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Sample records for arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced

  1. Use of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi for improved crop production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF), endophytic fungi reputed for their ability to enhance P uptake can be used to alleviate P deficiencies and improve crop productivity. Although the technology has been used in developed countries, it has not been applied in crop production systems in Africa to any significant level. This is ...

  2. The influence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas on production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arbuscular mycorrhizas produced slight increases in dry mater production in unsterilized field plots at Cedara, Natal. Phosphorus levels in plant tops showed no increases due to mycorrhizas but crude protein content of all mycorrhizal plants were ...

  3. Enhanced phytoremediation of soils contaminated with PAHs by arbuscular mycorrhiza and rhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cheng-Gang; Kong, Cun-Cui; Bian, Bian; Liu, Wei; Li, Yan; Luo, Yong-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Hong

    2017-09-02

    Greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the potential effectiveness of a legume (Sesbania cannabina), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Glomus mosseae), and rhizobia (Ensifer sp.) symbiosis for remediation of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in spiked soil. AMF and rhizobia had a beneficial impact on each other in the triple symbiosis. AMF and/or rhizobia significantly increased plant biomass and PAHs accumulation in plants. The highest PAHs dissipation was observed in plant + AMF + rhizobia treated soil, in which >97 and 85-87% of phenanthrene and pyrene, respectively, had been degraded, whereas 81-85 and 72-75% had been degraded in plant-treated soil. During the experiment, a relatively large amount of water-soluble phenolic compounds was detected in soils of AMF and/or rhizobia treatment. It matches well with the high microbial activity and soil enzymes activity. These results suggest that the mutual interactions in the triple symbiosis enhanced PAHs degradation via stimulating both microbial development and soil enzyme activity. The mutual interactions between rhizobia and AMF help to improve phytoremediation efficiency of PAHs by S. cannabina.

  4. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza and composted market waste on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined effects of composted market waste and Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) on Root Colonization (RC) and fibre yield of kenaf. The experimental design was 2 x 12 factorial in a Completely Randomized Design replicated three times. The treatments were with AM (AM+) and without (AM-) and twelve levels of ...

  5. Influence of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and phosphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was carried out to find out the effect of biofertilizers, vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM), and phosphate solubilising bacteria (PSB) individually and in combination on growth and physiological attributing properties of Marsdenia volubilis plant under nursery conditions. The plant seedlings were ...

  6. Enhanced hyphal growth of arbuscular mycorrhizae by root exudates derived from high R/FR treated Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Maki; Yamamoto, Naoya; Miyamoto, Taro; Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2016-06-02

    Red/Far Red (R/FR) sensing positively influences the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis of both legume and nonlegume plants through jasmonic acid (JA) and strigolactone signaling. We previously reported that root exudates obtained from high R/FR-grown plants contained more strigolactone than low R/FR-grown plants. To determine whether JA and JA derivatives were secreted from roots, we investigated the expression levels of JA-responsive genes in L. japonicus Miyakojima MG20 plants treated with root exudates prepared from either high or low R/FR light-treated plants. The root exudates from high R/FR light-treated plants were found to enhance the expression levels of JA-responsive genes significantly. Moreover, exogenous JA increased AM fungal hyphal elongation as did the root exudates derived from high R/FR-grown L. japonicus plants. We conclude that increased JA accumulation and secretion into root exudates from high R/FR light-grown plants is the best explanation for increased colonization and enhanced mycorrhization under these conditions.

  7. Successful joint ventures of plants: arbuscular mycorrhiza and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Ercolin, Flavia; Reinhardt, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Among the oldest symbiotic associations of plants are arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Although many of the symbiotic signaling components have been identified on the side of the plant, AM fungi have long evaded genetic analysis owing to their strict biotrophy and their exceptional genetics. Recently, the identification of the fungal symbiosis signal (Myc factor) and of a corresponding Myc factor receptor, and new insights into AM fungal genetics, have opened...

  8. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...... procedure is being used. These results indicate that VAM is of major importance to P uptake by the field-grown pea....

  9. The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on root precision nutrient foraging of two pioneer plant species during early reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Naeth, M. Anne

    2017-04-01

    On many post mining sites in the Lusatian Mining District (East Germany) soil heterogeneity consists of sandy soil with embedded clay-silt fragments. Those clays silt fragments might act as nutrient hotspots. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in an infertile ecosystem could enhance a plant's ability to selectively forage for those nutrients and thus to improve plants nutrient supply. In our study we investigated whether silt-clay fragments within a sandy soil matrix induced preferential root growth of Lotus corniculatus and Calamagrostis epigeios, whether arbuscular mycorrhizae influenced root foraging patterns, and to what extent selective rooting in clay silt fragments influenced plant growth were addressed in this research. Soil types were sterile and non-sterile sandy soil and clay-silt fragments. Treatments were with and without arbuscular mycorrhizae, with and without soil solution, and soil solution and mycorrhizal inoculum combined. Root biomass, root density and intraradical fungal alkaline phosphatase activity and frequency were determined in fragments relative to sandy soil. Furthermore, temporal relationship of number of roots in fragments and plant height was assessed. Lotus corniculatus showed strong selective rooting into fragments especially with those plants treated with commercial cultivated arbuscular mycorrhizae; Calamagrostis epigeios did not. Without arbuscular mycorrhizae, L. corniculatus growth was significantly reduced and selective rooting did not occur. Selective rooting induced significant growth spurts of L. corniculatus. Roots in fragments had higher fungal alkaline phosphatase activity suggesting that mycorrhizal efficiency and related plants phosphorus supply is enhanced in roots in fragments. The application of cultivated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly and quickly influenced root foraging patterns, especially those of L. corniculatus, suggesting mycorrhizae may also enhance the ability of other plants to selectively forage

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhiza in soil quality assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, M.; Jakobsen, I.

    1998-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi constitute a living bridge for the transport of nutrients from soil to plant roots, and are considered as the group of soil microorganisms that is of most direct importance to nutrient uptake by herbaceous plants. AM fungi also contribute to the formation of soil...... aggregates and to the protection of plants against drought and root pathogens. Assessment of soil quality, defined as the capacity of a soil to function within ecosystem boundaries to sustain biological productivity, maintain environmental quality, and promote plant health, should therefore include both...

  11. Plant nutrient transporter regulation in arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen; Bechmann, I.E.

    2002-01-01

    of nutrition. Their down-regulation in mycorrhizal roots, therefore, would be predicted as a result of symbiotic function. A variety of studies on Pi- Zn- and ammonium- or nitrate-transporter genes from two plant species indirectly support this model. For example, one study showed that the expression......This review discusses the role arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi play in the regulation of plant nutrient transporter genes. Many plant nutrient transporter genes appear to be transcriptionally regulated by a feed-back mechanism that reduces their expression when the plant reaches an optimal level...... of the high-affinity Pi-transporter MtPT2 within mycorrhizal roots of Medicago truncatula was inversely correlated with the concentration of P within the shoots, which suggested that P supply from the fungus influenced this gene's expression. However, there is some evidence that these plant nutrient...

  12. Environment and Host Affects Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF) Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Norahizah Abd; Jais, Hasnah Md; Hassan, Hasnuri Mat

    2016-11-01

    The association of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) and roots undoubtedly gives positive advantages to the host plant. However, heavily fertilised soil such as in oil palm plantation, inhibit the growth of mycorrhiza. Thus, the aim of this research is to distinguish and quantify the availability of AMF population and propagules at different sites of an oil palm plantation by Most Probable Number (MPN) assay. In addition, root infection method was employed to observe host compatibility through the propagation of AMF using two different types of hosts, monocotyledon ( Echinochloa cruss-galli ) and dicotyledon ( Vigna radiata ). Three different locations at an oil palm plantation were chosen for sampling. Each location was represented by a distinctive soil series, and were further divided into two sites, that is canopy and midway area. Midway site had a greater population of AMF compared to canopy. The result showed that different environments affect the availability of AMF in the soil. Higher number of AMF infection observed in monocotyledon host suggests that the fibrous root system provide a better association with mycorrhiza.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizas in cycads of southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, T; Udaiyan, K

    2002-08-01

    Root and soil samples of three potted or ground-grown cycads ( Cycas circinalis, C. revoluta, Zamiasp.) were collected between November 1999 and June 2000 and surveyed for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and spore populations. AM fungi were associated with all root systems and rhizosphere samples examined. Root colonization was of a typical Arum type and AM colonization levels differed significantly between species and between potted and ground-grown cycads. Mycorrhizal colonization levels were inversely related to root hair number and length. Spores of nine morphotypes belonging to three genera ( Acaulospora, Glomus, Scutellospora) were extracted from soil. The percentage root length colonized by AM fungi was not related to soil factors, but total AM fungal spore numbers in the rhizosphere soil were inversely related to soil nitrogen and phosphorus levels. AM fungal spore numbers in the soil were linearly related to root length colonized. The co-occurrence of septate non-mycorrhizal fungi was recorded for the first time in cycads. These observations and the relationship between plant mycorrhizal status and soil nutrients are discussed.

  14. Successful joint ventures of plants: arbuscular mycorrhiza and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolin, Flavia; Reinhardt, Didier

    2011-07-01

    Among the oldest symbiotic associations of plants are arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Although many of the symbiotic signaling components have been identified on the side of the plant, AM fungi have long evaded genetic analysis owing to their strict biotrophy and their exceptional genetics. Recently, the identification of the fungal symbiosis signal (Myc factor) and of a corresponding Myc factor receptor, and new insights into AM fungal genetics, have opened new avenues to address early communication and functional aspects of AM symbiosis. These advances will pave the way for breeding programs towards adapted AM fungi for crop production, and will shed light on the ecology and evolution of this remarkably successful symbiosis. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhiza effects on plant performance under osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Christian; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Olave, Jorge; Cartes, Paula; Borie, Fernando; Cornejo, Pablo

    2017-10-01

    At present, drought and soil salinity are among the most severe environmental stresses that affect the growth of plants through marked reduction of water uptake which lowers water potential, leading to osmotic stress. In general, osmotic stress causes a series of morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that affect plant performance. Several studies have found that diverse types of soil microorganisms improve plant growth, especially when plants are under stressful conditions. Most important are the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) which form arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) with approximately 80% of plant species and are present in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. Beyond the well-known role of AM in improving plant nutrient uptake, the contributions of AM to plants coping with osmotic stress merit analysis. With this review, we describe the principal direct and indirect mechanisms by which AM modify plant responses to osmotic stress, highlighting the role of AM in photosynthetic activity, water use efficiency, osmoprotectant production, antioxidant activities, and gene expression. We also discuss the potential for using AMF to improve plant performance under osmotic stress conditions and the lines of research needed to optimize AM use in plant production.

  16. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on microbial population and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous fungi distributed widely in soil ecosystems. It has been showed that AM fungi play an important role in improving soil nutrition and enhancing crop disease resistance, which have great application potentials in overcoming crop replant problems. In order to evaluate the effects ...

  17. Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza on Osmotic Adjustment and Photosynthetic Physiology of Maize Seedlings in Black Soils Region of Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen Xu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To investigate the effect of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi on maize growth, osmoregulation substances and photosynthetic physiology, a popular maize variety ZD 958 was measured under potted condition. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM symbiosis promoted plant growth, and enhanced plant height, leaf length, mean leaf width and dry weight. Higher soluble sugar and protein, but lower proline concentrations were detected in AM seedlings than corresponding non-AM seedlings. Quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and potential photochemical efficiency increased by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, meanwhile, AM plants had lower primary fluorescence but higher maximal fluorescence and variable fluorescence than non-AM plants. AM enhanced apparent quantum efficiency, maximum net photosynthetic rate, dark respiration rate and light saturation point, but reduced light compensation point. The conclusion was that, after the seedling inoculated with Glomus. tortuosum, AM symbioses could protect cell from being hurt through regulating substances related to osmotic adjustment, besides, the efficiency of light utilization, the capacity of using low light and the capacity of fitting and using high light were all increased by AM symbiosis.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of plants spontaneously colonizing the soda heap in Jaworzno (southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gucwa-Przepióra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies of the mycorrhizal status of plant species spontaneously established on the soda heap located in Jaworzno (Upper Silesia, Poland are presented. Additionally, the species of arbuscular fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota extracted from field-collected rhizosphere substrate samples of the heap are showed. Arbuscular mycorrhizae were described in 17 plant species. Five Glomus spp. were recognized in the spore populations of arbuscular fungi isolated. The investigation presented in this paper for the first time revealed Centaurea stoebe and Trifolium montanum to be hosts of arbuscular fungi.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non......-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant......-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza in species of Commelinidae (Liliopsida) in the state of Pernambuco (Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Gladstone Alves da; Santos Bartolomeu Acioli dos; Alves Marccus Vinícius; Maia Leonor Costa

    2001-01-01

    Mycorrhiza are a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, the main benefit to the plant being increased nutrient uptake. The arbuscular is the most important kind of mycorrhiza for agriculture and it is widespread in occurrence and distribution in most ecosystems. The aim of this work was to study the mycorrhizal status of the species of Commelinidae that occur in the State of Pernambuco. Plant roots, collected in ten municipalities, were washed, cleared in KOH, stained with Trypa...

  1. SOME PRELIMINARY DATA ABOUT VESICULAR – ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAS AT DIFFERENT SPECIES OF PLANTAGO

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta IANOVICI

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular – arbuscular mycorrhizas are though widely distributed. Root colonization of VAM fungi was studied in seven different species of Plantago. Colonization was high among all species. The highest intensity of root cortex colonization (M%), relative arbuscular richness (A%) and arbuscule richness in root fragments were found in the Plantago schwarzenbergiana. Comparison of the VAM colonization in roots from different ecosystems suggested that plants grown in the saline habitats might be...

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhiza differentially affects synthesis of essential oils in coriander and dill

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rydlová, Jana; Jelínková, M.; Dušek, K.; Dušková, E.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Püschel, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-131 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0571 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * aromatic plants * essential oils Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2016

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhiza stimulates biological nitrogen fixation in two Medicago spp. through omproved phosphorus acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Voříšková, Alena; Gryndlerová, H.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Jansa, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, MAR 27 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku no. 390. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05466S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * biological nitrogen fixation * phosphorus uptake Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  4. The development and significance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas as influenced by agricultural practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruissen, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and significance of vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM) in wheat and potatoes have been studied in relation to various farming systems and agricultural practices. The effects of farming systems on VAM have been observed on three neighbouring experimental farms in the vicinity of

  5. Gibberellin-Abscisic Acid Balances during Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Formation in Tomato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martin-Rodriguez, J.A.; Huertas, R.; Ho-Plagaro, T.; Ocampo, J.A.; Turečková, Veronika; Tarkowská, Danuše; Ludwig-Mueller, J.; Garcia-Garrido, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, AUG 23 (2016), s. 1273 ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * plant hormones * gibberellins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  6. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas in Plant Phosphorus Nutrition: Interactions between Pathways of Phosphorus Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots Have Important Implications for Understanding and Manipulating Plant Phosphorus Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, S.E.; Jakobsen, Iver; Grønlund, Mette

    2011-01-01

    In this Update, we review new findings about the roles of the arbuscular mycorrhizas (mycorrhiza = fungus plus root) in plant growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition. We focus particularly on the function of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses with different outcomes for plant growth (from positive...... and the regulation of P acquisition to the roles of AM fungi in determining the composition of natural plant assemblages in ecological settings and their changes with time....

  7. Carbon Uptake and the Metabolism and Transport of Lipids in an Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Philip E.; Douds, David D.; Bécard, Guillaume; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    1999-01-01

    Both the plant and the fungus benefit nutritionally in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: The host plant enjoys enhanced mineral uptake and the fungus receives fixed carbon. In this exchange the uptake, metabolism, and translocation of carbon by the fungal partner are poorly understood. We therefore analyzed the fate of isotopically labeled substrates in an arbuscular mycorrhiza (in vitro cultures of Ri T-DNA-transformed carrot [Daucus carota] roots colonized by Glomus intraradices) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Labeling patterns observed in lipids and carbohydrates after substrates were supplied to the mycorrhizal roots or the extraradical mycelium indicated that: (a) 13C-labeled glucose and fructose (but not mannitol or succinate) are effectively taken up by the fungus within the root and are metabolized to yield labeled carbohydrates and lipids; (b) the extraradical mycelium does not use exogenous sugars for catabolism, storage, or transfer to the host; (c) the fungus converts sugars taken up in the root compartment into lipids that are then translocated to the extraradical mycelium (there being little or no lipid synthesis in the external mycelium); and (d) hexose in fungal tissue undergoes substantially higher fluxes through an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway than does hexose in the host plant. PMID:10364411

  8. Effect of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa ecotype Warynski at different soil depths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gucwa-Przepióra, E.; Malkowski, E.; Sas-Nowosielska, A.; Kucharski, R.; Krzyzak, J.; Kita, A.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) of Deschampsia cespitosa roots at different depths in soils highly contaminated with heavy metals were studied in field trials. Mycorrhizal parameters, including frequency of mycorrhization, intensity of root cortex

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced arsenic resistance of both white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants in an arsenic-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Smith, F Andrew; Wang, Youshan; Chen, Baodong

    2008-09-01

    In a compartmented cultivation system, white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), with their roots freely intermingled, or separated by 37 microm nylon mesh or plastic board, were grown together in an arsenic (As) contaminated soil. The influence of AM inoculation on plant growth, As uptake, phosphorus (P) nutrition, and plant competitions were investigated. Results showed that both plant species highly depended on mycorrhizas for surviving the As contamination. Mycorrhizal inoculation substantially improved plant P nutrition, and in contrast markedly decreased root to shoot As translocation and shoot As concentrations. It also showed that mycorrhizas affected the competition between the two co-existing plant species, preferentially benefiting the clover plants in term of nutrient acquisition and biomass production. Based on the present study, the role of AM fungi in plant adaptation to As contamination, and their potential use for ecological restoration of As contaminated soils are discussed.

  10. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA FUNGI AS AN INDICATOR OF SOIL FERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akhid Syibli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are ubiquitous organism that forms association with the root of most terrestrial plants. AMF association also influence soil fertility through the enhancement of chemical, biological and physical content. In this study, we enumerated AMF spores from rhizosphere of Tithonia difersivolia as an indicator of soil fertility. The results showed that the most fertile soil had the highest AMF spores density. This research has confirmed that AMF has high interaction with organic carbon, organic matter, total phosphorus, cation exchange capacity, water level, soil fungi and soil bacteria. Partial regression analysis revealed the mathematic equation for their interaction. This equation used the abundant of AMF spores as an indicator for chemical, biological and physical fertility of the soil.

  11. EFFECT OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA FUNGI INOCULATION ON TEAK (Tectona grandis Linn. F AT CIKAMPEK, WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragil S.B. Irianto

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the effect of Arbuscular Mycorhiza Fungi (AMF on the early growth of teak (Tectona grandis Linn. F plantation. Teak seedlings were inoculated with Glomus aggregatum or Mycofer (mixing of four Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF : G. margarita, G. manihotis, G. etunicatum and Acalospora spinosa at the time of transplantation. At  three months old the seedlings were planted in Cikampek experimental forest. Results showed that application of G. aggregatum or mycofer to teak could accelerate height and diameter growth by up to 61%and4 7%, respectively, after three months in the field.

  12. SOME PRELIMINARY DATA ABOUT VESICULAR – ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAS AT DIFFERENT SPECIES OF PLANTAGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta IANOVICI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular – arbuscular mycorrhizas are though widely distributed. Root colonization of VAM fungi was studied in seven different species of Plantago. Colonization was high among all species. The highest intensity of root cortex colonization (M%, relative arbuscular richness (A% and arbuscule richness in root fragments were found in the Plantago schwarzenbergiana. Comparison of the VAM colonization in roots from different ecosystems suggested that plants grown in the saline habitats might be more dependence on VAM. There is a suggestion that AM fungi were able to detect variations in land. There is also an indication that VAM abundance was a response to stress.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced arsenic resistance of both white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yan; Zhu Yongguan; Smith, F. Andrew; Wang Youshan; Chen Baodong

    2008-01-01

    In a compartmented cultivation system, white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), with their roots freely intermingled, or separated by 37 μm nylon mesh or plastic board, were grown together in an arsenic (As) contaminated soil. The influence of AM inoculation on plant growth, As uptake, phosphorus (P) nutrition, and plant competitions were investigated. Results showed that both plant species highly depended on mycorrhizas for surviving the As contamination. Mycorrhizal inoculation substantially improved plant P nutrition, and in contrast markedly decreased root to shoot As translocation and shoot As concentrations. It also showed that mycorrhizas affected the competition between the two co-existing plant species, preferentially benefiting the clover plants in term of nutrient acquisition and biomass production. Based on the present study, the role of AM fungi in plant adaptation to As contamination, and their potential use for ecological restoration of As contaminated soils are discussed. - Both white clover and ryegrass highly depend on the mycorrhizal associations for surviving heavy arsenic contamination

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced arsenic resistance of both white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Yan; Zhu Yongguan [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Smith, F. Andrew [Soil and Land Systems, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Wang Youshan [Institute of Plant Nutrition and Resources, Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry, Beijing 100089 (China); Chen Baodong [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: bdchen@rcees.ac.cn

    2008-09-15

    In a compartmented cultivation system, white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), with their roots freely intermingled, or separated by 37 {mu}m nylon mesh or plastic board, were grown together in an arsenic (As) contaminated soil. The influence of AM inoculation on plant growth, As uptake, phosphorus (P) nutrition, and plant competitions were investigated. Results showed that both plant species highly depended on mycorrhizas for surviving the As contamination. Mycorrhizal inoculation substantially improved plant P nutrition, and in contrast markedly decreased root to shoot As translocation and shoot As concentrations. It also showed that mycorrhizas affected the competition between the two co-existing plant species, preferentially benefiting the clover plants in term of nutrient acquisition and biomass production. Based on the present study, the role of AM fungi in plant adaptation to As contamination, and their potential use for ecological restoration of As contaminated soils are discussed. - Both white clover and ryegrass highly depend on the mycorrhizal associations for surviving heavy arsenic contamination.

  15. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on photosynthesis and water status of maize plants under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Min; Tang, Ming; Chen, Hui; Yang, Baowei; Zhang, Fengfeng; Huang, Yanhui

    2008-09-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae on characteristics of the growth, water status, chlorophyll concentration, gas exchange, and chlorophyll fluorescence of maize plants under salt stress was studied in the greenhouse. Maize plants were grown in sand and soil mixture with five NaCl levels (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 g/kg dry substrate) for 55 days, following 15 days of non-saline pretreatment. Under salt stress, mycorrhizal maize plants had higher dry weight of shoot and root, higher relative chlorophyll content, better water status (decreased water saturation deficit, increased water use efficiency, and relative water content), higher gas exchange capacity (increased photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, and decreased intercellular CO(2) concentration), higher non-photochemistry efficiency [increased non-photochemical quenching values (NPQ)], and higher photochemistry efficiency [increased the maximum quantum yield in the dark-adapted state (Fv/Fm), the maximum quantum yield in the light-adapted sate (Fv'/Fm'), the actual quantum yield in the light-adapted steady state (phiPSII) and the photochemical quenching values (qP)], compared with non-mycorrhizal maize plants. In addition, AM symbiosis could trigger the regulation of the energy biturcation between photochemical and non-photochemical events reflected in the deexcitation rate constants (kN, kN', kP, and kP'). All the results show that G. mosseae alleviates the deleterious effect of salt stress on plant growth, through improving plant water status, chlorophyll concentration, and photosynthetic capacity, while the influence of AM symbiosis on photosynthetic capacity of maize plants can be indirectly affected by soil salinity and mycorrhizae-mediated enhancement of water status, but not by the mycorrhizae-mediated enhancement of chlorophyll concentration and plant biomass.

  16. Regulação do desenvolvimento de micorrizas arbusculares Regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizae development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Gabriela Kiriachek

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As micorrizas arbusculares (MAs são associações simbióticas mutualistas entre fungos do filo Glomeromycota e a maioria das plantas terrestres. A formação e o funcionamento das MAs depende de um complexo processo de troca de sinais, que resulta em mudanças no metabolismo dos simbiontes e na diferenciação de uma interface simbiótica no interior das células das raízes. Os mecanismos que regulam a formação das MAs são pouco conhecidos, mas sabe-se que a concentração de fosfato (P na planta é um fator determinante para o desenvolvimento da simbiose. A disponibilidade de P na planta pode afetar o balanço de açúcares e de fitormônios (FHs, além da expressão de genes de defesa vegetal. Com o advento da genômica e proteômica, vários genes essenciais para o desenvolvimento das MAs já foram identificados e seus mecanismos de regulação estão sendo estudados. Até o presente, sabe-se que as plantas secretam substâncias que estimulam a germinação de esporos e o crescimento de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs. Há evidências também de que os FMAs sintetizam moléculas sinalizadoras, que são reconhecidas pelas plantas hospedeiras. Pelo menos três genes são essenciais para o reconhecimento dessa molécula e a transdução do sinal molecular. Discutem-se os papéis desses genes e os possíveis mecanismos que regulam sua expressão, bem como os papéis dos FHs na regulação de MAs são discutidos.Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM are mutualistic symbiotic associations between fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota and most terrestrial plants. The formation and functioning of AM depend on a complex signal exchange process, which ultimately results in shifts in the metabolism of the symbionts and differentiation of a symbiotic interface in cortical root cells. The mechanisms regulating AM development are not well understood, but it is known that phosphate (P concentration in plants plays a key role in this process. Plant P

  17. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Stimulates Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Medicago spp. through Improved Phosphorus Acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, M.; Voříšková, A.; Gryndlerová, Hana; Vosátka, M.; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, MAR 27 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 390. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05466S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * nitrogen acquisition * phosphorus uptake Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  18. Morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza on bulbous plants (Taurus mountain in Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    Karaarslan Emel; Uyanöz Refik; Doğu Süleyman

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) on bulbous plants in the Taurus Mountains in Turkey. Thirteen soil samples and bulbous roots were taken from the rhizosphere of bulbous plants. The soils were analyzed for the number of VAM spores and chemical and physical properties. In addition, the roots were examined for infection levels, and morphological identification of VAM spores was ma...

  19. Isolation and Identification of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza-Stimulatory Compounds from Clover (Trifolium repens) Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Muraleedharan G.; Safir, Gene R.; Siqueira, Jose O.

    1991-01-01

    Two isoflavonoids isolated from clover roots grown under phosphate stress were characterized as formononetin (7-hydroxy,4′-methoxy isoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy,4′-methoxy isoflavone). At 5 ppm, these compounds stimulated hyphal growth in vitro and root colonization of an undescribed vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza, a Glomus sp. (INVAM-112). The permethylated products of the two compounds were inactive. These findings suggest that the isoflavonoids studied may act as signal molec...

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza contribution to the growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2009-06-12

    Jun 12, 2009 ... plant height and stem girth of sunflower plants only at 80 mg Cd kg-1 concentration. Highest values of ... fungi colonization percentage was obtained with increase in Cd and Pb concentrations. Key words: Glomus ..... of plants, mycorrhizae and phytochelators in heavy metal contaminated land remediation.

  1. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhiza in the rhizosphere of Cajeput in agroforestry system with different fertilizer management of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwi; Pudjiasmanto, B.; Purnomo, D.; Cahyani, VR

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhiza in rhizosphere of cajeput with different fertilizer management of maize. This research was conducted by observation on cajeput agroforestry system in Ponorogo that have different fertilizer management of maize: conventional management (CM), universal management (UM) and alternative management (AM1, AM2, and AM3). The result showed that the highest infection of arbuscular mycorrhiza was observed in the plot of AM3, while the lowest colonization was observed in the plot of CM. Infection of arbuscular mycorrhiza in roots cajeput from five fertilizer management, ranging from 32.64% - 63.33%. In all fertilizer management, there were eight species of arbuscular mycorrhiza which five species were Glomus genus, one species was Acaulospora genus and two species were Gigaspora genus. Glomus constrictum was the dominant species in all fertilizer management. Acaulospora favoeta was found only in the plot of AM3. Spore density varies between 150-594 / 100g of soil. The highest spore density was observed in the plot of AM3, while the lowest spore density was observed in the plot of AM1. The highest diversity index value of arbuscular mycorrhiza (Species richness and Shannon-Wiener) was observed in the plot of AM3.

  2. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-04

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem.

  3. [Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) on Tolerance of Cattail to Cd Stress in Aquatic Environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng-cheng; Li, Hang; Wang, Shu-guang

    2016-02-15

    Hygrophytes are planted more and more in landscaping and greening in many cities, but they often encounter threat from environmental pollution. Arbuscular mycorrhiza ( AM ) have been confirmed to enhance the tolerance of terrestrial plants to environmental pollution in many previous studies, but it is unclear how they affect hygrophytes. In the present study, a hydroponic culture experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AM fungi (Glomus etunicatum) inoculation on the tolerance of cattail (Typha latifolia) to different concentrations Cd2+ (0, 2.5, 5.0 mg x L(-1)). The aim was to provide reference for evaluating whether mycorrhizal technology can be used to enhance the tolerance of hygrophytes to environmental pollution. The results showed that symbiotic association was well established between AM fungi and cattail roots, and the mycorrhizal colonization rates (MCR) were beyond 30%. However, MCR presented downward trend one month after mycorrhizal cattails were transported to solution, and the maximal decrease was 25.5% (P < 0.05). AM increased pigment concentrations and peroxidase (POD) activity in cattail leaves, and also increased roots radial oxygen loss. However, AM only produced significant effect on increase of fresh weight in 5 mg x L(-1) Cd2+ solution. Although plant growth was inhibited by 5 mg x L(-1) Cd2+ and MCR was lower, AM increased Cd uptake of cattail at the two Cd2+ levels, and the maximal increments were 40.24% and 56.52% in aboveground and underground parts, respectively. This study indicates that AM has potential to enhance the tolerance of hygrophytes to environmental pollution and might be used to remedy heavy metal pollution.

  4. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1983-01-01

    The effect of inoculation with vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth of barley in the field was studied at two levels of soil P on plots fumigated with methyl bromide. During the vegetative phase, growth and P uptake was influenced only by soil P; P uptake in the period from earing...... and inoculation increased the uptake of bromide, Zn and Cu significantly. Mycorrhizal infection in inoculated plots was first observed 25 days after seedling emergence, and final infection levels were c. 50% in contrast to 12 % without inoculation. The introduced endophyte had spread 30 cm horizontally during...

  5. Terpenoids in plant and arbuscular mycorrhiza-reinforced defence against herbivorous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Esha; Anand, Garima; Kapoor, Rupam

    2017-03-01

    Plants, though sessile, employ various strategies to defend themselves against herbivorous insects and convey signals of an impending herbivore attack to other plant(s). Strategies include the production of volatiles that include terpenoids and the formation of symbiotic associations with fungi, such as arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). This constitutes a two-pronged above-ground/below-ground attack-defence strategy against insect herbivores. Terpenoids represent an important constituent of herbivore-induced plant volatiles that deter herbivores and/or attract their predators. Terpenoids serve as airborne signals that can induce defence responses in systemic undamaged parts of the plant and also prime defence responses in neighbouring plants. Colonization of roots by AM fungi is known to influence secondary metabolism in plants; this includes alteration of the concentration and composition of terpenoids, which can boost both direct and indirect plant defence against herbivorous insects. Enhanced nutrient uptake facilitated by AM, changes in plant morphology and physiology and increased transcription levels of certain genes involved in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway result in alterations in plant terpenoid profiles. The common mycorrhizal networks of external hyphae have added a dimension to the two-pronged plant defence strategy. These act as conduits to transfer defence signals and terpenoids. Improved understanding of the roles of terpenoids in plant and AM defences against herbivory and of interplant signalling in natural communities has significant implications for sustainable management of pests in agricultural ecosystems. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Role of arbuscular mycorrhiza in alleviating salinity stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown under ambient and elevated CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, X.; Song, F.; Liu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and development are influenced by future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased salinity stress. AM (arbuscular mycorrhiza) symbiosis has been shown to improve plant growth and resistance to environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential...

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhiza in species of Commelinidae (Liliopsida in the state of Pernambuco (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Gladstone Alves da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhiza are a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, the main benefit to the plant being increased nutrient uptake. The arbuscular is the most important kind of mycorrhiza for agriculture and it is widespread in occurrence and distribution in most ecosystems. The aim of this work was to study the mycorrhizal status of the species of Commelinidae that occur in the State of Pernambuco. Plant roots, collected in ten municipalities, were washed, cleared in KOH, stained with Trypan blue in lactoglycerol and observed under a light microscope in order to assess presence and identification of the mycorrhizal type. Percentage of root colonization was evaluated by the gridline intersect method. Forty specimens representing 30 species were observed. From these specimens, 70% were colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. In one family (Typhaceae, mycorrhizal structures were not observed, in two of them (Eriocaulaceae and Juncaceae all specimens showed the association, and three families (Commelinaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae presented specimens with or without AMF. In some of the roots, other fungi were observed together with the AMF. The results indicate that AMF are widely distributed among species of Commelinidae in Pernambuco, being probably important for their establishment in the areas visited.

  8. Plant 9-lox oxylipin metabolism in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ocampo, Juan A; García Garrido, José M

    2012-12-01

    The establishment of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal symbiotic interaction (MA) is a successful strategy to substantially promote plant growth, development and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the recognition and establishment of symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, the jasmonates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed upregulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and point a key regulatory feature for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly these derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX). In this mini-review we highlight recent progress understanding the function of oxylipins in the establishment of the AM symbiosis and hypothesize that the activation of the 9-LOX pathway might be part of the activation of host defense responses which will then contribute to both, the control of AM fungal spread and the increased resistance to fungal pathogens in mycorrhizal plants.

  9. Agroecology: the key role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gollotte, Armelle; Binet, Marie-Noëlle; van Tuinen, Diederik; Redecker, Dirk; Wipf, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    The beneficial effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant performance and soil health are essential for the sustainable management of agricultural ecosystems. Nevertheless, since the 'first green revolution', less attention has been given to beneficial soil microorganisms in general and to AM fungi in particular. Human society benefits from a multitude of resources and processes from natural and managed ecosystems, to which AM make a crucial contribution. These resources and processes, which are called ecosystem services, include products like food and processes like nutrient transfer. Many people have been under the illusion that these ecosystem services are free, invulnerable and infinitely available; taken for granted as public benefits, they lack a formal market and are traditionally absent from society's balance sheet. In 1997, a team of researchers from the USA, Argentina and the Netherlands put an average price tag of US $33 trillion a year on these fundamental ecosystem services. The present review highlights the key role that the AM symbiosis can play as an ecosystem service provider to guarantee plant productivity and quality in emerging systems of sustainable agriculture. The appropriate management of ecosystem services rendered by AM will impact on natural resource conservation and utilisation with an obvious net gain for human society.

  10. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizae under CuSO4 stress community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizae under CuSO4 stress in Capsicum annuum L. and Zea mays L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Chaudhry, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Community structure and ecology of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was studied in the present study using two host plant species i.e. Capsicum annuum L. and Zea mays L. under CuSO4 stress. Five levels of copper sulfate (CuSO4) i.e. 0 ppm (control), 25 ppm, 50 ppm, 75 ppm, and 100 ppm were used to elucidate their influence on mycorrhizal community. Results showed that some spores disappeared with increased metal content while other spores were abundant even at a high level of stress. Present studies supported the stress tolerance mechanism conferred by AMF spore density and diversity. Value of Simpson index was shown to decrease from 3.58 to 2.42. Shannon index value was changed from 0.27 to 0.51. Similar rise in the values was observed for spore diversity i.e. 20.94 to 79.13. However, it may be concluded that spore ecotypes might vary in their abundance depending upon the host plant and soil physical-chemical characters that control the metal availability to plants. Among all the four plant varieties, ghotki chilli seemed to have less species associated with it. It can be concluded that when compared to the control, more mycorrhizal types were found to be associated with plants under stress which could prove the tolerance of mycorrhizae against the heavy metals and their positive role in protecting plant from the toxicity of heavy metals. (author)

  12. Enzymatic evidence for the key role of arginine in nitrogen translocation by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz, C.; Egsgaard, Helge; Trujillo, C.

    2007-01-01

    Key enzymes of the urea cycle and N-15-labeling patterns of arginine (Arg) were measured to elucidate the involvement of Arg in nitrogen translocation by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Mycorrhiza was established between transformed carrot (Daucus carota) roots and Glomus intraradices in two...... weight h(-1). The results highlight the synchronization of the spatially separated reactions involved in the anabolic and catabolic arms of the urea cycle. This synchronization is a prerequisite for Arg to be a key component in nitrogen translocation in the AM mycelium....... was used to follow the dynamics of nitrogen incorporation into and turnover of Arg. Both the absence of external nitrogen and the presence of L- norvaline, an inhibitor of Arg synthesis, prevented the synthesis of Arg in the ERM and resulted in decreased activity of arginase and urease in the AM root...

  13. Morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza on bulbous plants (Taurus mountain in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaarslan Emel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM on bulbous plants in the Taurus Mountains in Turkey. Thirteen soil samples and bulbous roots were taken from the rhizosphere of bulbous plants. The soils were analyzed for the number of VAM spores and chemical and physical properties. In addition, the roots were examined for infection levels, and morphological identification of VAM spores was made. All tested plants are considered mycorrhizal plants. We determined three spore species (Glomus mosseae, Glomus hoi and Scutellospora calospora from the surveyed soils. The spore distribution rates were as follows: G. Mossea 61.54 %, G. Hoi 23.07 % and Scutellospora calospora 15.38 %. Results suggest that VAM fungal spores and root colonization display variation in rhizosphere under bulbous plants in different ecological conditions.

  14. The relationship between thiamine and two symbioses: Root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Miwa; Parniske, Martin; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-12-01

    Lotus japonicus THIC is expressed in all organs, and the encoded protein catalyzes thiamine biosynthesis. Loss of function produces chlorosis, a typical thiamine-deficiency phenotype, and mortality. To investigate thiamine's role in symbiosis, we focused on THI1, a thiamine-biosynthesis gene expressed in roots, nodules, and seeds. The thi1 mutant had green leaves, but formed small nodules and immature seeds. These phenotypes were rescued by THI1 complementation and by exogenous thiamine. Thus, THI1 is required for nodule enlargement and seed maturation. On the other hand, colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis was not affected in the thi1 mutant or by exogenous thiamine. However, spores of R. irregularis stored more thiamine than the source (host plants), despite lacking thiamine biosynthesis genes. Therefore, disturbance of the thiamine supply would affect progeny phenotypes such as spore formation and hyphal growth. Further investigation will be required to elucidate thiamine's effect on AM.

  15. Transcriptional changes in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the model plant Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Anne; Manthey, Katja; Doll, Jasmin; Perlick, Andreas M; Linke, Burkhard; Bekel, Thomas; Meyer, Folker; Franken, Philipp; Küster, Helge; Krajinski, Franziska

    2003-04-01

    Significant changes in root morphology and physiology during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development are likely to be controlled by specific gene expression pattern in the host plant. Until now, little was known about transcriptional changes which occur AM-exclusively; that is, they do not occur during other root-microbe associations, nor are they induced by improved phosphate nutrition. In order to identify such AM-exclusive gene inductions of Medicago truncatula, we used a pool of different RNA samples as subtractor population in a suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) experiment. This approach resulted in the identification of a number of new AM-regulated genes. None of these genes were expressed in nonmycorrhiza roots or leaves. Electronic data obtained by comparison of the cDNA sequences to expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from a wide range of cDNA libraries in the M. truncatula EST database (Gene Index, MtGI) support the mycorrhiza specificity of the corresponding genes, because sequences in the MtGI that were found to match the identified SSH-cDNA sequences originated exclusively from AM cDNA libraries. The promoter of one of those genes, MtGst1, showing similarities to plant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) encoding genes, was cloned and used in reporter gene studies. In contrast to studies with the potato GST gene PRP, MtGst 1 promoter activity was detected in all zones of the root cortex colonized by Glomus intraradices, but nowhere else.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in cordate gametophytes of two ferns, Angiopteris lygodiifolia and Osmunda japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Sakoda, Aki; Ebihara, Atsushi; Yukawa, Tomohisa; Imaichi, Ryoko

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is common among land plants including pteridophytes (monilophytes and lycophytes). In pteridophytes with diplohaplontic life cycle, mycorrhizal formations were mostly reported for sporophytes, but very few for gametophytes. To clarify the mycorrhizal association of photosynthetic gametophytes, field-collected gametophytes of Angiopteris lygodiifolia (Marattiaceae, n = 52) and Osmunda japonica (Osmundaceae, n = 45) were examined using microscopic and molecular techniques. Collected gametophytes were mostly cut into two pieces. One piece was used for light and scanning microscopic observations, and the other for molecular identification of plant species (chloroplast rbcL sequences) and mycorrhizal fungi (small subunit rDNA sequences). Microscopic observations showed that 96 % (50/52) of Angiopteris and 95 % (41/43) of Osmunda gametophytes contained intracellular hyphae with arbuscules and/or vesicles and fungal colonization was limited to the inner tissue of the thick midribs (cushion). Fungal DNA analyses showed that 92 % (48/52) of Angiopteris and 92 % (35/38) of Osmunda have sequences of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which were highly divergent but all belonged to Glomus group A. These results suggest that A. lygodiifolia and O. japonica gametophytes consistently form arbuscular mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizal formation in wild fern gametophytes, based on large-scale sampling with molecular identification of host plant species, was demonstrated for the first time.

  17. Investigation of dryland wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Azar 2 plants response to symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhiza and mycorrhiza like fungi under different levels of drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yaghoubian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomuss mossea and mycorrhiza-like (Piriformospora indica effects on yield, yield components and some morphological (cv. Azar 2 traits of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under water deficit stress, a pot experiment was conducted as factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with four replications. Treatments were drought stress at three levels (FC, -5 and -10 bar and fungi inoculation at four levels (mycorrhiza (AM, mycorrhiza-like (MLF and co-inoculation of AM+MLF and control. Results showed that the water stress significantly decreased 1000-grain weight, spike harvest index, fertility percent of spike, plant height, peduncle and extrusion length and colonization percent while grain density per spike markedly increased. Fungi inoculation significantly improved all studied traits except harvest index, 1000-grain weight and root colonization. Co-inoculation of AM and MLF had the best performance in terms of all mentioned parameters. Interaction effects of fungi and water stress was significant on grain and biological yield, spike and grain number and positively affected by fungi inoculation. Among fungi treatments, however, co-inoculation of AM+MLF had the best performance and recommended for both stress and non stress conditions.

  18. Mycorrhizae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Jurgensen; Dana Richter; Carl C. Trettin; Mary Davis

    2000-01-01

    Mycorrhizae, a mutual partnership between certain soil fungi and fine root tips, contribute to tree growth and vigor by increasing both water and nutrient uptake, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The fungal hyphae increase root surface contact with the soil, while the fungi are supplied with a reliable source of carbon (Allen 1991, George and Marschner 1995...

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlich, Michael; Franken, Philipp; Graefe, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT) plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC) mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6-1500 kPa) was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  20. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bitterlich

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6–1500 kPa was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi mediate soil respiration response to climate change in California grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Carme; Mcfarland, Jack; Haw, Monica P.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Pugnaire, Francisco I.; Waldrop, Mark P.

    2017-04-01

    California grasslands store ca. 100 Tg of soil organic carbon (SOC) and almost 40% of those ecosystems are prone to land use changes. The fate of these carbon pools will largely depend on how the main components of soil respiration - i.e., roots, mycorrhiza, and 'bulk soil' communities- respond to such changes. In order to determine the sensitivity to environmental drivers we set up an experiment to address the effect of plant community composition, soil age and warming on soil respiration rate during the 2014-2015 winter. We tested differences among microbial, fungal and root respiration using an exclusion technique to assess the effect of plant community (open grasslands vs oak woodland) in two field sites differing in soil properties as nutrient content, related to geologic soil age (92 and 137 kyr). We also used open top chambers (OTC) to simulate global change effects on grasslands. Our results showed that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were the main drivers of differences recorded between soils of different age, and that those differences were linked to nutrient availability. Bulk soil respiration was more sensitive to environmental variation than mycorrhizal or root respiration, indicating that the presence of mycorrhizae and roots can regulate the capacity of CO2 emission to the atmosphere. Soil age affected CO2 flux from grasslands but not under oak canopies, likely due to the high concentration of SOM in oak canopies which moderated any affect of soil mineralogy on nutrient availability. Overall our study shows that the ability of grasslands to mitigate CO2 emissions depends on interactions between vegetation and their rhizosphere on soil microbial communities.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  4. The Role of Teak Leaves (Tectona grandis), Rhizobium, and Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizae on Improving Soil Structure and Soil Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliani; Rahayu, Y. S.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium is the largest mineral in calcareous soils. High levels of calcium carbonate lead to phosphate deposition. Nutrient deficiencies in calcareous soil (mainly Phosphate and Nitrogen) resulted only certain crops with a wide range of tolerances that can grow. Meanwhile, dynamics nutrient in calcareous soils also depend on the topography and decomposition of the litter in the growing vegetation. The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of nutrient enhancement and soil-texture structures on calcareous soils after littering the teak leaves, Rhizobium and Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza. The research parameters were the concentration of N, P, K; C/N ratio, humid acid content, and soil structure, which measured at days 30, 60, and 85 of soil decomposition process. The results showed that at days 30, the texture and structure of the soil tend to be stable (porosity 31.2, DMR 1.93, moisture content 0.36, sandy clay) while at days 85 has been very stable (porosity 49.8; Water content 0.28, sandy clay). While C and N organic, N and K concentration at days 30 showed low value (C organic 1.03, N 0.12, K 0.49, C / N ratio 9). This condition is almost unchanged at days 85. While the P value shows very high value (60.53) at days 30 although after 60 days the P content showed a decrease.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation and its function under elevated atmospheric O3: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D

    2017-07-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the effects of elevated O 3 on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formation and on AM role in promoting plant growth in regard to several moderating variables (O 3 levels, O 3 exposure duration, plant types, AM fungi family, and additional stress) by means of meta-analysis of published data. The analysis consisted of 117 trials representing 20 peer-reviewed articles and 16 unpublished trials. Relative to non-mycorrhizal controls, AM inoculation did not significantly alter plant growth (shoot biomass, root biomass, total biomass and plant height) when O 3 concentration was less than 80 ppb, but at concentrations above 80 ppb symbiosis was associated with increases of 68% in shoot biomass and 131% in root biomass. AM effects on plant growth were affected by the duration of O 3 exposure but did not differ much with AM fungi taxa or plant type. AM symbiosis has also led to higher yields under O 3 stress, relative to the non-mycorrhizal plants, and the AM effects have been more pronounced as O 3 concentration increases. As with biomass, AM effects on yield have been affected by the duration of O 3 exposure, with the greatest increase (100%) occurring at 61-90 d. AM-induced promotion of yield differed with fungal species but not with plant type or other abiotic stress. Colonization of roots by AM fungi has been negatively affected by elevated O 3 compared to ambient O 3 ; total mycorrhizal colonization rate (MCR), arbuscular MCR, vesicular MCR and hyphal coil MCR declined as O 3 levels rose. AM colonization rates were affected by duration of O 3 exposure, plant type, AM fungal taxa and other concurrent stresses in most cases. The analysis showed that AM inoculation has the potential to ameliorate detrimental effects of elevated O 3 on plant growth and productivity, despite colonization rates being negatively affected by elevated O 3 . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Impacts of manganese mining activity on the environment: interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Becerril, Facundo; Juárez-Vázquez, Lucía V; Hernández-Cervantes, Saúl C; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Vela-Correa, Gilberto; Cruz-Chávez, Enrique; Moreno-Espíndola, Iván P; Esquivel-Herrera, Alfonso; de León-González, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    The mining district of Molango in the Hidalgo State, Mexico, possesses one of the largest deposits of manganese (Mn) ore in the world. This research assessed the impacts of Mn mining activity on the environment, particularly the interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) at a location under the influence of an open Mn mine. Soils and plants from three sites (soil under maize, soil under native vegetation, and mine wastes with some vegetation) were analyzed. Available Mn in both soil types and mine wastes did not reach toxic levels. Samples of the two soil types were similar regarding physical, chemical, and biological properties; mine wastes were characterized by poor physical structure, nutrient deficiencies, and a decreased number of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) spores. Tissues of six plant species accumulated Mn at normal levels. AM was absent in the five plant species (Ambrosia psilostachya, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Cynodon dactylon, Polygonum hydropiperoides, and Wigandia urens) established in mine wastes, which was consistent with the significantly lower number of AMF spores compared with both soil types. A. psilostachya (native vegetation) and Zea mays showed mycorrhizal colonization in their root systems; in the former, AM significantly decreased Mn uptake. The following was concluded: (1) soils, mine wastes, and plant tissues did not accumulate Mn at toxic levels; (2) despite its poor physical structure and nutrient deficiencies, the mine waste site was colonized by at least five plant species; (3) plants growing in both soil types interacted with AMF; and (4) mycorrhizal colonization of A. psilostachya influenced low uptake of Mn by plant tissues.

  7. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza inoculation on growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R.R. Damaiyanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the research was to study the effect mycorrhiza on growth and yield of tomato. The experiment was conducted in screen house 14 m x 10.5 m, in Pasuruan on November 2013 until March 2014, The experiment was conducted as a factorial randomized complete design. The first factor was dose of mycorrhiza (without mycorrhiza, 5 g mycorrhiza, 10 g mycorrhiza, and 20 g mycorrhiza. The second factor was the salinity stress level (without NaCl, 2500 ppm NaCl, 5000 ppm NaCl, and 7500 ppm NaCl. The results showed that salinity stress at the level 7500 ppm decreased the amount of fruit by 30.84% and fresh weight per hectare decreased by 51.72%. Mycorrhizal application was not able to increase the growth and yield in saline stress conditions; it was shown by the level of infection and the number of spores on the roots of tomato plants lower the salinity level 5000 ppm and 7500 ppm. But separately, application of 20 g mycorrhiza enhanced plant growth, such as plant height, leaf area, leaf number and proline. Application of 20 g mycorrhiza increased the yield by 35.99%.

  8. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Vera Lúcia dos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM and ectomycorrhizae (ECM in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonization increased followed by a decrease in AM. Pisolithus tinctorius was favored in simultaneous inoculation with G. etunicatum, and the positive effect of the simultaneous inoculation of both fungi in the percent colonization by the AM fungus occurred up to 60 days after inoculation. After 120 days, colonization of roots by G. etunicatum decreased in the presence of P. tinctorius. When inoculated simultaneously, the proportion of AM and ECM varied with evaluation time, while the combined percentage of mycorrhizal roots approached the maximum and remained more or less constant after 60 days, suggesting that there could be competition between the fungi for limiting substrate. The maximum percent mycorrhizal colonization varied with Eucalyptus species and the highest value was observed for E. camaldulensis, followed in order by E. citriodora, E. urophylla, E. grandis and E. cloeziana.

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi facilitate rapid adaptation of Elsholtzia splendens to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Liang, Huijuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Luxi; Zhang, Huating; Liu, Jie; Wang, Suizi; Jin, Zexin

    2017-12-01

    Closely associated microbes have been shown to drive local adaptation of plants. However, few studies provide direct evidence, disclosing the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) in their rapid adaptation of plants toward heavy metal tolerance. Elsholtzia splendens is a Cu-tolerant plant that was used as a model plant to study seed morphological traits as well as traits related to seed germination and seedling growth. This was achieved after acclimation for two generations with 1000mg/kg CuSO 4 in either absence or presence of AMF. In the absence of AMF, acclimation to Cu for two generations significantly decreased surface area, perimeter length, and perimeter width of E. splendens seeds, as well as seedling survival rate and fresh weight of the radicle of seedlings. However, in the presence of AMF, both the germination rate and the germination index of E. splendens seeds as well as the fresh weights of hypocotyl and radicle significantly increased. These results revealed that after Cu acclimation treatment, seeds and seedlings that had been inoculated with AMF outperformed those without AMF inoculation under Cu addition, indicating that AMF can facilitate rapid adaptation of E. splendens to Cu stress. In addition, two generations of Cu acclimation under AMF absence significantly increased radicle length, while amplitude increased under AMF presence, indicating that the direct adaptive plasticity response of radicle length to Cu stress helps with the Cu stress adaptation of E. splendens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza on Plant Chemistry and the Development and Behavior of a Generalist Herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Viktoria V; Schweiger, Rabea; Müller, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formed between plants and AM fungi (AMF) can alter host plant quality and thus influence plant-herbivore interactions. While AM is known to affect the development of generalist chewing-biting herbivores, AM-mediated impacts on insect behavior have been neglected until now. In this study, the effects of Rhizophagus irregularis, a generalist AMF, on phenotypic and leaf metabolic traits of Plantago major plants were investigated. Further, the influence of AM-mediated host plant modifications on the development and on seven behavioral traits of larvae of the generalist Mamestra brassicae were recorded. Tests were carried out in the third (L3) and fourth (L4) larval instar, respectively. While shoot water content, specific leaf area, and foliar concentrations of the secondary metabolite aucubin were higher in AM-treated compared to non-mycorrhized (NM) plants, lower concentrations of the primary metabolites citric acid and isocitric acid were found in leaves of AM plants. Larvae reared on AM plants gained a higher body mass and tended to develop faster than individuals reared on NM plants. However, plant treatment had no significant effect on any of the behavioral traits. Instead, differences between larvae of different ages were detected in several behavioral features, with L4 being less active and less bold than L3 larvae. The results demonstrate that AM-induced modifications of host plant quality influence larval development, whereas the behavioral phenotype seems to be more fixed at least under the tested conditions.

  11. Quantitative Simulation of Damage Roots on Inoculated Alfalfa by Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underground mining would cause ground subsidence damage and large amounts of cracks, which would result a loss of surface moisture and nutrient and intensifying drought. There are a few reports about damage to plant roots caused by coal mining. The irregular distribution of plant roots in soil and the different forces generated in process of surface subsidence are difficult to study comprehensively. The technologies to repair damaged plant roots have not been completely perfected yet. Based on quantitative simulation of alfalfa root cut-repair experiment, this paper discusses the influences of inoculated Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on alfalfa root and the mitigation effects of an inoculation on the growth of alfalfa. Root injured alfalfa were investigated by soil pot experiments. The result indicated that at the same cut degree, the growth situation of inoculated alfalfa is better than the contrast. Compared with the Olsen-P content, at cut level of 0 and 1/3, the sand of inoculated alfalfa has less Olsen-P than contrast, at cut degree of 1/2 and 2/3, the sand of inoculated alfalfa has more Olsen-P than contrast, at degree of 3/4, the sand of inoculated alfalfa has less Olsen-P than contrast, the change trend of Olsen-P content is concerned with the relative strength size of absorb Olsen-P by alfalfa root and dissolve Olsen-P by root exudates and hyphae interstate.

  12. Mycorrhiza

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ectomycorrhizal fungi invade a partial region of the host root without penetrating the cortical cells and .... The arbuscular cells function as machines for nutrient .... disease, etc. Mycorrhizal associations also protect plants against heavy metal toxicity. Ectomycorrhizal fungi protect trees from high concen- tration of toxic ...

  13. The effect of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza isolated from Syrian soil on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation in saline soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Atrash, F

    2001-01-01

    The influence of vesicular - arbuscular Mycorrhiza fungi (VAM) on symbiotic fixation of N 2 n alfalfa plants has been observed. Beneficial effects of study the effect of VAM or phosphorous fertilization on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L,) yields, umber of nodules and N 2 fixation by N 15 isotope dilution at different salinity levels. This experiment was realized in green house conditions, using soil of 2.3 dsm -1 conductivity mixed with sand (5: 2V) for alfalfa plants growing at various levels of phosphorus, or infected by Mycorrhiza fungi. Different conductivities (13.18, 22.2, 28.8, 43.5 dsm -1 ) were applied on these treatment by increasing concentrations of Nacl, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 and MgCl 2 by salinity soil irrigation. Ten days after planting, soil was enriched with 2 ppm of (NH 4 15 ) 2 SO 4 . Plant were grown under greenhouse condition for ten weeks. Our results confirmed that increased salinity reduced nitrogen - fixation and the number of nodules. The negative effect with increasing salinity was less in Mycorrhiza plants than in plants fertilized with various levels of phosphorus, and only the higher levels of salinity reduced significantly, the percentage of Mycorrhiza colonization, However, at all levels of salinity, VAM stimulated plant growth and nutrient uptake. (author)

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis induces a major transcriptional reprogramming of the potato SWEET sugar transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin eManck-Götzenberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the twelve induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10 corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical

  15. Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas and Dark Septate Endophytes in Hydrophytes from Lakes and Streams in Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Wang; Zhiwei, Zhao

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in 140 specimens of 32 hydrophytes collected from four lakes and four streams in southwest China were investigated. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and DSE colonization in these hydrophytes were rare. Typical AM structures were observed in one of the 25 hydrophytic species collected in lakes and six of the 17 species collected in streams.Spores of 10 identified AMF species and an unidentified Acaulospora sp. were isolated from the sediments. The identified AMF came from the four genera, Acaulospora, Gigaspora, Glomus and Scutellospora . Glomus and G. mosseae were the dominant genus and species respectively in these aquatic environments.The presence of DSE in hydrophytes was recorded for the first time. DSE occurred in one of the 25 hydrophyte species collected in lakes and three of the 17 species collected in streams.

