many reports have documented that bacteria are intimately associated with AMF mycelia in the soil. However, the role of these bacteria remains unclear and their diversity within intraradical AMF structures has yet to be explored. We aim to assess the bacterial communities associated within intraradical propagules (vesicles and intraradical spores) harvested from roots of plant growing in the sediments of an extremely petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted basin. Solidago rugosa roots were sampled, surface-sterilized, and microdissected. Eleven propagules were randomly collected and individually subjected to whole-genome amplification, followed by PCRs, cloning, and sequencing targeting fungal and bacterial rDNA. Ribotyping of the 11 propagules showed that at least five different AMF OTUs could be present in S. rugosa roots, while 16S rRNA ribotyping of six of the 11 different propagules showed a surprisingly high bacterial richness associated with the AMF within plant roots. Most dominant bacterial OTUs belonged to Sphingomonas sp., Pseudomonas sp., Massilia sp., and Methylobacterium sp. This study provides the first evidence of the bacterial diversity associated with AMF propagules within the roots of plants growing in extremely petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted conditions.

  7. Genetic Exchange in an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Results in Increased Rice Growth and Altered Mycorrhiza-Specific Gene Transcription▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colard, Alexandre; Angelard, Caroline; Sanders, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate symbionts with most terrestrial plants. They improve plant nutrition, particularly phosphate acquisition, and thus are able to improve plant growth. In exchange, the fungi obtain photosynthetically fixed carbon. AMF are coenocytic, meaning that many nuclei coexist in a common cytoplasm. Genetic exchange recently has been demonstrated in the AMF Glomus intraradices, allowing nuclei of different Glomus intraradices strains to mix. Such genetic exchange was shown previously to have negative effects on plant growth and to alter fungal colonization. However, no attempt was made to detect whether genetic exchange in AMF can alter plant gene expression and if this effect was time dependent. Here, we show that genetic exchange in AMF also can be beneficial for rice growth, and that symbiosis-specific gene transcription is altered by genetic exchange. Moreover, our results show that genetic exchange can change the dynamics of the colonization of the fungus in the plant. Our results demonstrate that the simple manipulation of the genetics of AMF can have important consequences for their symbiotic effects on plants such as rice, which is considered the most important crop in the world. Exploiting natural AMF genetic variation by generating novel AMF genotypes through genetic exchange is a potentially useful tool in the development of AMF inocula that are more beneficial for crop growth. PMID:21784911

  8. Chromium resistance of dandelion (Taraxacum platypecidum Diels.) and bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [Linn.] Pers.) is enhanced by arbuscular mycorrhiza in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Song-Lin; Chen, Bao-Dong; Sun, Yu-Qing; Ren, Bai-Hui; Zhang, Xin; Wang, You-Shan

    2014-09-01

    In a greenhouse pot experiment, dandelion (Taraxacum platypecidum Diels.) and bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon[Linn.] Pers.), inoculated with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Rhizophagus irregularis, were grown in chromium (Cr)-amended soils (0 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 20 mg/kg Cr[VI]) to test whether arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis can improve Cr tolerance in different plant species. The experimental results indicated that the dry weights of both plant species were dramatically increased by AM symbiosis. Mycorrhizal colonization increased plant P concentrations and decreased Cr concentrations and Cr translocation from roots to shoots for dandelion; in contrast, mycorrhizal colonization decreased plant Cr concentrations without improvement of P nutrition in bermudagrass. Chromium speciation analysis revealed that AM symbiosis potentially altered Cr species and bioavailability in the rhizosphere. The study confirmed the protective effects of AMF on host plants under Cr contaminations.

  9. Effectiveness of native and exotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on nutrient uptake and ion homeostasis in salt-stressed Cajanus cajan L. (Millsp.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neera; Pandey, Rekha

    2015-04-01

    Soil salinity is an increasing problem worldwide, restricting plant growth and production. Research findings show that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have the potential to reduce negative effects of salinity. However, plant growth responses to AM fungi vary as a result of genetic variation in mycorrhizal colonization and plant growth responsiveness. Thus, profitable use of AM requires selection of a suitable combination of host plant and fungal partner. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to compare effectiveness of a native AM fungal inoculum sourced from saline soil and two single exotic isolates, Funneliformis mossseae and Rhizophagus irregularis (single or dual mix), on Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. genotypes (Paras and Pusa 2002) under salt stress (0-100 mM NaCl). While salinity reduced plant biomass and disturbed ionic status in both genotypes, Pusa 2002 was more salt tolerant and ensured higher AM fungal colonization, plant biomass and nutrient content with favourable ion status under salinity. Although all AM fungi reduced negative effects of salt stress, R. irregularis (alone or in combination with F. mosseae) displayed highest efficiency under salinity, resulting in highest biomass, yield, nutrient uptake and improved membrane stability with favourable K(+)/Na(+) and Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratios in the host plant. Higher effectiveness of R. irregularis correlated with higher root colonization, indicating that the symbiosis formed by R. irregularis had more stable viability and efficiency under salt stress. These findings enhance understanding of the functional diversity of AM fungi in ameliorating plant salt stress tolerance and suggest the potential use of R. irregularis for increasing Cajanus cajan productivity in saline soils. PMID:25155616

  10. Glomus africanum and G. iranicum, two new species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszkowski, Janusz; Kovács, Gábor M; Balázs, Tímea K; Orlowska, Elzbieta; Sadravi, Mehdi; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François

    2010-01-01

    Two new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species (Glomeromycota) of genus Glomus, G. africanum and G. iranicum, are described and illustrated. Both species formed spores in loose clusters and singly in soil and G. iranicum sometimes inside roots. G. africanum spores are pale yellow to brownish yellow, globose to subglobose, (60-)87(-125) μm diam, sometimes ovoid to irregular, 80-110 x 90-140 μm. The spore wall consists of a semipermanent, hyaline, outer layer and a laminate, smooth, pale yellow to brownish yellow, inner layer, which always is markedly thinner than the outer layer. G. iranicum spores are hyaline to pastel yellow, globose to subglobose, (13-)40(-56) μm diam, rarely egg-shaped, prolate to irregular, 39-54 x 48-65 μm. The spore wall consists of three smooth layers: one mucilaginous, short-lived, hyaline, outermost; one permanent, semirigid, hyaline, middle; and one laminate, hyaline to pastel yellow, innermost. Only the outermost spore wall layer of G. iranicum stains red in Melzer's reagent. In the field G. africanum was associated with roots of five plant species and an unrecognized shrub colonizing maritime sand dunes of two countries in Europe and two in Africa, and G. iranicum was associated with Triticum aestivum cultivated in southwestern Iran. In one-species cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the host plant G. africanum and G. iranicum formed arbuscular mycorrhizae. Phylogenetic analyses of partial SSU sequences of nrDNA placed the two new species in Glomus group A. Both species were distinctly separated from sequences of described Glomus species.

  11. The intercropping partner affects arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici interactions in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage-Ahmed, Karin; Krammer, Johannes; Steinkellner, Siegrid

    2013-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their bioprotective aspects are of great interest in the context of sustainable agriculture. Combining the benefits of AMF with the utilisation of plant species diversity shows great promise for the management of plant diseases in environmentally compatible agriculture. In the present study, AMF were tested against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici with tomato intercropped with either leek, cucumber, basil, fennel or tomato itself. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) root colonisation of tomato was clearly affected by its intercropping partners. Tomato intercropped with leek showed even a 20 % higher AM colonisation rate than tomato intercropped with tomato. Positive effects of AMF expressed as an increase of tomato biomass compared to the untreated control treatment could be observed in root as well as in shoot weights. A compensation of negative effects of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici on tomato biomass by AMF was observed in the tomato/leek combination. The intercropping partners leek, cucumber, basil and tomato had no effect on F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici disease incidence or disease severity indicating no allelopathic suppression; however, tomato co-cultivated with tomato clearly showed a negative effect on one plant/pot with regard to biomass and disease severity of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Nonetheless, bioprotective effects of AMF resulting in the decrease of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici disease severity were evident in treatments with AMF and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici co-inoculation. However, these bioprotective effects depended on the intercropping partner since these effects were only observed in the tomato/leek and tomato/basil combination and for the better developed plant of tomato/tomato. In conclusion, the effects of the intercropping partner on AMF colonisation of tomato are of great interest for crop plant communities and for the influences on each other. The outcome of the bioprotective

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the invasion of Solidago canadensis L. in southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruyi; Zhou, Gang; Zan, Shuting; Guo, Fuyu; Su, Nannan; Li, Jing

    2014-11-01

    The significance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the process of plant invasion is still poorly understood. We hypothesize that invasive plants would change local AMF community structure in a way that would benefit themselves but confer less advantages to native plants, thus influencing the extent of plant interactions. An AMF spore community composed of five morphospecies of Glomus with equal density (initial AMF spore community, I-AMF) was constructed to test this hypothesis. The results showed that the invasive species, Solidago canadensis, significantly increased the relative abundance of G. geosperum and G. etunicatum (altered AMF spore community, A-AMF) compared to G. mosseae, which was a dominant morphospecies in the monoculture of native Kummerowia striata. The shift in AMF spore community composition driven by S. canadensis generated functional variation between I-AMF and A-AMF communities. For example, I-AMF increased biomass and nutrient uptake of K. striata in both monocultures and mixtures of K. striata and S. canadensis compared to A-AMF. In contrast, A-AMF significantly enhanced root nitrogen (N) acquisition of S. canadensis grown in mixture. Moreover, mycorrhizal-mediated 15N uptake provided direct evidence that I-AMF and A-AMF differed in their affinities with native and invading species. The non-significant effect of A-AMF on K. striata did not result from allelopathy as root exudates of S. canadensis exhibited positive effects on seed germination and biomass of K. striata under naturally occurring concentrations. When considered together, we found that A-AMF facilitated the invasion of S. canadensis through decreasing competitiveness of the native plant K. striata. The results supported our hypothesis and can be used to improve our understanding of an ecosystem-based perspective towards exotic plant invasion.

  13. Context-dependency of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant-insect interactions in an agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Barber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with a variety of other community members that have the potential to indirectly influence each other through a shared host plant. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are generally considered plant mutualists because of their generally positive effects on plant nutrient status and growth. AMF may also have important indirect effects on plants by altering interactions with other community members. By influencing plant traits, AMF can modify aboveground interactions with both mutualists, such as pollinators, and antagonists, such as herbivores. Because herbivory and pollination can dramatically influence plant fitness, comprehensive assessment of plant-AMF interactions should include these indirect effects. To determine how AMF affect plant-insect interactions, we grew Cucumis sativus (Cucurbitaceae under five AMF inoculum treatments and control. We measured plant growth, floral production, flower size, and foliar nutrient content of half the plants, and transferred the other half to a field setting to measure pollinator and herbivore preference of wild insects. Mycorrhizal treatment had no effect on plant biomass or floral traits but significantly affected leaf nutrients, pollinator behavior, and herbivore attack. Although total pollinator visitation did not vary with AMF treatment, pollinators exhibited taxon-specific responses, with honey bees, bumble bees, and Lepidoptera all responding differently to AMF treatments. Flower number and size were unaffected by treatments, suggesting that differences in pollinator preference were driven by other floral traits. Mycorrhizae influenced leaf K and Na, but these differences in leaf nutrients did not correspond to variation in herbivore attack. Overall, we found that AMF indirectly influence both antagonistic and mutualistic insects, but impacts depend on the identity of both the fungal partner and the interacting insect, underscoring the context dependency of plant-AMF interactions.

  14. Red list plants: colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, B; Haselwandter, K

    2004-08-01

    Since information concerning the mycorrhization of endangered plants is of major importance for their potential re-establishment, we determined the mycorrhizal status of Serratula tinctoria (Asteraceae), Betonica officinalis (Lamiaceae), Drosera intermedia (Droseraceae) and Lycopodiella inundata (Lycopodiaceae), occurring at one of two wetland sites (fen meadow and peat bog), which differed in soil pH and available P levels. Root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) was quantified. Colonization by AMF appeared to be more frequent in the fen meadow than in the peat bog, and depended on the host plant. Roots of S. tinctoria and B. officinalis were well colonized by AMF in the fen meadow (35-55% root length) and both arbuscules and vesicles were observed to occur in spring as well as in autumn. In the peat bog, L. inundata showed a low level of root colonization in spring, when vesicles were found frequently but no arbuscules. In roots of D. intermedia from the peat bog, arbuscules and vesicles were observed, but AMF colonization was lower than in L. inundata. In contrast, the amount of AMF spores extracted from soil at the peat bog site was higher than from the fen meadow soil. Spore numbers did not differ between spring and autumn in the fen meadow, but they were higher in spring than in autumn in the peat bog. Acaulospora laevis or A. colossica and Glomus etunicatum were identified amongst the AMF spores extracted from soil at the two sites. S. tinctoria and B. officinalis roots were also regularly colonized by DSE (18-40% root length), while L. inundata was only rarely colonized and D. intermedia did not seem to be colonized by DSE at all. PMID:15221579

  15. Mycorrhizal symbiosis produces changes in specific flavonoids in leaves of pepper plant (Capsicum annum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate if mycorrhizal plants grown under optimal growth conditions would improve crop quality compared to the non-mycorrhizal control. The results clearly showed that while mycorrhizal plants grown under an optimal nutrient supply did not increase t...

  16. Apocarotenoid biosynthesis in arbuscular mycorrhizal roots: contributions from methylerythritol phosphate pathway isogenes and tools for its manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Michael H; Floss, Daniela S; Hans, Joachim; Fester, Thomas; Strack, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    During colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi plant roots frequently accumulate two types of apocarotenoids (carotenoid cleavage products). Both compounds, C(14) mycorradicin and C(13) cyclohexenone derivatives, are predicted to originate from a common C(40) carotenoid precursor. Mycorradicin is the chromophore of the "yellow pigment" responsible for the long-known yellow discoloration of colonized roots. The biosynthesis of apocarotenoids has been investigated with a focus on the two first steps of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway catalyzed by 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR). In Medicago truncatula and other plants the DXS2 isogene appears to be specifically involved in the AM-mediated accumulation of apocarotenoids, whereas in the case of DXR a single gene contributes to both housekeeping and mycorrhizal (apo)carotenoid biosynthesis. Immunolocalization of DXR in mycorrhizal maize roots indicated an arbuscule-associated protein deposition, which occurs late in arbuscule development and accompanies arbuscule degeneration and breakdown. The DXS2 isogene is being developed as a tool to knock-down apocarotenoid biosynthesis in mycorrhizal roots by an RNAi strategy. Preliminary results from this approach provide starting points to suggest a new kind of function for apocarotenoids in mycorrhizal roots.

  17. The roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in phytoremediation and tree-herb interactions in Pb contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yurong; Liang, Yan; Han, Xiaozhen; Chiu, Tsan-Yu; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in plant interaction is essential for optimizing plant distribution to restore degraded ecosystems. This study investigated the effects of AMF and the presence of legume or grass herbs on phytoremediation with a legume tree, Robinia pseudoacacia, in Pb polluted soil. In monoculture, mycorrhizal dependency of legumes was higher than that of grass, and AMF benefited the plant biomass of legumes but had no effect on grass. Mycorrhizal colonization of plant was enhanced by legume neighbors but inhibited by grass neighbor in co-culture system. N, P, S and Mg concentrations of mycorrhizal legumes were larger than these of non-mycorrhizal legumes. Legume herbs decreased soil pH and thereby increased the Pb concentrations of plants. The neighbor effects of legumes shifted from negative to positive with increasing Pb stress levels, whereas grass provided a negative effect on the growth of legume tree. AMF enhanced the competition but equalized growth of legume-legume under unpolluted and Pb stress conditions, respectively. In conclusion, (1) AMF mediate plant interaction through directly influencing plant biomass, and/or indirectly influencing plant photosynthesis, macronutrient acquisition, (2) legume tree inoculated with AMF and co-planted with legume herbs provides an effective way for Pb phytoremediation. PMID:26842958

  18. Morphotype-based characterization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in a restored tropical dry forest, Margarita island-Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Laurie; Loveral, Milagros; Arrindell, Pauline; Aguilar, Victor Hugo; Hasmy, Zamira; Cuenca, Gisela

    2015-09-01

    The mycorrhizal component of revegetated areas after ecological restoration or rehabilitation in arid and semiarid tropical areas has been scarcely assessed, particularly those made after mining disturbance. We evaluated and compared the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of a small area of restored tropical dry forest destroyed by sand extraction, with a non-restored area of similar age, at the peninsula of Macanao, Margarita Island (Venezuela). Our study was undertaken in 2009, four years after planting, and the mycorrhizal status was evaluated in four restored plots (8 x 12.5 m) (two were previously treated with hydrogel (R2 and R2'), and two were left untreated (R1 and R1'), and four non-restored plots of similar size (NR1 and NR1' with graminoid physiognomy with some scattered shrubs; and NR2 and NR2', with a more species rich plant community). Apparently the restoration management promoted higher arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species richness and diversity, particularly in restored soils where the hydrogel was added (R2 treatment). Soil of the NRI treatment (with a higher herbaceous component) showed the highest spore density, compared to samples of soils under the other treatments. Considering species composition, Claroideoglomus etunicatum and Rhizophagus intraradices were found in all treatments; besides, Diversispora spurca and Funnefformis geosporum were only found in non-restored plots, while members of the Gigasporaceae (a family associated with little disturbed sites) were commonly observed in the plots with restored soils. Mycorrhizal colonization was similar in the restored and non-restored areas, being a less sensitive indicator of the ecosystem recovery. The trend of higher richness and diversity of AMF in the restored plot with hydrogel suggests that this management strategy contributes to accelerate the natural regeneration in those ecosystems where water plays an essential role. PMID:26666138

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Biochar Improved Early Growth of Neem (Melia azedarach Linn. Seedling Under Greenhouse Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wilarso Budi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the effect of biochar on the seedling quality index and growth of neem tree seedlings and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF development  grown on ultisol  soil medium.  Two factors in completely randomised experimental design was conducted under green house conditions and Duncan Multiple Range Test was used to analyse the data. The results showed that neem seedling quality index was improved by interaction of AMF fungi and biochar amandment. The growth of neem seedling was significantly increased by interactions of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and biochar.  The combination  treatment of Glomus etunicatum and biochar 10% gave best results of height and diameter, and significantly increased by 712% and 303% respectively, as compared to control plant, while the combination treatment of Gigaspora margarita and biochar 10% gave the best result of shoot dry weight, and root dry weight and significantly increase by 4,547% and 6,957% as compared to control plant.  The mycorrhizal root colonization was increased with increasing biochar added, but decreases when 15% of biochar was applied.  N, P, and K uptake of 12 weeks neem seedling old was higher and significantly increased as compared to control plant.Keywords: AMF development, nutrient uptake , plant growth , seedling quality index, biochar  DOI: 10.7226/jtfm.19.2.103

  20. Reforestation of bauxite mine spoils with Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm. seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krishnakumar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Open cast mining for bauxite at Yercaud hills (India resulted indegradation of forest ecosystem and production of large quantities of waste rocks (called mine spoils. To ameliorate mine spoils, topsoil is used to spread over before the planting of tree species, conventional method as the topsoil has a good structure, water holding capacity and beneficial microbes like Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM fungi essential for plant growth.However, the use of top soil is expensive and in this study bauxite mine spoils were reforestated with AM fungi instead of it. The beneficial microbes AM fungi (Glomus aggregatum Schenck & Smith, G. fasciculatum(Thatcher Gerd. & Trappe emend. Walker & Koske, G. geosporum(Nicol. & Gerd. Walker were isolated, cultured and inoculated into the seedlings of Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm. and grown in bauxite mine spoils as potting medium under nursery conditions. Then, the biomass improved seedlings of E. tereticornis with inoculation of AM fungi were directly transplanted at bauxite mine spoils. After transplantation of the seedlings at bauxite mine spoils, the growth and survival rate were monitored for two years. The AM fungi inoculated seedlings of E. tereticornis showed 95% survival over the control seedlings and their growth was also significantlyhigher. Tissue nutrients (N, P, K were also found higher inAM fungi inoculated E. tereticornis than un inoculated control seedlings.

  1. Solanum nigrum grown in contaminated soil: Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on zinc accumulation and histolocalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zn tissue accumulation in Solanum nigrum grown in a non-contaminated and a naturally contaminated Zn matrix and the effect of inoculation with different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on metal uptake were assessed. S. nigrum grown in the contaminated soil always presented higher Zn accumulation in the tissues, accumulating up to 1622 mg Zn kg-1. The presence of both Glomus claroideum and Glomus intraradices enhanced the uptake and accumulation of Zn by S. nigrum (up to 83 and 49% higher Zn accumulation, respectively). The main deposits of the metal were found in the intercellular spaces and in the cell walls of the root tissues, as revealed by autometallography, with the inoculation with different AMF species causing no differences in the location of Zn accumulation. These findings indicate that S. nigrum inoculated with selected heavy metal tolerant AMF presents extracting and accumulating capacities, constituting a potentially suitable remediation method for Zn polluted soils. - Zn accumulation by S. nigrum is enhanced by AMF and the metal storage in the tissues at the root level occurs mainly in the cell walls and in the intercellular spaces

  2. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, R; van der Werf, A; Lambers, H

    1989-09-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major.

  3. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Alter Soil Bacterial Community and Enhance Polychlorinated Biphenyls Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hua; Brookes, Philip C.; Xu, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) hyphae in alternation of soil microbial community and Aroclor 1242 dissipation. A two-compartment rhizobox system with double nylon meshes in the central was employed to exclude the influence of Cucurbita pepo L. root exudates on hyphal compartment soil. To assess the quantitative effect of AMF hyphae on soil microbial community, we separated the hyphal compartment soil into four horizontal layers from the central mesh to outer wall (e.g., L1–L4). Soil total PCBs dissipation rates ranged from 35.67% of L4 layer to 57.39% of L1 layer in AMF inoculated treatment, which were significant higher than the 17.31% of the control (P biphenyls as well as the total PCBs were significantly correlated with soil hyphal length (P biphenyl dissipation, while taxa from the Oxalobacteraceae and Streptomycetaceae responded negatively to AMF and PCB congener dissipation. Our results suggested that the AMF hyphal exudates as well as the hyphae per se did have quantitative effects on shaping soil microbial community, and could modify the PCBs dissipation processes consequently. PMID:27379068

  4. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, R; van der Werf, A; Lambers, H

    1989-09-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major. PMID:16667001

  5. Indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal assemblages protect grassland host plants from pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Wehner

    Full Text Available Plant roots can establish associations with neutral, beneficial and pathogenic groups of soil organisms. Although it has been recognized from the study of individual isolates that these associations are individually important for plant growth, little is known about interactions of whole assemblages of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms associating with plants.We investigated the influence of an interaction between local arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungal and pathogenic/saprobic microbial assemblages on the growth of two different plant species from semi-arid grasslands in NE Germany (Mallnow near Berlin. In a greenhouse experiment each plant species was grown for six months in either sterile soil or in sterile soil with one of three different treatments: 1 an AM fungal spore fraction isolated from field soil from Mallnow; 2 a soil pathogen/saprobe fraction consisting of a microbial community prepared with field soil from Mallnow and; 3 the combined AM fungal and pathogen/saprobe fractions. While both plant species grew significantly larger in the presence of AM fungi, they responded negatively to the pathogen/saprobe treatment. For both plant species, we found evidence of pathogen protection effects provided by the AM fungal assemblages. These results indicate that interactions between assemblages of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms can influence the growth of host plants, but that the magnitude of these effects is plant species-specific.

  6. Indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal assemblages protect grassland host plants from pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Jeannine; Antunes, Pedro M; Powell, Jeff R; Caruso, Tancredi; Rillig, Matthias C

    2011-01-01

    Plant roots can establish associations with neutral, beneficial and pathogenic groups of soil organisms. Although it has been recognized from the study of individual isolates that these associations are individually important for plant growth, little is known about interactions of whole assemblages of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms associating with plants.We investigated the influence of an interaction between local arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal and pathogenic/saprobic microbial assemblages on the growth of two different plant species from semi-arid grasslands in NE Germany (Mallnow near Berlin). In a greenhouse experiment each plant species was grown for six months in either sterile soil or in sterile soil with one of three different treatments: 1) an AM fungal spore fraction isolated from field soil from Mallnow; 2) a soil pathogen/saprobe fraction consisting of a microbial community prepared with field soil from Mallnow and; 3) the combined AM fungal and pathogen/saprobe fractions. While both plant species grew significantly larger in the presence of AM fungi, they responded negatively to the pathogen/saprobe treatment. For both plant species, we found evidence of pathogen protection effects provided by the AM fungal assemblages. These results indicate that interactions between assemblages of beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms can influence the growth of host plants, but that the magnitude of these effects is plant species-specific. PMID:22110635

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity in the Tuber melanosporum brûlé.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Antonietta; Lumini, Erica; Napoli, Chiara; Bianciotto, Valeria; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-06-01

    The development of the fruiting body (truffle) of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber melanosporum is associated with the production of an area (commonly referred to with the French word brûlé) around its symbiotic plant that has scanty vegetation. As truffles produce metabolites that can mediate fungal-plant interactions, the authors wondered whether the brûlé could affect the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that colonize the patchy herbaceous plants inside the brûlé. A morphological evaluation of the roots of plants collected in 2009 from a T. melanosporum/Quercus pubescens brûlé in France has shown that the herbaceous plants are colonized by AMF to a great extent. An analysis of the 18S rRNA sequences obtained from roots and soil inside the brûlé has shown that the AMF community structure seemed to be affected in the soil inside the brûlé, where less richness was observed compared to outside the brûlé. PMID:25986549

  8. A plausible mechanism of biosorption in dual symbioses by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmat, Rafia; Hamid, Neelofer

    2015-03-01

    Dual symbioses of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi with growth of Momordica charantia were elucidated in terms of plausible mechanism of biosorption in this article. The experiment was conducted in green house and mixed inoculum of the VAM fungi was used in the three replicates. Results demonstrated that the starch contents were the main source of C for the VAM to builds their hyphae. The increased plant height and leaves surface area were explained in relation with an increase in the photosynthetic rates to produce rapid sugar contents for the survival of plants. A decreased in protein, and amino acid contents and increased proline and protease activity in VAM plants suggested that these contents were the main bio-indicators of the plants under biotic stress. The decline in protein may be due to the degradation of these contents, which later on converted into dextrose where it can easily be absorbed by for the period of symbioses. A mechanism of C chemisorption in relation with physiology and morphology of plant was discussed.

  9. Mycoparasitism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a pathway for the entry of saprotrophic fungi into roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jaeger, Nathalie; Declerck, Stéphane; de la Providencia, Ivan E

    2010-08-01

    Within the rhizosphere, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi interact with a cohort of microorganisms, among which is the biological control agent, Trichoderma spp. This fungus parasitizes a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi, a phenomenon also reported in the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of AM fungi. Here, we question whether the mycoparasitism of the ERM could be extended to the intraradical mycelium (IRM), thus representing a pathway for the entry of Trichoderma harzianum within the root. Microcosm experiments allowing interactions between Glomus sp. MUCL 41833 placed in a clade that contains the recently described species Glomus irregulare and T. harzianum were set up under in vitro autotrophic culture conditions using potato as a host. A microscope camera-imaging system, coupled with succinate dehydrogenase staining, was used to assess the mycoparasitism in the ERM and IRM. Trichoderma harzianum colonized the ERM of the AM fungus and spread into the IRM, before exiting into the root cells. Intrahyphal growth of T. harzianum caused protoplasm degradation, decreasing the ERM and IRM viability. ERM of the AM fungus represented a pathway for the entry of T. harzianum into the roots of potato. It further sets off the debate on the susceptibility of the AM fungi of being infected by microorganisms from the rhizosphere. PMID:20533946

  10. Inoculant of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus clarus increase yield of soybean and cotton under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Viviana Torres Cely

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient availability is an important factor in crop production, and regular addition of chemical fertilizers is the most common practice to improve yield in agrosystems for intensive crop production. The use of some groups of microorganisms that have specific activity providing nutrients to plants is a good alternative, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF enhance plant nutrition by providing especially phosphorus (P, improving plant growth and increasing crop production. Unfortunately, the use of AMF as an inoculant on a large scale is not yet widely used, because of several limitations in obtaining a large amount of inoculum due to several factors, such as low growth, the few species domesticated under in vitro conditions, and high competition with native AMF. The objective of this work was to test the infectivity of a Rhizophagus clarus inoculum and its effectiveness as an alternative for P supply in soybean (Glycine max L. and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.. The experiments were carried out in plots and the treatments were: Fertilizer; AMF, AMF + Fertilizer and AMF + ½ Fertilizer; non-inoculated and non-fertilized plants were considered the control. The parameters evaluated were AMF root colonization and effect of inoculation on plant growth and yield under a field conditions. The results showed that AMF inoculation increased the effect of fertilizer application in soybean, and that in cotton R. clarus was more effective than chemical fertilizer

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal networks vary throughout the growing season and between successional stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Elizabeth Bennett

    Full Text Available To date, few analyses of mutualistic networks have investigated successional or seasonal dynamics. Combining interaction data from multiple time points likely creates an inaccurate picture of the structure of networks (because these networks are aggregated across time, which may negatively influence their application in ecosystem assessments and conservation. Using a replicated bipartite mutualistic network of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungal-plant associations, detected using large sample numbers of plants and AM fungi identified through molecular techniques, we test whether the properties of the network are temporally dynamic either between different successional stages or within the growing season. These questions have never been directly tested in the AM fungal-plant mutualism or the vast majority of other mutualisms. We demonstrate the following results: First, our examination of two different successional stages (young and old forest demonstrated that succession increases the proportion of specialists within the community and decreases the number of interactions. Second, AM fungal-plant mutualism structure changed throughout the growing season as the number of links between partners increased. Third, we observed shifts in associations between AM fungal and plant species throughout the growing season, potentially reflecting changes in biotic and abiotic conditions. Thus, this analysis opens up two entirely new areas of research: 1 identifying what influences changes in plant-AM fungal associations in these networks, and 2 what aspects of temporal variation and succession are of general importance in structuring bipartite networks and plant-AM fungal communities.

  12. Initial development and chemical components of sugarcane under water stress associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

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    Carmem C. M. de Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water stress levels in the soil and a mix (or: a mixed inoculum of four species: Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Gigasporas rosea, Acaulospora longula, Fuscutata heterogama of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on initial vegetative growth, fresh and dry biomass production, root colonization, phosphorus, proteins, enzymes and amino acid of the sugarcane variety RB 857515 under greenhouse conditions. The experiment was set in a randomized block design in a 2 x 2 factorial scheme with four treatments (T1 - 50% PC - pot capacity, with AMF; T2 - 100% PC with AMF; T3 - 50% PC without AMF; T4 - 100% PC without AMF with 16 replicates. The water stress level of 50% PC decreased stem diameter and shoot and root fresh weight of sugarcane plants, as well as AMF in the soil and in plant roots. However, AMF and the water stress level of 50% PC, separately or combined, did not affect plant height, number of leaves, dry matter and contents of phosphorus, total soluble proteins, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase and proline of the sugarcane variety RB857515.