  16. Nutrient limitation drives response of Calamagrostis epigejos to arbuscular mycorrhiza in primary succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlová, Jana; Püschel, David; Dostálová, Magdalena; Janoušková, Martina; Frouz, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the functioning of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis over the course of primary succession, where soil, host plants, and AM fungal communities all undergo significant changes. Over the course of succession at the studied post-mining site, plant cover changes from an herbaceous community to the closed canopy of a deciduous forest. Calamagrostis epigejos (Poaceae) is a common denominator at all stages, and it dominates among AM host species. Its growth response to AM fungi was studied at four distinctive stages of natural succession: 12, 20, 30, and 50 years of age, each represented by three spatially separated sites. Soils obtained from all 12 studied sites were γ-sterilized and used in a greenhouse experiment in which C. epigejos plants were (1) inoculated with a respective community of native AM fungi, (2) inoculated with reference AM fungal isolates from laboratory collection, or (3) cultivated without AM fungi. AM fungi strongly boosted plant growth during the first two stages but not during the latter two, where the effect was neutral or even negative. While plant phosphorus (P) uptake was generally increased by AM fungi, no contribution of mycorrhizae to nitrogen (N) uptake was recorded. Based on N:P in plant biomass, we related the turn from a positive to a neutral/negative effect of AM fungi on plant growth, observed along the chronosequence, to a shift in relative P and N availability. No functional differences were found between native and reference inocula, yet root colonization by the native AM fungi decreased relative to the reference inoculum in the later succession stages, thereby indicating shifts in the composition of AM fungal communities reflected in different functional characteristics of their members.

  17. [Regulatory genes of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) controlling the development of nitrogen-fixing nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza: a review of basic and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borisov, A Iu; Vasil'chikov, A G; Voroshilova, V A

    2007-01-01

    . Progress in identifying and cloning symbiotic genes is adequately reflected. The feasibility of using double inoculation as a means of increasing the plant productivity is demonstrated, in which the potential of a tripartite symbiotic system (pea plants-root nodule bacteria-arbuscular mycorrhiza...

  18. Antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) do not affect root colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Jagroop Gill; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Cahill, James F; Hall, Linda M

    2017-10-01

    Genetically modified crops have raised concerns about unintended consequences on non-target organisms including beneficial soil associates. Pea transformed with four antifungal genes 1-3 β glucanase, endochitinase, polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins, and stilbene synthase is currently under field-testing for efficacy against fungal diseases in Canada. Transgenes had lower expression in the roots than leaves in greenhouse experiment. To determine the impact of disease-tolerant pea or gene products on colonization by non-target arbuscular mycorrhizae and nodulation by rhizobium, a field trial was established. Transgene insertion, as single gene or stacked genes, did not alter root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF) or root nodulation by rhizobium inoculation in the field. We found no effect of transgenes on the plant growth and performance although, having a dual inoculant with both AMF and rhizobium yielded higher fresh weight shoot-to-root ratio in all the lines tested. This initial risk assessment of transgenic peas expressing antifungal genes showed no deleterious effect on non-target organisms.

  19. Enhanced tomato disease resistance primed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanyuan; Chen, Dongmei; Lu, Kai; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-01

    Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza) with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins, PR1, PR2, and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC, and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT) plant, a jasmonate (JA) biosynthesis mutant (spr2), and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for mycorrhiza

  20. Computational investigation of small RNAs in the establishment of root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza in leguminous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Danfeng; Meng, Xianwen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuhua; Chen, Ming

    2018-01-03

    Many small RNAs have been confirmed to play important roles in the development of root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza. In this study, we carried out the identification of certain small RNAs in leguminous plants (Medicago truncatula, soybean, peanut and common bean), such as miRNAs, tRFs and srRNAs, as well as the computational investigation of their regulations. Thirty miRNAs were predicted to be involved in establishing root nodules and mycorrhiza, and 12 of them were novel in common bean and peanut. The generation of tRFs in M. truncatula was not associated with tRNA gene frequencies and codon usage. Six tRFs exhibited different expressions in mycorrhiza and root nodules. Moreover, srRNA 5.8S in M. truncatula was generated from the regions with relatively low conservation at the rRNA 3' terminal. The protein-protein interactions between the proteins encoded by the target genes of miRNAs, tRFs and srRNAs were computed. The regulation of these three types of sRNAs in the symbiosis between leguminous plants and microorganisms is not a single regulation of certain signaling or metabolic pathways but a global regulation for the plants to own growth or specific events in symbiosis.

  1. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on Dry Matter and Concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium in Berseem Clover, by Cadmium stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hashem aram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil contaminations with heavy metals represent a potential risk to the biosphere and leads to increased concentration in ground and surface water. Therefore metals mobility in soil has been extensively studied in the last decades. Use of agrochemicals such as synthetic fertilizers and pesticides has resulted in soil and water pollution, and loss of biodiversity. Cadmium is a heavy metal with a strong effect on crop quality. Moreover, it is a very mobile element in the environment. Plants can easily uptake cadmium and transfer it to other organs. Experiments on the effects of cadmium on the contents of macro elements in plants are scarce and therefore the mechanism of its effect has not yet been fully explained. Contaminated soil can be remediated by chemical, physical or biological techniques. Mycorrhiza is the mutualistic symbiosis (non-pathogenic association between soil-borne fungi with the roots of higher plants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are obligate biotrophs, which can form mutualistic symbioses with the roots of around 80% of plant species. Arbuscular mycorrhiza have been observed to play a vital role in metal tolerance and accumulation. Many workers have reported enhancement of phosphate uptake and growth of leguminous plants by vesicular arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF. Materials and Methods: One study performed the factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD with three replications in the greenhouse of Agriculture Faculty of Zanjan University. The examined factors include different levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae (with and without inoculation, and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm. In this study, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae species were used. These fungi were prepared by the Plant Protection Clinic in Iran – Hamedan. The soil was prepared of arable land of depth of 0-20 cm at the University of

  2. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJA RISHI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kumar R, Tapwal A, Pandey S, Rishi R, Borah D. 2013. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India. Biodiversitas 14: 67-72. Non-timber forest products constitute an important source of livelihood for rural households from forest fringe communities across the world. Utilization of wild edible tuber plants is an integral component of their culture. Mycorrhizal associations influence the establishment and production of tuber plants under field conditions.The aim of present study is to explore the diversity and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF colonization of wild edible tuber plants grown in wet evergreen forest of Assam, India. A survey was conducted in 2009-10 in Sunaikuchi, Khulahat, and Bura Mayong reserved forest of Morigaon district of Assam to determine the AMF spore population in rhizosphere soils and root colonization of 14 tuberous edible plants belonging to five families. The results revealed AMF colonization of all selected species in all seasons. The percent colonization and spore count was less in summer, moderate in winter and highest in rainy season. Seventeen species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were recorded in four genera viz. Acaulospora (7 species, Glomus (5 species, Sclerocystis (3 species and Gigaspora (2 species.

  3. Establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius (Arecaceae: effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Ramos-Zapata

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi has often promoted increased growth of plants but very little work has been done in the tropics to evaluate the effects of inoculation on the establishment and development of seedlings in forests. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius is a scandent palm present both in early and late succession, and consequently can be used in restoration processes. A test was conducted to determine the effect of AM on the establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos in tropical forest in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Thirty inoculated and 30 non-inoculated seedlings were introduced in two sites of different successional age, a mature forest and an eight-year old abandoned cornfield (acahual.Survival and growth parameters were evaluated after 12 months. Leaf area and phosphorus, but not height, were greater in inoculated than non-inoculated plants in the forest but not in the acahual. However, mycorrhizae had a clear effect on plant survival in both sites, with a threefold increase in survival of inoculated compared with non-inoculated plants bassed on an odds ratio. The results suggest that inoculation will be important to increase the establishment of this commercially important palm. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(1: 65-72. Epub 2006 Mar 31.La inoculación con hongos micorrizógenos arbusculares (AMpromueve un incremento en el crecimiento de las plantas, sin embargo poco trabajo se ha realizado en los trópicos para evaluar el efecto de la inoculación en el proceso de establecimiento de plántulas. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius es una palmera trepadora que se distribuye tanto en etapas tempranas y tardías de la sucesión, por lo tanto puede ser empleada en procesos de restauración. Se realizó una prueba de establecimiento de D. orthacanthos en una selva tropical de la península de Yucatán, México. Treinta plántulas inoculadas y 30 no inoculadas se establecieron en dos sitios con diferentes etapas sucesionales: selva madura

  4. Proline and Abscisic Acid Content in Droughted Corn Plant Inoculated with Azospirillum sp. and Arbuscular Mycorrhizae Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVRI YOULA KANDOWANGKO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants that undergo drought stress perform a physiological response such as accumulation of proline in the leaves and increased content abscisic acid. A research was conducted to study proline and abscisic acid (ABA content on drought-stressed corn plant with Azospirillum sp. and arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF inoculated at inceptisol soil from Bogor, West Java. The experiments were carried out in a green house from June up to September 2003, using a factorial randomized block design. In pot experiments, two factors were assigned, i.e. inoculation with Azospirillum (0, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50 ml/pot and inoculation with AMF Glomus manihotis (0, 12.50, 25.00, 37.50 g/pot. The plants were observed during tasseling up to seed filling periods. Results of experiments showed that the interaction between Azospirillum sp. and AMF was synergistically increased proline, however it decreased ABA.

  5. Herbivory and arbuscular mycorrhiza in natural populations of Datura stramonium L.: correlation with the availability of nutrients in the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Aguilar-Chama

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trophic interactions impose important costs to their host plants, affecting patterns of resource allocation. The relationship between host and consumers is also influenced by the availability of resources, e. g., soil nutrients. In this study, we explored the relationship among mycorrhiza-plant-herbivore in natural populations of Datura stramonium and their correlation with the content of phosphorus, nitrogen and carbon in the soil. We estimated the vegetative and reproductive biomass of plants, the arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and the level of herbivory in populations of D. stramonium. The local abundance of D. stramonium was negatively related to the content of phosphorus in the soil. In contrast, soil carbon concentration affected positively the vegetative and reproductive mass of D. stramonium, although it was negatively correlated with the specific leaf area (SLA. Of the trophic interactions only herbivory was significantly correlated with the SLA and no relationship was detected between the two interaction types. The lack of significant response of mycorrhizae to the soil nutrients concentration, plant performance, and herbivory may result from the stochasticity in the availability of mycorrhizal inoculum (identity and abundance in the populations studied.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizas contribute to phytostabilization of uranium in uranium mining tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Baodong [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Roos, Per [Radiation Research Department, Technical University of Denmark, Riso National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Zhu Yongguan [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Jakobsen, Iver [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: iver.jakobsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-15

    Uranium (U) tailings pose environmental risks and call for proper remediation. In this paper medic and ryegrass plants were used as host plants to examine whether inoculation with an AM fungus, Glomus intraradices, would help phytostabilization of U tailings. The need of amending with uncontaminated soil for supporting plant survival was also examined by mixing soil with U tailing at different mixing ratios. Soil amendment increased plant growth and P uptake. Ryegrass produced a more extensive root system and a greater biomass than medic plants at all mixing ratios. Medic roots were extensively colonized by G. intraradices whereas ryegrass were more sparsely colonized. Plant growth was not improved by mycorrhizas, which, however, improved P nutrition of medic plants. Medic plants contained higher U concentrations and showed higher specific U uptake efficiency compared to ryegrass. In the presence of U tailing, most U had been retained in plant roots, and this distribution pattern was further enhanced by mycorrhizal colonization. The results suggest a role for AM fungi in phytostabilization of U tailings.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of Deschampsia cespitosa (Poaceae at different soil depths in highly metal-contaminated site in southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gucwa-Przepióra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents root colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa growing in the immediate vicinity of a former Pb/Zn smelter by arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF and dark septated endophytes (DSE at different soil depths. AMF spores and species distribution in soil profile were also assessed. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM and DSE were found in D. cespitosa roots at all investigated soil levels. However, mycorrhizal colonization in topsoil was extremely low with sporadically occurring arbuscules. AM parameters: frequency of mycorrhization of root fragments (F%, intensity of root cortex colonization (M%, intensity of colonization within individual mycorrhizal roots (m%, and arbuscule abundance in the root system (A% were markedly higher at 20–40, 40–60 cm soil levels and differed in a statistically significant manner from AM parameters from 0–10 and 10–20 cm layers. Mycorrhizal colonization was negatively correlated with bioavailable Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The number of AMF spores in topsoil was very low and increased with soil depth (20–40 and 40–60 cm. At the study area spores of three morphologically distinctive AMF species were found: Archaeospora trappei, Funneliformis mosseae and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. The fourth species Glomus tenue colonized roots of D. cespitosa and was observed in the root cortex at 20–40 and 40–60 soil depth, however, its spores were not found at the site.

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhiza affects nickel translocation and expression of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes in Festuca arundinacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Mostafavi pour, Sodabeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are key microorganisms for enhancing phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study, the effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae (=Glomus mosseae) on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the nickel (Ni) tolerance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea = Schedonorus arundinaceus) were investigated. Nickel addition had a pronounced negative effect on tall fescue growth and photosynthetic pigment contents, as well as on AMF colonization. Phosphorus content increased markedly in mycorrhizal plants (M) compared to non-inoculated (NM) ones. However, no significant difference was observed in root carbohydrate content between AMF-inoculated and non-inoculated plants. For both M and NM plants, Ni concentrations in shoots and roots increased according to the addition of the metal into soil, but inoculation with F. mosseae led to significantly lower Ni translocation from roots to the aboveground parts compared to non-inoculated plants. ABC transporter and metallothionein transcripts accumulated to considerably higher levels in tall fescue plants colonized by F. mosseae than in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal plants. These results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal colonization in alleviating Ni-induced stress by reducing Ni transport from roots to shoots of tall fescue plants.

  9. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza and Growth in Barley - Effects of Irradiation and Heating of Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Andersen, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    propagules. Mycorrhiza developed more slowly after inoculation in irradiated soils than in untreated soils. This could have been due to the small amounts of inoculum used, but the high concentrations of nutrients released by irradiation of the soil were probably of greater significance particularly...

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhiza-specific enzymes FatM and RAM2 fine-tune lipid biosynthesis to promote development of arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Armando; Brands, Mathias; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Harrison, Maria J

    2017-06-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis (AMS), considerable amounts of lipids are generated, modified and moved within the cell to accommodate the fungus in the root, and it has also been suggested that lipids are delivered to the fungus. To determine the mechanisms by which root cells redirect lipid biosynthesis during AMS we analyzed the roles of two lipid biosynthetic enzymes (FatM and RAM2) and an ABC transporter (STR) that are required for symbiosis and conserved uniquely in plants that engage in AMS. Complementation analyses indicated that the biochemical function of FatM overlaps with that of other Fat thioesterases, in particular FatB. The essential role of FatM in AMS was a consequence of timing and magnitude of its expression. Lipid profiles of fatm and ram2 suggested that FatM increases the outflow of 16:0 fatty acids from the plastid, for subsequent use by RAM2 to produce 16:0 β-monoacylglycerol. Thus, during AMS, high-level, specific expression of key lipid biosynthetic enzymes located in the plastid and the endoplasmic reticulum enables the root cell to fine-tune lipid biosynthesis to increase the production of β-monoacylglycerols. We propose a model in which β-monoacylglycerols, or a derivative thereof, are exported out of the root cell across the periarbuscular membrane for ultimate use by the fungus. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. 13C incorporation into signature fatty acids as an assay for carbon allocation in arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; van Aarle, Ingrid M; Gavito, Mayra E; Bengtson, Per; Bengtsson, Göran

    2005-05-01

    The ubiquitous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi consume significant amounts of plant assimilated C, but this C flow has been difficult to quantify. The neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1omega5 is a quantitative signature for most arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots and soil. We measured carbon transfer from four plant species to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices by estimating (13)C enrichment of 16:1omega5 and compared it with (13)C enrichment of total root and mycelial C. Carbon allocation to mycelia was detected within 1 day in monoxenic arbuscular mycorrhizal root cultures labeled with [(13)C]glucose. The (13)C enrichment of neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1omega5 extracted from roots increased from 0.14% 1 day after labeling to 2.2% 7 days after labeling. The colonized roots usually were more enriched for (13)C in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1omega5 than for the root specific neutral lipid fatty acid 18:2omega6,9. We labeled plant assimilates by using (13)CO(2) in whole-plant experiments. The extraradical mycelium often was more enriched for (13)C than was the intraradical mycelium, suggesting rapid translocation of carbon to and more active growth by the extraradical mycelium. Since there was a good correlation between (13)C enrichment in neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1omega5 and total (13)C in extraradical mycelia in different systems (r(2) = 0.94), we propose that the total amount of labeled C in intraradical and extraradical mycelium can be calculated from the (13)C enrichment of 16:1omega5. The method described enables evaluation of C flow from plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to be made without extraction, purification and identification of fungal mycelia.

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhiza detoxifying response against arsenic and pathogenic fungus in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoletti, Federico N; Balestrasse, Karina; Lavado, Raúl S; Giacometti, Romina

    2016-11-01

    Uptake of Arsenic (As) in plant tissues can affect metabolism, causing physiological disorders, even death. As toxicity, but also pathogen infections trigger a generalised stress response called oxidative stress; however knowledge on the response of soybean (Glycine max L.) under multiple stressors is limited so far. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance the tolerance of host plants to abiotic and biotic stress. Thus, we investigated the effects of the AMF Rhizophagus intraradices on soybean grown in As-contaminated soils as well as in the presence of the pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina (charcoal rot of the stem). Plant parameters and degree of mycorrhizal colonization under the different assessed treatments were analyzed. Content of As in roots and leaves was quantified. Increasing As level in the soil stopped plant growth, but promoted plant As uptake. Inoculation of soybean plants with M. phaseolina accentuated As effect at all physiological levels. In the presence of mycorrhizal symbiosis biomass dramatically increased, and significantly reduced the As concentration in plant tissues. Mycorrhization decreased oxidative damage in the presence of both As and the pathogen. Furthermore, transcription analysis revealed that the high-affinity phosphate transporter from R. intraradices RiPT and the gene encoding a putative arsenic efflux pump RiArsA were up-regulated under higher As doses. These results suggest that R. intraradices is most likely to get involved in the defense response against M. phaseolina, but also in the reduction of arsenate to arsenite as a possible detoxification mechanism in AMF associations in soybean. R. intraradices actively participates in the soybean antioxidant defense response against arsenic stress and M. phaseolina infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The development of arbuscular mycorrhiza in two simulated stages of spoil-bank succession

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Rydlová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2007), s. 363-369 ISSN 0929-1393 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/04/0996; GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : mycorrhiza * plant succession * spoil bank s Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.810, year: 2007

  14. Effect of combined inoculations of Rhizobium-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Leucaena leucocephala CV: Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Jesús Ojeda Quintana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was conducted at the Experimental Station of Soil and Fertilizer “Escambray” land of farmers and associated rural extension. The experimental design was randomized blocks, and treatments: Rizhobium loti V-4033 (Research Institute of Pastures and Forages, mycorrhizal fungi trainers, Rhizobium +mycorrhiza fungi trainers, nitrogen and total control. Inoculation with my corrhiza forming fungi was performed at 10 g/bag Certificate MicoFert Strain the Institute of Ecology and Systematics-3: Glomus spurcum, Topes de Collantes, 85 % colonization of rootlets, while the Rhizobium was inoculated in a dose of 50 g/kg of seed. Variant was nitrogen at 25 kg/ha of urea. The plots occupied 18m2 , with an area of 9 m2 evaluable. When the plants reached 7.5 months and an average height of 143.4 cm proceeded to make the Court of establishment and then four foliage cuts were made every 90 days. Each cut dry biomass yield, and phosphorus content was determined crude protein. The combined inoculation of Rhizobium and mycorrhiza fungi Makers increased the yield of dry biomass, and phosphorus content of crude protein. We conclude proposing the adoption of an alternative methodology using mycorrhiza formers Fungi and Rhizobium in Leucaena leucocephala as a way to increase the yield of dry biomass, decreasing mineral fertilization and contribute to environmental protection

  15. Weed Flora and Dormant-season cover crops have no effects on arbuscular mycorrhizae of grapevine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the hypotheses that mycorrhizal colonization of a perennial crop increases with a high frequency of mycorrhizal hosts within the plant community, and that a high diversity of mycorrhizal hosts is associated with a high diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the perennial crop. ...

  16. Effect of native arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi inocula on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The use of symbiotic microorganisms as mycorrhizal fungi to improve the availability of nutrients to plants is of great importance in agriculture. In this study, we were interested in the response of cowpea, variety KVX 396-4–5-2D, to mycorrhizal inoculation in the context of selection of effective Arbuscular ...

  17. SymRK defines a common genetic basis for plant root endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, rhizobia, and Frankiabacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherbi, Hassen; Markmann, Katharina; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Estevan, Joan; Autran, Daphné; Giczey, Gabor; Auguy, Florence; Péret, Benjamin; Laplaze, Laurent; Franche, Claudine; Parniske, Martin; Bogusz, Didier

    2008-03-25

    Root endosymbioses vitally contribute to plant nutrition and fitness worldwide. Nitrogen-fixing root nodulation, confined to four plant orders, encompasses two distinct types of associations, the interaction of legumes (Fabales) with rhizobia bacteria and actinorhizal symbioses, where the bacterial symbionts are actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Although several genetic components of the host-symbiont interaction have been identified in legumes, the genetic basis of actinorhiza formation is unknown. Here, we show that the receptor-like kinase gene SymRK, which is required for nodulation in legumes, is also necessary for actinorhiza formation in the tree Casuarina glauca. This indicates that both types of nodulation symbiosis share genetic components. Like several other legume genes involved in the interaction with rhizobia, SymRK is also required for the interaction with arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi. We show that SymRK is involved in AM formation in C. glauca as well and can restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Lotus japonicus symrk mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SymRK functions as a vital component of the genetic basis for both plant-fungal and plant-bacterial endosymbioses and is conserved between legumes and actinorhiza-forming Fagales.

  18. Colonization of Greek olive cultivars' root system by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus: root morphology, growth, and mineral nutrition of olive plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Chatzistathis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rooted leafy cuttings of three Greek olive (Olea europaea L. cultivars (Koroneiki, Kothreiki and Chondrolia Chalkidikis were grown for six months in three soil types, in an experimental greenhouse, in order to investigate: i if their root system was colonized by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF genus and, ii if genotypic differences concerning growth and mineral nutrition of olive plants existed. Gigaspora sp. colonized the root system of the three cultivars studied, while Glomus sp. colonized only the root system of 'Koroneiki'. Furthermore, in most cases root colonization by AMF differed among cultivars and soil types. The maximum root colonization, in all soils, was found in 'Chondrolia Chalkidikis'. In the three soils studied, the ratio shoot dry weight (SDW/ root dry weight (RDW was higher in 'Chondrolia Chalkidikis' than in the other two cultivars. Furthermore, root system morphology of the three olive cultivars was completely different, irrespectively of soil type. Leaf Mn, Fe, Zn, Ca, Mg, K and P concentrations, as well as total per plant nutrient content and nutrient use efficiency, differed among cultivars under the same soil conditions. These differences concerning root morphology, SDW/RDW, as well as nutrient uptake and use efficiency, could be possibly ascribed to the differential AMF colonization by Glomus sp. and Gigaspora sp.

  19. The incidence of arbuscular mycorrhiza in two submerged Isoëtes species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Rydlová, Jana; Čtvrtlíková, Martina; Havránek, P.; Adamec, Lubomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 4 (2011), s. 183-187 ISSN 0304-3770. [The Biology of Fungi . IMC9. Edinburgh, (01.08.2010-06.08.2010)] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0781; GA ČR GA206/07/1200 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * aquatic macrophytes * dark septate endophytes Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.516, year: 2011

  20. Identification of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM)-Responsive microRNAs in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ping; Wu, Yue; Liu, Cheng-Chen; Liu, Li-Wei; Ma, Fang-Fang; Wu, Xiao-Yi; Wu, Mian; Hang, Yue-Yu; Chen, Jian-Qun; Shao, Zhu-Qing; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A majority of land plants can form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated to regulate this process in legumes, but their involvement in non-legume species is largely unknown. In this study, by performing deep sequencing of sRNA libraries in tomato roots and comparing with tomato genome, a total of 700 potential miRNAs were predicted, among them, 187 are known plant miRNAs that have been previously deposited in miRBase. Unlike the profiles in ...

  1. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops. I. Mycorrhizal Infection in Cereals and Peas at Various Times and Soil Depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Nielsen, N.E.

    1983-01-01

    Development of infection by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was studied in some field-grown crops. An infection plateau was reached within the first month after seedling emergence of spring barley, oats and peas. During the rest of the growth period the proportion of root length infected....... The proportion of root length infected decreased markedly below 40 cm soil depth. Root density varied greatly between crops, whereas the absolute length of infected roots was similar in all crops. This indicates that susceptibility to infection was independent of host species. The results are discussed...

  2. Effects of biochar and Arbuscular mycorrhizae on bioavailability of potentially toxic elements in an aged contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Yuhui; Crowley, David; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Huiqi; Li, Huafen

    2015-01-01

    Biochar pyrolyzed from corn stalks at 300 °C/500 °C and arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF) were examined independently and in combination as possible treatments for soil remediation contaminated with Cd, Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn after 35 years following land application of sewage sludge in the 1970s. The results showed that biochar significantly decreased the heavy metal concentrations and their bioavailability for plants, and both biochars had similar such effects. AMF inoculation of corn plants had little effect on heavy metal bioavailability in either control or biochar amended soil, and no interaction between biochar and AMF was observed. Changes in DTPA extractable metals following biochar addition to soil were correlated with metal uptake by plants, whereas pore water metal concentrations were not predictive indicators. This research demonstrates positive benefits from biochar application for contaminated soil remediation, but remain ambiguous with regard to the benefits of simultaneous AMF inoculation on reduction of heavy metal bioavailability. - Highlights: • Biochar pyrolyzed from corn stalks at 300 °C/500 °C can increase the biomass of corn growing in a heavily contaminated soil. • Biochar could significantly decrease bioavailability of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn) for plants. • Effects were not augmented by the addition of AMF although the production of glomalin is promoted by biochars. • AMF had not reduced bioavailability of PTEs, no significant interaction between biochar and AMF inoculation was observed. - Biochar could significantly decrease bioavailability of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn) for plants, but AMF had little such effects, biochar and AMF interaction is not valid.

  3. Role of the GRAS transcription factor ATA/RAM1 in the transcriptional reprogramming of arbuscular mycorrhiza in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Mélanie K; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Roux, Christophe; Reinhardt, Didier

    2017-08-08

    Development of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) requires a fundamental reprogramming of root cells for symbiosis. This involves the induction of hundreds of genes in the host. A recently identified GRAS-type transcription factor in Petunia hybrida, ATA/RAM1, is required for the induction of host genes during AM, and for morphogenesis of the fungal endosymbiont. To better understand the role of RAM1 in symbiosis, we set out to identify all genes that depend on activation by RAM1 in mycorrhizal roots. We have carried out a transcript profiling experiment by RNAseq of mycorrhizal plants vs. non-mycorrhizal controls in wild type and ram1 mutants. The results show that the expression of early genes required for AM, such as the strigolactone biosynthetic genes and the common symbiosis signalling genes, is independent of RAM1. In contrast, genes that are involved at later stages of symbiosis, for example for nutrient exchange in cortex cells, require RAM1 for induction. RAM1 itself is highly induced in mycorrhizal roots together with many other transcription factors, in particular GRAS proteins. Since RAM1 has previously been shown to be directly activated by the common symbiosis signalling pathway through CYCLOPS, we conclude that it acts as an early transcriptional switch that induces many AM-related genes, among them genes that are essential for the development of arbuscules, such as STR, STR2, RAM2, and PT4, besides hundreds of additional RAM1-dependent genes the role of which in symbiosis remains to be explored. Taken together, these results indicate that the defect in the morphogenesis of the fungal arbuscules in ram1 mutants may be an indirect consequence of functional defects in the host, which interfere with nutrient exchange and possibly other functions on which the fungus depends.

  4. Relative quantitative RT-PCR to study the expression of plant nutrient transporters in arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    by some, but not all AMF. Colonization by the AMF Glomus rosen, in particular, failed to strongly down-regulate these plant genes within the root. This technique may be suitable for the study of plant genes in mycorrhizal roots when Northern blotting is not possible due to low gene expression or when......The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the expression of plant nutrient transporters was studied using a relative. quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain-reaction (RQRT-PCR) technique. Reverse-transcribed 18S rRNA was used to standardize the treatments. The technique...... had high reproducibility and reflected trends in gene expression as observed by Northern blotting. Using this technique, it was demonstrated that both the high-affinity phosphate transporter MtPt2 and a putative nitrate transporter from Medicago truncatula were down-regulated in roots when colonized...

  5. Dose-response relationships between four pesticides and phosphorus uptake by hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, P.F.; Jakobsen, I.

    1998-01-01

    was separated from the main root compartment by nylon mesh. After 5 weeks of plant growth external hyphae of the AM fungi had spread throughout the hyphal compartment. At this time aqueous solutions of both P-32 and pesticide were added to the hyphal compartment. Resulting soil pesticide concentrations covered...... a wide range with the aim of describing the dose-response relationships between pesticide concentration and hyphal P uptake. Plants were harvested 6d after pesticide application. The amount of P-32 taken up into the plant was measured as was hyphal length in the hyphal compartment. Carbendazim had......The effect of the fungicides carbendazim, fenpropimorph and propiconazole and of the insecticide dimethoate on plant P uptake via external hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi was examined. Mycorrhizal plants were grown in a two-compartment system where a root-free hyphal compartment...

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhiza improves yield and nutritional properties of onion (Allium cepa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozpądek, Piotr; Rąpała-Kozik, Maria; Wężowicz, Katarzyna; Grandin, Anna; Karlsson, Stefan; Ważny, Rafał; Anielska, Teresa; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2016-10-01

    Improving the nutritional value of commonly cultivated crops is one of the most pending problems for modern agriculture. In natural environments plants associate with a multitude of fungal microorganisms that improve plant fitness. The best described group are arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These fungi have been previously shown to improve the quality and yield of several common crops. In this study we tested the potential utilization of Rhizophagus irregularis in accelerating growth and increasing the content of important dietary phytochemicals in onion (Allium cepa). Our results clearly indicate that biomass production, the abundance of vitamin B1 and its analogues and organic acid concentration can be improved by inoculating the plant with AM fungi. We have shown that improved growth is accompanied with up-regulated electron transport in PSII and antioxidant enzyme activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomics provides insights into biological pathways altered by plant growth promoting bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhiza in sorghum grown in marginal soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawi, Faten; Datta, Rupali; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2017-02-01

    Sorghum is an economically important crop, a model system for gene discovery and a biofuel source. Sorghum seedlings were subjected to three microbial treatments, plant growth promoting bacteria (B), arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi mix with two Glomus species (G. aggregatum and G. etunicatum), Funelliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis (My), and B and My combined (My+B). Proteomic analysis was conducted followed by integration with metabolite, plant biomass and nutrient data. Out of 366 differentially expressed proteins in sorghum roots, 44 upregulated proteins overlapping among three treatment groups showed positive correlation with sorghum biomass or element uptake or both. Proteins upregulated only in B group include asparagine synthetase which showed negative correlation with biomass and uptake of elements. Phosphoribosyl amino imidazole succinocarboxamide protein with more than 50-fold change in My and My+B groups correlated positively with Ca, Cu, S and sucrose levels in roots. The B group showed the highest number of upregulated proteins among the three groups with negative correlation with sorghum biomass and element uptake. KEGG pathway analysis identified carbon fixation as the unique pathway associated with common upregulated proteins while biosynthesis of amino acids and fatty acid degradation were associated with common downregulated proteins. Protein-protein interaction analysis using STRING identified a major network with thirteen downregulated proteins. These findings suggest that plant-growth-promoting-bacteria alone or in combination with mycorrhiza enhanced radical scavenging system and increased levels of specific proteins thereby shifting the metabolism towards synthesis of carbohydrates resulting in sorghum biomass increase and uptake of nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Arum-type of arbuscular mycorrhizae, dark septate endophytes and Olpidium spp. in fine roots of container-grown seedlings of Sorbus torminalis (Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman M. Bzdyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the mycorrhizal status of nursery seedlings of the wild service tree (Sorbus torminalis, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Its mycorrhizal associations are still fragmentarily known, and data from the few existing studies indicate that it forms ectomycorrhizal symbiosis (ECM. We analyzed the degree of mycorrhizal colonization of thirty 2-year-old container-grown S. torminalis nursery seedlings, which belonged to three single-tree progenies. The roots were dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM, with the morphology of the Arum-type containing arbuscules, vesicles and hyphae; however, no ECM structures were found. The degree of root colonization of the analyzed seedlings by AM fungi was 83.6% and did not differ significantly between the three single-tree progenies. In addition to AM, structures of dark septate endophytes (0.7% and sporangia of Olpidium spp. (1.1% were found in wild service tree roots. In agreement with previous studies, we confirmed arbuscular mycorrhizae for S. torminalis. Moreover, this is the first report that roots of this Sorbus species show the Arum-type morphology of AM and are associated with Olpidium species.

  9. Growth and reproductive characteristics of the columnar cactus Stenocereus queretaroensis and their relationships with environmental factors and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta-Barrios, Eulogio; Pimienta-Barrios, Enrique; Salas-Galván, Mariá Eugenia; Zañudo-Hernandez, Julia; Nobel, Park S

    2002-06-01

    Three natural populations of pitayo (Stenocereus queretaroensis (Weber) Buxbaum), a columnar arborescent cactus, were studied in their subtropical environments in western Mexico. All of the sites were characterized by shallow, nutrient-poor soils. Percentage of colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) fungi, stem growth, fruit mass, and percentage germination were greater in S. queretaroensis at Autlan, Jalisco (AJ) than at Zacoalco de Torres, Jalisco (ZTJ) or Santa Rosa, Zacatecas (SRZ). The onset of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizae during the middle of the summer wet period preceded increases in stem extension rate and stem phosphorus concentration. Based on previous studies of effects of environmental factors on photosynthesis, climatic conditions were more favorable for photosynthesis at AJ than at SRZ and ZTJ, as indicated by the amount of summer rainfall, the amount of light, and the moderate air temperatures that prevailed during the fall and winter seasons. There was a significant positive correlation between stem growth and percentage of total root length colonized by arbuscules of AM fungi for S. queretaroensis at SRZ and AJ, but not at ZTJ. A negative significant correlation was observed between stem growth and maximal and minimal air temperatures at the three study sites. Stem growth was positively related to rainfall only at SRZ, and light was statistically related to stem growth only at ZTJ. Among sites, S. queretaroensis at AJ had the highest carbon gain and greatest AM colonization, creating physiological conditions that led to the highest stem growth, fruit mass and percentage of seed germination.

  10. The role of the arbuscular mycorrhiza-associated rhizobacteria in the biocontrol of soilborne phyto pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lioussanne, L.

    2010-07-01

    The mutualistic symbiosis of most land plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has been shown to favor mineral and water nutrition and to increase resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. This review reports the main mechanisms involved in the control of the disease symptoms and of the intraradical proliferation of soilborne phytopathogens by root colonization with AM fungi, with a special emphasis on the role of the rhizobacteria shown to be specifically associated with the AM extraradical network and the mycorrhizosphere (the soil zone with particular characteristics under the influence of the root/AM association). The mycorrhizosphere would constitute an environment conducive to microorganisms antagonistic to pathogen proliferation. Moreover, attempts to identify rhizobacteria from AM structures and/or the mycorrhizosphere often lead to the isolation of organisms showing strong properties of antagonism on various soilborne pathogens. The ability of AM fungi to control soilborne diseases would be strongly related to their capacity to specifically stimulate the establishment of rhizobacteria unfavorable to pathogen development within the mycorrhizosphere before root infection. Current knowledge concerning the mechanisms involved in AM/rhizobacteria interactions are also described in this review. (Author) 101 refs.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizas influence Lycium barbarum tolerance of water stress in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Haoqiang; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2017-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can assist their hosts to cope with water stress and other abiotic stresses in different ways. In order to test whether AM plants have a greater capacity than control plants to cope with water stress, we investigated the water status and photosynthetic capacity of Lycium barbarum colonized or not by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis under three water conditions during a hot summer. Sugar levels and transcriptional responses of both plant and AM fungus aquaporin genes in roots were analyzed. Compared with control plants, AM plants increased transpiration rate and stomatal conductance but decreased leaf relative water content under moderate water stress. Severe water stress, however, did not inhibit the quantum yield of PSII photochemistry in AM plants versus control plants. AM plants had higher expression levels of plasma membrane intrinsic proteins or tonoplast intrinsic proteins and Rir-AQP2 and lower leaf temperature than control plants under dry-hot stress. Additionally, AM plant sugar levels under normal water conditions were similar to those of control plants under moderate water stress, but sugar levels of AM plants especially increased with severe water stress. When these aspects of performance of AM and control plants under different water conditions are compared overall, AM plants displayed an obvious superiority over control plants at coping with moderate water stress in the hot environment; AM plants maintained normal photochemical processes under severe water stress, while sugar levels were affected strongly.

  12. Identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible Nitrate Transporter 1/Peptide Transporter Family (NPF) genes in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Navina; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brulé, Daphnée; Kunze, Reinhard

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonize up to 90% of all land plants and facilitate the acquisition of mineral nutrients by their hosts. Inorganic orthophosphate (P i ) and nitrogen (N) are the major nutrients transferred from the fungi to plants. While plant P i transporters involved in nutrient transfer at the plant-fungal interface have been well studied, the plant N transporters participating in this process are largely unknown except for some ammonium transporters (AMT) specifically assigned to arbuscule-colonized cortical cells. In plants, many nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF) members are involved in the translocation of nitrogenous compounds including nitrate, amino acids, peptides and plant hormones. Whether NPF members respond to AMF colonization, however, is not yet known. Here, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of 82 rice (Oryza sativa) NPF genes in response to colonization by the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis in roots of plants grown under five different nutrition regimes. Expression of the four OsNPF genes NPF2.2/PTR2, NPF1.3, NPF6.4 and NPF4.12 was strongly induced in mycorrhizal roots and depended on the composition of the fertilizer solution, nominating them as interesting candidates for nutrient signaling and exchange processes at the plant-fungal interface.

  13. Identification and expression analysis of arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible phosphate transporter genes of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yosuke; Kobae, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Toyotaka; Hata, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    Soybeans, the world's leading leguminous crop, establish mutualistic symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM fungi colonize root cortical cells forming arbuscules, highly branched fungal structures. Arbuscules are enveloped by plant-derived periarbuscular membranes through which plants obtain mineral nutrients, particularly phosphate. We searched the soybean genome in silico, and found 14 Pht1 genes encoding phosphate transporters putatively localized on the plasma membranes. Time course analyses involving reverse transcription-PCR indicated that three of these were AM-inducible. GmPT10 and GmPT11 were induced on fungal colonization, while a transcript of GmPT7 appeared in the later stages. The transport activities of GmPT10 and GmPT11 were confirmed by complementation of a yeast mutant. Soybean hairy roots expressing the GmPT10-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GmPT11-GFP fusion protein under the control of corresponding promoter showed GFP fluorescence on the branch domains of periarbuscular membranes, indicating that active phosphate transport occurred there.

  14. Competitive interactions are mediated in a sex-specific manner by arbuscular mycorrhiza in Antennaria dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, S; Vega-Frutis, R; Kytöviita, M-M

    2017-03-01

    Plants usually interact with other plants, and the outcome of such interaction ranges from facilitation to competition depending on the identity of the plants, including their sexual expression. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been shown to modify competitive interactions in plants. However, few studies have evaluated how AM fungi influence plant intraspecific and interspecific interactions in dioecious species. The competitive abilities of female and male plants of Antennaria dioica were examined in a greenhouse experiment. Females and males were grown in the following competitive settings: (i) without competition, (ii) with intrasexual competition, (iii) with intersexual competition, and (iv) with interspecific competition by Hieracium pilosella - a plant with similar characteristics to A. dioica. Half of the pots were grown with Claroideoglomus claroideum, an AM fungus isolated from the same habitat as the plant material. We evaluated plant survival, growth, flowering phenology, and production of AM fungal structures. Plant survival was unaffected by competition or AM fungi. Competition and the presence of AM fungi reduced plant biomass. However, the sexes responded differently to the interaction between fungal and competition treatments. Both intra- and interspecific competition results were sex-specific, and in general, female performance was reduced by AM colonization. Plant competition or sex did not affect the intraradical structures, extraradical hyphae, or spore production of the AM fungus. These findings suggest that plant sexual differences affect fundamental processes such as competitive ability and symbiotic relationships with AM fungi. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Temperature-mediated local adaptation alters the symbiotic function in arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling; Gai, Jingping

    2017-07-01

    Variation in the symbiotic function of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM fungi) has been demonstrated among distinct biotic and abiotic interactions. However, there is little knowledge on how local temperature conditions influence the functional divergence of AM symbionts in alpine ecosystems. Here, we conduct a reciprocal inoculation experiment to explore the three-way interactions among plants, AM fungal inoculum and temperature at sites of contrasting elevation. Evidence of local adaptation of plant growth was found only under low temperature conditions, with no consistent local versus foreign effect found in AM fungal performance. The origin of either the plant or the inoculum relative to the temperature was important in explaining symbiotic function. Specifically, when inoculum and temperature were sympatric but allopatric to the plant, poor adaptation by the plant to the novel environment was clearly found under both temperature conditions. Further analysis found that the symbiotic function was inversely related to fungal diversity under high temperature conditions. These results suggest that local adaptation represents a powerful factor in the establishment of novel combinations of plant, inoculum and temperature, and confirms the importance of taking into account both biotic and abiotic interactions in the prediction of the response of symbionts to global environmental change. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhiza differentially affects synthesis of essential oils in coriander and dill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlová, Jana; Jelínková, Marcela; Dušek, Karel; Dušková, Elena; Vosátka, Miroslav; Püschel, David

    2016-02-01

    Research on the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the synthesis of essential oils (EOs) by aromatic plants has seldom been conducted in field-relevant conditions, and then, only limited spectra of EO constituents have been analyzed. The effect was investigated of inoculation with AMF on the synthesis of a wide range of EO in two aromatic species, coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and dill (Anethum graveolens), in a garden experiment under outdoor conditions. Plants were grown in 4-l pots filled with soil, which was either γ-irradiated (eliminating native AMF) or left non-sterile (containing native AMF), and inoculated or not with an isolate of Rhizophagus irregularis. AMF inoculation significantly stimulated EO synthesis in both plant species. EO synthesis (total EO and several individual constituents) was increased in dill in all mycorrhizal treatments (containing native and/or inoculated AMF) compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. In contrast, EO concentrations in coriander (total EO and most constituents) were increased only in the treatment combining both inoculated and native AMF. A clear positive effect of AMF on EO synthesis was found for both aromatic plants, which was, however, specific for each plant species and modified by the pool of AMF present in the soil.

  17. Lights Off for Arbuscular Mycorrhiza: On Its Symbiotic Functioning under Light Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Plants are often exposed to shade over different time scales and this may substantially affect not only their own growth, but also development and functioning of the energetically dependent organisms. Among those, the root symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobia represent particularly important cases—on the one hand, they consume a significant share of plant carbon (C) budget and, on the other, they generate a number of important nutritional feedbacks on their plant hosts, often resulting in a net positive effect on their host growth and/or fitness. Here we discuss our previous results comparing mycorrhizal performance under different intensities and durations of shade (Konvalinková et al., 2015) in a broader context of previously published literature. Additionally, we review publicly available knowledge on the root colonization and mycorrhizal growth responses in AM plants under light deprivation. Experimental evidence shows that sudden and intensive decrease of light availability to a mycorrhizal plant triggers rapid deactivation of phosphorus transfer from the AM fungus to the plant already within a few days, implying active and rapid response of the AM fungus to the energetic status of its plant host. When AM plants are exposed to intensive shading on longer time scales (weeks to months), positive mycorrhizal growth responses (MGR) are often decreasing and may eventually become negative. This is most likely due to the high C cost of the symbiosis relative to the C availability, and failure of plants to fully compensate for the fungal C demand under low light. Root colonization by AM fungi often declines under low light intensities, although the active role of plants in regulating the extent of root colonization has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated. Quantitative information on the rates and dynamics of C transfer from the plant to the fungus is mostly missing, as is the knowledge on the involved molecular mechanisms. Therefore

  18. Identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM-responsive microRNAs in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping eWu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A majority of land plants can form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated to regulate this process in legumes, but their involvement in non-legume species is largely unknown. In this study, by performing deep sequencing of sRNA libraries in tomato roots and comparing with tomato genome, a total of 700 potential miRNAs were predicted, among them, 187 are known plant miRNAs that have been previously deposited in miRBase. Unlike the profiles in other plants such as rice and Arabidopsis, a large proportion of predicted tomato miRNAs was 24 nt in length. A similar pattern was observed in the potato genome but not in tobacco, indicating a Solanum genus-specific expansion of 24-nt miRNAs. About 40% identified tomato miRNAs showed significantly altered expressions upon Rhizophagus irregularis inoculation, suggesting the potential roles of these novel miRNAs in AM symbiosis. The differential expression of five known and six novel miRNAs were further validated using qPCR analysis. Interestingly, three up-regulated known tomato miRNAs belong to a known miR171 family, a member of which has been reported in Medicago truncatula to regulate AM symbiosis. Thus, the miR171 family likely regulates AM symbiosis conservatively across different plant lineages. More than 1000 genes targeted by potential AM-responsive miRNAs were provided and their roles in AM symbiosis are worth further exploring.

  19. Identification of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM)-Responsive microRNAs in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Wu, Yue; Liu, Cheng-Chen; Liu, Li-Wei; Ma, Fang-Fang; Wu, Xiao-Yi; Wu, Mian; Hang, Yue-Yu; Chen, Jian-Qun; Shao, Zhu-Qing; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A majority of land plants can form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated to regulate this process in legumes, but their involvement in non-legume species is largely unknown. In this study, by performing deep sequencing of sRNA libraries in tomato roots and comparing with tomato genome, a total of 700 potential miRNAs were predicted, among them, 187 are known plant miRNAs that have been previously deposited in miRBase. Unlike the profiles in other plants such as rice and Arabidopsis, a large proportion of predicted tomato miRNAs was 24 nt in length. A similar pattern was observed in the potato genome but not in tobacco, indicating a Solanum genus-specific expansion of 24-nt miRNAs. About 40% identified tomato miRNAs showed significantly altered expressions upon Rhizophagus irregularis inoculation, suggesting the potential roles of these novel miRNAs in AM symbiosis. The differential expression of five known and six novel miRNAs were further validated using qPCR analysis. Interestingly, three up-regulated known tomato miRNAs belong to a known miR171 family, a member of which has been reported in Medicago truncatula to regulate AM symbiosis. Thus, the miR171 family likely regulates AM symbiosis conservatively across different plant lineages. More than 1000 genes targeted by potential AM-responsive miRNAs were provided and their roles in AM symbiosis are worth further exploring.

  20. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi and Pseudomonas fluorescent bactria on Nutrient Uptake of Pistachio Seedling (Pistacia Vera Cv. Qazvini under Four Irrigation Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shool

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pistachio is one of the most important products exported from the country, which due to the low rainfall, its production is faced with water deficiency in Iran. One of the strategies adopted to deal with water deficiency and drought stress in recent years is the use of mycorrhizal fungi and phosphate solubilizing bacteria. Therefore, to study the effect of co-inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae and Pseudomonas fluorescens P52 strain bacteria on nutrient uptake of pistachio seedling (Pistacia vera cv. Qazvini under drought stress, a greenhouse experiment was conducted using four levels of drought stress (%100 Field capacity (FC as control and 75, 50 and 25 %FC and four levels of biofertilizer (plant without mycorrhizae and bacteria as control, mycorrhizae alone (100 gr of mycorrhizal inoculum in every pot, bacteria alone (two ml of the bacterial suspension in every pot and mycorrhizae and bacteria combination (100 gr of mycorrhizal inoculum and two ml of the bacterial suspension in every pot in a completely randomized design as factorial with four replications. The experiment was carried out between the years of 2010 to 2011 on 3-months old seedlings with three seedlings per pot. In this experiment, bacteria inoculation in different levels of drought had no significant effect on root colonization by mycorrhizae, but regardless of bacterial treatment, an increase in drought intensity had a promotive effect on root colonization. The amount of phosphorus was increased using biofertilizer and in many cases the greatest amount of phosphorus was obtained in mycorrhizae and mixed treatments under 25 and 50% FC. The K+ content of shoot was maximum in the mixed treatment. The greatest amount of root Ca+ was recorded under 25% FC. Drought stress caused a significant increase in micronutrients compared with control at 25% of field capacity, but was ineffective in the roots. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that in many

  1. IMPACT OF BRACHIARIA, ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA, AND POTASSIUM ENRICHED RICE STRAW COMPOST ON ALUMINIUM, POTASSIUM AND STABILITY OF ACID SOIL AGGREGATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bariot Hafif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acid soil is commonly grown with cassava, which in general, tolerate low soil  fertility and aluminum (Al toxicity. However, without any improvement efforts such soil will become worse. Intercropping cassava with Brachiaria decumbens (BD which adapts to acid soil and tolerates low fertility soils as well as application of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM and organic matters are among the important efforts to rehabilitate this soil. The experiment was conducted to  examine the impact of BD, AM, and potassium (K enriched rice straw compost on exchangeable Al, available K, and stability of soil aggregates. Experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with three factors and three replications. The first factor was BD as cassava intercropping, the second factor was AM, and the third factor was 2 t ha-1 rice straw compost enriched with 0 kg, 50 kg, 100 kg, and 200 kg KCl ha-1. Brick pots (1 m length x 1 m width x 0.45 m depth filled with Kanhapludult soil was used for growing cassava in which row of BD was planted at 60 cm from cassava stem. K-enriched rice straw compost and AM (10 g per stem were applied around cassava stem at 2 and 12 days after planting, respectively. BD was cut every 30 days and the cutting was returned to the soil. Soil exchangeable Al was analyzed at 0, 3, 6 and 9 months after planting (MAP, while Al and K contents as well as aggregate stability were measured at 6 MAP. The results showed that planting BD decreased 33% exchangeable Al, which means that the root exudates of this grass was effective in detoxifying Al3+. Treatment of BD and/or in combination with AM was effective in preserving K added to the soil, increasing total polysaccharides, and improving soil aggregate stability. This indicated that planting BD and applying AM and Kenriched rice straw compost improved acid soil fertility, and therefore can be recommended in cassava cultivation.

  2. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Augments Arsenic Tolerance in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Strengthening Antioxidant Defense System and Thiol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surbhi; Anand, Garima; Singh, Neeraja; Kapoor, Rupam

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) can help plants to tolerate arsenic (As) toxicity. However, plant responses are found to vary with the host plant and the AM fungal species. The present study compares the efficacy of two AM fungi Rhizoglomus intraradices (M1) and Glomus etunicatum (M2) in amelioration of As stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. var. HD-2967). Mycorrhizal (M) and non-mycorrhizal (NM) wheat plants were subjected to four levels of As (0, 25, 50, and 100 mg As kg-1 soil). Although As additions had variable effects on the percentage of root colonized by the two fungal inoculants, each mycobiont conferred benefits to the host plant. Mycorrhizal plants continued to display better growth than NM plants. Formation of AM helped the host plant to overcome As-induced P deficiency and maintained favorable P:As ratio. Inoculation of AMF had variable effects on the distribution of As in plant tissues. While As translocation factor decreased in low As (25 mg kg-1 soil), it increased under high As (50 and 100 mg As kg-1 soil). Further As translocation to grain was reduced (As grain:shoot ratio) in M plants compared with NM plants. Arsenic-induced oxidative stress (generation of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation) in plants reduced significantly by AMF inoculation. The alleviation potential of AM was more evident with increase in severity of As stress. Colonization of AMF resulted in higher activities of the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase). It increased the concentrations of the antioxidant molecules (carotenoids, proline, and α-tocopherol) than their NM counterparts at high As addition level. Comparatively higher activities of enzymes of glutathione-ascorbate cycle in M plants led to higher ascorbate:dehydroascorbate (AsA:DHA) and glutathione:glutathione disulphide (GSH:GSSG) ratios. Inoculation by AMF also augmented the glyoxalase system by increasing the activities of both glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II enzymes. Mycorrhizal

  3. Plant growth responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 are increased by phosphorus sufficiency but not by arbuscular mycorrhizas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Smith, Sally E.; Smith, F. Andrew; Watts-Williams, Stephanie J.; Clausen, Signe S.; Grønlund, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Capturing the full growth potential in crops under future elevated CO2 (eCO2) concentrations would be facilitated by improved understanding of eCO2 effects on uptake and use of mineral nutrients. This study investigates interactions of eCO2, soil phosphorus (P), and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in Medicago truncatula and Brachypodium distachyon grown under the same conditions. The focus was on eCO2 effects on vegetative growth, efficiency in acquisition and use of P, and expression of phosphate transporter (PT) genes. Growth responses to eCO2 were positive at P sufficiency, but under low-P conditions they ranged from non-significant in M. truncatula to highly significant in B. distachyon. Growth of M. truncatula was increased by AM at low P conditions at both CO2 levels and eCO2×AM interactions were sparse. Elevated CO2 had small effects on P acquisition, but enhanced conversion of tissue P into biomass. Expression of PT genes was influenced by eCO2, but effects were inconsistent across genes and species. The ability of eCO2 to partly mitigate P limitation-induced growth reductions in B. distachyon was associated with enhanced P use efficiency, and requirements for P fertilizers may not increase in such species in future CO2-rich climates. PMID:27811084

  4. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass production and nitrogen fixation of berseem clover plants subjected to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, Sergio; Amato, Gaetano; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Giambalvo, Dario; Ruisi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N) fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season) on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions) or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment.

  5. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass production and nitrogen fixation of berseem clover plants subjected to water stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Saia

    Full Text Available Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment.

  6. No significant transfer of N and P from Pueraria Phaseoloides to Hevea Brasiliensis via Hyphal links of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikram, A.; Jensen, E.S.; Jakobsen, I.

    1994-01-01

    and averaged 0.05 and 0.03% for mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal H. brasiliensis. The estimated transfer of N and P from P. phaseoloides to H. brasiliensis was not affected by mycorrhizas despite the high degree of root colonization in both species. The percentage of total legume N transferred to H...

  7. External hyphae of Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198 are less sensitive to low pH than roots in arbuscular mycorrhizae: evidence from axenic culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Feng, Zengwei; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Honghui; Yao, Qing

    2017-10-01

    The growth of plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can be inhibited by low pH; however, it is largely unknown which is more sensitive to low pH. This study aimed to compare the physiological and molecular responses of external hyphae (EH) and roots to low pH in terms of growth, development and functioning. We established AM symbiosis in a two-compartmented system (root compartment, RC; hyphal compartment, HC) using AMF and transformed hairy roots and exposed them to pH 6.5 and/or pH 4.5. The results showed that pH 4.5 significantly decreased root cell viability, while EH at pH 6.5 attenuated the effect. In either RC or HC, pH 4.5 reduced biomass, P content, colonization, ALP activity in roots, and ALP activity and polyphosphate accumulation in EH. GintPT expression in EH was inhibited by pH 4.5 in HC but not in RC. The expression of mycorrhiza-responsive LePTs was significantly reduced by the lower colonization due to decreased pH in either RC or HC, while the expression of non-mycorrhiza-responsive LePTs was not affected. Variation partitioning analysis indicated that EH was less sensitive to low pH than roots. The interactions between roots and EH under low pH stress merit further investigation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhiza improve growth, nitrogen uptake, and nitrogen use efficiency in wheat grown under elevated CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiancan; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Shengqun

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on plant growth, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) accumulation, and partitioning was investigated in Triticum aestivum L. plants grown under elevated CO2 in a pot experiment. Wheat plants inoculated or not inoculated with the AM...

  9. Structural characterization and molecular identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza morphotypes of Alzatea verticillata (Alzateaceae), a prominent tree in the tropical mountain rain forest of South Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Adela; Haug, Ingeborg; Oberwinkler, Franz; Kottke, Ingrid

    2007-10-01

    The vast majority of the highly diverse trees in the tropical mountain rain forest of South Ecuador form arbuscular mycorrhizas, and previous molecular investigations revealed a high diversity of fungi. In this study, we present a first trial to link fungal DNA-sequences with defined morphotypes characterized on the basis of partly new mycelial features obtained from field material of one tree species, Alzatea verticillata. Fine roots were halved lengthwise to study the mycelium anatomy on one half and to obtain fungal nuclear rDNA coding for the small subunit rRNA of Glomeromycota from the other half. Light microscopy revealed conspicuously large amounts of mycelium attaching to the surface of the rootlets. The mycelium formed fine- or large-branched appressoria-like plates, vesicles of regular or irregular shape, and very fine, multibranched structures ensheathed by septate hyphae. These previously undescribed features of the supraradical mycelia combined with intraradical mycelium structures were used for distinguishing of four main morphogroups and subordinate 14 morphotypes. DNA sequences of Glomus group A, Acaulospora and Gigaspora, were obtained and linked to three morphogroups. Two sequence types within Glomus group A could be tentatively associated to subordinate morphotypes.

  10. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on growth and mineral nutrition of greenhouse propagated fruit trees from diverse geographic provenances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guissou, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are known to promote plant growth by enhancing mineral uptake in nutrient deficient soils. These beneficial effects on plant growth may vary considerably between cultivars of a given species and between plant species originating from different locations. Objectives. The present experiment evaluated the response of three Sahelian fruit trees: néré (Parkia biglobosa [Jacq.] G.Don, tamarind (Tamarindus indica L., and jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lam., originating from five different geographic provenances, to mycorrhizal colonization, evaluate their respective mycorrhizal dependency (MD and analyze their leaf and stem mineral composition. Method. Trees were cultivated in a nursery on pre-sterilized soil substrate low in available P (2.18 μg·g-1 with or without inoculum of Glomus aggregatum (Schenck & Smith emend. Koske. The experiment was arranged in a factorial design for each fruit tree species separately: 5 provenances x 2 AM treatments (inoculated and non-inoculated [control] with 10 replicates per treatment. Plants were harvested six months after inoculation and different parameters were measured. Results. Overall, the results showed significant provenance variations in the plant response to mycorrhizal inoculation. Néré mycorrhizal plants, from two seed sources, tamarind and jujube plants from one seed source had significant higher dry weight and shoot height than those from other provenances. Jujube plants from 3 out of the 5 provenances showed significant higher MD. It then appears that seed provenance happened to be determinant even though AM-root colonization levels (80-90% do not vary much from one provenance to another. In all cases, the fruit trees benefited from AM fungi with increased N, P and K mineral uptake in aerial parts. In particular P uptake was proportional to MD concentration in AM-jujube plants. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the importance of

  11. Ocorrência de micorrizas arbusculares e da bactéria diazotrófica Acetobacter diazotrophicus em cana-de-açúcar Occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizae and bacterium Acetobacter diazotrophicus in sugar cane

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    Veronica Massena Reis

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a ocorrência e a distribuição de espécies de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs e Acetobacter diazotrophicus em plantios de cana-de-açúcar em diferentes tipos de manejo nos Estados do Rio de Janeiro e Pernambuco. Foram feitas 35 coletas de amostras de solo da rizosfera e de raízes de 14 variedades de cana-de-açúcar para extração de esporos e isolamento da bactéria. O número de esporos variou de 18 a 2.070/100 mL de solo, e os maiores número e diversidade de espécies foram verificados nos canaviais de Campos, RJ, especialmente naqueles que não adotam a queima do palhiço. As espécies predominantes nas três localidades amostradas foram: Acaulospora sp., Scutellospora heterogama, Glomus etunicatum, Glomus occultum e Gigaspora margarita. A. diazotrophicus estava presente nas amostras de raízes colhidas em canaviais de Campos, com exceção de uma coleta de cana-de-açúcar plantada num solo usado como bacia de sedimentação de vinhaça. Não foi possível isolar essa bactéria a partir de esporos desinfestados dos FMAs nativos, apenas dos esporos lavados com água estéril.The occurrence and distribution of species of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi and Acetobacter diazotrophicus in sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum grown in different regimes of crop management in the States of Rio de Janeiro and Pernambuco, Brazil, were studied. Thirty five samples of the rhizosphere soil and roots were collected from 14 varieties of sugar cane for the extraction of spores and isolation of the bacterium. The number of spores varied from 18 to 2,070 per 100 mL of soil, and the greatest diversity of fungal species was found in the sugarcane fields of Campos (Rio de Janeiro State, especially in those where the sugarcane trash was not burned at harvest. The predominant species found in the three localities sampled were: Scutellospora heterogama, Glomus etunicatum, Glomus occultum, Acaulospora sp. and Gigaspora margarita. A

  12. Dinâmica e contribuição da micorriza arbuscular em sistemas de produção com rotação de culturas Dynamics and contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza in culture systems with crop rotation

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    Jeanne Christine Claessen de Miranda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotação de culturas e variações sazonais podem promover alterações quantitativas e qualitativas na comunidade de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares nativos e na formação da micorriza arbuscular. Essa dinâmica foi avaliada, em campo, num Latossolo Vermelho, em relação ao tempo de cultivo e variação sazonal, em sistemas de rotação de culturas. Em casa de vegetação, avaliou-se, em solo proveniente da área experimental, a contribuição da micorriza arbuscular no crescimento de soja e capim-andropógon utilizados na rotação. O número de esporos dos fungos aumentou no solo cultivado. O número de esporos e o porcentual de colonização radicular, inicialmente maiores sob pastagem, variaram de acordo com o tempo de cultivo, as estações seca e chuvosa, a cultura e o sistema de rotação utilizados. O número de gêneros e espécies aumentou com o tempo de cultivo e manejo de culturas e foi maior sob culturas anuais em rotação. A presença dos fungos no solo contribuiu no crescimento da soja e do capim-andropógon em 53% e 95%, respectivamente. A cultura e o sistema de cultivo são fatores determinantes para o enriquecimento do sistema com micorriza arbuscular.Crop rotation and seasonal variations can promote quantitative and qualitative changes in the indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi population in the soil and arbuscular mycorrhiza establishment. These fungi dynamics were evaluated in the field, in a Red Latosol, in relation to cropping time, seasonal variation and rotation systems. The contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza to the growth of andropogon grass and soybean, which were used in the systems, was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment using soil from the experimental area. The number of spores of the fungi increased in the cultivated soil. The spores number and percent root colonization varied according to cropping time, soil moisture, crops and rotation system and were, initially, higher under pasture. The number

  13. A key role for arbuscular mycorrhiza in plant acquisition of P from sewage sludge recycled to soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackay, Jessica E.; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.; Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Dried and incinerated sewage sludge (SS) have the potential to be used as phosphorus (P) fertilisers. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) contribute to plant P uptake; however, their role in P uptake from SS has yet to be fully explored. A compartmented pot system with an isotope pool dilution...... approach was used to investigate wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) P uptake from soluble P, dried SS and incinerated SS, via roots and/or AMF hyphae. Wheat was sown into an inner compartment containing a 33P label with/without AMF (Rhizophagus irregularis) inoculum. An outer soil compartment contained the P...

  14. Micorriza arbuscular e nutrição fosfática na toxidez de zinco para a trema [Trema micrantha (L. Blum.] Arbuscular mycorrhiza and phosphorus nutrition on zinc toxicity to trema [Trema micrantha (L. Blum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Roberto Fonsêca Sousa Soares

    2006-08-01

    mycorrhiza, the plant P nutritional status and increasing levels of P in nutrient solution on Zn toxicity to Trema micrantha (L. Blum. In a first experiment trema seedlings were grown in a substrate with increasing P rates [0, 100, 200 and 400 mg dm-3 as Ca(H2PO42], besides a mycorrhizal treatment inoculated with Glomus etunicatum (Ge. After 60 days of growth, the plants were transferred to pots with Clark's nutrient solution containing 2, 75, 150 and 225 µmol L-1 of Zn, grown for 40 days, harvested and evaluated. In a second experiment the ameliorating effects of P on Zn phytotoxicity were also evaluated in nutrient solution containing increasing P rates (0.07; 0.5; 1 and 2 mmol L-1 supplied by different sources and Zn (2, 75, 150 and 225 µmol L-1 as ZnSO4.7H2O combined and simultaneously applied to the solution where trema seedlings were left to grow for 40 days. It was found that high Zn concentrations were highly inhibitory to plant growth and mycorrhizal colonization. Enhanced P nutrition reduced translocation of Zn from plant roots to shoots, but such effects as well as mycorrhizal colonization had no effect on trema growth under Zn excess in solution. In the second experiment, higher P concentration in solution improved the plant nutritional status and protected them against the excess of Zn. Considering that chemical speciation of the solution showed no significant effect on Zn forms, the results suggested that the ameliorating effects of P occur within the plant (in planta, possibly by reducing Zn translocation from roots to shoots.

  15. Gene expression analyses in tomato near isogenic lines provide evidence for ethylene and abscisic acid biosynthesis fine-tuning during arbuscular mycorrhiza development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracetto, Giselle Gomes Monteiro; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Lambais, Marcio Rodrigues

    2017-07-01

    Plant responses to the environment and microorganisms, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, involve complex hormonal interactions. It is known that abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene may be involved in the regulation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and that part of the detrimental effects of ABA deficiency in plants is due to ethylene overproduction. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the low susceptibility to mycorrhizal colonization in ABA-deficient mutants is due to high levels of ethylene and whether AM development is associated with changes in the steady-state levels of transcripts of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ethylene and ABA. For that, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ethylene overproducer epinastic (epi) mutant and the ABA-deficient notabilis (not) and sitiens (sit) mutants, in the same Micro-Tom (MT) genetic background, were inoculated with Rhizophagus clarus, and treated with the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The development of AM, as well as the steady-state levels of transcripts involved in ethylene (LeACS2, LeACO1 and LeACO4) and ABA (LeNCED) biosynthesis, was determined. The intraradical colonization in epi, not and sit mutants was significantly reduced compared to MT. The epi mutant completely restored the mycorrhizal colonization to the levels of MT with the application of 10 µM of AVG, probably due to the inhibition of the ACC synthase gene expression. The steady-state levels of LeACS2 and LeACO4 transcripts were induced in mycorrhizal roots of MT, whereas the steady-state levels of LeACO1 and LeACO4 transcripts were significantly induced in sit, and the steady-state levels of LeNCED transcripts were significantly induced in all genotypes and in mycorrhizal roots of epi mutants treated with AVG. The reduced mycorrhizal colonization in sit mutants seems not to be limited by ethylene production via ACC oxidase regulation. Both ethylene overproduction and ABA deficiency impaired AM fungal

  16. Rhizosphere bacterial community composition responds to arbuscular mycorrhiza, but not to reductions in microbial activity induced by foliar cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette Vestergård; Henry, Frédéric; Rangel-Castro, J. Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Differences in bacterial community composition (BCC) between bulk and rhizosphere soil and between rhizospheres of different plant species are assumed to be strongly governed by quantitative and qualitative rhizodeposit differences. However, data on the relationship between rhizodeposit amounts...... and BCC are lacking. Other soil microorganisms, e.g. arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), may also influence BCC. We simulated foliar herbivory (cutting) to reduce belowground carbon allocation and rhizodeposition of pea plants grown either with or without AMF. This reduced soil respiration, rhizosphere...... microbial biomass and bacteriovorous protozoan abundance, whereas none of these were affected by AMF. After labelling plants with 13CO2, root and rhizosphere soil 13C enrichment of cut plants were reduced to a higher extent (24-46%) than shoot 13C enrichment (10-24%). AMF did not affect 13C enrichment...

  17. Functional diversity in arbuscular mycorrhizas: Exploitation of soil patches with different phosphate enrichment differs among fungal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavagnaro, T.R.; Smith, F.A.; Smith, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    . This was studied by growing symbioses of Linum usitatissimum and three AMF (Glomus intraradices, G. mosseae and Gigaspora margarita) in pots with two side-arms, which were accessible to hyphae, but not to roots. Soil in one side-arm was either unamended (P0) or enriched with P; simultaneous labelling of this soil......Most terrestrial plant species form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that transfer soil P to the plant via their external hyphae. The distribution of nutrients in soils is typically patchy (heterogeneous) but little is known about the ability of AMF to exploit P patches in soil...... with P-32 revealed that G. intraradices responded to P enrichment both in terms of hyphal proliferation and P uptake, whereas the other AMF did not. Labelling with P-33 of P0 soil in the other side arm revealed that the increased P uptake by G. intraradices from the P-enriched patch was paralleled...

  18. Unraveling the signaling and signal transduction mechanisms controlling arbuscular mycorrhiza development Desenredando os mecanismo de sinalização e transdução de sinais que controlam o desenvolvimento de micorrizas arbusculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rodrigues Lambais

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM are the most widespread symbiotic associations between plant roots and soil fungi. AM can contribute to increasing the survival and fitness of plants to limiting environments mostly due to their ability in improving nutrient uptake from the soil solution. Despite their ecological significance, the mechanisms controlling AM development and functioning are largely unknown. The obligate mutualistic nature of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF has hampered the advances on the understanding and application of the symbiosis. Significant alterations in the genetic programs of both symbionts are required for the successful establishment of an AM, and complex signaling and signal transduction mechanisms are likely involved. The analyses of legume mutants affected in the development of nitrogen fixing nodules and AM suggest that part of the signal transduction pathways involved in the regulation of both symbioses are conserved. Even though the use of genomics of model plants has helped to advance our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in AM, identifying the signal molecules involved in plant-AMF communication and determining their transduction pathways is still essential for its biotechnological application in agriculture.As micorrizas arbusculares (MAs são as associações simbióticas entre raízes de plantas e fungos mais comuns na natureza. Elas podem contribuir para o aumento da sobrevivência e adaptação das plantas a ambientes limitantes, principalmente devido a sua maior capacidade em absorver nutrientes da solução do solo. Apesar de sua importância ecológica, os mecanismos que controlam o desenvolvimento e fisiologia das MAs são pouco conhecidos. A natureza mutualística obrigatória dos fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs tem limitado os avanços na compreensão e aplicação da simbiose. Alterações significativas nos programas genéticos de ambos simbiontes são necessárias para o

  19. Interactive effects of silicon and arbuscular mycorrhiza in modulating ascorbate-glutathione cycle and antioxidant scavenging capacity in differentially salt-tolerant Cicer arietinum L. genotypes subjected to long-term salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neera; Bhandari, Purnima

    2016-09-01

    Salinity is the major environmental constraint that affects legume productivity by inducing oxidative stress. Individually, both silicon (Si) nutrition and mycorrhization have been reported to alleviate salt stress. However, the mechanisms adopted by both in mediating stress responses are poorly understood. Thus, pot trials were undertaken to evaluate comparative as well as interactive effects of Si and/or arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) in alleviating NaCl toxicity in modulating oxidative stress and antioxidant defence mechanisms in two Cicer arietinum L. (chickpea) genotypes-HC 3 (salt-tolerant) and CSG 9505 (salt-sensitive). Plants subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0-100 mM) recorded a substantial increase in the rate of superoxide radical (O2 (·-)), H2O2, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which induced leakage of ions and disturbed Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratio in roots and leaves. Individually, Si and AM reduced oxidative burst by strengthening antioxidant enzymatic activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX)). Si was relatively more efficient in reducing accumulation of stress metabolites, while mycorrhization significantly up-regulated antioxidant machinery and modulated ascorbate-glutathione (ASA-GSH) cycle. Combined applications of Si and AM complemented each other in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) build-up by further enhancing the antioxidant defence responses. Magnitude of ROS-mediated oxidative burden was lower in HC 3 which correlated strongly with more effective AM symbiosis, better capacity to accumulate Si and stronger defence response when compared with CSG 9505. Study indicated that Si and/or AM fungal amendments upgraded salt tolerance through a dynamic shift from oxidative destruction towards favourable antioxidant defence system in stressed chickpea plants.

  20. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae on zinc nutrition of maize grow in calcareous soil amended with different phosphorus sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, S.S.M.; EL-Ghandour, I. A.

    2001-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known to improve P nutrition of plants. The information of AMF effects on corn Zn nutrition under P fertilization in calcareous soil is limited. A greenhouse experiment was carried out using calcareous soil and two P-sources i.e single superphosphate and rock phosphate (with full and one third of recommended dose). to evaluate the ability of AMF on improving Zn nutrition in maize plants. Labelled 65 ZnSo 4 was added at rates of 0.10 and 20 mg Zn Kg -1 soil. Zinc uptake and dry mater of corn shoots were improved as a result of AMF inoculation. The maximum improvement was recorded with super-P fertilizer in combination with 10 or 20 mg Zn Kg -1 soil for non-inoculated and AMF inoculated plants. respectively. The amount of Zn in non-inoculated and AMF inoculated plants. respectively. The amount of ZnSo 4 utilized plant derived from fertilizer.(Zndff) and the percent of ZnSo 4 utilization by corn plants were increased when ZnSo 4 was added at rate of 10 mg Zn Kg -1 soil in the presence of super-P fertilizer. Inoculated plants with AMF had higher Zndff content and U% than non-inoculated ones and the greater Zndff and superphosphate fertilizer. It could be concluded that. AMF is useful method utilization by corn plants grown in calcareous soil

  1. Effects of heavy metals and arbuscular mycorrhiza on the leaf proteome of a selected poplar clone: a time course analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingua, Guido; Bona, Elisa; Todeschini, Valeria; Cattaneo, Chiara; Marsano, Francesco; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi establish a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species. While receiving photosynthates, they improve the mineral nutrition of the plant and can also increase its tolerance towards some pollutants, like heavy metals. Although the fungal symbionts exclusively colonize the plant roots, some plant responses can be systemic. Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression. Poplar leaf samples were collected from plants maintained in a glasshouse on polluted (copper and zinc contaminated) or unpolluted soil, after four, six and sixteen months of growth. For each harvest, about 450 proteins were reproducibly separated on 2DE maps. At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments. This work demonstrates how importantly the time of sampling affects the proteome responses in perennial plants. In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein.

  2. Effects of heavy metals and arbuscular mycorrhiza on the leaf proteome of a selected poplar clone: a time course analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Lingua

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi establish a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species. While receiving photosynthates, they improve the mineral nutrition of the plant and can also increase its tolerance towards some pollutants, like heavy metals. Although the fungal symbionts exclusively colonize the plant roots, some plant responses can be systemic. Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression. Poplar leaf samples were collected from plants maintained in a glasshouse on polluted (copper and zinc contaminated or unpolluted soil, after four, six and sixteen months of growth. For each harvest, about 450 proteins were reproducibly separated on 2DE maps. At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments. This work demonstrates how importantly the time of sampling affects the proteome responses in perennial plants. In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein.

  3. Time of Stablishment of Pastures and Their Relationship with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Hilly Terrain and Fertile Valley

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    Raúl Hernando Posada Almanza

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this research was to evaluate the effect of the time of establishment (0-5 years, 5-10 years, and more than 10 years. of pastures of Brachiaria sp. over theArbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal populations (AMF: genus and spore distribution, length of extramatrical mycelia, root colonizations by AMF and septate fungi; the pastures resulting from fragmentation of the tropical rainforest with valley and hilly landscapes at Florencia, Caquetá, Colombia. Whichever the age of pasture, the genera Glomus and Acaulospora predominate; the change of coverage require more than ten years for different species of MAF to recolonize, adapt and diversify. In hilly terrain, the Brachiaria sp-MAF relationship decrease with time, specially after ten years of establishment; in valley landscapes the relationship is medium and homogeneous (21- 50%, while the root colonization by septate fungi increased, showing possibly a competitive mechanism by root space or a cooperative activity. Finally, the extramatrical mycelia and spores in any landscape had a variable behavior (increase, decrease or stability with time.

  4. Influence of fertilization, season, and forage species in presence of arbuscular mycorrhizae in a degraded Andisoil of Colombia

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    Otero Joel Tupac

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Para determinar la influencia de la fertilización, época, y especies forrajeras en la producción de micorrizas arbusculares  se realizó un experimento  con una graminea C4, (Brachiaria dictyoneura, dos leguminosas forrajeras C3  (Arachis pintoi y Centrosema macrocarpum  y la vegetación nativa; cultivadas en dos sistemas de siembra (monocultivo y asociación, dos niveles de fertilización (alto y bajo y cuatro edades de cosecha. Se uso un diseño de parcelas sub-sub divididas, en el cual la parcela principal fue la especie, los niveles de  fertilización como subparcelas y la edad de rebrote como la sub-sub parcela. El número de esporas de hongos micorrizicos en el suelo y el porcentaje de infección en las raices se incrementó con la edad y varió con la especie y la época del muestreo (seca o húmeda. Se encontraron diferencias en la capacidad para formar simbiosis micorrízica entre las especies de gramíneas y leguminosas bajo condiciones de campo.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhiza improve growth, nitrogen uptake, and nitrogen use efficiency in wheat grown under elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiancan; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Shengqun; Liu, Fulai

    2016-02-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on plant growth, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) accumulation, and partitioning was investigated in Triticum aestivum L. plants grown under elevated CO2 in a pot experiment. Wheat plants inoculated or not inoculated with the AM fungus were grown in two glasshouse cells with different CO2 concentrations (400 and 700 ppm) for 10 weeks. A (15)N isotope labeling technique was used to trace plant N uptake. Results showed that elevated CO2 increased AM fungal colonization. Under CO2 elevation, AM plants had higher C concentration and higher plant biomass than the non-AM plants. CO2 elevation did not affect C and N partitioning in plant organs, while AM symbiosis increased C and N allocation into the roots. In addition, plant C and N accumulation, (15)N recovery rate, and N use efficiency (NUE) were significantly higher in AM plants than in non-AM controls under CO2 enrichment. It is concluded that AM symbiosis favors C and N partitioning in roots, increases C accumulation and N uptake, and leads to greater NUE in wheat plants grown at elevated CO2.

  6. Late activation of the 9-oxylipin pathway during arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in tomato and its regulation by jasmonate signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Angel, José; Martín-Rodríguez; Vierheilig, Horst; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2012-06-01

    The establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic interaction is a successful strategy for the promotion of substantial plant growth, development, and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the establishment of functional AM symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed up-regulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and indicate a key regulatory role for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly those derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOXs). Continuing with the tomato as a model, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of genes involved in the 9-LOX pathway during the different stages of AM formation in tomato was analysed. The effects of JA signalling pathway changes on AM fungal colonization were assessed and correlated with the modifications in the transcriptional profiles of 9-LOX genes. The up-regulation of the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway in mycorrhizal wild-type roots seems to depend on a particular degree of AM fungal colonization and is restricted to the colonized part of the roots, suggesting that these genes could play a role in controlling fungal spread in roots. In addition, the results suggest that this strategy of the plant to control AM fungi development within the roots is at least partly dependent on JA pathway activation.

  7. Late activation of the 9-oxylipin pathway during arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in tomato and its regulation by jasmonate signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ángel, José; Martín-Rodríguez; Vierheilig, Horst; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic interaction is a successful strategy for the promotion of substantial plant growth, development, and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the establishment of functional AM symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed up-regulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and indicate a key regulatory role for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly those derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOXs). Continuing with the tomato as a model, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of genes involved in the 9-LOX pathway during the different stages of AM formation in tomato was analysed. The effects of JA signalling pathway changes on AM fungal colonization were assessed and correlated with the modifications in the transcriptional profiles of 9-LOX genes. The up-regulation of the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway in mycorrhizal wild-type roots seems to depend on a particular degree of AM fungal colonization and is restricted to the colonized part of the roots, suggesting that these genes could play a role in controlling fungal spread in roots. In addition, the results suggest that this strategy of the plant to control AM fungi development within the roots is at least partly dependent on JA pathway activation. PMID:22442425

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizae alleviate negative effects of zinc oxide nanoparticle and zinc accumulation in maize plants--A soil microcosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fayuan; Liu, Xueqin; Shi, Zhaoyong; Tong, Ruijian; Adams, Catharine A; Shi, Xiaojun

    2016-03-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are considered an emerging contaminant when in high concentration, and their effects on crops and soil microorganisms pose new concerns and challenges. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (AMF) form mutualistic symbioses with most vascular plants, and putatively contribute to reducing nanotoxicity in plants. Here, we studied the interactions between ZnO NPs and maize plants inoculated with or without AMF in ZnO NPs-spiked soil. ZnO NPs had no significant adverse effects at 400 mg/kg, but inhibited both maize growth and AM colonization at concentrations at and above 800 mg/kg. Sufficient addition of ZnO NPs decreased plant mineral nutrient acquisition, photosynthetic pigment concentrations, and root activity. Furthermore, ZnO NPs caused Zn concentrations in plants to increase in a dose-dependent pattern. As the ZnO NPs dose increased, we also found a positive correlation with soil diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Zn. However, AM inoculation significantly alleviated the negative effects induced by ZnO NPs: inoculated-plants experienced increased growth, nutrient uptake, photosynthetic pigment content, and SOD activity in leaves. Mycorrhizal plants also exhibited decreased ROS accumulation, Zn concentrations and bioconcentration factor (BCF), and lower soil DTPA-extractable Zn concentrations at high ZnO NPs doses. Our results demonstrate that, at high contamination levels, ZnO NPs cause toxicity to AM symbiosis, but AMF help alleviate ZnO NPs-induced phytotoxicity by decreasing Zn bioavailability and accumulation, Zn partitioning to shoots, and ROS production, and by increasing mineral nutrients and antioxidant capacity. AMF may play beneficial roles in alleviating the negative effects and environmental risks posed by ZnO NPs in agroecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of six PHT1 members in Lycium barbarum and their response to arbuscular mycorrhiza and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Haoqiang; Zhang, Xiangyu; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) is vitally important for most plant processes. However, the P available to plants is present in the soil in the form of inorganic phosphate (Pi), and is often present in only limited amounts. Water stress further reduces Pi availability. Previous studies have highlighted the important roles of members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER 1 (PHT1) family and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations for Pi acquisition by plants growing in various environments. In order to understand the Pi uptake of Lycium barbarumL., a drought-tolerant ligneous species belonging to the Solanaceae family, we cloned and characterized six L. barbarum genes encoding transporter proteins belonging to the PHT1 family, and investigated their transcriptional response to AM associations and water stress. The six cloned PHT1 genes of L. barbarum had a similar evolutionary history to that of PHT1 genes found in other Solanaceae species. Three of these genes (LbPT3, LbPT4 and LbPT5) were AM-induced; the other three genes (LbPT1, LbPT2 and LbPT7) played distinct roles in Pi acquisition, translocation and remobilization in roots and leaves. AM-induced PHT1 genes maintained their function under water stress, while moderate and severe water stress upregulated non-AM-induced PHT1 genes in roots and leaves, respectively. Moreover, although LbPT1 was upregulated in AM roots under water stress, LbPT2 and LbPT7 were inhibited in AM roots, which suggested that an AM association satisfied the demand for Pi in roots under water stress and that LbPT1 may play a role in translocating Pi from roots to shoots in this situation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Enhanced Secondary- and Hormone Metabolism in Leaves of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Medicago truncatula1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolfsson, Lisa; Šimura, Jan; Beebo, Azeez; Aboalizadeh, Jila; Široká, Jitka

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are the most common symbiotic associations between a plant’s root compartment and fungi. They provide nutritional benefit (mostly inorganic phosphate [Pi]), leading to improved growth, and nonnutritional benefits, including defense responses to environmental cues throughout the host plant, which, in return, delivers carbohydrates to the symbiont. However, how transcriptional and metabolic changes occurring in leaves of AM plants differ from those induced by Pi fertilization is poorly understood. We investigated systemic changes in the leaves of mycorrhized Medicago truncatula in conditions with no improved Pi status and compared them with those induced by high-Pi treatment in nonmycorrhized plants. Microarray-based genome-wide profiling indicated up-regulation by mycorrhization of genes involved in flavonoid, terpenoid, jasmonic acid (JA), and abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis as well as enhanced expression of MYC2, the master regulator of JA-dependent responses. Accordingly, total anthocyanins and flavonoids increased, and most flavonoid species were enriched in AM leaves. Both the AM and Pi treatments corepressed iron homeostasis genes, resulting in lower levels of available iron in leaves. In addition, higher levels of cytokinins were found in leaves of AM- and Pi-treated plants, whereas the level of ABA was increased specifically in AM leaves. Foliar treatment of nonmycorrhized plants with either ABA or JA induced the up-regulation of MYC2, but only JA also induced the up-regulation of flavonoid and terpenoid biosynthetic genes. Based on these results, we propose that mycorrhization and Pi fertilization share cytokinin-mediated improved shoot growth, whereas enhanced ABA biosynthesis and JA-regulated flavonoid and terpenoid biosynthesis in leaves are specific to mycorrhization. PMID:28698354

  11. Effectiveness of native arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth of four tree forest species from the Santa Marta Mountain, Veracruz (Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Retama-Ortiz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The aim of this work was to isolate consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF associated to Liquidambar styraciflua in soils of the Santa Marta Mountain in Veracruz, and to select highly effective mycorrhizal consortia on promoting the growth of four tree forest species with economic and ecological importance. Area of study: Santa Marta Mountain, inside the buffer area of the Los Tuxtlas Biological Reserve in Veracruz (México. Materials and methods: Ten composite samples of rhizosphere soil were collected from L. styraciflua trees of 13-15 cm DBH (diameter at breast height. Roots were fixed in FAA solution to determine the mycorrhizal colonization percentage, the abundance of morphospecies, and its effectiveness in promoting the growth of L. styraciflua, Terminalia amazonia, Cordia alliodora, and Cojoba arborea. Soil physical and chemical characteristics were also analysed, and soil type recognition was performed with the Reference Base for Soil FAO-ISRIC World-SICS. Mycorrhizal colonization was determined by the method of clearing and staining roots with trypan blue; total percentage of colonization was estimated by the Linderman-Biermann method. Spores were extracted for counting and identifying morphospecies from each soil sample, those with more effectiveness were selected and inoculated in the four tree species, based upon a completely random design there were evaluated height, number of leaves, total dry weight and foliar area. Main results: Average mycorrhizal colonization percentage was 45% from natural conditions, samples one and four showed 80% of AMF-colonization. Average number of spores was 617 in 100 g-1 of dry soil. Forty-seven AMF-morphospecies were identified. After eight months significant differences were observed in root colonization, height, number of leaves, total dry weight, leaf area and foliar analysis of N5+, P5+ and K+ on plants inoculated with rhizosphere samples of L. styraciflua. Terminalia

  12. Effectiveness of native arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth of four tree forest species from the Santa Marta Mountain, Veracruz (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retama-Ortiz, Y.; Ávila-Bello, C.H.; Alarcón, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study: The aim of this work was to isolate consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated to Liquidambar styraciflua in soils of the Santa Marta Mountain in Veracruz, and to select highly effective mycorrhizal consortia on promoting the growth of four tree forest species with economic and ecological importance. Area of study: Santa Marta Mountain, inside the buffer area of the Los Tuxtlas Biological Reserve in Veracruz (México). Materials and methods: Ten composite samples of rhizosphere soil were collected from L. styraciflua trees of 13-15 cm DBH (diameter at breast height). Roots were fixed in FAA solution to determine the mycorrhizal colonization percentage, the abundance of morphospecies, and its effectiveness in promoting the growth of L. styraciflua, Terminalia amazonia, Cordia alliodora, and Cojoba arborea. Soil physical and chemical characteristics were also analysed, and soil type recognition was performed with the Reference Base for Soil FAO-ISRIC World-SICS. Mycorrhizal colonization was determined by the method of clearing and staining roots with trypan blue; total percentage of colonization was estimated by the Linderman-Biermann method. Spores were extracted for counting and identifying morphospecies from each soil sample, those with more effectiveness were selected and inoculated in the four tree species, based upon a completely random design there were evaluated height, number of leaves, total dry weight and foliar area. Main results: Average mycorrhizal colonization percentage was 45% from natural conditions, samples one and four showed 80% of AMF-colonization. Average number of spores was 617 in 100 g-1 of dry soil. Forty-seven AMF-morphospecies were identified. After eight months significant differences were observed in root colonization, height, number of leaves, total dry weight, leaf area and foliar analysis of N5+, P5+ and K+ on plants inoculated with rhizosphere samples of L. styraciflua. Terminalia amazonia and

  13. Effectiveness of native arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth of four tree forest species from the Santa Marta Mountain, Veracruz (Mexico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retama-Ortiz, Y.; Ávila-Bello, C.H.; Alarcón, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of the study: The aim of this work was to isolate consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated to Liquidambar styraciflua in soils of the Santa Marta Mountain in Veracruz, and to select highly effective mycorrhizal consortia on promoting the growth of four tree forest species with economic and ecological importance. Area of study: Santa Marta Mountain, inside the buffer area of the Los Tuxtlas Biological Reserve in Veracruz (México). Materials and methods: Ten composite samples of rhizosphere soil were collected from L. styraciflua trees of 13-15 cm DBH (diameter at breast height). Roots were fixed in FAA solution to determine the mycorrhizal colonization percentage, the abundance of morphospecies, and its effectiveness in promoting the growth of L. styraciflua, Terminalia amazonia, Cordia alliodora, and Cojoba arborea. Soil physical and chemical characteristics were also analysed, and soil type recognition was performed with the Reference Base for Soil FAO-ISRIC World-SICS. Mycorrhizal colonization was determined by the method of clearing and staining roots with trypan blue; total percentage of colonization was estimated by the Linderman-Biermann method. Spores were extracted for counting and identifying morphospecies from each soil sample, those with more effectiveness were selected and inoculated in the four tree species, based upon a completely random design there were evaluated height, number of leaves, total dry weight and foliar area. Main results: Average mycorrhizal colonization percentage was 45% from natural conditions, samples one and four showed 80% of AMF-colonization. Average number of spores was 617 in 100 g-1 of dry soil. Forty-seven AMF-morphospecies were identified. After eight months significant differences were observed in root colonization, height, number of leaves, total dry weight, leaf area and foliar analysis of N5+, P5+ and K+ on plants inoculated with rhizosphere samples of L. styraciflua. Terminalia amazonia and

  14. Influence of bacterial strains isolated from lead-polluted soil and their interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizae on the growth of Trifolium pratense L. under lead toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, A; Azcón, R; Biró, B; Barea, J M; Ruiz-Lozano, J M

    2003-10-01

    We isolated two bacterial strains from an experimentally lead (Pb)-polluted soil in Hungary, 10 years after soil contamination. These strains represented the two most abundant cultivable bacterial groups in such soil, and we tested their influence on Trifolium pratense L. growth and on the functioning of native mycorrhizal fungi under Pb toxicity in a second Pb-spiked soil. Our results showed that bacterial strain A enhanced plant growth, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulations, nodule formation, and mycorrhizal infection, demonstrating its plant-growth-promoting activity. In addition, strain A decreased the amount of Pb absorbed by plants, when expressed on a root weight basis, because of increased root biomass due to the production of indoleacetic acid. The positive effect of strain A was not only evident after a single inoculation but also in dual inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Strain A also exhibited higher tolerance than strain B when cultivated under increasing Pb levels in the spiked soil. Molecular identification unambiguously placed strain A within the genus Brevibacillus. We showed that it is important to select the most tolerant and efficient bacterial strain for co-inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to promote effective symbiosis and thus stimulate plant growth under adverse environmental conditions, such as heavy-metal contamination.

  15. Mycorrhization between Cistus ladanifer L. and Boletus edulis Bull is enhanced by the mycorrhiza helper bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Olaya; Olaizola, Jaime; Santos-del-Blanco, Luis; Oria-de-Rueda, Juan Andrés; Martín-Pinto, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Boletus edulis Bull. is one of the most economically and gastronomically valuable fungi worldwide. Sporocarp production normally occurs when symbiotically associated with a number of tree species in stands over 40 years old, but it has also been reported in 3-year-old Cistus ladanifer L. shrubs. Efforts toward the domestication of B. edulis have thus focused on successfully generating C. ladanifer seedlings associated with B. edulis under controlled conditions. Microorganisms have an important role mediating mycorrhizal symbiosis, such as some bacteria species which enhance mycorrhiza formation (mycorrhiza helper bacteria). Thus, in this study, we explored the effect that mycorrhiza helper bacteria have on the efficiency and intensity of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between C. ladanifer and B. edulis. The aim of this work was to optimize an in vitro protocol for the mycorrhizal synthesis of B. edulis with C. ladanifer by testing the effects of fungal culture time and coinoculation with the helper bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula. The results confirmed successful mycorrhizal synthesis between C. ladanifer and B. edulis. Coinoculation of B. edulis with P. fluorescens doubled within-plant mycorrhization levels although it did not result in an increased number of seedlings colonized with B. edulis mycorrhizae. B. edulis mycelium culture time also increased mycorrhization levels but not the presence of mycorrhizae. These findings bring us closer to controlled B. edulis sporocarp production in plantations.

  16. Micorriza arbuscular e rizóbios no enraizamento e nutrição de mudas de angico-vermelho Arbuscular mycorrhizae and rhizobium in rooting and nutrition of angico-vermelho seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Coqueiro Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da inoculação dos fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs e rizóbio no enraizamento, crescimento e nutrição de mudas de angico-vermelho (Anadenanthera macrocarpa (Benth Brenan propagadas via miniestaquia. Foram utilizadas seis progênies, das quais foram confeccionadas miniestacas com um par de folhas inteiras, bem como tubetes de 55 cm³ contendo substrato comercial Bioplant®. Foram testados quatro tratamentos: 8 kg m-3 de superfosfato simples (SS misturados ao substrato; 4 kg m-3 de SS misturados ao substrato; 4 kg m-3 de SS misturados ao substrato e adição de suspensão contendo rizóbios; e 4 kg m-3 de SS e adição de suspensão contendo rizóbios e 5 g de solo contendo esporos de FMAs. Não houve interação entre os tratamentos para percentagem de sobrevivência das miniestacas e percentagem de miniestacas com raízes observadas na extremidade inferior do tubete, na saída da casa de vegetação (30 dias e da casa de sombra (40 dias, provavelmente em função do sistema radicular ainda estar em formação. Houve diferenças entre as progênies para percentagem de sobrevivência das miniestacas, percentagem de miniestacas com raízes observadas na extremidade inferior do tubete, altura, diâmetro de colo e massa seca da parte aérea. As avaliações das características de crescimento das miniestacas enraizadas, principalmente com relação à sobrevivência a pleno sol (140 dias, evidenciam a eficiência dos rizóbios e FMAs na produção de mudas desta espécie. Conclui-se que a associação simbiótica com rizóbio e/ou FMA favorece a produção de mudas de A. macrocarpa via miniestaquia.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF and rhizobium on rooting, growth and nutrition of seedlings of angico-red (Anadenanthera macrocarpa (Benth Brenan propagated by minicutting. Six progenies were used, of which were prepared

  17. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2015-01-21

    Jan 21, 2015 ... Burleigh SH, Cavagnaro T, Jakobsen I (2002). Functional diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizas extends to the expression of plant genes involved in P nutrition. J. Exp. Bot. 53:1593-1601. Demir S (2004). Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on some physiological‚ growth parameters of pepper. Turkish J. Biol.

  18. Colonização por fungos micorrízicos arbusculares e teores de nutrientes em cinco cultivares de bananeiras em um Latossolo da Amazônia Arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi and nutrient contents in five banana cultivars on an Amazonian Oxisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlem Nascimento de Oliveira

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A bananeira é uma espécie de grande importância sócio-econômica na Amazônia, mas precisa de altos insumos agrícolas para ser produtiva. A associação com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs pode minimizar as suas necessidades nutricionais nos solos pobres da Amazônia. O presente trabalho objetivou verificar a ocorrência de associação micorrízica e os teores de nutrientes em bananeiras cultivadas em um Latossolo ácido da Amazônia. O bananal encontra-se deficiente em macro (Ca, Mg e P e micronutrientes (Fe, Mn, Zn e Cu. A colonização micorrízica foi de 54,9 %, no cultivar Mysore; 51,5 %, na Maçã, 47,6 %, na Pacovan; 47,3 %, na Nanica, e 44,7 %, na banana Prata, ocorrendo diferenças significativas. Os cultivares Mysore e Maçã apresentaram maiores índices de colonização radicular nos meses de janeiro e agosto, enquanto a Nanica, nos meses de julho, janeiro e agosto. Os cultivares Pacovan e Prata não apresentaram variações significativas de colonização por FMAs nas épocas estudadas. Nos cultivares, a associação micorrízica correlacionou-se significativamente com os teores de K, Mg, P e Zn no cultivar Maçã, K e P no Nanica e Zn no Prata.The Amazon banana plant is of great socio-economical importance, despite its requirement for high agricultural input in order to obtain good yields. An association with arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi could minimize the crop's nutritional needs in the poor soils of the Amazon. The present study aimed at verifying how the plant-fungus mycorrhizal symbiosis influences nutrient concentration in five varieties of adult banana plants cultivated in an acid Amazon Oxisol under field conditions. The banana plantation was defficient in macro (Ca, Mg and P and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu. The mycorrhizae colonization varied from 33.6 to 66.5 % of the sampled roots. The average mycorrhizae colonization was 54.9 % in the Mysore, 51.5 % in Maçã, 47.6 % in Pacovan, 47.3 % in Nanica, and

  19. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on tomato yield, nutrient uptake, water relations, and soil carbon dynamics under deficit irrigation in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Timothy M; Barrios-Masias, Felipe H; Carlisle, Eli A; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Jackson, Louise E

    2016-10-01

    Plant strategies to cope with future droughts may be enhanced by associations between roots and soil microorganisms, including arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. But how AM fungi affect crop growth and yield, together with plant physiology and soil carbon (C) dynamics, under water stress in actual field conditions is not well understood. The well-characterized mycorrhizal tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genotype 76R (referred to as MYC+) and the mutant nonmycorrhizal tomato genotype rmc were grown in an organic farm with a deficit irrigation regime and control regime that replaced evapotranspiration. AM increased marketable tomato yields by ~25% in both irrigation regimes but did not affect shoot biomass. In both irrigation regimes, MYC+ plants had higher plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations (e.g. 5 and 24% higher N and P concentrations in leaves at fruit set, respectively), 8% higher stomatal conductance (gs), 7% higher photosynthetic rates (Pn), and greater fruit set. Stem water potential and leaf relative water content were similar in both genotypes within each irrigation regime. Three-fold higher rates of root sap exudation in detopped MYC+ plants suggest greater capacity for water uptake through osmotic driven flow, especially in the deficit irrigation regime in which root sap exudation in rmc was nearly absent. Soil with MYC+ plants also had slightly higher soil extractable organic C and microbial biomass C at anthesis but no changes in soil CO2 emissions, although the latter were 23% lower under deficit irrigation. This study provides novel, field-based evidence for how indigenous AM fungi increase crop yield and crop water use efficiency during a season-long deficit irrigation and thus play an important role in coping with increasingly limited water availability in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Plant growth responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 are increased by phosphorus sufficiency but not by arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Smith, Sally E.; Smith, F. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Capturing the full growth potential in crops under future elevated CO2 (eCO2) concentrations would be facilitated by improved understanding of eCO2 effects on uptake and use of mineral nutrients. This study investigates interactions of eCO2, soil phosphorus (P), and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM...... in such species in future CO2-rich climates....

  1. Consequences of pre-inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizae on root colonization and survival of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) seedlings after transplanting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill Eugene Davidson

    2015-01-01

    Inoculation of seedlings with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is a common practice aimed at improving seedling establishment. The success of this practice largely depends on the ability of the inoculum to multiply and colonize the growing root system after transplanting. These events were investigated in Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush...

  2. Influencia de la fertilización, la época y la especie forrajera en la presencia Influence of fertilization, season, and forage species in presence of arbuscular mycorrhizae in a degraded Andisoil of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulfo Gómez-Carabalí

    2011-01-01

    and percentage of root infection of arbuscular mycorrhiza increased with age and varied with the species and season. We founded differences among forage grass and legume species under field conditions to form symbiosis with mycorrhizal fungi. Knowledge on these interspecific differences could contribute to developing better adapted forage systems to contribute recuperating the degraded soils of the Andean hillsides of Latin America.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis affects the grain proteome of Zea mays: a field study

    OpenAIRE

    Bona, Elisa; Scarafoni, Alessio; Marsano, Francesco; Boatti, Lara; Copetta, Andrea; Massa, Nadia; Gamalero, Elisa; D?Agostino, Giovanni; Cesaro, Patrizia; Cavaletto, Maria; Berta, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important crops worldwide and is strongly dependent on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi, organisms that form a mutualistic association with land plants. In maize, AM symbiosis enhances spike dry weight, spike length, spike circumference, and the dry weight and dimensions of the grain. Notwithstanding its ubiquitous nature, the detailed relationship between AM fungal colonization and plant development is not completely understood. To facilitate a better understanding o...

  4. Micorriza arbuscular em plantações de Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell no litoral norte da Bahia, Brasil Arbuscular mycorrhiza in Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell plantations in the north littoral of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano V.M. Araújo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available As micorrizas arbusculares são de longa data conhecidas e exploradas devido à importância ecológica e aos efeitos no crescimento e na nutrição das plantas. Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell, particularmente nas áreas em estudo, apresenta comportamento diferenciado quando comparado com outras espécies de eucaliptos, instalando-se em sítios de solos pobres e textura arenosa, com crescimento reduzido, dificuldades para a formação das mudas e problemas nutricionais. Objetivando avaliar a percentagem de colonização radicular e a densidade de esporos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em plantações de E. cloeziana, foram realizadas coletas de solo rizosférico e de raízes em 20 áreas, distribuídas em seis municípios do Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Os resultados médios da percentagem de colonização variaram de 10% a 96,66% e a densidade de esporos variou de 3 a 110 esporos/50cm³ de solo, demonstrando a grande suscetibilidade do E. cloeziana à micorrização.The arbuscular mycorrhizal are known and explored long ago due to the ecological significance and the effects in the growth and nutrition of the plants. Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell, particularly in the studied sites, exhibit differenced behaviour when compared with other eucaliptus species, establishing in sites of the poor soils and sandy texture, with reduced growth, difficulty to formation of the seedling and nutritional problems. Aiming to evaluate the percentage of mycorrhizal colonization, as well as the density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi spores in E. cloeziana plantations, rhizospheric soil and roots samples were collected in twenty sites, distributed in six municipalities of Bahia state, Brazil. The mean results of percentage root colonization ranged from 10 to 96.66% and spore number ranged from 3 to 110 spores/50cm³ soil, demonstrating high susceptibility of the E. cloeziana to mycorrhization.

  5. Arsenic stress affects the expression profile of genes of 14-3-3 proteins in the shoot of mycorrhiza colonized rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Varsha; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Sonawane, Balasaheb V; Suprasanna, Penna

    2016-10-01

    The intimate association between the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and host plants helps the latter in phosphate acquisition in exchange of carbohydrates and in enhanced stress tolerance. Similarly, the ubiquitous 14-3-3 protein family is known to be a major regulator of plant metabolism and stress responses. However, the involvement of mycorrhiza and plant 14-3-3 proteins interaction in plant response to environmental stimuli, such as arsenic (As) stress, is yet unknown. In this study, we analysed the impact of the As stress on the expression profile of 14-3-3 genes in the shoot of mycorrhiza colonized rice ( Oryza sativa ) plants. Ten day old rice seedlings were kept for 45 days for mycorrhizal colonisation (10 g inoculum per 120 g soilrite) and were then subjected to 12.5 µM arsenate [As(V)] exposure for 1 and 3 days, in hydroponics. Arsenate stress resulted in significant change in expression of 14-3-3 protein genes in non-colonized and mycorrhiza colonized rice plants which indicated As mediated effects on 14-3-3 proteins as well as interactive impact of mycorrhiza colonization. Indeed, mycorrhiza colonization itself induced up-regulation of all 14-3-3 genes in the absence of As stress. The results thus indicate that 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in As stress signalling and the mycorrhiza induced As stress response of the rice plants.

  6. Nutrição fosfática e micorriza arbuscular na redução da toxicidade de cádmio em trema [Trema micrantha (L. Blum.] Phosphate nutrition and arbuscular mycorrhiza on amelioration of cadmium toxicity in trema [Trema micrantha (L. Blum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Roberto Fonsêca Sousa Soares

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, avaliaram-se os efeitos da nutrição fosfática e da micorriza arbuscular na toxicidade de Cd em Trema micrantha (L. Blum. Em um primeiro experimento, mudas de trema foram formadas em substrato contendo doses crescentes de P (0, 100, 200 e 400 mg dm-3 e com um tratamento de inoculação com Glomus etunicatum. Após crescimento por 60 dias, essas mudas foram transferidas para solução nutritiva de Clark sem Cd e suplementada com 5, 15 e 45 µmol L-1 de Cd e mantidas por mais 40 dias, quando os efeitos dos tratamentos foram avaliados. As influências do P na amenização da fitotoxidez de Cd foram também avaliados em outro experimento, aplicando-se simultaneamente e de forma combinada em solução, doses de P (0,07; 0,5; 1; e 2 mmol L-1 e de Cd (0, 5, 10 e 15 µmol L-1. Houve acentuada inibição no crescimento e colonização micorrízica da trema mesmo na dose mais baixa de Cd em solução (5 µmol L-1. Constatou-se que a melhoria da nutrição fosfática favoreceu o crescimento da planta, sendo isso associado à redução da toxicidade de Cd, enquanto a inoculação com G. etunicatum não teve o mesmo efeito. Encontrou-se uma relação inversa entre o aumento no fornecimento de P em solução e a absorção e acúmulo de Cd na trema. Análise da especiação química da solução indicou que o P não interferiu na disponibilidade de Cd em solução, o que evidencia que a ação amenizante do P se deve às interações na planta, possivelmente reduzindo a translocação do Cd.In the present study the effects of phosphorus nutrition and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM were evaluated on Cd toxicity to Trema micrantha (L. Blum.. In a first experiment, trema seedlings were raised in a P-enriched substrate (0, 100, 200 and 400 mg dm-3 and with an AM treatment (inoculation with Glomus etunicatum. After sixty days of growth, plants were transferred to Clark nutrient solution either without Cd added or amended with this metal at

  7. The interaction of heavy metals and nutrients present in soil and native plants with arbuscular mycorrhizae on the riverside in the Matanza-Riachuelo River Basin (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Rodolfo E; García, Ileana V; de Cabo, Laura; Weigandt, Cristian F; Fabrizio de Iorio, Alicia

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the contamination by heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn), and nutrients (N, P) in soils and native plants, and the effect of the concentration of those elements with the density of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) spores in soil and colonization in roots from the riverside of the Matanza-Riachuelo River Basin (MRRB). The concentration of metals and nutrients in soils and plants (Eleocharis montana, Cyperus eragrostis, Hydrocotyle bonariensis) increased from the upper sites (8 km from headwaters) to the lower sites (6 km from the mouth of the Riachuelo River) of the basin. AM-colonization on the roots of H. bonariensis and spore density in soil decreased as the concentrations of metals in soil and plant tissues increased from the upper to lower sites of the basin within a consistent gradient of contamination associated with land use, soil disturbance, population, and chemicals discharged into the streams and rivers along the MRRB. The general trends for all metals in plant tissue were to have highest concentrations in roots, then in rhizomes and lowest in aerial biomass. The translocation (TF) and bioconcentration (BCF) factors decreased in plants which grow from the upper sites to the lower sites of the basin. The plants tolerated a wide range in type and quantity of contamination along the basin by concentrating more metals and nutrients in roots than in aboveground tissue. The AM spore density in soil and colonization in roots of H. bonariensis decreased with the increase of the degree of contamination (Dc) in soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis | Quilambo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Orlando António Quilambo. Abstract. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are associated with the majority ot the terrestrial plants. Their function ranges from stress alleviation to bioremediation in soils polluted with heavy metals. However, our knowledge about this ...

  9. Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em estéril revegetado com Acacia mangium, após mineração de bauxita Colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi in substrate, after bauxite mining, vegetated with Acacia mangium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucy Caproni

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a composição das comunidades de FMAs em áreas revegetadas com Acacia mangium após a mineração de bauxita na região de Porto Trombetas, PA. Foram coletadas amostras de solo compostas nos períodos seco e chuvoso, em áreas revegetadas com Acacia mangium, que receberam inóculos de Glomus clarum e Gigaspora margarita, com 1 e 5 anos de idade. Os solos foram revegetados sem a reposição do horizonte superficial orgânico. Os esporos dos fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs foram extraídos e identificados através de suas características morfológicas. Analisou-se a densidade de esporos e de espécies em cada amostra, a densidade relativa e a freqüência de ocorrência de cada espécie por período de amostragem, além do índice de abundância e freqüência (IAF. Sob o plantio de mudas de A. mangium, a densidade de esporos de FMAs foi elevada e aumentou com a idade, enquanto o número de espécies não variou. Glomus clarum produz alta densidade de esporos na fase inicial do plantio e declina com o tempo, e Gigaspora margarita não esporula nas condições edafoclimáticas locais. A maioria das espécies de FMA não apresenta o mesmo padrão de esporulação nos períodos seco e chuvoso.The objective of this work was to monitor the establishment of Gigaspora margarita and Glomus clarum in reclaimed areas after the bauxite mining in Porto Trombetas, PA, Brazil. Soil samples were collected during the dry and rainy periods under one and five-year-old Acacia mangium trees grown from seedlings that had been inoculated with Glomus clarum and Gigaspora margarita. The exposed subsoil was managed without replacing the organic soil layer. FMA spores were extracted and identified through their morphologic characteristics. Spore density and frequency of each species were determined in each sampling The index of abundance and frequency (IAF were estimated for all samples. Under A. mangium the arbuscular

  10. Response of meloidogyne hapla to mycorrhiza fungi inoculation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) isolated from pyrethrum were screened in the greenhouse for efficacy in improving pyrethrum growth and in suppressing a root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne hapla. The fungi screened were Glomus spp. (isolates LM61, ML34 and ML35), Scutellospora sp. (isolate KS74) and ...

  11. Lime and phosphate application as mycorrhizae stimulation to enhance growth and yield of Marandu grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Eduardo Melo Santiago

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pastures are important food sources for Brazilian cattle herds. However, inadequate management of soil fertility has emerged as a major cause of low yield rates and of progressive degradation of these areas. The objective of the present study was to evaluate growth, by means of morphogenetic and structural characteristics, and yield of Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu as functions of the application of the mycorrhizae stimulant formononetin, associated with lime and phosphate application. The experimental design was completely randomised with four replications, and the treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 x 5 factorial scheme, consisting of two liming treatments (with and without limestone, two formononetin treatments (with and without application and five P2O5 doses (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg dm-3. Three shoot cuttings were carried out after a first standardisation cutting to evaluate the morphogenetic and structural characteristics as well as the dry matter yield of different morphological fractions. Liming and phosphate application at the dose of 141 mg dm-3 P2O5 increased growth and yield of Marandu grass, and these practices are essential for the cultivation of this pasture grass in Yellow Latosol of the Cerrado region of Piauí, Brazil. The application of formononetin increased stem elongation rate, total number of tillers and green stem dry matter, and decreased dead dry matter of Marandu grass, which are effects that contribute to the improvement of pasture quality.