  13. Biases for detecting arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal mixture by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanarojanaporn, N; Longtonglang, A; Boonkerd, N; Tittabutr, P; Lee, J; Teaumroong, N

    2014-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of amplified ribosomal RNA genes is used for profiling microbial communities and sometimes for species richness and relative abundance estimation in environmental samples. However, the T-RFLP fingerprint may be subject to biases during the procedure, influencing the detection of real community structures in the environment. To investigate possible sources of T-RFLP bias, 18S rRNA gene clones derived from two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal sequences were combined in simple pairwise mixes to assess the effects of polymerase chain reaction cycle number, plant genomic DNA purification method and varying template ratio on the template-to-product ratio as measured by relative T-RF peak area. Varying cycle numbers indicated that amplification was still in the exponential phase at the cycle numbers lower than 18, so these small cycle numbers were used for the comparison of template-to-product quantities. Relative abundance estimated from T-RF peak ratios varied with different purification procedures, but the best results, closest to input ratios, were obtained by using phenol-chloroform purification. The presence of an excess of unpurified non-target plant genomic DNA generated a bias towards lower or overestimation of relative abundance. We conclude that a low number of amplification cycles and stringent DNA purification are necessary for accurate mixed sample analysis by T-RFLP.

  14. The occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota in Israeli soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In December 1997 and June-July 2000, 49 and 113 rhizosphere soil and root mixtures were collected, respectively, to determine the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the phylum Glomeromycota in different sites of Israel. Except for five samples taken from under cultivated plants, all the others came from under Ammophila arenaria and Oenothera drummondii colonizing sand dunes adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea. After a continuous cultivation of the mixtures in pot trap cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the plant host up to 2006 and their examination at least twice a year, spores of AMF were found in 41 and 103 cultures with the 1997 and 2000 soil and root mixtures, respectively. The spores represented 30 species and 8 undescribed morphotypes in 7 genera of the Glomeromycota. The AMF most frequently found in Israeli soils were Glomus aurantium and G. constrictum, followed by G. coronatum, G. gibbosum, an undescribed Glomus 178, and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. Up to 2001, 21 species of AMF were known to occur in Israel, and this paper increases this number to 33, of which 11 are new fungi for this country. Moreover, four species, G. aurantium, G. drummondii, G. walkeri and G. xanthium, were recently described as new for science based on spores isolated from Israeli soils. Additionally, the general distribution in the world of the formally described species found in Israel was presented.

  15. A history of the taxonomy and systematics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürmer, Sidney Luiz

    2012-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are grouped in a monophyletic group, the phylum Glomeromycota. In this review, the history and complexity of the taxonomy and systematics of these obligate biotrophs is addressed by recognizing four periods. The initial discovery period (1845-1974) is characterized by description mainly of sporocarp-forming species and the proposal of a classification for these fungi. The following alpha taxonomy period (1975-1989) established a solid morphological basis for species identification and classification, resulting in a profuse description of new species and a need to standardize the nomenclature of spore subcellular structures. The cladistics period from 1990 to 2000 saw the first cladistic classification of AMF based on phenotypic characters only. At the end of this period, genetic characters played a role in defining taxa and elucidating evolutionary relationships within the group. The most recent phylogenetic synthesis period (2001 to present) started with the proposal of a new classification based on genetic characters using sequences of the multicopy rRNA genes.

  16. Clonality and recombination in the life history of an asexual arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C; Vankuren, Nicholas W; Morton, Joseph B; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2010-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota colonize roots of the majority of land plants and assist them in the uptake of mineral nutrients in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon. In the absence of sexual reproductive structures and with asexual spore morphology conserved since the Ordovician, Glomeromycota may be one of the oldest eukaryotic lineages that rely predominantly on asexual reproduction for gene transmission. Clonal population structure detected in the majority of AM fungi examined to date supports this hypothesis. However, evidence of recombination found in few local populations suggests that genetic exchanges may be more common in these organisms than is currently recognized. To explore the significance of clonal expansion versus genetic recombination in the life history of modern Glomeromycota, we examined the global population of a cosmopolitan fungus Glomus etunicatum and made inferences about the population structure and the occurrence of recombination in the history of this species. We sampled eight loci from 84 isolates. We found that although the global population of G. etunicatum showed a pattern of significant differentiation, several haplotypes had a broad geographic distribution spanning multiple continents. Molecular variation among the sampled isolates indicated an overwhelmingly clonal population structure and suggested that clonal expansion plays an important role in the ecological success of modern Glomeromycota. In contrast, a pattern of homoplasy consistent with a history of recombination suggested that gene exchanges are not completely absent from the life history of these organisms, although they are likely to be very rare.

  17. Mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit sequences are homogeneous within isolates of Glomus (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Glomeromycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Philipp A; Brennwald, Annemarie; Redecker, Dirk

    2005-12-01

    Partial sequences of the mtLSU rDNA were obtained from the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus proliferum (isolate DAOM 226389) and G. intraradices (isolates JJ291 and BEG75). The exon sequences of the two species showed regions of strong divergence. There was no evidence of intra-isolate sequence heterogeneity as it is found in variable regions of nuclear ribosomal genes of Glomeromycota. In G. intraradices JJ291, two introns were found in the partial LSU sequence. One of the introns contained an ORF for a putative site-specific homing endonuclease of the LAGLIDADG family. In G. intraradices BEG75, one of the introns was missing and the other had a DNA sequence distinct from JJ291. G. proliferum had no introns in the region sequenced. A PCR primer was designed to amplify the fragment of the mtLSU of a different, distinguishable G. intraradices genotype from colonized roots of a field sample. These mitochondrial gene sequences are the first reported from the phylum Glomeromycota. Our findings indicate that the intra-individual sequence heterogeneity of the Glomeromycota may be a peculiar feature of the nuclear genes. Therefore, mtLSU and its introns have the potential to be highly sensitive genetic markers for these fungi in the future.

  18. Role of Dual Inoculation of Rhizobium and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM Fungi on Pulse Crops Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erneste HAVUGIMANA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Legume crops are useful as human and animal feed, wood energy, and as soil-improving components of agricultural and agro forestry systems through its association with bio-fertilizers. The later have a potential environment friendly inputs that are supplemented for proper plant growth. Bio-fertilizers are preparations containing living cells of microorganisms that help crop plants in the uptake of nutrients by their interactions in the rhizosphere. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are beneficial symbionts for plant growth. They are associated with higher plants by a symbiotic association and benefit plants in the uptake of phosphorus nutrients, production of growth hormones, increase of proteins, lipids and sugars levels, helps in heavy metal binding, salinity tolerance and disease resistance. In nature symbiotic association of Rhizobium and leguminous plants fixes atmospheric nitrogen. Indeed, research has proved that the association of mycorrhizae fungi and Rhizobium, with pulse crops, increased the beneficial aspects comparatively more than their single associations with the host plants. This review focuses on the role of dual inoculation of AM fungi and Rhizobium on different pulse crops.

  19. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice with different radial oxygen loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Man, Y B; Ye, Z H; Wu, C; Wu, S C; Wong, M H

    2013-11-15

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the temporal variation of arsenic (As) speciation and accumulation in two paddy rice cultivars (TD 71 and Xiushui 11) with different degrees of radial oxygen loss (ROL) at three growth periods (day 7, day 35, day 63 after flooding the soil) were investigated in soil, spiked with and without 30 mg As kg(-1). The results showed that TD 71 with high ROL colonized by Glomus intraradices led to higher root colonization rates than Xiushui 11 at three growth periods, both in soil with or without 30 mg As kg(-1) (pcontaminated flooding soils. Furthermore, the ratios of As(III) conc./As(V) conc. in roots of TD71 were significantly more than Xiushui 11 when colonized by AMF at three growth periods in 30 mg As kg(-1) soil (price with high ROL can favor AM fungal infection and enhance root ratio of As(III) conc./As(V) conc. in the presence of AMF. PMID:22673057

  20. Tree species as hosts for arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septate endophyte fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Uma; K.Sathiyadash; J.Loganathan; T.Muthukumar

    2012-01-01

    A survey of 35 tree species (belonging to 28 genera in 19families) in Aliyar,South India was carried out to ascertain their arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) fungal status.All the tree species examined had AM association.AM and DSE colonization is reported for the first time in 20 and 14 species respectively.Cooccurrence of AM and DSE was observed in 14 (40%) tree species.The extent of DSE colonization was inversely related to the extent of AM fungal colonization.Six tree species had Arum-type,18 had intermediatetype and 1l had typical Paris-type AM morphology.AM fungal spore morphotypes belonging to 11 species in two genera were isolated from the rhizosphere soil.AM fungal spore numbers were not related to the extent of AM colonization and Glomus dominated spore diversity.AM association individually and along with DSE were found respectively in the 63% and 44% of the economically important tree species.The occurrence of AM and DSE fungal association in economically important indigenous tree species indicates the possibility of exploiting this association in future conservation programmes of these species.

  1. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus populations in heavy-metal-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Val, C.; Barea, J.M.; Azcon-Aguilar, C. [CSIC, Granada (Spain)

    1999-02-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals have been shown to adversely affect the size, diversity, and activity of microbial populations in soil. The aim of this work was to determine how the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is affected by the addition of sewage-amended sludge containing heavy metals in a long-term experiment. Due to the reduced number of indigenous AM fungal (AMF) propagules in the experimental soils, several host plants with different life cycles were used to multiply indigenous fungi. Six AMF ecotypes were found in the experimental soils, showing consistent differences with regard to their tolerance to the presence of heavy metals. AMF ecotypes ranged from very sensitive to the presence of metals to relatively tolerant to high rates of heavy metals in soil. Total AMF spore numbers decreased with increasing amounts of heavy metals in the soil. However, species richness and diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index increased in soils receiving intermediate rates of sludge contamination but decreased in soils receiving the highest rate of heavy-metal-contaminated sludge. Relative densities of most AMF species were also significantly influenced by soil treatments. Host plant species exerted a selective influence on AMF population size and diversity. The authors conclude based on the results of this study that size and diversity of AMF populations were modified in metal-polluted soils, even in those with metal concentrations that were below the upper limits accepted by the European Union for agricultural soils.

  2. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice. PMID:27450963

  3. Precipitation shapes communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Tibetan alpine steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fang; Che, Rongxiao; Wang, Ping; Liu, Hanke; Ji, Baoming; Cui, Xiaoyong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is one of the largest and most unique habitats for organisms including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). However, it remains unclear how AMF communities respond to key environmental changes in this harsh environment. To test if precipitation could be a driving force in shaping AMF community structures at regional scale, we examined AMF communities associated with dominant plant species along a precipitation gradient in Tibetan alpine steppe. Rhizosphere soils were collected from five sites with annual precipitation decreasing from 400 to 50 mm. A total of 31 AMF operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified. AMF community composition varied significantly among sites, whereas AMF community composition did not vary among plant species. Path analysis revealed that precipitation directly affected AMF hyphal length density, and indirectly influenced AMF species richness likely through the mediation of plant coverage. Our results suggested that water availability could drive the changes of AMF communities at regional scale. Given the important roles AMF could play in the dynamics of plant communities, exploring the changes of AMF communities along key environmental gradients would help us better predict the ecosystem level responses of the Tibetan vegetation to future climate change. PMID:27002188

  4. Development of Soils and Communities of Plants and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on West Virginia Surface Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael A.; Cumming, Jonathan R.

    2014-11-01

    Surface mining followed by reclamation to pasture is a major driver of land use and cover change in Appalachia. Prior research suggests that many aspects of ecosystem recovery are either slow or incomplete. We examined ecosystem structure—including soil physical and chemical properties, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) infectivity and community composition, and plant diversity and community composition—on a chronosequence of pasture-reclaimed surface mines and a non-mined pasture in northern West Virginia. Surface mining and reclamation dramatically altered ecosystem structure. Some aspects of ecosystem structure, including many measures of soil chemistry and infectivity of AMF, returned rapidly to levels found on the non-mined reference site. Other aspects of ecosystem structure, notably soil physical properties and AMF and plant communities, showed incomplete or no recovery over the short-to-medium term. In addition, invasive plants were prevalent on reclaimed mine sites. The results point to the need for investigation on how reclamation practices could minimize establishment of exotic invasive plant species and reduce the long-term impacts of mining on ecosystem structure and function.

  5. The role of glomalin, a protein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, in sequestering potentially toxic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Chavez, M.C.; Carrillo-Gonzalez, R.; Wright, S.F.; Nichols, K.A

    2004-08-01

    Naturally occurring soil organic compounds stabilize potentially toxic elements (PTEs) such as Cu, Cd, Pb, and Mn. The hypothesis of this work was that an insoluble glycoprotein, glomalin, produced in copious amounts on hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) sequesters PTEs. Glomalin can be extracted from laboratory cultures of AMF and from soils. Three different experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 showed that glomalin extracted from two polluted soils contained 1.6-4.3 mg Cu, 0.02-0.08 mg Cd, and 0.62-1.12 mg Pb/g glomalin. Experiment 2 showed that glomalin from hyphae of an isolate of Gigaspora rosea sequestered up to 28 mg Cu/g in vitro. Experiment 3 tested in vivo differences in Cu sequestration by Cu-tolerant and non-tolerant isolates of Glomus mosseae colonizing sorghum. Plants were fed with nutrient solution containing 0.5, 10 or 20 {mu}M of Cu. Although no differences between isolates were detected, mean values for the 20 {mu}M Cu level were 1.6, 0.4, and 0.3 mg Cu/g for glomalin extracted from hyphae, from sand after removal of hyphae and from hyphae attached to roots, respectively. Glomalin should be considered for biostabilization leading to remediation of polluted soils. - Glomalin may be useful in remediation of toxic elements in soils.

  6. Genetic Diversity and Association Characters of Bacteria Isolated from Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Spore Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, Gopal; Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Kiyoon; Sa, Tong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Association between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and bacteria has long been studied. However, the factors influencing their association in the natural environment is still unknown. This study aimed to isolate bacteria associated with spore walls of AMF and identify their potential characters for association. Spores collected from coastal reclamation land were differentiated based on their morphology and identified by 18S rDNA sequencing as Funneliformis caledonium, Racocetra alborosea and Funneliformis mosseae. Bacteria associated with AMF spore walls were isolated after treating them with disinfection solution at different time intervals. After 0, 10 and 20 min of spore disinfection, 86, 24 and 10 spore associated bacteria (SAB) were isolated, respectively. BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis showed that diverse bacterial communities were associated to AMF spores. Bacteria belonging to the same genera could associate with different AMF spores. Gram positive bacteria were more closely associated with AMF spores. Isolated SAB were characterized and tested for spore association characters such as chitinase, protease, cellulase enzymes and exopolysaccharide production (EPS). Among the 120 SAB, 113 SAB were able to show one or more characters for association and seven SAB did not show any association characters. The 16S rDNA sequence of SAB revealed that bacteria belonging to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bactereiodes were associated with AMF spore walls. PMID:27479250

  7. Spatio-Temporal Variation of Core and Satellite Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Communities in Miscanthus giganteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher J; Burns, Caitlin A; van der Gast, Christopher J; McNamara, Niall P; Bending, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a group of obligate plant symbionts which can promote plant nutrition. AMF communities are diverse, but the factors which control their assembly in space and time remain unclear. In this study, the contributions of geographical distance, environmental heterogeneity and time in shaping AMF communities associated with Miscanthus giganteus (a perennial grass originating from south-east Asia) were determined over a 13 months period. In particular, the community was partitioned into core (abundant and persistent taxa) and satellite (taxa with low abundance and persistence) constituents and the drivers of community assembly for each determined. β-diversity was exceptionally low across the 140 m line transects, and there was limited evidence of geographical scaling effects on the composition of the core, satellite or combined communities. However, AMF richness and community composition changed over time associated with fluctuation within both the core and satellite communities. The degree to which AMF community variation was explained by soil properties was consistently higher in the core community than the combined and satellite communities, suggesting that the satellite community had considerable stochasticity associated with it. We suggest that the partitioning of communities into their core and satellite constituents could be employed to enhance the variation explained within microbial community analyses. PMID:27597844

  8. Reducing nitrogen runoff from paddy fields with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi under different fertilizer regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Xue; Fu, Dafang

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) runoff from paddy fields serves as one of the main sources of water pollution. Our aim was to reduce N runoff from paddy fields by fertilizer management and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). In northeast China, Shuangcheng city in Heilongjiang province, a field experiment was conducted, using rice provided with 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% of the local norm of fertilization (including N, phosphorus and potassium), with or without inoculation with Glomus mosseae. The volume, concentrations of total N (TN), dissolved N (DN) and particulate N (PN) of runoff water were measured. We found that the local norm of fertilization led to 18.9kg/ha of N runoff during rice growing season, with DN accounting for 60%-70%. We also found that reduction in fertilization by 20% cut down TN runoff by 8.2% while AMF inoculation decreased N runoff at each fertilizer level and this effect was inhibited by high fertilization. The combination of inoculation with AMF and 80% of the local norm of fertilization was observed to reduce N runoff by 27.2%. Conclusively, we suggested that the contribution of AMF inoculation combined with decreasing fertilization should get more attention to slow down water eutrophication by reducing N runoff from paddy fields. PMID:27521940

  9. Solanum nigrum grown in contaminated soil: Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on zinc accumulation and histolocalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Ana P.G.C. [Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: amarques@mail.esb.ucp.pt; Oliveira, Rui S. [Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: rsoliveira@mail.esb.ucp.pt; Samardjieva, Kalina A. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: kas@ibmc.up.pt; Pissarra, Jose [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Botanica, Rua do Campo Alegre, 1191, 4150-181 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jpissarr@fc.up.pt; Rangel, Antonio O.S.S. [Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: arangel@esb.ucp.pt; Castro, Paula M.L. [Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: plcastro@esb.ucp.pt

    2007-02-15

    Zn tissue accumulation in Solanum nigrum grown in a non-contaminated and a naturally contaminated Zn matrix and the effect of inoculation with different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on metal uptake were assessed. S. nigrum grown in the contaminated soil always presented higher Zn accumulation in the tissues, accumulating up to 1622 mg Zn kg{sup -1}. The presence of both Glomus claroideum and Glomus intraradices enhanced the uptake and accumulation of Zn by S. nigrum (up to 83 and 49% higher Zn accumulation, respectively). The main deposits of the metal were found in the intercellular spaces and in the cell walls of the root tissues, as revealed by autometallography, with the inoculation with different AMF species causing no differences in the location of Zn accumulation. These findings indicate that S. nigrum inoculated with selected heavy metal tolerant AMF presents extracting and accumulating capacities, constituting a potentially suitable remediation method for Zn polluted soils. - Zn accumulation by S. nigrum is enhanced by AMF and the metal storage in the tissues at the root level occurs mainly in the cell walls and in the intercellular spaces.

  10. Bioremediation of adverse impact of cadmium toxicity on Cassia italica Mill by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, E F; Alqarawi, A A; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2016-01-01

    Cassia italica Mill is an important medicinal plant within the family Fabaceae. Pot experiment was conducted to evaluate cadmium stress induced changes in physiological and biochemical attributes in C. italica with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Cadmium stressed plant showed reduced chlorophyll pigment and protein content while AMF inoculation enhanced the chlorophyll and protein content considerably. AMF also ameliorated the cadmium stress induced reduction in total chlorophyll and protein contents by 19.30% and 38.29%, respectively. Cadmium stress enhanced lipid peroxidation while AMF inoculation reduced lipid peroxidation considerably. Increase in proline and phenol content was observed due to cadmium stress and AMF inoculation caused a further increase in proline and phenol content ensuring better growth under stressed conditions. AMF alone also enhanced proline and phenol content. Activity of antioxidant enzymes enhanced under cadmium treatment and AMF inoculation further enhanced their activity thereby strengthening the antioxidant system. Enhanced activities of antioxidants and increased accumulation of osmolytes help plants to avoid damaging impact of oxidative damage. The research has shown that AMF inoculation mitigated the negative impact of stress by reducing the lipid peroxidation and enhancing the antioxidant activity. The present study strongly supports employing AMF as the biological mean for enhancing the cadmium stress tolerance of C. italica. PMID:26858537

  11. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarei, Mehdi [Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture, University of Shiraz, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hempel, Stefan, E-mail: hempel.stefan@googlemail.co [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Biologie, Okologie der Pflanzen, Altensteinstrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wubet, Tesfaye; Schaefer, Tina [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Savaghebi, Gholamreza [Department of Soil Science Engineering, University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII), P.O. Box 31535-1897, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Buscot, Francois [UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions. - The molecular diversity of AMF was found to be influenced by a combination of soil heavy metal and other soil chemical parameters.

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with Populus-Salix stands in a semiarid riparian ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Stromberg, J.C.; Stutz, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    ??? This study examined the activity, species richness, and species composition of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community of Populus-Salix stands on the Verde River (Arizona, USA), quantified patterns of AMF richness and colonization along complex floodplain gradients, and identified environmental variables responsible for structuring the AMF community. ??? Samples from 61 Populus-Salix stands were analyzed for AMF and herbaceous composition, AMF colonization, gravimetric soil moisture, soil texture, per cent organic matter, pH, and concentrations of nitrate, bicarbonate phosphorus and exchangeable potassium. ??? AMF species richness declined with stand age and distance from and elevation above the channel and was positively related to perennial species cover and richness and gravimetric soil moisture. Distance from and elevation above the active channel, forest age, annual species cover, perennial species richness, and exchangeable potassium concentration all played a role in structuring the AMF community in this riparian area. ??? Most AMF species were found across a wide range of soil conditions, but a subset of species tended to occur more often in hydric areas. This group of riparian affiliate AMF species includes several not previously encountered in the surrounding Sonoran desert. ?? New Phytologist (2006).

  13. Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus (AMF) on degradation of iron-cyanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Magdalena; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil contamination in the vicinities of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites is a worldwide known environmental issue. The pollutants, in form of iron-cyanide complexes, originating from the gas purification process, create a risk for human health due to potential release of toxic free cyanide, CN(aq) and HCN(g), (aq).The management and remediation of cyanide contaminated soil can be very challenging due to the complex chemistry and toxicity of CN compounds. The employment of phytoremediation to remove or stabilize contaminants at a former MGP site is an inexpensive process, but can be limited through shallow rotting, decreased biomass, poor growing and the risk of secondary accumulation. However, this adaptation may be enhanced via arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) activity, which may cooperate on the degradation, transformation or uptake of the contaminants. We would like to present our preliminary results from the ongoing project concerning toxic substrate-AMF-plant relation, based on studying the site of a former MGP site. In situ experiments contributed to identifying those fungi that are likely to persist in extremely acidic and toxic conditions. Subsequently, commercially available Rhizophagus irregularis was grown in sterilized, un-spiked soil with the roots of the host plant Calamagrostis epigejos. Extracted roots and AMF hyphae were used in the batch experiment, were the potential of this association on degradation of iron-cyanide complexes, in form of potassium ferrocyanide solution, was assessed.

  14. Evidence for the sexual origin of heterokaryosis in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Jeanne; Toro, Kinga Sędzielewska; Noel, Jessica; Pelin, Adrian; Charron, Philippe; Farinelli, Laurent; Marton, Timea; Krüger, Manuela; Fuchs, Jörg; Brachmann, Andreas; Corradi, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, and fully asexual lineages are extremely rare. Prominent among ancient asexual lineages are the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a group of plant symbionts with a multinucleate cytoplasm. Genomic divergence among co-existing nuclei was proposed to drive the evolutionary success of AMF in the absence of sex(1), but this hypothesis has been contradicted by recent genome analyses that failed to find significant genetic diversity within an AMF isolate(2,3). Here, we set out to resolve issues surrounding the genome organization and sexual potential of AMF by exploring the genomes of five isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis, a model AMF. We find that genetic diversity in this species varies among isolates and is structured in a homo-dikaryon-like manner usually linked with the existence of a sexual life cycle. We also identify a putative AMF mating-type locus, containing two genes with structural and evolutionary similarities with the mating-type locus of some Dikarya. Our analyses suggest that this locus may be multi-allelic and that AMF could be heterothallic and bipolar. These findings reconcile opposing views on the genome organization of these ubiquitous plant symbionts and open avenues for strain improvement and environmental application of these organisms. PMID:27572831

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi regulate soil respiration and its response to precipitation change in a semiarid steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingwei; Li, Shan; Chen, Shiping; Ren, Tingting; Yang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Hanlin; Liang, Yu; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are critical links in plant-soil continuum and play a critical role in soil carbon cycles. Soil respiration, one of the largest carbon fluxes in global carbon cycle, is sensitive to precipitation change in semiarid ecosystems. In this study, a field experiment with fungicide application and water addition was conducted during 2010-2013 in a semiarid steppe in Inner Mongolia, China, and soil respiration was continuously measured to investigate the influences of AMF on soil respiration under different precipitation regimes. Results showed that soil respiration was promoted by water addition treatment especially during drought seasons, which induced a nonlinear response of soil respiration to precipitation change. Fungicide application suppressed AMF root colonization without impacts on soil microbes. AMF suppression treatment accelerated soil respiration with 2.7, 28.5 and 37.6 g C m-2 across three seasons, which were mainly caused by the enhanced heterotrophic component. A steeper response of soil respiration rate to precipitation was found under fungicide application treatments, suggesting a greater dampening effect of AMF on soil carbon release as water availability increased. Our study highlighted the importance of AMF on soil carbon stabilization and sequestration in semiarid steppe ecosystems especially during wet seasons.

  16. The Use of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to Improve Strawberry Production in Coir Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson Boyer, Louisa; Feng, Wei; Gulbis, Natallia; Hajdu, Klara; Harrison, Richard J; Jeffries, Peter; Xu, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry is an important fruit crop within the UK. To reduce the impact of soil-borne diseases and extend the production season, more than half of the UK strawberry production is now in substrate (predominantly coir) under protection. Substrates such as coir are usually depleted of microbes including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and consequently the introduction of beneficial microbes is likely to benefit commercial cropping systems. Inoculating strawberry plants in substrate other than coir has been shown to increase plants tolerance to soil-borne pathogens and water stress. We carried out studies to investigate whether AMF could improve strawberry production in coir under low nitrogen input and regulated deficit irrigation. Application of AMF led to an appreciable increase in the size and number of class I fruit, especially under either deficient irrigation or low nitrogen input condition. However, root length colonization by AMF was reduced in strawberry grown in coir compared to soil and Terragreen. Furthermore, the appearance of AMF colonizing strawberry and maize roots grown in coir showed some physical differences from the structure in colonized roots in soil and Terragreen: the colonization structure appeared to be more compact and smaller in coir. PMID:27594859

  17. Plant Identity Exerts Stronger Effect than Fertilization on Soil Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in a Sown Pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong; Chen, Liang; Luo, Cai-Yun; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Shi-Ping; Guo, Liang-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play key roles in plant nutrition and plant productivity. AM fungal responses to either plant identity or fertilization have been investigated. However, the interactive effects of different plant species and fertilizer types on these symbiotic fungi remain poorly understood. We evaluated the effects of the factorial combinations of plant identity (grasses Avena sativa and Elymus nutans and legume Vicia sativa) and fertilization (urea and sheep manure) on AM fungi following 2-year monocultures in a sown pasture field study. AM fungal extraradical hyphal density was significantly higher in E. nutans than that in A. sativa and V. sativa in the unfertilized control and was significantly increased by urea and manure in A. sativa and by manure only in E. nutans, but not by either fertilizers in V. sativa. AM fungal spore density was not significantly affected by plant identity or fertilization. Forty-eight operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of AM fungi were obtained through 454 pyrosequencing of 18S rDNA. The OTU richness and Shannon diversity index of AM fungi were significantly higher in E. nutans than those in V. sativa and/or A. sativa, but not significantly affected by any fertilizer in all of the three plant species. AM fungal community composition was significantly structured directly by plant identity only and indirectly by both urea addition and plant identity through soil total nitrogen content. Our findings highlight that plant identity has stronger influence than fertilization on belowground AM fungal community in this converted pastureland from an alpine meadow.