  12. Co-inoculation of arbusculr mycorrhizae and nitrogen fixing bacteria enhance alfalfa yield under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, R.; Tang, F.; Liu, F.; Chen, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study was to investigate the effects of combined inoculation of Glomus mosseae (arbusculr mycorrhizae fungi, AMF) and Sinorhizobium meliloti (nitrogen-fixing bacteria, i.e., an Rhizobium meliloti, RM) on yield, nutrient contents, nodulation and mycorrhizal colonization of different alfalfa cultivars under saline conditions. An experiment was conducted to test the efficacy of AMF and RM inoculation in development of salt tolerance in alfalfa cultivars (Zhaodong, Nongjing and Longmu) under different salinity levels (0, 60, 120 and 180 mM NaCl). We found that under non stress condition, double inoculation of alfalfa with rhizobium and AM increased the alfalfa yield, nodule weight and number, as well as shoot proline contents, the most when plants were double inoculated followed by AM and rhizobium inoculation, respectively. Whereas under salinity condition, double inoculation of alfalfa with rhizobium and AM increased alfalfa yield, mycorrhizal infection, nodule weight and number as well as increased in shoot proline content, the most followed by AM and rhizobium inoculation, respectively. The Results suggest that growth of alfalfa may be improved by combined inoculation of alfalfa with AM and rhizobium under salt and non-stress conditions. Alleviation of alfalfa growth under saline condition was perhaps due to an increase in mycorrhizal infection and nodule weight and number as well as an increased in shoot proline content by dual inoculation. (author)

  13. Distribution patterns of arbuscular mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plant species in Germany

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menzel, A.; Hempel, S.; Manceur, A. M.; Götzenberger, Lars; Moora, M.; Rilling, M.C.; Zobel, M.; Kühn, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, August 2016 (2016), s. 78-88 ISSN 1433-8319 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * distribution model * Central Europe Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2016

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associating with roots of Alnus and Rubus in Europe and the Middle East

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pölme, S.; Öpik, M.; Moora, M.; Zobel, M.; Kohout, Petr; Oja, J.; Köljalg, U.; Tedersoo, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, Part A (2016), s. 27-34 ISSN 1754-5048 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * fungi * biogeography Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2016

  15. Quantification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal DNA in roots: how important is material preservation?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Püschel, David; Hujslová, M.; Slavíková, R.; Jansa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 3 (2015), s. 205-214 ISSN 0940-6360 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * quantitative real-time PCR * sample preservation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.252, year: 2015

  16. Colonização micorrízica arbuscular e tolerância ao mal-do-Panamá em mudas de banana-maçã Colonisation of arbuscular mycorrhiza and tolerance to Panama disease in seedlings of the maçã banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deusiane Batista Sampaio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da colonização micorrízica arbuscular na tolerância da bananeira, cv. Maçã, ao mal-do-Panamá, sob diferentes fontes de nutrientes. Utilizou-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado com fatorial 2 x 4 [2 densidades de esporos de FMA nativos (D1 - 3.500 esporos kg-1 solo e D2 - 7.000 esporos kg-1 solo e 4 diferentes concentrações de fontes de nutrientes - três de solução nutritiva (SN 40%, SN 70% e SN 100% e uma de biofertilizante 100% (B4] com três repetições. Após o plantio inoculou-se Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense e posteriormente avaliou-se matéria seca da parte aérea (MSPA, o teor de fósforo foliar (P, a colonização micorrízica, o pH do solo e o índice de severidade da doença (ID. As diferentes fontes de nutrientes influenciaram a matéria seca da parte aérea, o teor de fósforo, a colonização micorrízica e o índice de severidade da doença, porém não influenciaram o pH da solução do solo. O biofertilizante não atendeu à demanda nutricional das plantas, as quais se mostraram pouco desenvolvidas. Porém proporcionou intensa colonização micorrízica e menor índice de severidade da fusariose, o qual aumentou com a adubação mineral.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhiza on the tolerance to Panama disease of the banana plant cv. maçã under different sources of nutrients. A completely randomized design was employed, having a 2 x 4 factorial [2 densities of native FMA spores (D1 - 3,500 spores kg-1 soil and D2 - 7000 spores kg-1 soil and four different concentrations of nutrient sources - three of a nutrient solution (SN 40%, SN 70% and SN 100% and a 100% solution of bio-fertiliser (B4], with three replications. After planting, the seedlings were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense, and later the shoot dry matter, leaf phosphorus content, mycorrhizal colonization, soil pH and disease

  17. Sugar exchanges in arbuscular mycorrhiza: RiMST5 and RiMST6, two novel Rhizophagus irregularis monosaccharide transporters, are involved in both sugar uptake from the soil and from the plant partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Lahmidi, Nassima; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brulé, Daphnée; Chatagnier, Odile; Arnould, Christine; Doidy, Joan; Berta, Graziella; Lingua, Guido; Wipf, Daniel; Bonneau, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are associated with about 80% of land plants. AM fungi provide inorganic nutrients to plants and in return up to 20% of the plant-fixed CO2 is transferred to the fungal symbionts. Since AM fungi are obligate biotrophs, unraveling how sugars are provided to the fungus partner is a key for understanding the functioning of the symbiosis. In this study, we identified two new monosaccharide transporters from Rhizophagus irregularis (RiMST5 and RiMST6) that we characterized as functional high affinity monosaccharide transporters. RiMST6 was characterized as a glucose specific, high affinity H(+) co-transporter. We provide experimental support for a primary role of both RiMST5 and RiMST6 in sugar uptake directly from the soil. The expression patterns of RiMSTs in response to partial light deprivation and to interaction with different host plants were investigated. Expression of genes coding for RiMSTs was transiently enhanced after 48 h of shading and was unambiguously dependent on the host plant species. These results cast doubt on the 'fair trade' principle under carbon-limiting conditions. Therefore, in light of these findings, the possible mechanisms involved in the modulation between mutualism and parasitism in plant-AM fungus interactions are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction between C 4 barnyard grass and C 3 upland rice under elevated CO 2: Impact of mycorrhizae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianjun; Xu, Liming; Chen, Xin; Hu, Shuijin

    2009-03-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 enrichment may impact arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) development and function, which could have subsequent effects on host plant species interactions by differentially affecting plant nutrient acquisition. However, direct evidence illustrating this scenario is limited. We examined how elevated CO 2 affects plant growth and whether mycorrhizae mediate interactions between C 4 barnyard grass ( Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) Beauv.) and C 3 upland rice ( Oryza sativa L.) in a low nutrient soil. The monocultures and combinations with or without mycorrhizal inoculation were grown at ambient (400 ± 20 μmol mol -1) and elevated CO 2 (700 ± 20 μmol mol -1) levels. The 15N isotope tracer was introduced to quantify the mycorrhizally mediated N acquisition of plants. Elevated CO 2 stimulated the growth of C 3 upland rice but not that of C 4 barnyard grass under monoculture. Elevated CO 2 also increased mycorrhizal colonization of C 4 barnyard grass but did not affect mycorrhizal colonization of C 3 upland rice. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased the shoot biomass ratio of C 4 barnyard grass to C 3 upland rice under both CO 2 concentrations but had a greater impact under the elevated than ambient CO 2 level. Mycorrhizae decreased relative interaction index (RII) of C 3 plants under both ambient and elevated CO 2, but mycorrhizae increased RII of C 4 plants only under elevated CO 2. Elevated CO 2 and mycorrhizal inoculation enhanced 15N and total N and P uptake of C 4 barnyard grass in mixture but had no effects on N and P acquisition of C 3 upland rice, thus altering the distribution of N and P between the species in mixture. These results implied that CO 2 stimulation of mycorrhizae and their nutrient acquisition may impact competitive interaction of C 4 barnyard grass and C 3 upland rice under future CO 2 scenarios.

  19. Reaction and interaction of mycorrhizae and rhizosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottke, I.

    1989-01-01

    Mycorrhizae of forest trees react and interact in a sensitive manner to environmental stress but have evolved adaption mechanism. Soil acidification causes no reduction of mycorrhizal frequency but shorter life span which is frequently compensated for by a higher production rate of mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae of Norway spruce preferentially develop in soil pores. Nutrient availability probably relies more on the exchangeable ions at the surfaces of the pores than on the total ion exchange capacity. Additionally, organically bound compounds are mobilized by fungal hyphae and interaction on the rhizoplane. A lack of soil pores results in severe difficulties for Norway spruce to penetrate soil and to maintain mycorrhizal acticity. Water stress in the top soil causing a high percentage of dormant and dead mycorrhizae can be compensated for by a higher mycorrhizal production in deeper soil layers. At low nutrient availability in the mineral soil preferentially development of mycorrhizae is observed in the organic layer that may be regarded as an internal regulation mechanism, not as a toxic effect caused by Al in the mineral soil. Differentiated hyphal mantles protect mycorrhizae against water stress by impermeability and enhanced trehalose content and serve as storage and detoxification organs. There are indications of mycorrhizal types specially adapted to acidified soil conditions. (orig./vhe)

  20. MULTIPLICACIÓN DE HONGOS MICORRIZA ARBUSCULAR (H.M.A Y EFECTO DE LA MICORRIZACIÓN EN PLANTAS MICROPROPAGADAS DE BANANO (Musa AAA cv. Gran Enano (Musaceae MULTIPLICATION OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAE FUNGI (AMF AND MYCORRHIZATION EFFECT IN MICROPROPAGATED PLANTS OF BANANA (Musa AAA cv. ‘Gran Enano’ (Musaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elena Usuga Osorio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el proceso de multiplicación de hongos que forman micorriza arbuscular (HMA, para lo cual se usaron diferentes tipos de inóculos entre ellos nativos de agroecosistemas bananeros del Urabá (Antioquia-Colombia, en sustrato sólido, con diferentes plantas hospedadoras y la infectividad y efectividad sobre plantas de banano (Musa AAA cv. Gran Enano. La colonización micorrizal promedio general de los HMA a las plantas trampa fue de 37,76 ± 21,86 %, con respecto a este porcentaje, las plantas B (Brachiaria decumbens y S (Sorgum vulgare fueron las que más favorecieron la simbiosis. Teniendo en cuenta el sustrato, el S2 (Arena 50 - suelo 50 y el S6 (Vermiculita 50-suelo 50 permitieron expresiones significativamente mayores respecto a los demás. El Sorgum vulgare y Pueraria phaseoloides y en el sustrato S1 (Arena 30 - suelo 70, se encontró un mayor número de esporas. La combinación planta-sustrato que más favoreció la asociación fue la planta trampa B en los sustratos S2 y S4 (cascarilla de arroz 50-suelo50 y la producción de esporas fueron las plantas K y S en el sustrato S1. La asociación micorrícica general en plantas de banano provenientes de cultivo de tejidos fue de 48,74 ± 30,44. No se encontraron diferencias significativas (P > 0,05 entre plantas de cero días con plantas de 30 de aclimatadas. Los inóculos que significativamente favorecieron la asociación fueron los provenientes de agroecosistemas bananeros al compararse con el inóculo comercial y el proveniente de ecosistemas naturales del Urabá. El mayor peso seco foliar y radical se encontró en plántulas de banano inoculadas con I5 (Inóculo proveniente de agroecosistema bananeros de la zona de estudio. Para las variables de crecimiento no se encontraron diferencias.The process of multiplication of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF from indigenous banana agro-environments from Urabá (Antioquia - Colombia was evaluated, using solid substrate, with different

  1. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Enhance Basil Tolerance to Salt Stress through Improved Physiological and Nutritional Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salwa, A.; Abeer, H.; Alqarawi, A. A.; Abdullah, E.F.; Egamberdieva, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of salinity on some physio-biochemical traits in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) cultivars with contrasting salt stress tolerance and to determine the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in ameliorating the salt stress in plant. Salt stress (250 mM NaCl) reduced the colonization potential of AMF and inhibited photosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll and carotenoids in plant tissue. AMF inoculated plants contained higher level of chlorophyll pigments. Salt stressed plants showed increased lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities like superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and peroxidase (POD). Plants inoculated with AMF showed lower lipid peroxidation and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities. Moreover, the content of lipids, proline, and soluble sugars in basil plants was improved with AMF inoculation. AMF inoculation reduced accumulation of Na+ and improved nutrient acquisition. In conclusion, AMF were capable to reduce oxidative stress via supporting of the antioxidant system. Salt tolerant cultivar showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and accumulation of osmolytes. (author)

  2. Management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode and root wilt fungus on pigeonpea through soil organically enriched with Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza, karanj (Pongamia pinnata) oilseed cake and farmyard manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, B K; Pandey, Rajesh Kumar; Goswami, Jaideep; Tewari, D D

    2007-11-01

    This investigation was undertaken to compare the percentage response of colonization and development of VA-Mycorrhiza (Glomus fasciculatum) on a number of pulse crops viz. cowpea, chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea and lentil under glasshouse conditions. Among the above-mentioned crops, pigeonpea exhibited the best performance and was selected for further studies. In this host the development and colonization percentage of G. fasciculatum was investigated under two separate substrates i. e. soil amended with FYM and karanj oilseed cake keeping a control treatment of field soil. A third treatment amended with karanj oilseed cake and farm yard manure (FYM) was also kept which responded best in terms of colonization percentage. This treatment showing improved plant health as well as integration with G. fasciculatum was selected as an ideal treatment for the management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita and root wilt fungus, Fusarium udum on pigeonpea. Thus the treatment constituting FYM, karanj oilseed cake and VA-Mycorrhiza reduced the disease incidence caused by both maladies to a great extent with the most promising improvement in plant growth parameters as compared to all others. The present investigation, in addition to proposing an ideal eco-friendly treatment for the management of this disease complex also proposed an excellent medium for the proliferation of the obligate bio-protectant, G. fasciculatum.

  3. Interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and cellulose in growth substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryndler, Milan; Vosátka, Miroslav; Hršelová, Hana; Chvátalová, Irena; Jansa, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 19, - (2002), s. 279-288 ISSN 0929-1393 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/99/0895 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * sporulation * cellulose Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2002

  4. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on 137Cs uptake by plants grown on different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinichuk, M.; Mårtensson, A.; Ericsson, T.; Rosén, K.

    2013-01-01

    The potential use of mycorrhiza as a bioremediation agent for soils contaminated by radiocesium was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment. The uptake of 137 Cs by cucumber, perennial ryegrass, and sunflower after inoculation with a commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) product in soils contaminated with 137 Cs was investigated, with non-mycorrhizal quinoa included as a “reference” plant. The effect of cucumber and ryegrass inoculation with AM fungi on 137 Cs uptake was inconsistent. The effect of AM fungi was most pronounced in sunflower: both plant biomass and 137 Cs uptake increased on loamy sand and loamy soils. The total 137 Cs activity accumulated within AM host sunflower on loamy sand and loamy soils was 2.4 and 3.2-fold higher than in non-inoculated plants. Although the enhanced uptake of 137 Cs by quinoa plants on loamy soil inoculated by the AM fungi was observed, the infection of the fungi to the plants was not confirmed. - Highlights: ► Effect of soil inoculation on 137 Cs uptake by crops was studied in greenhouse. ► 137 Cs uptake by inoculated sunflower plants was most pronounced. ► The higher 137 Cs uptake by inoculated sunflower due to presence of mycorrhiza. ► Studies suggest potential for use of mycorrhiza on contaminated sites.

  5. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Nitrogen Concentration of Berseem Clover in Contaminated Soil with Cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    H. Aram; A. Golchin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi on nitrogen concentration of berseem clover were examined in contaminated soil with cadmium. Examined factors included: levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae) (With and without inoculation), and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg.kg-1). The results showed that the effects of cadmium levels and mycorrhiza fungi were significant on nitrogen concentration (P≤ 0.01).  Arbuscular myc...

  6. Effects of mycorrhiza on growth and essential oil production in selected aromatic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waed Tarraf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis is widely investigated in aromatic herbs. Several studies have shown different effects on secondary metabolites, biomass production, as well as oil quantitative and qualitative aspects. The seeking to increase the yield of plants and their oils is an interesting topic in the world of medicinal and aromatic plant production. In tune with that, this study evaluated the effectiveness of two mycorrhiza fungi, Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae and Septoglomus viscosum (syn. Glomus viscosum, on three species from Lamiaceae family: Salvia officinalis L., Origanum vulgare L., and Thymus vulgaris L. besides untreated control. It was found that the effect of symbiosis on growth was more favourable with S. viscosum than other AM fungus. The S. viscosum inoculation raised the yield of essential oil in oregano. Analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry showed that manool obtained the highest abundance in leaf essential oil of inoculated sage; thymol was the major component whatever the treatment in thyme and lower relative content of carvacrol was reported with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation in oregano. The results suggest the mycorrhizal inoculation as a promising technology in sustainable agricultural system to improve the plant productivity performance. Specific inocula are strategic to enhance the chemical profile of essential oils.

  7. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Promote the Growth of Ceratocarpus arenarius (Chenopodiaceae) with No Enhancement of Phosphorus Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Ning; Bai, Dengsha; Chen, Yinglong; Feng, Gu

    2012-01-01

    The mycorrhizal status of plants in the Chenopodiaceae is not well studied with a few controversial reports. This study examined arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and growth response of Ceratocarpus arenarius in the field and a greenhouse inoculation trial. The colonization rate of AM fungi in C. arenarius in in-growth field cores was low (around 15%). Vesicles and intraradical hyphae were present during all growth stages, but no arbuscules were observed. Sequencing analysis of the lar...

  8. Effects of metal lead on growth and mycorrhizae of an invasive plant species (Solidago canadensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruyi; Yu, Guodong; Tang, Jianjun; Chen, Xin

    2008-01-01

    It is less known whether and how soil metal lead (Pb) impacts the invasion of exotic plants. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to estimate the effects of lead on the growth and mycorrhizae of an invasive species (Solidago canadensis L.) in a microcosm system. Each microcosm unit was separated into HOST and TEST compartments by a replaceable mesh screen that allowed arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae rather than plant roots to grow into the TEST compartments. Three Pb levels (control, 300, and 600 mg/kg soil) were used in this study to simulate ambient soil and two pollution sites where S. canadensis grows. Mycorrhizal inoculum comprised five indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species (Glomus mosseae, Glomus versiform, Glomus diaphanum, Glomus geosporum, and Glomus etunicatum). The 15N isotope tracer was used to quantify the mycorrhizally mediated nitrogen acquisition of plants. The results showed that S. canadensis was highly dependent on mycorrhizae. The Pb additions significantly decreased biomass and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization (root length colonized, RLC%) but did not affect spore numbers, N (including total N and 15N) and P uptake. The facilitating efficiency of mycorrhizae on nutrient acquisition was promoted by Pb treatments. The Pb was mostly sequestered in belowground of plant (root and rhizome). The results suggest that the high efficiency of mycorrhizae on nutrient uptake might give S. canadensis a great advantage over native species in Pb polluted soils.

  9. Micorriza arbuscular em cupuaçu e pupunha cultivados em sistema agroflorestal e em monocultivo na Amazônia Central Arbuscular mycorrhiza in cupuaçu and peach palm cultivated in agroforestry and monoculture systems in the Central Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pereira da Silva Junior

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a colonização micorrízica arbuscular em pupunha (Bactris gasipaes Kunth e cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd ex Spring K. Schum cultivados em sistema agroflorestal e em monocultivo na Amazônia Central, em duas épocas do ano, e também identificar características anatômicas da formação dessa simbiose nessas espécies. Foram realizadas coletas de solo e raízes em duas estações, seca e chuvosa. A colonização micorrízica arbuscular no cupuaçu e na pupunha é alterada pelo sistema de manejo adotado, com taxas maiores de colonização no monocultivo. A densidade total dos esporos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares sob o cupuaçu não é alterada pelo sistema de manejo ou pela época do ano, ao contrário do que ocorre sob a pupunha. Nessa cultura, a densidade de esporos foi maior sob sistema agroflorestal no período seco. A colonização micorrízica na pupunha apresenta dois padrões anatômicos, Paris e Arum, enquanto no cupuaçu ocorre o padrão Arum.The objective of this work was to evaluate the arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth and cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd ex Spring K. Schum, in agroforestry systems and monoculture in the Central Amazon region, and to identify anatomic characteristics of mycorrhizal colonization in these species. Soil and root samples were collected in the field, in the dry and rainy season. Mycorrhizal root colonization of cupuaçu and peach palm is affected by the management systems, with higher colonization rates in the monoculture system. Total spore density of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi under cupuaçu is not affected by management systems or season, but under peach palm this variation is season dependent. Mycorrhizal colonization of Arum and Paris types occur in peach palm, and only Arum type occurs in cupuaçu.

  10. Response of free-living soil protozoa and microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 and presence of mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, R.; Gavito, M.; Larsen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Possible interactions between mycorrhiza, atmospheric CO2, free-living soil microorganisms and protozoa were investigated in pot experimental systems. Pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Solara) were grown under ambient (360 mul l(-1)) or elevated (700 mul l(-1)) atmospheric CO2 concentration...... with or without the presence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus caledonium. It was hypothesised that (1) the populations of free-living soil protozoa would increase as a response to elevated CO2, (2) the effect of elevated CO2 on protozoa would be moderated by the presence of mycorrhiza and (3......) the presence of arbuscular mycorrhiza would affect soil protozoan numbers regardless of atmospheric CO2. After 3 weeks growth there was no difference in bacterial numbers (direct counts) in soil, but the number of free-living bacterial-feeding protozoa was significantly higher under elevated CO2...

  11. [Discussion on appraisal methods and key technologies of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and medicinal plant symbiosis system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilan; Guo, Lanping; Yang, Guang; Chen, Min; Yang, Li; Huang, Luqi

    2011-11-01

    Applications of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in research of medicinal plant cultivation are increased in recent years. Medicinal plants habitat is complicated and many inclusions are in root, however crop habitat is simple and few inclusions in root. So appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of crop and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can't completely suitable for the symbiotic system of medicinal plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This article discuss the appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of medicinal plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the isolation and identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza, and the appraisal of colonization intensity. This article provides guidance for application research of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in cultivation of medicinal plants.

  12. Effect of Mycorrhiza Symbiosis on Yield, Yield Components and Water Use Efficiency of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Affected by Different Irrigation Regimes in Mashhad Condition

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    A Koocheki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Plant association with mycorrhiza has been considered as one of the options to improve input efficiency particularly for water and nutrient - (Allen and Musik, 1993; Bolan, 1991. This has been due to kncreasing the absorbing area of the root and therefore better contact with water and nutrients. Inoculation with mycorrhiza enhances nutrient uptake with low immobility such as phosphorus and solphur-, improve association and could be an option to drought and other environmental abnormalities such as salinity (Rice et al., 2002. Moreover, higher water use efficiency (WUE for crops -has been reported in the literatures (Sekhara and Reddy, 1993.The sustainable use of scarce water resources in Iran is a priority for agricultural development. The pressure of using water in agriculture sector is increasing, so creating ways to improve water-use efficiency and taking a full advantage of available water are crucial. Water stress reduce crop yield by impairing the growth of crop canopy and biomass. Scheduling water application is very crucial for efficient use of drip irrigation system, as excessive irrigation reduces yield, while inadequate irrigation causes water stress and reduces production. The aim of present study was to evaluate the symbiotic effect of mycorrhiza on yield, yield components and water use efficiency of sesame under different irrigation regimes in Mashhad. Material and Methods In order to investigate the impact of inoculation with two species of Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi on yield, yield components and water use efficiency (WUE of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. under different irrigation regimes, an experiment was conducted as split plot based on a randomized complete block design with three replications during two growing seasons 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 at the Agricultural Research Station, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad.. The experimental factors were three irrigation regimes include 2000, 3000 and

  13. Evaluation of Two Mycorrhiza Species and Nitroxin on Yield and Yield Components of Garlic (Allium sativum L. in an Ecological Agroecosystem

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    P Rezvani Moghaddam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Maintenance of soil fertility is one of the most important issues affecting the sustainability of food production. The application of ecological inputs such as mycorrhiza and biofertilizers are one of those approaches which are needed to maintain soil fertility Biofetilizers include different types of free living organisms that convert unavailable nutrients to available forms and enhance root development and better seed germination. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR occupy the rhizosphere of many plant species and have beneficial effects on the host plant. They may directly and indirectly influence the plant growth. A direct mechanism would be to increase plant growth by supplying the plant with nutrients and hormones. Indirect mechanisms, on the other hand, include reduced susceptibility to diseases and acting as a form of defense referred to as induces systematic resistance. Mycorrhiza arbuscular fungi are other coexist microorganisms that improve soil fertility, nutrients cycling and agroecosystem health. Mycorrhizal fungi are the most abundant organisms in agricultural soils. Many researchers have pointed to the positive roles of mycorrhizal fungi on plants growth characteristics. Arbuscular mycorrhizas are found in 85% of all plant families and occur in many crop species. Mineral nutrients such as potassium, calcium, copper, zinc and iron are assimilated more quickly and in greater amounts by mycorrhizal plants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation has also been shown to increase plant resistance of pathogen attack. Garlic (Allium sativum L. is a very powerful medicinal plant that is often underestimated. Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown year-round in any mild climates. Garlic cloves are used for consumption (row and cooked or for medicinal purposes. They have a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor that mellows and sweetens considerably with cooking. Despite of many studies on the effects of mycorrhiza and

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis affects the grain proteome of Zea mays: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Elisa; Scarafoni, Alessio; Marsano, Francesco; Boatti, Lara; Copetta, Andrea; Massa, Nadia; Gamalero, Elisa; D'Agostino, Giovanni; Cesaro, Patrizia; Cavaletto, Maria; Berta, Graziella

    2016-05-24

    Maize is one of the most important crops worldwide and is strongly dependent on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi, organisms that form a mutualistic association with land plants. In maize, AM symbiosis enhances spike dry weight, spike length, spike circumference, and the dry weight and dimensions of the grain. Notwithstanding its ubiquitous nature, the detailed relationship between AM fungal colonization and plant development is not completely understood. To facilitate a better understanding of the effects of AM fungi on plants, the work reported here assessed the effects of a consortium of AM fungi on the kernel proteome of maize, cultivated in open-field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the modulation of a plant seed proteome following AM fungal inoculation in the field. Here, it was found that AM fungi modify the maize seed proteome by up-regulating enzymes involved in energetic metabolism, embryo development, nucleotide metabolism, seed storage and stress responses.

  15. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and pesticides on Cynara cardunculus growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. MARIN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L. is a promising crop for biomass production. A nursery trial was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of mycorrhizal inoculation on the biomass yield of wild cardoon seedlings and the effect of the pesticides fosetyl-Al, folpet and propamocarb, as fungicides, and isofenphos, phoxim and oxamyl, as insecticides, on cardoon plant growth and the mycorrhization. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi inocula were: commercial inoculum with Glomus mosseae spores, and an inoculum of a Glomus sp. strain (AMF-i isolated locally. Mycorrhizal inoculation with either inoculum increased cardoon shoot biomass compared to non-inoculated control plants. The pesticide applications had a neutral or positive effect on cardoon seedling growth. However, the AM fungi colonisation did not decrease except for plants colonised by G. mosseae and treated with the insecticides isofenphos and oxamyl. Thus, the mycorrhiza can survive to pesticide concentrations employed in commercial nursery, and enhance cardoon plant productivity.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation enhances survival rates and growth of Micropropagated plantlets of Echinacea pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Hemant; De Andrade, Zita; Schaneberg, Brian; Bedir, Ebru; Khan, Ikhlas; Moraes, Rita

    2003-07-01

    In an attempt to induce positive effects on the acclimatization of in vitro propagated Echinacea pallida, four arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, Glomus mosseae, Gigaspora ramisporophora, Scutellospora fulgida and Entrophospora colombiana were selected to aid the soil adaptation process. Fungal inocula affected the survival of E. pallida plantlets ranging from 83 % to 92 %, depending on the AM species and also contrasting with 58 % survival of the non-inoculated plantlets. Growth and development were faster in mycorrhizal treated plantlets than in non-treated ones, especially among those treated with Glomus mossae and Scutellospora fulgida. The presence of well-formed arbuscules and vesicles in Echinacea infested roots was confirmed by microscopic examinations in addition to 90 % success in the survival rate of vigorous plants indicated that mycorrhization is a valuable tool to overcome Echinacea acclimatization shock.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine stress

    OpenAIRE

    Fuqiang Song; Jize Li; Xiaoxu Fan; Quan Zhang; Wei Chang; Fengshan Yang; Gui Geng

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) protect host plants against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses, and promote biodegradation of various contaminants. In this study effect of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine degradation was investigated. It was observed that the atrazine degradation rates with any addition level in mycorrhizal treatments were all significantly higher than those in non- mycorrhizal treatments. When atrazine was applied at 20?mg kg?1, the removal efficienc...

  18. Large-scale diversity patterns in spore communities of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Alvarez-Sanchez; Nancy C. Johnson; Anita Antoninka; V. Bala Chaudhary; Matthew K. Lau; Suzanne M. Owen; Patricia Gauadarrama; Silvia. Castillo

    2010-01-01

    Surprising little is known about the factors controlling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungal diversity and distribution patterns. A better understanding of these factors is necessary before mycorrhizas can be effectively managed for their benefits in ecosystem restoration and agriculture. The goal of this chapter is to examine the relationships between AM fungal...

  19. Carbon flow from plant to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is reduced under phosphorus fertilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Püschel, David; Řezáčová, Veronika; Gryndlerová, Hana; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 419, 1-2 (2017), s. 319-333 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhiza * Carbon allocation * Mycorrhizal cost Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.052, year: 2016

  20. Differential benefits of arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal infection of salix repens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.

    2001-01-01

    The functional significance of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and ectomycorrhiza (EcM) for Salix repens, a dual mycorrhizal plant, was investigated over three harvest periods (12, 20 and 30 weeks). Cuttings of S. repens were collected in December (low shoot P) and March (high shoot P). Glomus mosseae

  1. Quantitative assessment of the differential impacts of arbuscular and ectomycorrhiza on soil carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A.; van der Heijden, Marcel G A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/240923901; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Makarov, Mikhail I.; Onipchenko, Vladimir G.; Maslov, Mikhail N.; Akhmetzhanova, Asem A.; van Bodegom, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    A significant fraction of carbon stored in the Earth's soil moves through arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and ectomycorrhiza (EM). The impacts of AM and EM on the soil carbon budget are poorly understood. We propose a method to quantify the mycorrhizal contribution to carbon cycling, explicitly

  2. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI - AN ESSENTIAL TOOL TO SUSTAINABLE VINEYARD DEVELOPMENT: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Cristian Popescu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine is one of the most important horticultural perennial crops grown in many countries from worldwide. In this paper, we review the global benefits of arbuscular mycorrhiza application for grapevine production and the impact of viticultural practices for these natural microorganisms to establish symbiotic associations with vine roots. This review aims to provide a brief overview of the status of and to outline the most important application and effects of AMF in viticulture in order to increase the sustainability of vineyards. Viticulture has to adapt to new challenges of pest and chemicals fertilizers management, climate change, global urbanization, land erosions, increasing droughts, world population growth and others factors that can affect the sustainability of viticultural production systems. One of eco-friendly approaches is to use the application of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF. Response of grapevine to AMF application demonstrated a lot of benefits for viticultural ecosystems. Technologies on sustainable agriculture and conservation of ecosystems vineyards may consider arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi as biofertilizers. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi could be an effective tool for improving the agro-enviromental perfomance in viticultural farms.

  3. Gibberellins interfere with symbiosis signaling and gene expression and alter colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza is a mutualistic plant-fungus interaction that confers great advantages for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enter the host root and form symbiotic structures that facilitate nutrient supplies between the symbionts. The gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones known to inhibit AM fungal infection. However, our transcriptome analysis and phytohormone quantification revealed GA accumulation in the roots of Lotus japonicus infected with AM fungi, suggesting that de novo GA synthesis plays a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza development. We found pleiotropic effects of GAs on the AM fungal infection. In particular, the morphology of AM fungal colonization was drastically altered by the status of GA signaling in the host root. Exogenous GA treatment inhibited AM hyphal entry into the host root and suppressed the expression of Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization1 (RAM1) and RAM2 homologs that function in hyphal entry and arbuscule formation. On the other hand, inhibition of GA biosynthesis or suppression of GA signaling also affected arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the host root. Low-GA conditions suppressed arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced subtilisin-like serine protease1 (SbtM1) expression that is required for AM fungal colonization and reduced hyphal branching in the host root. The reduced hyphal branching and SbtM1 expression caused by the inhibition of GA biosynthesis were recovered by GA treatment, supporting the theory that insufficient GA signaling causes the inhibitory effects on arbuscular mycorrhiza development. Most studies have focused on the negative role of GA signaling, whereas our study demonstrates that GA signaling also positively interacts with symbiotic responses and promotes AM colonization of the host root. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi promote the growth of Ceratocarpus arenarius (Chenopodiaceae) with no enhancement of phosphorus nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Ning; Bai, Dengsha; Chen, Yinglong; Feng, Gu

    2012-01-01

    The mycorrhizal status of plants in the Chenopodiaceae is not well studied with a few controversial reports. This study examined arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and growth response of Ceratocarpus arenarius in the field and a greenhouse inoculation trial. The colonization rate of AM fungi in C. arenarius in in-growth field cores was low (around 15%). Vesicles and intraradical hyphae were present during all growth stages, but no arbuscules were observed. Sequencing analysis of the large ribosomal rDNA subunit detected four culturable Glomus species, G. intraradices, G. mosseae, G. etunicatum and G. microaggregatum together with eight unculturable species belong to the Glomeromycota in the root system of C. arenarius collected from the field. These results establish the mycotrophic status of C. arenarius. Both in the field and in the greenhouse inoculation trial, the growth of C. arenarius was stimulated by the indigenous AM fungal community and the inoculated AM fungal isolates, respectively, but the P uptake and concentration of the mycorrhizal plants did not increase significantly over the controls in both experiments. Furthermore, the AM fungi significantly increased seed production. Our results suggest that an alternative reciprocal benefit to carbon-phosphorus trade-off between AM fungi and the chenopod plant might exist in the extremely arid environment.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi promote the growth of Ceratocarpus arenarius (Chenopodiaceae with no enhancement of phosphorus nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal status of plants in the Chenopodiaceae is not well studied with a few controversial reports. This study examined arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM colonization and growth response of Ceratocarpus arenarius in the field and a greenhouse inoculation trial. The colonization rate of AM fungi in C. arenarius in in-growth field cores was low (around 15%. Vesicles and intraradical hyphae were present during all growth stages, but no arbuscules were observed. Sequencing analysis of the large ribosomal rDNA subunit detected four culturable Glomus species, G. intraradices, G. mosseae, G. etunicatum and G. microaggregatum together with eight unculturable species belong to the Glomeromycota in the root system of C. arenarius collected from the field. These results establish the mycotrophic status of C. arenarius. Both in the field and in the greenhouse inoculation trial, the growth of C. arenarius was stimulated by the indigenous AM fungal community and the inoculated AM fungal isolates, respectively, but the P uptake and concentration of the mycorrhizal plants did not increase significantly over the controls in both experiments. Furthermore, the AM fungi significantly increased seed production. Our results suggest that an alternative reciprocal benefit to carbon-phosphorus trade-off between AM fungi and the chenopod plant might exist in the extremely arid environment.

  6. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Janos

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alleviate oxidative stress induced by ADOR and enhance antioxidant responses of tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Palma, José Manuel; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet

    2014-03-15

    The behaviour of tomato plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi grown in the presence of aqueous extracts from dry olive residue (ADOR) was studied in order to understand how this symbiotic relationship helps plants to cope with oxidative stress caused by ADOR. The influence of AM symbiosis on plant growth and other physiological parameters was also studied. Tomato plants were inoculated with the AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae and were grown in the presence of ADOR bioremediated and non-bioremediated by Coriolopsis floccosa and Penicillium chrysogenum-10. The antioxidant response as well as parameters of oxidative damage were examined in roots and leaves. The data showed a significant increase in the biomass of AM plant growth in the presence of ADOR, regardless of whether it was bioremediated. The establishment and development of the symbiosis were negatively affected after plants were exposed to ADOR. No differences were observed in the relative water content (RWC) or PS II efficiency between non-AM and AM plants. The increase in the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) were simultaneous to the reduction of MDA levels and H2O2 content in AM root growth in the presence of ADOR. Similar H2O2 levels were observed among non-AM and AM plants, although only AM plants showed reduced lipid peroxidation content, probably due to the involvement of antioxidant enzymes. The results highlight how the application of both bioremediated ADOR and AM fungi can alleviate the oxidative stress conditions, improving the growth and development of tomato plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical identification and functional analysis of apocarotenoids involved in the development of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Kohki

    2007-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae formed between more than 80% of land plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi represent the most widespread symbiosis on the earth. AM fungi facilitate the uptake of soil nutrients, especially phosphate, by plants, and in return obtain carbohydrates from hosts. Apocarotenoids, oxidative cleavage products of carotenoids, have been found to play a critical role in the establishment of AM symbiosis. Strigolactones previously isolated as seed-germination stimulants for root parasitic weeds act as a chemical signal for AM fungi during presymbiotic stages. Stimulation of carotenoid metabolism, leading to massive accumulation of mycorradicin and cyclohexenone derivatives, occurs during root colonization by AM fungi. This review highlights research into the chemical identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza-related apocarotenoids and their role in the regulation and establishment of AM symbiosis conducted in the past 10 years.

  9. The nitrogen availability interferes with mycorrhiza-induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Sanchez-Bel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal plants are generally quite efficient in coping with environmental challenges. It has been shown that the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can confer resistance against root and foliar pathogens, although the molecular mechanisms underlying such mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR are poorly understood. Tomato plants colonized with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis display enhanced resistance against the necrotrophic foliar pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Leaves from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM plants develop smaller necrotic lesions, mirrored also by a reduced levels of fungal biomass. A plethora of metabolic changes takes place in AMF colonized plants upon infection. Certain changes located in the oxylipin pathway indicate that several intermediaries are over-accumulated in the AM upon infection. AM plants react by accumulating higher levels of the vitamins folic acid and riboflavin, indolic derivatives and phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid. Transcriptional analysis support the key role played by the LOX pathway in the shoots associated with MIR against B. cinerea.Interestingly, plants that have suffered a short period of nitrogen starvation appear to react by reprogramming their metabolic and genetic responses by prioritizing abiotic stress tolerance. Consequently, plants subjected to a transient nitrogen depletion become more susceptible to B. cinerea. Under these experimental conditions, MIR is severely affected although still functional. Many metabolic and transcriptional responses which are accumulated or activated by MIR such NRT2 transcript induction and OPDA and most Trp and indolic derivatives accumulation during MIR were repressed or reduced when tomato plants were depleted of N for 48 h prior infection. These results highlight the beneficial roles of AMF in crop protection by promoting induced resistance not only under optimal nutritional conditions but also buffering the susceptibility

  10. Nursery inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus viscosum and its effect on the growth and physiology of hybrid artichoke seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Campanelli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most nurseries operating in Italy adopt high technologies and produce transplants that well suit and satisfy the grower’s need to produce high value crops. Mycorrhizas are discussed as a tool for improving and developing plant production in the nursery. Much research has been carried out on mycorrhizal symbiosis and we now know more about the symbiontic relationship between fungi and host plants. Plants receive numerous benefits from this symbiosis which are more macroscopic the earlier in the ontogenetic cycle this symbiosis is established. Therefore, it appears that the most effective period in which the inoculum should be made corresponds to the in-nursery growing stage. The earlier the plant is inoculated, the more evident the effect will be. In this study, several aspects related to the physiological foundations of arbuscular mycorrhiza in artichoke plants are presented. The main goal was to study the effects of mycorrhiza on the growth and physiological parameters of three hybrids of artichokes growing in the nursery. The experimental 3¥2 design included two treatments (with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and three hybrids of artichokes marketed by Nunhems (Opal F1, Madrigal F1, Concerto F1. Mycorrhizal plants have greater shoot length, leaf area, shoot and root fresh and dry mass, and root density. This also corresponded with increased photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance of mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal colonization improves relative water content and increases proline concentration in vegetal tissue. Inoculation produced the most beneficial effect on hybrid Madrigal F1 and on hybrid Opal F1; the best mycorrhizal affinity was enhanced when compared to hybrid Concerto F1. The results showed that mycorrhizal symbiosis stimulated the growth of inoculated seedlings providing a qualitatively good propagation material.

  11. Mycorrhizal diversity in Apostasia (Orchidaceae) indicates the origin and evolution of orchid mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Tomohisa; Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Shefferson, Richard P; Yokoyama, Jun

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated that "orchid mycorrhiza," a specialized mycorrhizal type, appeared in the common ancestor of the largest plant family Orchidaceae and that the fungal partner shifted from Glomeromycota to a particular clade of Basidiomycota in association with this character evolution. Several unique mycorrhizal characteristics may have contributed to the diversification of the family. However, the origin of orchid mycorrhiza and the diversity of mycobionts across orchid lineages still remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the mycorrhizae of five Apostasia taxa, members of the earliest-diverging clade of Orchidaceae. The results of molecular identification using nrDNA ITS and LSU regions showed that Apostasia mycorrhizal fungi belong to families Botryobasidiaceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, which fall within the order Cantharellales of Basidiomycota. Most major clades in Orchidaceae also form mycorrhizae with members of Cantharellales, while the sister group and other closely related groups to Orchidaceae (i.e., Asparagales except for orchids and the "commelinid" families) ubiquitously form symbioses with Glomeromycota to form arbuscular mycorrhizae. This pattern of symbiosis indicates that a major shift in fungal partner occurred in the common ancestor of the Orchidaceae.

  12. Effect of mycorrhizas application on plant growth and nutrient uptake in cucumber production under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortas, I.

    2010-07-01

    Mycorrhizas application in horticultural production in the Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey has been studied under field conditions for several years. The effects of different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been evaluated under field conditions for cucumber production. The parameters measured were seedling survival, plant growth and yield, and root colonization. In 1998 and 1999, Glomus mosseae and Glomus etunicatum inoculated cucumber seedlings were treated with and without P (100 kg P2O5 ha-1) application. A second experiment was set up to evaluate the response of cucumber to the inoculation with a consortia of indigenous mycorrhizae, G. mosseae, G. etunicatum, Glomus clarum, Glomus caledonium and a mixture of these four species. Inoculated and control non inoculated cucumber seedlings were established under field conditions in 1998, 2001, 2002 and 2004. Seedling quality, seedling survival under field conditions and yield response to mycorrhiza were tested. Fruits were harvested periodically; at blossom, plant leaves and root samples were taken for nutrient content and mycorrhizal colonization analysis respectively. The field experiment results showed that mycorrhiza inoculation significantly increased cucumber seedling survival, fruit yield, P and Zn shoot concentrations. Indigenous mycorrhiza inoculum was successful in colonizing plant roots and resulted in better plant growth and yield. The relative effectiveness of each of the inocula tested was not consistent in the different experiments, although inoculated plants always grew better than control no inoculated. The most relevant result for growers was the increased survival of seedlings. (Author) 20 refs.

  13. Propágulos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em solos deficientes em fósforo sob diferentes usos, da região semi-arida no nordeste do Brasil Propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizae in p-deficient soils under different land uses, in semi-arid NE Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lúcia Félix de Aguiar Lima

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A conversão de áreas de caatinga em agricultura e pecuária de subsistência é uma das características marcantes da região semi-árida do Nordeste do Brasil. O presente estudo investigou o efeito dessa conversão sobre os propágulos de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMA em 10 locais diferentes, distribuídos nos Estados da Paraíba e de Pernambuco. Cada local consistiu de uma área de vegetação nativa (caatinga contígua com uma área cultivada, na mesma posição de encosta. Amostras de solo foram coletadas a intervalos de 20-30 m, nas profundidades de 0-7,5 e 7,5-15 cm (10 locais x 2 usos do solo x 2 profundidades com 4 pontos amostrais ao longo de uma transecção que cruzava as áreas contíguas. As raízes (The conversion of tropical dry forest into areas used for subsistence agriculture or livestock production is a common feature of the semi-arid region of NE Brazil. Our study looked into the effect of these land use changes on propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF at ten sites distributed in the states of Paraíba and Pernambuco. Each site consisted of an area under native vegetation (Dry-Forest adjacent to a cultivated area in the same slope position. Soil samples were taken at distance intervals of 20-30 m from two depths (0-7.5 and 7.5-15 cm along a transect crossing the adjacent areas (10 sites x 2 land uses x 2 depths x 4 sampling points. Roots (< 2 mm found in the soil samples (n = 160 were stained with trypan blue to assess the percentage of AMF colonization as well as the type of fungal structures. The AMF spores were separated from soil by wet sieving, incubated in iodonitrotetrazolium chloride (INT solution and counted; those stained with INT were considered viable. Soil samples were analyzed for resin-extractable P and total organic carbon (TOC. For data analysis, the 10 areas under dry forest were separated in two sub-groups: Undisturbed-Dry-Forest (UDF, n = 6 and Disturbed-Dry-Forest (DDF, n = 4, owing

  14. Insights on the Impact of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on Tomato Tolerance to Water Stress1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Ilenia

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which form symbioses with the roots of the most important crop species, are usually considered biofertilizers, whose exploitation could represent a promising avenue for the development in the future of a more sustainable next-generation agriculture. The best understood function in symbiosis is an improvement in plant mineral nutrient acquisition, as exchange for carbon compounds derived from the photosynthetic process: this can enhance host growth and tolerance to environmental stresses, such as water stress (WS). However, physiological and molecular mechanisms occurring in arbuscular mycorrhiza-colonized plants and directly involved in the mitigation of WS effects need to be further investigated. The main goal of this work is to verify the potential impact of AM symbiosis on the plant response to WS. To this aim, the effect of two AM fungi (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) under the WS condition was studied. A combined approach, involving ecophysiological, morphometric, biochemical, and molecular analyses, has been used to highlight the mechanisms involved in plant response to WS during AM symbiosis. Gene expression analyses focused on a set of target genes putatively involved in the plant response to drought, and in parallel, we considered the expression changes induced by the imposed stress on a group of fungal genes playing a key role in the water-transport process. Taken together, the results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to WS in tomato, with a different plant response depending on the AM fungi species involved. PMID:27208301

  15. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  16. Unravelling mycorrhiza-induced wheat susceptibility to the English grain aphid Sitobion avenae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amma L.; Wellham, Peter A. D.; Aradottir, Gudbjorg I.; Gange, Alan C.

    2017-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are root symbionts that can increase or decrease aphid growth rates and reproduction, but the reason by which this happens is unknown. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of this interaction, we examined the effect of AM fungi on the English Grain aphid (Sitobion avenae) development, reproduction, attraction, settlement and feeding behaviour on two naturally susceptible varieties Triticum aestivum (L.) variety Solstice and T. monococcum MDR037, and two naturally resistant lines, T. monococcum MDR045 and MDR049. Mycorrhizal colonisation increased the attractiveness of T. aestivum var. Solstice to aphids, but there was no effect on aphid development on this variety. Using the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique, we found that mycorrhizal colonisation increased aphid phloem feeding on T. monococcum MDR037 and MDR045, colonisation also increased growth rate and reproductive success of S. avenae on these varieties. Mycorrhizas increased vascular bundle size, demonstrating that these fungi can influence plant anatomy. We discuss if and how this could be related to an enhanced success rate in phloem feeding in two varieties. Overall, we present and discuss how mycorrhizal fungi can affect the feeding behaviour of S. avenae in wheat, inducing susceptibility in a resistant variety.

  17. The impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mitigating salt-induced adverse effects in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Elhindi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the serious abiotic stresses adversely affecting the majority of arable lands worldwide, limiting the crop productivity of most of the economically important crops. Sweet basil (Osmium basilicum plants were grown in a non-saline soil (EC = 0.64 dS m−1, in low saline soil (EC = 5 dS m−1, and in a high saline soil (EC = 10 dS m−1. There were differences between arbuscular mycorrhizal (Glomus deserticola colonized plants (+AMF and non-colonized plants (−AMF. Mycorrhiza mitigated the reduction of K, P and Ca uptake due to salinity. The balance between K/Na and between Ca/Na was improved in +AMF plants. Growth enhancement by mycorrhiza was independent from plant phosphorus content under high salinity levels. Different growth parameters, salt stress tolerance and accumulation of proline content were investigated, these results showed that the use of mycorrhizal inoculum (AMF was able to enhance the productivity of sweet basil plants under salinity conditions. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased chlorophyll content and water use efficiency under salinity stress. The sweet basil plants appeared to have high dependency on AMF which improved plant growth, photosynthetic efficiency, gas exchange and water use efficiency under salinity stress. In this study, there was evidence that colonization with AMF can alleviate the detrimental salinity stress influence on the growth and productivity of sweet basil plants.

  18. Compost Addition Enhanced Hyphal Growth and Sporulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi without Affecting Their Community Composition in the Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Gu, Siyu; Xin, Ying; Bello, Ayodeji; Sun, Wenpeng; Xu, Xiuhong

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form symbiotic associations with most crop plant species in agricultural ecosystems, and are conspicuously influenced by various agricultural practices. To understand the impact of compost addition on AM fungi, we examined effect of four compost rates (0, 11.25, 22.5, and 45 Mg/ha) on the abundance and community composition of AM fungi in seedling, flowering, and mature stage of soybean in a 1-year compost addition experiment system in Northeast China. Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] was used as test plant. Moderate (22.5 Mg/ha) and high (45 Mg/ha) levels of compost addition significantly increased AM root colonization and extraradical hyphal (ERH) density compared with control, whereas low (11.5 Mg/ha) level of compost addition did not cause significant increase in AM root colonization and ERH density. AM fungal spore density was significantly enhanced by all the compost rates compared with control. The temporal variations analysis revealed that, AM root colonization in seedling stage was significantly lower than in flowering and mature stage. Although AM fungal operational taxonomic unit richness and community composition was unaffected by compost addition, some abundant AM fungal species showed significantly different response to compost addition. In mature stage, Rhizophagus fasciculatum showed increasing trend along with compost addition gradient, whereas the opposite was observed with Paraglomus sp. In addition, AM fungal community composition exhibited significant temporal variation during growing season. Further analysis indicated that the temporal variation in AM fungal community only occurred in control treatment, but not in low, moderate, and high level of compost addition treatments. Our findings highlighted the significant effects of compost addition on AM growth and sporulation, and emphasized that growth stage is a stronger determinant than 1-year compost addition in shaping AM fungal community in black soil of

  19. Compost Addition Enhanced Hyphal Growth and Sporulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi without Affecting Their Community Composition in the Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi form symbiotic associations with most crop plant species in agricultural ecosystems, and are conspicuously influenced by various agricultural practices. To understand the impact of compost addition on AM fungi, we examined effect of four compost rates (0, 11.25, 22.5, and 45 Mg/ha on the abundance and community composition of AM fungi in seedling, flowering, and mature stage of soybean in a 1-year compost addition experiment system in Northeast China. Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] was used as test plant. Moderate (22.5 Mg/ha and high (45 Mg/ha levels of compost addition significantly increased AM root colonization and extraradical hyphal (ERH density compared with control, whereas low (11.5 Mg/ha level of compost addition did not cause significant increase in AM root colonization and ERH density. AM fungal spore density was significantly enhanced by all the compost rates compared with control. The temporal variations analysis revealed that, AM root colonization in seedling stage was significantly lower than in flowering and mature stage. Although AM fungal operational taxonomic unit richness and community composition was unaffected by compost addition, some abundant AM fungal species showed significantly different response to compost addition. In mature stage, Rhizophagus fasciculatum showed increasing trend along with compost addition gradient, whereas the opposite was observed with Paraglomus sp. In addition, AM fungal community composition exhibited significant temporal variation during growing season. Further analysis indicated that the temporal variation in AM fungal community only occurred in control treatment, but not in low, moderate, and high level of compost addition treatments. Our findings highlighted the significant effects of compost addition on AM growth and sporulation, and emphasized that growth stage is a stronger determinant than 1-year compost addition in shaping AM fungal community in

  20. The interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endophytic bacteria enhances plant growth of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Hashem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance.Key words: AMF, endophyte, Acacia gerrardii, salinity, nutrition

  1. Azospirillum and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization enhance rice growth and physiological traits under well-watered and drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-Sánchez, Michel; Armada, Elisabet; Muñoz, Yaumara; García de Salamone, Inés E; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Azcón, Rosario

    2011-07-01

    The response of rice plants to inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Azospirillum brasilense, or combination of both microorganisms, was assayed under well-watered or drought stress conditions. Water deficit treatment was imposed by reducing the amount of water added, but AM plants, with a significantly higher biomass, received the same amount of water as non-AM plants, with a poor biomass. Thus, the water stress treatment was more severe for AM plants than for non-AM plants. The results showed that AM colonization significantly enhanced rice growth under both water conditions, although the greatest rice development was reached in plants dually inoculated under well-watered conditions. Water level did not affect the efficiency of photosystem II, but both AM and A. brasilense inoculations increased this value. AM colonization increased stomatal conductance, particularly when associated with A. brasilense, which enhanced this parameter by 80% under drought conditions and by 35% under well-watered conditions as compared to single AM plants. Exposure of AM rice to drought stress decreased the high levels of glutathione that AM plants exhibited under well-watered conditions, while drought had no effect on the ascorbate content. The decrease of glutathione content in AM plants under drought stress conditions led to enhance lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, inoculation with the AM fungus itself increased ascorbate and proline as protective compounds to cope with the harmful effects of water limitation. Inoculation with A. brasilense also enhanced ascorbate accumulation, reaching a similar level as in AM plants. These results showed that, in spite of the fact that drought stress imposed by AM treatments was considerably more severe than non-AM treatments, rice plants benefited not only from the AM symbiosis but also from A. brasilense root colonization, regardless of the watering level. However, the beneficial effects of A. brasilense on most of the

  2. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae can enhance arsenic tolerance in Medicago truncatula by increasing plant phosphorus status and restricting arsenate uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pengliang; Christie, Peter; Liu Yu; Zhang Junling; Li Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    A pot experiment examined the biomass and As uptake of Medicago truncatula colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae in low-P soil experimentally contaminated with different levels of arsenate. The biomass of G. mosseae external mycelium was unaffected by the highest addition level of As studied (200 mg kg -1 ) but shoot and root biomass declined in both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants, indicating that the AM fungus was more tolerant than M. truncatula to arsenate. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased shoot and root dry weights by enhancing host plant P nutrition and lowering shoot and root As concentrations compared with uninoculated plants. The AM fungus may have been highly tolerant to As and conferred enhanced tolerance to arsenate on the host plant by enhancing P nutrition and restricting root As uptake. - G. mosseae was more tolerant than M. truncatula to As and may have conferred enhanced host tolerance by restricting root As uptake and enhancing P nutrition

  3. Potential contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza to cadmium immobilisation in soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Pavlíková, D.; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 11 (2006), s. 1959-1965 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/02/0293; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : extraradical mycelium * heavy metals * rhizosphere Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.442, year: 2006

  4. Differences in the effects of three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal strains on P and Pb accumulation by maize plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 296, 1-2 (2007), s. 77-83 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB600050636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : heavy metals * arbuscular mycorrhiza * lead Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.821, year: 2007

  5. L-System model for the growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, both within and outside of their host roots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schnepf, A.; Leitner, D.; Schweiger, P.F.; Scholl, P.; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 117 (2016), s. 20160129 ISSN 1742-5689 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : L-system * arbuscular mycorrhiza * external hyphae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.579, year: 2016

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance biomass, photosynthesis and water use efficiency of frankincense seedlings in a drought -pulse environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emiru Birhane, E.B.; Sterck, F.J.; Fetene, M.; Bongers, F.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Under drought conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi alter water relationships of plants and improve their resistance to drought. In a factorial greenhouse experiment, we tested the effects of the AM symbiosis and precipitation regime on the performance (growth, gas exchange, nutrient status

  7. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Mariea Gahan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted.

  8. Occurrence and succession of mycorrhizas in Alnus incana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arveby, A.S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Section of Forest Ecophysiology; Granhall, U. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-12-31

    The occurrence of different mycorrhizas of the grey alder, Alnus incana (L.) Moench., in Sweden was investigated. Root sampling was carried out in planted and natural grey alder stands, representing different soil types, geographical sites, and plant ages. Mycorrhizal infection of roots was found to be frequent at all investigated sites, except for some planted peat bogs, where alders do not occur naturally. At the latter sites, mycorrhizal infection was less frequent and consisted only of ectomycorrhizas. Young trees here were non-mycorrhizal. At all other sites vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was found to be the almost exclusive type of mycorrhiza in first-year seedlings. In trees older than one year ectomycorrhiza was the dominating type. In the planted stands up to five years of age no fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal fungi were found. In such stands the ectomycorrhizas generally had thin, translucent mantles and could be observed only by microscopic examination. In one old plantation (27 years) and in the natural stands sporocarps of several specific `alder fungi` were found. Here, the mycorrhizal root tips had thick, mostly whitish mantles. The Hartig net was in all cases confined to penetration between epidermal cells. Soil collected from one alder site and two non-alder biotopes readily infected grey alder seedlings with Frankia and VAM fungi whereas a peat soil failed to infect seedlings with any symbiont. In vitro inoculation of nodulated seedlings with Glomus mossae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe resulted in VAM-infection. Simultaneous syntheses with isolates of alder-specific, and other, ectomycorrhizal fungi, using three different methods, failed. On the basis of these results an endomycorrhizal-ectomycorrhizal succession after the first growth season in Alnus incana is concluded. A subsequent succession of ectomycorrhizal species from early-stage to late-stage ones is discussed 58 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Identification of mycorrhiza-regulated genes with arbuscule development-related expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Ulf; Nyamsuren, Oyunbileg; Tamasloukht, M'Barek; Lapopin, Laurence; Becker, Anke; Mann, Petra; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Krajinski, Franziska; Franken, Philipp

    2004-07-01

    Suppressive subtractive hybridisation was applied to the analysis of late stage arbuscular mycorrhizal development in pea. 96 cDNA clones were amplified and 81, which carried fragments more than 200 nt in size, were sequence analysed. Among 67 unique fragments, 10 showed no homology and 10 were similar to sequences with unknown function. RNA accumulation of the corresponding 67 genes was analysed by hybridisation of macro-arrays. The cDNAs used as probes were derived from roots of wild type and late mutant pea genotypes, inoculated or not with the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. After calibration, a more than 2.5-fold mycorrhiza-induced RNA accumulation was detected in two independent experiments in the wild type for 25 genes, 22 of which seemed to be induced specifically during late stage AM development. Differential expression for 7 genes was confirmed by RT-PCR using RNA from mycorrhiza and from controls of a different pea cultivar. In order to confirm arbuscule-related expression, the Medicago truncatula EST data base was screened for homologous sequences with putative mycorrhiza-related expression and among a number of sequences with significant similarities, a family of trypsin inhibitor genes could be identified. Mycorrhiza-induced RNA accumulation was verified for five members by real-time PCR and arbuscule-related activation of the promoter could be shown in transgenic roots for one of the genes, MtTi 1.

  10. Effect of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza with compost, vermicompost and sulfural geranole on some quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. in a low input cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P rezvani moghaddam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In recent years, by increasing human knowledge and using different technology on food production, human concerns have increased on safety of food products especially medicinal crops. In order to achieve healthy food production, application of ecological inputs such as organic and biological fertilizers are inevitable. Organic fertilizers are fertilizer compounds that contain one or more kinds of organic matter. They can improve the soil ability to hold water and nutrients. They create a beneficial environment for earthworms and microbial organisms that break the soil down into rich, fine humus (Motta & Magggiore, 2013. Compost is organic matter that has been decomposed and recycled as a fertilizer and soil amendment. Compost can greatly enhance the physical structure of soil. The addition of compost may provide greater drought resistance and more efficient water utilization. Vermicompost is the final product of composting organic material using different types of worms, such as red wigglers or earthworms, to create a homogenized blend of decomposed vegetable and food waste, bedding materials and manure. Vermicompost helps store nutrients and keeps them safe from leaching and irrigation, functioning to balance hormones within plant physiology, and adding beneficial biology to soil (Raja Sekar & Karmegan, 2010. Mycorrhiza arbuscular fungi are other coexist microorganisms that improves soil fertility, nutrients cycling and agroecosystem health. Mycorrhizal fungi are the most abundant organisms in agricultural soils. Many researchers have pointed to the positive roles of mycorrhizal fungi on plants growth characteristics. Despite of many researches on the effect of organic and biological fertilizers on different crops, information on the effects of these fertilizers for many medicinal plants is scarce, therefore, in this study the effect of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza with compost, vermicompost and sulfural geranole on some

  11. Mycorrhizae in forest tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle M. Cram; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are symbiotic fungus-root associations. The colonization of roots by mycorrhizal fungi can benefit the host by improving nutrient and water uptake. In exchange, the host plant provides the mycorrhizal fungi carbohydrates (carbon) from photosynthesis. A substantial portion of this carbon is ultimately transferred to the rhizosphere and is estimated to...

  12. The characterization of novel mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporters from ¤Lycopersicon esculentum¤ and ¤Solanum tuberosum¤ uncovers functional redundancy in symbiotic phosphate transport in solanaceous species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, F.; Karandashov, V.; Chague, W.

    2005-01-01

    Solanaceous species are among the >200 000 plant species worldwide forming a mycorrhiza, that is, a root living in symbiosis with soil-borne arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. An important parameter of this symbiosis, which is vital for ecosystem productivity, agriculture, and horticulture...

  13. Early phosphorus nutrition, mycorrhizae development, dry matter partitioning and yield of maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavito, M.E.; Miller, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a field experiment to test the hypothesis that improved phosphorus nutrition occurs in maize plants with rapid arbuscular (AM) mycorrhizae development at early developmental stages and that this also is reflected in dry matter allocation and final yield. A split-split plot design...... to a mycorrhizal mycelium network (no-tillage treatments). Maize yield and harvest index were lower after cropping With canola. The yield for conventional tillage was higher than that for no-tillage but the harvest index was lower. The hypothesis was supported at early stages of maize growth by the effect...

  14. Fungal and plant gene expression in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2006-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AMs) are a unique example of symbiosis between two eukaryotes, soil fungi and plants. This association induces important physiological changes in each partner that lead to reciprocal benefits, mainly in nutrient supply. The symbiosis results from modifications in plant and fungal cell organization caused by specific changes in gene expression. Recently, much effort has gone into studying these gene expression patterns to identify a wider spectrum of genes involved. We aim in this review to describe AM symbiosis in terms of current knowledge on plant and fungal gene expression profiles.

  15. Inoculation effects on root-colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities spread beyond directly inoculated plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Krak, Karol; Vosátka, Miroslav; Püschel, David; Štorchová, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 7 (2017), s. 1-21, č. článku e0181525. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14285 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : inoculation * arbuscular mycorrhiza * community Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (UEB-Q) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Plant sciences, botany (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  16. Advances in the study of genetic diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Yanpeng Liu; Bokyoon Sohn; Miaoyan Wang; Guoyong Jiang; Runjin Liu

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are obligate symbiotic endophytes which have not been cultured in vitro. The life cycle of AM fungi can be completed only when the mycorrhiza forms between the fungi and plant roots. There are more than 200 genetically-diverse species of AM fungi belonging to Glomeromycota in the Kingdom Fungi. It is well documented that surprisingly high genetic variability exists between and within species, and even in a single spore of AM fungi. We summarize recent advance...

  17. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  18. Rhizoglomus melanum, a new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species associated with submerged plants in freshwater lake Avsjøen in Norway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana; Čtvrtlíková, Martina; Oehl, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2015), s. 1-8, no.9 ISSN 1617-416X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0781 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * biodiversity * submerged plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; DA - Hydrology ; Limnology (BC-A) Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2015

  19. Asymmetric response of root-associated fungal communities of an arbuscular mycorrhizal grass and an ectomycorrhizal tree to their coexistence in primary succession

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knoblochová, T.; Kohout, Petr; Püschel, D.; Doubková, P.; Frouz, J.; Cajthaml, T.; Kukla, J.; Vosátka, M.; Rydlová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 8 (2017), s. 775-789 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10377S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhiza * Ectomycorrhiza * Root-associated fungal communities Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2016

  20. Root colonization of bait plants by indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities is not a suitable indicator of agricultural land-use legacy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jansa, Jan; Řezáčová, Veronika; Šmilauer, P.; Oberholzer, H.-R.; Egli, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 231, SEPTEMBER (2016), s. 310-319 ISSN 0167-8809 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/1665; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhiza * Geography * Root colonization Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.099, year: 2016

  1. Phosphorus acquisition efficiency in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize is correlated with the abundance of root-external hyphae and the accumulation of transcripts encoding PHT1 phosphate transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    In light of the rising cost and often limited access to agricultural fertilizers, arbuscular mycorrhizas are attracting ever greater interest for their potential to promote more efficient use of the world's mineral resources. This potential remains largely unrealized, in part because of a lack of un...

  2. Comparison of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal effects on the heavy metal uptake of a host and a non-host plant species in contact with extraradical mycelial network

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mnasri, M.; Janoušková, Martina; Rydlová, Jana; Abdelly, C.; Ghnaya, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 171, MAR 2017 (2017), s. 476-484 ISSN 0045-6535 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * heavy metal s * Sesuvium portulacastrum Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.208, year: 2016

  3. Phosphorus and Nitrogen Regulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Petunia hybrida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Feller, Urs; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis), the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:24608923

  4. Phosphorus and nitrogen regulate arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Petunia hybrida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Nouri

    Full Text Available Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis, the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  5. Insights on the Impact of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on Tomato Tolerance to Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarra, Walter; Pagliarani, Chiara; Maserti, Biancaelena; Lumini, Erica; Siciliano, Ilenia; Cascone, Pasquale; Schubert, Andrea; Gambino, Giorgio; Balestrini, Raffaella; Guerrieri, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which form symbioses with the roots of the most important crop species, are usually considered biofertilizers, whose exploitation could represent a promising avenue for the development in the future of a more sustainable next-generation agriculture. The best understood function in symbiosis is an improvement in plant mineral nutrient acquisition, as exchange for carbon compounds derived from the photosynthetic process: this can enhance host growth and tolerance to environmental stresses, such as water stress (WS). However, physiological and molecular mechanisms occurring in arbuscular mycorrhiza-colonized plants and directly involved in the mitigation of WS effects need to be further investigated. The main goal of this work is to verify the potential impact of AM symbiosis on the plant response to WS To this aim, the effect of two AM fungi (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) under the WS condition was studied. A combined approach, involving ecophysiological, morphometric, biochemical, and molecular analyses, has been used to highlight the mechanisms involved in plant response to WS during AM symbiosis. Gene expression analyses focused on a set of target genes putatively involved in the plant response to drought, and in parallel, we considered the expression changes induced by the imposed stress on a group of fungal genes playing a key role in the water-transport process. Taken together, the results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to WS in tomato, with a different plant response depending on the AM fungi species involved. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Inoculation of Mimosa latispinosa Lam with the Commercial Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198, and Bradyrhizobium spp. Under Nursery Production Conditions in South-East Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarasin, G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Qit Madagascar Minerals (QMM has planned several actions to reduce the environmental footprint of its mining project located near the city of Fort-Dauphin (Madagascar. One of these actions is the reclamation of a portion of its mined sites. Different symbiotic strains were tested as bio-enhancers for the ecological restoration using Mimosa latispinosa Lam, a native and pioneer shrub. The symbiotic strains tested in nursery were the commercial strain of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM197198, and two local strains of Bradyrhizobium spp., STM1415 and STM1447, inoculated alone or dually with the arbuscular mycorrhiza. Treatments did not significantly increase the plant height and dry mass. However, plants grown in tyndallized soil had better growth than those in unsterilized soil. Results obtained twenty weeks after inoculation suggest that soil tyndallization (heating at 100°C and at atmospheric pressure of 700 kPa during three hours is an effective method for nursery production of high quality seedlings of M. latispinosa.

  7. Effects of mycorrhiza inoculation and different irrigation levels on yield, yield components and essential oil contents of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and ajwain (Trachyspermum ammi L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fertilizers are the key components which provide plant nutrients' needs in recent years (Omid Jangir & Sing, 1996; Kapoor et al., 2007. In many cases, using chemical fertilizers has different negative environmental effects such as soil, water and air pollution, which increase environmental hazardous and production costs (Jangir & Sing, 1996; Kapoor et al., 2007. Biological activities are markedly enhanced by microbial interactions in the rhizosphere of plants (Kapoor et al., 2007. Many investigators have successfully used mycorrhiza to increase the availability of immobilized phosphate and thus minimize the use of mineral fertilizers. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF can better enable a plant to withstand environmental stresses such as drought and salinity. AMF interacts with pathogens and other rhizosphere inhabitants which affect plant health and nutrition. More importantly, mycorrhizal fungi are capable of dissolving weakly soluble soil minerals, especially phosphate, by releasing acids or increasing CO2 partial pressure (Gupta et al., 2002; Gosling et al., 2006; Kapoor et al., 2007. Therefore, they have the ability to enhance host plant uptake of relatively immobile nutrients particularly P, S and Zn. Limited water supply is also another major environmental constraint in the productivity of crop and medicinal plants. Moisture deficiency induces various physiological and metabolic responses such as stomatal closure, decline in growth rate and photosynthesis (Flexas and Medrano, 2002. The results of Baher et al. (2002 showed that greater soil water stress decreased plant height and total fresh and dry weight of Satureja hortensis. Materials and Methods In order to study the effects of mycorrhiza inoculation and different irrigation levels on the growth, quantitative and qualitative yield of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and ajwain (Trachyspermum ammi L., a field experiment was conducted as factorial based on randomized

  8. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Enhanced Early Growth of Mallotus paniculatus and Albizia saman under Nursery Conditions in East Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Wulandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest over logging, forest fire, forest conversion, and opencast mining have promoted deforestation in Indonesia, and reforestation is needed immediately. However, reforestation is limited by low seedling quality and production, and slow seedling growth in nurseries. Native tropical tree and fast-growing species, Mallotus paniculatus and Albizia saman, are potential to promote the first rotation of reforestation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are known to promote nutrient uptake and plant growth. We examined the effects of two native AM fungi, Gigaspora decipiens and Glomus clarum, on the growth of M. paniculatus and A. saman seedlings under nursery conditions. At harvest, after six months, we determined AM colonization, shoot dry weight, and shoot N and P concentration. Approximately 90% and 50% of M. paniculatus and A. saman roots, respectively, were colonized by AM fungi, without any difference between the inoculation treatments. G. decipiens and G. clarum increased shoot height, leaf number, shoot dry weight, and shoot N and P uptake of both species. A positive correlation was observed between N and P uptake and shoot dry weight. These results suggest that AM fungi are effective in accelerating nutrient uptake and plant growth, which will, in turn, promote reforestation and sustainable forest timber production.

  9. Comparative response of six grapevine rootstocks to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi based on root traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogiatzis, Antreas; Bowen, Pat; Hart, Miranda; Holland, Taylor; Klironomos, John

    2017-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been proven to be essential in grapevines, sustaining plant growth especially under abiotic and biotic stressors. The mycorrhizal growth response of young grapevines varies among rootstock cultivars and the underlying mechanisms involved in this variation are unknown. We predicted that this variation in mycorrhizal response may be explained by differences in root traits among rootstocks. We analyzed the entire root system of six greenhouse-grown rootstocks (Salt Creek, 3309 Couderc, Riparia Gloire, 101-14 Millardet et de Grasset, Swarzmann, Teleki 5C), with and without AM fungal inoculation (Rhizophagus irregularis) and characterized their morphological and architectural responses. Twenty weeks after the inoculation, aboveground growth was enhanced by AM colonization. The rootstock varieties were distinctly different in their response to AM fungi, with Salt Creek receiving the highest growth benefit, while Schwarzmann and 5C Teleki receiving the lowest. Plant responsiveness to AM fungi was negatively correlated with branching intensity (fine roots per root length). Furthermore, there was evidence that mycorrhizas can influence the expression of root traits, inducing a higher branching intensity and a lower root to shoot ratio. The results of this study will help to elucidate how interactions between grapevine rootstocks and AM fungi may benefit the establishment of new vineyards.

  10. Effects of inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on clonal growth of Potentilla reptans and Fragaria moschata (Rosaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 308, 1-2 (2008), s. 55-67 ISSN 0032-079X. [5th International Conference on Mycorrhizae. Granada, 23.07.2006-27.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP526/05/P063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis * physiological integration * stoloniferous plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.998, year: 2008

  11. Do ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal temperate tree species systematically differ in root order-related fine root morphology and biomass?

    OpenAIRE

    Kubisch, Petra; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While most temperate broad-leaved tree species form ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbioses, a few species have arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). It is not known whether EM and AM tree species differ systematically with respect to fine root morphology, fine root system size and root functioning. In a species-rich temperate mixed forest, we studied the fine root morphology and biomass of three EM and three AM tree species from the genera Acer, Carpinus, Fagus, Fraxinus, and Tilia searching for principal dif...

  12. Plant tolerance to mercury in a contaminated soil is enhanced by the combined effects of humic matter addition and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, V; De Martino, A; Nebbioso, A; Di Meo, V; Salluzzo, A; Piccolo, A

    2016-06-01

    In a greenhouse pot experiment, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were grown in a Hg-contaminated sandy soil with and without inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (a commercial inoculum containing infective propagules of Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae) amended with different rates of a humic acid (0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1) of soil), with the objective of verifying the synergistic effects of the two soil treatments on the Hg tolerance of lettuce plants. Our results indicated that the plant biomass was significantly increased by the combined effect of AMF and humic acid treatments. Addition of humic matter to soil boosted the AMF effect on improving the nutritional plant status, enhancing the pigment content in plant leaves, and inhibiting both Hg uptake and Hg translocation from the roots to the shoots. This was attributed not only to the Hg immobilization by stable complexes with HA and with extraradical mycorrhizal mycelium in soil and root surfaces but also to an improved mineral nutrition promoted by AMF. This work indicates that the combined use of AMF and humic acids may become a useful practice in Hg-contaminated soils to reduce Hg toxicity to crops.

  13. The growth and phosphorus acquisition of invasive plants Rudbeckia laciniata and Solidago gigantea are enhanced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Marta L; Rola, Kaja; Zubek, Szymon

    2017-02-01

    While a number of recent studies have revealed that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can mediate invasive plant success, the influence of these symbionts on the most successful and high-impact invaders is largely unexplored. Two perennial herbs of this category of invasive plants, Rudbeckia laciniata and Solidago gigantea (Asteraceae), were thus tested in a pot experiment to determine whether AMF influence their growth, the concentration of phosphorus in biomass, and photosynthesis. The following treatments, including three common AMF species, were prepared on soils representative of two habitats that are frequently invaded by both plants, namely fallow and river valley: (1) control-soil without AMF, (2) Rhizophagus irregularis, (3) Funneliformis mosseae, and (4) Claroideoglomus claroideum. The invaders were strongly dependent on AMF for their growth. The mycorrhizal dependency of R. laciniata was 88 and 63 % and of S. gigantea 90 and 82 % for valley and fallow soils, respectively. The fungi also increased P concentration in their biomass. However, we found different effects of the fungal species in the stimulation of plant growth and P acquisition, with R. irregularis and C. claroideum being the most and least effective symbionts, respectively. None of AMF species had an impact on the photosynthetic performance indexes of both plants. Our findings indicate that AMF have a direct effect on the early stages of R. laciniata and S. gigantea growth. The magnitude of the response of both plant species to AMF was dependent on the fungal and soil identities. Therefore, the presence of particular AMF species in a site may determine the success of their invasion.

  14. Mycorrhiza alters the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhang, De-Jian; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-Hua; Wu, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Root hairs and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) coexist in root systems for nutrient and water absorption, but the relation between AM and root hairs is poorly known. A pot study was performed to evaluate the effects of four different AM fungi (AMF), namely, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Diversispora versiformis, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices on root hair development in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings grown in sand. Mycorrhizal seedlings showed significantly higher root hair density than non-mycorrhizal seedlings, irrespective of AMF species. AMF inoculation generally significantly decreased root hair length in the first- and second-order lateral roots but increased it in the third- and fourth-order lateral roots. AMF colonization induced diverse responses in root hair diameter of different order lateral roots. Considerably greater concentrations of phosphorus (P), nitric oxide (NO), glucose, sucrose, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were found in roots of AM seedlings than in non-AM seedlings. Levels of P, NO, carbohydrates, IAA, and MeJA in roots were correlated with AM formation and root hair development. These results suggest that AMF could alter the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange through modulation of physiological activities. F. mosseae, which had the greatest positive effects, could represent an efficient AM fungus for increasing fruit yields or decreasing fertilizer inputs in citrus production.

  15. Mycorrhiza

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The symbiotic association between plant and fungi (mycor- rhizal association) is an amazing phenomenon observed in nature. The mycorrhizal association is one of nature's boons for sustainable agriculture. In today's changing environment, indiscriminate use of pesticides and chemicals pose a great threat to the existence ...

  16. Presymbiotic factors released by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita induce starch accumulation in Lotus japonicus roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Novero, Mara; Guether, Mike; Montanari, Ombretta; Udvardi, Michael; Bonfante, Paola

    2009-01-01

    * Nutrient exchange is the key symbiotic feature of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). As evidence is accumulating that plants sense presymbiotic factors from AM fungi and prepare for colonization, we investigated whether modifications in plant sugar metabolism might be part of the precolonization program. * Inoculation of Lotus japonicus roots in a double Millipore sandwich with the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita prevented contact between the symbionts but allowed exchange of signal molecules. Starch content was used as a marker for root carbohydrate status. * Mycorrhizal colonization of L. japonicus roots led to a decrease in starch concentration. In roots inoculated in the double sandwich, the polysaccharide accumulated after 1 wk and persisted for at least 4 wk. The response was absent in the castor myc(-) mutant, sym4-2, while transcript levels of both CASTOR and POLLUX were slightly enhanced in the wild-type L. japonicus roots, suggesting a requirement of the corresponding proteins for the starch-accumulation response. Exudates obtained from fungal spores germinated in the absence of the plant also induced starch accumulation in wild-type L. japonicus roots. * We conclude that factors released from germinating AM fungal spores induce changes in the root carbon status, possibly by enhancing sugar import, which leads to starch accumulation when colonization is prevented.

  17. A Native Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus, Acaulospora scrobiculata Stimulated Growth of Mongolian Crested Wheatgrass ( Agropyron cristatum (L. Gaertn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burenjargal Otgonsuren

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Agr opyron cristatum (L. Gaertn. (crested wheatgrass is an endemic plant species, which dominates most area of the Mongolian steppe and forest steppe. In the present study, spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the rhizosphere soil of crested wheatgrass were isolated with wet- sieving/decanting methods, and the major species was identifi ed as Acaulospora scrobiculata Trappe. For arbuscular-mycorrhizal resynthesis, the spores of A. scrobiculata were propagated with corn pot-culture technique and inoculated onto the roots of crested wheatgrass seedlings. The inoculated crested wheatgrass seedlings exhibited vigor in growth, and examination of the root structure revealed the occurrence of arbuscules and vesicles in the cortical cells. These results demonstrated that A. scrobiculata could effectively form arbuscular mycorrhizas with crested wheatgrass and promote its growth, which can be used to restore Mongolian grassland.

  18. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Nitrogen Concentration of Berseem Clover in Contaminated Soil with Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aram

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi on nitrogen concentration of berseem clover were examined in contaminated soil with cadmium. Examined factors included: levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae (With and without inoculation, and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg.kg-1. The results showed that the effects of cadmium levels and mycorrhiza fungi were significant on nitrogen concentration (P≤ 0.01.  Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased nitrogen concentration in the root and aerial plant 30% and 40.3% respectively. Also cadmium in concentration of 80 mg.kg-1 reduced nitrogen concentration in root and aerial plant 28.3% and 35% respectively.

  19. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and/or bacteria to enhancing plant drought tolerance under natural soil conditions: effectiveness of autochthonous or allochthonous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, N; Armada, E; Duque, E; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2015-02-01

    Autochthonous microorganisms [a consortium of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)] were assayed and compared to Rhizophagus intraradices (Ri), Bacillus megaterium (Bm) or Pseudomonas putida (Psp) and non-inoculation on Trifolium repens in a natural arid soil under drought conditions. The autochthonous bacteria Bt and the allochthonous bacteria Psp increased nutrients and the relative water content and decreased stomatal conductance, electrolyte leakage, proline and APX activity, indicating their abilities to alleviate the drought stress. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly enhanced plant growth, nutrient uptake and the relative water content, particularly when associated with specific bacteria minimizing drought stress-imposed effects. Specific combinations of autochthonous or allochthonous inoculants also contributed to plant drought tolerance by changing proline and antioxidative activities. However, non-inoculated plants had low relative water and nutrients contents, shoot proline accumulation and glutathione reductase activity, but the highest superoxide dismutase activity, stomatal conductance and electrolyte leakage. Microbial activities irrespective of the microbial origin seem to be coordinately functioning in the plant as an adaptive response to modulated water stress tolerance and minimizing the stress damage. The autochthonous AM fungi with Bt or Psp and those allochthonous Ri with Bm or Psp inoculants increased water stress alleviation. The autochthonous Bt showed the greatest ability to survive under high osmotic stress compared to the allochthonous strains, but when single inoculated or associated with Ri or AM fungi were similarly efficient in terms of physiological and nutritional status and in increasing plant drought tolerance, attenuating and compensating for the detrimental effect of water limitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxicity of coal fly ash (CFA) and toxicological response of switchgrass in mycorrhiza-mediated CFA-soil admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoyemi, Olushola M; Dzantor, E Kudjo

    2017-10-01

    Increasing support for the use of Coal fly ash (CFA) in agriculture has necessitated a better understanding of the effects of the CFA in various cropping schemes. Experiments were conducted to assess mutagenic response of a mutant strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (TA100) to varying concentrations of CFA-water extracts, determine oxidative stress in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) at varying levels of CFA-soil admixtures, and evaluate mycorrhiza-mediated modulation of oxidative stress responses of CFA-grown switchgrass. The TA100 exposed to 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% (w/v) CFA-water extracts elicited significant (p < 0.05) mutagenic responses at 20% and 25% extract levels but not below the 15% level. In greenhouse pot experiment, CFA-soil admixtures at 7.5% and 15% (w/w) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 19.1% and 28.3% respectively, compared to control soil (0% w/w CFA/soil). Under the same conditions, activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) decreased by 75.9% and 66.9%. In contrast to the antioxidant enzyme activities, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) an indicator of lipid peroxidation increased significantly (p < 0.05) by 30.49% and 38.38%. Inoculation of 7.5% and 15% CFA-soil admixtures with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), Rhizophaga clarus enhanced the activities of both SOD and GPx in the switchgrass, while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the levels of MDA. The study demonstrated that incorporation of CFA (at concentrations considered to be non-mutagenic against TA100) as soil amendment produced concentration-dependent oxidative stress responses in switchgrass; however, inoculation of the CFA-soil admixtures with AMF significantly modulated the oxidative stress responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Iris

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    CHEN Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For efficiency using the amphibious plant iris to restore polluted water, the promoting effect of different arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi(AMFon iris was investigated, by monitoring the plant growth index, the physicochemical properties of the soil and the plant photosynthesis indexes. The result showed that the promoting effects of the AMF on the aboveground part and the underground part of the iris were based on different mechanism. For the underground part of the iris, the AMF stimulated its growth through the nutrient enrichment which was performed by the enormous hypha network. The nitrogen absorbing rate of the G. mosseae and the G. intraradices infected iris increased about 71.75% and 42.55%, and the phosphorous absorbing rate increased 8.36% and 9.5% separately. For the aboveground part of the iris, the AMF strengthened the conductance of the leaves’ stomas to control the balance between the net photosynthesis rate and the transpiration rate, so that the utilization rate of water resources was optimized, the metabolic rate was accelerated and the growth of the plant was promoted eventually. In this study, the promoting effect of the G. mosseae on the photosynthesis rate of the iris was significantly better than that of the G. intraradices(P<0.05.

  2. Diet of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: Bread and Butter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Mélanie K; Nouri, Eva; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Reinhardt, Didier

    2017-08-01

    Most plants entertain mutualistic interactions known as arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) with soil fungi (Glomeromycota) which provide them with mineral nutrients in exchange for reduced carbon from the plant. Mycorrhizal roots represent strong carbon sinks in which hexoses are transferred from the plant host to the fungus. However, most of the carbon in AM fungi is stored in the form of lipids. The absence of the type I fatty acid synthase (FAS-I) complex from the AM fungal model species Rhizophagus irregularis suggests that lipids may also have a role in nutrition of the fungal partner. This hypothesis is supported by the concerted induction of host genes involved in lipid metabolism. We explore the possible roles of lipids in the light of recent literature on AM symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sugar beet waste and its component ferulic acid inhibits external mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Almudena; Jakobsen, Iver; Egsgaard, Helge

    2011-01-01

    External arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) mycelium plays an important role in soil while interacting with a range of biotic and abiotic factors. One example is the soil organic amendment sugar beet waste. The fermented Aspergillus niger–sugar beet waste (ASB) increases growth and P uptake by the AM...... mycelium in soil whereas non-fermented waste (SB) had a strong inhibitory effect. The underlying mechanisms are not understood. We used gas chromatography–mass spectrometry to identify differences in composition of water extracts of ASB and SB. The chromatograms showed that ferulic acid was present in SB...

  4. Amazonian açai and food dyes for staining arbuscular- micorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lourdes Martins Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizae microscopy requires differential staining of typical structures. Dyes employed, such as trypan blue, pose risks to health and environment. Alternative dyes such as pen ink and aniline have variable coloring efficiency. In this work, Brachiaria decumbens roots, discolored with caustic soda (NaOH, were stained with açai, annatto, saffron, trypan blue and pen inks. There were significant differences among dyes regarding stained mycorrhizal structures and pictures quality. Acai was considered the best alternative dye, with similar results to trypan blue.

  5. The enhancement by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Cd remediation ability and bioenergy quality-related factors of five switchgrass cultivars in Cd-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the growth, P and Cd concentrations and bioenergy quality-related factors of five cultivars of switchgrass, including three lowland cultivars (Alamo (Ala, Kanlow (Kan, Performer (Per and two highland cultivars (Blackwell (Bw, Summer (Sum, with 0, 1 and 10 mg/kg Cd addition levels. The results showed that AMF inoculation notably increased the biomass and P concentrations of all the cultivars. The Cd concentrations in the roots were higher than those in the shoots of all cultivars irrespective of inoculation, but the AMF had different effects on Cd accumulation in highland and lowland cultivars. AMF inoculation decreased the shoot and root concentrations in Ala and Kan, increased the shoot and root concentrations of Cd in Bw and Sum, and increased shoot Cd concentrations and decreased root Cd concentrations in Per. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in the roots of Bw and in the shoots of Sum with AMF symbiosis. Bw contained the highest total extracted Cd which was primarily in the roots. Ala had the second highest extracted Cd in the shoots, reaching 32% with 1 mg/kg of added Cd, whereas Sum had the lowest extracted Cd. AMF symbiosis had varied effects on bioenergy quality-related factors: for example, AMF decreased the ash lignin content in Ala and the C/N in Sum, increased the nitrogen, gross calorie values, and maintained the hemicellulose and cellulose contents in all cultivars with all tested concentrations of Cd. A principal component analysis (PCA showed that AMF inoculation could enhance, weaken or transform (positive-negative, PC1-PC2 the correlations of these factors with the principle components under Cd stress. Therefore, AMF symbiosis enhanced the growth of different cultivars of switchgrass, increased/decreased Cd accumulation, promoted Cd extraction, and regulated the bioenergy quality-related factors in Cd

  6. Effect of the single and combined inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) in micropropagated blackberry plants (Rubus glaucus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Urley Adrian Pérez Moncada; María Margarita Ramírez Gómez; Yimmy Alexander Zapata Narváez; Juana Marcela Córdoba Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain blackberry seedlings of three ecotypes of blackberry (monterrico, sin espinas and castilla), from in vitro cultures inoculated individually and combined with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF) Glomus sp. (GEV02) and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains of Pseudomonas migulae (Pf014) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (Bs006). The growth variables were aerial and root length (cm), leaf and ro...

  7. Imbalanced carbon-for-phosphorus exchange between European arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and non-native Panicum grasses-A case of dysfunctional symbiosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Veronika; Slavíková, Renata; Konvalinková, Tereza; Hujslová, Martina; Gryndlerová, Hana; Gryndler, Milan; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 62, May 2017 (2017), s. 48-55 ISSN 0031-4056 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhiza * Panicum * Plant biomass Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.000, year: 2016

  8. OCCURRENCE OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS OF KERALA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Abraham; Malathy, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of mycorrhiza in 40 selected medicinal plants was studied. The percentage of mycorrhizal colonization in each of the plant was calculated. The colonization was found to be very less in four plants and very high in six plants. All others showed a moderate level of colonization. The present work suggests the use of mycorrhiza as a biofertilizer to enhance the growth and yield of medicinal plants. PMID:22557224

  9. Interação de chumbo, da saturação por bases do solo e de micorriza arbuscular no crescimento e nutrição mineral da soja Interaction between lead, soil base saturation rate, and mycorrhiza on soybean development and mineral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. L. Andrade

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Existem divergências sobre o efeito do fungo micorrízico arbuscular (FMA na absorção de metais pesados pelas plantas. Isso pode ser atribuído não só às diferenças na disponibilidade do metal no solo, espécie de FMA e de planta, mas também às possíveis interações que ocorrem entre estes e os demais fatores ambientais. Realizou-se um experimento em casa de vegetação, com a finalidade de avaliar o efeito da inoculação de FMAe da saturação por bases do solo sobre o crescimento, nutrição e absorção de Pb em soja crescida em um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo. Os tratamentos consistiram de inoculação, ou não, de Glomus macrocarpum, duas doses de calcário, elevando a saturação por bases do solo a 63 e 82 %, e cinco doses de Pb (0; 7,5; 37,5; 150 e 300 mg dm-3, utilizando-se como fonte Pb(NO32. A inoculação do FMA aumentou a produção de matéria seca da parte aérea das plantas, as quais também apresentaram maiores teores de P e maiores quantidades acumuladas de P, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe e Zn. A produção de matéria seca da soja micorrizada reduziu linearmente com o aumento da dose de Pb adicionada, em ambas as saturações por bases. No solo com menor V %, a colonização radicular pelo FMA diminuiu 40 % na maior dose de Pb adicionada, o teor de Pb na parte aérea da soja foi cinco vezes maior e as plantas micorrizadas apresentaram um teor de Pb 30 % menor do que as não micorrizadas. A adição de Pb afetou tanto o estabelecimento quanto o desempenho da simbiose. O FMA teve papel relevante na diminuição da concentração do Pb na parte aérea da soja, no solo com menor saturação por bases, conferindo tolerância à planta em uma condição de excesso de metal pesado no solo.The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on heavy metal absorption by plants are controversial. This is due to the differences in soil metal availability, AMF and plant species, and also to possible interactions among these and other

  10. The application of mycorrhiza in horticulture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija ZRNIC

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a review of scientific and professional literature regarding the application of mycorrhizas in horticulture. It defines the phenomenon of mycorrhizal symbiosis and describes some of the basic features of symbiotic relationships between plants and fungi. It specifies most common types of mycorrhizas appearing in nature, their characteristics and differences considering diverse hosts, symbiotic fungi and nature of their relationship. The main objective of the article is to demonstrate the effects of mycorrhizal colonization on various agricultural, physiological and biochemical properties of horticultural crops. It also proposes an important influence of mycorrhization on plant nutrition, nutrient uptake and crop yields. Researches show that plants with mycorrhiza are more tolerant to nutrients and water stress, soil salinity and high heavy metals concentrations. Also, it has been shown that mycorrhizal symbiosis positively affects plants during attacks of foliar pathogens and plant-parasitic nematodes. These effects propose the possibility of use of mycorrhizas in sustainable agroecosystems, but the relationship between plants, mycorrhizal fungi and soil type is yet to be elucidated.

  11. Inzet van mycorrhiza's in de bollenteelt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de M.; Breeuwsma, S.J.; Baar, J.; Hiddink, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    In samenwerking met PPO-paddestoelen is door PPO-bloembollen in Lisse een proef met hyacinten opgezet waarin het effect van mycorrhiza-preparaten op gewasgroei en bestrijding van Pythium-wortelrot werd getest. Uit de eerste resultaten in het voorjaar bleek dat er nauwelijks kolonisatie van de

  12. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis differentially regulates the copper response of two maize cultivars differing in copper tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlos, Miguel A; Zitka, Ondrej; Vojtech, Adam; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza can increase plant tolerance to heavy metals. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza on plant metal tolerance vary depending on the fungal and plant species involved. Here, we report the effect of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the physiological and biochemical responses to Cu of two maize genotypes differing in Cu tolerance, the Cu-sensitive cv. Orense and the Cu-tolerant cv. Oropesa. Development of the symbiosis confers an increased Cu tolerance to cv. Orense. Root and shoot Cu concentrations were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants of both cultivars. Shoot lipid peroxidation increased with soil Cu content only in non-mycorrhizal plants of the Cu-sensitive cultivar. Root lipid peroxidation increased with soil Cu content, except in mycorrhizal plants grown at 250mg Cu kg -1 soil. In shoots of mycorrhizal plants of both cultivars, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were not affected by soil Cu content. In Cu-supplemented soils, total phytochelatin content increased in shoots of mycorrhizal cv. Orense but decreased in cv. Oropesa. Overall, these data suggest that the increased Cu tolerance of mycorrhizal plants of cv. Orense could be due to an increased induction of shoot phytochelatin biosynthesis by the symbiosis in this cultivar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, rhizobium inoculation and rock phosphate on growth and quality of lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaseen, T.; Ali, K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective inoculation of legumes has the ability not only to ensure nutrients availability to plants particularly in N and P-limiting (due to improvement in nutrients fixation) environments but also can manipulate the environmental hazards associated with over inorganic fertilization. To support this view, the current experiment was conducted to study the influence of rock phosphorus fertilization, Arbuscular Mycorrhizae (AM) and Rhizobium inoculation on growth and yield parameters of Lens culinaris (NARC.2008-4). In addition, the current experiments aimed to evaluate the effect of different inoculation practices on crop quality in comparison with control (no inoculation).The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with four replications during winter (2010-11 and 2012-13) at the Department of Botany University of Peshawar Pakistan. Overall, inoculated plant performed superior in terms of plant growth and quality over control. All plants measured parameters (Leaf chlorophyll content, seed protein, fiber and ash content, plant height, number of seed pod-1, leaves plant-1, flowers plant-1, pods plant-1, pod length and thousand seed weight) were highest in plant samples inoculated with VAM and Rhizobium in combination as compared to sole application of VAM or Rhizobium. Combined inoculation of VAM and Rhizobium caused 10, 24, 17, 21 and 14% increase in seed protein content, leaf chlorophyll content, seed fiber content, seed ash content and number of seed pod-1 over sole application of VAM and Rhizobium when averaged over two years. Combined application of Rhizobium + VAM enhanced seed yield plant-1 by 45% over control and 24% and 28% over sole inoculation of VAM and Rhizobium respectively. It is therefore concluded that dual inoculation of VAM + Rhizobium and rock phosphate may be of only limited consequence in high input agricultural systems. (author)

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal morphology and dark septate fungal associations in medicinal and aromatic plants of Western Ghats, Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, T; Senthilkumar, M; Rajangam, M; Udaiyan, K

    2006-12-01

    We investigated roots of 107 medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) in the Western Ghats region of Southern India for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) associations. Of the 107 MAPs belonging to 98 genera in 52 families examined, 79 were AM and 38 harbored a DSE association. Typical Arum- and Paris-type mycorrhizas are first reported in the presumed nonmycorrhizal family Amaranthaceae. Similarly, DSE associations are recorded for the first time in nine plant families and 37 plant species. Thirty MAPs had both AM and DSE associations. The number of MAPs having Arum-type mycorrhiza was greater than those having Paris-type. This was more prominent among herbaceous plants than in trees where the Paris-type was predominant. Similarly, the Arum-type was more prevalent in annuals than in perennials. DSE associations were more frequent in herbs and perennials compared to other MAPs.

  15. EFFECT OF DIESEL AND BIODIESEL ON THE GROWTH OF Brachiaria decumbens INOCULATED WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Trejo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have been found to be associated with plants useful in soil phytoremediation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of diesel and biodiesel in soil and sand on the growth of Brachiaria decumbens inoculated with mycorrhizae. Two experiments were carried out: one experiment in soil and another in sand. A two-level- factorial design with three factors was used (one on sterile and another on non-sterile soil, with and without mycorrhizae; and one with diesel and another with biodiesel. In sand, a two-factor design with two levels was used (with and without mycorrhizae and with diesel and biodiesel, both with three replications. NOVADIESEL, biodiesel and PEMEX diesel were use as contaminants, both at 7%. The fresh and dry weight of the plants and percentage of mycorrhizal colonization, were assessed 30 days after planting. In soil, biodiesel was more toxic and reduced the fresh and dry weights of plants, especially in non-sterile soil. Biodiesel yielded greater mycorrhizal colonization values that doubled those of the control. In sand, diesel was found to reduce three times the fresh and dry weights of plants, compared to the biodiesel. In sand diesel presented high values of mycorrhizal colonization in comparison with biodiesel.  Plants inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi exhibited better development than non-inoculated plants, even in the presence of contaminants.

  16. Use of the Signature Fatty Acid 16:1ω5 as a Tool to Determine the Distribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ngosong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass estimation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM fungi, widespread plant root symbionts, commonly employs lipid biomarkers, predominantly the fatty acid 16:1ω5. We briefly reviewed the application of this signature fatty acid, followed by a case study comparing biochemical markers with microscopic techniques in an arable soil following a change to AM non-host plants after 27 years of continuous host crops, that is, two successive cropping seasons with wheat followed by amaranth. After switching to the non-host amaranth, spore biomass estimated by the neutral lipid fatty acid (NLFA 16:1ω5 decreased to almost nil, whereas microscopic spore counts decreased by about 50% only. In contrast, AM hyphal biomass assessed by the phospholipid (PLFA 16:1ω5 was greater under amaranth than wheat. The application of PLFA 16:1ω5 as biomarker was hampered by background level derived from bacteria, and further enhanced by its incorporation from degrading spores used as microbial resource. Meanwhile, biochemical and morphological assessments showed negative correlation for spores and none for hyphal biomass. In conclusion, the NLFA 16:1ω5 appears to be a feasible indicator for AM fungi of the Glomales group in the complex field soils, whereas the use of PLFA 16:1ω5 for hyphae is unsuitable and should be restricted to controlled laboratory studies.

  17. Transcriptional profiling of arbuscular mycorrhizal roots exposed to high levels of phosphate reveals the repression of cell cycle-related genes and secreted protein genes in Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Yusaku; Saito, Katsuharu

    2017-02-01

    The development of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is strongly suppressed under high-phosphate (Pi) conditions. To investigate AM fungal responses during the suppression of AM by high Pi, we performed an RNA-seq analysis of Rhizophagus irregularis colonizing Lotus japonicus roots at different levels of Pi (20, 100, 300, and 500 μM). AM fungal colonization decreased markedly under high-Pi conditions. In total, 163 fungal genes were differentially expressed among the four Pi treatments. Among these genes, a cell cycle-regulatory gene, cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1, and several DNA replication- and mitosis-related genes were repressed under high-Pi conditions. More than 20 genes encoding secreted proteins were also downregulated by high-Pi conditions, including the strigolactone-induced putative secreted protein 1 gene that enhances AM fungal colonization. In contrast, the expression of genes related to aerobic respiration and transport in R. irregularis were largely unaffected. Our data suggest that high Pi suppresses the expression of genes associated with fungal cell cycle progression or that encode secreted proteins that may be required for intercellular hyphal growth and arbuscule formation. However, high Pi has little effect on the transcriptional regulation of the primary metabolism or transport in preformed fungal structures.

  18. INFLUENCIA DEL USO DEL SUELO SOBRE LA OCURRENCIA DE MICORRIZAS ARBUSCULARES EN REGIONES DE GRAN ALTITUD DEL MONTE KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Jefwa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out to establish the effects of Land Use Types (LUTs on Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF. AMF spore abundance and colonization were evaluated. The percentage root colonization was assessed in trap plants only. AMF were identified and enumerated from spores extracted directly from field soils. Soils were sampled from 60 points occurring in central Kenya. A total of 17 AMF species were isolated and 14 identified to species level. The spore community was dominated by Acaulosporaceae, and Glomaceae. Land use type had no significant (p

  19. Co-Inoculation Effects of Thiobacillus thiooxidans Bacteria and Mycorrhiza (Glomus spp. on Maize Nutrition at Different Levels of Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholami

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sulfur is the key element for higher crops and plays an important role in the formation of proteins, vitamins, and enzymes. It is a constituent of amino acids such as cysteine and methionine, which act for the synthesis of other compounds containing reduced sulfur, such as chlorophyll and utilization of phosphorus and otheressential nutrients.Deficiency of this nutrient in soil is usually compensated by using chemical fertilizers. However, these fertilizers have harmful effects on the environment and decrease the quality of the agriculture products. Therefore, biological fertilizers are more useful for using in agricultural ecosystems.Sulfurshould be addedto the soil, usually in a reduced form such as elemental sulfur. Use of S oxidizers enhances the rate of natural oxidation of S and speeds up the production of sulfates and makes them available to plants consequently resulting in an increased plant yield. The role of chemolithotrophic bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus through oxidation process in the soil is usually emphasized. Sulfur oxidation is the most important step of sulfur cycle, which improves soil fertility. The result is formation of sulfate, which can be used by the plants, while the acidity produced by oxidation helps to solubilize nutrients in alkaline soils. These bacteria can solubilise the soil minerals through the production of H2SO4 that reacts with these non-soluble minerals and oxidised them to be available nutrients to the cultivated plants. Arbuscular MycorrhizalFungi isan important component ofthe microbiota, mutualistic symbioticsoilfungithatcolonizesthe rootsofmost cropplants.The AM symbiosis involves an about 80% of land plant species and 92% of plant families. They have theability to enhance host uptake of relativelyimmobile nutrientsparticularly phosphorus (P andzinc (Zn,Manganese (Mn andiron(Fe.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased plant uptake of phosphorus, nitrogen and water absorption

  20. Arsenic uptake and phytoremediation potential by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinhua He; Erik Lilleskov

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of soils and water is a global problem because of its impacts on ecosystems and human health. Various approaches have been attempted for As remediation, with limited success. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play vital roles in the uptake of water and essential nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), and hence enhance plant performance and...

  1. Identification and functional characterization of a sulfate transporter induced by both sulfur starvation and mycorrhiza formation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Marco; Tolosano, Matteo; Volpe, Veronica; Kopriva, Stanislav; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AMs) are one of the most widespread symbioses in the world. They allow plants to receive mineral nutrients from the symbiotic fungus which in turn gets back up to 20% of plant carbon and completes its life cycle. Especially in low-nutrient conditions, AM fungi are capable of significantly improving plant phosphate and nitrogen acquisition, but fewer data are available about sulfur (S) nutrition. We focused on S metabolism in Lotus japonicus upon mycorrhizal colonization under sulfur starvation or repletion. We investigated both tissue sulfate concentrations and S-related gene expression, at cell-type or whole-organ level. Gene expression and sulfate tissue concentration showed that Rhizophagus irregularis colonization can improve plant S nutritional status under S starvation. A group 1 sulfate transporter, LjSultr1;2, induced by both S starvation and mycorrhiza formation, was identified. Its transcript was localized in arbuscule-containing cells, which was confirmed with a promoter-GUS assay, and its function was verified through phenotyping of TILLING mutants in nonmycorrhizal seedlings. LjSultr1;2 thus appears to encode a key protein involved in plant sulfate uptake. In contrast to phosphate transporters, a single gene, LjSultr1;2, seems to mediate both direct and symbiotic pathways of S uptake in L. japonicus. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  3. Multiple Exocytotic Markers Accumulate at the Sites of Perifungal Membrane Biogenesis in Arbuscular Mycorrhizas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Genre, A.; Ivanov, S.; Fendrych, Matyáš; Faccio, A.; Žárský, Viktor; Bisseling, T.; Bonfante, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2012), s. 244-255 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/1629 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Daucus carota * Exocytosis * Medicago truncatula Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.134, year: 2012

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizas contribute to phyto stabilization of uranium in uranium mining tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Bao-Dong; Roos, Per; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2008-01-01

    with uncontaminated soil for supporting plant survival was also examined by mixing soil with U tailing at different mixing ratios. Soil amendment increased plant growth and P uptake. Ryegrass produced a more extensive root system and a greater biomass than medic plants at all mixing ratios. Medic roots were...

  5. The importance of arbuscular mycorrhiza for Cyclamen purpurascens subsp. immaculatum endemic in Slovakia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rydlová, Jana; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Slavíková, Renata; Turis, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 8 (2015), s. 599-609 ISSN 0940-6360 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : wild cyclamens * Septoglomus constrictum * growth response Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.252, year: 2015

  6. Lights Off for Arbuscular Mycorrhiza: On Its Symbiotic Functioning under Light Deprivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUNE (2016), s. 782 ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mycorrhizal symbiosis * costs and benefits * light intensity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  7. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth and cadmium uptake of tobacco with inserted metallothionein gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Pavlíková, D.; Macek, Tomáš; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2005), s. 209-214 ISSN 0929-1393 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/02/0293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : heavy metal s * genetic engineering * phytoremediation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.755, year: 2005

  8. Nutrient limitation drives response of Calamagrostis epigejos to arbuscular mycorrhiza in primary succession

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rydlová, Jana; Püschel, David; Dostálková, M.; Janoušková, Martina; Frouz, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 7 (2016), s. 757-767 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10377S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chronosequence * mycorrhizal growth response * spoil banks Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2016

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of plants from the Mountain Botanical Garden in Zakopane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Zubek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal status of 77 plant species collected from the Mountain Botanical Garden of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Zakopane (southern Poland was surveyed. These plants include rare, endemic and threatened species in the Tatra Mts. (the Western Carpathians and are maintained in the botanical garden in order to develop effective methods of protection and cultivation. Plants belonging to Brassicaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Dryopteridaceae, Juncaceae, Polygonaceae, Rubiaceae and Woodsiaceae families were nonmycorrhizal. 41 species formed AM symbiosis. Spores of nine AMF spccies (Glomeromycota, including Archaeospora trappei, Glomus aggregatum, G. claroideum, G. constrictum, G. deserticola, G. geosponrum, G. microcarpum, G. mosseae and G.rubiforme were isolated for the first time from this region of Poland. In addition, the occurrence of the fine endophyte, G. tenue was detected in roots of 18 species from the study area, although formation of arbuscules by this fungus was observed rarely. AM fungi were sporadically accompanied by dark septate endophytes (DSE. 70% of nonmycorrhizal plant sepcies were devoid of DSE.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhiza decreases cadmium phytoextraction by transgenic tobacco with inserted metallothionein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Pavlíková, D.; Macek, Tomáš; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, - (2005), s. 29-40 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/02/0293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : CUP1 gene * heavy metals * soil microflora Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.703, year: 2005

  11. Global environmental change and the biology of arbuscular mycorrhizas: gaps and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitter, A.H.; Heinemeyer, A.; Husband, R.

    2004-01-01

    in determining the structure of the AM fungal community. Nevertheless, the direct response of AM fungi to temperature may have large implications for rates of C cycling. New evidence shows that AM fungal hyphae may be very short lived, potentially acting as a rapid route by which C may cycle back...

  12. Coal Waste Powder Amendment and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Enhance the Growth of Jabon (Anthocephalus cadamba Miq Seedling in Ultisol Soil Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wilarso Budi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Coal powder waste application on low nutrient media is expected to be able to increase plant growth and to improve Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF development. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of coal waste powder on the growth of Anthocephallus cadamba Jack and AMF development grown on ultisol soil. Two factors in a completely randomised experimental design was conducted under greenhouse conditions and Duncan Multiple Range Test was used to analyse of the effect the treatment. The first factor was ultisol soil ammended with coal waste powder (control, soil amanded with coal waste 5%, soil amanded with coal waste 10% and soil amanded with coal waste 15% and the second factor was AMF inoculation (uninoculated control, inoculated with Gigaspora margarita. Plant height, diameter, shoot dry weight, percentage of AMF colonization and nutrient uptake were measured in this experiment. Results of this study showed that coal amendment and AMF when applied separately significantly increased height, diameter, shoot dry weight, root dry weight and nutrient uptake of 12 weeks A. cadamba seedling, but when the coal waste powder and AMF were combined the plant growth parameters were lower than those applied separately but significantly higher than control. The application of coal waste powder or AMF in ultisol soil could increase A. cadamba growth and development.

  13. Protozoa enhance foraging efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for mineral nitrogen from organic matter in soil to the benefit of host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Robert; Rodriguez, Alia; Robin, Christophe; Scheu, Stefan; Bonkowski, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Dead organic matter (OM) is a major source of nitrogen (N) for plants. The majority of plants support N uptake by symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Mineralization of N is regulated by microfauna, in particular, protozoa grazing on bacteria. We hypothesized that AM fungi and protozoa interactively facilitate plant N nutrition from OM. In soil systems consisting of an OM patch and a root compartment, plant N uptake and consequences for plant carbon (C) allocation were investigated using stable isotopes. Protozoa mobilized N by consuming bacteria, and the mobilized N was translocated via AM fungi to the host plant. The presence of protozoa in both the OM and root compartment stimulated photosynthesis and the translocation of C from the host plant via AM fungi into the OM patch. This stimulated microbial activity in the OM patch, plant N uptake from OM and doubled plant growth. The results indicate that protozoa increase plant growth by both mobilization of N from OM and by protozoa-root interactions, resulting in increased C allocation to roots and into the rhizosphere, thereby increasing plant nutrient exploitation. Hence, mycorrhizal plants need to interact with protozoa to fully exploit N resources from OM. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fuqiang; Li, Jize; Fan, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Quan; Chang, Wei; Yang, Fengshan; Geng, Gui

    2016-02-02

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) protect host plants against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses, and promote biodegradation of various contaminants. In this study effect of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine degradation was investigated. It was observed that the atrazine degradation rates with any addition level in mycorrhizal treatments were all significantly higher than those in non-mycorrhizal treatments. When atrazine was applied at 20 mg kg(-1), the removal efficiency was up to 74.65%. Therefore, G. mosseae can be considered as ideal inhabitants of technical installations to facilitate phytoremediation. Furthermore, a total of 10.4 Gb was used for de novo transcriptome assembly, resulting in a comprehensive data set for the identification of genes corresponding to atrazine stress in the AM association. After comparative analysis with edgeR, a total of 2,060 differential expressed genes were identified, including 570 up-regulated genes and 1490 down-regulated genes. After excluding 'function unknown' and 'general function predictions only' genes, 172 up-regulated genes were obtained. The differentially expressed genes in AM association with and without atrazine stress were associated with molecular processes/other proteins, zinc finger protein, intracellular/extracellular enzymes, structural proteins, anti-stress/anti-disease protein, electron transport-related protein, and plant growth associated protein. Our results not only prove AMF has important ecological significance on atrazine degradation but also provide evidence for the molecular mechanisms of atrazine degradation by AMF.

  15. Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares e adubação fosfatada em mudas de mangabeira Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus supply on seedlings of mangabeira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Maria Carneiro Costa

    2005-03-01

    , at the time of inoculation. After 150 days, high increment on height, shoot biomass and leaf area were observed in the treatments with G. albida, in fumigated soil. Positive response to inoculation occurred in seedlings cultivated in soil with the lower phosphorus level, in both soil treatments. Hancornia speciosa was mycorrhiza dependent only when in fumigated soil, at the lowest phosphorus level. In treatments at other levels, the dependency varied according to the AMF and soil condition. The association with G. albida enhanced growth of H. speciosa.

  16. Induction of DIMBOA accumulation and systemic defense responses as a mechanism of enhanced resistance of mycorrhizal corn (Zea mays L.) to sheath blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Cao, Man; Xie, Li Jun; Liang, Xiao Ting; Zeng, Ren Sen; Su, Yi Juan; Huang, Jing Hua; Wang, Rui Long; Luo, Shi Ming

    2011-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas are the most important symbioses in terrestrial ecosystems and they enhance the plant defense against numerous soil-borne pathogenic fungi and nematodes. Two corn (Zea mays) varieties, Gaoyou-115 that is susceptible to sheath blight disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Yuenong-9 that is resistant, were used for mycorrhizal inoculation in this study. Pre-inoculation of susceptible Gaoyou-115 with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus mosseae significantly reduced the disease incidence and disease severity of sheath blight of corn. HPLC analysis showed that AMF inoculation led to significant increase in 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2 H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4 H)-one (DIMBOA) accumulation in the roots of both corn varieties and in leaves of resistant Yuenong-9. R. solani inoculation alone did not result in accumulation of DIMBOA in both roots and leaves of the two corn varieties. Our previous study showed that DIMBOA strongly inhibited mycelial growth of R. solani in vitro. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mycorrhizal inoculation itself did not affect the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pre-inoculation with G. mosseae induced strong responses of three defense-related genes PR2a, PAL, and AOS, as well as BX9, one of the key genes in DIMBOA biosynthesis pathway, in the leaves of corn plants of both Yuenong-9 and Gaoyou-115 after the pathogen attack. Induction of defense responses in pre-inoculated plants was much higher and quicker than that in non-inoculated plants upon R. solani infection. These results indicate that induction of accumulation of DIMBOA, an important phytoalexin in corn, and systemic defense responses by AMF, plays a vital role in enhanced disease resistance of mycorrhizal plants of corn against sheath blight. This study also suggests that priming is an important mechanism in mycorrhiza-induced resistance.

  17. Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    K?hdorf, Katja; M?nzenberger, B.; Begerow, D.; G?mez-Laurito, J.; H?ttl, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where...

  18. Implication of evolution and diversity in arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscot, François

    2015-01-01

    Being highly sensitive to ecological variations, symbiotic associations should inherently have a limited occurrence in nature. To circumvent this sensitivity and reach their universal distribution, symbioses used three strategies during their evolution, which all generated high biodiversity levels: (i) specialization to a specific environment, (ii) protection of one partner via its internalization into the other, (iii) frequent partner exchange. Mycorrhizal associations follow the 3rd strategy, but also present traits of internalization. As most ancient type, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formed by a monophyletic fungal group with reduced species richness did constantly support the mineral nutrition of terrestrial plants and enabled their ecological radiation and actual biodiversity level. In contrast ectomycorrhiza (EM) evolved later and independently within different taxa of fungi able to degrade complex organic plant residues, and the diversity levels of EM fungal and tree partners are balanced. Despite their different origins and diversity levels, AM and EM fungi display similar patterns of diversity dynamics in ecosystems. At each time or succession interval, a few dominant and many rare fungi are recruited by plants roots from a wide reservoir of propagules. However, the dominant fungal partners are frequently replaced in relation to changes in the vegetation or ecological conditions. While the initial establishment of AM and EM fungal communities corresponds to a neutral recruitment, their further succession is rather driven by niche differentiation dynamics. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  19. Gibberellin regulates infection and colonization of host roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is established by the entry of AM fungi into the host plant roots and the formation of symbiotic structures called arbuscules. The host plant supplies photosynthetic products to the AM fungi, which in return provide phosphate and other minerals to the host through the arbuscules. Both partners gain great advantages from this symbiotic interaction, and both regulate AM development. Our recent work revealed that gibberellic acids (GAs) are required for AM development in the legume Lotus japonicus. GA signaling interact with symbiosis signaling pathways, directing AM fungal colonization in host roots. Expression analysis showed that genes for GA biosynthesis and metabolism were induced in host roots around AM fungal hyphae, suggesting that the GA signaling changes with both location and time during AM development. The fluctuating GA concentrations sometimes positively and sometimes negatively affect the expression of AM-induced genes that regulate AM fungal infection and colonization.