  18. Crop rotation biomass and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi effects on sugarcane yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosano, Edmilson Jose; Rossi, Fabricio; Guirado, Nivaldo; Teramoto, Juliana Rolim Salome [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Polo Regional Centro Sul; Azcon, Rozario [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Granada (Spain). Estacao Experimental de Zaidin; Cantarela, Heitor [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IAC), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. Agronomico. Centro de Solos e Recursos Ambientais; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social], Email: ambrosano@apta.sp.gov.br; Schammass, Eliana Aparecida [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IZ), Nova Odessa, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Zootecnia; Muraoka, Takashi; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Ungaro, Maria Regina Goncalves [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IAC), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. Agronomico. Centro de Plantas Graniferas

    2010-07-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important crop for sugar production and agro-energy purposes in Brazil. In the sugarcane production system after a 4- to 8-year cycle crop rotation may be used before replanting sugarcane to improve soil conditions and give an extra income. This study had the objective of characterizing the biomass and the natural colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of leguminous green manure and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in rotation with sugarcane. Their effect on stalk and sugar yield of sugarcane cv. IAC 87-3396 grown subsequently was also studied. Cane yield was harvested in three subsequent cuttings. Peanut cv. IAC-Caiapo, sunflower cv. IAC-Uruguai and velvet bean (Mucuna aterrimum Piper and Tracy) were the rotational crops that resulted in the greater percentage of AMF. Sunflower was the specie that most extracted nutrients from the soil, followed by peanut cv. IAC-Tatu and mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). The colonization with AMF had a positive correlation with sugarcane plant height, at the first cut (p = 0.01 and R = 0.52) but not with the stalk or cane yields. Sunflower was the rotational crop that brought about the greatest yield increase of the subsequent sugarcane crop: 46% increase in stalk yield and 50% in sugar yield compared with the control. Except for both peanut varieties, all rotational crops caused an increase in net income of the cropping system in the average of three sugarcane harvests. (author)

  19. Experimental warming decreases arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization in prairie plants along a Mediterranean climate gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bart R.; Bohannan, Brendan; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Mueller, Rebecca; Bridgham, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide numerous services to their plant symbionts. Understanding climate change effects on AMF, and the resulting plant responses, is crucial for predicting ecosystem responses at regional and global scales. We investigated how the effects of climate change on AMF-plant symbioses are mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics. Methods: We used a combination of a greenhouse experiment and a manipulative climate change experiment embedded within a Mediterranean climate gradient in the Pacific Northwest, USA to examine this question. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to determine the direct and indirect effects of experimental warming on AMF colonization. Results: Warming directly decreased AMF colonization across plant species and across the climate gradient of the study region. Other positive and negative indirect effects of warming, mediated by soil water availability, soil nutrient availability, and vegetation dynamics, canceled each other out. Discussion: A warming-induced decrease in AMF colonization would likely have substantial consequences for plant communities and ecosystem function. Moreover, predicted increases in more intense droughts and heavier rains for this region could shift the balance among indirect causal pathways, and either exacerbate or mitigate the negative, direct effect of increased temperature on AMF colonization. PMID:27280074

  20. Impact of alien pines on local arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities-evidence from two continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazol, Antonio; Zobel, Martin; Cantero, Juan José; Davison, John; Esler, Karen J; Jairus, Teele; Öpik, Maarja; Vasar, Martti; Moora, Mari

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of alien plants can influence biodiversity and ecosystems. However, its consequences for soil microbial communities remain poorly understood. We addressed the impact of alien ectomycorrhizal (EcM) pines on local arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities in two regions with contrasting biogeographic histories: in South Africa, where no native EcM plant species are present; and in Argentina, where EcM trees occur naturally. The effect of alien pines on AM fungal communities differed between these regions. In South Africa, plantations of alien EcM pines exhibited lower AM fungal richness and significantly altered community composition, compared with native fynbos. In Argentina, the richness and composition of local AM fungal communities were similar in plantations of alien EcM pines and native forest. However, the presence of alien pines resulted in slight changes to the phylogenetic structure of root AM fungal communities in both regions. In pine clearcut areas in South Africa, the richness and composition of AM fungal communities were intermediate between the native fynbos and the alien pine plantation, which is consistent with natural regeneration of former AM fungal communities following pine removal. We conclude that the response of local AM fungal communities to alien EcM pines differs between biogeographic regions with different histories of species coexistence. PMID:27056916

  1. Relative Importance of Individual Climatic Drivers Shaping Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dan; Veresoglou, Stavros D; Rillig, Matthias C; Xu, Tianle; Li, Huan; Hao, Zhipeng; Chen, Baodong

    2016-08-01

    The physiological tolerance hypothesis (PTH) postulates that it is the tolerance of species to climatic factors that determines overall community richness. Here, we tested whether a group of mutualistic microbes, Glomeromycota, is distributed in semi-arid environments in ways congruent with the PTH. For this purpose, we modeled with climatic predictors the niche of each of the four orders of Glomeromycota and identified predictors of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. Our dataset consisted of 50 paired grassland and farmland sites in the farming-pastoral ecotone of northern China. We observed shifts in the relative abundance of AM fungal orders in response to climatic variables but also declines in OTU richness in grassland sites that had experienced high precipitation during the preceding year which was incongruous with the PTH. We found pronounced differences across groups of Glomeromycotan fungi in their responses to climatic variables and identified strong dependencies of AM fungal communities on precipitation. Given that precipitation is expected to further decline in the farming-pastoral ecotone over the coming years and that mycorrhiza represents an integral constituent of ecosystem functioning, it is likely that the ecosystem services in the region will change accordingly. PMID:27117797

  2. Nutritional effects of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal associations on the sclerophyllous species Agathosma betulina

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    M. A. Pèrez-Fernández

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little is currently known about the seedling physiology of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM Agathosma betulina, a sclerophyllous crop plant cultivated for its high-value essential oils and food additives. In addition, virtually nothing is known about the AM associations of this plant. Consequently, the effect of an indigenous community of AM fungi on P nutrition and C economy in seedlings, grown in nursery conditions, was determined during different stages of host and AM fungal establishment. AM fungal ribosomal gene sequence analyses were used to identify some of the fungi within the roots, responsible for the nutritional changes. During the early stages of host and AM fungal establishment (0 to 77 days after germination, host growth was reduced, whereas the rate of P-uptake and growth respiration was increased. Beyond 77 days of growth, the rate of P-uptake and growth respiration declined. These findings, together with results obtained after molecular analyses of root associated fungal DNA, indicate that AM fungi belonging to the genera Acaulospora and Glomus, improve P-uptake and costs of utilization during the early stages of seedling establishment in a nutrient-poor soil.

  3. Diversity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in a Brazilian Atlantic Forest Toposequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Joice Andrade; Vasconcellos, Rafael Leandro Figueiredo; Gumiere, Thiago; de Lourdes Colombo Mescolotti, Denise; Oehl, Fritz; Nogueira Cardoso, Elke Jurandy Bran

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was studied in the Atlantic Forest in Serra do Mar Park (SE Brazil), based on seven host plants in relationship to their soil environment, altitude and seasonality. The studied plots along an elevation gradient are located at 80, 600, and 1,000 m. Soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected in four seasons from SE Brazilian winter 2012 to autumn 2013. AMF spores in rhizosperic soils were morphologically classified and chemical, physical and microbiological soil caracteristics were determined. AMF diversity in roots was evaluated using the NS31/AM1 primer pair, with subsequent cloning and sequencing. In the rhizosphere, 58 AMF species were identified. The genera Acaulospora and Glomus were predominant. However, in the roots, only 14 AMF sequencing groups were found and all had high similarity to Glomeraceae. AMF species identities varied between altitudes and seasons. There were species that contributed the most to this variation. Some soil characteristics (pH, organic matter, microbial activity and microbial biomass carbon) showed a strong relationship with the occurrence of certain species. The highest AMF species diversity, based on Shannon's diversity index, was found for the highest altitude. Seasonality did not affect the diversity. Our results show a high AMF diversity, higher than commonly found in the Atlantic Forest. The AMF detected in roots were not identical to those detected in rhizosperic soil and differences in AMF communities were found in different altitudes even in geographically close-lying sites. PMID:26304552

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal status of wild plants in saline-alkaline soils of the Yellow River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fa-Yuan; Liu, Run-Jin; Lin, Xian-Gui; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2004-04-01

    A survey was made of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) status of five dominant wild plants Tamarix chinensis, Phragmites communis, Suaeda glauca, Aeluropus littoralis var. sinensis and Cirsium setosum in saline-alkaline soils of the Yellow River Delta that show low plant diversity. All of the species were colonized and showed typical AM structures (arbuscules, vesicles). The colonization percentage ranged from 0.2% to 9.5%, where C. setosum was the highest. The species richness of AMF at the different sites ranged from 2.00 to 2.40 per 50 ml soil, with an average of 2.16. Species diversity ranged from 1.99 to 2.22 per 50 ml soil, with an average of 2.13. Spore density ranged from 3 to 30 per 50 ml soil, with an average of 12. Glomus was the dominant genus, with a frequency and relative abundance of 88.1% and 68.4%, respectively. G. caledonium, with a frequency and relative abundance of 15.0% and 4.6%, respectively, was the dominant species. Differences were also observed in the distribution of AMF in different soil layers. Although there were still AM fungal spores in the layer 40 cm below the surface, most spores were found at a depth of 0-40 cm.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: new species and records in Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Karla Alves da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF comprise the largest association of plants and fungi in nature yet have only recently been considered within the context of conservation biology. The aim of this work was to document the occurrence of AMF species and highlight recent advances in our knowledge of their diversity in Northeast Brazil. This new information has been generated by the Sisbiota-Brazil Program (National System of Biodiversity Research and provides the basis for a discussion on the AMF species found in the region. The work included a bibliographic review of the records from natural and agricultural area plus data generated by collections made in natural areas in six of the nine northeastern states during the period 2010-2013. Overall we recorded 28 genera and 125 species of AMF. Of these, 11 were new species, 13 represented new records for Brazil and six were unique to the Northeast. This represents a 25% increase in our knowledge of the diversity of AMF in the region. We can now estimate that the Northeast represents about 50% of the AMF species described worldwide. This finding reinforces the need for more studies in areas that are poorly studied in order to extend our understanding of this biodiversity and to help to define future strategies for management and conservation.

  6. A plausible mechanism of biosorption in dual symbioses by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmat, Rafia; Hamid, Neelofer

    2015-03-01

    Dual symbioses of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi with growth of Momordica charantia were elucidated in terms of plausible mechanism of biosorption in this article. The experiment was conducted in green house and mixed inoculum of the VAM fungi was used in the three replicates. Results demonstrated that the starch contents were the main source of C for the VAM to builds their hyphae. The increased plant height and leaves surface area were explained in relation with an increase in the photosynthetic rates to produce rapid sugar contents for the survival of plants. A decreased in protein, and amino acid contents and increased proline and protease activity in VAM plants suggested that these contents were the main bio-indicators of the plants under biotic stress. The decline in protein may be due to the degradation of these contents, which later on converted into dextrose where it can easily be absorbed by for the period of symbioses. A mechanism of C chemisorption in relation with physiology and morphology of plant was discussed. PMID:25730809

  7. The ecology of arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) under different cropping regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecology of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) in mono-cropping and low-input ideal agroforestry cropping systems of Avena sativa has been studied. Soil chemical heterogeneity, seasonality and nature of cropping system showed significant attributes on AMF. AMF percentage in roots and spore populations in soil were elevated in dry season compared to wet season. With respect to cropping regimes, mono-cropping systems exhibited highest root infection whereas the agroforestry systems possessed highest AM fungal spore populations. Generally, farming systems tested here possessed significant colonization of AMF, however, overall extent of colonization and spore densities were low. While assessing the correlation between soil chemical composition and AMF, electrical conductivity, organic carbon content, available potassium and saturation percentage showed a negative correlation. However, pH showed a positive correlation and available phosphorus content showed no correlation with AMF. Present study was aimed to view the importance of agroforestry in modern agriculture and normal agricultural system and the benefits associated with AM fungi. (author)

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a semiarid copper mining area in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gladstone Alves; Trufem, Sandra Farto Botelho; Saggin Júnior, Orivaldo José; Maia, Leonor Costa

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in a copper mining area was investigated. Soil samples were collected from six sites at the Mineração Caraiba, Bahia State, northeastern Brazil, comprising: (1) a site that receives the waste product; (2) a site that receives low grade deposits; (3) the interface between the caatinga and site 1; (4) the surroundings of the industrial area; (5) the site for extracting topsoil for land filling; (6) the preserved caatinga. Thirty-two plant species were identified around the collection locations. Trap cultures were maintained in the greenhouse for 3 months, using bahia grass ( Paspalum notatum Flügge) as the host plant. Spores were extracted from soil and 21 AMF species (15 Glomus and one of each of Acaulospora, Archaeospora, Entrophospora, Gigaspora , Paraglomus and Scutellospora) were identified. In site 1, plants or AMF were not found during the dry season. Site 6, with native vegetation, had the highest number of plants and AMF species. The disturbed sites showed less plant diversification, with the community of AMF being quantitative and qualitatively affected by disturbance. PMID:14767726

  9. Relative importance of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Rhizophagus intraradices) and root hairs in plant drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Lin, Ge; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yongliang; Zhang, Shubin; Chen, Baodong

    2014-11-01

    Both arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and root hairs play important roles in plant uptake of water and mineral nutrients. To reveal the relative importance of mycorrhiza and root hairs in plant water relations, a bald root barley (brb) mutant and its wild type (wt) were grown with or without inoculation of the AM fungus Rhizophagus intraradices under well-watered or drought conditions, and plant physiological traits relevant to drought stress resistance were recorded. The experimental results indicated that the AM fungus could almost compensate for the absence of root hairs under drought-stressed conditions. Moreover, phosphorus (P) concentration, leaf water potential, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and water use efficiency were significantly increased by R. intraradices but not by root hairs, except for shoot P concentration and photosynthetic rate under the drought condition. Root hairs even significantly decreased root P concentration under drought stresses. These results confirm that AM fungi can enhance plant drought tolerance by improvement of P uptake and plant water relations, which subsequently promote plant photosynthetic performance and growth, while root hairs presumably contribute to the improvement of plant growth and photosynthetic capacity through an increase in shoot P concentration.

  10. The Use of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to Improve Strawberry Production in Coir Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson Boyer, Louisa; Feng, Wei; Gulbis, Natallia; Hajdu, Klara; Harrison, Richard J.; Jeffries, Peter; Xu, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry is an important fruit crop within the UK. To reduce the impact of soil-borne diseases and extend the production season, more than half of the UK strawberry production is now in substrate (predominantly coir) under protection. Substrates such as coir are usually depleted of microbes including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and consequently the introduction of beneficial microbes is likely to benefit commercial cropping systems. Inoculating strawberry plants in substrate other than coir has been shown to increase plants tolerance to soil-borne pathogens and water stress. We carried out studies to investigate whether AMF could improve strawberry production in coir under low nitrogen input and regulated deficit irrigation. Application of AMF led to an appreciable increase in the size and number of class I fruit, especially under either deficient irrigation or low nitrogen input condition. However, root length colonization by AMF was reduced in strawberry grown in coir compared to soil and Terragreen. Furthermore, the appearance of AMF colonizing strawberry and maize roots grown in coir showed some physical differences from the structure in colonized roots in soil and Terragreen: the colonization structure appeared to be more compact and smaller in coir. PMID:27594859

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd.) Poir from Brazilian semi-arid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tancredo Augusto Feitosa; Rodriguez-Echeverría, Susana; de Andrade, Leonaldo Alves; Freitas, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Many plant species from Brazilian semi-arid present arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in their rhizosphere. These microorganisms play a key role in the establishment, growth, survival of plants and protection against drought, pathogenic fungi and nematodes. This study presents a quantitative analysis of the AMF species associated with Mimosa tenuiflora, an important native plant of the Caatinga flora. AMF diversity, spore abundance and root colonization were estimated in seven sampling locations in the Ceará and Paraíba States, during September of 2012. There were significant differences in soil properties, spore abundance, percentage of root colonization, and AMF diversity among sites. Altogether, 18 AMF species were identified, and spores of the genera Acaulospora, Claroideoglomus, Dentiscutata, Entrophospora, Funneliformis, Gigaspora, Glomus, Racocetra, Rhizoglomus and Scutellospora were observed. AMF species diversity and their spore abundance found in M. tenuiflora rhizosphere shown that this native plant species is an important host plant to AMF communities from Brazilian semi-arid region. We concluded that: (a) during the dry period and in semi-arid conditions, there is a high spore production in M. tenuiflora root zone; and (b) soil properties, as soil pH and available phosphorous, affect AMF species diversity, thus constituting key factors for the similarity/dissimilarity of AMF communities in the M. tenuiflora root zone among sites. PMID:26991277

  12. Spatio-temporal variation of core and satellite arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus communities in Miscanthus giganteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Barnes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are a group of obligate plant symbionts which can promote plant nutrition. AMF communities are diverse, but the factors which control their assembly in space and time remain unclear. In this study, the contributions of geographical distance, environmental heterogeneity and time to shaping AMF communities associated with Miscanthus giganteus were determined over a 13 month period. In particular, the community was partitioned into core (abundant and persistent taxa and satellite (taxa with low abundance and persistence constituents and the drivers of community assembly for each determined. We show that AMF richness and community composition changed over time associated with fluctuation within both the core and satellite communities. The degree to which AMF community variation was explained by soil properties was consistently higher in the core community than the combined and satellite communities, suggesting that the satellite community had considerable stochasticity associated with it. We suggest that the partitioning of communities into their core and satellite constituents could be employed to enhance the variation explained within microbial community analyses.

  13. Spatio-Temporal Variation of Core and Satellite Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Communities in Miscanthus giganteus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher J.; Burns, Caitlin A.; van der Gast, Christopher J.; McNamara, Niall P.; Bending, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a group of obligate plant symbionts which can promote plant nutrition. AMF communities are diverse, but the factors which control their assembly in space and time remain unclear. In this study, the contributions of geographical distance, environmental heterogeneity and time in shaping AMF communities associated with Miscanthus giganteus (a perennial grass originating from south-east Asia) were determined over a 13 months period. In particular, the community was partitioned into core (abundant and persistent taxa) and satellite (taxa with low abundance and persistence) constituents and the drivers of community assembly for each determined. β-diversity was exceptionally low across the 140 m line transects, and there was limited evidence of geographical scaling effects on the composition of the core, satellite or combined communities. However, AMF richness and community composition changed over time associated with fluctuation within both the core and satellite communities. The degree to which AMF community variation was explained by soil properties was consistently higher in the core community than the combined and satellite communities, suggesting that the satellite community had considerable stochasticity associated with it. We suggest that the partitioning of communities into their core and satellite constituents could be employed to enhance the variation explained within microbial community analyses. PMID:27597844

  14. Phylogeny of the glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi): recent developments and new gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redecker, Dirk; Raab, Philipp

    2006-01-01

    The fungal symbionts of arbuscular mycorrhiza form a monophyletic group in the true Fungi, the phylum Glomeromycota. Fewer than 200 described species currently are included in this group. The only member of this clade known to form a different type of symbiosis is Geosiphon pyriformis, which associates with cyanobacteria. Because none of these fungi has been cultivated without their plant hosts or cyanobacterial partners, progress in obtaining multigene phylogenies has been slow and the nuclear-encoded ribosomal RNA genes have remained the only widely accessible molecular markers. rDNA phylogenies have revealed considerable polyphyly of some glomeromycotan genera that has been used to reassess taxonomic concepts. Environmental studies using phylogenetic methods for molecular identification have recovered an amazing diversity of unknown phylotypes, suggesting considerable cryptic species diversity. Protein gene sequences that have become available recently have challenged the rDNA-supported sister group relationship of the Glomeromycota with Asco/Basidiomycota. However the number of taxa analyzed with these new markers is still too small to provide a comprehensive picture of intraphylum relationships. We use nuclear-encoded rDNA and rpb1 protein gene sequences to reassess the phylogeny of the Glomeromycota and discuss possible implications.

  15. Growth Response of Two Phaseolus mungo L. Cultivars Induced by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Trichoderma viride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navnita Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aimed to quantify the difference in response of two Phaseolus mungo L. cultivars (i.e., UH-1 and IPU-94-1 to Glomus mosseae (G, that is, Funneliformis mosseae, Acaulospora laevis (A, and Trichoderma viride (T, in different combinations or alone. All the treatments were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum to ensure nodulation as soil used in the experiment was sterilized. After 120 days of inoculation, plants were analyzed for chlorophyll content, nodulation, mycorrhization, leaf area, and protein content. Results indicate variation in growth response of two cultivars with different treatments. Triple inoculation of plants with G + A + T proved to be the best treatment for growth followed by G + T in both cultivars. Our work allowed the selection of P. mungo L. cultivar UH-1 as highly mycorrhizal responsive as compared to IPU-94-1 and G. mosseae to be an efficient bioinoculant as compared to A. laevis for growth enhancement of P. mungo. Further characterization of P. mungo genotypes will enhance our knowledge of physiological and genetic mechanism behind increase in plant growth and yield due to AM symbiosis.

  16. Sodium Chloride Stress Induced Changes in Leaf Osmotic Adjustment of Trifoliate Orange (Poncirus trifoliata Seedlings Inoculated with Mycorrhizal Fungi

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    Ying-Ning ZOU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are sensitive to salinity, and thus employing new approaches to alleviate salt damage are necessary. The present study evaluated the effect of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomus mosseae and G. versiforme, on leaf osmotic adjustment of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata seedings exposed to 100 mM NaCl. Salinity significantly inhibited mycorrhizal colonization, plant biomass and leaf relative water content, whereas the reduce of plant biomass was notably alleviated by the mycorrhizal colonization. Mycorrhizal seedlings exhibited significantly lower Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations, whilst also recorded higher K+ concentration and K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+ and Mg2+/Na+ ratios at both salinity levels. Under salinity stress, mycorrhizal symbiosis markedly decreased sucrose concentrations of leaves and also increased glucose, fructose and proline concentrations of leaves. The results suggest that arbuscular mycorrhizas improved leaf osmotic adjustment responses of the seedlings to salt stress, thus enhancing salt tolerance of mycorrhizal plants.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal associations in different forest tree species of Hazarikhil forest of Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.P.Dhar; M.A.U.Mridha

    2012-01-01

    Biodiversity ofarbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and AM fungal spores were studied in the roots and rhizosphere soils of Acacia catechu (L.f).Wild.,A.mangium Willd,Anthocephala cadamba Miq.,Artocarpus chaplasha Roxb.,Chickrassia tabularis A.Juss.,Swietenia macrophylla King.,Tectona grandis L.from plantations; Albizia procera (Roxb.) Benth.,A.falcataria L.,Alstonia scholaris (L.) R.Br.,Aphanamixis polystachya (Wall.) Parker.,Hydnocarpus kurzii (King.)Warb.,Heynea trijuga Roxb.,Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers.,Messua ferrea Linn.,Podocarpus nerifolia Don.,Swintonia floribunda Griff.,Syzygium fruticosum (Roxb.) DC.,S.grandis (Wt.) Wal.from forest and nursery seedlings of A.polystachya,A.chaplasha,Gmelina arborea Roxb.and S.cuminii (L.) Skeels from Hazarikhil forest,Chittagong of Bangladesh.Roots were stained in aniline blue and rhizosphere soils were assessed by wet sieving and decanting methods.The range of AM colonization varied significantly from 10%-73% in the plantations samples.Maximum colonization was observed in A.mangium (73%) and minimum colonization was observed in C tabularis (10%).Vesicular colonization was recorded 15%-67% in five plantation tree species.The highest was in A.cadamba (67%) and the lowest was in T.grandis; A.chaplasha and C tabularis showed no vesicular colonization.Arbuscular colonization was recorded 12%-60% in four plantation tree species.The highest was in A.mangium (60%) and the lowest was in A.cadamba.Roots of Artocarpus chaplasha,C tabularis and T.grandis showed no arbuscular colonization.Among 12 forest tree species,nine tree species showed AM colonization.The highest was in A.falcataria (62%) and the lowest was in S.fruticosum (10%).Significant variation in vesicular colonization was recorded in seven forest tree species.The highest was in H.trijuga (52%) and the lowest was in L.speciosa (18%).Hydnocarpus kurzii,M.ferrea,P.nerifolia S.fruticosum and S.grandis showed no vesicular colonization.Arbuscular colonization was

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the occurrence of flavonoids in roots of passion fruit seedlings Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares e a ocorrência de flavonóides em raízes de mudas de maracujazeiro amarelo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Fermino Soares

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Composition and the role of root flavonoids in the regulation of mycorrhizal symbiosis are still poorly understood. Several flavonoids stimulate spore germination, mycelia growth and root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, and both root colonization and flavonoid composition are affected by plant nutritional status. Effects of AMF on the occurrence and content of aromatic secondary metabolites in the roots of passion fruit seedlings grown under two levels of phosphorus (P fertilization (10 and 50 mg kg-1 of phosphorus was studied. Seedlings were inoculated with Glomus clarum and a population of native fungi from a passion fruit plantation. Methanolic extracts of passion fruit seedlings roots were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. It was recorded the occurrence of several compounds, possibly flavonoids, with seven major peaks. The root contents of the compound with a retention time of 4.5 minutes, varied in response to the root colonization by different mycorrhizal fungi, and the contents of two compounds with retention times of 3.4 and 18.9 minutes varied due to the poor plant growth and nutritional status. Passion fruit seedlings have several aromatic compounds, and their contents were correlated with root colonization by different mycorrhizal fungi, the reduced seedling growth due to nutritional stress, and/or the plant defense responses to the fungi.Os flavonóides nas raízes e seu papel na regulação da simbiose com fungos micorrízicos não são bem conhecidos. Vários flavonóides estimulam a germinação de esporos, crescimento micelial e colonização micorrízica. Ambos, a colonização micorrízica e a composição de flavonóides nas raízes são afetados pelo estado nutricional da planta. Avaliou-se o efeito de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares sobre a ocorrência e concentração de substâncias, possivelmente metabólitos aromáticos secundários pertencentes à classe dos flavonóides, em

  19. Community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated to Veronica rechingeri at the Anguran zinc and lead mining region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarei, M. [Department of Soil Science Engineering, Soil and Water Engineering Faculty, University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mehdizarei20@yahoo.ca; Koenig, S. [UFZ Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle Ltd, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: stephan.koenig@ufz.de; Hempel, S. [UFZ Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle Ltd, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: hempel.stefan@gmail.com; Nekouei, M. Khayam [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran (ABRII), P.O. Box 31535-1897, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Khayam@abrii.ac.ir; Savaghebi, Gh. [Department of Soil Science Engineering, Soil and Water Engineering Faculty, University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Savagheb@ut.ac.ir; Buscot, F. [UFZ Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle Ltd, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: francois.buscot@ufz.de

    2008-12-15

    Root colonization and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were analyzed in Veronica rechingeri growing in heavy metal (HM) and non-polluted soils of the Anguran Zn and Pb mining region (Iran). Three species could be separated morphologically, while phylogenetic analyses after PCR amplification of the ITS region followed by RFLP and sequencing revealed seven different AMF sequence types all within the genus Glomus. Rarefaction analysis confirmed exhaustive molecular characterization of the AMF diversity present within root samples. Increasing heavy metal contamination between the sites studied was accompanied by a decrease in AMF spore numbers, mycorrhizal colonization parameters and the number of AMF sequence types colonizing the roots. Some AMF sequence types were only found at sites with the highest and lowest soil HM contents, respectively. - The increase in soil heavy metal content between sites was accompanied by a decrease in mycorrhization parameters, spore numbers and AMF molecular diversity.

  20. Effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on availability of soil phosphorus and growth of maize

    OpenAIRE

    A.E. Mau; S.R. Utami

    2014-01-01

    A glasshouse experiment was conducted to study the interactive effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation on phosphorus uptake by maize (Zea mayze L.) grown on a calcareous soil of Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara. The biochar was made of cow dung. Twelve treatment combinations (three biochars levels of 0, 5 and 7.5 g/kg of soil, and four AMF inoculation levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 spores / kg of soil) were arranged in a completely randomized block design with thr...

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in field-collected terrestrial cordate gametophytes of pre-polypod leptosporangiate ferns (Osmundaceae, Gleicheniaceae, Plagiogyriaceae, Cyatheaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Hirayama, Yumiko; Sakoda, Aki; Suzuki, Ayako; Ebihara, Atsushi; Morita, Nana; Imaichi, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    To determine the mycorrhizal status of pteridophyte gametophytes in diverse taxa, the mycorrhizal colonization of wild gametophytes was investigated in terrestrial cordate gametophytes of pre-polypod leptosporangiate ferns, i.e., one species of Osmundaceae (Osmunda banksiifolia), two species of Gleicheniaceae (Diplopterygium glaucum, Dicranopteris linearis), and four species of Cyatheales including tree ferns (Plagiogyriaceae: Plagiogyria japonica, Plagiogyria euphlebia; Cyatheaceae: Cyathea podophylla, Cyathea lepifera). Microscopic observations revealed that 58 to 97% of gametophytes in all species were colonized with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Fungal colonization was limited to the multilayered midrib (cushion) tissue in all gametophytes examined. Molecular identification using fungal SSU rDNA sequences indicated that the AM fungi in gametophytes primarily belonged to the Glomeraceae, but also included the Claroideoglomeraceae, Gigasporaceae, Acaulosporaceae, and Archaeosporales. This study provides the first evidence for AM fungal colonization of wild gametophytes in the Plagiogyriaceae and Cyatheaceae. Taxonomically divergent photosynthetic gametophytes are similarly colonized by AM fungi, suggesting that mycorrhizal associations with AM fungi could widely occur in terrestrial pteridophyte gametophytes.

  2. Grain yield and arsenic uptake of upland rice inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in As-spiked soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuyong; Hu, Junli; Wu, Shengchun; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-06-01

    A pot trial was conducted to investigate the effects of three arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi species, including Glomus geosporum BGC HUN02C, G. versiforme BGC GD01B, and G. mosseae BGC GD01A, on grain yield and arsenic (As) uptake of upland rice (Zhonghan 221) in As-spiked soils. Moderate levels of AM colonization (24.1-63.1 %) were recorded in the roots of upland rice, and up to 70 mg kg(-1) As in soils did not seem to inhibit mycorrhizal colonization. Positive mycorrhizal growth effects in grain, husk, straw, and root of the upland rice, especially under high level (70 mg kg(-1)) of As in soils, were apparent. Although the effects varied among species of AM fungi, inoculation of AM fungi apparently enhanced grain yield of upland rice without increasing grain As concentrations in As-spiked soils, indicating that AM fungi could alleviate adverse effects on the upland rice caused by As in soils. The present results also show that mycorrhizal inoculation significantly (p < 0.05) decreased As concentrations in husk, straw, and root in soils added with 70 mg kg(-1) As. The present results suggest that AM fungi are able to mitigate the adverse effects with enhancing rice production when growing in As-contaminated soils.

  3. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  4. Organic nitrogen-driven stimulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae correlates with abundance of ammonia oxidizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eBukovská

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass, while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples

  5. LysM-Type Mycorrhizal Receptor Recruited for Rhizobium Symbiosis in Nonlegume Parasponia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Op den R.H.M.; Streng, A.J.; Mita, De S.; Cao, Q.; Polone, E.; Liu, W.; Ammiraju, J.S.S.; Kudrna, D.; Wing, R.; Untergasser, A.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobium root nodule symbiosis is generally considered to be unique for legumes. However, there is one exception and that is Parasponia. In this nonlegume, the rhizobial nodule symbiosis evolved independently and is, like in legumes, induced by rhizobium Nod factors. We used Parasponia to identify

  6. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Beatrice Meyer

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology.

  7. Molecular biodiversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in trace metal-polluted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saad El Din; Boon, Eva; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    We assessed the indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) community structure from the roots and associated soil of Plantago major (plantain) plants growing on sites polluted with trace metals (TM) and on unpolluted sites. Uncontaminated and TM-contaminated sites containing As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sn and Zn were selected based on a survey of the TM concentration in soils of community gardens in the City of Montréal. Total genomic DNA was extracted directly from these samples. PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), augmented by cloning and sequencing, as well as direct sequencing techniques, was all used to investigate AMF community structure. We found a decreased diversity of native AMF (assessed by the number of AMF ribotypes) in soils and plant roots harvested from TM-polluted soils compared with unpolluted soils. We also found that community structure was modified by TM contamination. Various species of Glomus, Scutellospora aurigloba and S. calospora were the most abundant ribotypes detected in unpolluted soil; ribotypes of G. etunicatum, G. irregulare/G. intraradices and G. viscosum were found in both polluted and unpolluted soils, while ribotypes of G. mosseae and Glomus spp. (B9 and B13) were dominant in TM-polluted soils. The predominance of G. mosseae in metal-polluted sites suggests the tolerance of this species to TM stress, as well as its potential use for phytoremediation. These data are relevant for our understanding of how AMF microbial communities respond to natural environments that contain a broad variety of toxic inorganic compounds and will substantially expand our knowledge of AMF ecology and biodiversity. PMID:21668808

  8. The Potential Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Restoration of Degraded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmelash, Fisseha; Bekele, Tamrat; Birhane, Emiru

    2016-01-01

    Experiences worldwide reveal that degraded lands restoration projects achieve little success or fail. Hence, understanding the underlying causes and accordingly, devising appropriate restoration mechanisms is crucial. In doing so, the ever-increasing aspiration and global commitments in degraded lands restoration could be realized. Here we explain that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) biotechnology is a potential mechanism to significantly improve the restoration success of degraded lands. There are abundant scientific evidences to demonstrate that AMF significantly improve soil attributes, increase above and belowground biodiversity, significantly improve tree/shrub seedlings survival, growth and establishment on moisture and nutrient stressed soils. AMF have also been shown to drive plant succession and may prevent invasion by alien species. The very few conditions where infective AMF are low in abundance and diversity is when the soil erodes, is disturbed and is devoid of vegetation cover. These are all common features of degraded lands. Meanwhile, degraded lands harbor low levels of infective AMF abundance and diversity. Therefore, the successful restoration of infective AMF can potentially improve the restoration success of degraded lands. Better AMF inoculation effects result when inocula are composed of native fungi instead of exotics, early seral instead of late seral fungi, and are consortia instead of few or single species. Future research efforts should focus on AMF effect on plant community primary productivity and plant competition. Further investigation focusing on forest ecosystems, and carried out at the field condition is highly recommended. Devising cheap and ethically widely accepted inocula production methods and better ways of AMF in situ management for effective restoration of degraded lands will also remain to be important research areas. PMID:27507960

  9. Soil solarization reduces arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as a consequence of weed suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, P R; Ivors, K L; Pinkerton, J N

    2001-12-01

    Soil solarization, the process of heating soil by covering fields with clear plastic, is a promising method to reduce populations of soilborne pests and weeds without the use of pesticides. However, the destruction of beneficial organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi also may occur, thereby reducing positive effects of solarization. We compared the effects of solarization and chemical fumigants on the survival of indigenous AM fungi in 1995 and 1996. The infectivity of AM fungi was monitored before and after solarization using a greenhouse bioassay with Sorghum bicolor L. for both years. AM colonization of roots was also monitored in the field 8 months after solarization in 1995. Weed densities were measured 8 months after treatment in 1996. Solarization increased the average daily soil temperature 6-10°C and the maximum soil temperature reached by 10-16°C (5-20 cm depth). Solarization did not reduce the infectivity of AM fungi immediately after the solarization period in either year, as determined by the greenhouse bioassay. Infectivity was greatly reduced in solarized plots 8 months after solarization (over winter) in both years as assessed in the field (1995) or with the greenhouse bioassay (1996). Fumigation with metam sodium at 930 l ha(-1) (350 kg active ingredient ha(-1)) reduced the infectivity of AM fungi in both years, and fumigation with methyl bromide at 800 kg ha(-1) eliminated infection by AM fungi. Solarization was as effective as methyl bromide and metam sodium at 930 l ha(-1) in controlling winter annual weeds measured 8 months after treatment. Solarization apparently reduced AM fungi in soil indirectly by reducing weed populations that maintained infective propagules over the winter. Fumigation with metam sodium or methyl bromide directly reduced AM fungi in soil.

  10. Variation of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities across land use gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moora, M.; Davison, J.; Metsis, M.; Öpik, M.; Vasar, M.; Zobel, M.

    2012-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (phylum Glomeromycota) colonize the roots of most terrestrial plants, facilitating mineral nutrient uptake from soil in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon. While investigating functional aspects of plant-AM fungi interactions has been a major focus of research, there is increasing interest in describing and explaining the distribution of AM fungal diversity. Different management practices has been shown to influence the AM fungal communities while more intense management can bring along the loss of AM fungal diversity. Such a loss may have negative consequences on ecosystem service delivery, primary production and soil sustainability. However, due to cryptic lifestyle of AM fungi, relatively few information is available about variability of diversity and composition of AM fungal communities in the soils from differently managed ecosystems. To study the variation of soil AM fungal communities in response to the land use intensity, replicated soil samples were collected along land use gradient from intensively managed agricultural fields, organic fields, forest plantations and managed natural forest to primeval forest in Estonia. Soil AM fungal communities were described using molecular tools: DNA extraction, amplicon isolation and 454 large scale parallel pyrosequencing. Glomeromycota sequences were amplified using the SSU rDNA primers NS31 and AML2. We shall analyse and describe AM fungal community changes along land use intensity gradient and seek finding indicator taxa characteristic to particular land use types. We shall also address changes in the diversity of AM fungal taxa and check whether the decrease of diversity along land use intensity is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  11. Natural selection and the evolutionary ecology of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Phylum Glomeromycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Thorunn; Fitter, Alastair H

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's model of evolution by natural selection was based on his observations of change in discrete organisms in which individuals are easy to define. Many of the most abundant functional groups in ecosystems, such as fungi and bacteria, do not fit this paradigm. In this review, we seek to understand how the elegant logic of Darwinian natural selection can be applied to distributed clonal organisms. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are one such group. Globally, they are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems, are locally distributed among many host plant species, and are significant drivers of nutrient cycling in ecosystems. The AM fungi are intractable to study, as the few taxa that can be cultured cannot be grown in the absence of plant roots. Research has focused on the plant-fungus interface, and thus on the symbiotic phenotype. A model is discussed for the interchange of materials at the interface that throws the emphasis of research onto the behaviour of the individual organisms and removes the need to test for phenomena such as selectivity, co-evolution, and cheating. The AM fungi are distributed organisms with an extensive external mycelium that is likely to be under strong environmental selection. AM fungi show sufficient phenotypic variation and fitness differentials for selection to occur, and developments in genetic analyses suggest that a better understanding of heritability in these organisms is not far away. It is argued that direct selection on fungal traits related to their survival and performance in the soil independent of the host is likely to be the major driver of differentiation in the AM fungi, and the evidence for direct fungal responses to soil conditions such as pH, hypoxia, and temperature is reviewed.

  12. Mitochondrial comparative genomics and phylogenetic signal assessment of mtDNA among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Maryam; Daubois, Laurence; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genes, such as cytochrome C oxidase genes (cox), have been widely used for barcoding in many groups of organisms, although this approach has been less powerful in the fungal kingdom due to the rapid evolution of their mt genomes. The use of mt genes in phylogenetic studies of Dikarya has been met with success, while early diverging fungal lineages remain less studied, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Advances in next-generation sequencing have substantially increased the number of publically available mtDNA sequences for the Glomeromycota. As a result, comparison of mtDNA across key AMF taxa can now be applied to assess the phylogenetic signal of individual mt coding genes, as well as concatenated subsets of coding genes. Here we show comparative analyses of publically available mt genomes of Glomeromycota, augmented with two mtDNA genomes that were newly sequenced for this study (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM240159 and Glomus aggregatum DAOM240163), resulting in 16 complete mtDNA datasets. R. irregularis isolate DAOM240159 and G. aggregatum isolate DAOM240163 showed mt genomes measuring 72,293bp and 69,505bp with G+C contents of 37.1% and 37.3%, respectively. We assessed the phylogenies inferred from single mt genes and complete sets of coding genes, which are referred to as "supergenes" (16 concatenated coding genes), using Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests, in order to identify genes that best described AMF phylogeny. We found that rnl, nad5, cox1, and nad2 genes, as well as concatenated subset of these genes, provided phylogenies that were similar to the supergene set. This mitochondrial genomic analysis was also combined with principal coordinate and partitioning analyses, which helped to unravel certain evolutionary relationships in the Rhizophagus genus and for G. aggregatum within the Glomeromycota. We showed evidence to support the position of G. aggregatum within the R. irregularis 'species complex'. PMID:26868331

  13. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms. PMID:27197388

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidinger, Stefan; Eschen, René; Gange, Alan C.; Finch, Paul; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF colonization levels of individual ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea) plants growing in grassland plots that were originally sown with 15 or 4 plant species, or were unsown. We measured the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and assessed the presence of aboveground insect herbivores on the sampled plants. Total AMF colonization and colonization by arbuscules was lower in plots sown with 15 species than in plots sown with 4 species and unsown plots. AMF colonization was positively related to the cover of oxeye daisy ( Leucanthemum vulgare) and a positive relationship between colonization by arbuscules and the occurrence of a specialist seed-feeding fly ( Pegohylemyia seneciella) was found. The occurrence of stem-boring, leaf-mining and sap-sucking insects was not affected by AMF colonization. Total PA concentrations were negatively related to colonization levels by vesicles, but did not differ among the sowing treatments. No single factor explained the observed differences in AMF colonization among the sowing treatments or insect herbivore occurrence on S. jacobaea. However, correlations across the treatments suggest that some of the variation was due to the abundance of one plant species, which is known to stimulate AMF colonization of neighbouring plants, while AMF colonization was related to the occurrence of a specialist insect herbivore. Our results thus illustrate that in natural systems, the ecosystem impact of AMF through their influence on the occurrence of specialist insects can be recognised, but they also highlight the confounding effect of neighbouring plant species identity. Hence, our results emphasise the importance of field

  15. The effect of different land uses on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the northwestern Black Sea Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Şahin; Lermi, Ayşe Genç; Beki, Rıdvan

    2016-06-01

    The object of the present research was to establish correlations between the status of root colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and different types of land use. In order to achieve this aim, rhizosphere soil samples from grassland crops were taken during June and July of 2013 in order to use for determining several soil characteristics. The 27 different taxa and 60 soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere level in the study areas. The existence of AMF was confirmed in 100 % of these plants with different rations of colonization (approximately 12-89 %). Bromus racemosus L. (pasture) was the most dense taxon with the percentage of AMF colonization of 88.9 %, and Trifolium pratense L. (forest) was the least dense taxon with the percentage of AMF colonization of 12.2 % (average 52.0 %). As a result of the statistical analysis, a positive relationship was found between the botanical composition of legumes and AMF colonization (r = 0.35; p = 0.006). However, a negative relationship was determined between botanical composition of other plant families and AMF colonization (r = -0.39; p = 0.002). In addition, a positive relationship was defined between soil pH (H2O) and the root colonization of AMF (r = 0.35; p = 0.005). The pasture had the highest mean value of AMF root colonization. However, the pasture and gap in the forest were in the same group, according to the results of the S-N-K test. PMID:27178052

  16. Inoculant of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (Rhizophagus clarus) Increase Yield of Soybean and Cotton under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, Martha V T; de Oliveira, Admilton G; de Freitas, Vanessa F; de Luca, Marcelo B; Barazetti, André R; Dos Santos, Igor M O; Gionco, Barbara; Garcia, Guilherme V; Prete, Cássio E C; Andrade, Galdino

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient availability is an important factor in crop production, and regular addition of chemical fertilizers is the most common practice to improve yield in agrosystems for intensive crop production. The use of some groups of microorganisms that have specific activity providing nutrients to plants is a good alternative, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance plant nutrition by providing especially phosphorus, improving plant growth and increasing crop production. Unfortunately, the use of AMF as an inoculant on a large scale is not yet widely used, because of several limitations in obtaining a large amount of inoculum due to several factors, such as low growth, the few species of AMF domesticated under in vitro conditions, and high competition with native AMF. The objective of this work was to test the infectivity of a Rhizophagus clarus inoculum and its effectiveness as an alternative for nutrient supply in soybean (Glycine max L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) when compared with conventional chemical fertilization under field conditions. The experiments were carried out in a completely randomized block design with five treatments: Fertilizer, AMF, AMF with Fertilizer, AMF with 1/2 Fertilizer, and the Control with non-inoculated and non-fertilized plants. The parameters evaluated were AMF root colonization and effect of inoculation on plant growth, nutrient absorption and yield. The results showed that AMF inoculation increased around 20 % of root colonization in both soybean and cotton; nutrients analyses in vegetal tissues showed increase of P and nitrogen content in inoculated plants, these results reflect in a higher yield. Our results showed that, AMF inoculation increase the effectiveness of fertilizer application in soybean and reduce the fertilizer dosage in cotton. PMID:27303367

  17. The Potential Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Restoration of Degraded Lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmelash, Fisseha; Bekele, Tamrat; Birhane, Emiru

    2016-01-01

    Experiences worldwide reveal that degraded lands restoration projects achieve little success or fail. Hence, understanding the underlying causes and accordingly, devising appropriate restoration mechanisms is crucial. In doing so, the ever-increasing aspiration and global commitments in degraded lands restoration could be realized. Here we explain that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) biotechnology is a potential mechanism to significantly improve the restoration success of degraded lands. There are abundant scientific evidences to demonstrate that AMF significantly improve soil attributes, increase above and belowground biodiversity, significantly improve tree/shrub seedlings survival, growth and establishment on moisture and nutrient stressed soils. AMF have also been shown to drive plant succession and may prevent invasion by alien species. The very few conditions where infective AMF are low in abundance and diversity is when the soil erodes, is disturbed and is devoid of vegetation cover. These are all common features of degraded lands. Meanwhile, degraded lands harbor low levels of infective AMF abundance and diversity. Therefore, the successful restoration of infective AMF can potentially improve the restoration success of degraded lands. Better AMF inoculation effects result when inocula are composed of native fungi instead of exotics, early seral instead of late seral fungi, and are consortia instead of few or single species. Future research efforts should focus on AMF effect on plant community primary productivity and plant competition. Further investigation focusing on forest ecosystems, and carried out at the field condition is highly recommended. Devising cheap and ethically widely accepted inocula production methods and better ways of AMF in situ management for effective restoration of degraded lands will also remain to be important research areas. PMID:27507960

  18. Changes in communities of Fusarium and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as related to different asparagus cultural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergeau, Etienne; Vujanovic, Vladimir; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2006-07-01

    Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a high-value perennial vegetable crop that has shown a marked decline in productivity after many years of continuous harvesting. This decline is caused by an increase in both abiotic (autotoxicity, harvesting pressure) and biotic stresses [fungal infections, mainly Fusarium crown and root rot (FCRR)]. To gain insight into disease development and possible mitigation strategies, we studied the effects of harvesting, time in the growing season, and field age on FCRR development, Fusarium species composition, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities in both a controlled field experiment and an ecological survey of commercial fields. In one experiment, a 3-year-old asparagus field was subdivided into plots that were harvested or not and sampled throughout the growing season to assess short-term dominant Fusarium species shifts. In addition, diseased and healthy asparagus plants sampled from six commercial fields in the same geographical region were used to assess Fusarium and AMF communities in relation to different parameters. Fusarium and AMF communities were described by using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach, and results were analyzed by mainly correspondence analysis and canonical correspondence analysis. Results showed that dominant Fusarium taxa assemblages changed throughout the growing season. Harvested plots had significantly more FCRR symptomatic plants at the end of the growing season, but this effect was not related with any trend in Fusarium community structure. Sampling site and plant age significantly influenced AMF community structure, whereas only sampling site consistently influenced the Fusarium community. Diseased and healthy plants harbored similar Fusarium and AMF communities. Shifts in Fusarium community might not be responsible for different disease incidence because they are ubiquitous regardless of plant health status or harvesting regime

  19. Propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a secondary dry forest of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama, Patricia; Castillo-Argüero, Silvia; Ramos-Zapata, José A; Camargo-Ricalde, Sara L; Alvarez-Sánchez, Javier

    2008-03-01

    Plant cover loss due to changes in land use promotes a decrease in spore diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), viable mycelium and, therefore, in AMF colonization, this has an influence in community diversity and, as a consequence, in its recovery. To evaluate different AMF propagules, nine plots in a tropical dry forest with secondary vegetation were selected: 0, 1, 7, 10, 14, 18, 22, 25, and 27 years after abandonment in Nizanda, Oaxaca, Mexico. The secondary vegetation with different stages of development is a consequence of slash and burn agriculture, and posterior abandonment. Soil samples (six per plot) were collected and percentage of AMF field colonization, extrarradical mycelium, viable spore density, infectivity and most probable number (MPN) ofAMF propagules were quantified through a bioassay. Means for field colonization ranged between 40% and 70%, mean of total mycelium length was 15.7 +/- 1.88 mg(-1) dry soil, with significant differences between plots; however, more than 40% of extracted mycelium was not viable, between 60 and 456 spores in 100 g of dry soil were recorded, but more than 64% showed some kind of damage. Infectivity values fluctuated between 20% and 50%, while MPN showed a mean value of 85.42 +/- 44.17 propagules (100 g dry soil). We conclude that secondary communities generated by elimination of vegetation with agricultural purposes in a dry forest in Nizanda do not show elimination of propagules, probably as a consequence of the low input agriculture practices in this area, which may encourage natural regeneration. PMID:18624242

  20. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms.

  1. Development and amplification of multiple co-dominant genetic markers from single spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by nested multiplex PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva; Rosendahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Multiple co-dominant genetic markers from single spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus mosseae, Glomus caledonium, and Glomus geosporum were amplified by nested multiplex PCR using a combination of primers for simultaneous amplification of five loci in one PCR. Subsequently, each...

  2. A comparison of the development and metabolic activity of mycorrhizas formed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from different genera on two tropical forage legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddington, C.L.; Dodd, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Two glasshouse experiments were done to assess the development and metabolic activity of mycorrhizas formed by isolates of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) from three different genera, Acaulospora, Gigaspora and Glomus on either Pueraria phaseoloides L. or Desmodium ovalifolium L. plants. The seco

  3. Biocontrol traits of plant growth suppressive arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi against root rot in tomato caused by Pythium aphanidermatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime;

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi known to cause plant growth depressions in tomato were examined for their biocontrol effects against root rot caused by Pythium aphanidermatum. The main hypothesis was that plant growth suppressive AM fungi would elicit a defence response in the host plant reduci...

  4. Community analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots of Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata based on SSU rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Morphological observation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in rhizospheric soil could not accurately reflect the actual AMF colonizing status in roots, while molecular identification of indigenous AMF colonizing citrus rootstocks at present was rare in China. In our study, community of AMF colonizing trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) and red tangerine (Citrus reticulata Blanco) were analyzed based on small subunit of ribosomal DNA genes. Morphological observation showed that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization, spore density, and hyphal length did not differ significantly between two rootstocks. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 173 screened AMF sequences clustered in at least 10 discrete groups (GLO1~GLO10), all belonging to the genus of Glomus Sensu Lato. Among them, GLO1 clade (clustering with uncultured Glomus) accounting for 54.43% clones was the most common in trifoliate orange roots, while GLO6 clade (clustering with Glomus intraradices) accounting for 35.00% clones was the most common in red tangerine roots. Although, Shannon-Wiener indices exhibited no notable differences between both rootstocks, relative proportions of observed clades analysis revealed that composition of AMF communities colonizing two rootstocks varied severely. The results indicated that native AMF species in citrus rhizosphere had diverse colonization potential between two different rootstocks in the present orchards. PMID:25162057

  5. Species richness and spore abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi across distinct land uses in western Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürmer, Sidney Luiz; Siqueira, José Oswaldo

    2011-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were surveyed for species richness and abundance in sporulation in six distinct land uses in the western Amazon region of Brazil. Areas included mature pristine forest and sites converted to pasture, crops, agroforestry, young and old secondary forest. A total of 61 AMF morphotypes were recovered and 30% of them could not be identified to known species. Fungal communities were dominated by Glomus species but Acaulospora species produced the most abundant sporulation. Acaulospora gedanensis cf., Acaulospora foveata, Acaulospora spinosa, Acaulospora tuberculata, Glomus corymbiforme, Glomus sp15, Scutellospora pellucida, and Archaeospora trappei sporulated in all land use areas. Total spore numbers were highly variable among land uses. Mean species richness in crop, agroforestry, young and old secondary forest sites was twice that in pristine forest and pasture. fungal communities were dominated in all land use areas except young secondary forest by two or three species which accounted for 48% to 63% of all sporulation. Land uses influenced AMF community in (1) frequency of occurrence of sporulating AMF species, (2) mean species diversity, and (3) relative spore abundance. Conversion of pristine forest into distinct land uses does not appear to reduce AMF diversity. Cultural practices adopted in this region maintain a high diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi diversity influenced by different agricultural management practices in a semi-arid Mediterranean agro-ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mar Alguacil, Maria; Torrecillas, Emma; Garcia-Orenes, Fuensanta; Torres, Maria Pilar; Roldan, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study a field experiment was performed at the El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera Experimental Station (eastern Spain) to assess the influence during a 6-yr period of different agricultural practices on the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The management practices included residual herbicide use, ploughing, ploughing + oats, addition of oat straw mulch and a control (land abandonment). Adjacent soil under natural vegetation was used as a reference for local, high-quality soil and as a control for comparison with the agricultural soils under different management practices. The AM fungal small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Thirty-six different phylotypes were identified, which were grouped in four families: Glomeraceae, Paraglomeraceae, Ambisporaceae and Claroideoglomeraceae. The first results showed significant differences in the distribution of the AMF phylotypes as consequence of the difference between agricultural management practices. Thus, the lowest diversity was observed for the plot that was treated with herbicide. The management practices including ploughing and ploughing + oats had similar AMF diversity. Oat straw mulching yielded the highest number of different AMF sequence types and showed the highest diversity index. Thus, this treatment could be more suitable in sustainable soil use and therefore protection of biodiversity.

  7. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve grain yield, As uptake and tolerance of rice grown under aerobic conditions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ye, Z.H. [State Key Laboratory for Bio-control, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chan, W.F.; Chen, X.W.; Wu, F.Y. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wu, S.C. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); School of Environment and Natural Resources, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Lin' an, Zhejiang 311300 (China); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); School of Environment and Natural Resources, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Lin' an, Zhejiang 311300 (China)

    2011-10-15

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) -Glomus intraradices and G. geosporum on arsenic (As) and phosphorus (P) uptake by lowland (Guangyinzhan) and upland rice (Handao 502) were investigated in soil, spiked with and without 60 mg As kg{sup -1}. In As-contaminated soil, Guangyinzhan inoculated with G. intraradices or Handao 502 inoculated with G. geosporum enhanced As tolerance, grain P content, grain yield. However, Guangyinzhan inoculated with G. geosporum or Handao 502 inoculated with G. intraradices decreased grain P content, grain yield and the molar ratio of grain P/As content, and increased the As concentration and the ratio of grain/straw As concentration. These results show that rice/AMF combinations had significant (p < 0.05) effects on grain As concentration, grain yield and grain P uptake. The variation in the transfer and uptake of As and P reflected strong functional diversity in AM (arbuscular mycorrhizal) symbioses. - Highlights: > Rice/AMF combinations had significant effects on grain As concentration, grain yield and grain P uptake. > Rice colonized with suitable AMF can increase grain yield. > The variation in the transfer and uptake of As and P reflected strong functional diversity in AM symbioses. - Different rice/AMF combinations had very different effects on arsenic and phosphorus uptake.

  8. The effect of different soil properties on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of peanuts, sorghum and maize Diferentes propriedades do solo na colonização micorrízica arbuscular de amendoim, sorgo e milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilaine Carrenho

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are important for plant growth since they increase mineral influx. However, symbiosis efficiency is affected by many environmental factors. This study evaluated the effects of different treatments (+/- phosphorus; +/- liming; +/- organic matter; field, sandy or clayey soil textures on root colonization (RC of peanuts, sorghum and maize. The combination of these resulted in seventy-two treatments. The 2×2×2×3×3 factorial experiment was laid out in a randomized design. All data were subjected to variance analysis and the means were compared (Tukey at PFungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMA são importantes para o crescimento das plantas, pois aumentam o influxo de minerais. Porém, a eficiência simbiótica é afetada por muitos fatores ambientais. Este estudo avaliou os efeitos de diferentes tratamentos (+/- fósforo; +/- calcário; +/- matéria orgânica; texturas de solo arenosa, argilosa e de campo sobre a colonização radical (CR de amendoim, sorgo e milho. Da combinação destes fatores resultaram 72 tratamentos. O experimento fatorial foi do tipo 2×2×2×3×3, com amostragem inteiramente ao acaso. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância e ao teste de Tukey (P< 0,05. Três meses após a germinação das sementes, as raízes foram coletadas para avaliação das percentagens de CR. Os resultados mostraram que a textura do solo e a calagem foram os fatores que mais influenciaram a CR em milho, sorgo e amendoim. Diferenças significativas também foram observadas entre os fitobiontes. Matéria orgânica teve influência pouco significativa sobre a CR enquanto adição de fósforo não ocasionou variação.

  9. Especies de hongos formadores de Micorrizas Arbusculares: nuevas citas para la República Argentina Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species: new records for Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Irrazabal

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Se investigó la presencia de hongos formadores de micorrizas arbusculares asociados a plantas colectadas en un agroecosistema y en un bosque nativo de tala, en la provincia de Buenos Aires. Las especies que constituyen un nuevo registro para la Argentina son: Scutellospora dipapillosa (Walker & Koske Walker & Sanders y Scutellospora fulgida Koske & Walker halladas en la rizósfera de Triticum aestivum L.; Scutellospora gilmorei (Trappe & Gerd. Walker & Sanders, en la rizósfera de Celtis tala Gill. Ex Planch., Scutia buxifolia Reiss. y plantas herbáceas; Acaulospora delicata Walker, Pfeiffer & Bloss. y Glomus clarum Nicolson & Schenck, halladas en ambos sitios. Estas especies son citadas, descriptas e ilustradas por primera vez para Argentina. Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerdemann ha sido citada pero no descripta e ilustrada para nuestro país.The presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with plants from an agroecosystem and a native forest, in Buenos Aires province is studied. The species that correspond a new register for Argentina are: Scutellospora dipapillosa (Walker & Koske Walker & Sanders and Scutellospora fulgida Koske & Walker found in the rhizosphere of Triticum aestivum L.; Scutellospora gilmorei (Trappe & Gerd. Walker & Sanders, in the rhizosphere of Celtis tala Gill. Ex Planch., Scutia buxifolia Reiss. and herbaceous plants; Acaulospora delicata Walker, Pfeiffer & Bloss. and Glomus clarum Nicolson & Schenck, occurred in both sites. They are cited, described and illustrated for the first time from Argentina. Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerdemann was previously cited although it was not described and illustrated from Argentina.

  10. Arsenic uptake by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) grown in an arsenic-contaminated soil with added phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae) and phosphorus (P) addition (100 mg/kg soil) on arsenic (As)uptake by maize plants (Zea mays L.) from an As-contaminated soil were examined in a glasshouse experiment. Non-mycorrhizal and zero-P addition controls were included. Plant biomass and concentrations and uptake of As, P, and other nutrients, AM colonization, root lengths, and hyphal length densities were determined. The results indicated that addition of P significantly inhibited root colonization and development of extraradical mycelium. Root length and dry weight both increased markedly with mycorrhizal colonization under the zero-P treatments, but shoot and root biomass of AM plants was depressed by P application. AM fungal inoculation decreased shoot As concentrations when no P was added, and shoot and root As concentrations of AM plants increased 2.6 and 1.4 times with P addition, respectively. Shoot and root uptake of P, Mn, Cu, and Zn increased, but shoot Fe uptake decreased by 44.6%, with inoculation,when P was added. P addition reduced shoot P, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn uptake of AM plants, but increased root Fe and Mn uptake of the nonmycorrhizal ones. AM colonization therefore appeared to enhance plant tolerance to As in low P soil, and have some potential for the phytostabilization of As-contaminated soil, however, P application may introduce additional environmental risk by increasing soil As mobility.

  11. Possible evidence for contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in phytoremediation of iron-cyanide (Fe-CN) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Magdalena; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Raab, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are integral functioning parts of plant root systems and are widely recognized for enhancing contaminants uptake and metabolism on severely disturbed sites. However, the patterns of their influence on the phytoremediation of iron-cyanide (Fe-CN) complexes are unknown. Fe-CN complexes are of great common interest, as iron is one of the most abundant element in soil and water. Effect of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) roots inoculation, using mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis and a mixture of R. irregularis, Funneliformis mosseae, Rhizophagus aggregatus, and Claroideoglomus etunicatum), on iron-cyanide sorption was studied. Results indicated significantly higher colonization of R. irregularis than the mixture of AMF species on ryegrass roots. Series of batch experiments using potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) solutions, in varying concentrations revealed significantly higher reduction of total CN and free CN content in the mycorrhizal roots, indicating greater cyanide decrease in the treatment inoculated with R. irregularis. Our study is a first indication of the possible positive contribution of AM fungi on the phytoremediation of iron-cyanide complexes. PMID:27256319

  12. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and two levels of compost supply on nutrient uptake and flowering of pelargonium plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Henrike; Schwarz, Dietmar; Bruns, Christian; Mäder, Paul; George, Eckhard

    2007-07-01

    Two challenges frequently encountered in the production of ornamental plants in organic horticulture are: (1) the rate of mineralization of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from organic fertilizers can be too slow to meet the high nutrient demand of young plants, and (2) the exclusive use of peat as a substrate for pot-based plant culture is discouraged in organic production systems. In this situation, the use of beneficial soil microorganisms in combination with high quality compost substrates can contribute to adequate plant growth and flower development. In this study, we examined possible alternatives to highly soluble fertilizers and pure peat substrates using pelargonium (Pelargonium peltatum L'Her.) as a test plant. Plants were grown on a peat-based substrate with two rates of compost addition and with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Inoculation with three different commercial AM inocula resulted in colonization rates of up to 36% of the total root length, whereas non-inoculated plants remained free of root colonization. Increasing the rate of compost addition increased shoot dry weight and shoot nutrient concentrations, but the supply of compost did not always completely meet plant nutrient demand. Mycorrhizal colonization increased the number of buds and flowers, as well as shoot P and potassium (K) concentrations, but did not significantly affect shoot dry matter or shoot N concentration. We conclude that addition of compost in combination with mycorrhizal inoculation can improve nutrient status and flower development of plants grown on peat-based substrates.

  13. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with desert ephemerals growing under and beyond the canopies of Tamarisk shrubs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zhaoyong; ZHANG Liyun; FENG Gu; Christie Peter; TIAN Changyan; LI Xiaolin

    2006-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal status of the four most common ephemeral plant species, Chorispora tenella (Pall.) DC., Ceratocephalus testiculatus (Crantz) Bess., Eremopyrum orientale (L.) Jaub et. Spash and Veronica campylopoda Boiss growing in an area dominated by Tamarisk shrubs (Tamarix spp.) was investigated.Samples of the four ephemerals and their rhizosphere soils were collected from underneath and beyond the canopies of the Tamarisk shrubs.Plant mycorrhizal status and soil AM fungal spore densities and community structures were analyzed and compared under and beyond the shrub canopies.The mycorrhizal colonization rates of the ephemerals and spore densities in their corresponding rhizosphere soils were significantly lower under the shrub canopies than beyond. The number of AM fungal species under the shrubs (12) was also lower than beyond the canopies (19). When soil properties in the rhizospheres of the four ephemerals were examined, available N and P and total P, organic matter content, total salt content and electrical conductivity (EC) were all higher under the canopies than beyond. In contrast, soil available K and pH showed no such trend. A total of 21 AM fungal species were isolated from rhizosphere soils of the four ephemerals. Five belonged to Acaulospora, one to Archaeospora, thirteen to Glomus and two to Paraglomus. We conclude that the canopies of Tamarix spp. exerted some influence on the AM status of the ephemerals and on the AM fungal communities and some of the properties of their rhizosphere soils.