  20. Effects of Tissue Culture and Mycorrhiza Applications in Organic Farming on Concentrations of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Capacities in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) Rhizomes and Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byungrok R; Marsh, Lurline E; Brathwaite, Keegan; Daramola, Adebola O

    2017-04-01

    Tissue culture and mycorrhiza applications can provide disease-free seedlings and enhanced nutrient absorption, respectively, for organic farming. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is rich in phytochemicals and has various health-protective potentials. This study was aimed at determining effects of tissue culture and mycorrhiza applications alone or in combinations in organic farming on phytochemical contents (total phenolics and flavonoids [TP and TF, respectively], gingerol and shogaol homologues, phenolic acids, and carotenoids) and antioxidant capacities (DPPH [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl] radical scavenging, oxygen radical absorbance (ORAC), and iron-chelating capacities [ICC]) in solvent-extractable (Free) and cell-wall-matrix-bound (Bound) fractions of ginger rhizome and Free fraction of the leaves in comparison with non-organics. Concentrations of the phytochemicals and antioxidant capacities, except for carotenoids and ICC, were significantly higher in organic ginger rhizomes and leaves than in non-organics regardless of the fractions and treatments (P Mycorrhiza application in organic farming significantly increased levels of TP, TF, gingerols, and ORAC in the Free fraction of the rhizome (P mycorrhiza significantly increased concentrations of TF and gingerols and ORAC in the Free fraction of the rhizome (P mycorrhiza and tissue culture applications can increase concentrations of phytochemicals and antioxidant capacities in ginger rhizomes and leaves and therefore improve their health-protective potentials. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. CONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF A MYCORRHIZAL ARBUSCULAR SPECIFIC cDNA LIBRARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayenkov, S; Maathuis, F J M

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the potential benefits of mycorrhizas, we need to investigate the processes that occur in these symbiotic interactions, particularly in the arbuscular compartment where nutrients are exchanged between the plant and the fungus. Progress in this area is restricted due to the intricacy and complexity of this plant-fungus interface and many techniques that have been employed successfully in other plants and animal systems cannot be used. An effective approach to study processes in arbuscules is to examine transcript composition and dynamics. We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate approximately 3000 arbuscules from Glomus intraradices colonised Me- dicago truncatula roots. Total RNA was extracted from microdissected arbuscules and subjected to T7 RNA polymerase-based linear amplification. Amplified RNA was then usedfor construction of a cDNA library. The presence and level of enrichment of mycorrhiza-specific transcripts was determined by quantitative Real-time and conventional PCR. To improve enrichment a cDNA library subtraction was performed. Complementation of yeast mutants deficient in the uptake of.potassium, phosphate, sulphate, amino acids, ammonium and of a Mn²⁺sensitive strain, demonstrates the functionality of our cDNA library.

  2. Radiocaesium in fruitbodies and mycorrhizae in ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolova, Ivanka [N. Pouskharov Inst. of Soil Sciences and Agroecology, Sofia (Bulgaria); Johanson, K.J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Radioecology Dept., Uppsala (Sweden); Dahlberg, Anders [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Forest Mycology and Pathology Dept., Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    Fruitbodies of Suillus variegatus and Lactarius rufus and, at a maximum distance of 50 cm, the corresponding mycorrhizae, were collected on a rocky area in a coniferous forest. The tuberculate mycorrhizae collected close to S. variegatus fruitbodies were identified by the RFLP pattern to be S. variegatus mycorrhizae. In contrast the smooth brown mycorrhizae collected close to fruitbodies of L. rufus were found to be of various species - L. rufus, but also Russula sp. The {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in fruitbodies and the fungal part of the tuburculate mycorrhizae of S. variegatus were about the same. A local enrichment of {sup 137}Cs within fruitbodies was studied by collecting fruitbodies growing in clusters. Between 13 and 64% of the mean ground {sup 137}Cs deposition of the cluster area (400 or 625 cm{sup 2}) was found in the fruitbodies. This indicates that there might be an important fungal redistribution of {sup 137}Cs in the forest floor during the production of fruitbodies. The distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the fruitbodies was heterogenous. For example in Cortinarious armillatus, the {sup 137}Cs level in the cap was 2.7 times higher compared to in the stripe. (Author).

  3. Radiocaesium in fruitbodies and mycorrhizae in ectomycorrhizal fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, Ivanka; Johanson, K.J.; Dahlberg, Anders

    1997-01-01

    Fruitbodies of Suillus variegatus and Lactarius rufus and, at a maximum distance of 50 cm, the corresponding mycorrhizae, were collected on a rocky area in a coniferous forest. The tuberculate mycorrhizae collected close to S. variegatus fruitbodies were identified by the RFLP pattern to be S. variegatus mycorrhizae. In contrast the smooth brown mycorrhizae collected close to fruitbodies of L. rufus were found to be of various species - L. rufus, but also Russula sp. The 137 Cs activity concentrations in fruitbodies and the fungal part of the tuburculate mycorrhizae of S. variegatus were about the same. A local enrichment of 137 Cs within fruitbodies was studied by collecting fruitbodies growing in clusters. Between 13 and 64% of the mean ground 137 Cs deposition of the cluster area (400 or 625 cm 2 ) was found in the fruitbodies. This indicates that there might be an important fungal redistribution of 137 Cs in the forest floor during the production of fruitbodies. The distribution of 137 Cs within the fruitbodies was heterogenous. For example in Cortinarious armillatus, the 137 Cs level in the cap was 2.7 times higher compared to in the stripe. (Author)

  4. Auxins in the development of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitze, Dorothee; Wiepning, Anne; Kaldorf, Michael; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2005-11-01

    While the levels of free auxins in maize (Zea mays L.) roots during arbuscular mycorrhiza formation have been previously described in detail, conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) with amino acids and sugars were neglected. In this study, we have therefore determined free, ester and amide bound auxins in roots of maize inoculated with Glomus intraradices during early stages of the colonization process. Ester conjugates of IAA and IBA were found only in low amounts and they did not increase in AM colonized roots. The Levels of IAA and IBA amide conjugates increased 20 and 30 days past inoculation (dpi). The formation of free and conjugated IBA but not IAA was systemically induced during AM colonization in leaves of maize plants. This implicated a role for auxin conjugate synthesis and hydrolysis during AM. We have therefore investigated the in vivo metabolism of 3H-labeled IBA by TLC but only slight differences between control and AM-inoculated roots were observed. The activity of auxin conjugate hydrolase activity measured with three different putative substrates showed a decrease in infected roots compared to controls. The fluorinated IBA analog TFIBA inhibited IBA formation in leaves after application to the root system, but was not transported from roots to shoots. AM hyphae were also not able to transport TFIBA. Our results indicate complex control mechanisms to regulate the levels of free and conjugated auxins, which are locally and systemically induced during early stages of the formation of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  5. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal 14-3-3 Proteins Are Involved in Arbuscule Formation and Responses to Abiotic Stresses During AM Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongfeng; Song, Jiabin; Xin, Xi'an; Xie, Xianan; Zhao, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are soil-borne fungi belonging to the ancient phylum Glomeromycota and are important symbionts of the arbuscular mycorrhiza, enhancing plant nutrient acquisition and resistance to various abiotic stresses. In contrast to their significant physiological implications, the molecular basis involved is poorly understood, largely due to their obligate biotrophism and complicated genetics. Here, we identify and characterize three genes termed Fm201 , Ri14-3-3 and RiBMH2 that encode 14-3-3-like proteins in the AM fungi Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis , respectively. The transcriptional levels of Fm201 , Ri14-3-3 and RiBMH2 are strongly induced in the pre-symbiotic and symbiotic phases, including germinating spores, intraradical hyphae- and arbuscules-enriched roots. To functionally characterize the Fm201 , Ri14-3-3 and RiBMH2 genes, we took advantage of a yeast heterologous system owing to the lack of AM fungal transformation systems. Our data suggest that all three genes can restore the lethal Saccharomyces cerevisiae bmh1 bmh2 double mutant on galactose-containing media. Importantly, yeast one-hybrid analysis suggests that the transcription factor RiMsn2 is able to recognize the STRE (CCCCT/AGGGG) element present in the promoter region of Fm201 gene. More importantly, Host-Induced Gene Silencing of both Ri14-3-3 and RiBMH2 in Rhizophagus irregularis impairs the arbuscule formation in AM symbiosis and inhibits the expression of symbiotic PT4 and MST2 genes from plant and fungal partners, respectively. We further subjected the AM fungus- Medicago truncatula association system to drought or salinity stress. Accordingly, the expression profiles in both mycorrhizal roots and extraradical hyphae reveal that these three 14-3-3-like genes are involved in response to drought or salinity stress. Collectively, our results provide new insights into molecular functions of the AM fungal 14-3-3 proteins in abiotic stress responses and

  6. III. MYCORRHIZAE IN AGROFORESTRY: A CASE-STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T. NUHAMARA

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Census of mycorrhizae in Shorea javanica agroforests has been made periodically in the district of Krui, Lampung, Sumatra. Amanita hemibapha (Amanitaceae, Cantharellus cibarius (Cantharella-ceae, Lactarius spp., Russula spp. (Russulaceae and Scleroderma sp. (Sclerodermataceae were commonly encountered on the agroforest floor. These mycorrhizal fungi are naturally associated with the planted trees. The significance of mycorrhizae for the maximization of growth and sustained productivity of resin is discussed as well as the need to design well defined agroforestry systems to facilitate growth and to improve production management techniques. INTRODU

  7. Nitrate transport processes in Fagus-Laccaria-mycorrhizae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreuzwieser, J; Stulen, [No Value; Wiersema, P; Vaalburg, W; Rennenberg, H

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of influx and efflux of NO3- on NO3- net uptake has been studied in excised mycorrhizae of 18-20 week old beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees. Net uptake rates of NO3- followed uniphasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the concentration range between 10 mu M and 1.0 mM external NO3-, with

  8. Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühdorf, Katja; Münzenberger, B; Begerow, D; Gómez-Laurito, J; Hüttl, R F

    2015-02-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where this plant species grows together with Quercus costaricensis. We provide here the first evidence of mycorrhizal status for the Ascomycete Leotia cf. lubrica (Helotiales) that was so far under discussion as saprophyte or mycorrhizal. This fungus formed arbutoid mycorrhiza with C. arbutoides. The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically. Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses. Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

  9. Effects of Mycorrhiza on the Growth and Productivity of Faidherbia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of mycorrhiza on growth and growth components of Faidherbia albida (Del.) A. Chev. was investigated in the semi arid environment of Sokoto State, Nigeria. A complete randomized block design with five replications and factorial combination of three watering regimes (daily for unstressed plant, twice weekly for ...

  10. Effects of Mycorrhiza on the Growth and Productivity of Faidherbia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    the plant including height, basal diameter, leaf number, leaf area, root length and dry weights as well as its moisture utilization efficiency. Therefore, the use of mycorrhiza is recommended for sustained production of high-grade seedlings of the apple ring acacia in the semi arid environment. KEYWORDS: Faidherbia albida ...

  11. Effects of Moisture and Mycorrhiza on Stomatal Conductance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ISSN 0794-5698. Effects of Moisture and Mycorrhiza on Stomatal Conductance and Xylem Pressure Potential of Faidherbia albida (Del.) A. Chev. *. 1. M.A. Shinkafi and. 2. A.M. Aduradola. 1Department of Forestry and Fisheries, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria. 2Department of Forest Resources Management ...

  12. Enhanced Drought Stress Tolerance by the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in a Drought-Sensitive Maize Cultivar Is Related to a Broader and Differential Regulation of Host Plant Aquaporins than in a Drought-Tolerant Cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Gabriela; Erice, Gorka; Aroca, Ricardo; Chaumont, François; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been shown to improve maize tolerance to different drought stress scenarios by regulating a wide range of host plants aquaporins. The objective of this study was to highlight the differences in aquaporin regulation by comparing the effects of the AM symbiosis on root aquaporin gene expression and plant physiology in two maize cultivars with contrasting drought sensitivity. This information would help to identify key aquaporin genes involved in the enhanced drought tolerance by the AM symbiosis. Results showed that when plants were subjected to drought stress the AM symbiosis induced a higher improvement of physiological parameters in drought-sensitive plants than in drought-tolerant plants. These include efficiency of photosystem II, membrane stability, accumulation of soluble sugars and plant biomass production. Thus, drought-sensitive plants obtained higher physiological benefit from the AM symbiosis. In addition, the genes ZmPIP1;1, ZmPIP1;3, ZmPIP1;4, ZmPIP1;6, ZmPIP2;2, ZmPIP2;4, ZmTIP1;1, and ZmTIP2;3 were down-regulated by the AM symbiosis in the drought-sensitive cultivar and only ZmTIP4;1 was up-regulated. In contrast, in the drought-tolerant cultivar only three of the studied aquaporin genes (ZmPIP1;6, ZmPIP2;2, and ZmTIP4;1) were regulated by the AM symbiosis, resulting induced. Results in the drought-sensitive cultivar are in line with the hypothesis that down-regulation of aquaporins under water deprivation could be a way to minimize water loss, and the AM symbiosis could be helping the plant in this regulation. Indeed, during drought stress episodes, water conservation is critical for plant survival and productivity, and is achieved by an efficient uptake and stringently regulated water loss, in which aquaporins participate. Moreover, the broader and contrasting regulation of these aquaporins by the AM symbiosis in the drought-sensitive than the drought-tolerant cultivar suggests a role of these aquaporins

  13. Combined Field Inoculations ofPseudomonasBacteria, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Entomopathogenic Nematodes and their Effects on Wheat Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiali, Nicola; Chiriboga, Xavier; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Fesselet, Marie; Villacrés, Daniela; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Bender, S Franz; Dennert, Francesca; Blanco-Pérez, Ruben; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Maurhofer, Monika; Mascher, Fabio; Turlings, Ted C J; Keel, Christoph J; Campos-Herrera, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    In agricultural ecosystems, pest insects, pathogens, and reduced soil fertility pose major challenges to crop productivity and are responsible for significant yield losses worldwide. Management of belowground pests and diseases remains particularly challenging due to the complex nature of the soil and the limited reach of conventional agrochemicals. Boosting the presence of beneficial rhizosphere organisms is a potentially sustainable alternative and may help to optimize crop health and productivity. Field application of single beneficial soil organisms has shown satisfactory results under optimal conditions. This might be further enhanced by combining multiple beneficial soil organisms, but this remains poorly investigated. Here, we inoculated wheat plots with combinations of three beneficial soil organisms that have different rhizosphere functions and studied their effects on crop performance. Plant beneficial Pseudomonas bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), were inoculated individually or in combinations at seeding, and their effects on plant performance were evaluated throughout the season. We used traditional and molecular identification tools to monitor their persistence over the cropping season in augmented and control treatments, and to estimate the possible displacement of native populations. In three separate trials, beneficial soil organisms were successfully introduced into the native populations and readily survived the field conditions. Various Pseudomonas , mycorrhiza, and nematode treatments improved plant health and productivity, while their combinations provided no significant additive or synergistic benefits compared to when applied alone. EPN application temporarily displaced some of the native EPN, but had no significant long-term effect on the associated food web. The strongest positive effect on wheat survival was observed for Pseudomonas and AMF during a season with heavy natural infestation by

  14. Combined Field Inoculations of Pseudomonas Bacteria, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Entomopathogenic Nematodes and their Effects on Wheat Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Imperiali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In agricultural ecosystems, pest insects, pathogens, and reduced soil fertility pose major challenges to crop productivity and are responsible for significant yield losses worldwide. Management of belowground pests and diseases remains particularly challenging due to the complex nature of the soil and the limited reach of conventional agrochemicals. Boosting the presence of beneficial rhizosphere organisms is a potentially sustainable alternative and may help to optimize crop health and productivity. Field application of single beneficial soil organisms has shown satisfactory results under optimal conditions. This might be further enhanced by combining multiple beneficial soil organisms, but this remains poorly investigated. Here, we inoculated wheat plots with combinations of three beneficial soil organisms that have different rhizosphere functions and studied their effects on crop performance. Plant beneficial Pseudomonas bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, and entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN, were inoculated individually or in combinations at seeding, and their effects on plant performance were evaluated throughout the season. We used traditional and molecular identification tools to monitor their persistence over the cropping season in augmented and control treatments, and to estimate the possible displacement of native populations. In three separate trials, beneficial soil organisms were successfully introduced into the native populations and readily survived the field conditions. Various Pseudomonas, mycorrhiza, and nematode treatments improved plant health and productivity, while their combinations provided no significant additive or synergistic benefits compared to when applied alone. EPN application temporarily displaced some of the native EPN, but had no significant long-term effect on the associated food web. The strongest positive effect on wheat survival was observed for Pseudomonas and AMF during a season with heavy

  15. Combined Field Inoculations of Pseudomonas Bacteria, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Entomopathogenic Nematodes and their Effects on Wheat Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiali, Nicola; Chiriboga, Xavier; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Fesselet, Marie; Villacrés, Daniela; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Bender, S. Franz; Dennert, Francesca; Blanco-Pérez, Ruben; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Maurhofer, Monika; Mascher, Fabio; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Keel, Christoph J.; Campos-Herrera, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    In agricultural ecosystems, pest insects, pathogens, and reduced soil fertility pose major challenges to crop productivity and are responsible for significant yield losses worldwide. Management of belowground pests and diseases remains particularly challenging due to the complex nature of the soil and the limited reach of conventional agrochemicals. Boosting the presence of beneficial rhizosphere organisms is a potentially sustainable alternative and may help to optimize crop health and productivity. Field application of single beneficial soil organisms has shown satisfactory results under optimal conditions. This might be further enhanced by combining multiple beneficial soil organisms, but this remains poorly investigated. Here, we inoculated wheat plots with combinations of three beneficial soil organisms that have different rhizosphere functions and studied their effects on crop performance. Plant beneficial Pseudomonas bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), were inoculated individually or in combinations at seeding, and their effects on plant performance were evaluated throughout the season. We used traditional and molecular identification tools to monitor their persistence over the cropping season in augmented and control treatments, and to estimate the possible displacement of native populations. In three separate trials, beneficial soil organisms were successfully introduced into the native populations and readily survived the field conditions. Various Pseudomonas, mycorrhiza, and nematode treatments improved plant health and productivity, while their combinations provided no significant additive or synergistic benefits compared to when applied alone. EPN application temporarily displaced some of the native EPN, but had no significant long-term effect on the associated food web. The strongest positive effect on wheat survival was observed for Pseudomonas and AMF during a season with heavy natural infestation by

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal growth responses are fungal specific but do not differ between soybean genotypes with different phosphate efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiurong; Zhao, Shaopeng; Bücking, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play a key role in the phosphate (P) uptake of many important crop species, but the mechanisms that control their efficiency and their contribution to the P nutrition of the host plant are only poorly understood. Methods The P uptake and growth potential of two soybean genotypes that differ in their root architectural traits and P acquisition efficiency were studied after colonization with different AM fungi and the transcript levels of plant P transporters involved in the plant or mycorrhizal P uptake pathway were examined. Key Results The mycorrhizal growth responses of both soybean genotypes ranged from highly beneficial to detrimental, and were dependent on the P supply conditions, and the fungal species involved. Only the colonization with Rhizophagus irregularis increased the growth and P uptake of both soybean genotypes. The expression of GmPT4 was downregulated, while the mycorrhiza-inducible P transporter GmPT10 was upregulated by colonization with R. irregularis. Colonization with both fungi also led to higher transcript levels of the mycorrhiza-inducible P transporter GmPT9, but only in plants colonized with R. irregularis were the higher transcript levels correlated to a better P supply. Conclusions The results suggest that AM fungi can also significantly contribute to the P uptake and growth potential of genotypes with a higher P acquisition efficiency, but that mycorrhizal P benefits depend strongly on the P supply conditions and the fungal species involved. PMID:27208734

  17. Do ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal temperate tree species systematically differ in root order based fine root morphology and biomass?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eKubisch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available While most temperate broad-leaved tree species form ectomycorrhizal (EM symbioses, a few species have arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM. It is not known whether EM and AM tree species differ systematically with respect to fine root morphology, fine root system size and root functioning. In a species-rich temperate mixed forest, we studied the fine root morphology and biomass of three EM and three AM tree species from the genera Acer, Carpinus, Fagus, Fraxinus and Tilia searching for principal differences between EM and AM trees. We further assessed the evidence of convergence or divergence in root traits among the six co-occurring species. Eight fine root morphological and chemical traits were investigated in root segments of the first to fourth root order in three different soil depths and the relative importance of the factors root order, tree species and soil depth for root morphology was determined. Root order was more influential than tree species while soil depth had only a small effect on root morphology All six species showed similar decreases in specific root length and specific root area from the 1st to the 4th root order, while the species patterns differed considerably in root tissue density, root N concentration, and particularly with respect to root tip abundance. Most root morphological traits were not significantly different between EM and AM species (except for specific root area that was larger in AM species, indicating that mycorrhiza type is not a key factor influencing fine root morphology in these species. The order-based root analysis detected species differences more clearly than the simple analysis of bulked fine root mass. Despite convergence in important root traits among AM and EM species, even congeneric species may differ in certain fine root morphological traits. This suggests that, in general, species identity has a larger influence on fine root morphology than mycorrhiza type.

  18. The plasma membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula roots as modified by arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Achref; Recorbet, Ghislaine; Lemaître-Guillier, Christelle; Mounier, Arnaud; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane

    2018-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) roots, the plasma membrane (PM) of the host plant is involved in all developmental stages of the symbiotic interaction, from initial recognition to intracellular accommodation of intra-radical hyphae and arbuscules. Although the role of the PM as the agent for cellular morphogenesis and nutrient exchange is especially accentuated in endosymbiosis, very little is known regarding the PM protein composition of mycorrhizal roots. To obtain a global overview at the proteome level of the host PM proteins as modified by symbiosis, we performed a comparative protein profiling of PM fractions from Medicago truncatula roots either inoculated or not with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. PM proteins were isolated from root microsomes using an optimized discontinuous sucrose gradient; their subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (MS) identified 674 proteins. Cross-species sequence homology searches combined with MS-based quantification clearly confirmed enrichment in PM-associated proteins and depletion of major microsomal contaminants. Changes in protein amounts between the PM proteomes of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots were monitored further by spectral counting. This workflow identified a set of 82 mycorrhiza-responsive proteins that provided insights into the plant PM response to mycorrhizal symbiosis. Among them, the association of one third of the mycorrhiza-responsive proteins with detergent-resistant membranes pointed at partitioning to PM microdomains. The PM-associated proteins responsive to mycorrhization also supported host plant control of sugar uptake to limit fungal colonization, and lipid turnover events in the PM fraction of symbiotic roots. Because of the depletion upon symbiosis of proteins mediating the replacement of phospholipids by phosphorus-free lipids in the plasmalemma, we propose a role of phosphate nutrition in the PM composition of mycorrhizal roots.

  19. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

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    Giovannetti Marco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis.

  20. Presymbiotic growth and sporal morphology are affected in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita cured of its endobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumini, Erica; Bianciotto, Valeria; Jargeat, Patricia; Novero, Mara; Salvioli, Alessandra; Faccio, Antonella; Bécard, Guillaume; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-07-01

    Some arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi contain endocellular bacteria. In Gigaspora margarita BEG 34, a homogenous population of beta-Proteobacteria is hosted inside the fungal spore. The bacteria, named Candidatus Glomeribacter gigasporarum, are vertically transmitted through fungal spore generations. Here we report how a protocol based on repeated passages through single-spore inocula caused dilution of the initial bacterial population eventually leading to cured spores. Spores of this line had a distinct phenotype regarding cytoplasm organization, vacuole morphology, cell wall organization, lipid bodies and pigment granules. The absence of bacteria severely affected presymbiotic fungal growth such as hyphal elongation and branching after root exudate treatment, suggesting that Ca. Glomeribacter gigasporarum is important for optimal development of its fungal host. Under laboratory conditions, the cured fungus could be propagated, i.e. could form mycorrhizae and sporulate, and can therefore be considered as a stable variant of the wild type. The results demonstrated that - at least for the G. margarita BEG 34 isolate - the absence of endobacteria affects the spore phenotype of the fungal host, and causes delays in the growth of germinating mycelium, possibly affecting its ecological fitness. This cured line is the first manipulated and stable isolate of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

  1. SEEDLING GROWTH OF RAINFOREST SPECIES INOCULATED WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI: AN ANALYSIS OF THE SIZE FRAGMENT EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Francisco Álvarez-Sánchez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Deforestation is a process that brings as a consequence strong environmental problems in tropical rain forests. Restoration of damaged areas can accelerate succession process and improve seedling performance. One way to reach this objective is to inoculate them with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This study analyzed the effect of mycorrhizae inoculation on seedling survivorship and growth of two tree species, Pleuranthodendron lindenii (light demanding and Pimenta dioica (shade tolerant in shaded greenhouse and field conditions in the region of "Los Tuxtlas", Veracruz. We applied three inoculation treatments, without mycorrhizal inoculum (control, mycorrhizal inoculum from small fragments, and inoculum from large fragments. We analyzed survivorship and relative growth rates for height and diameter. For both species, significant differences (p<0.05 in growth rates in height and diameter were found for inoculum origin and time, as well as their interaction. The highest mean values corresponded to plants with inoculum from small fragments. Differences in survival among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi treatments were significant only under shaded greenhouse conditions. The results are discussed in terms of life history traits and environmental conditions.

  2. The impact of domestication and crop improvement on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in cereals: insights from genetics and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Ruairidh J H; Ramírez-Flores, M Rosario; Olalde-Portugal, Víctor; Paszkowski, Uta

    2018-04-15

    Contents I. II. III. IV. V. References SUMMARY: Cereals (rice, maize, wheat, sorghum and the millets) provide over 50% of the world's caloric intake, a value that rises to > 80% in developing countries. Since domestication, cereals have been under artificial selection, largely directed towards higher yield. Throughout this process, cereals have maintained their capacity to interact with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, beneficial symbionts that associate with the roots of most terrestrial plants. It has been hypothesized that the shift from the wild to cultivation, and above all the last c. 50 years of intensive breeding for high-input farming systems, has reduced the capacity of the major cereal crops to gain full benefit from AM interactions. Recent studies have shed further light on the molecular basis of establishment and functioning of AM symbiosis in cereals, providing insight into where the breeding process might have had an impact. Classic phytohormones, targets of artificial selection during the generation of Green Revolution semi-dwarf varieties, have emerged as important regulators of AM symbiosis. Although there is still much to be learnt about the mechanistic basis of variation in symbiotic outcome, these advances are providing an insight into the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza in agronomic systems. © 2018 The Authors New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associations of vascular plants confined to river valleys: towards understanding the river corridor plant distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobis, Agnieszka; Błaszkowski, Janusz; Zubek, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    The group of river corridor plants (RCP) includes vascular plant species which grow mainly or exclusively in the valleys of large rivers. Despite the long recognized fact that some plant species display a corridor-like distribution pattern in Central Europe, there is still no exhaustive explanation of the mechanisms generating this peculiar distribution. The main goal of this study was therefore to investigate whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and fungal root endophytes influence the RCP distribution. Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) were observed in 19 out of 33 studied RCP. Dark septate endophytes (DSE) and Olpidium spp. were recorded with low abundance in 15 and 10 plant species, respectively. The spores of AMF were found only in 32% of trap cultures established from the soils collected in the river corridor habitats. In total, six widespread AMF species were identified. Because the percentage of non-mycorrhizal species in the group of RCP is significant and the sites in river corridors are characterized by low AMF species diversity, RCP can be outcompeted outside river valleys by the widespread species that are able to benefit from AM associations in more stable plant-AMF communities in non-river habitats.

  4. Interactions of arbuscular mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi improve seedling survival and growth in post-mining waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wężowicz, Katarzyna; Rozpądek, Piotr; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    The impact of fungal endophytes and the modulating role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the vitality of Verbascum lychnitis, grown in the laboratory in a substratum from a post-mining waste dump was investigated. We report that inoculation with a single endophyte negatively affected the survival rate and biomass production of most of the plant-endophyte consortia examined. The introduction of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi into this setup (dual inoculation) had a beneficial effect on both biomass yield and survivability. V. lychnitis co-inoculated with AMF and Cochliobolus sativus, Diaporthe sp., and Phoma exigua var. exigua yielded the highest biomass, exceeding the growth rate of both non-inoculated and AMF plants. AMF significantly improved the photosynthesis rates of the plant-endophyte consortia, which were negatively affected by inoculation with single endophytes. The abundance of PsbC, a photosystem II core protein previously shown to be upregulated in plants colonized by Epichloe typhina, exhibited a significant increase when the negative effect of the fungal endophyte was attenuated by AMF.

  5. Oecologie van paddestoelen en schimmels 3. Arbusculaire mycorrhiza schimmels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Th.B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) occur in symbiosis with a wide range of host plants and play an important role in natura! and agricultural ecosystems . AMF belang to six genera in three families in the order Glomales. Spore characteristics and differences in sequence of nucleic acids are used for

  6. Plant Functional Traits Associated with Mycorrhizal Root Foraging in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Ectomycorrhizal Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, D. M.; Chen, W.; Cheng, L.; Liu, B.; Koide, R. T.; Guo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Root foraging for nutrient "hot spots" is a key strategy by which some plants maximize nutrient gain from their carbon investment in root and mycorrhizal hyphae. Foraging strategies may depend on costs of root construction, with thick roots generally costing more per unit length than thin roots. Investment in mycorrhizal hyphae, which are considerably thinner than roots, may represent an alternative strategy for cost-effective nutrient foraging, especially for thick-root species. Type of mycorrhiza may matter, as ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are more associated with longer hyphae and ability to mineralize organic matter than arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Among AM trees in both subtropical forests in SE China and in temperate forests in central Pennsylvania, USA, we found that tree species with thin roots proliferated their roots in soil patches enriched with mineral nutrients to a greater extent than species with thick roots. In addition, thick-root species were consistently colonized more heavily with mycorrhizal fungi than thin root species, although nutrient addition tended to diminish colonization. In a common garden in central Pennsylvania of both AM and EM tree species, we found that nutrient patches enriched with organic materials resulted in greater root and mycorrhizal fungal proliferation compared to those enriched with inorganic nutrients and that thick-root species proliferated more with their mycorrhizal fungi whereas thin-root species proliferated more with their roots. We further examined with many more species, patterns of root and mycorrhizal fungal proliferation in organic-nutrient-enriched patches. Foraging precision, or the extent that roots or mycorrhizal hyphae grew in the enriched patch relative to the unenriched patch, was related to both root thickness and type of mycorrhiza. In both AM and EM trees, thick-root species were not selective foragers of either their roots or hyphae. In thin-root species, there was strong selectivity in

  7. Post-transplant reactions of mycorrhizal and mycorrhiza-free seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala to pH changes in an Oxisol and Ultisol of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Habte; G. Diarra; P.G. Scowcroft

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which pretransplant colonization of seedlings with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus aggregatum Schenck and Smith emend. Koske could enhance the post-transplant growth of two cultivars of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit (cv. K-8 and cv. K-636) in Al- and Mn-rich acid soils was evaluated in a...

  8. Fresh perspectives on the roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in plant nutrition and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sally E; Smith, F Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent research on arbuscular mycorrhizas has demonstrated that AM fungi play a significant role in plant phosphorus (P) uptake, regardless of whether the plant responds positively to colonization in terms of growth or P content. Here we focus particularly on implications of this finding for consideration of the balance between organic carbon (C) use by the fungi and P delivery (i.e. the C-P trade between the symbionts). Positive growth responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization are attributed frequently to increased P uptake via the fungus, which results in relief of P deficiency and increased growth. Zero AM responses, compared with non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants, have conventionally been attributed to failure of the fungi to deliver P to the plants. Negative responses, combined with excessive C use, have been attributed to this failure. The fungi were viewed as parasites. Demonstration that the AM pathway of P uptake operates in such plants indicates that direct P uptake by the roots is reduced and that the fungi are not parasites but mutualists because they deliver P as well as using C. We suggest that poor plant growth is the result of P deficiency because AM fungi lower the amount of P taken up directly by roots but the AM uptake of P does compensate for the reduction. The implications of interplay between direct root uptake and AM fungal uptake of P also include increased tolerance of AM plants to toxins such as arsenate and increased success when competing with NM plants. Finally we discuss the new information on C-P trade in the context of control of the symbiosis by the fungus or the plant, including new information (from NM plants) on sugar transport and on the role of sucrose in the signaling network involved in responses of plants to P deprivation.

  9. Growth, cadmium uptake and accumulation of maize (Zea mays L.) under the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingzhi; Gong, Zongqiang; Zhang, Yulong; Li, Peijun

    2014-12-01

    The effects of three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi isolates on Cd uptake and accumulation by maize (Zea mays L.) were investigated in a planted pot experiment. Plants were inoculated with Glomus intraradices, Glomus constrictum and Glomus mosseae at three different Cd concentrations. The results showed that root colonization increased with Cd addition during a 6-week growth period, however, the fungal density on roots decreased after 9-week growth in the treatments with G. constrictum and G. mosseae isolates. The percentage of mycorrhizal colonization by the three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi isolates ranged from 22.7 to 72.3%. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculations decreased maize biomass especially during the first 6-week growth before Cd addition, and this inhibitory effect was less significant with Cd addition and growth time. Cd concentrations and uptake in maize plants increased with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization at low Cd concentration (0.02 mM): nonetheless, it decreased at high Cd concentration (0.20 mM) after 6-week growth period. Inoculation with G. constrictum isolates enhanced the root Cd concentrations and uptake, but G. mosseae isolates showed the opposite results at high Cd concentration level after 9 week growth period, as compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. In conclusion, maize plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were less sensitive to Cd stress than uninoculated plants. G. constrictum isolates enhanced Cd phytostabilization and G. mosseae isolates reduced Cd uptake in maize (Z. mays L.).

  10. Evaluation of integrated management of organic manure application and mycorrhiza inoculation on growth criteria, qualitative and essential oil yield of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L. under Mashhad climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shabahang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study impacts of organic manure levels and inoculation with mycorrhiza fungi on growth, quantitative and qualitative yield of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., a field experiment was conducted as factorial based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during two growing seasons of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Mycorhiza inoculation (with and without inoculation and five levels of organic manure as decomposed cow manure (zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40 t.ha-1 were considered as treatments. Plant height, canopy diameter, leaf to shoot ratio, shoot dry weight, essential oil content and essential oil yield of hyssop were measured and calculated accordingly. The results showed that the simple and interaction effects between organic manure and mycorrhiza were significant (p≤0.01 on plant height, canopy diameter, leaf to stem ratio, shoot dry weight and essential oil content and yield of hyssop. By increasing organic manure level from zero to 30 t.ha-1 enhanced shoot dry weight and essential oil yield of hyssop up to 127 and 43%, respectively. Whereas by increasing organic manure level up to 40 t.ha-1 improved these traits up to 12 and 24%, respectively. Mycorrhiza inoculation enhanced shoot dry weight and essential oil yield up to 19 and 14%, respectively. The second year, growth of hyssop plants due to suitable establishment and more availability of nutrients were higher than the first year. Organic manure enhanced growth and yield of hyssop due to availability of nutrients and improvement in soil characteristics. Mycorrhiza inoculation promoted growth and yield of this valuable medicinal plant because of root development and nutrient availability particularly phosphorus.

  11. Effects of salt stress and mycorrhiza fungi on morpho-physiological characteristics of sweet corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyed Abdolreza kazemeini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the interaction of mycorrhizal fungi and salinity on growth and physiological characteristics of sweet corn, a greenhouse experiment was conducted at College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, in 2014. The experimental design was factorial based on Completely Randomized Design in three replications. Treatments included salinity at four levels (0.4 (control, 4, 7, 10 dS m-1, and the fungi at three levels (no fungi (control, Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices. Results indicated that at flowering stage, with increasing salinity levels, leaf chlorophyll a, b and a+b content and carotenoid decreased at a rate of 18.9, 52.4, 33.1, and 34.5 respectively. Application of mycorrhiza under salinity, partially offset the negative impacts and increased tolerance of maize to NaCl by enhancing SOD and CAT activities, chlorophyll contents, carotenoid and K concentrations in leaves, plant height, leaf area, and total dry weight at flowering stage significantly, compared to control. The Na/K ratio at salinity level of 10 dS m-1 in treatments inoculated with GIN and GM fungi decreased by 39.69 and 40.45 percentage, respectively. Increases plant height, leaf area, total dry weight, concentrations of chlorophyll a, b, chlorophyll a+b and carotenoid and K, the activity of antioxidant enzymes compared with the control. Moreover, GIN type fungi had a greater advantage over GM and reduced the negative effects of salinity. Results indicated that application of mycorrhiza alleviated the adverse effect of salinity stress and improve the sweet corn dry weight up to 38 percentage at salinity level of 10 dS m-1.

  12. Phenanthrene uptake by Medicago sativa L. under the influence of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Naiying; Huang Honglin; Zhang Shuzhen; Zhu Yongguan; Christie, Peter; Zhang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Phenanthrene uptake by Medicago sativa L. was investigated under the influence of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Inoculation of lucerne with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum L. resulted in higher phenanthrene accumulation in the roots and lower accumulation in the shoots compared to non-mycorrhizal controls. Studies on sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by roots and characterization of heterogeneity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots using solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 13 C NMR) demonstrated that increased aromatic components due to mycorrhizal inoculation resulted in enhanced phenanthrene uptake by the roots but lower translocation to the shoots. Direct visualization using two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) revealed higher phenanthrene accumulation in epidermal cells of roots and lower transport into the root interior and stem in mycorrhizal plants than in non-mycorrhizal controls. These results provide some insight into the mechanisms by which arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation may influence the uptake of organic contaminants by plants. - Colonization by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus promoted root uptake and decreased shoot uptake of phenanthrene by Medicago sativa L.

  13. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R. [Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Lab. de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, 62 - Calais (France)

    2005-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  14. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R.

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  15. Effects of phosphorus availability and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas on the carbon budget of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, K.F.; Bouma, T.J.; Lynch, J.P.; Eissenstat, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    Low phosphorus availability is often a primary constraint to plant productivity in native soils. Here we test the hypothesis that root carbon costs are a primary limitation to plant growth in low P soils by assessing the effect of P availability and mycorrhizal infection on whole plant C budgets in

  16. Dynamic of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM fungus in a Humic Dystrudepts sowed with corn Zea mays L. and Green Compost (GC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Vélez Zabala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Green Compost (GC have a positive impact on physical, chemical and biological properties of the soil, among them, the expression of the MA. In a Humic Dystrudepts in a mountainous area of Palmira (Valle five treatments were established: (T, fertilization of insdustrial chemical synthesis (FQ, green manure (AV, Compost (C and green manure compost (AVC, in a settlement of randomized complete blocks with three replications. As GC intermingled Canavalia ensiformis L. and Axonopus scoparius F., were harvested in prefloration of the legume, incorporated and became the first planting of corn, variety ICA V-354, monitored during 150 days, until time of fill of cob, when assessed length total external mycelium, LMET (Technical of the membrane filter method and the intercepted of Miller and Jastrow, that alive and active LMEV (succinate dehydrogenase, Hamel et al., 1990 and percentage of colonization by branch out manifold (Phillips and Hayman, 1980, described by Sieverding, 1983 and adapted for this crop, Sanchez et al. , 2010. The analysis of variance (SASR software version 9.1.3 showed that LMET, LMEV and % of branch out manifold showed highly significant differences between treatments. Greater LMET, coincided with increases in LMEV, colonization by branch out manifold and is presented in GC C, followed by AV, C and T, which did not vary among themselves, and, the lowest in CF. The coincidence of these three variables, would indicate that through LMET and especially, LMEV is absorbing and transporting P to the inside of the plants, and this supply, coinciding with higher % of colonization by branch out manifold, traces the path of the conjunction P in the soil-plantorganic fertilization, with their consequences on the economy of the agroecosystem and farmer.

  17. Hyphal growt and mycorrhiza formation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus claroideum BEG 23 is stimulated by humic substances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryndler, Milan; Hršelová, Hana; Sudová, Radka; Gryndlerová, Hana; Řezáčová, Veronika; Merhautová, Věra

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2005), s. 483-488 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188; GA ČR GA526/00/1276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : fulvic acid * humic acid * iron Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2005

  18. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on tomato yield and nutrient uptake under different fertilization levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudovít Nedorost

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the arbuscular mycorrhiza on tomato plants (Lycopersicon lycopersicum in the pot experiment was studied. Three different fertilization regimes (optimum – H1, stress a – H2, stress b - H3 and three different mycorrhizal treatments (control – Ctrl, Glomus mossae – Gm, Glomus intraradices – Gi were used. Economical parameter (yield, nutritional characteristic (vitamin C content, phosphates and minerals content, total antioxidant capacity, and level of root colonization were studied. The yield of the tomatoes was influenced by the basic dose of the fertilization, especially in the H2 and H3 treatment. The highest yield was in the H2 treatment in Gm (938 g per plant. The positive effect of the inoculation resulted in the increased content of the vitamin C. The highest significant influence was observed in the H2 treatment (plants inoculated with Gi with the average content of the vitamin C 289 mg.kg−1. The average rate of the colonization was in the range from 39 % to 65 %.

  19. Full establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice occurs independently of enzymatic jasmonate biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Siegler, Heike; Haga, Ken; Iino, Moritoshi; Paszkowski, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Development of the mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis between most land plants and fungi of the Glomeromycota is regulated by phytohormones. The role of jasmonate (JA) in AM colonization has been investigated in the dicotyledons Medicago truncatula, tomato and Nicotiana attenuata and contradicting results have been obtained with respect to a neutral, promotive or inhibitory effect of JA on AM colonization. Furthermore, it is currently unknown whether JA plays a role in AM colonization of monocotyledonous roots. Therefore we examined whether JA biosynthesis is required for AM colonization of the monocot rice. To this end we employed the rice mutant constitutive photomorphogenesis 2 (cpm2), which is deficient in JA biosynthesis. Through a time course experiment the amount and morphology of fungal colonization did not differ between wild-type and cpm2 roots. Furthermore, no significant difference in the expression of AM marker genes was detected between wild type and cpm2. However, treatment of wild-type roots with 50 μM JA lead to a decrease of AM colonization and this was correlated with induction of the defense gene PR4. These results indicate that JA is not required for AM colonization of rice but high levels of JA in the roots suppress AM development likely through the induction of defense.

  20. BIOFERTILIZATION WITH RHIZOBACTERIA AND A CONSORTIUM OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN CITRUS ROOTSTOCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gregorio Chiquito-Contreras

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofertilization of plants with rhizobacteria and vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae (mycorrhizal consortium, potentially promotes plant growth and health, and reduces the use of agrochemicals. The effect of individual and combined biofertilization with three strains of rhizobacteria and the mycorrhizal consortium (MTZ-1 was evaluated under nursery conditions on the growth of rootstocks of Citrus volkameriana and Rangpur lime grafted with Tahiti lime. Plants were inoculated individually and combined with the rhizobacteria strains FCA-8, FCA-56 and FCA-60 of Pseudomonas putida, and with MTZ-1; 50 % fertilization also was applied (18-46-00 N-P-K and compared with controls that received nursery management and 100 % fertilization. A split-plot experimental design with five replications per treatment was established. Individual and combined biofertilization with the three strains of bacteria and MTZ-1 positively promoted the growth of C. volkameriana, and Rangpur lime grafted with Tahiti lime, similar to the control with 100 % fertilization. The nutrient content of Tahiti lime leaves was similar to the control for both rootstocks. The presence of rhizobacterial and mycorrhizal populations in the combined biofertilization treatments demonstrated a positive synergism in the colonization of rootstock roots. Results demonstrate the potential of the three strains of P. putida and the MTZ-1 mycorrhizal consortium on the promotion of plant growth and assimilation of nutrients.

  1. Increase of multi-metal tolerance of three leguminous plants by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ai-Jun; Zhang, Xu-Hong; Wong, Ming-Hung; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Lou, Lai-Qing; Wang, You-Shan; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2007-12-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus mosseae on the growth and metal uptake of three leguminous plants (Sesbania rostrata, Sesbania cannabina, Medicago sativa) grown in multi-metal contaminated soil. AMF colonization increased the growth of the legumes, indicating that AMF colonization increased the plant's resistance to heavy metals. It also significantly stimulated the formation of root nodules and increased the N and P uptake of all of the tested leguminous plants, which might be one of the tolerance mechanisms conferred by AMF. Compared with the control, colonization by G. mosseae decreased the concentration of metals, such as Cu, in the shoots of the three legumes, indicating that the decreased heavy metals uptake and growth dilution were induced by AMF treatment, thereby reducing the heavy metal toxicity to the plants. The root/shoot ratios of Cu in the three legumes and Zn in M. sativa were significantly increased (P<0.05) with AMF colonization, indicating that heavy metals were immobilized by the mycorrhiza and the heavy metal translocations to the shoot were decreased.

  2. Growth responses of maritime sand dune plant species to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Tadych

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a greenhouse, the response of 6 plant species dominating in the succession of vegetation of a deflation hollow of the Łeba Bar to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was investigated. The inoculum was a mixture of soil, roots and spores of 5 species of AMF with the dominant species Glomus aggregatum. Except for Corynephorus canescens and Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria, both the growth and the dry matter of above-ground parts of plants of Agrostis stolonifera, Ammophila arenaria, Corynephorus canescens, Juncus articulatus and J. balticus inoculated with AMF were higher than those growing in soils lacking infection propagules of these fungi. Inoculation with AMF decreased the dry matter of root: shoot ratios in 5 plant species. This property was not determined in Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria due to the death of all control plants. The level of mycorrhizal infection was low and did not correlate with the growth responses found. The high growth reaction of Juncus spp. to AMF found in this study suggests that the opinion of non-mycotrophy or low dependence of plants of Juncaceae on AMF was based on results of investigations of plants growing in wet sites known to inhibit the formation of mycorrhizae.

  3. Colonization with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Promotes the Growth of Morus alba L. Seedlings under Greenhouse Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Morus alba L. is an important tree species planted widely in China because of its economic value. In this report, we investigated the influence of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF species, Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices, alone and together, on the growth of M. alba L. seedlings under greenhouse conditions. The growth parameters and physiological performance of M. alba L. seedlings were evaluated 90 days after colonization with the fungi. The growth and physiological performance of M. alba L. seedlings were significantly affected by the AMF species. The mycorrhizal seedlings were taller, had longer roots, more leaves and a greater biomass than the non-mycorrhizae-treated seedlings. In addition, the AMF species-inoculated seedlings had increased root activity and a higher chlorophyll content compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Furthermore, AMF species colonization increased the phosphorus and nitrogen contents of the seedlings. In addition, simultaneous root colonization by the two AMF species did not improve the growth of M. alba L. seedlings compared with inoculation with either species alone. Based on these results, these AMF species may be applicable to mulberry seedling cultivation.

  4. Transcriptional response of Medicago truncatula sulphate transporters to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with and without sulphur stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casieri, Leonardo; Gallardo, Karine; Wipf, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Sulphur is an essential macronutrient for plant growth, development and response to various abiotic and biotic stresses due to its key role in the biosynthesis of many S-containing compounds. Sulphate represents a very small portion of soil S pull and it is the only form that plant roots can uptake and mobilize through H(+)-dependent co-transport processes implying sulphate transporters. Unlike the other organically bound forms of S, sulphate is normally leached from soils due to its solubility in water, thus reducing its availability to plants. Although our knowledge of plant sulphate transporters has been growing significantly in the past decades, little is still known about the effect of the arbuscular mycorrhiza interaction on sulphur uptake. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur measurements in plant parts and expression analysis of genes encoding putative Medicago sulphate transporters (MtSULTRs) were performed to better understand the beneficial effects of mycorrhizal interaction on Medicago truncatula plants colonized by Glomus intraradices at different sulphate concentrations. Mycorrhization significantly promoted plant growth and sulphur content, suggesting increased sulphate absorption. In silico analyses allowed identifying eight putative MtSULTRs phylogenetically distributed over the four sulphate transporter groups. Some putative MtSULTRs were transcribed differentially in roots and leaves and affected by sulphate concentration, while others were more constitutively transcribed. Mycorrhizal-inducible and -repressed MtSULTRs transcripts were identified allowing to shed light on the role of mycorrhizal interaction in sulphate uptake.

  5. Full establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice occurs independently of enzymatic jasmonate biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gutjahr

    Full Text Available Development of the mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM symbiosis between most land plants and fungi of the Glomeromycota is regulated by phytohormones. The role of jasmonate (JA in AM colonization has been investigated in the dicotyledons Medicago truncatula, tomato and Nicotiana attenuata and contradicting results have been obtained with respect to a neutral, promotive or inhibitory effect of JA on AM colonization. Furthermore, it is currently unknown whether JA plays a role in AM colonization of monocotyledonous roots. Therefore we examined whether JA biosynthesis is required for AM colonization of the monocot rice. To this end we employed the rice mutant constitutive photomorphogenesis 2 (cpm2, which is deficient in JA biosynthesis. Through a time course experiment the amount and morphology of fungal colonization did not differ between wild-type and cpm2 roots. Furthermore, no significant difference in the expression of AM marker genes was detected between wild type and cpm2. However, treatment of wild-type roots with 50 μM JA lead to a decrease of AM colonization and this was correlated with induction of the defense gene PR4. These results indicate that JA is not required for AM colonization of rice but high levels of JA in the roots suppress AM development likely through the induction of defense.

  6. Modelling Spatial Interactions in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis using the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Calcagno

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM is the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Investigating this kind of symbiosis is considered one of the most promising ways to develop methods to nurture plants in more natural manners, avoiding the complex chemical productions used nowadays to produce artificial fertilizers. In previous work we used the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments (CWC to investigate different phases of the AM symbiosis. In this paper, we continue this line of research by modelling the colonisation of the plant root cells by the fungal hyphae spreading in the soil. This study requires the description of some spatial interaction. Although CWC has no explicit feature modelling a spatial geometry, the compartment labelling feature can be effectively exploited to define a discrete surface topology outlining the relevant sectors which determine the spatial properties of the system under consideration. Different situations and interesting spatial properties can be modelled and analysed in such a lightweight framework (which has not an explicit notion of geometry with coordinates and spatial metrics, thus exploiting the existing CWC simulation tool.

  7. Effect of the single and combined inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR in micropropagated blackberry plants (Rubus glaucus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urley Adrian Pérez Moncada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain blackberry seedlings of three ecotypes of blackberry (monterrico, sin espinas and castilla, from in vitro cultures inoculated individually and combined with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF Glomus sp. (GEV02 and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains of Pseudomonas migulae (Pf014 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (Bs006. The growth variables were aerial and root length (cm, leaf and root fresh and dry weight (g , root volume (cm3 and leaf area (cm2. The symbiotic variables were root colonization (% by the AMF. The results show a possible synergism between Glomus sp. (GEV02 and rhizobacteria evaluated in combination as these showed the highest values in all variables analyzed. Using the mixture of these organisms a better establishment, development and seedling vigor of default in the three ecotypes was observed, improving survival (≥80 % in the stages of hardening and acclimatization.

  8. Response of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    2Department of Botany, A.V.C. College (Autonomous), Mannampandal-609 305,. Mayiladuthurai, Tamil Nadu, India. E-mail: rmugam@gmail.com. ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Rhizobium and Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation, both individually and in combination on growth ...

  9. interaction between phosphorus fertilizer and arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    ABSTRACT. Field experiment was carried out in the Northern Guinea Savanna agro-ecology of Nigeria to examine the interaction between Phosphorus (P) fertilizer and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal. (AMF) inoculants on cassava yield components. The experiment was laid in a split plot design with P fertilizers as main plot ...

  10. Interaction of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus ( Glomus intraradices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research, the effect of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) inoculation (Glomus intraradices and Glomus etunicatum) on tomato plants growing in nutrient solution with high concentrations of copper were studied. Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth. In the present study, the effect of copper ...

  11. Responses of potatoes plants inoculated with arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pot experiment was set to examine the impact of the foliar litter (Hardwickia binata and Azadirachta indica) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the development of two varieties of potato plants (Aida, Atlas). Three litter doses (0, 25 and 50 g) were applied to the pots after bedding plantlets. The plants were ...

  12. Phosphorus Requirement for Colonization by Arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of phosphorus (P) concentrations on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization and growth of two perennial crops (Catha edulis and Ensete ventricosum) and four multipurpose agroforestry trees (Cordia africana, Croton macrostachyus, Erythrina brucei and ...

  13. Composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars as influenced by chemical fertilization and tillage in Cameroon. Didier Aime Boyogueno Begoude, Papa Saliou Sarr, Tatiana Laure Yondi Mpon, Didier Alexis Owona, Miraine Ndacnou Kapeua, Shigeru Araki ...

  14. Response of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect ofRhizobium and Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation, both individually and in combination on growth and chlorophyll content of economically important plant Vigna unguiculata L. A significant (p < 0.05) increase over control in root length (45.6 cm), shoot height ...

  15. Micorrizas arbusculares no crescimento de mudas de sabiá em um substrato proveniente da mineração de manganês

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaio Gráculo Vieira Garcia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available O manganês (Mn é considerado um micronutriente essencial às plantas, porém o seu excesso pode resultar em toxidez, causando clorose e necrose nas folhas. O uso de leguminosas inoculadas com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares tem se tornado uma importante estratégia do ponto de vista da remediação de áreas contaminadas com metais como é o caso do manganês. Neste sentido, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o crescimento de mudas de Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. inoculadas com micorrizas arbusculares sob condições de substrato esterilizado e natural proveniente de uma área de mineração de Mn do município de Ocara – CE. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, utilizando-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 4x2, considerando-se: quatro tratamentos de inoculação (controle não-inoculado, inoculado com Glomus clarum, inoculado com Glomus etunicatum e com a mistura dos dois fungos (Mix e duas condições de substrato (estéril e natural, com quatro repetições. As mudas de sabiá foram produzidas em bandeja de isopor, sendo transplantadas e inoculadas em vasos após treze dias da semeadura. Após trinta dias do transplantio foram realizadas avaliações de altura da parte áerea, diâmetro do colo, número de folíolos e porcentagem de sobrevivência. A inoculação com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares favoreceu o crescimento das mudas de sabiá em substrato da mineração de manganês, em condições naturais, principalmente quando se utilizou o Glomus etunicatum. No substrato esterilizado a inoculação com micorrizas arbusculares proporcionou a atenuação da toxidez de Mn nas mudas de sabiá favorecendo o crescimento das mesmas nestas condições.Arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth of sabiá seedlings on a substrate from the manganese miningAbstract: Manganese (Mn is considered an essential micronutrient to plants but its excess can result in toxicity causing chlorosis and necrosis on

  16. Community assembly and coexistence in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vályi, Kriszta; Mardhiah, Ulfah; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are asexual, obligately symbiotic fungi with unique morphology and genomic structure, which occupy a dual niche, that is, the soil and the host root. Consequently, the direct adoption of models for community assembly developed for other organism groups is not evident. In this paper we adapted modern coexistence and assembly theory to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We review research on the elements of community assembly and coexistence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, highlighting recent studies using molecular methods. By addressing several points from the individual to the community level where the application of modern community ecology terms runs into problems when arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are concerned, we aim to account for these special circumstances from a mycocentric point of view. We suggest that hierarchical spatial structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities should be explicitly taken into account in future studies. The conceptual framework we develop here for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is also adaptable for other host-associated microbial communities.