  14. Yield and yield components of hybrid corn (Zea mays L.) as affected by mycorrhizal symbiosis and zinc sulfate under drought stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sajedi, N. A.; M. R. Ardakani; Rejali, F.; Mohabbati, F.; Miransari, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    With respect to the significance of improving hybrid corn performance under stress, this experiment was conducted at the Islamic Azad University, Arak Branch, Iran. A complete randomized block design with three levels of irrigations (at 100%, 75% and 50% crop water requirement), two levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glumus intraradisis) (including control), and three levels of zinc (Zn) sulfate (0, 25 and 45 kg ha−1), was performed. Results of the 2-year experiments indicated that ...

  15. Micorrizas arbusculares del tipo 'Arum' y 'Paris' y endófitos radicales septados oscuros en Miconia ioneura y Tibouchina paratropica (Melastomataceae 'Arum' and 'Paris' arbuscular mycorrhizal types and dark septate root endophytes in Miconia ioneura and Tibouchina paratropica (Melastomataceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Urcelay

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la colonización de las raíces por simbiontes fúngicos en Miconia ioneura y Tibouchina paratropica (Melastomataceae. Se observaron y describen estructuras micorrícicas arbusculares pertenecientes a los tipos 'Paris' (hifas y rulos intracelulares y 'Arum' (hifas intercelulares y arbúsculos. Además se observaron endófitos septados oscuros (hifas y esclerocios. Se registra por primera vez la ocurrencia de ambos tipos micorrícicos arbusculares y de endófitos septados oscuros en raíces de especies pertenecientes a la familia Melastomataceae. Se discuten las implicancias ecológicas y evolutivas de la ocurrencia simultánea de los distintos tipos de colonización micorrícica en raíces de la misma especie.The roots of Miconia ioneura and Tibouchina paratropica (Melastomataceae were studied for fungal symbionts colonization. Typical structures of 'Paris' (intracellular hyphae and coils and 'Arum' (intercellular hyphae and arbuscules arbuscular mycorrhizal types were observed and are described here. Dark septate fungi (hyphae and sclerotia were also observed. The occurrence of both types of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation and dark septate fungi in the roots of species belonging to Melastomataceae is reported for the first time. The possible ecological and evolutionary implications of the co-occurrence of these mycorrhizal colonisation types in the same species are discussed.

  16. Hyphal N transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus associated with cucumber grown at three nitrogen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    mg N which were applied gradually to the RC during the experiment. N-15 was supplied to HC(A) 42 d after planting, at 50 mg (NH4+)-N-15-N kg-1 soil. Lateral movement of the applied N-15 towards the roots was minimized by using a nitrification inhibitor and a hyphal buffer compartment. Non......Cucumis sativus L. cv. Aminex (F1 hybrid) was grown alone or in symbiosis with Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith in containers with two hyphal compartments (HC(A) and HC(B)) on either side of a root compartment (RC) separated by fine nylon mesh. Plants received a total of either 100, 200 or 400......-mycorrhizal controls contained only traces of N-15 after a 27 d labelling period irrespective of the amount of N supplied to the RC. In contrast, 49, 48 and 27% of the ap lied N-15 was recovered in mycorrhizal plants supplied with 100, 200 and 400 mg N, respectively. The plant dry weight was increased by mycorrhizal...

  17. Action Mechanisms of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Phosphorus Uptake by Capsicum annuum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. SHARIF; N. CLAASSEN

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the action mechanisms of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in phosphorus (P) uptake of Capsicum annuum L.in a sterilized fossil Oxisol. Three P levels of 0,10 and 200 mg kg-1 soil (P0,P10 and P200,respectively) without and with AM fungal inoculation were applied as Ca(H2PO4)2·H2O.Shoot dry matter yields and shoot P uptake increased significantly (P > 0.05) by the inoculation of AM fungi at P0 and P10.Root length and P concentration in soil solution increased with the inoculation of AM fungi but the root:shoot ratio decreased or remained constant.Around 50% roots of inoculated plants were infected by AM and the external hyphae amounted to 20 m g-1 soil at P10 and P200.The hyphae surface area of the infected root cylinder amounted to 11 and 2 cm2 cm-2 root at P0 and P10,respectively.The increased P uptake of inoculated plants was mainly because of an up to 5 times higher P influx of the infected root.Model calculations showed that the root alone could not have achieved the measured P influx in both infected and non-infected roots.But the P influx for hyphae calculated by the model was even much higher than the measured one.The P uptake capacity of hyphae introduced in the model was too high.Model calculations further showed that the depletion zone around roots or hyphae was very narrow.In the case of the root only 7% of the soil volume would contribute P to the plant,while in the case of hyphae it would be 100%.The results together with the model calculations showed that the increased P uptake of AM inoculated plants could be explained partly by the increased P concentration in the soil solution and by the increased P absorbing surface area coming from the external hyphae.

  18. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Natural Biofertilizers: Let's Benefit from Past Successes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berruti, Andrea; Lumini, Erica; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bianciotto, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) constitute a group of root obligate biotrophs that exchange mutual benefits with about 80% of plants. They are considered natural biofertilizers, since they provide the host with water, nutrients, and pathogen protection, in exchange for photosynthetic products. Thus, AMF are primary biotic soil components which, when missing or impoverished, can lead to a less efficient ecosystem functioning. The process of re-establishing the natural level of AMF richness can represent a valid alternative to conventional fertilization practices, with a view to sustainable agriculture. The main strategy that can be adopted to achieve this goal is the direct re-introduction of AMF propagules (inoculum) into a target soil. Originally, AMF were described to generally lack host- and niche-specificity, and therefore suggested as agriculturally suitable for a wide range of plants and environmental conditions. Unfortunately, the assumptions that have been made and the results that have been obtained so far are often worlds apart. The problem is that success is unpredictable since different plant species vary their response to the same AMF species mix. Many factors can affect the success of inoculation and AMF persistence in soil, including species compatibility with the target environment, the degree of spatial competition with other soil organisms in the target niche and the timing of inoculation. Thus, it is preferable to take these factors into account when "tuning" an inoculum to a target environment in order to avoid failure of the inoculation process. Genomics and transcriptomics have led to a giant step forward in the research field of AMF, with consequent major advances in the current knowledge on the processes involved in their interaction with the host-plant and other soil organisms. The history of AMF applications in controlled and open-field conditions is now long. A review of biofertilization experiments, based on the use of AMF, has here

  19. Infectivity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Naturally Regenerating, Unmanaged and Clear-Cut Beech Forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.CLOSA; N.GOICOECHEA

    2011-01-01

    Clear-cutting, a management practice applied to many beech forests in the North of Spain, modifies microclimate and, consequently,the composition of the understory plant community in the disturbed areas. The objectives of this study were to assess if changes in the understory vegetation caused by altered light microclimate after clear-cutting affect the infectivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on herbaceous plant species in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forests naturally regenerating from clear-cutting and to test if the use of bioassays for studying the infectivity of native AMF could provide aseful information to improve the management of clear-cut areas.Three nearby beech forests in northwest Navarra, Spain, a region in the northwest part of the Pyrenees, were selected: an unmanaged forest, a forest clear-cut in 1996, and another forest clear-cut in 2001. High stem density in the forest clear-cut in 1996 (44 000 trees ha-1) attenuated photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and impaired the growth of herbaceous species within the ecosystem. The percentage of AMF colonization of plants in bioassays performed on soil samples collected from the forest clear-cut in 1996 was always lower than 10%. In the forest clear-cut in 2001, where soil was covered by perennial grasses, PAR was high and thc infectivity of native AMF achieved minimum values in spring and autumn and a maximum value in summer. In contrast, the infectivity of native AMF in the umnanaged forest remained similar across the seasons. Our results demonstrated that changes in the composition of understory vegetation within beech forests strongly affected the infectivity of native AMF in clear-cut areas and suggested that the assessment of the infectivity of native AMF through bioassays could provide helpful information for planning either the removal of overstory when the tree density is so high that it impairs the correct development of herbaceous species or the plantation of new sesdlings when high

  20. Ecological specialization in mycorrhizal symbiosis leads to rarity in an endangered orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarts, Nigel D; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Francis, Anthony; Dixon, Kingsley W

    2010-08-01

    Terrestrial orchid germination, growth and development are closely linked to the establishment and maintenance of a relationship with a mycorrhizal fungus. Mycorrhizal dependency and specificity varies considerably between orchid taxa but the degree to which this underpins rarity in orchids is unknown. In the context of examining orchid rarity, large scale in vitro and in situ germination trials complemented by DNA sequencing were used to investigate ecological specialization in the mycorrhizal interaction of the rare terrestrial orchid Caladenia huegelii. Common and widespread sympatric orchid congeners were used for comparative purposes. Germination trials revealed an absolute requirement for mycorrhisation with compatibility barriers to germination limiting C. huegelii to a highly specific and range limited, efficacious mycorrhizal fungus. DNA sequencing confirmed fidelity between orchid and fungus across the distribution range of C. huegelii and at key life history stages within its life cycle. It was also revealed that common congeners could swap or share fungal partners including the fungus associated with the rare orchid but not vice versa. Data from this study provides evidence for orchid rarity as a cause and consequence of high mycorrhizal specialization. This interaction must be taken into account in efforts to mitigate the significant extinction risk for this species from anthropogenically induced habitat change and illustrates the importance of understanding fungal specificity in orchid ecology and conservation.

  1. Upscaling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Related Agroecosystems Services in Smallholder Farming Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Marjorie Bonareri Oruru; Ezekiel Mugendi Njeru

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming systems form unique ecosystems that can protect beneficial soil biota and form an important source of useful genetic resources. They are characterized by high level of agricultural diversity mainly focused on meeting farmers’ needs. Unfortunately, these systems often experience poor crop production mainly associated with poor planning and resource scarcity. Soil fertility is among the primary challenges faced by smallholder farmers, which necessitate the need to come up wi...

  2. Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae on growth and metal uptake by four plant species in copper mine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B.D. [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China)]. E-mail: bdchen@rcees.ac.cn; Zhu, Y.-G. [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Duan, J. [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Xiao, X.Y. [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Smith, S.E. [Centre for Soil-Plant Interactions, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2007-05-15

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the potential role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in encouraging revegetation of copper (Cu) mine tailings. Two native plant species, Coreopsis drummondii and Pteris vittata, together with a turf grass, Lolium perenne and a leguminous plant Trifolium repens associated with and without AMF Glomus mosseae were grown in Cu mine tailings to assess mycorrhizal effects on plant growth, mineral nutrition and metal uptake. Results indicated that symbiotic associations were successfully established between G. mosseae and all plants tested, and mycorrhizal colonization markedly increased plant dry matter yield except for L. perenne. The beneficial impacts of mycorrhizal colonization on plant growth could be largely explained by both improved P nutrition and decreased shoot Cu, As and Cd concentrations. The experiment provided evidence for the potential use of local plant species in combination with AMF for ecological restoration of metalliferous mine tailings. - This study demonstrated that AM associations can encourage plant survival in Cu mine tailings.

  3. ROLE OF MYCORRHIZAL SYMBIOSIS IN GROWTH AND SALT AVOIDANCE OF PISTACHIO PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    M.H. Shamshiri; Pourizadi, F.; Karimi, H. R.

    2014-01-01

    In a greenhouse experiment, plant growth and rates of uptake and root to shoot transport of chloride and sodium were investigated in seedlings of pistachio ( Pistacia vera cv. Badami-Riz-Zarand) inoculated with Glomus mosseae and exposed for 21 and 42 days with four salinity levels (0.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0 dSm -1). Mycorrhizal (+M) plants maintained greater root and shoot biomass at all salinity levels compared to non-mycorrhizal (-M) plants. In -M plants, salt intensity had no significant effe...

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Per [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jakobsen, Iver [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: iver.jakobsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-15

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock.

  5. Uso de vermicomposto favorece o crescimento de mudas de gravioleira (Annona muricata L. 'Morada' associadas a fungos micorrízicos arbusculares Use of earthworm manure improves growth of soursop seedlings (Annona muricata L. 'Morada' associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Karla Alves da Silva

    2008-09-01

    melhorar a qualidade do solo, contribuindo para a produção sustentável de mudas desta e de outras fruteiras.Annona muricata L. (soursop easily adapts to irrigation in the semiarid Northeast. The economically important fruits have high exportation potential, so production has been encouraged. The use of organic amendments, together with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF may be useful for production of seedlings. However, the effect of such amendments on the symbiosis established between AMF and soursop remains unknown. The effect of AMF multiplied in a substrate with earthworm manure on the formation of A. muricata seedlings maintained in fertilized substrate was investigated. The experimental design was entirely random, in a factorial of 2×5 = 2 substrates (with or without 10% organic manure and five inoculation treatments (Acaulospora longula Spain & Schenck and Gigaspora albida Schenck & Smith, produced in substrates with or without organic residue and an uninoculated control, with four replicates. After 102 days, dry mass of shoots and roots, height, growth rate, production of AMF spores and glomalin, soil enzymatic activity, microbial respiration, total, arbuscular and hyphal colonization were evaluated. In general, seedling growth was stimulated by the inoculation with AMF, but in the fertilized soil, growth of seedlings in symbiosis with G. albida was not benefited. The use of organic fertilizer stimulated mycorrhizal colonization, microbial respiration, enzymatic activity and glomalin production, but inhibited A. longula sporulation. The application of AMF and organic manure may constitute an alternative for production of Annona muricata, since it reduced by half the period for seedling formation, and can reduce by 75% the dose of fertilizer to be applied. However, the choice of AMF compatible with the host is needed to assure positive results. The combination of both, AMF and organic amendment, can also improve soil quality, thus contributing to sustainable

  6. Improvement of the soil nitrogen content and maize growth by earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soils polluted by oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia; Wang, Chong; Ji, Dingge

    2016-11-15

    Interactions between earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus intraradices, AM fungi) have been suggested to improve the maize nitrogen (N) content and biomass and were studied in soils polluted by oxytetracycline (OTC). Maize was planted and amended with AMF and/or earthworms (E) in the soil with low (1mgkg(-1) soil DM) or high (100mgkg(-1) soil DM) amounts of OTC pollution in comparison to soil without OTC. The root colonization, shoot and root biomass, shoot and root N contents, soil nitrogen forms, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) were measured at harvest. The results indicated that OTC decreased maize shoot and root biomass (pfungi on the urease activity in soil polluted by OTC (pfungi could increase the maize biomass and N content (pfungi and earthworms interactively increased maize shoot and root biomass (pfungi could be used as an efficient method to relieve the OTC stress in agro-ecosystems. PMID:27496075

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation of contaminated areas by trace elements: mechanisms and major benefits of their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Lucélia; Soares, Claúdio Roberto Fonsêca Sousa; Giachini, Admir José; Siqueira, José Oswaldo

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, the concentration of trace elements has increased in soil and water, mainly by industrialization and urbanization. Recovery of contaminated areas is generally complex. In that respect, microorganisms can be of vital importance by making significant contributions towards the establishment of plants and the stabilization of impacted areas. Among the available strategies for environmental recovery, bioremediation and phytoremediation outstand. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered the most important type of mycorrhizae for phytoremediation. AMF have broad occurrence in contaminated soils, and evidences suggest they improve plant tolerance to excess of certain trace elements. In this review, the use of AMF in phytoremediation and mechanisms involved in their trace element tolerance are discussed. Additionally, we present some techniques used to study the retention of trace elements by AMF, as well as a summary of studies showing major benefits of AMF for phytoremediation.

  8. In vivo 31 P NMR Spectroscopy for the study of P Pools and their Dynamics in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Nanna

    The main objective of the studies described in the present P1i.D. thesis was to investigate the phospbate (P) metabolism of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi by in viv0 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. P is an essential nutrient for all organisms. It is required in relatively...... of AM fungi used included Scutellospora caloJpora, G. mosseae and Gigaspora rosea. The cucumber plants were grown in a central mesh-bag, which prevents root penetration but allow free passage of AM fungal hyphae. Tbe extraradical mycelium grew into sand surrounding the mesh-bag and could be collected...... from the sand, while root matenal could be collected from the mesh-bag. A circulation system was constructed for oxygenating the excised hyphae or roots while in the NMR tube. Both the efficiency of P, uptake and the turn-over of P metabolites by excised hyphae were investigated in order to clarify the...

  9. Effect of different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth and physiology of maize at ambient and low temperature regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Fulai;

    2014-01-01

    The effect of four different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the growth and lipid peroxidation, soluble sugar, proline contents, and antioxidant enzymes activities of Zea mays L. was studied in pot culture subjected to two temperature regimes. Maize plants were grown in pots filled...... with a mixture of sandy and black soil for 5 weeks, and then half of the plants were exposed to low temperature for 1 week while the rest of the plants were grown under ambient temperature and severed as control. Different AMF resulted in different root colonization and low temperature significantly decreased AM...... colonization. Low temperature remarkably decreased plant height and total dry weight but increased root dry weight and root-shoot ratio. The AM plants had higher proline content compared with the non-AM plants. The maize plants inoculated with Glomus etunicatum and G. intraradices had higher malondialdehyde...

  10. SymGRASS: a database of sugarcane orthologous genes involved in arbuscular mycorrhiza and root nodule symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The rationale for gathering information from plants procuring nitrogen through symbiotic interactions controlled by a common genetic program for a sustainable biofuel production is the high energy demanding application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. We curated sequence information publicly available for the biofuel plant sugarcane, performed an analysis of the common SYM pathway known to control symbiosis in other plants, and provide results, sequences and literature links as an online database. Methods Sugarcane sequences and informations were downloaded from the nucEST database, cleaned and trimmed with seqclean, assembled with TGICL plus translating mapping method, and annotated. The annotation is based on BLAST searches against a local formatted plant Uniprot90 generated with CD-HIT for functional assignment, rpsBLAST to CDD database for conserved domain analysis, and BLAST search to sorghum's for Gene Ontology (GO) assignment. Gene expression was normalized according the Unigene standard, presented as ESTs/100 kb. Protein sequences known in the SYM pathway were used as queries to search the SymGRASS sequence database. Additionally, antimicrobial peptides described in the PhytAMP database served as queries to retrieve and generate expression profiles of these defense genes in the libraries compared to the libraries obtained under symbiotic interactions. Results We describe the SymGRASS, a database of sugarcane orthologous genes involved in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and root nodule (RN) symbiosis. The database aggregates knowledge about sequences, tissues, organ, developmental stages and experimental conditions, and provides annotation and level of gene expression for sugarcane transcripts and SYM orthologous genes in sugarcane through a web interface. Several candidate genes were found for all nodes in the pathway, and interestingly a set of symbiosis specific genes was found. Conclusions The knowledge integrated in SymGRASS may guide studies on

  11. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Glomus spp. Inoculation on Alfalfa Growth in Soils with Copper Efecto de la Inoculación con Hongos Micorrízicos Arbusculares Glomus spp. sobre el Crecimiento de Alfalfa en Suelos con Cobre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Novoa M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soils near mining centers usually have high heavy metal (HM levels. It has been found that some plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF improve growth and tolerance to HM in soils. This symbiosis is a biological resource for degraded soil recovery. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inoculating AMF (Glomus spp. on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. growth in agricultural soils with different copper (Cu levels for degraded soil recovery. To this effect, alfalfa seeds were grown in soils from the Catemu and Casablanca valleys and inoculated with AMF. Plant height, stem diameter, and number of leaves were measured weekly. Dry matter, mycorrhizal colonization, and Cu concentration in alfalfa plant tissues were measured after 81 days. Inoculation increased plant height by 24%, stem diameter by 11%, and number of leaves by 34%. Inoculation had a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05 on alfalfa plants that were grown in soil with the highest Cu concentration, but had no effect on Cu accumulation in alfalfa plant tissues. A direct relationship was observed between Cu accumulation in alfalfa and Cu concentration in soils. It was concluded that alfalfa inoculated with Glomus spp. is applicable to the soil recovery process whenever soil properties can ensure inoculum effectiveness on alfalfa growth, and avoid toxicity by excessive Cu in alfalfa plant tissues.Los suelos cercanos a centros de actividad minera suelen presentar altos niveles de metales pesados (HM. Se ha encontrado que algunas plantas asociadas a hongos micorrízicos arbusculares (AMF mejoran su crecimiento y tolerancia a los HM presentes en los suelos. Esta simbiosis constituye un recurso biológico para la recuperación de suelos degradados. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el efecto de la inoculación con AMF (Glomus spp. sobre el crecimiento de alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. en suelos agrícolas con distintos niveles de cobre (Cu para la recuperación de

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization of Glycyrrhiza glabra roots enhances plant biomass, phosphorus uptake and concentration of root secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongLing LIU; Yong TAN; Monika NELL; Karin ZITTER-EGLSEER; Chris WAWSCRAH; Brigitte KOPP; ShaoMing WANG; Johannes NOVAK

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi penetrate the cortical cells of the roots of vascular plants, and are widely distributed in soil. The formation of these symbiotic bodies accelerates the absorption and utilization of min-eral elements, enhances plant resistance to stress, boosts the growth of plants, and increases the survival rate of transplanted seedlings. We studied the effects of various arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi on the growth and devel-opment of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra). Several species of AM, such as Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices, and a mixture of fungi (G. mosseae, G. intraradices, G. cladoideum, G. microagregatum, G. caledonium and G. etunica-tum) were used in our study. Licorice growth rates were determined by measuring the colonization rate of the plants by the fungi, plant dry biomass, phosphorus concentration and concentration of secondary metabolites. We estab-lished two cloned strains of licorice, clone 3 (C3) and clone 6 (C6) to exclude the effect of genotypic variations. Our results showed that the AM fungi could in fact increase the leaf and root biomass, as well as the phosphorus con-centration in each clone. Furthermore, AM fungi significantly increased the yield of certain secondary metabolites in clone 3. Our study clearly demonstrated that AM fungi play an important role in the enhancement of growth and development of licorice plants. There was also a significant improvement in the secondary metabolite content and yield of medicinal compounds from the roots.

  13. Alterations of the Antioxidant Enzyme Activities are not General Characteristics of the Colonization Process by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Alteraciones de las Actividades de Enzimas Antioxidantes no son Características Generales del Proceso de Colonización por Hongos Micorrízicos Arbusculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakelin Rodríguez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant system is involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, but its role during the colonization process is still poorly understood. To gain new insights into the role of antioxidant system during root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, the activities of key antioxidant enzymes were evaluated in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. roots inoculated with six strains of different genera and species: two Glomus mosseae, Glomus cubense, Glomus intraradices, Glomus sp. and Acaulospora scrobiculata. Glomus cubense and A. scrobiculata strains reached the highest infectivity levels with maximum values of colonization frequency and intensity of 29-10.88% and 18-9.20%, respectively; G. mosseae strains showed an intermediate infectivity, both with 15% of colonization frequency and maximum intensities of 7.647.06%, respectively; while the infectivity levels of Glomus sp. and G. intraradices strains were the lowest with colonization frequency- 13% and intensities- 5.07 and 5.41, respectively. Some activity patterns of peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and polyphenol oxidase enzymes were not specific for early or late colonization stages neither for the colonization level and type of strain. However, a unique superoxide dismutase-band presents at early colonization and the low level of guaiacol-peroxidase activity at later stages presents in all inoculated roots indicate that these antioxidant responses are independent of colonization degree and strain. Taking together, our data suggest that alterations of the antioxidant enzyme activities are not general characteristics of the colonization process by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, probably having the key role on those responses the specific feature of each strain rather than colonization per se.El sistema antioxidante está involucrado en la simbiosis micorrízico-arbuscular, pero su rol durante el proceso de colonización es aún escasamente comprendido. Para esclarecer el papel del sistema

  14. Effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on availability of soil phosphorus and growth of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Mau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A glasshouse experiment was conducted to study the interactive effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF inoculation on phosphorus uptake by maize (Zea mayze L. grown on a calcareous soil of Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara. The biochar was made of cow dung. Twelve treatment combinations (three biochars levels of 0, 5 and 7.5 g/kg of soil, and four AMF inoculation levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 spores / kg of soil were arranged in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Results of the study showed that at 8 weeks after transplanting, the biochar and mycorrhizal treatments increased the availability soil phosphorus and phosphorus uptake by maize. Application 4.5 and 7.5 g biochar/kg of soil combined with inoculation of 10-15 AMF spores / kg of soil provided to high value of phosphorus uptake by maize. Application of biochar alone, however, did not significantly improve maize growth and phosphorus uptake by maize

  15. Effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on availability of soil phosphorus and growth of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Mau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A glasshouse experiment was conducted to study the interactive effects of biochar amendment and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF inoculation on phosphorus uptake by maize (Zea mayze L. grown on a calcareous soil of Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara. The biochar was made of cow dung. Twelve treatment combinations (three biochars levels of 0, 5 and 7.5 g/kg of soil, and four AMF inoculation levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 spores / kg of soil were arranged in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Results of the study showed that at 8 weeks after transplanting, the biochar and mycorrhizal treatments increased the availability soil phosphorus and phosphorus uptake by maize. Application 4.5 and 7.5 g biochar/kg of soil combined with inoculation of 10-15 AMF spores / kg of soil provided to high value of phosphorus uptake by maize. Application of biochar alone, however, did not significantly improve maize growth and phosphorus uptake by maize.

  16. Evaluation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Capacity to Alleviate Abiotic Stress of Olive (Olea europaea L.) Plants at Different Transplant Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompadre, María Josefina; Pérgola, Mariana; Fernández Bidondo, Laura; Colombo, Roxana Paula; Silvani, Vanesa Analía; Pardo, Alejandro Guillermo; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Godeas, Alicia Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of roots to sense soil physicochemical parameters plays an essential role in maintaining plant nutritional and developmental functions under abiotic stress. These conditions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues causing oxidation of proteins and lipids among others. Some plants have developed adaptive mechanisms to counteract such adverse conditions such as symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). AMF enhance plant growth and improve transplant survival by protecting host plants against environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alleviation of transplanting stress by two strains of Rhizophagus irregularis (GC2 and GA5) in olive. Our results show that olive plants have an additional energetic expense in growth due to an adaptative response to the growing stage and to the mycorrhizal colonization at the first transplant. However, at the second transplant the coinoculation improves olive plant growth and protects against oxidative stress followed by the GA5-inoculation. In conclusion, a combination of two AMF strains at the beginning of olive propagation produces vigorous plants successfully protected in field cultivation even with an additional cost at the beginning of growth. PMID:24688382

  17. Response of Solanum melongena L. to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi under Low and High Phosphate Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan AZIZ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Solanum melongena L. a medicinally and economically important crop plants were grown in polythene bags. The effect of mycorrhizal inoculation (Glomus mosseae and increasing phosphate levels on the expression of the photosynthetic activity in terms of chlorophyll content. Antioxidant enzymes like peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, root acid and alkaline phosphatase activity of Solanum melongena were evaluated. The experimental design was entirely at CRBD with eight treatments with three levels of phosphate (50,100,150 mg kg-1 of soil. Root colonization ranged from 50.33% to 67.33% . The activity of the studied antioxidant enzymes were found to be increased in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM Solanum plants. Root phosphatase activity was greater in 100 and 150 mg phosphate level in AM treated than non AM treated Solanum plants. Besides, only AM treated plants of Solanum reflected increase in total chlorophyll content as compared to non AM plants. This work suggests that the mycorrhiza helps Solanum plants to perform better in low and high phosphate level by enhancing antioxidant enzyme activity, acid and alkaline phosphatase activity and total chlorophyll content.

  18. Associations of dominant plant species with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi during vegetation development on coal mine spoil banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydlova, J.; Vosatka, M. [Academy of Science. Pruhonice (Czech Republic). Inst. of Botany

    2001-07-01

    Among plants colonizing mine spoil banks in Northern Bohemia the first colonizers, mainly ruderal annuals from Chenopodiaceae and Brassicaceae were found not to be associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These species cultivated in pots with soil from four sites in different succession stages of the spoil bank did not respond to the presence of native or non-native AMF. All grass species studied (Elytrigia repens, Calamagrostis epigejos and Arrhenatherum elatius) were found moderately colonized in the field. Carduus acanthoides was found to be highly colonized in the field; however, it did not show growth response to AMF in the pot experiment. The AMF native in four sites on the spoil banks showed high infectivity but low effectiveness in association with colonizing plants compared to the non-native isolate G. fistulosum BEG23. In general, dependence on AMF in the cultivation experiment was rather low, regardless of the fact that plants were found to be associated with AMF either in the field or in pots. Occurrence and effectiveness of mycorrhizal associations might relate primarily to the mycotrophic status of each plant species rather than to the age of the spoil bank sites studied.

  19. Differences in the composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities promoted by different propagule forms from a Mediterranean shrubland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Cervero, Sara; López-García, Álvaro; Barea, José Miguel; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción

    2016-07-01

    As it is well known, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization can be initiated from the following three types of fungal propagules: spores, extraradical mycelium (ERM), and mycorrhizal root fragments harboring intraradical fungal structures. It has been shown that biomass allocation of AM fungi (AMF) among these three propagule types varies between fungal taxa, as also differs the ability of the different AMF propagule fractions to initiate new colonizations. In this study, the composition of the AMF community in the roots of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L., a characteristic Mediterranean shrub), inoculated with the three different propagule types, was analyzed. Accordingly, cuttings from this species were inoculated with either AMF spores, ERM, or colonized roots extracted from a natural soil. The AMF diversity within the rosemary roots was characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the small subunit (SSU) rDNA region. The AMF community established in the rosemary plants was significantly different according to the type of propagule used as inoculum. AMF taxa differed in their ability to initiate new colonizations from each propagule type. Results suggest different colonization strategies for the different AMF families involved, Glomeraceae and Claroideoglomeraceae colonizing mainly from colonized roots whereas Pacisporaceae and Diversisporaceae from spores and ERM. This supports that AMF taxa show contrasting life-history strategies in terms of their ability to initiate new colonizations from the different propagule types. Further research to fully understand the colonization and dispersal abilities of AMF is essential for their rational use in ecosystem restoration programs. PMID:26883142

  20. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae gives contradictory effects on phosphorus and arsenic acquisition by Medicago sativa Linn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Baodong [Department of Soil Environmental Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Xiao Xueyi [Department of Soil Environmental Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu Yongguan [Department of Soil Environmental Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)]. E-mail: ygzhu@rcees.ac.en; Smith, F. Andrew [Soil and Land Systems, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Miao Xie, Z. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Smith, Sally E. [Soil and Land Systems, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2007-07-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi may play an important role in protecting plants against arsenic (As) contamination. However, little is known about the direct and indirect involvement of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in detoxification mechanisms. A compartmented pot cultivation system ('cross-pots') is used here to investigate the roles of AMF Glomus mosseae in plant phosphorus (P) and As acquisition by Medicago sativa, and P-As interactions. The results indicate that fungal colonization dramatically increased plant dry weight by a factor of around 6, and also substantially increased both plant P and As contents (i.e. total uptake). Irrespective of P and As addition levels, AM plants had shoot and root P concentrations 2 fold higher, but As concentrations significantly lower, than corresponding uninoculated controls. The decreased shoot As concentrations were largely due to 'dilution effects' that resulted from stimulated growth of AM plants and reduced As partitioning to shoots. The study provides further evidence for the protective effects of AMF on host plants against As contamination, and have uncovered key aspects of underlying mechanisms. The possible application of AMF in remediation practices is discussed.

  1. Evaluation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi capacity to alleviate abiotic stress of olive (Olea europaea L.) plants at different transplant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompadre, María Josefina; Pérgola, Mariana; Fernández Bidondo, Laura; Colombo, Roxana Paula; Silvani, Vanesa Analía; Pardo, Alejandro Guillermo; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Godeas, Alicia Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of roots to sense soil physicochemical parameters plays an essential role in maintaining plant nutritional and developmental functions under abiotic stress. These conditions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues causing oxidation of proteins and lipids among others. Some plants have developed adaptive mechanisms to counteract such adverse conditions such as symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). AMF enhance plant growth and improve transplant survival by protecting host plants against environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alleviation of transplanting stress by two strains of Rhizophagus irregularis (GC2 and GA5) in olive. Our results show that olive plants have an additional energetic expense in growth due to an adaptative response to the growing stage and to the mycorrhizal colonization at the first transplant. However, at the second transplant the coinoculation improves olive plant growth and protects against oxidative stress followed by the GA5-inoculation. In conclusion, a combination of two AMF strains at the beginning of olive propagation produces vigorous plants successfully protected in field cultivation even with an additional cost at the beginning of growth.

  2. Evaluation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Capacity to Alleviate Abiotic Stress of Olive (Olea europaea L. Plants at Different Transplant Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Josefina Bompadre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of roots to sense soil physicochemical parameters plays an essential role in maintaining plant nutritional and developmental functions under abiotic stress. These conditions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS in plant tissues causing oxidation of proteins and lipids among others. Some plants have developed adaptive mechanisms to counteract such adverse conditions such as symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. AMF enhance plant growth and improve transplant survival by protecting host plants against environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alleviation of transplanting stress by two strains of Rhizophagus irregularis (GC2 and GA5 in olive. Our results show that olive plants have an additional energetic expense in growth due to an adaptative response to the growing stage and to the mycorrhizal colonization at the first transplant. However, at the second transplant the coinoculation improves olive plant growth and protects against oxidative stress followed by the GA5-inoculation. In conclusion, a combination of two AMF strains at the beginning of olive propagation produces vigorous plants successfully protected in field cultivation even with an additional cost at the beginning of growth.

  3. Leaf δ15N as an indicator of arbuscular mycorrhizal nitrogen uptake in a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardegan, S. F.; Valadares, R.; Martinelli, L.

    2013-12-01

    Restinga diversity contrasts with a series of adverse environmental conditions that constrain their development, including nutrient limitation. In this sense, the mutualistic symbiosis between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may contribute in nutrient acquisition, including nitrogen. However, this association deeply affects plant nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N), since assimilation processes and biochemical reactions within the fungi may reflect in a delivered product with an isotopic composition about 8 to 10 ‰ lower than that observed at the fungal symbiont per se. Here we assessed if the association with AMF affects δ15N values of plant species from a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at Southeastern Brazil. Accordingly, we analyzed the nutritional and isotopic compositions from ecosystem key-compartments (soil, litter and leaves), relating plant δ15N with the colonization rates. The study was carried out in a permanent plot (1 ha) at a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at the Serra do Mar State Park, SP, Brazil. Sampled vegetation is characterized by the lack of a well-defined stratification and a rather open canopy. It also comprises trees ranging from 10 to 15-m high. Soils are deep and sandy, being characterized by high acidity, nutrient deficiency and a dense litter cover. We randomly collected five samples (250 mg) from topsoil (0-10 cm) and five to ten leaves from individuals belonging to 16 plant species of high relevance within the site (IVI index). We also collected superficial (0-10 cm depth) fine roots (5 g) and 13 samples (100 g) of fine litter next to the individuals sampled. Soil samples were air-dried, sieved, homogenized and used in the physical-chemical characterization. The remainder was ground to a fine powder to determine nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Leaves were dried at 50 °C, finely milled and used for the determination of nitrogen concentrations, C/N ratios and δ15N values. Root samples were

  4. Phosphate concentration and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation influence the growth, yield and expression of twelve PHT1 family phosphate transporters in foxtail millet (Setaria italica)

    OpenAIRE

    Antony Ceasar, S.; Angela Hodge; Alison Baker; Baldwin, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element which plays several key roles in all living organisms. Setaria italica (foxtail millet) is a model species for panacoid grasses including several millet species widely grown in arid regions of Asia and Africa, and for the bioenergy crop switchgrass. The growth responses of S. italica to different levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and to colonisation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae) were studied. Phosphat...

  5. General microflora, arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and occurrence of endophytes in the rhizosphere of two age groups of Ginkgo biloba L.of Indian Central Himalaya

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Shipra; Pandey, Anita

    2009-01-01

    The populations of the general microflora (bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi) in the rhizosphere and their corresponding non-rhizosphere soil samples of Ginkgo biloba L. of two age groups (Group A, 60 years-old trees) growing under a temperate location of Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) have been determined. Observations were also made for the diversity, distribution and colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and occurrence of endophytes in roots of G. biloba. The population of gener...

  6. Differences in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Community Composition in Soils of Three Land Use Types in Subtropical Hilly Area of Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Caihuan; Gu, Zhenhong; Cui, Hang; Zhu, Honghui; Fu, Shenlei; Yao, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Land use type is key factor in restoring the degraded soils due to its impact on soil chemical properties and microbial community. In this study, the influences of land use type on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community and soil chemical properties were assessed in a long-run experimental station in subtropical hilly area of southern China. Soil samples were collected from forest land, orchard and vegetable field. Soil chemical properties were analyzed, and PCR-DGGE was performed to ex...

  7. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus (AMF) and Humic Acid on the Growth of Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Plant and Root Rot Disease Caused by Phytophthora capsici Leonian

    OpenAIRE

    ASLANPAY, Burcu; Semra DEMİR

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of singular and double combinations of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and humic acid (HA) were investigated on the growth of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and rot root disease caused by Phytophthora capsici Leonian which has been known as an important problem of pepper cultivation and leading yield losses. Under controlled conditions, four F1 pepper cultivars (Ergenekon, Bafra, Sirena and Yıldız) were inoculated with three different AMF strains (Glomus intraradice...

  8. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphate fertilization on initial growth of six arboreal species of cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Alves Pereira Lacerda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the benefit of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Glomus clarum, for the initial growth of some native arboreal species of the Cerrado biome, namely gabiroba (Campomanesia cambessedeana, baru (Dipterix alata, jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril, ingá (Inga laurina, caroba (Jacaranda cuspidifolia and chichá (Sterculia striata, in unsterilized soil with low (0.02 mg L‑1 and high (0.2 mg L‑1 concentrations of P in the soil solution. Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse, using 1.5 kg vases, for up to 120 days. The experimental design for each arboreal species was completely randomized, with ten replicates in a 2x2 factorial design (inoculated and noninoculated seedlings, and two levels of phosphorus (P in the soil solution. Arboreal plants of the Cerrado biome showed increased mycorrhizal colonization from inoculation with Glomus clarum, except chichá, as this species showed a high indigenous colonization, not differing from the colonization promoted by inoculated fungi. Inoculation promoted increased growth in baru, gabiroba, ingá, caroba and chichá, increasing shoot dry matter (MSPA and root dry matter (MSR. In caroba, this effect was synergistic with application of P to the soil. Baru and jatobá showed increased dry matter with application of P to the soil only. The mycotrophy (mycorrhizal dependence of species and their response to inoculation and to phosphorus are discussed. In order to produce quality seedlings of caroba, gabiroba, chichá and ingá, combining inoculation with Glomus clarum and phosphate fertilization of the soil is recommended, while for jatobá and baru only the application of P to the soil is recommended.

  9. SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES AND GROWTH OF SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L. AS AFFECTED BY THE APPLICATION OF ORGANIC FERTILIZERS AND INOCULATION WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolino José Nogueira da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic fertilizers and the inoculation of mycorrhizal fungi in the cultivation of oil crops is essential to reduce production costs and minimize negative impacts on natural resources. A field experiment was conducted in an Argissolo Amarelo (Ultisol with the aim of evaluating the effects of fertilizer application and inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth attributes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. and on soil chemical properties. The experiment was conducted at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, using a randomized block design with three replicates in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement consisting of four treatments in regard to application of organic fertilizer (liquid biofertilizer, cow urine, mineral fertilizer, and unfertilized control and two treatments in regard to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (with and without mycorrhizal fungi. The results showed that the physiological attributes of relative growth rate and leaf weight ratio were positively influenced by fertilization, compared to the control treatment, likely brought about by the supply of nutrients from the fertilizers applied. The growth and productivity attributes were positively affected by mycorrhization.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal status of medicinal plants in Rajshahi University Campus%拉杰沙希大学校园药用植物菌根研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Forty different medicinal plants were investigated for arbuscular mycorrhizal association in the Rajshahi University Campus in Bangladesh.The results indicated that 35 different plants were infected by AM (arbuscular mycorrhizal)fungi as found by trypan blue staining procedure.The percentage of root colonization by AM fungi varied from 13.3% to 100%.Mangifera indica and Morus indica have maximum percentage of colonization(100%).The intensity of root colonization were abundant in the plants belonging to the families Anacardiaceae,Asclepiadaceae,Moraceae,Leguminosae and Apocynaceae whereas the intensity of colonization of crop roots were moderate and poor belonging to Gramineae and Leguminosae.The presence of greater number of spore in soil was always associated with the incidence of abundant mycelia.In plant roots the formation of spore and mycelia was restricted by low pH.Number of mycorrhizal fungus spores ranged between 35 to100 per 100g air dried soil in different family respective soils.The frequency of mycorrhizal fungus infection showed positive correlation with soil pH,moisture,water holding capacity,texture,total nitrogen,organic carbon,phosphorus,calcium,potassium,and magnesium.Especially phosphorus and nitrogen in the soil greatly influenced the plant root infection by AM fungi.

  11. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J.; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.;

    2015-01-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake...... fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter...... genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi...

  12. Plant 9-lox oxylipin metabolism in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ocampo, Juan A.; García Garrido, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal symbiotic interaction (MA) is a successful strategy to substantially promote plant growth, development and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the recognition and establishment of symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, the jasmonates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed upregulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and point a key regulatory feature for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly these derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX). In this mini-review we highlight recent progress understanding the function of oxylipins in the establishment of the AM symbiosis and hypothesize that the activation of the 9-LOX pathway might be part of the activation of host defense responses which will then contribute to both, the control of AM fungal spread and the increased resistance to fungal pathogens in mycorrhizal plants. PMID:23073021

  13. Consequences of inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for root colonization and survival of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis seedlings after transplanting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Bill E; Novak, Stephen J; Serpe, Marcelo D

    2016-08-01

    In arid environments, the propagule density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may limit the extent of the plant-AMF symbiosis. Inoculation of seedlings with AMF could alleviate this problem, but the success of this practice largely depends on the ability of the inoculum to multiply and colonize the growing root system after transplanting. These phenomena were investigated in Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) seedlings inoculated with native AMF. Seedlings were first grown in a greenhouse in soil without AMF (non-inoculated seedlings) or with AMF (inoculated seedlings). In spring and fall, 3-month-old seedlings were transplanted outdoors to 24-L pots containing soil from a sagebrush habitat (spring and fall mesocosm experiments) or to a recently burned sagebrush habitat (spring and fall field experiments). Five or 8 months after transplanting, colonization was about twofold higher in inoculated than non-inoculated seedlings, except for the spring field experiment. In the mesocosm experiments, inoculation increased survival during the summer by 24 % (p = 0.011). In the field experiments, increased AMF colonization was associated with increases in survival during cold and dry periods; 1 year after transplanting, survival of inoculated seedlings was 27 % higher than that of non-inoculated ones (p AMF increased survival, we analyzed water use efficiency (WUE) based on foliar (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios (δ (13)C). A positive correlation between AMF colonization and δ (13)C values was observed in the spring mesocosm experiment. In contrast, inoculation did not affect the δ (13)C values of fall transplanted seedlings that were collected the subsequent spring. The effectiveness of AMF inoculation on enhancing colonization and reducing seedling mortality varied among the different experiments, but average effects were estimated by meta-analyses. Several months after transplanting, average AMF colonization was in proportion 84

  14. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R. [Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Lab. de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, 62 - Calais (France)

    2005-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  15. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  16. Entrophospora schenckii and Pacispora franciscana, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota new for Europe and Poland, respectively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological properties of spores of Pacispora franciscana, as well as spores and mycorrhizae of Entrophospora schenckii, arbuscular fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota found for the first time in Poland and Europe, respectively, are described and illustrated. Additionally, the known distribution of the two fungi is presented.

  17. Succession of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a deflation hollow of the Słowiński National Park, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Tadych

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the years 1994-1995, the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM in eight successional stages of vegetation of a deflation hollow no. 12 of the Łeba Bar, Poland, was investigated. Early successional stages were colonized by members of the families Gramineae and Juncaceae, being gradually replaced by ericaceous plants in the middle and later stages and by trees in the most advanced stage corresponding to the Empetro nigri-Pinetum plant association. From the 96 soil samples collected, 21 species in three genera of AMF were recovered. The fungi most frequently found were members of the genus Acaulospora. The overall spore abundance, the species_ richness of AMF and the level of AM colonisation increased from stage 1 to reach a maximum in the middle stages and then gradually declined, being lowest in the forested stage 8. The values of the overall spore abundance and those of the abundances of the most frequently occurring AMF species strongly evidenced functioning in nature of the process of host-dependent differentiation of AMF communities. Of the five most numerously represented AMF species, the early colonizer and quickly diminishing in later successional stages was Glomus 107. The mid-late successor was A. koskei, and the latest - Glomus aggregatum. All measures of AMF presence negatively correlated with the content of organic C in the soil and most of them were negatively correlated with soil N-NO3 and P concentrations. In contrast, the occurrence of AMY and AM generally was positively correlated with soil pH and the K content of the soil.

  18. Eficiência de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares sobre o crescimento do porta-enxerto de pessegueiro 'aldrighi Efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth of 'aldrighi' peach tree rootstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis da Silva Nunes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou avaliar a eficiência de diferentes espécies de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs sobre o crescimento vegetativo e o conteúdo de nutrientes de plantas do porta-enxerto de pessegueiro (Prunus persica cv. Aldrighi. O experimento foi realizado no município de Eldorado do Sul (RS, entre 2004 e 2005. Foram utilizados quatro tratamentos de inoculação de estirpes de FMAs (Acaulospora sp. Trappe, Glomus clarum Nicol. & Schenck, Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerd e Scutellospora heterogama Nicol. & Gerd. e um tratamento testemunha, sem inoculação. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com 20 plantas por parcela e quatro repetições. A altura das plantas, o diâmetro do colo, a área foliar, as biomassas fresca e seca, o conteúdo em nutrientes e em substâncias da parte aérea e das raízes e a colonização das raízes foram avaliados aos 180 dias após a semeadura. O uso das espécies de FMAs beneficia o desenvolvimento de plantas do porta-enxerto cv. Aldrighi, e a eficiência da simbiose planta-FMAs é variável com a espécie de FMAs inoculada. As plantas submetidas à inoculação com S. heterogama e G. etunicatum destacaram-se das demais, com maior crescimento vegetativo e maiores teores de nitrogênio, fósforo e potássio nos tecidos.This work aimed to evaluate the eficiency of four species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the vegetative growth and the nutrient contents of peach tree rootstocks (Prunus persica cv. Aldrighi. The experiment was conducted at the Estação Experimental Agronômica (EEA of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Eldorado do Sul, RS, during 2004 and 2005. Four treatments of AMF inoculation strains (Acaulospora sp. Trappe, Glomus clarum Nicol. & Schenck, Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerd e Scutellospora heterogama Nicol. & Gerd. and one with non-inoculated plants were used. A randomized block design was used, with 20 plants per plot and four

  19. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation in combination with different organic fertilizers on maize crop in eroded soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of inoculating maize (Zea mays L. Azam) with Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in 2 different series of North West Pakistan during the year 2007. Data showed significant increase in shoots and roots yield of maize with the inoculation of AM fungi alone and in combination with farm yard manure (FYM), poultry manure (PM) and humic acid (HA) over control and N-P-K treatments. Accumulation of N by maize shoots increased significantly by the addition of HA, PM and FYM plus N-P-K with or without inoculation of AM fungi over the treatments of N-P-K and control. Plants P accumulation increased significantly over control and N-P-K treatments with the inoculation of AM fungi alone and in combination with FYM, PM and HA in missa soil series. In missa gullied soil series, significantly increased plants P accumulation was noted by the treatments of AM inoculation with PM followed by HA. Accumulation of Mn by maize shoots increased significantly with AM inoculation with HA and PM over all other treatments, Fe increased with PM, HA and FYM. Plants Cu accumulation in missa series increased significantly over control and N-P-K treatments by AM alone and in combination with PM, FYM and HA and by AM fungi with PM, FYM and HA in missa gullied series. Maximum Mycorrhizal root infection rate of 51 % was recorded in the treatment of AM fungal inoculation with HA followed by the treatment inoculated with AM fungi with FYM. In missa gullied soil series, Maximum (59 %) and significantly increased roots infection rates over all treatments were observed in the treatment of AM fungal inoculation with HA followed by PM. Spores concentrations of AM fungi increased significantly with AM inoculation alone and with FYM, PM and HA. Maximum spores numbers of 50 in 20 g soil were recorded by the inoculation of AM fungi alone and with HA. (author)

  20. [Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Ce Uptake of Maize Grown in Ce-contaminated Soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Guo, Weil; Ma, Peng-kun; Pan, Liang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-15

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus aggregatum (GA) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) on AM colonization rate, biomass, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric and Ce uptake and transport by maize (Zea mays L.) grown in soils with different levels of Ce-contaminated (100, 500 and 1000 mg x kg(-1)). The aim was to provide basic data and technical support for the treatment of soils contaminated by rare earth elements. The results indicated that symbiotic associations were successfully established between the two isolates and maize, and the average AM colonization rate ranged from 7. 12% to 74.47%. The increasing concentration of Ce in soils significantly decreased the mycorrhizal colonization rate, biomass, nutrition contents and transport rate of Ce from root to shoot of maize, and significantly increased C: P and N: P ratios and Ce contents in shoot and root of maize. Both AM fungi inoculations promoted the growth of maize, but the promoting role of FM was more significant than that of GA in severe Ce-contaminated soils. There were no significant differences in the growth of maize between two AM fungi in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils. Inoculation with AM fungi significantly improved nutritional status of maize by increasing nutrient uptake and decreasing C: N: P ratios. GA was more efficient than FM in enhancing nutrient uptake in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils, while FM was more efficient in severe Ce-contaminated soils. Moreover, inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased Ce contents of shoot and root in mild Ce-contaminated soils, but had no significant effect on Ce contents of maize in moderate and severe Ce-contaminated soils, and promoted the transport of Ce from root to shoot. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi can alleviate toxic effects of Ce on plants and have a potential role in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated by rare earth elements. PMID

  1. [Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Ce Uptake of Maize Grown in Ce-contaminated Soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Guo, Weil; Ma, Peng-kun; Pan, Liang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-15

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus aggregatum (GA) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) on AM colonization rate, biomass, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric and Ce uptake and transport by maize (Zea mays L.) grown in soils with different levels of Ce-contaminated (100, 500 and 1000 mg x kg(-1)). The aim was to provide basic data and technical support for the treatment of soils contaminated by rare earth elements. The results indicated that symbiotic associations were successfully established between the two isolates and maize, and the average AM colonization rate ranged from 7. 12% to 74.47%. The increasing concentration of Ce in soils significantly decreased the mycorrhizal colonization rate, biomass, nutrition contents and transport rate of Ce from root to shoot of maize, and significantly increased C: P and N: P ratios and Ce contents in shoot and root of maize. Both AM fungi inoculations promoted the growth of maize, but the promoting role of FM was more significant than that of GA in severe Ce-contaminated soils. There were no significant differences in the growth of maize between two AM fungi in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils. Inoculation with AM fungi significantly improved nutritional status of maize by increasing nutrient uptake and decreasing C: N: P ratios. GA was more efficient than FM in enhancing nutrient uptake in mild and moderate Ce-contaminated soils, while FM was more efficient in severe Ce-contaminated soils. Moreover, inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased Ce contents of shoot and root in mild Ce-contaminated soils, but had no significant effect on Ce contents of maize in moderate and severe Ce-contaminated soils, and promoted the transport of Ce from root to shoot. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi can alleviate toxic effects of Ce on plants and have a potential role in the phytoremediation of soils contaminated by rare earth elements.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal formation of crucifer leaf mustard induced by flavonoids apigenin and daidzein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Changjin; ZHAO Bin

    2004-01-01

    Flavonoids from legume root secretion may probably act as signal molecules for expression of Rhizobial "nod" nodulation genes and AM fungal symbiotic gene. Leaf mustard is a non-mycorrhizal plant; it does not contain fiavonoids and other signal molecules. AM fungi could not infect the roots of leaf mustard and form a symbiont in nature,when it was treated with fiavonoids (apigenin or daidzein).The results of trypan blue staining showed that two kinds of AM fungi (G. intraradices and G mosseae) successfully infected the roots of non-mycorrhizal plant leaf mustard. AM fungi grew towards and colonized the roots of leaf mustard,producing young spores and completing the course of life.AM fungi are the only one kind of fungi with ALP activity.The result of ALP staining has also proved that AM fungi infected successfully the roots of leaf mustard. AM fungi (G.intraradices and G. mosseae) that existed in the roots of non-mycorrhizal plant leaf mustard were probed by nested PCR and special molecular probes. The above-mentioned proof chains have fully proved that fiavonoids induced AM fungi (G. intraradices and G mosseae) to infect non-mycorrhizal plant and establish symbiotic relationship.

  3. Metabolic activity of Glomus intraradices in Arum- and Paris-type arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aarle, IM; Cavagnaro, TR; Smith, SE; Dickson, S

    2005-01-01

    Colonization of two plant species by Glomus intraradices was studied to investigate the two morphological types (Arum and Paris), their symbiotic interfaces and metabolic activities. Root pieces and sections were stained to observe the colonization and metabolic activity of all mycorrhizal structure

  4. Nitrogen and carbon/nitrogen dynamics in arbuscular mycorrhiza: the great unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, A; Cruz, C; Ferrol, N

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have established that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi transfer N to the host plant. However, the role and importance of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) in plant N nutrition is still uncertain, as are the C/N interactions within the symbiosis. Published reports provide differing, and often contradictory, results that are difficult to combine in a coherent framework. This review explores questions such as: What makes the difference between a positive and a negative effect of AM on plant N nutrition? Is the mycorrhizal N response (MNR) correlated to the mycorrhizal growth response (MGR), and how or under which conditions? Is the MNR effect on plant growth C mediated? Is plant C investment on fungal growth related to N needs or N benefit? How is the N for C trade between symbionts regulated? The patternless nature of current knowledge is made evident, and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  5. Changes in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Abundance and Community Structure in Response to the Long-Term Manipulation of Inorganic Nutrients in a Lowland Tropical Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Merlin; Rosenstock, Nicholas; Tanner, Ed

    2014-05-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is considered primarily mutualistic. In exchange for up to 30% of plants' total photosynthate, AM provide improved access to mineral nutrients. While there is evidence that AM fungi provide nitrogen, potassium and other nutrients to their host plants, most research has focused on their effect on plant phosphorus uptake. Pot experiments have shown, and field experiments have provided further support, that nutrient availability (primarily P, but also N) is inversely correlated with mycorrhizal colonization, indicating plant control over carbon losses to AM fungi. Yet pot experiments have also shown that some fungal species are more mutualistic than others and that AM colonization may cause decreased plant growth, suggesting that plant control is not absolute. AMF communities are diverse, and it is poorly understood how factors such as adaptation to local soil environment, fungal-plant compatibility, and plant nutrient status combine to shape AMF community structure. We conducted a study to examine the relative effects of N, P, and K addition on the AMF community in a plant species rich tropical forest, given the long-held belief that AMF are primarily involved in plant P uptake, particularly on weathered tropical soils. Our study site is the Barro Colorado Nature Monument in Panama. It is a 13 year-old factorial N, P, and K addition experiment (40 m x 40m plots; n=4) in an AMF dominated, old (>200 yr), secondary, tropical forest. Previous research has shown co-limitation by N, P, and K, but the strongest plant growth responses were obtained with K additions. We analyzed the AMF community using 454 pyrosequencing of the ribosomal small subunit (SSU) on both soils and the roots of the 6 dominant AMF tree species. Additionally, we used the AMF-specific neutral lipid fatty acid (NLFA) biomarker as a measure of AMF biomass. Both AMF biomass and community structure were altered by nutrient additions. AMF biomass in soil was reduced

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities along a pedo-hydrological gradient in a Central Amazonian terra firme forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Freitas, Rejane; Buscardo, Erika; Nagy, Laszlo; dos Santos Maciel, Alex Bruno; Carrenho, Rosilaine; Luizão, Regina C C

    2014-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to plant mutualistic interactions in the Amazon rainforest, and the general pattern of occurrence and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in these ecosystems is largely unknown. This study investigated AMF communities through their spores in soil in a 'terra firme forest' in Central Amazonia. The contribution played by abiotic factors and plant host species identity in regulating the composition, abundance and diversity of such communities along a topographic gradient with different soils and hydrology was also evaluated. Forty-one spore morphotypes were observed with species belonging to the genera Glomus and Acaulospora, representing 44 % of the total taxa. Soil texture and moisture, together with host identity, were predominant factors responsible for shaping AMF communities along the pedo-hydrological gradient. However, the variability within AMF communities was largely associated with shifts in the relative abundance of spores rather than changes in species composition, confirming that common AMF species are widely distributed in plant communities and all plants recruited into the forest are likely to be exposed to the dominant sporulating AMF species. PMID:23754540

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and soil aggregation as affected by cultivation of various crops during the sugarcane fallow period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Viviane Truber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Management systems involving crop rotation, ground cover species and reduced soil tillage can improve the soil physical and biological properties and reduce degradation. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effect of various crops grown during the sugarcane fallow period on the production of glomalin and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in two Latosols, as well as their influence on soil aggregation. The experiment was conducted on an eutroferric Red Latosol with high-clay texture (680 g clay kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol with clayey texture (440 g kg-1 clay in Jaboticabal (São Paulo State, Brazil. A randomized block design involving five blocks and four crops [soybean (S, soybean/fallow/soybean (SFS, soybean/millet/soybean (SMS and soybean/sunn hemp/soybean (SHS] was used to this end. Soil samples for analysis were collected in June 2011. No significant differences in total glomalin production were detected between the soils after the different crops. However, total external mycelium length was greater in the soils under SMS and SHS. Also, there were differences in easily extractable glomalin, total glomalin and aggregate stability, which were all greater in the eutroferric Red Latosol than in the acric Red Latosol. None of the cover crops planted in the fallow period of sugarcane improved aggregate stability in either Latosol.

  8. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, plant identity and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community determine assemblages of the AMF spore-associated microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffis, Bachir; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    The root-associated microbiome is a key determinant of pollutant degradation, soil nutrient availability and plant biomass productivity, but could not be examined in depth prior to recent advances in high-throughput sequencing. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with the majority of vascular plants. They are known to enhance mineral uptake and promote plant growth and are postulated to influence the processes involved in phytoremediation. Amplicon sequencing approaches have previously shown that petroleum hydrocarbon pollutant (PHP) concentration strongly influences AMF community structure in in situ phytoremediation experiments. We examined how AMF communities and their spore-associated microbiomes were structured within the rhizosphere of three plant species growing spontaneously in three distinct waste decantation basins of a former petrochemical plant. Our results show that the AMF community was only affected by PHP concentrations, while the AMF-associated fungal and bacterial communities were significantly affected by both PHP concentrations and plant species identity. We also found that some AMF taxa were either positively or negatively correlated with some fungal and bacterial groups. Our results suggest that in addition to PHP concentrations and plant species identity, AMF community composition may also shape the community structure of bacteria and fungi associated with AMF spores.

  9. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, plant identity and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community determine assemblages of the AMF spore-associated microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffis, Bachir; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    The root-associated microbiome is a key determinant of pollutant degradation, soil nutrient availability and plant biomass productivity, but could not be examined in depth prior to recent advances in high-throughput sequencing. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with the majority of vascular plants. They are known to enhance mineral uptake and promote plant growth and are postulated to influence the processes involved in phytoremediation. Amplicon sequencing approaches have previously shown that petroleum hydrocarbon pollutant (PHP) concentration strongly influences AMF community structure in in situ phytoremediation experiments. We examined how AMF communities and their spore-associated microbiomes were structured within the rhizosphere of three plant species growing spontaneously in three distinct waste decantation basins of a former petrochemical plant. Our results show that the AMF community was only affected by PHP concentrations, while the AMF-associated fungal and bacterial communities were significantly affected by both PHP concentrations and plant species identity. We also found that some AMF taxa were either positively or negatively correlated with some fungal and bacterial groups. Our results suggest that in addition to PHP concentrations and plant species identity, AMF community composition may also shape the community structure of bacteria and fungi associated with AMF spores. PMID:27376781

  10. Natural attenuation in a slag heap contaminated with cadmium: The role of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Chavez, M.C. [Programa de Edafologia. Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agricolas, Campus Montecillo. Carretera Mexico-Texcoco, km 36.5. Montecillo, Texcoco, Mexico, 56230 (Mexico)], E-mail: carmeng@colpos.mx; Carrillo-Gonzalez, R.; Gutierrez-Castorena, M.C. [Programa de Edafologia. Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agricolas, Campus Montecillo. Carretera Mexico-Texcoco, km 36.5. Montecillo, Texcoco, Mexico, 56230 (Mexico)

    2009-01-30

    A field study of the natural attenuation occurring in a slag heap contaminated with high available cadmium was carried out. The aims of this research were: to determine plants colonizing this slag heap; to analyze colonization and morphological biodiversity of spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF); to determine spore distribution in undisturbed samples; to know mycelium and glomalin abundance in the rhizosphere of these plants, and to investigate glomalin participation in Cd-stabilization. Forming vegetal islands, 22 different pioneering plant species from 11 families were colonizing the slag heap. The most common plants were species of Fabaceae, Asteraceae and Poaceae. Almost all plants were hosting AMF in their roots, and spores belonging to Gigaspora, Glomus, Scutellospora and Acaulospora species were observed. Micromorphological analysis showed that spores were related to decomposing vegetal residues and excrements, which means that mesofauna is contributing to their dispersion in the groundmass. Mycelium mass ranged from 0.11 to 26.3 mg/g, which contained between 13 and 75 mg of glomalin/g. Slag-extracted total glomalin was between 0.36 and 4.74 mg/g. Cadmium sequestered by glomalin extracted from either slag or mycelium was 0.028 mg/g. The ecological implication of these results is that organisms occupying vegetal patches are modifying mine residues, which contribute to soil formation.