  17. Identification of two conserved cis-acting elements, MYCS and P1BS, involved in the regulation of mycorrhiza-activated phosphate transporters in eudicot species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqun; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Zhu, Lingling; Hong, Shuai; Xu, Guohua

    2011-03-01

    • In this study, six putative promoter regions of phosphate transporter Pht1;3, Pht1;4 and Pht1;5 genes were isolated from eggplant and tobacco using the inverse polymerase chain reaction (iPCR). The isolated sequences show evolutionary conservation and divergence within/between the two groups of Pht1;3 and Pht1;4/Pht1;5. • Histochemical analyses showed that all six promoter fragments were sufficient to drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression specifically in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tobacco roots and were confined to distinct cells containing AM fungal structures (arbuscules or intracellular hyphae). • A series of promoter truncation and mutation analyses combined with phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters revealed that at least two cis-regulatory elements--the mycorrhiza transcription factor binding sequence (MYCS) first identified in this study and P1BS--mediated the transcriptional activation of the AM-mediated inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter genes. Deletion or partial mutation of either of the two motifs in the promoters could cause a remarkable decrease, or even complete absence, of the promoter activity. • Our results propose that uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi) by AM fungi is regulated, at least partially, in an MYCS- and P1BS-dependent manner in eudicot species. Our finding offers new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordination between the AM and the Pi signalling pathways. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. The use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate fertilizers, in particular rock phosphate, in Venezuela: II. Monitoring mycorrhizas and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, E.; Salas, A.M.; Toro, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to quantify and isolate P solubilizing microorganisms (fungus and bacteria) from corn, sorghum and beans rhizosphere from El Sombrero soil, located in Guarico state, a very important agricultural area in Venezuela. Rhizospheric soil samples were taken from the crops in the field and taken to the laboratory to conduct a serial dilution procedure in specific medium culture to obtain pure cultures and isolate microorganisms according to their function. The spores of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) from the soils were reproduced using trap pots in the greenhouse and after 4-6 months a dilute soil sample was wet-sieved and decanted for isolation of AM spores which were used for classification and for obtaining native pure cultures. Finally, the infective potential of AM was determined by setting pots with test crops and determining the AM colonization and efficiency to produce potential infection in the root system. There were no differences in the total microflora in both crop rhizospheres but there was a tendency of higher values in the corn rhizosphere due to the root exudates. Two solubilizing fungi identified were Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus niger. (author)

  19. The Effects of Arbuscular-Mycorrhizal Fungi and Phosphorous on Arsenic Uptake by Sunflower Plant in Soils Spiked with Arsenite and Arsenate

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    Saeed Bagherifam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arsenic is a highly toxic metalloid in group 15 of periodic table. The information on environmental behaviour of arsenic, however, is still scarce. Contamination of soils and water with arsenic and antimony due to their widespread industrial application and mining activities has raised serious environmental concerns. Nearly all Arsenic-contaminated soils results from human activities and it has different environmental and sociological impacts. Various strategies and methods have been proposed for environmental management and remediation of contaminated soils. Among all methods, the phytoremediation is receiving more attention due to its cost effective and environmental friendly characteristics. In the case of arsenic contaminated soils, there are effective factors such as soil fertility, nutrients content and microorganisms function, which can improve the uptake of As by plants. Up to now, several studies have been evaluated the effects of symbiotic fungal association in plants on increasing nutrients and toxic elements uptake. Many of authors reported that the mycorrhizal symbiosis increases the uptake of toxic elements in root and shoot of plants and consequently improve the efficacy of phytostabilization and phytoextraction processes. There are conflicting results about the effect of arbuscular- mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on As uptake by various plants. Chen et al. (4 found that Glomus mosseae symbiosis with plant reduces As concentration and enhance phosphorus content in shoot and root of plant. Whilst Cozzolino et al. (7 reported that the AMF increases as concentration in shoot and root of cabbage. Phosphorus has important role on mycorrhizal symbiosis and also As uptake by plants. Therefore, current study was conducted to evaluated effect of Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae symbiosis with sunflower and also soil phosphorus concentration on uptake of arsenic from arsenite and arsenate contaminated soils. Materials and

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance both absorption and stabilization of Cd by Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in a Cd-contaminated acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Shengchun; Wu, Fuyong; Leung, Ho Man; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-10-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to compare the phytoextraction efficiencies of Cd by hyper-accumulating Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) and fast-growing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) from a Cd-contaminated (1.6 mg kg(-1)) acidic soil, and their responses to the inoculations of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal strains, Glomus caledonium 90036 (Gc) and Glomus mosseae M47V (Gm). Ryegrass and stonecrop were harvested after growing for 9 and 27 wk, respectively. Without AM fungal inoculation, the weekly Cd extraction by stonecrop (8.0 μg pot(-1)) was 4.3 times higher than that by ryegrass (1.5 μg pot(-1)). Both Gc and Gm significantly increased (P soil acid phosphatase activities, and available P concentrations, and thereby plant P absorptions (except for Gm-inoculated ryegrass), shoot biomasses, and Cd absorptions (except for Gm-inoculated stonecrop), while only Gc-inoculated stonecrop significantly accelerated (P soil pH. The results suggested the potential application of hyper-accumulating Alfred stonecrop associated with AM fungi (notably Gc) for both extraction and stabilization of Cd in the in situ treatment of Cd-contaminated acidic soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Cr(VI)-reducing Microbacterium sp. strain SUCR140 enhances growth and yield of Zea mays in Cr(VI) amended soil through reduced chromium toxicity and improves colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sumit K; Singh, Rakshapal; Awasthi, Ashutosh; Kalra, Alok

    2014-02-01

    Pot culture experiments were conducted in a glasshouse to evaluate the effects of four efficient Cr(VI)-reducing bacterial strains (SUCR44, SUCR140, SUCR186, and SUCR188) isolated from rhizospheric soil, and four arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF-Glomus mosseae, G. aggregatum, G. fasciculatum, and G. intraradices) alone or in combination, on Zea mays in artificially Cr(VI)-amended soil. Presence of a strain of Microbacterium sp. SUCR140 reduced the chromate toxicity resulting in improved growth and yields of plants compared to control. The bioavailability of Cr(VI) in soil and its uptake by the plant reduced significantly in SUCR140-treated plants; the effects of AMF, however, either alone or in presence of SUCR140 were not significant. On the other hand, presence of AMF significantly restricted the transport of chromium from root to the aerial parts of plants. The populations of AMF chlamydospores in soil and its root colonization improved in presence of SUCR140. This study demonstrates the usefulness of an efficient Cr(VI)-reducing bacterial strain SUCR140 in improving yields probably through reducing toxicity to plants by lowering bioavailability and uptake of Cr(VI) and improving nutrient availability through increased mycorrhizal colonization which also restricted the transport of chromium to the aerial parts.

  2. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and addition of composted olive-mill waste enhance plant establishment and soil properties in the regeneration of a heavy metal-polluted environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curaqueo, Gustavo; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Borie, Fernando; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in order to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation and the use of composted olive waste (COW) in the establishment of Tetraclinis articulata and soil properties in a heavy metal-polluted soil. The treatments assayed were as follows: AM + 0% COW, AM + 1% COW, and AM + 3% COW. The higher doses of COW in combination with AM fungi increased shoot and root biomass production of T. articulata by 96 and 60%, respectively. These treatments trended to improve the soil properties evaluated, highlighting the C compounds and N as well as the microbiological activities. In relation to the metal translocation in T. articulata, doses of COW applied decreased the Cr, Ni, and Pb contents in shoot, as well as Cr and As in root, although the most of them reached low levels and far from phytotoxic. The COW amendment aided Glomus mosseae-inoculated T. articulata plants to thrive in contaminated soil, mainly through an improvement in both nutrients uptake, mainly P and soil microbial function. In addition, the combined use of AM fungi plus COW could be a feasible strategy to be incorporated in phytoremediation programs because it promotes soil properties, a better performance of plants for supporting the stress in heavy metal-contaminated soils derived from the mining process, and also can be a good way for olive-mill waste disposal.

  3. The membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula roots displays qualitative and quantitative changes in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Cosette; Valot, Benoit; Guillier, Christelle; Mounier, Arnaud; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; van Tuinen, Diederik; Renaut, Jenny; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Recorbet, Ghislaine

    2014-08-28

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis that associates roots of most land plants with soil-borne fungi (Glomeromycota), is characterized by reciprocal nutritional benefits. Fungal colonization of plant roots induces massive changes in cortical cells where the fungus differentiates an arbuscule, which drives proliferation of the plasma membrane. Despite the recognized importance of membrane proteins in sustaining AM symbiosis, the root microsomal proteome elicited upon mycorrhiza still remains to be explored. In this study, we first examined the qualitative composition of the root membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula after microsome enrichment and subsequent in depth analysis by GeLC-MS/MS. The results obtained highlighted the identification of 1226 root membrane protein candidates whose cellular and functional classifications predispose plastids and protein synthesis as prevalent organelle and function, respectively. Changes at the protein abundance level between the membrane proteomes of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots were further monitored by spectral counting, which retrieved a total of 96 proteins that displayed a differential accumulation upon AM symbiosis. Besides the canonical markers of the periarbuscular membrane, new candidates supporting the importance of membrane trafficking events during mycorrhiza establishment/functioning were identified, including flotillin-like proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000875. During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, one of the most widespread mutualistic associations in nature, the endomembrane system of plant roots is believed to undergo qualitative and quantitative changes in order to sustain both the accommodation process of the AM fungus within cortical cells and the exchange of nutrients between symbionts. Large-scale GeLC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of the membrane fractions from mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots of M. truncatula coupled to spectral counting

  4. Morphological and molecular characterization of selected Ramaria mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhra, Eduardo R; Horton, Thomas R; Cazares, Efren; Castellano, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Ramaria species are conspicuous mycorrhizal symbionts of conifers in the Pacific Northwest. Here we collected and identified sporocarps and associated ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria acrisiccescens Marr & Stuntz, R. cyaneigranosa Marr & Stuntz, R. sandaracina Marr & Stuntz, R. celerivirescens Marr & Stuntz, and R. flavobrunnescens var. aromatica Marr & Stuntz. An internal transcribed spacer (ITS)- restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern was observed for each of the Ramaria species and used as a diagnostic tool to support the identification of mycorrhizae occurring in mats below the sporocarps. We provide a description of ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria, which exhibit similar macro- and microscopic characteristics such as ramification pattern, coloration, abundance of mycelial strands and emanating hyphae, mantle morphology and chemical reactions of mantle and mycelial strands with KOH, FeSO4 and Melzer's reagent. Sequences of the ITS region for each of the species are deposited in the GenBank.

  5. Metal content in fruit-bodies and mycorrhizas of Pisolithus arrhizus from zinc wastes in Poland

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    Katarzyna Turnau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pisolithus arrhizus has been selected for investigation as one of the ectomycorrhizal species most resistant to stress factors. Metal content in fruit-bodies and mycorrhizas was estimated to evaluate their role as bioindicators and to check whether mycorrhizas have any special properties for heavy metal accumulation. Fruit-bodies and mycorrhizas were collected from zinc wastes in Katowice-Wełnowiec and analyzed using conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy accompanying scanning electron microscopy. Differences in tendencies to accumulate metals within sporophores and mycorrhizas were found. The fruit-bodies accumulated Al (up to 640 µg g-1, while high concentrations of Al, Zn, Fe, Ca and Si were noted in the outer mantle of the mycorrhizas. in the material secreted and in the mycelium wali. The content of elements varied depending on the agę of mycorrhizas. The ability of extramatrical mycelium and hyphae forming mycorrhizal mantle to immobilize potentially toxic elements might indicate biofiltering properties though thc next step should include investigations on ability of the fungus to prevent element uptake by the plant.

  6. Succession of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a deflation hollow of the Słowiński National Park, Poland

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    Mariusz Tadych

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the years 1994-1995, the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM in eight successional stages of vegetation of a deflation hollow no. 12 of the Łeba Bar, Poland, was investigated. Early successional stages were colonized by members of the families Gramineae and Juncaceae, being gradually replaced by ericaceous plants in the middle and later stages and by trees in the most advanced stage corresponding to the Empetro nigri-Pinetum plant association. From the 96 soil samples collected, 21 species in three genera of AMF were recovered. The fungi most frequently found were members of the genus Acaulospora. The overall spore abundance, the species_ richness of AMF and the level of AM colonisation increased from stage 1 to reach a maximum in the middle stages and then gradually declined, being lowest in the forested stage 8. The values of the overall spore abundance and those of the abundances of the most frequently occurring AMF species strongly evidenced functioning in nature of the process of host-dependent differentiation of AMF communities. Of the five most numerously represented AMF species, the early colonizer and quickly diminishing in later successional stages was Glomus 107. The mid-late successor was A. koskei, and the latest - Glomus aggregatum. All measures of AMF presence negatively correlated with the content of organic C in the soil and most of them were negatively correlated with soil N-NO3 and P concentrations. In contrast, the occurrence of AMY and AM generally was positively correlated with soil pH and the K content of the soil.

  7. Mosaic genome of endobacteria in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Transkingdom gene transfer in an ancient mycoplasma-fungus association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Ghignone, Stefano; Bonfante, Paola; Schüßler, Arthur

    2015-06-23

    For more than 450 million years, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have formed intimate, mutualistic symbioses with the vast majority of land plants and are major drivers in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. The obligate plant-symbiotic AMF host additional symbionts, so-called Mollicutes-related endobacteria (MRE). To uncover putative functional roles of these widespread but yet enigmatic MRE, we sequenced the genome of DhMRE living in the AMF Dentiscutata heterogama. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses showed that MRE form a previously unidentified lineage sister to the hominis group of Mycoplasma species. DhMRE possesses a strongly reduced metabolic capacity with 55% of the proteins having unknown function, which reflects unique adaptations to an intracellular lifestyle. We found evidence for transkingdom gene transfer between MRE and their AMF host. At least 27 annotated DhMRE proteins show similarities to nuclear-encoded proteins of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis, which itself lacks MRE. Nuclear-encoded homologs could moreover be identified for another AMF, Gigaspora margarita, and surprisingly, also the non-AMF Mortierella verticillata. Our data indicate a possible origin of the MRE-fungus association in ancestors of the Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. The DhMRE genome encodes an arsenal of putative regulatory proteins with eukaryotic-like domains, some of them encoded in putative genomic islands. MRE are highly interesting candidates to study the evolution and interactions between an ancient, obligate endosymbiotic prokaryote with its obligate plant-symbiotic fungal host. Our data moreover may be used for further targeted searches for ancient effector-like proteins that may be key components in the regulation of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis.

  8. Ectomycorrhizal fungi and exogenous auxins influence root and mycorrhiza formation of Scots pine hypocotyl cuttings in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, K; Vuorinen, T; Ernstsen, A; Häggman, H

    2002-12-01

    We studied the ability of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch and Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr. (Strain H), to produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and to affect the formation and growth of roots on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) hypocotyl cuttings in vitro. Effects of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and the auxin transport inhibitor, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), on rooting and the cutting-fungus interaction were also studied. Both fungi produced IAA in the absence of exogenous tryptophan, but the mycelium and culture filtrate of Pisolithus tinctorius contained higher concentrations of free and conjugated IAA than the mycelium and culture filtrate of Paxillus involutus. Inoculation with either fungus or short-term application of culture filtrate of either fungus to the base of hypocotyl cuttings enhanced root formation. Inoculation with either fungus was even more effective in enhancing root formation than treatment of the hypocotyl bases with IBA. Fungal IAA production was not directly correlated with root formation, because rooting was enhanced more by Paxillus involutus than by Pisolithus tinctorius. This suggests that, in addition to IAA, other fungal components play an important role in root formation. Treatment with 5 microM TIBA increased the rooting percentage of non-inoculated cuttings, as well as of cuttings inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius, perhaps as a result of accumulation of IAA at the cutting base. However, the marked reduction in growth of Pisolithus tinctorius in the presence of TIBA suggests that the effects of TIBA on rooting are complicated and not solely related to IAA metabolism. The high IAA-producer, Pisolithus tinctorius, formed mycorrhizas, and the IBA treatment increased mycorrhizal frequency in this species, whereas TIBA decreased it. Paxillus involutus did not form mycorrhizas, indicating that a low concentration of IAA together with other fungal components were sufficient to stimulate

  9. The effect of potassium and mycorrhiza on growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrew

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    I GEDE TIRTA

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The few and shallow roots caused slow growth of vanilla seedling. Mycorrhiza may increased the absorption of water and nutrients, while potassium may increased the rate of growth and strength of seedlings. This study was conducted at Sambangan Village, Buleleng, Bali in 2003 (April-Agustus 2003. The experiment was done in polybag and was arranged in Randomized Block Design with three replications. The treatments were consisted of two factors. The first factor was the rates of KCl fertilizer ( 0, 100 and 200 kg ha-1 or 0, 0,10 and 0,20 9 plant-1 and the second factor was the rates of mycorrhiza (0, 20 and 30 g plant-1. The aim of the research to study interactions between potassium and mycorrhiza and The optimum dosage the mycorrhiza on growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrew. The resultes showed that there were interactions between potassium and mycorrhiza on fresh weight of the new shoot, root length and fresh root weight. The optimum dosage of the mycorrhiza was 20 g plant-1 with new shoot fresh weight was 25.63 g plant-1. The longest root (24.67 cm plant-1 was observed at the treatment without potasium with 20 g plant-1 mycorrhiza and this was 23% longer than control (19.93 cm plant-1. The highest fresh root weight (2.48 g plant-1 was observed at the dosage of 200 kg KCl ha-1 and 20 g mycorrhiza plant-1 and that was 55% heavier than control (1.60 g plant-1. The leaf number of the plant with 20 g plant-1 mycorrhiza was 6.22 and that was 18% more than control with leaf number 5.25. The total fresh weight of the seedling with 20 g plant-1 mycorrhiza was 86.74 g plant-1or 15% higher compared with control (75.18 g plant-1. The dosage of 100 kg KCl ha-1 increased the K content of the plant (2.45%K or 35% higher than control (1.81%K.

  10. The Role of Mycorrhiza in Drought Tolerance of Marigold (Calendula officinalis L.

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    Sh. Moghadasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis and drought stress on marigold, a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three replications was conducted at the Plant Research Laboratory of Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur branch in 2014. The first factor consisted of application and non-application of mycorrhiza (Glomus intraradices and the second factor consisted of drought stress with three levels (irrigation based on 100%, 75% and 50% of field capacity. The results showed that growth parameters like plant height, leaf number, leaf area, root, shoot dry/fresh weight, Chla and Chlb content were significantly decreased by drought stress in both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. However, inoculation of plants by mycorrhizal fungus increased growth parameters and photosynthetic pigments as compared with non-mycorrhizal ones. Traits like RWC, potassium and phosphorus in response to drought stress were decreased. Inoculation of plant roots with Mycorrhizal fungi increased significantly RWC, potassium and phosphorus content of the plants under drought conditions as compared with non-inoculated plants. The results also showed the mycorrhizal symbiosis by Glomus intraradices improved drought tolerance of marigold through enhancing the absorption of water and mineral ions.

  11. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Modulates Antioxidant Response and Ion Distribution in Salt-Stressed Elaeagnus angustifolia Seedlings

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    Wei Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Elaeagnus angustifolia L. is a drought-resistant species. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is considered to be a bio-ameliorator of saline soils that can improve salinity tolerance in plants. The present study investigated the effects of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the biomass, antioxidant enzyme activities, and root, stem, and leaf ion accumulation of E. angustifolia seedlings grown during salt stress conditions. Salt-stressed mycorrhizal seedlings produced greater root, stem, and leaf biomass than the uninoculated stressed seedlings. In addition, the seedlings colonized by R. irregularis showed notably higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX in the leaves of the mycorrhizal seedlings in response to salinity compared to those of the non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Mycorrhizal seedlings not only significantly increased their ability to acquire K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, but also maintained higher K+:Na+ ratios in the leaves and lower Ca2+:Mg2+ ratios than non-mycorrhizal seedlings during salt stress. These results suggest that the salt tolerance of E. angustifolia seedlings could be enhanced by R. irregularis. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis could be a promising method to restore and utilize salt-alkaline land in northern China.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots during Development of the Prepenetration Apparatus1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Valeria; Genre, Andrea; Balestrini, Raffaella; Cappellazzo, Gilda; deWit, Pierre J.G.M.; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Information on changes in the plant transcriptome during early interaction with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is still limited since infections are usually not synchronized and plant markers for early stages of colonization are not yet available. A prepenetration apparatus (PPA), organized in epidermal cells during appressorium development, has been reported to be responsible for assembling a trans-cellular tunnel to accommodate the invading fungus. Here, we used PPAs as markers for cell responsiveness to fungal contact to investigate gene expression at this early stage of infection with minimal transcript dilution. PPAs were identified by confocal microscopy in transformed roots of Medicago truncatula expressing green fluorescent protein-HDEL, colonized by the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita. A PPA-targeted suppressive-subtractive cDNA library was built, the cDNAs were cloned and sequenced, and, consequently, 107 putative interaction-specific genes were identified. The expression of a subset of 15 genes, selected by reverse northern dot blot screening, and five additional genes, potentially involved in PPA formation, was analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and compared with an infection stage, 48 h after the onset of the PPA. Comparison of the expression profile of G. margarita-inoculated wild type and the mycorrhiza-defective dmi3-1 mutant of M. truncatula revealed that an expansin-like gene, expressed in wild-type epidermis during PPA development, can be regarded as an early host marker for successful mycorrhization. A putative Avr9/Cf-9 rapidly elicited gene, found to be up-regulated in the mutant, suggests novel regulatory roles for the DMI3 protein in the early mycorrhization process. PMID:17468219

  13. Assessing the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in semiarid shrublands dominated by Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Keith A; Smith, James F; White, Merlin M; Serpe, Marcelo D

    2014-05-01

    Variation in the abiotic environment and host plant preferences can affect the composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF) assemblages. This study analyzed the AMF taxa present in soil and seedlings of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis collected from sagebrush steppe communities in southwestern Idaho, USA. Our aims were to determine the AMF diversity within and among these communities and the extent to which preferential AMF-plant associations develop during seedling establishment. Mycorrhizae were identified using molecular methods following DNA extraction from field and pot culture samples. The extracted DNA was amplified using Glomeromycota specific primers, and identification of AMF was based on phylogenetic analysis of sequences from the large subunit-D2 rDNA region. The phylogenetic analyses revealed seven phylotypes, two within the Claroideoglomeraceae and five within the Glomeraceae. Four phylotypes clustered with known species including Claroideoglomus claroideum, Rhizophagus irregularis, Glomus microaggregatum, and Funneliformis mosseae. The other three phylotypes were similar to several published sequences not included in the phylogenetic analysis, but all of these were from uncultured and unnamed glomeromycetes. Pairwise distance analysis revealed some phylotypes with high genetic variation. The most diverse was the phylotype that included R. irregularis, which contained sequences showing pairwise differences up to 12 %. Most of the diversity in AMF sequences occurred within sites. The smaller genetic differentiation detected among sites was correlated with differences in soil texture. In addition, multiplication in pot cultures led to differentiation of AMF communities. Comparison of sequences obtained from the soil with those from A. tridentata roots revealed no significant differences between the AMF present in these samples. Overall, the sites sampled were dominated by cosmopolitan AMF taxa, and young seedlings of A. tridentata ssp

  14. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

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    Schrey Silvia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum. The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines. Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites.

  15. The arbuscular mycorrhizal status has an impact on the transcriptome profile and amino acid composition of tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvioli, Alessandra; Zouari, Inès; Chalot, Michel; Bonfante, Paola

    2012-03-27

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is the most widespread association between plant roots and fungi in natural and agricultural ecosystems. This work investigated the influence of mycorrhization on the economically relevant part of the tomato plant, by analyzing its impact on the physiology of the fruit. To this aim, a combination of phenological observations, transcriptomics (Microarrays and qRT-PCR) and biochemical analyses was used to unravel the changes that occur on fruits from Micro-Tom tomato plants colonized by the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. Mycorrhization accelerated the flowering and fruit development and increased the fruit yield. Eleven transcripts were differentially regulated in the fruit upon mycorrhization, and the mycorrhiza-responsive genes resulted to be involved in nitrogen and carbohydrate metabolism as well as in regulation and signal transduction. Mycorrhization has increased the amino acid abundance in the fruit from mycorrhizal plants, with glutamine and asparagine being the most responsive amino acids. The obtained results offer novel data on the systemic changes that are induced by the establishment of AM symbiosis in the plant, and confirm the work hypothesis that AM fungi may extend their influence from the root to the fruit.

  16. Fine root productivity and turnover of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizaltree species in a temperate broad-leaved mixed forest

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    Petra Kubisch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Advancing our understanding of tree fine root dynamics is of high importance for tree physiology and forest biogeochemistry. In temperate broad-leaved forests, ectomycorrhizal (EM and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM tree species often are coexisting. It is not known whether EM and AM trees differ systematically in fine root dynamics and belowground resource foraging strategies. We measured fine root productivity (FRP and fine root turnover (and its inverse, root longevity of three EM and three AM broad-leaved tree species in a natural cool-temperate mixed forest using ingrowth cores and combined the productivity data with data on root biomass per root orders. FRP and root turnover were related to root morphological traits and aboveground productivity.FRP differed up to twofold among the six coexisting species with larger species differences in lower horizons than in the topsoil. Root turnover varied up to fivefold among the species with lowest values in Acer pseudoplatanus and highest in its congener A. platanoides. Variation in root turnover was larger within the two groups than between EM and AM species. We conclude that the main determinant of fine root productivity and turnover in this mixed forest is species identity, while the influence of mycorrhiza type seems to be less important.

  17. Impact of two fluorescent pseudomonads and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on tomato plant growth, root architecture and P acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamalero, Elisa; Trotta, Antonio; Massa, Nadia; Copetta, Andrea; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Berta, Graziella

    2004-07-01

    The ability of fluorescent pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to promote plant growth is well documented but knowledge of the impact of pseudomonad-mycorrhiza mixed inocula on root architecture is scanty. In the present work, growth and root architecture of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Guadalete), inoculated or not with Pseudomonas fluorescens 92rk and P190r and/or the AMF Glomus mosseae BEG12, were evaluated by measuring shoot and root fresh weight and by analysing morphometric parameters of the root system. The influence of the microorganisms on phosphorus (P) acquisition was assayed as total P accumulated in leaves of plants inoculated or not with the three microorganisms. The two bacterial strains and the AMF, alone or in combination, promoted plant growth. P. fluorescens 92rk and G. mosseae BEG12 when co-inoculated had a synergistic effect on root fresh weight. Moreover, co-inoculation of the three microorganisms synergistically increased plant growth compared with singly inoculated plants. Both the fluorescent pseudomonads and the myco-symbiont, depending on the inoculum combination, strongly affected root architecture. P. fluorescens 92rk increased mycorrhizal colonization, suggesting that this strain is a mycorrhization helper bacterium. Finally, the bacterial strains and the AMF, alone or in combination, improved plant mineral nutrition by increasing leaf P content. These results support the potential use of fluorescent pseudomonads and AMF as mixed inoculants for tomato and suggest that improved tomato growth could be related to the increase in P acquisition.

  18. Communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi detected in forest soil are spatially heterogeneous but do not vary throughout the growing season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, John; Öpik, Maarja; Zobel, Martin; Vasar, Martti; Metsis, Madis; Moora, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Despite the important ecosystem role played by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), little is known about spatial and temporal variation in soil AMF communities. We used pyrosequencing to characterise AMF communities in soil samples (n = 44) from a natural forest ecosystem. Fungal taxa were identified by BLAST matching of reads against the MaarjAM database of AMF SSU rRNA gene diversity. Sub-sampling within our dataset and experimental shortening of a set of long reads indicated that our approaches to taxonomic identification and diversity analysis were robust to variations in pyrosequencing read length and numbers of reads per sample. Different forest plots (each 10 × 10 m and separated from one another by 30 m) contained significantly different soil AMF communities, and the pairwise similarity of communities decreased with distance up to 50 m. However, there were no significant changes in community composition between different time points in the growing season (May-September). Spatial structure in soil AMF communities may be related to the heterogeneous vegetation of the natural forest study system, while the temporal stability of communities suggests that AMF in soil represent a fairly constant local species pool from which mycorrhizae form and disband during the season.

  19. Heart of endosymbioses: transcriptomics reveals a conserved genetic program among arbuscular mycorrhizal, actinorhizal and legume-rhizobial symbioses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tromas

    Full Text Available To improve their nutrition, most plants associate with soil microorganisms, particularly fungi, to form mycorrhizae. A few lineages, including actinorhizal plants and legumes are also able to interact with nitrogen-fixing bacteria hosted intracellularly inside root nodules. Fossil and molecular data suggest that the molecular mechanisms involved in these root nodule symbioses (RNS have been partially recycled from more ancient and widespread arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis. We used a comparative transcriptomics approach to identify genes involved in establishing these 3 endosymbioses and their functioning. We analysed global changes in gene expression in AM in the actinorhizal tree C. glauca. A comparison with genes induced in AM in Medicago truncatula and Oryza sativa revealed a common set of genes induced in AM. A comparison with genes induced in nitrogen-fixing nodules of C. glauca and M. truncatula also made it possible to define a common set of genes induced in these three endosymbioses. The existence of this core set of genes is in accordance with the proposed recycling of ancient AM genes for new functions related to nodulation in legumes and actinorhizal plants.

  20. Morphological characterization of the mycorrhiza formed by Helianthemum almeriense Pau with Terfezia claveryi Chatin and Picoa lefebvrei (Pat.) Maire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, A; Morte, A; Honrubia, M

    2003-12-01

    This work presents the first anatomical description of the mycorrhizal systems of Helianthemum almeriense, and of the structure and ultrastructure of the mycorrhizae formed by this plant species with the ascomycetes Terfezia claveryi and Picoa lefebvrei. Four different mycorrhizal systems are described, the club-shaped mycorrhiza being the most abundant. The type of mycorrhiza formed depended on the mycorrhiza culture conditions, but not on the fungal species. For both fungal species, H. almeriense formed an endomycorrhiza in natural field conditions, an ecto- and ectendomycorrhiza without a sheath in pot cultures, and an ectomycorrhiza with a characteristic sheath and Hartig net in in vitro cultures. This is the first report of a typical sheath in Helianthemum-desert truffle mycorrhizal associations. The results support the idea that culture conditions can induce changes in mycorrhiza morphology and that there is no clear barrier between the two main types of mycorrhiza organization in Helianthemum species. The ultrastructural study confirmed the regular presence of T. claveryi intracellular hyphae in direct contact with the host wall, a localization which seems to be a characteristic of the T. claveryi mycorrhiza organization. The P. lefebvrei mycorrhiza organization was characterized by intracellular hyphae with large amounts of electron-dense globules, probably with a lipidic content, and a warty ornamentation on the wall of the root external hyphae.

  1. Effect of mycorrhiza on growth criteria and phosphorus nutrition of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. under different phosphorus application rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fatih Ergin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effect of mycorrhiza on growth criteria and phosphorus nutrition of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. under different phosphorus fertilization rates were investigated. Phosphorus were added into growing media as 0, 50, 100 and 200 mg P2O5/kg with and without mycorrhiza applications. Phosphorus applications significantly increased yield criteria of lettuce according to the control treatment statistically. Mycorrhiza application also significantly increased plant diameter, plant dry weight and phosphor uptake by plant. The highest phosphorus uptakes by plants were determined in 200 mg P2O5/kg treatments as 88.8 mg P/pot with mycorrhiza and 83.1 mg P/pot without mycorrhiza application. In the control at 0 doses of phosphorus with mycorrhiza treatment, phosphorus uptake (69.9 mg P/pot, edible weight (84.36 g, dry weight (8.64 g and leaf number (28 of lettuce were higher than that (47.7 mg P/pot, 59.33 g, 6.75 g and 20, respectively in the control without mycorrhiza application. It was determined that mycorrhiza had positive effect on growth criteria and phosphorus nutrition by lettuce plant, and this effect decreased at higher phosphorus application rates.

  2. Growing poplars for research with and without mycorrhizas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eMüller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the importance of the genus Populus increased because the poplar genome has been sequenced and molecular tools for basic research are available. Furthermore, poplar species occur in different habitats and harbour large genetic variation, which can be exploited for economic applications and for increasing our knowledge on the basic molecular mechanisms of the woody life style. Poplars are, therefore, employed to unravel the molecular mechanisms of wood formation, stress tolerance, tree nutrition and interaction with other organisms such as pathogens or mycorrhiza. The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material. In this method paper we describe techniques and growth conditions for the in vitro propagation of different poplar species (Populus × canescens, P. trichocarpa, P. tremula and P. euphratica and ectomycorrhizal fungi (Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus as well as for their co-cultivation for ectomycorrhizal synthesis. Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media. Growth systems to cultivate poplars under axenic conditions in agar and sand cultures with and without mycorrhizal fungi are described. Transfer of the plants from in vitro to in situ conditions is critical and hardening is important to prevent high mortality. Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

  3. Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2015-12-28

    Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. Some of the fungal ABC transporter-encoding genes are also induced during the mycorrhiza formation. However, no experimental evidences of the direct involvement of fungal ABC transporters in this process are available so far. To facilitate the identification of fungal ABC proteins with a potential role in the establishment of the mycorrhizal symbiosis, we have performed an inventory of the ABC protein-encoding genes in the genomes of 25 species of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. We have identified, manually annotated and curated more than 1300 gene models of putative ABC protein-encoding genes. Out of those, more than 1000 models are predicted to encode functional proteins, whereas about 300 models represent gene fragments or putative pseudogenes. We have also performed the phylogenetic analysis of the identified sequences. The sets of ABC proteins in the mycorrhiza-forming species were compared to the related saprotrophic or plant-pathogenic fungal species. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of ABC genes in the genomes of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. Via comparison of transcriptomics data from different species, we have identified candidate groups of ABC transporters that might have a role in the process of the mycorrhiza formation. Results of our inventory will facilitate the identification of fungal transporters with a role in the mycorrhiza formation. We also provide the first data on ABC protein-coding genes for the phylum Glomeromycota and for orders Pezizales, Atheliales, Cantharellales and Sebacinales, contributing to

  4. Biofertilizers and sustainable agriculture: exploring arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igiehon, Nicholas O; Babalola, Olubukola O

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide agricultural food production has to double in 2050 so as to feed the global increasing population while reducing dependency on conventional chemical fertilizers plus pesticides. To accomplish this objective, there is the need to explore the several mutualistic interactions between plant roots and rhizosphere microbiome. Biofertilization is the process of boosting the abundance of microorganisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the natural plant rhizosphere which depicts a beneficial alternative to chemical fertilization practices. Mineral nutrients uptake by AMF are plausible by means of transporters coded for by different genes and example include phosphate transporter. These fungi can be produced industrially using plant host and these, including the possibility of AMF contamination by other microorganism, are factors militating against large scale production of AMF. AMF isolates can be inoculated in the greenhouse or field, and it has been shown that AMF survival and colonization level were enhanced in soybeans grown on land that was previously cultivated with the same plant. Next generation sequencing (NGS) is now used to gain insight into how AMF interact with indigenous AMF and screen for beneficial microbial candidates. Besides application as biofertilizers, novel findings on AMF that could contribute to maintenance of agricultural development include AMF roles in controlling soil erosion, enhancing phytoremediation, and elimination of other organisms that may be harmful to crops through common mycelia network. The combination of these potentials when fully harnessed under agricultural scenario will help to sustain agriculture and boost food security globally.

  5. Changes in mycorrhiza development in maize induced by crop management practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavito, M.E.; Miller, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    mays L.) or a non-host (canola, Brassica napus L.) crop, and all of them with maize for the second year. Tillage and P fertilization treatments were applied to the plots in the second year. Mycorrhiza development in maize was measured in pot culture bioassays conducted before planting and after harvest...... of the previous and the subsequent crops, and in the field during the second crop season. Previous cropping of a soil with canola (Brassica napus L.), a non-host plant species, delayed mycorrhiza development of maize in a bioassay conducted with that soil in comparison with a previous cropping cycle with maize...

  6. Host plant quality mediates competition between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegt, B.; Jansa, J.; Franken, O.; Engelmoer, D.J.P.; Werner, G.D.A.; Bücking, H.; Kiers, E.T.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi exchange soil nutrients for carbon from plant hosts. Empirical works suggests that hosts may selectively provide resources to different fungal species, ultimately affecting fungal competition. However, fungal competition may also be mediated by colonization strategies of

  7. Role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation of heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation of heavy metals and effects on growth and biochemical activities of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants in Zn contaminated soils. Sadia Kanwal, Asma Bano, Riffat Naseem Malik ...

  8. Communities, populations and individuals of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota are found globally in most vegetation types, where they form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots. Despite their wide distribution, only relatively few species are described. The taxonomy is based on morphological characters...

  9. Diversity and biogeography of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agricultural soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oehl, F.; Laczko, E.; Oberholzer, H.-R.; Jansa, Jan; Egli, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 7 (2017), s. 777-797 ISSN 0178-2762 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhizal * Agriculture * Biodiversity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.683, year: 2016

  10. Nuclear techniques to study the role of mycorrhiza in increasing food crop production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    A group of consultants, whose names are listed at the end of this publication were invited by the FAO/IAEA Division to Vienna from 16-20 November 1981 to review, together with the Division's staff, the state-of-the-art regarding Vascular-arbuscular-mycorrhizal symbiosis with various food crops, to assess the useful role of the association in food crop production, and to recommend inputs that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division could make to promote research which might lead to the exploitation of VAM for increased crop production. The reports presented at the meeting covered several topics, including the ecology of the VAM fungus, mechanism of VAM infection, factors affecting the establishment of an effective symbiosis with food crops, mechanisms for enhanced nutrient availability to mycorrhizal plants, increased tolerance of mycorrhizal plants to adverse environmental conditions, inoculum production and field inoculation procedures. These reports, together with the experimental plans and recommendations made at the meeting, are embodied in this unpriced Technical Document. Separate abstracts were prepared for the various presentations at this meeting

  11. Mutualistic mycorrhiza-like symbiosis in the most ancient group of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Claire P; Franks, Peter J; Rees, Mark; Bidartondo, Martin I; Leake, Jonathan R; Beerling, David J

    2010-11-02

    Over 35 years ago, it was hypothesized that mutualistic symbiotic soil fungi assisted land plants in their initial colonization of terrestrial environments. This important idea has become increasingly established with palaeobotanical and molecular investigations dating the interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and land plants to at least 400 Ma, but the functioning of analogous partnerships in 'lower' land plants remains unknown. In this study, we show with multifactorial experiments that colonization of a complex thalloid liverwort, a member of the most ancient extant clade of land plants, with AMF significantly promotes photosynthetic carbon uptake, growth and asexual reproduction. Plant fitness increased through fungal-enhanced acquisition of phosphorus and nitrogen from soil, with each plant supporting 100-400 m of AMF mycelia. A simulated CO(2)-rich atmosphere, similar to that of the Palaeozoic when land plants originated, significantly amplified the net benefits of AMF and likely selection pressures for establishment of the symbiosis. Our analyses provide essential missing functional evidence supporting AMF symbionts as drivers of plant terrestrialization in early Palaeozoic land ecosystems.

  12. Relation of soil nutrients and light to prevalence of mycorrhizae on pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward Hacskaylo; Albert G., Jr. Snow

    1959-01-01

    Odd relationships abound among the wonders of Nature. Just as men keep cows, some ants herd aphids. The bee pays Nature for its food by pollinating the flower. One symbiotic relationship that concerns foresters is the coupling of tree roots with certain fungi to form compound structures, part tree root and part fungus mycelium, which we call mycorrhizae.

  13. Soil Structure and Mycorrhizae Encourage Black Walnut Growth on Old Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Jr. Ponder

    1979-01-01

    Examination of black walnut seedlings grown in forest and field soils showed all root systems were infected with mycorrhizae; the amount of infection was influenced by treatments. Mean height and dry weight of tops and roots were greater for seedlings grown in forest than field soil. Seedling height growth was not increased by disturbing either soil; but, root dry...

  14. Effect of mycorrhiza symbiosis on the Nacl salinity in Sorghum bicolor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... Effect of mycorrhiza symbiosis on the Nacl salinity in. Sorghum bicolor. Ghanbar Laei*, M. H. Khajehzadeh, Hossein Afshari, Abdol Ghaffar Ebadi and Hossein. Abbaspour. Department of Agricultural Sciences, Damghan branch, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran. Accepted 19 May, 2011. In order to ...

  15. Molecular Identification of Mycorrhizae of Cymbidium kanran (Orchidaceae) on Jeju Island, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Won; Suh, Hyoungmin; Kim, Oh Hong; Lee, Nam Sook

    2015-12-01

    A fungal internal transcribed spacer region was used to identify the mycorrhizae of Cymbidium kanran. The family Russulaceae was found to be the most frequently occurring group in both root and soil samples. In phylogenetic analyses, the majority of the Russulaceae clones were clustered with Russula brevipes and R. cyanoxantha. Therefore, C. kanran may form symbiotic relationships with the genus Russula.

  16. Ondergrondse communicatie: de driehoeksrelatie gastheerplant, parasitaire plant en mycorrhiza-schimmel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlen, W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    De ontdekking van strigolactonen laat zien dat planten op grote schaal ondergronds communiceren. Planten produceren die strigolactonen niet om te communiceren met de parasitaire planten, maar met de mycorrhiza schimmels en mogelijk ook andere voor de plant nuttige organismen. De parasitaire planten

  17. Impact of soil salinity on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biodiversity and microflora biomass associated with Tamarix articulata Vahll rhizosphere in arid and semi-arid Algerian areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencherif, Karima; Boutekrabt, Ammar; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Fréderic; Dalpè, Yolande; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj

    2015-11-15

    Soil salinization is an increasingly important problem in many parts of the world, particularly under arid and semi-arid areas. Unfortunately, the knowledge about restoration of salt affected ecosystems using mycorrhizae is limited. The current study aims to investigate the impact of salinity on the microbial richness of the halophytic plant Tamarix articulata rhizosphere. Soil samples were collected from natural sites with increasing salinity (1.82-4.95 ds.m(-1)). Six arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species were isolated from the different saline soils and identified as Septoglomus constrictum, Funneliformis mosseae, Funneliformis geosporum, Funneliformis coronatum, Rhizophagus fasciculatus, and Gigaspora gigantea. The number of AMF spores increased with soil salinity. Total root colonization rate decreased from 65 to 16% but remained possible with soil salinity. Microbial biomass in T. articulata rhizosphere was affected by salinity. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) C16:1ω5 as well as i15:0, a15:0, i16:0, i17:0, a17:0, cy17:0, C18:1ω7 and cy19:0 increased in high saline soils suggesting that AMF and bacterial biomasses increased with salinity. In contrast, ergosterol amount was negatively correlated with soil salinity indicating that ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungal biomasses were reduced with salinity. Our findings highlight the adaptation of arbuscular and bacterial communities to natural soil salinity and thus the potential use of mycorrhizal T. articulata trees as an approach to restore moderately saline disturbed arid lands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Desenvolvimento Vegetativo e morfologia radicular de citrange carrizo afetado por ácido indolbutírico e micorrizas arbusculares Vegetative development and root morphology of carrizo citrange affected by indolebutyric acid and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vitor Dutra de Souza

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo foi realizado na localidade de Alcanar (Tarragona, Espanha e objetivou avaliar o efeito de cinco concentrações do ácido indolbutírico (AIB (0,0; 0,5; 1,0; 1,5; 2,0 g/L e da inoculação com micorrizas arbusculares (MA (Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith sobre o desenvolvimento vegetativo, conteúdo foliar de P e K e morfologia radicular de plântulas de citrange Carrizo (Citrus sinensis (L. X Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf.. Utilizou-se o delineamento experimental de blocos completos casualisados em esquema fatorial, com 4 repetições e 10 plantas por parcela. A aplicação de AIB não alterou o desenvolvimento vegetativo das plântulas cultivadas em ausência de MA, apesar de haver incrementado a quantidade de P e K e a espessura dos feixes vasculares. As MA incrementaram o conteúdo de P foliar. Encontrou-se uma interação positiva entre o AIB e as MA, pois as plântulas micorrizadas apresentaram um incremento no desenvolvimento vegetativo, nos conteúdos foliares de P e K e na espessura dos feixes vasculares com o aumento das concentrações de AIB.This study was carried out in Alcanar (Tarragona - Spain to evaluate the effect of five indolebutyric acid (IBA concentrations (0.0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0 g/L and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF (Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith on Carrizo citrange (Citrus sinensis (L. x Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf. vegetative development, P and K foliar contents and root morphology. The experimental design was in a Completly Randomized Block Design with 10 seedlings per plot and 4 replicates. The IBA concentrations had no effect on vegetative development of nonmycorrhizal seedlings, althougt it had increased P and K foliar contents and primary xylem tickness. AMF increased P foliar content. IBA x AMF interaction was observed, increasing IBA concentrations on mycorrhizal seedlings resulted in increased in vegetative development, P and K foliar contents and primary xylem thickness.

  19. Mycorrhizae Alter Toxin Sequestration and Performance of Two Specialist Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Meier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multitrophic species interactions are shaped by both top-down and bottom-up factors. Belowground symbionts of plants, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, can alter the strength of these forces by altering plant phenotype. For example, AMF-mediated changes in foliar toxin and nutrient concentrations may influence herbivore growth and fecundity. In addition, many specialist herbivores sequester toxins from their host plants to resist natural enemies, and the extent of sequestration varies with host plant secondary chemistry. Therefore, by altering plant phenotype, AMF may affect both herbivore performance and their resistance to natural enemies. We examined how inoculation of plants with AMF influences toxin sequestration and performance of two specialist herbivores feeding upon four milkweed species (Asclepias incarnata, A. curassavica, A. latifolia, A. syriaca. We raised aphids (Aphis nerii and caterpillars (Danaus plexippus on plants for 6 days in a fully factorial manipulation of milkweed species and level of AMF inoculation (zero, medium, and high. We then assessed aphid and caterpillar sequestration of toxins (cardenolides and performance, and measured defensive and nutritive traits of control plants. Aphids and caterpillars sequestered higher concentrations of cardenolides from plants inoculated with AMF across all milkweed species. Aphid per capita growth rates and aphid body mass varied non-linearly with increasing AMF inoculum availability; across all milkweed species, aphids had the lowest performance under medium levels of AMF availability and highest performance under high AMF availability. In contrast, caterpillar survival varied strongly with AMF availability in a plant species-specific manner, and caterpillar growth was unaffected by AMF. Inoculation with AMF increased foliar cardenolide concentrations consistently among milkweed species, but altered aboveground biomasses and foliar phosphorous concentrations in a plant

  20. Transcriptomes of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and litchi host interaction after tree girdling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eShu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trunk girdling can increase carbohydrate content above the girdling site and is an important strategy for inhibiting new shoot growth to promote flowering in cultivated litchi (Litchi chinenis Sonn.. However, girdling inhibits carbohydrate transport to the root in nearly all of the fruit development periods and consequently decreases root absorption. The mechanism through which carbohydrates regulate root development in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM remains largely unknown. Carbohydrate content, AM colonization, and transcriptome in the roots were analyzed to elucidate the interaction between host litchi and AM fungi when carbohydrate content decreases. Girdling decreased glucose, fructose, sucrose, quebrachitol and starch contents in the litchi mycorrhizal roots, thereby reducing AM colonization. RNA-seq achieved approximately 60 million reads of each sample, with an average length of reads reaching 100 bp. Assembly of all the reads of the 30 samples produced 671,316 transcripts and 381,429 unigenes, with average lengths of 780 and 643 bp, respectively. Litchi (54,100 unigenes and AM fungi unigenes (33,120 unigenes were achieved through sequence annotation during decreased carbohydrate content. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG showed that flavonoids, alpha-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid are the main factors that regulate AM colonization in litchi. However, flavonoids may play a role in detecting the stage at which carbohydrate content decreases; alpha-linolenic acid or linoleic acid may affect AM formation under the adaptation process. Litchi trees stimulated the expression of defense-related genes and downregulated symbiosis signal-transduction genes to inhibit new AM colonization. Moreover, transcription factors of the AP2, ERF, Myb, WRKY, bHLH families, and lectin genes altered maintenance of litchi mycorrhizal roots in the post-symbiotic stage for carbohydrate starvation. Similar to those of the litchi host, the E3 ubiquitin

  1. Transcriptomes of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Litchi Host Interaction after Tree Girdling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bo; Li, Weicai; Liu, Liqin; Wei, Yongzan; Shi, Shengyou

    2016-01-01

    Trunk girdling can increase carbohydrate content above the girdling site and is an important strategy for inhibiting new shoot growth to promote flowering in cultivated litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.). However, girdling inhibits carbohydrate transport to the root in nearly all of the fruit development periods and consequently decreases root absorption. The mechanism through which carbohydrates regulate root development in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) remains largely unknown. Carbohydrate content, AM colonization, and transcriptome in the roots were analyzed to elucidate the interaction between host litchi and AM fungi when carbohydrate content decreases. Girdling decreased glucose, fructose, sucrose, quebrachitol, and starch contents in the litchi mycorrhizal roots, thereby reducing AM colonization. RNA-seq achieved approximately 60 million reads of each sample, with an average length of reads reaching 100 bp. Assembly of all the reads of the 30 samples produced 671,316 transcripts and 381,429 unigenes, with average lengths of 780 and 643 bp, respectively. Litchi (54,100 unigenes) and AM fungi unigenes (33,120 unigenes) were achieved through sequence annotation during decreased carbohydrate content. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that flavonoids, alpha-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid are the main factors that regulate AM colonization in litchi. However, flavonoids may play a role in detecting the stage at which carbohydrate content decreases; alpha-linolenic acid or linoleic acid may affect AM formation under the adaptation process. Litchi trees stimulated the expression of defense-related genes and downregulated symbiosis signal-transduction genes to inhibit new AM colonization. Moreover, transcription factors of the AP2, ERF, Myb, WRKY, bHLH families, and lectin genes altered maintenance of litchi mycorrhizal roots in the post-symbiotic stage for carbohydrate starvation. Similar to those of the litchi host, the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex

  2. A Mycorrhizal-Specific Ammonium Transporter from Lotus japonicus Acquires Nitrogen Released by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guether, Mike; Neuhäuser, Benjamin; Balestrini, Raffaella; Dynowski, Marek; Ludewig, Uwe; Bonfante, Paola

    2009-01-01

    In mycorrhizal associations, the fungal partner assists its plant host by providing nitrogen (N) in addition to phosphate. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have access to inorganic or organic forms of N and translocate them via arginine from the extra- to the intraradical mycelium, where the N is transferred to the plant without any carbon skeleton. However, the molecular form in which N is transferred, as well as the involved mechanisms, is still under debate. NH4+ seems to be the preferential transferred molecule, but no plant ammonium transporter (AMT) has been identified so far. Here, we offer evidence of a plant AMT that is involved in N uptake during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The gene LjAMT2;2, which has been shown to be the highest up-regulated gene in a transcriptomic analysis of Lotus japonicus roots upon colonization with Gigaspora margarita, has been characterized as a high-affinity AMT belonging to the AMT2 subfamily. It is exclusively expressed in the mycorrhizal roots, but not in the nodules, and transcripts have preferentially been located in the arbusculated cells. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant complementation has confirmed its functionality and revealed its dependency on acidic pH. The transport experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes indicated that, unlike other plant AMTs, LjAMT2;2 transports NH3 instead of NH4+. Our results suggest that the transporter binds charged ammonium in the apoplastic interfacial compartment and releases the uncharged NH3 into the plant cytoplasm. The implications of such a finding are discussed in the context of AM functioning and plant phosphorus uptake. PMID:19329566

  3. Lead accumulation by jabon seedling (Anthocephalus cadamba) on tailing media with application of compost and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningsih, L.; Setiadi, Y.; Budi, S. W.; Hamim; Sopandie, D.

    2017-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the dangerous heavy metal contained in tailing that needs remediation activity. This study aimed to investigate the potency of jabon to take up and accumulate lead in its tissue by the application of compost and arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF) on pot observation. In Pb-containing tailing media, the average levels of Pb in roots seedling was 50% greater as compared to the levels of Pb in the stem and leaves of seedlings. Application of compost in tailings media significantly increased (p ≤ 0.5) the average levels of Pb in the roots and stems, but decreased Pb levels in leaves. Applications AMF significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.5) the average levels of Pb in the roots, stem and leaves of seedlings by approximately 18-33%. The combination applications of compost and AMF significantly (p ≤ 0.5) increased the level of Pb in the roots, stems and leaves of seedlings at 6, 16 and 27 fold respectively than that in control plant (without compost and AMF). After 12 weeks exposure, lead bioconcentration factor varied from 0.1-1.6 in seedling tissue with transport factor varied from 0.1-1.0. The application of active compost and AMF increased 1-15 fold lead accumulation from control, and the biggest accumulation was 452.9 x10-2 mg/plant with Pb concentration of 1.5 mM. Active compost and AMF application supported jabon seedling to act as lead phytostabilizer and to remove lead from the tailing to the above part of the plant.

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Pseudomonas in reduce drought stress damage in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.): a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Saeedeh; Pirzad, Alireza

    2017-08-01

    Drought stress, which is one of the most serious world environmental threats to crop production, might be compensated by some free living and symbiotic soil microorganisms. The physiological response of flax plants to inoculation with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Funneliformis mosseae or Rhizophagus intraradices) and a phosphate solubilizing bacterium (Pseudomonas putida P13; PSB) was evaluated under different irrigation regimes (irrigation after 60, 120, and 180 mm of evaporation from Class A pan as well-watered, mild, and severe stress, respectively). A factorial (three factors) experiment was conducted for 2 years (2014-2015) based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at Urmia University, Urmia, located at North-West of Iran (37° 39' 24.82″ N44° 58' 12.42″ E). Water deficit decreased biomass, showing that flax was sensitive to drought, and AM root colonization improved the performance of the plant within irrigation levels. In all inoculated and non-inoculated control plants, leaf chlorophyll decreased with increasing irrigation intervals. Water deficit-induced oxidative damage (hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde, and electrolyte leakage) were significantly reduced in dual colonized plants. All enzymatic (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (glutathione, ascorbic acid, total carotenoids) antioxidants were reduced by water-limiting irrigation. Dual inoculated plants with AM plus Pseudomonas accumulated more enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants than plants with bacterial or fungal inoculation singly. Dual colonized plants significantly decreased the water deficit-induced glycine betaine and proline in flax leaves. These bacterial-fungal interactions in enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense of flax plants demonstrated equal synergism with both AM fungi species. In conclusion, increased activity of enzymatic antioxidants and higher production of non

  5. 134Cs in heather seed plants grown with and without mycorrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, M.; Johansson, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine differences between mycorrhized and non-mycorrhized seed plants of heather, Calluna vulgaris(L)Hull, as regards the uptake of 134 Cs. In most treatments heather with mycorrhiza had a significantly higher transfer of 134 Cs to the shoots than heather without mycorrhiza. As an average the concentration of 134 Cs was 18% higher in the mycorrhized plants than in the non-mycorrhized. Application of 10 kg K/ha reduced the concentration of 134 Cs in shoots of heather by 49% as an average. Because of improved growth in the potassium fertilized pots the reduction viewed on the basis of the area was only 33%. Nitrogen application does not significantly influence the concentration of 134 Cs in shoots of heather regardless of mycorrhizal status. (Copyright (c) 1988 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. The intracellular delivery of TAT-aequorin reveals calcium-mediated sensing of environmental and symbiotic signals by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatiello, Roberto; Sello, Simone; Novero, Mara; Negro, Alessandro; Bonfante, Paola; Navazio, Lorella

    2014-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is an ecologically relevant symbiosis between most land plants and Glomeromycota fungi. The peculiar traits of AM fungi have so far limited traditional approaches such as genetic transformation. The aim of this work was to investigate whether the protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein, previously shown to act as a potent nanocarrier for macromolecule delivery in both animal and plant cells, may translocate protein cargoes into AM fungi. We evaluated the internalization into germinated spores of Gigaspora margarita of two recombinant TAT fusion proteins consisting of either a fluorescent (GFP) or a luminescent (aequorin) reporter linked to the TAT peptide. Both TAT-fused proteins were found to enter AM fungal mycelia after a short incubation period (5-10 min). Ca2+ measurements in G. margarita mycelia pre-incubated with TAT-aequorin demonstrated the occurrence of changes in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration in response to relevant stimuli, such as touch, cold, salinity, and strigolactones, symbiosis-related plant signals. These data indicate that the cell-penetrating properties of the TAT peptide can be used as an effective strategy for intracellularly delivering proteins of interest and shed new light on Ca2+ homeostasis and signalling in AM fungi. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. New insights into the regulation of aquaporins by the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in maize plants under drought stress and possible implications for plant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárzana, Gloria; Aroca, Ricardo; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between modulation by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) of aquaporin expression in the host plant and changes in root hydraulic conductance, plant water status, and performance under stressful conditions is not well known. This investigation aimed to elucidate how the AM symbiosis modulates the expression of the whole set of aquaporin genes in maize plants under different growing and drought stress conditions, as well as to characterize some of these aquaporins in order to shed further light on the molecules that may be involved in the mycorrhizal responses to drought. The AM symbiosis regulated a wide number of aquaporins in the host plant, comprising members of the different aquaporin subfamilies. The regulation of these genes depends on the watering conditions and the severity of the drought stress imposed. Some of these aquaporins can transport water and also other molecules which are of physiological importance for plant performance. AM plants grew and developed better than non-AM plants under the different conditions assayed. Thus, for the first time, this study relates the well-known better performance of AM plants under drought stress to not only the water movement in their tissues but also the mobilization of N compounds, glycerol, signaling molecules, or metalloids with a role in abiotic stress tolerance. Future studies should elucidate the specific function of each aquaporin isoform regulated by the AM symbiosis in order to shed further light on how the symbiosis alters the plant fitness under stressful conditions.