  11. The co-occurrence of ectomycorrhizal, arbuscular mycorrhizal, and dark septate fungi in seedlings of four members of the Pinaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagg, Cameron; Pautler, Michael; Massicotte, Hugues B; Peterson, R Larry

    2008-02-01

    Although roots of species in the Pinaceae are usually colonized by ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, there are increasing reports of the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophytic (DSE) fungi in these species. The objective of this study was to determine the colonization patterns in seedlings of three Pinus (pine) species (Pinus banksiana, Pinus strobus, Pinus contorta) and Picea glauca x Picea engelmannii (hybrid spruce) grown in soil collected from a disturbed forest site. Seedlings of all three pine species and hybrid spruce became colonized by EM, AM, and DSE fungi. The dominant EM morphotype belonged to the E-strain category; limited colonization by a Tuber sp. was found on roots of Pinus strobus and an unknown morphotype (cf. Suillus-Rhizopogon group) with thick, cottony white mycelium was present on short roots of all species. The three fungal categories tended to occupy different niches in a single root system. No correlation was found between the percent root colonized by EM and percent colonization by either AM or DSE, although there was a positive correlation between percent root length colonized by AM and DSE. Hyphae and vesicles were the only AM intracellular structures found in roots of all species; arbuscules were not observed in any roots. PMID:18157555

  12. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi for the Biocontrol of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes: A Review of the Mechanisms Involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, Nele; De Waele, Dirk; Panis, Bart; Vos, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant-parasitic nematode (PPN) infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and discusses into more detail the plausibility of their involvement in the biocontrol against PPN specifically. The proposed mechanisms include enhanced plant tolerance, direct competition for nutrients and space, induced systemic resistance (ISR) and altered rhizosphere interactions. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of ISR in biocontrol and are increasingly placing rhizosphere effects on the foreground as well, both of which will be the focal point of this review. Though AMF are not yet widely used in conventional agriculture, recent data help to develop a better insight into the modes of action, which will eventually lead toward future field applications of AMF against PPN. The scientific community has entered an exciting era that provides the tools to actually unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms, making this a timely opportunity for a review of our current knowledge and the challenges ahead. PMID:26635750

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for the biocontrol of plant-parasitic nematodes: a review of the mechanisms involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele eSchouteden

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant parasitic nematode (PPN infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and discusses into more detail the plausibility of their involvement in the biocontrol against PPN specifically. The proposed mechanisms include enhanced plant tolerance, direct competition for nutrients and space, induced systemic resistance (ISR and altered rhizosphere interactions. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of ISR in biocontrol and are increasingly placing rhizosphere effects on the foreground as well, both of which will be the focal point of this review. Though AMF are not yet widely used in conventional agriculture, recent data help to develop a better insight into the modes of action, which will eventually lead towards future field applications of AMF against PPN. The scientific community has entered an exciting era that provide the tools to actually unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms, making this a timely opportunity for a review of our current knowledge and the challenges ahead.

  14. Fine Root Productivity and Turnover of Ectomycorrhizal and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Tree Species in a Temperate Broad-Leaved Mixed Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubisch, Petra; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Advancing our understanding of tree fine root dynamics is of high importance for tree physiology and forest biogeochemistry. In temperate broad-leaved forests, ectomycorrhizal (EM) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tree species often are coexisting. It is not known whether EM and AM trees differ systematically in fine root dynamics and belowground resource foraging strategies. We measured fine root productivity (FRP) and fine root turnover (and its inverse, root longevity) of three EM and three AM broad-leaved tree species in a natural cool-temperate mixed forest using ingrowth cores and combined the productivity data with data on root biomass per root orders. FRP and root turnover were related to root morphological traits and aboveground productivity. FRP differed up to twofold among the six coexisting species with larger species differences in lower horizons than in the topsoil. Root turnover varied up to fivefold among the species with lowest values in Acer pseudoplatanus and highest in its congener Acer platanoides. Variation in root turnover was larger within the two groups than between EM and AM species. We conclude that the main determinant of FRP and turnover in this mixed forest is species identity, while the influence of mycorrhiza type seems to be less important. PMID:27617016

  15. Land-Cover Legacy Effects on Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Abundance in Human and Wildlife Dominated Systems in Tropical Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geofrey E. Soka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can be important mutualists to plant hosts in acquiring soil nutrients. Past work has not explored whether previous land-cover history influences current AMF abundance in croplands and whether different land-cover histories in grazed but not cultivated areas influence AMF. This study was conducted to assess the effects of land-cover history in and near Serengeti National Park on AMF abundance in areas with three different land uses. The results showed that land-cover history influenced a number of soil physicochemical properties following conversion of grassland to cropland or woodland to cropland during the past 27 years. Different original land cover generally did not significantly influence current AMF abundance in croplands or livestock-grazed soils. However, livestock-grazed current grasslands that were formerly woodlands had lower AMF abundance than sites that had been grasslands since 1984. These results suggest that lower AMF abundance in livestock-grazed and cropland areas as compared to protected wildlife-grazed areas may reflect reduced total carbon inputs and higher disturbance and are not strongly influenced by the legacy of previous land cover. Given that recent studies have detected legacy effects on AMF, such effects may reflect more the impact on the taxonomic composition of AMF rather than their total abundance.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities along a pedo-hydrological gradient in a Central Amazonian terra firme forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Freitas, Rejane; Buscardo, Erika; Nagy, Laszlo; dos Santos Maciel, Alex Bruno; Carrenho, Rosilaine; Luizão, Regina C C

    2014-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to plant mutualistic interactions in the Amazon rainforest, and the general pattern of occurrence and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in these ecosystems is largely unknown. This study investigated AMF communities through their spores in soil in a 'terra firme forest' in Central Amazonia. The contribution played by abiotic factors and plant host species identity in regulating the composition, abundance and diversity of such communities along a topographic gradient with different soils and hydrology was also evaluated. Forty-one spore morphotypes were observed with species belonging to the genera Glomus and Acaulospora, representing 44 % of the total taxa. Soil texture and moisture, together with host identity, were predominant factors responsible for shaping AMF communities along the pedo-hydrological gradient. However, the variability within AMF communities was largely associated with shifts in the relative abundance of spores rather than changes in species composition, confirming that common AMF species are widely distributed in plant communities and all plants recruited into the forest are likely to be exposed to the dominant sporulating AMF species.

  17. Specific interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria--as revealed by different combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaderlund, Lotta; Arthurson, Veronica; Granhall, Ulf; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-05-15

    The interactions between two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Paenibacillus brasilensis PB177, two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) and one pathogenic fungus (Microdochium nivale) were investigated on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cultivar Tarso) in a greenhouse trial. PB177, but not SBW25, had strong inhibitory effects on M. nivale in dual culture plate assays. The results from the greenhouse experiment show very specific interactions; e.g. the two AM fungi react differently when interacting with the same bacteria on plants. G. intraradices (single inoculation or together with SBW25) increased plant dry weight on M. nivale infested plants, suggesting that the pathogenic fungus is counteracted by G. intraradices, but PB177 inhibited this positive effect. This is an example of two completely different reactions between the same AM fungus and two species of bacteria, previously known to enhance plant growth and inhibit pathogens. When searching for plant growth promoting microorganisms it is therefore important to test for the most suitable combination of plant, bacteria and fungi in order to get satisfactory plant growth benefits.

  18. Foliar Spray with Vermiwash Modifies the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Dependency and Nutrient Stoichiometry of Bhut Jolokia (Capsicum assamicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra; Kalita, Mohan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vermiwash (VW), a liquid extract obtained from vermicomposting beds, is used as an organic fertilizer for crop plants. The current study investigated the effect of a vermiwash foliar spray on the response of bhut jolokia (Capsicum assamicum) exposed to two different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF: Rhizophagus irregularis, RI and G. mosseae, GM) in acidic soil under naturally ventilated greenhouse conditions. The VW spray significantly influenced the growth of plants receiving the dual treatment of AMF+VW. Plant growth was more prominent in the GM+VW treatment group than that in the RI+VW treatment group. The plant-AMF interactions in relation to growth and nutrient requirements were also significantly influenced by the application of VW. Interestingly, the VW treatment appeared to contribute more N to plants when compared to that under the AMF treatment, which led to changes in the C:N:P stoichiometry in plant shoots. Furthermore, the increased potassium dependency, as observed in the case of the dual treatments, suggests the significance of such treatments for improving crop conditions under salt stress. Overall, our study shows that the VW foliar spray modifies the response of a crop to inoculations of different AMF with regard to growth and nutrient utilization, which has implications for the selection of an efficient combination of nutrient source for improving crop growth. PMID:24651577

  19. Variability in growth, nutrition and phytochemical constituents of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour Spreng. as influenced by indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevanan Rajeshkumar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted under greenhouse nursery condition on the efficacy of seven indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi in the improvement of growth, biomass, nutrition and phytochemical constituents, namely total phenols, ortho dihydroxy phenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins and saponins, in the roots and leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour Spreng. Seedlings were raised in polythene bags containing soil inoculated with isolates of seven different indigenous AM fungi, viz. Acaulospora bireticulata, A. scrobiculata, Gigaspora margarita, Glomus aggregatum, G. mosseae, G. geosporum, and Scutellospora heterogama. P. amboinicus seedlings raised in the presence of AM fungi generally showed an increase in plant growth, nutritional status and phytochemical constituents over those grown in the absence of AM fungi. The extent of growth, biomass, nutritional status and phytochemical constituents enhanced by AM fungi varied with the species of AM fungi inhabiting the roots and leaves of P. amboinicus seedlings. Considering the various plant growth parameters, nutritional status of the plant, total phenols, ortho dihydroxy phenols, alkaloids , flavonoids , tannins, and saponins in the roots and leaves, it was observed that Gigaspora margarita is the best AM symbiont for P. amboinicus used in this experiment.

  20. Sequencing and comparison of the mitochondrial COI gene from isolates of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi belonging to Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Roberto; Bianciotto, Valeria; Orgiazzi, Alberto; Lumini, Erica; Bergero, Roberta

    2014-06-01

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) are well known for their ecological importance and their positive influence on plants. The genetics and phylogeny of this group of fungi have long been debated. Nuclear markers are the main tools used for phylogenetic analyses, but they have sometimes proved difficult to use because of their extreme variability. Therefore, the attention of researchers has been moving towards other genomic markers, in particular those from the mitochondrial DNA. In this study, 46 sequences of different AMF isolates belonging to two main clades Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae have been obtained from the mitochondrial gene coding for the Cytochrome c Oxidase I (COI), representing the largest dataset to date of AMF COI sequences. A very low level of divergence was recorded in the COI sequences from the Gigasporaceae, which could reflect either a slow rate of evolution or a more recent evolutionary divergence of this group. On the other hand, the COI sequence divergence between Gigasporaceae and Glomeraceae was high, with synonymous divergence reaching saturated levels. This work also showed the difficulty in developing valuable mitochondrial markers able to effectively distinguish all Glomeromycota species, especially those belonging to Gigasporaceae, yet it represents a first step towards the development of a full mtDNA-based dataset which can be used for further phylogenetic investigations of this fungal phylum.

  1. Change in morphological properties of root and aerial parts of chickpea under drought stress, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium treatments

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    S. Morad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi (Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices and Mesorhizobium Ciceri bacteria at three soil moisture levels [28% (field capacity, FC, 15% (-5 bar suction and 9% (-10 bar tension by weight] on morphological properties of root and aerial parts of chickpea, a greenhouse factorial experiment, arranged as a complete randomized design, was conducted in a sterilized soil. Results showed that moisture treatment had significance effect on number of pods, number of seeds, fresh and dry weight of root and aerial parts, plant height and root length and volume. Application of Mesorhizobium was effective on number of nodes, number of pods, number of seeds, fresh and dry weight of root and aerial parts, plant height, root length and volume. Glomus mosseae had significant effect on plant height. Interaction of moisture and AM fungi was significant on fresh and dry weight of root and aerial parts. Interaction effect of Mesorhizobium and soil moisture was only significant on number of nodes. In general, the highest fresh and dry weight of aerial parts (44.6 and 10.53 grams, respectively was obtained by inoculation of chickpea by rhizobium bacteria and Glomus mosseae at FC moisture level, and AM fungi Glomus mosseae was more efficient compared to Glomus intraradices in both drought stress and without stress conditions.

  2. Effects of Soil Depth and Season Variation on Community Structure of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Greenhouse Soils Planted with Watermelon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Run-Jin; LI Yan; DIAO Zhi-Kai; LI Min; LIN Xian-Gui

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community structure in various soil depths and growing seasons of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) grown in commercial greenhouses in Daxing of Beijing and Weifang and Laiyang of Shandong,China were investigated using both morphological identification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.The sampled soils had been used for continuous greenhouse production of watermelon for 0,5,10,15,or 20 years.Glomus claroideum was the dominant species in the greenhouse soils planted for 5,10,and 15 years in Laiyang,while Glomus mosseae and Glomus etunicatum were dominant in the nearby open farmland soil.Sorenson's similarity index of AMF community composition ranged from 0.67 to 0.84 in the soils planted for 5 years,and from 0.29 to 0.33 for 20 years among the three locations.Spore abundance,species richness,and the Shannon index were highest near the soil surface (0-10 cm) and decreased with soil depth,and higher in June and October than in August and December.Canonical correspondence analysis showed that available P and the number of years that soil had been used for greenhouse production were the main factors contributing to the variance of AMF community composition.It was concluded that the community structure of AMF was mainly influenced by soil available P and planting time of watermelon as well as by soil depth and seasonal variation in the commercial greenhouse.

  3. The molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the arsenic mining impacted sites in Hunan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Hu, Yajun; Wu, Songlin; Chen, Baodong

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can establish a mutualistic association with most terrestrial plants even in heavy metal contaminated environments. It has been documented that high concentrations of toxic metals, such as arsenic (As) in soil could adversely affect the diversity and function of AMF. However, there are still gaps in understanding the community composition of AMF under long-term As contaminations. In the present study, six sampling sites with different As concentrations were selected in the Realgar mining area in Hunan Province of China. The AMF biodiversity in the rhizosphere soils of the dominant plant species was investigated by sequencing the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene fragments using 454-pyrosequencing technique. A total of 11 AMF genera were identified, namely Rhizophagus, Glomus, Funneliformis, Acaulospora, Diversispora, Claroideoglomus, Scutellopora, Gigaspora, Ambispora, Praglomus, and Archaeospora, among which Glomus, Rhizophagus, and Claroideoglomus clarodeum were detected in all sampling sites, and Glomus was the dominant AMF genus in the Realgar mining area. Redundancy analysis indicated that soil pH, total As and Cd concentrations were the main factors influencing AMF community structure. There was a negative correlation between the AMF species richness and the total As concentration in the soil, but no significant correlation between the Shannon-Wiener index of the AMF and plants. Our study showed that high As concentrations can exert a selective effect on the AMF populations. PMID:26899650

  4. Alleviation of cadmium stress in Solanum lycopersicum L. by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi via induction of acquired systemic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, E F; Alqarawi, A A; Al Huqail, Asma A; Egamberdieva, D; Wirth, S

    2016-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate cadmium (Cd) stress-induced changes in growth, antioxidants and lipid composition of Solanum lycopersicum with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Cadmium stress (50 μM) caused significant changes in the growth and physio-biochemical attributes studied. AMF mitigated the deleterious impact of Cd on the parameters studied. Cadmium stress increased malonaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide production but AMF reduced these parameters by mitigating oxidative stress. The activity of antioxidant enzymes enhanced under Cd treatment and AMF inoculation further enhanced their activity, thus strengthening the plant's defense system. Proline and phenol content increased in Cd-treated as well as AMF-inoculated plants providing efficient protection against Cd stress. Cadmium treatment resulted in great alterations in the main lipid classes leading to a marked change in their composition. Cadmium stress caused a significant reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in enhanced membrane leakage. The present study supports the use of AMF as a biological means to ameliorate Cd stress-induced changes in tomato. PMID:26981010

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soil and roots respond differently to phosphorus inputs in an intensively managed calcareous agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yunlong; Jiang, Shanshan; Deng, Yan; Christie, Peter; Murray, Philip J; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the diversity and community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is important for potentially optimizing their role in mining phosphorus (P) in agricultural ecosystems. Here, we conduct a comprehensive study to investigate the vertical distribution of AMF in a calcareous field and their temporal structure in maize-roots with fertilizer P application over a three-year period. The results showed that soil available-P response to P fertilization but maize yields did not. Phosphorus fertilization had no-significant effect on richness of AMF except at greater soil-depths. High P-supply reduced root colonization while optimum-P tended to increase colonization and fungal richness on all sampling occasions. Crop phenology might override P-supply in determining the community composition of active root inhabiting fungi. Significant differences in the community structure of soil AMF were observed between the controls and P treatments in surface soil and the community shift was attributable mainly to available-P, N/P and pH. Vertical distribution was related mainly to soil electrical conductivity and Na content. Our results indicate that the structure of AMF community assemblages is correlated with P fertilization, soil depth and crop phenology. Importantly, phosphorus management must be integrated with other agricultural-practices to ensure the sustainability of agricultural production in salinized soils. PMID:27102357

  6. Unusually large contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi tosoil organic matter pools in tropical forest soils. Plant and soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rilling, M.C.; Wright, S.F.; Nicholas, K.A.; Schmidt, W.F.; Torn,M.S.

    2000-07-12

    The origins and composition of soil organic matter (SOM) are still largely uncertain. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are recognized as indirect contributors through their influence on soil aggregation, plant physiology, and plant community composition. Here we present evidence that AMF can also make large, direct contributions to SOM. Glomalin, a recently discovered glycoprotein produced by AMF hyphae, was detected in tropical soils in concentrations of over 60 mg cm-3. Along a chronosequence of soils spanning ages from 300 to 4.1 Mio years, a pattern of glomalin concentrations is consistent with the hypothesis that this protein accumulates in soil. Carbon dating of glomalin indicated turnover at time scales of several years to decades, much longer than the turnover of AMF hyphae (which is assumed to be on the order of days to weeks). This suggests that contributions of mycorrhizae to soil carbon storage based on hyphal biomass in soil and roots may be an underestimate. The amount of C and N in glomalin represented a sizeable amount (ca. 4-5 percent) of total soil C and N in the oldest soils. Our results thus indicate that microbial (fungal) carbon that is not derived from above- or below-ground litter can make a significant contribution to soil carbon and nitrogen pools and can far exceed the contributions of soil microbial biomass (ranging from 0.08 to 0.2 percent of total C for the oldest soils).

  7. Interactive Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Copper Stress on Flowering Phenology and Reproduction of Elsholtzia splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zexin; Li, Junmin; Li, Yueling

    2015-01-01

    Plant responses to heavy metal contamination may depend on the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Elsholtzia splendens is an indicator species for the presence of copper (Cu) mines because both its flowering phenology and reproduction are tolerant to heavy metals. To test whether effects of Cu on the flowering phenology and reproduction of E. splendens depend on the presence of AMF, we conducted a factorial experiment with two Cu treatments (with or without Cu addition) crossed with two AMF treatments (with or without AMF inoculation). Without AMF, Cu addition significantly delayed the onset dates, ending dates and peak dates of flowering and decreased flowering duration. However, AMF inoculation reversed the effects of Cu stress, with recovered flowering onset and ending dates and increased the flowering duration. Cu addition significantly decreased inflorescence width and number, inflorescence biomass, vegetative biomass and total seed number, but significantly increased 1000-seed weight. AMF inoculation significantly increased vegetative biomass. Two-way ANOVA results showed that the interactive effects between Cu addition and AMF inoculation were significant on the inflorescence number, vegetative biomass and total seed number. These results indicate that AMF can alleviate the Cu stress on the flowering phenology and reproduction of E. splendens. PMID:26709921

  8. Interactive Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Copper Stress on Flowering Phenology and Reproduction of Elsholtzia splendens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zexin Jin

    Full Text Available Plant responses to heavy metal contamination may depend on the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Elsholtzia splendens is an indicator species for the presence of copper (Cu mines because both its flowering phenology and reproduction are tolerant to heavy metals. To test whether effects of Cu on the flowering phenology and reproduction of E. splendens depend on the presence of AMF, we conducted a factorial experiment with two Cu treatments (with or without Cu addition crossed with two AMF treatments (with or without AMF inoculation. Without AMF, Cu addition significantly delayed the onset dates, ending dates and peak dates of flowering and decreased flowering duration. However, AMF inoculation reversed the effects of Cu stress, with recovered flowering onset and ending dates and increased the flowering duration. Cu addition significantly decreased inflorescence width and number, inflorescence biomass, vegetative biomass and total seed number, but significantly increased 1000-seed weight. AMF inoculation significantly increased vegetative biomass. Two-way ANOVA results showed that the interactive effects between Cu addition and AMF inoculation were significant on the inflorescence number, vegetative biomass and total seed number. These results indicate that AMF can alleviate the Cu stress on the flowering phenology and reproduction of E. splendens.

  9. Carbon and phosphorus exchange may enable cooperation between an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and a phosphate-solubilizing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Minggang; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fusuo; Hodge, Angela; Feng, Gu

    2016-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) transfer plant photosynthate underground which can stimulate soil microbial growth. In this study, we examined whether there was a potential link between carbon (C) release from an AMF and phosphorus (P) availability via a phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB). We investigated the outcome of the interaction between the AMF and the PSB by conducting a microcosm and two Petri plate experiments. An in vitro culture experiment was also conducted to determine the direct impact of AMF hyphal exudates on growth of the PSB. The AMF released substantial C to the environment, triggering PSB growth and activity. In return, the PSB enhanced mineralization of organic P, increasing P availability for the AMF. When soil available P was low, the PSB competed with the AMF for P, and its activity was not stimulated by the fungus. When additional P was added to increase soil available P, the PSB enhanced AMF hyphal growth, and PSB activity was also stimulated by the fungus. Our results suggest that an AMF and a free-living PSB interacted to the benefit of each other by providing the C or P that the other microorganism required, but these interactions depended upon background P availability. PMID:27074400

  10. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Polyphenol Profile of Marjoram, Lemon Balm, and Marigold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Rita; Szabó, Krisztina; Abrankó, László; Rendes, Kata; Füzy, Anna; Takács, Tünde

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization on biomass, polyphenol profile, and content of economically important herbs. A pot experiment was performed with marjoram, lemon balm, and marigold applying a commercially available AMF mixture for inoculation. Major polyphenols were identified using HPLC-UV-ESI-qTOFMS on the basis of their UV-vis and mass spectral characteristics, and selected ones were quantified. We showed that AMF can provide different services for each herb. Marjoram had the highest level of fungal colonization (82 M%) followed by lemon balm (62 M%) and marigold (17 M%). AMF inoculation significantly increased the biomass of marjoram (1.5-fold), the number of marigold flowers (1.2-fold), and the yield of rosmarinic acid and lithospermic acid isomers of marjoram (1.5-fold) and lemon balm (1.2-fold). Therefore, the quantity and quality of plant material could be improved by the application of optimized AMF inoculum. PMID:27096876

  11. Isolated root caps, border cells, and mucilage from host roots stimulate hyphal branching of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Gigaspora gigantea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahashi, Gerald; Douds, David D

    2004-09-01

    Unlike previous reports that have shown that water soluble and volatile compounds from roots or root exudates play an important role in precolonization events during arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus-host root interactions (Bécard & Piché 1989, Giovannetti et al. 1993), the results shown here deal with particulate and viscous fractions isolated from host roots. Root caps and a slow sedimenting particulate fraction (SSPF) were rapidly isolated and separated from Ri T-DNA transformed carrot roots (D. carota) grown in liquid culture. In addition, border cells (BC) and mucilage were isolated from aseptically grown corn seedlings (Zea mays). Root caps, SSPF (composed mainly of small root cap fragments and some BCs), BCs, and mucilage all had an associated AM fungus hyphal branching stimulator. Root caps stored for 5 d at 4 degrees C appeared to either synthesize or slowly release the branching stimulator. Also, isolated root caps from roots grown in the absence of P contained more branch stimulating activity than those isolated from roots grown in the presence of P. Although the branching stimulation activity in particulate fractions was low compared to that of the exudate, the particulate fractions can stick to the root surface at considerable distances from the root tip. This may be significant during the infection and colonization of host roots at sites far removed from the primary location of exudation.

  12. Natural attenuation in a slag heap contaminated with cadmium: The role of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field study of the natural attenuation occurring in a slag heap contaminated with high available cadmium was carried out. The aims of this research were: to determine plants colonizing this slag heap; to analyze colonization and morphological biodiversity of spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF); to determine spore distribution in undisturbed samples; to know mycelium and glomalin abundance in the rhizosphere of these plants, and to investigate glomalin participation in Cd-stabilization. Forming vegetal islands, 22 different pioneering plant species from 11 families were colonizing the slag heap. The most common plants were species of Fabaceae, Asteraceae and Poaceae. Almost all plants were hosting AMF in their roots, and spores belonging to Gigaspora, Glomus, Scutellospora and Acaulospora species were observed. Micromorphological analysis showed that spores were related to decomposing vegetal residues and excrements, which means that mesofauna is contributing to their dispersion in the groundmass. Mycelium mass ranged from 0.11 to 26.3 mg/g, which contained between 13 and 75 mg of glomalin/g. Slag-extracted total glomalin was between 0.36 and 4.74 mg/g. Cadmium sequestered by glomalin extracted from either slag or mycelium was 0.028 mg/g. The ecological implication of these results is that organisms occupying vegetal patches are modifying mine residues, which contribute to soil formation

  13. Effect of biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban on the colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, R S; Lissemore, L; Shahmohamadloo, R S; Sibley, P K

    2015-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a symbiotic relationship with the majority of crop plants. AMF provide plants with nutrients (e.g., P), modulate the effect of metal and pathogen exposure, and increase tolerance to moisture stress. The benefits of AMF to plant growth make them important to the development of sustainable agriculture. The land application of biosolids is becoming an increasingly common practice in sustainable agriculture, as a source of nutrients. However, biosolids have been found to contain numerous pharmaceutical and personal care products including antimicrobial chemicals such as triclosan and triclocarban. The potential risks that these two compounds may pose to plant-AMF interactions are poorly understood. The current study investigated whether biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban affect the colonization of the roots of lettuce and corn plants by AMF. Plants were grown in soil amended with biosolids that contained increasing concentrations of triclosan (0 to 307 μg/g dw) or triclocarban (0 to 304 μg/g dw). A relationship between the concentration of triclosan or triclocarban and colonization of plants roots by AMF was not observed. The presence of biosolids did not have a significant (p>0.05) effect on percent colonization of corn roots but had a significant, positive effect (ptriclocarban did not inhibit the colonization of crop plant roots by AMF. PMID:25497682

  14. Effect of biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban on the colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, R S; Lissemore, L; Shahmohamadloo, R S; Sibley, P K

    2015-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a symbiotic relationship with the majority of crop plants. AMF provide plants with nutrients (e.g., P), modulate the effect of metal and pathogen exposure, and increase tolerance to moisture stress. The benefits of AMF to plant growth make them important to the development of sustainable agriculture. The land application of biosolids is becoming an increasingly common practice in sustainable agriculture, as a source of nutrients. However, biosolids have been found to contain numerous pharmaceutical and personal care products including antimicrobial chemicals such as triclosan and triclocarban. The potential risks that these two compounds may pose to plant-AMF interactions are poorly understood. The current study investigated whether biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban affect the colonization of the roots of lettuce and corn plants by AMF. Plants were grown in soil amended with biosolids that contained increasing concentrations of triclosan (0 to 307 μg/g dw) or triclocarban (0 to 304 μg/g dw). A relationship between the concentration of triclosan or triclocarban and colonization of plants roots by AMF was not observed. The presence of biosolids did not have a significant (p>0.05) effect on percent colonization of corn roots but had a significant, positive effect (proots. Biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban did not inhibit the colonization of crop plant roots by AMF.

  15. Land-use intensity and host plant identity interactively shape communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots of grassland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vályi, Kriszta; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We studied the effect of host plant identity and land-use intensity (LUI) on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) communities in roots of grassland plants. These are relevant factors for intraradical AMF communities in temperate grasslands, which are habitats where AMF are present in high abundance and diversity. In order to focus on fungi that directly interact with the plant at the time, we investigated root-colonizing communities. Our study sites represent an LUI gradient with different combinations of grazing, mowing, and fertilization. We used massively parallel multitag pyrosequencing to investigate AMF communities in a large number of root samples, while being able to track the identity of the host. We showed that host plants significantly differed in AMF community composition, while land use modified this effect in a plant species-specific manner. Communities in medium and low land-use sites were subsets of high land-use communities, suggesting a differential effect of land use on the dispersal of AMF species with different abundances and competitive abilities. We demonstrate that in these grasslands, there is a small group of highly abundant, generalist fungi which represent the dominating species in the AMF community.

  16. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on leaf solutes and root absorption areas of trifoliate orange seedlings under water stress conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qiangsheng; XIA Renxue

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM)fungus Glomus mosseae on plant growth,leaf solutes and root absorption area of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.) seedlings were studied in potted culture under water stress conditions.Inoculation with G.mosseae increased plant height,stem diameter,leaf area,shoot dry weight,root dry weight and plant dry weight,when the soil water content was 20%,16% and 12%.AM inoculation also promoted the active and total absorption area of root system and absorption of phosphorus from the rhizosphere,enhanced the content of soluble sugar in leaves and roots,and reduced proline content in leaves.AM seedlings had higher plant water use efficiency and higher drought tolerance than non-AM seedlings.Effects of G.mosseae inoculation on trifoliate orange seedlings under 20% and 16% soil water content were more significant than under 12% soil water content.AM infection was severely restrained by 12% soil water content.Thus,effects of AM fungi on plants were probably positively related to the extent of root colonization by AM fungi.The mechanism of AM fungi in enhancing drought resistance of host plants ascribed to greater osmotic adjustment and greater absorption area of root system by AM colonization.

  17. Impact of weed control on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a tropical agroecosystem: a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Zapata, José A; Marrufo-Zapata, Denis; Guadarrama, Patricia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Lilia; Hernández-Cuevas, Laura; Caamal-Maldonado, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    Cover crop species represent an affordable and effective weed control method in agroecosystems; nonetheless, the effect of its use on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) has been scantily studied. The goal of this study was to determine root colonization levels and AMF species richness in the rhizosphere of maize plants and weed species growing under different cover crop and weed control regimes in a long-term experiment. The treatment levels used were (1) cover of Mucuna deeringian (Muc), (2) "mulch" of Leucaena leucocephala (Leu), (3) "mulch" of Lysiloma latisiliquum (Lys), (4) herbicide (Her), (5) manual weeding (CD), (6) no weeding (SD), and (7) no maize and no weeding (B). A total of 18 species of AMF belonging to eight genera (Acaulospora, Ambispora, Claroideoglomus, Funneliformis, Glomus, Rhizophagus, Sclerocystis, and Scutellospora) were identified from trap cultures. Muc and Lys treatments had a positive impact on AMF species richness (11 and seven species, respectively), while Leu and B treatments on the other hand gave the lowest richness values (six species each). AMF colonization levels in roots of maize and weeds differed significantly between treatment levels. Overall, the use of cover crop species had a positive impact on AMF species richness as well as on the percentage of root colonized by AMF. These findings have important implications for the management of traditional agroecosystems and show that the use of cover crop species for weed control can result in a more diverse AMF community which should potentially increase crop production in the long run. PMID:22584877

  18. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Enhanced Early Growth of Mallotus paniculatus and Albizia saman under Nursery Conditions in East Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Wulandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest over logging, forest fire, forest conversion, and opencast mining have promoted deforestation in Indonesia, and reforestation is needed immediately. However, reforestation is limited by low seedling quality and production, and slow seedling growth in nurseries. Native tropical tree and fast-growing species, Mallotus paniculatus and Albizia saman, are potential to promote the first rotation of reforestation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are known to promote nutrient uptake and plant growth. We examined the effects of two native AM fungi, Gigaspora decipiens and Glomus clarum, on the growth of M. paniculatus and A. saman seedlings under nursery conditions. At harvest, after six months, we determined AM colonization, shoot dry weight, and shoot N and P concentration. Approximately 90% and 50% of M. paniculatus and A. saman roots, respectively, were colonized by AM fungi, without any difference between the inoculation treatments. G. decipiens and G. clarum increased shoot height, leaf number, shoot dry weight, and shoot N and P uptake of both species. A positive correlation was observed between N and P uptake and shoot dry weight. These results suggest that AM fungi are effective in accelerating nutrient uptake and plant growth, which will, in turn, promote reforestation and sustainable forest timber production.

  19. Inner Mongolian steppe arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities respond more strongly to water availability than to nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Tingyao; Peng, Fei; Chen, Qing; Lin, Shan; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling

    2015-08-01

    Plant community productivity and species composition are primarily constrained by water followed by nitrogen (N) availability in the degraded semi-arid grasslands of Inner Mongolia. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how long-term N addition and water availability interact to influence the community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and whether AM fungi contribute to the recovery of degraded grasslands. Soils and roots of the dominant plant species Stipa grandis and Agropyron cristatum were sampled under two water levels and N) rates after 8 years. The abundance and diversity of AM fungi remained relatively resilient after the long-term addition of water and N. Variation in the AM fungal communities in soils and roots were affected primarily by watering. AM fungal abundance and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness were significantly correlated with average aboveground net primary productivity and biomass of plant functional groups. Hyphal length density was significantly correlated with plant richness, the average biomass of S. grandis and perennial forbs. Both water and plant biomass had a considerable influence on the AM fungal assemblages. The tight linkages between AM fungi with aboveground plant productivity highlight the importance of plant-microbe interactions in the productivity and sustainability of these semi-arid grassland ecosystems. PMID:26033305

  20. Radioactivity and the environment: technical approaches to understand the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants in radionuclide bioaccumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena S. Davies

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoaccumulation of radionuclides is of significant interest with regards to monitoring radionuclide build-up in food chains, developing methods for environmental bioremediation and for ecological management. There are many gaps in our understanding of the characteristics and mechanisms of plant radionuclide accumulation, including the importance of symbiotically-associated arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. We first briefly review the evidence that demonstrates the ability of AM fungi to enhance the translocation of 238U into plant root tissues, and how fungal association may prevent further mobilization into shoot tissues. We then focus on approaches that should further advance our knowledge of AM fungi-plant radionuclide accumulation. Current research has mostly used artificial cultivation methods and we consider how more ecologically-relevant analysis might be performed. The use of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging and absorption spectroscopy techniques to understand the mechanisms of radionuclide transfer from soil to plant via AM fungi is evaluated. Without such further knowledge, the behavior and mobilization of radionuclides cannot be accurately modelled and the potential risks cannot be accurately predicted.

  1. Soil Solution Phosphorus Status and Mycorrhizal Dependency in Leucaena leucocephala†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Mitiku; Manjunath, Aswathanarayan

    1987-01-01

    A phosphorus sorption isotherm was used to establish concentrations of P in a soil solution ranging from 0.002 to 0.807 μg/ml. The influence of P concentration on the symbiotic interaction between the tropical tree legume Leucaena leucocephala and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum was evaluated in pot experiments. The level of mycorrhizal infection in Leucaena roots increased as the concentration of P was raised from 0.002 to 0.153 μg/ml. Higher levels of P depressed mycorrhizal infection, but the level of infection never declined below 50%. Periodic monitoring of P contents of Leucaena subleaflets indicated that significant mycorrhizal activity was detected as early as 17 days after planting, with the activity peaking 12 to 16 days thereafter. The highest level of mycorrhizal activity was associated with a soil solution P level of 0.021 μg/ml. Even though the mycorrhizal inoculation effect diminished as the concentration of P in the soil solution was increased, mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased P uptake and dry-matter yield of Leucaena at all levels of soil solution P examined. The concentration of P required by nonmycorrhizal L. leucocephala for maximum yield was 27 to 38 times higher than that required by mycorrhizal L. leucocephala. The results illustrate the very high dependence of L. leucocephala on VAM fungi and the significance of optimizing soil solution phosphorus for enhancing the benefits of the VAM symbiosis. PMID:16347323

  2. Gold Nanomaterial Uptake from Soil Is Not Increased by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization of Solanum Lycopersicum (Tomato)

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan D. Judy; Jason K. Kirby; Mike J McLaughlin; Timothy Cavagnaro; Bertsch, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) by plants has been demonstrated in numerous studies over the past 5–10 years. However, the overwhelming majority of these studies were conducted using hydroponic systems and the degree to which the addition of the biological and chemical components present in the soil might fundamentally alter the potential of plant bioaccumulation of ENMs is unclear. Here, we used two genotypes of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), reduced mycorrhizal colonizati...

  3. Mycorrhizal mediated feedbacks influence net carbon gain and nutrient uptake in Andropogon gerardii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R. M.; Miller, S. P.; Jastrow, J. D.; Rivetta, C. B.; Environmental Research

    2002-07-01

    The carbon sink strength of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was investigated by comparing the growth dynamics of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal Andropogon gerardii plants over a wide range of equivalent tissue phosphorus : nitrogen (P : N) ratios. Host growth, apparent photosynthesis (A{sub net}), net C gain (C{sub n}) and P and N uptake were evaluated in sequential harvests of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal A. gerardii plants. Response curves were used to assess the effect of assimilate supply on the mycorrhizal symbiosis in relation to the association of C with N and P. Mycorrhizal plants had higher C{sub n} than nonmycorrhizal plants at equivalent shoot P : N ratios even though colonization did not affect plant dry mass. The higher C{sub n} in mycorrhizal plants was related to both an increase in specific leaf area and enhanced photosynthesis. The additional carbon gain associated with the mycorrhizal condition was not allocated to root biomass. The C{sub n} in the mycorrhizal plants was positively related to the proportion of active colonization in the roots. The calculated difference between C{sub n} values in mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants, C{sub diff}, appeared to correspond to the sink strength of the AMF and was not an indirect result of enhanced nutrition in mycorrhizal plants.

  4. Effect of phosphate and the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices on disease severity of root rot of peas ( Pisum sativum ) caused by Aphanomyces euteiches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Lars; Kjøller, Rasmus; Rosendahl, Søren

    1998-01-01

    The effects of inorganic phosphate levels and the presence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on disease severity of Aphanomyces euteiches in pea roots were studied. Disease severity on roots and epicotyl as well as the oospore number within infected root tissue were correlated with the phosphorus (P) level...... in the growth medium. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices increased P uptake and the P concentration in the plant but reduced disease development in peas. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by densitometry of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase specific to A.euteiches was used...... to measure the activity of the pathogen in roots. The enzyme activity increased with disease severity and disease incidence, except in plants supplemented with P at the highest level, where a peak in activity was seen 12 days after inoculation with the pathogen, followed by a decrease in activity...

  5. Production and Application of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungicides%丛枝菌根真菌菌剂的生产及应用概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静; 刘洁; 金海如

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus is a new microbial fertilizer, which plays an irreplaceable role in reduction of chemical fertilizer and pesticide application, reduction of environmental pollution and crop yield improvement. The authors introduce characteristics of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus and microbial fertilizer types in China, review the production methods and application of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungicides and point out the further application prospect of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungicides.%丛枝菌根真菌(AM真菌)是一种新型的微生物肥料,对减少化肥和农药施用,减少环境污染,提高农作物产量等方面具有不可替代的作用.介绍了AM真菌的特点及我国生产的微生物肥料种类,对AM真菌菌剂的生产方法及其应用情况进行了概述,指出AM真菌菌剂的应用前景.

  6. Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant neodomestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Marie; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Food demand will increase concomitantly with human population. Food production therefore needs to be high enough and, at the same time, minimize damage to the environment. This equation cannot be solved with current strategies. Based on recent findings, new trajectories for agriculture and plant breeding which take into account the belowground compartment and evolution of mutualistic strategy, are proposed in this opinion article. In this context, we argue that plant breeders have the opportunity to make use of native arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in an innovative ecologically intensive agriculture.

  7. The influence of pre-crop plants on the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomales and Phialophora graminicola associated with roots of winter XTriticosecale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of four pre-crop plant species on the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF, Glomales, Zygomycetes spores, mycorrhizae and Phialophora graminicola (Deacon Walker associated with roots of field-culuvated XTriticosecale Wittmack cv. Malno was investigated. The pre-crop plant species were Hordeum vutgare L., Lupinus luteus L., Pisum sativum L., and Vicia faba v. major Harz. Most spores and species of AMF were found when XTriticosecale was cultivated following P. sativum. Prior cropping with L. luteus caused the occurrence of the lowest number of spores among XTriticosecale roots. Mycorrhizal colonization of XTriticosecale was highest when planted after P. sativum and lowest when grown after L. luteus.

  8. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi May Mitigate the Influence of a Joint Rise of Temperature and Atmospheric CO2 on Soil Respiration in Grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vicca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of mycorrhizal colonization and future climate on roots and soil respiration (Rsoil in model grassland ecosystems. We exposed artificial grassland communities on pasteurized soil (no living arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF present and on pasteurized soil subsequently inoculated with AMF to ambient conditions and to a combination of elevated CO2 and temperature (future climate scenario. After one growing season, the inoculated soil revealed a positive climate effect on AMF root colonization and this elicited a significant AMF x climate scenario interaction on root biomass. Whereas the future climate scenario tended to increase root biomass in the noninoculated soil, the inoculated soil revealed a 30% reduction of root biomass under warming at elevated CO2 (albeit not significant. This resulted in a diminished response of Rsoil to simulated climatic change, suggesting that AMF may contribute to an attenuated stimulation of Rsoil in a warmer, high CO2 world.

  9. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Inoculation and Mulch of Contrasting Chemical Composition on the Yield of Cassava under Humid Tropical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iniobong E. Okon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF, Glomus deserticola, and leaf mulch from Gliricidia sepium and Senna siamea on the yield of cassava (Manihot esculenta in a degraded alfisol of southwestern Nigeria was investigated. Inoculation in conjunction with mulching increased cassava tuber yield by 40–278% over the control. The highest yield was obtained with G. sepium and S. siamea mulch applied together in equal proportions. The results are explained in the light of the growth-enhancing effects of AMF, encouraged by the ameliorating effects of mulch on the soil structure and nutrient contents.

  10. Auxins as Signals in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güther, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Plant hormones such as auxin derivatives are likely signals during the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. Although reports on auxin levels during AM in different plant species are contradictory, the contribution of auxins to the establishment of an AM symbiosis might be an important factor especially for the development of lateral roots which are the preferred infection sites for the fungi. In addition to evidence that different auxins could be elevated after colonization with AM fungi, there are also overlapping gene expression patterns between auxin-treated and AM-inoculated roots that provide further clues on auxin-triggered colonization events. Using an auxin-inducible promoter-reporter system it was shown that the reporter was strongly induced in AM colonized roots, although co-localization with AM fungi was not observed. Our data are discussed in frame of a model together with other plant hormones which might be involved in the AM colonization processes. PMID:19704695

  11. Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares e adubação fosfatada em mudas de mangabeira Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus supply on seedlings of mangabeira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Maria Carneiro Costa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMA e da adubação fosfatada em mudas de mangabeira (Hancornia speciosa Gomes. O experimento, em casa de vegetação, utilizou delineamento inteiramente casualizado em fatorial com dois tratamentos de solo nativo oriundo de pomar com mangabeiras, desinfestado com brometo de metila e não-desinfestado, seis doses de P (3*, 3, 48, 93, 138 e 183 mg dm-3 e três tratamentos de inoculação, Gigaspora albida Schenck & Smith, Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerdemann e controle sem inoculação, com quatro repetições. O tratamento 3* não recebeu solução nutritiva e os demais receberam solução nutritiva de Hoagland sem fósforo por ocasião da inoculação. Após 150 dias, observou-se aumento na altura, biomassa e área foliar nos tratamentos com G. albida, em solo desinfestado. Respostas à inoculação ocorreram nas mudas cultivadas com a menor dose de P, nos dois tratamentos de solo. A mangabeira mostrou-se dependente da micorrização apenas na menor dose de P em solo desinfestado. Nos demais níveis de P, a dependência variou em função do FMA e da condição do solo. A associação com G. albida proporcionou melhor desenvolvimento das mudas de mangabeira.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of the association of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and phosphorus fertilization on seedlings of "mangaba" (Hancornia speciosa. The experiment, at a greenhouse, was in a completely randomized factorial design with two treatments of the native soil from an H. speciosa orchard, fumigated with methyl bromite and non-fumigated, six doses of P (3*, 3, 48, 93, 138 and 183 mg dm-3 and three inoculation treatments, Gigaspora albida Schenck & Smith, Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gerdemann and an uninoculated control, with four replicates. The treatment 3* did not receive nutrient solution and the others received Hoagland nutrient solution without phosphorus

  12. The nucleus of differentiated root plant cells: modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lingua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclei of plant cells show marked differences in chromatin organisation, related to their DNA content, which ranges from the type with large strands of condensed chromatin (reticulate or chromonematic nuclei to one with mostly decondensed chromatin (chromocentric or diffuse nuclei. A loosening of the chromatin structure generally occurs in actively metabolising cells, such as differentiating and secretory cells, in relation to their high transcriptional activity. Endoreduplication may occur, especially in plants with a small genome, which increases the availability of nuclear templates, the synthesis of DNA, and probably regulates gene expression. Here we describe structural and quantitative changes of the chromatin and their relationship with transcription that occur in differentiated cells following an increase of their metabolism. The nuclei of root cortical cells of three plants with different 2C DNA content (Allium porrum, Pisum sativum and Lycopersicon esculentm and their modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhization, which strongly increase the metabolic activity of colonised cells, are taken as examples.

  13. Sugar beet waste and its component ferulic acid inhibits external mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Almudena; Jakobsen, Iver; Egsgaard, Helge

    2011-01-01

    mycelium in soil whereas non-fermented waste (SB) had a strong inhibitory effect. The underlying mechanisms are not understood. We used gas chromatography–mass spectrometry to identify differences in composition of water extracts of ASB and SB. The chromatograms showed that ferulic acid was present in SB...... and absent in ASB. We compared the effects of the water extracts of SB and ASB and ferulic acid upon the growth of Glomus intraradices in in vitro monoxenic cultures. Hyphal growth of the AM fungus G. intraradices was extremely reduced in ferulic acid and SB treatments. Moreover, AM hyphae appeared......External arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) mycelium plays an important role in soil while interacting with a range of biotic and abiotic factors. One example is the soil organic amendment sugar beet waste. The fermented Aspergillus niger–sugar beet waste (ASB) increases growth and P uptake by the AM...

  14. The interactions between plant life form and fungal traits of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi determine the symbiotic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Álvaro; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Barea, José M

    2014-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have traditionally been considered generalist symbionts. However, an increasing number of studies are pointing out the selectivity potential of plant hosts. Plant life form, determined by plant life history traits, seems to drive the AM fungal community composition. The AM fungi also exhibit a wide diversity of functional traits known to be responsible for their distribution in natural ecosystems. However, little is known about the role of plant and fungal traits driving the resultant symbiotic assemblages. With the aim of testing the feedback relationship between plant and fungal traits on the resulting AM fungal community, we inoculated three different plant life forms, i.e. annual herbs, perennial herbs and perennial semi-woody plants, with AM fungal communities sampled in different seasons. We hypothesized that the annual climate variation will induce changes in the mean traits of the AM fungal communities present in the soil throughout the year. Furthermore, the association of plants with different life forms with AM fungi with contrasting life history traits will show certain preferences according to reciprocal traits of the plants and fungi. We found changes in the AM fungal community throughout the year, which were differentially disrupted by disturbance and altered by plant growth form and plant biomass. Both plant and fungal traits clearly contributed to the resultant AM fungal communities. The revealed process can have implications for the functioning of ecosystems since changes in dominant plant life forms or climatic variables could influence the traits of AM fungal communities in soil and hence ecosystem processes.

  15. Influence of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth, nutrition and phytochemical constituents of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajendran Srinivasan; Chinnavenkataraman Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the isolation, identification, mass production and the effect of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM fungi) on growth parameters of the Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus).Methods:Acaulospora marrowae, Glomus aggregatum (G. aggregatum), Glomus fasciculatum, Glomusgeosporum, Gigaspora margarita, Gigaspora nigra, Scutellospora heterogama and Scutellospora pellucida were isolated and identified from the root zone soil of C. roseus.Results:A total of nine different AM fungi species such as Acaulospora scrobiculata, The phytochemical analyses showed high concentration of chlorophyll a (0.152±0.0140 µg/g), chlorophyll b (0.081±0.006 µg/g), total chlorophyll (0.233±0.020 µg/g), soluble sugar (0.051±0.004 µg/g), reducing sugar (0.060±0,007 µg/g), phenols (0.293±0.032 µg/g), ortho-dihydroxy phenols (0.275±0.022 µg/g), lipids (0.300±0.025 µg/g), proteins (0.063±0.003 µg/g) and amino acids (1.042±0.056 µg/g) in G. aggregatum inoculated C. roseus. G. aggregatum was found to perform better on growth when compared to others and phytochemical constituents of C. roseus.Conclusions:fasciculatum can be used as a potential growth promoters for the C. roseus for better yielding in the agricultural sectors. It is concluded from the present findings that the G. aggregatum and Glomus fasciculatum can be used as a potential growth promoters for the C. roseus for better yielding in the agricultural sectors.

  16. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi at a large-scale antimony mining area in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuan; Chen, Zhipeng; Wu, Fengchang; Hou, Hong; Li, Jining; Shangguan, Yuxian; Zhang, Juan; Li, Fasheng; Zeng, Qingru

    2015-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have great potential for assisting heavy metal hyperaccumulators in the remediation of contaminated soils. However, little information is available about the community composition of AMF under natural conditions in soils contaminated by antimony (Sb). The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of AMF molecular diversity, and to explore the effects of Sb content and soil properties on the AMF community structure in an Sb mining area. Four Sb mine spoils and one adjacent reference area were selected from around the Xikuangshan mine in southern China. The association of AMF molecular diversity and community composition with the rhizosphere soils of the dominant plant species was studied by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Results from all five studied sites showed that the diversity of AMF decreased with increasing Sb concentration. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the AMF community structure was markedly different among these groups. Further redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that Sb contamination was the dominating factor influencing the AMF community structure in the Sb mine area. However, the multivariate analysis showed that, apart from the soil Sb content, extractable nitrogen content and organic matter content also attributed to AMF sequence distribution type. Some AMF sequences were only found in the highly contaminated area and these might be ideal candidates for improving phytoremediation efficiency in Sb mining regions. Gene sequencing analysis revealed that most species were affiliated with Glomus, suggesting that Glomus was the dominant AMF genus in the studied Sb mining area. PMID:25766009

  17. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on whole-plant respiration and thermal acclimation of tropical tree seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Catherine; Winter, Klaus; Slot, Martijn; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2016-02-01

    Symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous in tropical forests. AMF play a role in the forest carbon cycle because they can increase nutrient acquisition and biomass of host plants, but also incur a carbon cost to the plant. Through their interactions with their host plants they have the potential to affect how plants respond to environmental perturbation such as global warming. Our objective was to experimentally determine how plant respiration rates and responses to warmer environment are affected by AMF colonization in seedlings of five tropical tree species at the whole plant level. We evaluated the interaction between AMF colonization and temperature on plant respiration against four possible outcomes; acclimation does or does not occur regardless of AMF, or AMF can increase or decrease respiratory acclimation. Seedlings were inoculated with AMF spores or sterilized inoculum and grown at ambient or elevated nighttime temperature. We measured whole plant and belowground respiration rates, as well as plant growth and biomass allocation. There was an overall increase in whole plant, root, and shoot respiration rate with AMF colonization, whereas temperature acclimation varied among species, showing support for three of the four possible responses. The influence of AMF colonization on growth and allocation also varied among plant species. This study shows that the effect of AMF colonization on acclimation differs among plant species. Given the cosmopolitan nature of AMF and the importance of plant acclimation for predicting climate feedbacks a better understanding of the patterns and mechanisms of acclimation is essential for improving predictions of how climate warming may influence vegetation feedbacks.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota associated with roots of Ammophila arenaria growing in maritime dunes of Bornholm (Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available 155 rhizosphere soil and root mixtures were collected from under Ammophila arenaria colonizing maritime dunes of the island Bornholm (Denmark to determine arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the phylum Glomeromycota co-existing with this plant. In the laboratory, each mixture was divided into two parts. One part was used to establish a pot culture with Plantago lanceolata as the host plant to initiate sporulation of fungi that had not produced spores in field conditions. In the second part, the numerical and species composition of the spore populations of AMF sporulating in the field was determined. Spores of AMF were found in 70 field-collected samples and 134 trap cultures. They represented 26 species and six undescribed morphotypes in six genera of the Glomeromycota. Of them, 20 species and three morphotypes in five genera occurred in the field, and 16 species and three morphotypes in five genera were found in trap cultures. The fungi most frequently revealed were members of the genus Glomus; a total of 17 species and six morphotypes of this genus were recognized. Considering the occurrence of spores in both field samples and trap cultures, the fungi most frequently co-occurring with roots of A. arenaria growing in the dunes of Bornholm were G. irregulare (present in 73.6% of samples, followed by Scutellospora dipurpurescens (19.4% and Archaeospora trappei (10.3%. However, Glomus irregulare mainly sporulated in trap cultures; spores of this fungus were found in only 0.6% of field samples. Other relatively frequently found species were G. aggregatum (9.0%, G. eburneum (7.1%, Paraglomus laccatum (5.2%, and S. armeniaca (6.5%. The species most abundantly sporulating in the field were G. aggregatum (produced 28.36% of all spores isolated, G. badium (11.00%, and S. dipurpurescens (21.55%.

  19. Revealing natural relationships among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: culture line BEG47 represents Diversispora epigaea, not Glomus versiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Schüssler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the mechanisms underlying biological phenomena, such as evolutionarily conservative trait inheritance, is predicated on knowledge of the natural relationships among organisms. However, despite their enormous ecological significance, many of the ubiquitous soil inhabiting and plant symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, phylum Glomeromycota are incorrectly classified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we focused on a frequently used model AMF registered as culture BEG47. This fungus is a descendent of the ex-type culture-lineage of Glomus epigaeum, which in 1983 was synonymised with Glomus versiforme. It has since then been used as 'G. versiforme BEG47'. We show by morphological comparisons, based on type material, collected 1860-61, of G. versiforme and on type material and living ex-type cultures of G. epigaeum, that these two AMF species cannot be conspecific, and by molecular phylogenetics that BEG47 is a member of the genus Diversispora. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights that experimental works published during the last >25 years on an AMF named 'G. versiforme' or 'BEG47' refer to D. epigaea, a species that is actually evolutionarily separated by hundreds of millions of years from all members of the genera in the Glomerales and thus from most other commonly used AMF 'laboratory strains'. Detailed redescriptions substantiate the renaming of G. epigaeum (BEG47 as D. epigaea, positioning it systematically in the order Diversisporales, thus enabling an evolutionary understanding of genetical, physiological, and ecological traits, relative to those of other AMF. Diversispora epigaea is widely cultured as a laboratory strain of AMF, whereas G. versiforme appears not to have been cultured nor found in the field since its original description.

  20. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Species Dependency Governs Better Plant Physiological Characteristics and Leaf Quality of Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Song-Mei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Bei; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Xian-Zhi; Liu, Gui-Xi; Zhu, Li-Quan; He, Xin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the synergic interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and its host mulberry (Morus alba L.), an important perennial multipurpose plant, has theoretical and practical significance in mulberry plantation, silkworm cultivation, and relevant textile industry. In a greenhouse study, we compared functional distinctions of three genetically different AMF species (Acaulospora scrobiculata, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices) on physiological and growth characteristics as well as leaf quality of 6-month-old mulberry seedlings. Results showed that mulberry was AMF-species dependent, and AMF colonization significantly increased shoot height and taproot length, stem base and taproot diameter, leaf and fibrous root numbers, and shoot and root biomass production. Meanwhile, leaf chlorophyll a or b and carotenoid concentrations, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were generally significantly greater, while intercellular CO2 concentration was significantly lower in AMF-inoculated seedlings than in non-AMF-inoculated counterparts. These trends were also generally true for leaf moisture, total nitrogen, all essential amino acids, histidine, proline, soluble protein, sugar, and fatty acid as they were significantly increased under mycorrhization. Among these three tested AMFs, significantly greater effects of AMF on above-mentioned mulberry physiological and growth characteristics ranked as F. mosseae > A. scrobiculata > R. intraradices, whilst on mulberry leaf quality (e.g., nutraceutical values) for better silkworm growth as F. mosseae ≈A. scrobiculata > R. intraradices. In conclusion, our results showed that greater mulberry biomass production, and nutritional quality varied with AMF species or was AMF-species dependent. Such improvements were mainly attributed to AMF-induced positive alterations of mulberry leaf photosynthetic pigments, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and N

  1. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on whole-plant respiration and thermal acclimation of tropical tree seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Catherine; Winter, Klaus; Slot, Martijn; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2016-02-01

    Symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous in tropical forests. AMF play a role in the forest carbon cycle because they can increase nutrient acquisition and biomass of host plants, but also incur a carbon cost to the plant. Through their interactions with their host plants they have the potential to affect how plants respond to environmental perturbation such as global warming. Our objective was to experimentally determine how plant respiration rates and responses to warmer environment are affected by AMF colonization in seedlings of five tropical tree species at the whole plant level. We evaluated the interaction between AMF colonization and temperature on plant respiration against four possible outcomes; acclimation does or does not occur regardless of AMF, or AMF can increase or decrease respiratory acclimation. Seedlings were inoculated with AMF spores or sterilized inoculum and grown at ambient or elevated nighttime temperature. We measured whole plant and belowground respiration rates, as well as plant growth and biomass allocation. There was an overall increase in whole plant, root, and shoot respiration rate with AMF colonization, whereas temperature acclimation varied among species, showing support for three of the four possible responses. The influence of AMF colonization on growth and allocation also varied among plant species. This study shows that the effect of AMF colonization on acclimation differs among plant species. Given the cosmopolitan nature of AMF and the importance of plant acclimation for predicting climate feedbacks a better understanding of the patterns and mechanisms of acclimation is essential for improving predictions of how climate warming may influence vegetation feedbacks. PMID:26865973

  2. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Species Dependency Governs Better Plant Physiological Characteristics and Leaf Quality of Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Song-Mei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Bei; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Xian-Zhi; Liu, Gui-Xi; Zhu, Li-Quan; He, Xin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the synergic interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and its host mulberry (Morus alba L.), an important perennial multipurpose plant, has theoretical and practical significance in mulberry plantation, silkworm cultivation, and relevant textile industry. In a greenhouse study, we compared functional distinctions of three genetically different AMF species (Acaulospora scrobiculata, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices) on physiological and growth characteristics as well as leaf quality of 6-month-old mulberry seedlings. Results showed that mulberry was AMF-species dependent, and AMF colonization significantly increased shoot height and taproot length, stem base and taproot diameter, leaf and fibrous root numbers, and shoot and root biomass production. Meanwhile, leaf chlorophyll a or b and carotenoid concentrations, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were generally significantly greater, while intercellular CO2 concentration was significantly lower in AMF-inoculated seedlings than in non-AMF-inoculated counterparts. These trends were also generally true for leaf moisture, total nitrogen, all essential amino acids, histidine, proline, soluble protein, sugar, and fatty acid as they were significantly increased under mycorrhization. Among these three tested AMFs, significantly greater effects of AMF on above-mentioned mulberry physiological and growth characteristics ranked as F. mosseae > A. scrobiculata > R. intraradices, whilst on mulberry leaf quality (e.g., nutraceutical values) for better silkworm growth as F. mosseae ≈A. scrobiculata > R. intraradices. In conclusion, our results showed that greater mulberry biomass production, and nutritional quality varied with AMF species or was AMF-species dependent. Such improvements were mainly attributed to AMF-induced positive alterations of mulberry leaf photosynthetic pigments, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and N

  3. Influence of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth, nutrition and phytochemical constituents of Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don.