  8. Improvement of Verticillium Wilt Resistance by Applying Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to a Cotton Variety with High Symbiotic Efficiency under Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Xinpeng; Ren, Yanyun; Ding, Xinhua; Qiu, Jiajia; Li, Ning; Zeng, Fanchang

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an important role in nutrient cycling processes and plant stress resistance. To evaluate the effect of Rhizophagus irregularis CD1 on plant growth promotion (PGP) and Verticillium wilt disease, the symbiotic efficiency of AMF (SEA) was first investigated over a range of 3% to 94% in 17 cotton varieties. The high-SEA subgroup had significant PGP effects in a greenhouse. From these results, the highest-SEA variety of Lumian 1 was selected for a two-year field assay. Consistent with the performance from the greenhouse, the AMF-mediated PGP of Lumian 1 also produced significant results, including an increased plant height, stem diameter, number of petioles, and phosphorus content. Compared with the mock treatment, AMF colonization obviously inhibited the symptom development of Verticillium dahliae and more strongly elevated the expression of pathogenesis-related genes and lignin synthesis-related genes. These results suggest that AMF colonization could lead to the mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR) of Lumian 1 to V. dahliae. Interestingly, our results indicated that the AMF endosymbiont could directly inhibit the growth of phytopathogenic fungi including V. dahliae by releasing undefined volatiles. In summary, our results suggest that stronger effects of AMF application result from the high-SEA. PMID:29342876

  9. Colonization of native Andean grasses by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Puna: a matter of altitude, host photosynthetic pathway and host life cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Mónica A; Negritto, María A; Jofré, Mariana; Anton, Ana; Galetto, Leonardo

    2012-08-01

    The relationships of altitude, host life cycle (annual or perennial) and photosynthetic pathway (C(3) or C(4) ) with arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) root colonization were analysed in 35 species of Andean grasses. The study area is located in north-western Argentina along altitudinal sites within the Puna biogeographical region. Twenty-one sites from 3320 to 4314 m were sampled. Thirty-five grasses were collected, and the AM root colonization was quantified. We used multivariate analyses to test emerging patterns in these species by considering the plant traits and variables of AM colonization. Pearson's correlations were carried out to evaluate the specific relationships between some variables. Most grasses were associated with AM, but the colonization percentages were low in both C(3) and C(4) grasses. Nevertheless, the AM root colonization clearly decreased as the altitude increased. This distinctive pattern among different species was also observed between some of the populations of the same species sampled throughout the sites. An inverse relationship between altitude and AM colonization was found in this Southern Hemisphere Andean system. The effect of altitude on AM colonization seems to be more related to the grasses' photosynthetic pathway than to life cycles. This study represents the first report for this biogeographical region. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of in planta-expressed arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal proteins upon comparison of the root proteomes of Medicago truncatula colonised with two Glomus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recorbet, Ghislaine; Valot, Benoît; Robert, Franck; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane

    2010-07-01

    In the absence of sequenced genomes for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, their obligatory biotrophy makes their intra-radical biology especially recalcitrant to functional analyses. Because tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics enables fungal gene product identifications in phyla lacking genomic information, we have compared as a way to enlarge the coverage of in planta expressed-mycorrhiza-related proteins, the root proteome responses of Medicago truncatula upon colonisation with two AM fungi, Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices, using two-dimensional electrophoresis. In contrast to phosphate fertilization, mycorrhization led to specific changes in the abundance of 99 spots, including 42 overlapping modifications between G. mosseae- and G. intraradices-colonised roots. The 32 confident identifications that could be retrieved following tandem mass spectrometry encompassed 21 fungal proteins whose homology-inferred functions were found to complement the working models so far proposed for the intra-radical functioning of AM fungi with regard to carbon utilization, energy generation, redox homeostasis and protein turnover-related processes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution by two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to P uptake by cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) from 32P-labelled organic matter during mineralization in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joner, E.J.; Jakobsen, I.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment was set up to investigate the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) in utilization of P from organic matter during mineralization in soil. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) inoculated with one of two AM fungi or left uninoculated were grown for 30 days in cross-shaped PVC pots. One of two...... horizontal compartments contained 100 g soil (quartz sand : clay loam, 1:1) with 0.5 g ground clover leaves labelled with P-32. The labelled soil received microbial inoculum without AM fungi to ensure mineralization of the added organic matter. The labelling compartment was separated from a central root...... compartment by either 37 mu m or 700 mu m nylon mesh giving only hyphae or both roots and hyphae, respectively, access to the labelled soil. The recovery of P-32 from the hyphal compartment was 5.5 and 8.6 % for plants colonized with Glomus sp. and G. caledonium, respectively, but only 0.6 % for the non...

  12. Dipterocarps and Mycorrhiza. An ecological adaptation and a factor in forest regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, W.Th.M.

    1983-01-01

    Each dipterocarp has its own species of fungus, forming an ectomycorrhiza. From literature and experiments (in East Kalimantan and in vitro) ecological consequences are explored. These help explain the clumping of dipterocarp trees in the forest, the lack of hybrids, the poor dispersal, and speciation as dependent on the viability of the root-fungus combination on a particular soil type. Mycorrhizas are located in the top soil. They are extremely sensitive to increase of soil temperatures as ...

  13. Identification of genes and proteins involved in the regulation of orchid mycorrhiza

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Borges da Silva Valadares

    2014-01-01

    Orchids are characterized by producing minute endosperm-lacking seeds, which depend on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and embryo development. Some aclorophyllous orchids remain dependent on the mycorrhizal association for carbon acquisition during their whole life history, whereasother orchids develop photosynthesis. Despite the biological significance of orchid mycorrhiza, gene expression studies are lacking. We have used different highthroughput approaches in order to understanding the m...

  14. Trade-Offs in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis: Disease Resistance, Growth Responses and Perspectives for Crop Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine N. Jacott

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need to develop high-yielding, disease-resistant crops and reduce fertilizer usage. Combining disease resistance with efficient nutrient assimilation through improved associations with symbiotic microorganisms would help to address this. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF form symbiotic relationships with most terrestrial plants, resulting in nutritional benefits and the enhancement of stress tolerance and disease resistance. Despite these advantages, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM interactions are not normally directly considered in plant breeding. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms of AM symbiosis comes from model plants, which typically exhibit positive growth responses. However, applying this knowledge to crops has not been straightforward. In many crop plants, phosphate uptake and growth responses in AM-colonized plants are variable, with AM plants exhibiting sometimes zero or negative growth responses and lower levels of phosphate acquisition. Host plants must also balance the ability to host AMF with the ability to resist pathogens. Advances in understanding the plant immune system have revealed similarities between pathogen infection and AM colonization that may lead to trade-offs between symbiosis and disease resistance. This review considers the potential trade-offs between AM colonization, agronomic traits and disease resistance and highlights the need for translational research to apply fundamental knowledge to crop improvement.

  15. Can Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Reduce the Growth of Agricultural Weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Rita S. L.; Jansa, Jan; Frossard, Emmanuel; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between −22 and −35%). In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species – Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum – and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum). Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize) enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field conditions. PMID

  16. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce the growth of agricultural weeds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita S L Veiga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between -22 and -35%. In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species--Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum--and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum. Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field

  17. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce the growth of agricultural weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Rita S L; Jansa, Jan; Frossard, Emmanuel; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between -22 and -35%). In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species--Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum--and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum). Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize) enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field conditions.

  18. Dicty_cDB: FC-BN21 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available library MtBC from arbuscular mycorrhiza of cultivar Jemalong of Medicago truncat...BC26G02 of cDNA library MtBC from arbuscular mycorrhiza of cultivar Jemalong of Medicago truncatula (barrel

  19. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the 'rust' lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-04-22

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the 'rust' lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants.

  20. A.B. Frank and mycorrhizae: the challenge to evolutionary and ecologic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, James M

    2005-06-01

    A. B. Frank's observations and hypotheses about mycorrhizae in 1885 flew in the face of conventional thinking of the time. He reported that what we now term ectomycorrhizae were widespread on root systems of many woody plant species in a great diversity of habitats and soils. He hypothesized that mycorrhizae represent a pervasive mutualistic symbiosis in which fungus and host nutritionally rely on each other; that the fungus extracts nutrients from both mineral soil and humus and translocates them to the tree host; and that the tree, in turn, nourishes the fungus. Initially opposed by much of the scientific community, nearly all of Frank's major hypotheses have since been unequivocally demonstrated, although many decades were required to achieve conclusive evidence. Nonetheless, the revolution in thinking about plant and fungal evolution, ecology and physiology generated by Frank is still in the process of acceptance by much of the scientific community, 120 years and tens of thousands of scientific papers since he coined the term "mycorrhiza". The reasons for this extraordinary lag time in themselves present an intriguing research subject.

  1. Rendimento de massa seca e absorção de fósforo pelo milho afetado pela aplicação de fósforo, calcário e inoculação com fungos micorrízicos Dry matter of corn and phosphorus uptake as affected by liming, rates of phosphorus, and mycorrhizae inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Pires Santos

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available A colonização do sistema radicular com micorrizas pode aumentar a absorção de P e com isto aumentar o crescimento das plantas, o que parece ser mais comum em solos com baixa disponibilidade de P. No presente trabalho, a inoculação com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMA, objetivou avaliar seu efeito na morfologia do sistema radicular, na produção de massa seca e na absorção de fósforo pelo milho. Utilizou-se o latossolo bruno argiloso, e os tratamentos consistiram de dois valores de pH (4,8 e 5,5, duas doses de fósforo (25 e 100mg P/kg de solo e inoculação com FMA. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação com cinco repetições, distribuídas no delineamento experimental completamente casualisado. Aos 46 dias após a emergência as plantas foram colhidas, e nelas determinou-se a produção de massa seca de parte aérea e de raízes, o comprimento e o raio médio radicular. a porcentagem e intensidade de colonização micorrízica e a absorção de fósforo. A inoculação com FMA aumentou a CM mas não afetou a produção de massa seca e absorção de fósforo pelo milho, embora as raízes mostrassem menor comprimento, indicando que as hifas extraradiculares compensaram o crescimento radicular. A adição de fósforo e a elevação do pH aumentaram a massa seca da parte aérea e raízes, a absorção de fósforo e o comprimento radicular.The existence of mycorrhiza in the plant roots may increase phosphorus uptake and thus crop yield. This effect, however, seems to occur only in phosphorus deficient soils. The objetive of this work was to evaluate the effect of soil pH, rates of phosphorus addition, and mycorrhiza inoculation on dry matter yield of corn and on phosphorus uptake. The experiment was run in a greenhouse, using an oxisol, with five replicates per treatment distributed in a completely randomized experimental design. The treatments, a 2x2x2 factorial, were two rates of phosphorus (25 and 100mg P/kg, two p

  2. Does the sequence of plant dominants affect mycorrhiza development in simulated succession on spoil banks?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Rydlová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 302, 1-2 (2008), s. 273-282 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * plant succession * spoil banks Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.998, year: 2008

  3. Studies on arbuscular mycorrhisation of papaya | Khade | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carica papaya L. is known to exhibit a strong growth response to colonisation by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; yet it is generally believed that mycorrhizal growth effects are primarily nutritionally mediated and are inversely related to improved soil fertility, especially available soil P, which affects the fungus symbiotic ...

  4. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... and positive in some applications (G.i + W50, G.i + W100), but the effects of soil pH, saltiness and CaCO3 content on both the colonization and sporulation are statistically insignificant. Key words: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF), whey, colonization, spore density. INTRODUCTION. The building and ...

  5. In vitro culture of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: advances and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ecologically important for most vascular plants for their growth and survival. AM fungi are obligate symbionts. In recent years, there have been many attempts to cultivate in vitro. Some relevant results indicate efforts are not far from successful growth of AM fungi independent of a plant ...

  6. Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... The symbiotic association between certain plants and microorganisms plays an important role in soil fertilization, and improves their growth and mineral nutrition. The symbiotic association between vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and roots provides a significant contribution to plant nutrition ...

  7. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on growth, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of our work was to assess the effect of inoculation with three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Rhizoglomus aggregatum (N.C. Schenck and G.S. Sm.) Sieverd., G.A. Silva and Oeh., Funneliformis mosseae (T.H. Nicolson and Gerd.) C. Walker and A. Schüssler. and Rhizoglomus intraradices (N.C. Schenck and ...

  8. Solanum cultivar responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in a sandy soil with a low available phosphorus to evaluate responsiveness of four Solanum aethiopicum cultivars to indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Results showed clear interaction between genetic variability of cultivars and fungal isolates on shoot biomass and on ...

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species associated with rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) diversity and date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) tree root colonization in arid areas was undertaken in ten palm groves located along the Ziz valley (Tafilalet, south-west Morocco). The frequency and the mean intensity of root colonization reached 72 and 43% respectively and ...

  10. What we know about arbuscular mycorhizal fungi and associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycorrhizal fungi are common soil microorganisms and are well known for their symbiotic association with the roots of host plants. The soil is a complex environment harbouring a wide diversity of microorganisms. The interaction between soil bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi has been shown in several studies to ...

  11. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi (Glomales) in Egypt. III: Distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roots and rhizospheric soils of 26 plant species belonging to 18 families representing five different habitats at El-Omayed Biosphere Reserve were collected and examined for arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) associations. Plant species recorded in the habitat of coastal sand dunes had the highest percentage of ...

  12. Composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with cassava

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... Composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars as influenced by chemical fertilization and tillage in Cameroon. Didier Aime Boyogueno BEGOUDE2, Papa Saliou SARR1*, Tatiana Laure Yondi MPON3, Didier Alexis. OWONA2, Miraine Ndacnou ...

  13. Seasonal and spatial distribution of roots and arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization (% of total roots length) was assessed after staining and observation under a compound microscope. Spores were extracted from soils by sucrose centrifugation and counted under the microscope. Root concentrations (cm per 100 g of dry soil) were greater on A. melliferathan on A. laeta ...

  14. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on resistance to Phytophthora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xp

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... found among citrus species in the percentage of root colonization by the AM fungi and in the severity of root rot disease ... Key words: Phytophthora parasitica, citrus, rootstock, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, root rot. INTRODUCTION ..... caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici by AMF Glomus.

  15. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Camellia sinensis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Camellia sinensis was conducted in four plantation territories of Uttarakhand. Microscopic analysis of the mycorrhizal status of roots has revealed that samples from all four locations belonged only to AM fungi. The mycorrhizal colonization level was found high thus ...

  16. Detection of species diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular-mycorhizal fungi (AMF) from melon plants grown in Van province, were studied by nested-PCR method to establish colonization ratio of related fungi in plants and to detect the fungi at species level. From 10 different locations, a total of 100 soil samples were taken from rhizosphere area of melon plants.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the growth of olive trees and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the growth of olive trees and their resistance to transplantation stress. ... This change in the root: shoot ratio permitted greater utilization of soil resources and strengthened the plant's capacity to resist transplantation shock and water stress. The abundance of the two fungi in the roots of ...

  18. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the rhizosphere of Coffea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study describes the status of mycorrhizal fungi in coffee (Coffea arabica) in the Yemeni ecosystems. Methodology and results: Soil samples were extracted from the rhizosphere of the coffee tree groves in several regions of Yemen. The frequency and the level of colonization of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi ...

  19. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on resistance to Phytophthora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xp

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... Thai honey tangerine (Sainamphueng tangerine) is generally grown by grafting on rootstocks of another variety of tangerine or citrus species which may differ in their reaction to beneficial and pathogenic soil organisms. The objectives of this study were to evaluate responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) ...

  20. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus to red kidney and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The researcher had investigated the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation in red idney and wheat in heavy metals tolerance in soil artificially contaminated with high oncentrations of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium. Metals accumulated by mycorrhizal wheat lants were mostly distributed in root tissues, suggesting ...

  1. Shoot- and root-borne cytokinin influences arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebeca Cosme, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is functionally important for the nutrition and growth of most terrestrial plants. Nearly all phytohormones are employed by plants to regulate the symbiosis with AM fungi, but the regulatory role of cytokinin (CK) is not well understood. Here, we used

  2. Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The symbiotic association between certain plants and microorganisms plays an important role in soil fertilization, and improves their growth and mineral nutrition. The symbiotic association between vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and roots provides a significant contribution to plant nutrition and growth.

  3. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to pearl millet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Land degradation may cause nutrient deficiencies for plant growth. These deficiencies can be partly compensated through plant association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi under the condition that the degradation status does not affect the symbiosis. We therefore investigated P and K uptake by millet [Pennisetum ...

  4. Interactive effects of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Legumes form a tripartite symbiosis with Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and rhizobia. Chickpea plants were inoculated with six strains of Mesorhizobium ciceri and three AMF species, Glomus intraradices (GI), G. mosseae (GM) and G. etunicatum (GE). The plants inoculated with a number of AMF species and bacterial ...

  5. Effectiveness of the application of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and organic amendments to improve soil quality and plant performance under stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azcón, R.; Medina, A.

    2010-01-01

    Plant growth is limited in arid and/or contaminated sites due to the adverse conditions coming from heavy metal (HM) contamination and/or water stress. Moreover, soils from these areas are generally characterised by poor soil structure, low water-holding capacity, lack of organic matter and nutrient

  6. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on Dry Matter and Concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium in Berseem Clover, by Cadmium stress

    OpenAIRE

    hashem aram; A. Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Soil contaminations with heavy metals represent a potential risk to the biosphere and leads to increased concentration in ground and surface water. Therefore metals mobility in soil has been extensively studied in the last decades. Use of agrochemicals such as synthetic fertilizers and pesticides has resulted in soil and water pollution, and loss of biodiversity. Cadmium is a heavy metal with a strong effect on crop quality. Moreover, it is a very mobile element in the environme...

  7. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus caledonium) on the accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize (Zea mays L.) and atrazine dissipation in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Honglin; Zhang Shuzhen; Shan Xiaoquan; Chen Baodong; Zhu Yongguan; Bell, J. Nigel B.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus caledonium) on accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize grown in soil contaminated with different concentrations of atrazine were investigated in a series of pot experiments. Roots of mycorrhizal plants accumulated more atrazine than non-mycorrhizal roots. In contrast, atrazine accumulation in shoot decreased in mycorrhizal compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. No atrazine derivatives were detected in the soil, either with or without mycorrhizal colonization. However, atrazine metabolites, deethylatrazine (DEA) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA), were detected in plant roots and the AM colonization enhanced the metabolism. After plant harvest atrazine concentrations decreased markedly in the soils compared to the initial concentrations. The decreases were the most in rhizosphere soil and then near-rhizosphere soil and the least in bulk soil. Mycorrhizal treatment enhanced atrazine dissipation in the near-rhizosphere and bulk soils irrespective of atrazine application rates. - Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus increases the accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize

  8. Uptake and speciation of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Lobinski, R.; Burger-Meyer, K.

    2006-01-01

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic...... in garlic. The selenium content in garlic, which was analysed by ICP-MS, showed that addition of mycorrhiza to the natural soil increased the selenium uptake by garlic tenfold to 15 mu g g(-1) (dry mass). Fertilisation with selenate and addition of mycorrhiza strongly increased the selenium content...... in garlic to around one part per thousand. The parallel analysis of the sample extracts by cation exchange and reversed-phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection showed that gamma-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine amounted to 2/3, whereas methylselenocysteine, selenomethionine and selenate each amounted to a few...

  9. Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D.H. (comp.)

    1990-12-01

    This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

  10. Effect of Inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with Mycorrhiza and Rhizobia on soil properties and microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assigbetsé, K.; Ciss, I.; Bakhoum, N.; Dieng, L.

    2012-04-01

    Inoculation of legume plants with symbiotic microorganisms is widely used to improve their development and productivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae, G. fasciculatum, G. intraradices) either singly or in combination, on soil properties, activity and the genetic structure of soil microbial communities. The experiment set up in Southern Senegal consisted of 4 randomized blocks of A. senegal mature trees with 4 treatments including inoculated trees with Rhizobium (R), mycorrhizal fungus (M) and with Rhizobium+mycorhizal fungus (RM) and non-inoculated control (CON). Soil were sampled 2 years after the inoculation. Soil pH, C and N and available P contents were measured. The microbial abundance and activity were measured in terms of microbial biomass C (MBC) and basal soil respiration. The community structure of the total bacterial, diazotrophic and denitrifying communities was assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA, nifH and nirK genes respectively. Inoculations with symbiont under field conditions have increased soil pH. The C and N contents were enhanced in the dual-inoculated treatments (RM). The mycorrhized treatment have displayed the lowest available P contents while RM and R treatments exhibited higher contents rates. The microbial biomass C rates were higher in treatments co-inoculated with AM fungi and Rhizobium than in those inoculated singly with AM fungi or Rhizobium strains. The basal soil respiration were positively correlated to MBC, and the highest rates were found in the co-inoculated treatments. Fingerprints of 16S rDNA gene exhibited similar patterns between inoculated treatments and the control showing that the inoculation of mature trees have not impacted the total bacterial community structure. In contrast, the inoculated treatments have displayed individually different

  11. Optical properties of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Adverdi; V-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rudamas, Carlos; Dreyer, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    It was already reported by B. Dreyer at al. [1] that all fungal structures, both intra- and extra-radical fluoresced under blue light excitation regardless of their state (dead or alive). The source of the so called autofluorescence appears to be localized in the fungal cell wall. This supports the use of photoluminescence for the evaluation of AM colonization. However, the interpretation of these results is still in discussion [1-4]. In this work, arbuscular mycorrhizal spores were isolated from the rhizosphere of mango (Mangifera indica L.) plants by the method of wet sieving and decanting of Gerdemann and Nicolson [5] and studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our experimental setup consists of an epifluorescence microscope (EM) coupled to a CCD-spectrometer through an arrangement of a home-made-telescope + fiber optic. This experimental setup allows the capture of images of the mycorrhizal structures (as usual in a standard epifluorescence microscope) combined with measurements of their corresponding emission bands. The preliminary results based on images obtained by standard EM do not clearly show that the emission is originated in the fungal cell walls as reported in Ref. 1. On the other hand, a very broad emission band in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum was observed in these spores by exciting at 450-490 nm and 300- 380 nm. We obtain a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of around 200 nm for this emission band whichis centered at 515 nm. This broad band seems to be composed of two narrower bands peaked around 494 and 547 nm and with FWHM of 50 nm and 150 nm, respectively. The profile of the observed emission band is in good agreement with the bands reported in Ref. 1 for vesicles, arbuscules and spores measured using the λ-Scan of a confocal laser scanning microscope. However, our results for spores show that the maxima of the narrower bands are shifted to higher energies in comparison to the corresponding bands observed in Ref. 1

  12. Induction of defense responses in common bean plants by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, G M; El-Haddad, S A; Hafez, E E; Rashad, Y M

    2011-05-20

    Interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as a bio-agent and Rhizoctonia root rot disease of common bean plant was investigated in this study under natural conditions in pot experiment. A mixture of Egyptian formulated AM (Multi-VAM) in suspension form (1 × 10(6) unit L(-1) in concentration) was used at dilution of 5 ml L(-1) water. The results demonstrated that colonization of bean plants with AM fungi significantly increased growth parameters, yield parameters and mineral nutrient concentrations and reduced the negative effects on these parameters as well as both disease severity and disease incidence. Different physical and biochemical mechanisms have been shown to play a role in enhancement of plant resistance against Rhizoctonia solani, namely, improved plant nutrition, improved plant growth, increase in cell wall thickening, cytoplasmic granulation, and accumulation of some antimicrobial substances (phenolic compounds and defense related enzymes). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Household Solid Waste on Initial Growth Performance of Acacia auriculiformis and Cedrela toona in Mycorrhiza Inoculated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Abdullah-Al-Mamun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid waste disposal and management became one of the major environmental concerns in Bangladesh. Realising the problem, the present study has been undertaken with a view to find a sound and effective way of bio-degradable solid waste management. The study was carried out in the nursery of Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences at University of Chittagong to determine the effects of solid waste and waste inoculated with mycorrhizal soil on initial growth performance of Acacia auriculiformis and Cedrela toona. Before planting the seedlings, decomposable waste and mycorrhiza inoculated decomposable waste were placed on the planting holes. Physical growth parameters of seedlings (shoot and root length, leaf and branch number, fresh and dry weight of shoot and root and nodulation status and the macro nutrients (N, P and K were recorded after six months of planting. The highest performance of physical parameters was recorded in the soil treated by mycorrhiza inoculated waste. Cedrela toona was represented by maximum nutrients uptake (N-2.60%, P-0.21% and K-2.34% respectively in the soil treated with mycorrhiza. In case of Acacia auriculiformis, N uptake was maximum (3.02% in control while K uptake was highest (1.27% in soil with waste and P (0.18% uptake was highest in the soil treated with mycorrhiza inoculated waste. Highest initial growth performance was revealed by seedlings treated with mycorrhiza inoculated waste. This study suggested to use mycorrhiza and waste for plantation purposes for hygienic disposal of solid waste and to reduce cost of cultivation.

  14. Application of Mycorrhiza and Soil from a Permaculture System Improved Phosphorus Acquisition in Naranjilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symanczik, Sarah; Gisler, Michelle; Thonar, Cécile; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Van der Heijden, Marcel; Kahmen, Ansgar; Boller, Thomas; Mäder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Naranjilla ( Solanum quitoense ) is a perennial shrub plant mainly cultivated in Ecuador, Colombia, and Central America where it represents an important cash crop. Current cultivation practices not only cause deforestation and large-scale soil degradation but also make plants highly susceptible to pests and diseases. The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can offer a possibility to overcome these problems. AMF can act beneficially in various ways, for example by improving plant nutrition and growth, water relations, soil structure and stability and protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the impact of AMF inoculation on growth and nutrition parameters of naranjilla has been assessed. For inoculation three European reference AMF strains ( Rhizoglomus irregulare , Claroideoglomus claroideum , and Cetraspora helvetica ) and soils originating from three differently managed naranjilla plantations in Ecuador (conventional, organic, and permaculture) have been used. This allowed for a comparison of the performance of exotic AMF strains (reference strains) versus native consortia contained in the three soils used as inocula. To study fungal communities present in the three soils, trap cultures have been established using naranjilla as host plant. The community structures of AMF and other fungi inhabiting the roots of trap cultured naranjilla were assessed using next generation sequencing (NGS) methods. The growth response experiment has shown that two of the three reference AMF strains, a mixture of the three and soil from a permaculture site led to significantly better acquisition of phosphorus (up to 104%) compared to uninoculated controls. These results suggest that the use of AMF strains and local soils as inoculants represent a valid approach to improve nutrient uptake efficiency of naranjilla and consequently to reduce inputs of mineral fertilizers in the cultivation process. Improved phosphorus acquisition after inoculation with

  15. Application of Mycorrhiza and Soil from a Permaculture System Improved Phosphorus Acquisition in Naranjilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Symanczik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Naranjilla (Solanum quitoense is a perennial shrub plant mainly cultivated in Ecuador, Colombia, and Central America where it represents an important cash crop. Current cultivation practices not only cause deforestation and large-scale soil degradation but also make plants highly susceptible to pests and diseases. The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can offer a possibility to overcome these problems. AMF can act beneficially in various ways, for example by improving plant nutrition and growth, water relations, soil structure and stability and protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the impact of AMF inoculation on growth and nutrition parameters of naranjilla has been assessed. For inoculation three European reference AMF strains (Rhizoglomus irregulare, Claroideoglomus claroideum, and Cetraspora helvetica and soils originating from three differently managed naranjilla plantations in Ecuador (conventional, organic, and permaculture have been used. This allowed for a comparison of the performance of exotic AMF strains (reference strains versus native consortia contained in the three soils used as inocula. To study fungal communities present in the three soils, trap cultures have been established using naranjilla as host plant. The community structures of AMF and other fungi inhabiting the roots of trap cultured naranjilla were assessed using next generation sequencing (NGS methods. The growth response experiment has shown that two of the three reference AMF strains, a mixture of the three and soil from a permaculture site led to significantly better acquisition of phosphorus (up to 104% compared to uninoculated controls. These results suggest that the use of AMF strains and local soils as inoculants represent a valid approach to improve nutrient uptake efficiency of naranjilla and consequently to reduce inputs of mineral fertilizers in the cultivation process. Improved phosphorus acquisition after inoculation with

  16. Availability of caesium radionuclides to plants - classification of soils and role of mycorrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drissner, J.; Buermann, W.; Enslin, F.; Heider, R.; Klemt, E.; Miller, R.; Schick, G.; Zibold, G.

    1998-01-01

    At different locations in spruce stands spread rather homogeneously over southern Baden-Wuerttemberg, samples of soil and plants were taken and the vertical distribution of the caesium radionuclides in the soil was studied. As a direct measure of the bioavailability, the aggregated transfer factor, T ag , was determined for fern, bilberry, raspberry, blackberry, and clover. The T ag (in m2 kg -1 ) is defined by the specific caesium activity (in Bq kg -1 ) of the dry mass of the plants, divided by the total inventory (in Bq m -2 ) of the soil. It varies between 0·5 and 0·001 m2kg -1 , being highest for fern and lowest for blackberry or clover at all sampling sites. Most decisive for the value of the T ag are kind of humus deposit, thickness and pH value of the humus layers. Also important are the soil properties, whereas geology has only a minor influence on T ag . At different sampling sites in spruce forests, the T ag can vary by two orders of magnitude for one plant species. Caesium desorption experiments were performed. We could not find a dependence of the transfer of caesium to the plant on the desorbability of caesium from the soil, which implies a more complex transport mechanism than simple ion exchange in the soil solution. It is suggested that the transport of caesium is mediated by mycorrhiza fungi. Therefore, we studied the density of mycorrhiza hyphae in the O f , O h and A h soil horizons of two sites differing in T ag by a factor of 10. The densities of mycorrhiza hyphae in the O h and A h soil horizons each differ by a factor of 2 for the two sites. Yet, the effect of the hyphae density on radiocaesium uptake has to be a subject of further investigation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Inoculum of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for production systems: science meets business

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gianinazzi, S.; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 82, - (2004), s. 1264-1271 ISSN 0008-4026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Inoculum production * mycorrhiza applications Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.194, year: 2004

  18. Changes in host-mycorrhiza relationships revealed by stable isotopes after naturally-induced thinning of the stand: case study on Tuber aestivum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Lauteri, Marco; Ciolfi, Marco; Chiocchini, Francesca; Paris, Pierluigi; Pisanelli, Andrea; Portarena, Silvia; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial plants overcome nutrients and water limitations by forming mutualistic associations with mycorrhizal fungi. Fungi, in return, take advantage from the carbohydrates supplied by the host. Some mycorrhizal fruit bodies, like that of Tuber spp., have a peculiar gastronomic value with many efforts being undertaken to predict and enhance their productivity. However, many issues of truffle-producing mycorrhizal ecology are still poorly understood, in particular optimal conditions favoring fruit formation, potential host plants and host-mycorrhiza relationships. In this study, we tested the applicability of stable isotope measurements under natural abundance to identify the plants which likely host the mycorrhiza of Tuber aestivum and to characterize host-mycorrhizal nutrient, water and carbohydrate exchange under plant natural growing conditions and with the change of the forest cover after naturally occurred thinning. For these purposes, sampling of the fruit bodies of T. aestivum was performed during the growing season 2011 in a mixed broadleaved-coniferous forest in central Italy (initially the site was a manmade pine plantation). Nine truffle-producing parcels were identified with five being composed of the original Pinus pinaster -dominated vegetation and four in which pine was replaced by broadleaf species after both wind-induced thinning and natural dieback of pine trees. Seasonal variation of δ13C, δ15N and δ18O were analyzed in the fungal material, in the surrounding soil and in the plant material of the potential host species (xylem water in the trunk, branches and leaves, recently assimilated carbohydrates in phloem and leaves). The results showed a possibility of the identification of the mycorrhizal host species applying isotope analyses, with mycorrhiza receiving most part of the carbohydrates from the pine in pine-dominated parcels. Interestingly, in thinned parcels, the truffle bodies maintained isotope composition similar to bodies gathered

  19. Efeito da mobilização do solo nas micorrizas arbusculares de cereais de Inverno Effects of soil management on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in autumn-sown crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Brito

    2007-01-01

    sua capacidade para gerar novas colonizações no período cultural. Com o objectivo de avaliar a diversidade dos Glomeromycota presentes no campo de ensaios em estudo, sujeito aos dois tipos de mobilização do solo (SD e MT, foi usada a técnica de amplificação de sequências de rDNA destes fungos a partir de DNA total do solo. Esta técnica permite uma avaliação abrangente, evitando a morosidade e complexidade da abordagem clássica através de culturas armadilha. No total foram analisadas 87 sequencias, provenientes de solo perturbado e não perturbado, e encontrados 11 tipos ribosomais. Considerando as diferenças de frequência dos tipos ribosomais presentes em cada tipo de solo, os resultados parecem confirmar que os fungos micorrízicos arbusculares são diferencialmente susceptíveis à perturbação do solo, não só em termos de diversidade como ao nível da estrutura da comunidade.Soil tillage may markedly reduce the rate of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM establishment by breaking up the living AM fungal mycelium in the soil. In no till or reduced till management, this mycelium can allow earlier AM formation. Work under field conditions in a Mediterranean climate clearly confirmed that wheat plants cultivated under no-till system had a 6 fold greater mycorrhizal colonization than those grown using a conventional tillage system. Pot experiments were initiated to determine the benefit of the timing of colonization on plants. Soil disturbance induced by tillage practices was simulated by passing the soil through a 4 mm sieve at the start of each successive period of 3 weeks plant growth cycles. After 4 cycles of plant growth (wheat, significant effects in all colonization parameters were detected. Arbuscular, vesicular and hyphal colonization were clearly higher in undisturbed soil. To gain a global overview of the diversity of Glomeromycota under the 2 cultivation systems in the experimental field, rDNA sequences from the fungi have been amplified

  20. Interaction Effects of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria and Mycorrhiza on the Growth and Phosphorus uptakeof Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhossein ziaeyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most abundant of agricultural soils in Iran, are calcareous. In calcareous soils, phosphorus fertilizers use efficiency is low. The usage of soil microorganisms is one of the effective ways to increment the uptake of phosphorus in calcareous soils. This microorganisms using various mechanisms, including the production of plant hormones or the production of organic and inorganic acids to dissolve the insoluble phosphorous compounds. Mycorrhizal symbiosis is also one of the most recognized and important symbiosis relationship found in the world. In a mycorrhizal symbiosis,plants can be able to absorb more nutrients and water from soil and fungus plays a protective role as a growth enhancer and make the plants more tolerable to biotic (pathogens and abiotic (drought, cold and salinity stresses .This research conducted to study phosphate solubilizing bacteria and mycorrhiza roles on sorghum growth and phosphorus availability to this plant. Materials and methods: To achieve the desired goals, a pot experiment was conducted as a factorial in completely randomized design with sixteen treatments in three replications. The treatments were combination of four P levels of zero, 25, 50, and 75 mg kg-1 P2O5 from triple super phosphate source, the two treatments of inoculation and without inoculation of phosphate solubilizing bacteria and the two treatments of inoculation and no inoculation of mycorrizal fungus. Required fertilizers based on initial soil test results were supplied. Accordingly, the same amount of nitrogen, 80 mg kg-1 (30 mg kg-1 before planting and 50 mg kg-1 after planting twice as urea source, 10 mg Zn kg-1 and 5 mg kg-1 Cu per kg soil as the forms of Zinc sulphate (ZnSO4.7H2O and copper sulphate (CuSO4.H2O were added to each soil sample. Required Phosphorus also was calculated based on treatments and added to potting soil. Each pot size was 5 kg. every sample was thoroughly mixed and then were placed in pots. At the same

  1. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to research the effect of 2 different doses of whey [50 ml kg-1(W50) and 100 ml kg-1(W100)], an important organic waste, on colonization and sporulation of arbuscular mycorhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices'(G.i.) inoculated to lentil plant and the effects of changing P ratio in the soil and plant as ...

  2. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Diesel Toxicity on Melilotus albus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Ortega, H. A.; Alarcon, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.; Zavaleta-Mancera, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) affect plant growth and development by limiting water absorption and nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been demonstrated to increase plant tolerance of grass species to PH, but the performance of AMF on legume species during phytorremediation of PH-contaminated soils has been scarcely understood. Thus, this research evaluated the effects of AMF on tolerance and growth of Melilotus albus in a diesel-contaminated soil. (Author)

  3. Preliminary Findings on the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization of Organic Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, Anne; Fox, Dr. Stephen; Entz, Dr. Martin; Tenuta, Dr. Mario

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi aid many crop plants in the uptake of phosphorus, which is one of the most limiting nutrients in organic crop production. Genotypic variation for mycorrhizal colonization exists in wheat cultivars. Mycorrhizal colonization and yield were studied in 5 modern wheat cultivars and 5 older wheat cultivars to investigate if differences in colonization exist between the cultivars. Cultivars that may be better suited for organic production are identified.

  4. Phosphorus and Nitrogen Regulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Petunia hybrida

    OpenAIRE

    Nouri Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms Florence; Feller Urs; Reinhardt Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phos...

  5. Programming good relations - development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhardt, Didier

    2007-01-01

    The majority of plants live in symbiotic associations with fungi or bacteria that improve their nutrition. Critical steps in a symbiosis are mutual recognition and subsequently the establishment of an intimate association, which involves the penetration of plant tissues and, in many cases, the invasion of individual host cells by the microbial symbiont. Recent advances revealed that in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with soil fungi of the order Glomeromycota, plant-derived signals attra...

  6. Glyphosate drift affects arbuscular mycorrhizal association in coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,F.P.; Souza,B.P.; França,A.C.; Ferreira,E.A.; Franco,M.H.R.; Kasuya,M.C.M.; Ferreira,F.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhizal association promotes better survival and nutrition of colonized seedling on field, and consequently, increasing of productivity. However, the weed management can interfere on this association, due to incorrect use of glyphosate. This work has assessed the effects of glyphosate drift on the growth and nutrition of arabica coffee plants (Catuaí Vermelho - IAC 99) colonized with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The experiment was conducted in 2 x 5 factorial scheme, and included i...

  7. Analysis of a large dataset of mycorrhiza inoculation field trials on potato shows highly significant increases in yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    An increasing human population requires more food production in nutrient-efficient systems in order to simultaneously meet global food needs while reducing the environmental footprint of agriculture. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have the potential to enhance crop yield, but their efficiency has yet to be demonstrated in large-scale crop production systems. This study reports an analysis of a dataset consisting of 231 field trials in which the same AMF inoculant (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198) was applied to potato over a 4-year period in North America and Europe under authentic field conditions. The inoculation was performed using a liquid suspension of AMF spores that was sprayed onto potato seed pieces, yielding a calculated 71 spores per seed piece. Statistical analysis showed a highly significant increase in marketable potato yield (ANOVA, P < 0.0001) for inoculated fields (42.2 tons/ha) compared with non-inoculated controls (38.3 tons/ha), irrespective of trial year. The average yield increase was 3.9 tons/ha, representing 9.5 % of total crop yield. Inoculation was profitable with a 0.67-tons/ha increase in yield, a threshold reached in almost 79 % of all trials. This finding clearly demonstrates the benefits of mycorrhizal-based inoculation on crop yield, using potato as a case study. Further improvements of these beneficial inoculants will help compensate for crop production deficits, both now and in the future.

  8. The role of pH in Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum mycorrhiza development within commercial orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The accepted advice when establishing a plantation of Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum is that young inoculated trees should be planted on calcareous soils with a naturally high pH level. When a site is employed that has a naturally low pH level, lime is often applied to raise the pH to a considered ideal level of c.7.5. However, this may not be the correct approach. Here we present data from 33 data points taken from commercial truffle orchards in England, UK. Soil pH is correlated to Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum mycorrhiza survivorship and development. The optimal observed pH was 7.51 but the actual optimal pH for cultivation may be higher. Sub optimal pH levels lead to a reduction of Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum mycorrhiza. This reduction is not permanent and mycorrhization levels may be improved within a 12 month period by amending the soil pH. The importance of understanding the interaction of pH with other variables and the results in relation truffle cultivation are discussed.

  9. Seasonal dynamics of extraradical mycelium and mycorrhizas in a black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queralt, Mikel; Parladé, Javier; Pera, Joan; DE Miguel, Ana María

    2017-08-01

    Seasonal dynamics of black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) extraradical mycelium as well as the associated mycorrhizal community have been evaluated in a 16-year-old plantation with productive and non-productive trees. Mycelium biomass was seasonally quantified by real-time PCR over two consecutive years and the correlation with environmental variables explored. Extraradical mycelium biomass varied seasonally and between the two consecutive years, being correlated with the precipitation that occurred 1 month before sampling. In addition, productive trees had more mycelium in the brûlé area than non-productive trees did. The ectomycorrhizal community composition inside the burnt areas was seasonally evaluated during a year. Ten mycorrhizal morphotypes were detected; T. melanosporum was the most abundant in productive and non-productive trees. Black truffle mycorrhizas were more abundant (mycorrhizal tips per unit of soil volume) in productive trees, and no seasonal variation was observed. The occurrence of black truffle mycorrhizas was significantly and positively correlated with the biomass of extraradical mycelium. The mycorrhizal community within the brûlé areas was significantly different between productive and non-productive trees, and no variation was detected between seasons. The assessment of the fungal vegetative structures in a mature plantation is of paramount importance to develop trufficulture methods based on the knowledge of the biological cycle of the fungus and its relationships with the associated ectomycorrhizal communities.

  10. Changes in Nutrient Content of Root and Grain of Wheat Cultivars Inoculated by Azospirillum and Mycorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jiriaie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Providing the nutritional requirements of agricultural crops by non-chemical resources is a new approach in the organic farming that has attracted the attention of both the researchers and the consumers in recent years. Therefore, it is highly important to find new fertilizer resources that are both economically able to provide the nutritional needs of the crop plants and have no adverse effects on the consumers and the environment. Materials and Methods: With this approach, an experiment was conducted in the research station of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran in 2012-13. The experimental design was factorial based on randomized complete blocks design with three replications. The treatments including Mycorrhizal fungi in three levels (i.e. no use of strain; use of Glomus intraradices strain; and use of Glomus mosseae strain, bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum in two-levels (i.e. non-inoculated and inoculated and wheat cultivars in three levels (i.e. Chamran; Dena; and Behrang. The measured parameters include the concentration of macronutrients (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and some micronutrients (i.e. zinc, iron and manganese in two part seed and the root of wheat. Results and Discussion: Surveying the elements content in the root and the grain indicated a significant and positive effect of the use the Azospirillum and Mycorrhiza to improve the concentration of the elements in wheat cultivars. However, the simultaneous use of these microorganisms led to an increase of the effects of their application on their assessed traits.Finally the highest concentration of N (2.21 present, P (0.50 present and Fe (33.88 mg.kg-1 were observed in the grain; the highest concentration of K (0.93 present and 0.54 present and Mn (43.11 and 23.63 mg.kg-1 were observed in the grain and root, respectively. Moreover, the highest concentration of Zn in the root (19.70 mg.kg-1 was obtained from inoculation of C.V Dena seeds with

  11. Morpho-anatomical characterization of Tuber macrosporum/Corylus avellana mycorrhizas from cultivated seedlings: Case report

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    Stanojković Jelena N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of mycorrhizae on seedlings from part of ten-year-old truffles plantation (about 3,000 m2 located in Eastern Serbia. This study is observation of the presence of ectomycorrhizal fungus from genus Tuber during its symbiotic stage on the roots of Corylus avellana L. Ten root samples were collected (randomly and observed macroscopically and microscopically analyzed. There were changes in morphology and anatomy of the infected roots of C. avellana. Mantle was clearly observed to cover the roots and the mycelia formed the Harting net. Among arbitrary selected seedlings, there were found mature fruiting bodies on the surface of the soil. The truffles, identified as Tuber macrosporum Vittad, were found in the immediate vicinity of the hazelnut trees. There has been no previous information of mycorrhizae Tuber macrosporum/Corylus avellana on artificially created truffles plantation in Serbia. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173032 and Grant no. 173015

  12. Reactive oxygen species generation-scavenging and signaling during plant-arbuscular mycorrhizal and Piriformospora indica interaction under stress condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Nath

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A defined balance between the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS is essential to utilize ROS as an adaptive defense response of plants under biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Moreover, ROS are not only a major determinant of stress response but also acts as signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes including plant-microbe interaction. In particular, rhizosphere constitutes the biologically dynamic zone for plant–microbe interactions which forms a mutual link leading to reciprocal signaling in both the partners. Among plant–microbe interactions, symbiotic associations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and arbuscular mycorrhizal-like fungus especially Piriformospora indica with plants are well known to improve plant growth by alleviating the stress-impacts and consequently enhance the plant fitness. AMF and P. indica colonization mainly enhances ROS-metabolism, maintains ROS-homeostasis, and thereby averts higher ROS-level accrued inhibition in plant cellular processes and plant growth and survival under stressful environments. This article summarizes the major outcomes of the recent reports on the ROS-generation and scavenging and signaling in biotic-abiotic stressed plants with AMF and P. indica colonization. Overall, a detailed exploration of ROS-signature kinetics during plant-AMF/P. indica interaction can help in designing innovative strategies for improving plant health and productivity under stress conditions.

  13. Mycorrhizas and soil ecosystem function of co-existing woody vegetation islands at the alpine tree line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, L.; Otgonsuren, B.; Godbold, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 411, 1-2 (2017), s. 467-481 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Ectoenzymes * Ectomycorrhizas * Enzyme activity * Ericoid mycorrhizas * Nitrogen-mineralization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 3.052, year: 2016

  14. Novel root-fungus symbiosis in Ericaceae: sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza formed by a hitherto undescribed basidiomycete with affinities to Trechisporales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohník, Martin; Sadowsky, J. J.; Kohout, Petr; Lhotáková, Z.; Nestby, R.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2012), e39524 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/09/P340 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : ericoid mycorrhiza * Ericaceae * Basidiomycetes Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  15. Uptake and specification of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, E.H.; Lobinski, R.; Burger-Meijer, K.; Hansen, M.; Ruzik, R.; Mazurowska, L.; Rasmussen, P.H.; Sloth, J.J.; Scholten, O.E.; Kik, C.

    2006-01-01

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal protein mRNA over-expression in bread wheat seedlings by Trichoderma harzianum Raifi (KRL-AG2) elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asbahi, Adnan A S

    2012-02-25

    Association between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and majority of terrestrial plant species provides many benefits to plants that range from stress alleviation and bioremediation in soils polluted with heavy metals to plant growth promotion and yield quantity. Some non-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi such as, Trichoderma harzianum, are known to enhance the AMF symbiosis with vascular plants. However, information about their role in AMF symbiosis is still limited. Shoots of (Avocet S) wheat seedlings were sprayed with the fungal culture filtrate and gene expression patterns were analyzed in the treated tissues. An increase in the level of mRNA of arbuscular mycorrhizal protein comparing with control was found. The over-expression of this protein in wheat tissues might contribute in initiation of AMF colonization in wheat tissues. The result of this study can spark future researches to elucidate possible role of this protein in the symbiotic interaction mechanisms between soil AMF and various plant roots. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares na formação de mudas de cafeeiro, em substratos orgânicos comerciais Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the development of coffee plantlets using different organic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Sales Massafera Tristão

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um experimento, em casa de vegetação, em arranjo fatorial 9 x 4, com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito de substratos orgânicos comerciais e inoculação de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs no desenvolvimento de mudas de cafeeiro, cultivar 'Catuaí Amarelo', IAC 62. Utilizaram-se substratos à base de fibra de coco (Golden Mix 11, Golden Mix 47 e Golden Mix 80, casca de pinus (Rendmax, Vida Verde com adubação, Vida Verde sem adubação e Terra do Paraíso, solo puro e solo + esterco (70% e 30%,v/v, inoculando-se os FMAs Glomus intraradices, Glomus etunicatum e Gigaspora margarita. Manteve-se um tratamento sem inoculação. Aos 200 dias após transplante avaliaram-se: altura, diâmetro do caule, número de folhas, matéria seca da parte aérea, matéria fresca da raiz, teor de fósforo na parte aérea, colonização radicular, comprimento do micélio externo, atividade da fosfatase ácida e teores de pigmentos fotossintetizantes nas folhas do cafeeiro. Independentemente da micorrização, o melhor crescimento das mudas foi obtido no substrato Vida Verde sem adubação. Os melhores efeitos da micorrização foram constatados nas plantas colonizadas por G. margarita e crescidas nos substratos convencional (solo + esterco e Vida Verde com adubação, nas quais se verificaram mais eficácia na utilização de P, o que reverteu em maior crescimento e produção de biomassa, resultando em maior eficiência simbiótica. No substrato solo + esterco, a micorrização favoreceu a concentração de pigmentos fotossintetizantes e diminuiu a atividade da fosfatase ácida nas folhas do cafeeiro.A greenhouse experiment with an alleatory factorial 9 x 4 scheme was carried out to evaluate the effects of different substrates and species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the development of coffee plants, cultivar Catuaí Amarelo, IAC 62. Nine substrates were used: seven commercial organic substrates - four substrates containing composted

  18. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Salt Stress in Black Locust through Improved Photosynthesis, Water Status, and K+/Na+Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Haoqiang; Zhang, Xinlu; Tang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinization and the associated land degradation are major and growing ecological problems. Excess salt in soil impedes plant photosynthetic processes and root uptake of water and nutrients such as K + . Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can mitigate salt stress in host plants. Although, numerous studies demonstrate that photosynthesis and water status are improved by mycorrhizae, the molecular mechanisms involved have received little research attention. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of AM symbiosis and salt stress on photosynthesis, water status, concentrations of Na + and K + , and the expression of several genes associated with photosynthesis ( RppsbA, RppsbD, RprbcL , and RprbcS ) and genes coding for aquaporins or membrane transport proteins involved in K + and/or Na + uptake, translocation, or compartmentalization homeostasis ( RpSOS1, RpHKT1, RpNHX1 , and RpSKOR ) in black locust. The results showed that salinity reduced the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and relative water content in both non-mycorrhizal (NM) and AM plants; the reductions of these three parameters were less in AM plants compared with NM plants. Under saline conditions, AM fungi significantly improved the net photosynthetic rate, quantum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry, and K + content in plants, but evidently reduced the Na + content. AM plants also displayed a significant increase in the relative water content and an evident decrease in the shoot/root ratio of Na + in the presence of 200 mM NaCl compared with NM plants. Additionally, mycorrhizal colonization upregulated the expression of three chloroplast genes ( RppsbA, RppsbD , and RprbcL ) in leaves, and three genes ( RpSOS1, RpHKT1 , and RpSKOR ) encoding membrane transport proteins involved in K + /Na + homeostasis in roots. Expression of several aquaporin genes was regulated by AM symbiosis in both leaves and roots depending on soil salinity. This study suggests that the beneficial

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Salt Stress in Black Locust through Improved Photosynthesis, Water Status, and K+/Na+ Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinization and the associated land degradation are major and growing ecological problems. Excess salt in soil impedes plant photosynthetic processes and root uptake of water and nutrients such as K+. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi can mitigate salt stress in host plants. Although, numerous studies demonstrate that photosynthesis and water status are improved by mycorrhizae, the molecular mechanisms involved have received little research attention. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of AM symbiosis and salt stress on photosynthesis, water status, concentrations of Na+ and K+, and the expression of several genes associated with photosynthesis (RppsbA, RppsbD, RprbcL, and RprbcS and genes coding for aquaporins or membrane transport proteins involved in K+ and/or Na+ uptake, translocation, or compartmentalization homeostasis (RpSOS1, RpHKT1, RpNHX1, and RpSKOR in black locust. The results showed that salinity reduced the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and relative water content in both non-mycorrhizal (NM and AM plants; the reductions of these three parameters were less in AM plants compared with NM plants. Under saline conditions, AM fungi significantly improved the net photosynthetic rate, quantum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry, and K+ content in plants, but evidently reduced the Na+ content. AM plants also displayed a significant increase in the relative water content and an evident decrease in the shoot/root ratio of Na+ in the presence of 200 mM NaCl compared with NM plants. Additionally, mycorrhizal colonization upregulated the expression of three chloroplast genes (RppsbA, RppsbD, and RprbcL in leaves, and three genes (RpSOS1, RpHKT1, and RpSKOR encoding membrane transport proteins involved in K+/Na+ homeostasis in roots. Expression of several aquaporin genes was regulated by AM symbiosis in both leaves and roots depending on soil salinity. This study suggests that the beneficial effects of AM

  20. Spatiotemporal variation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization in olive (Olea europaea L.) roots across a broad mesic-xeric climatic gradient in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddad-Hamza, Amel; Hamza, Nabila; Neffar, Souad; Beddiar, Arifa; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to determine the spatiotemporal dynamics of root colonization and spore density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the rhizosphere of olive trees (Olea europaea) with different plantation ages and under different climatic areas in Algeria. Soil and root samples were seasonally collected from three olive plantations of different ages. Other samples were carried out in productive olive orchards cultivated under a climatic gradient (desertic, semi-arid, subhumid, and humid). The olive varieties analysed in this study were Blanquette, Rougette, Chemlel and the wild-olive. Spore density, mycorrhization intensity (M%), spore diversity and the most probable number (MPN) were determined. Both the intensity of mycorrhizal colonization and spore density increased with the increase of seasonal precipitation and decreased with the increase of air temperature regardless of the climatic region or olive variety. The variety Rougette had the highest mycorrhizal levels in all plantation ages and climates. Spore community was composed of the genera Rhizophagus, Funneliformis, Glomus, Septoglomus, Gigaspora, Scutellospora and Entrophospora. The genus Glomus, with four species, predominated in all climate regions. Spores of Gigaspora sp. and Scutellospora sp. were the most abundant in desertic plantations. Statistical models indicated a positive relationship between spore density and M% during spring and winter in young seedlings and old plantations. A significant positive relationship was found between MPN and spore density under different climates. For a mycotrophic species, the rhizosphere of olive trees proved to be poor in mycorrhiza in terms of mycorrhizal colonization and numbers of the infective AMF propagules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Mycotrophic capacity and efficiency of microbial consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi native of soils from Buenos Aires province under contrasting management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thougnon Islas, Andrea J; Eyherabide, Mercedes; Echeverría, Hernán E; Sainz Rozas, Hernán R; Covacevich, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the infective and sporulation capacities of microbial consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) native of Buenos Aires province (Argentina) and determined if some soil characteristics and mycorrhizal parameters could allow to select potentially beneficial inocula. Soil samples were selected from seven locations in Buenos Aires province all under agricultural (A) and pristine (P) conditions. The AMF were multiplied and mycorrhizal root colonization of trap plants was observed at 10 weeks of growth. Spore number in field was low; however, after multiplication spore density accounted for 80-1175 spores per 100g of soil. The principal component analysis showed that the P and Fe soil contents are the main modulators of infectivity and sporulation capacity. The mycorrhizal potential was determined in three locations, being high in Pristine Lobería and Agricultural Trenque Lauquen and low in Junín. Agricultural Lobería (AL) and Pristine Lobería (PL) inocula were selected and their efficiency was evaluated under controlled conditions. Even though shoot dry matter increases after inoculation was not significant (p>0.05) mycorrhizal response was greater than 40% for tomato and 25% for corn, particularly after inoculation with inocula from the agricultural management. These results could be associated to the incipient development of mycorrhizae in both species. Additional research should be conducted to further develop our findings in order to determine the factors involved in the selection of efficient inocula. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in heavy metal phytoremediation: Meta-analytical and conceptual perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audet, Patrick; Charest, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    To estimate dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in heavy metal (HM) phytoremediation, we conducted a literature survey and correlated HM uptake and relative plant growth parameters from published data. After estimating AM feedback responses for these parameters at low and high soil-HM concentration intervals, we determined that the roles of AM symbiosis are characterized by (1) an increased HM phytoextraction via mycorrhizospheric 'Enhanced Uptake' at low soil-HM concentrations, and (2) a reduced HM bioavailability via AM fungal 'Metal-Binding' processes at high soil-HM levels, hence resulting in increased plant biomass and enhanced plant tolerance through HM stress-avoidance. We present two conceptual models which illustrate the important compromise between plant growth, plant HM uptake and HM tolerance, and further emphasize the importance of AM symbiosis in buffering the soil environment for plants under such stress conditions. - This meta-analysis has revealed a transition role of the AM symbiosis in phytoremediation shifting from 'Enhanced Uptake' to 'Metal-Binding' beyond critical soil-HM levels

  3. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve grain yield, As uptake and tolerance of rice grown under aerobic conditions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ye, Z.H. [State Key Laboratory for Bio-control, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chan, W.F.; Chen, X.W.; Wu, F.Y. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wu, S.C. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); School of Environment and Natural Resources, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Lin' an, Zhejiang 311300 (China); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); School of Environment and Natural Resources, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Lin' an, Zhejiang 311300 (China)

    2011-10-15

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) -Glomus intraradices and G. geosporum on arsenic (As) and phosphorus (P) uptake by lowland (Guangyinzhan) and upland rice (Handao 502) were investigated in soil, spiked with and without 60 mg As kg{sup -1}. In As-contaminated soil, Guangyinzhan inoculated with G. intraradices or Handao 502 inoculated with G. geosporum enhanced As tolerance, grain P content, grain yield. However, Guangyinzhan inoculated with G. geosporum or Handao 502 inoculated with G. intraradices decreased grain P content, grain yield and the molar ratio of grain P/As content, and increased the As concentration and the ratio of grain/straw As concentration. These results show that rice/AMF combinations had significant (p < 0.05) effects on grain As concentration, grain yield and grain P uptake. The variation in the transfer and uptake of As and P reflected strong functional diversity in AM (arbuscular mycorrhizal) symbioses. - Highlights: > Rice/AMF combinations had significant effects on grain As concentration, grain yield and grain P uptake. > Rice colonized with suitable AMF can increase grain yield. > The variation in the transfer and uptake of As and P reflected strong functional diversity in AM symbioses. - Different rice/AMF combinations had very different effects on arsenic and phosphorus uptake.

  4. PHOSPHATE AND INOCULATION WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI ON THE GROWTH OF Cecropia pachystachya (Trec SEEDLINGS FÓSFORO E INOCULAÇÃO COM FUNGOS MICORRÍZICOS ARBUSCULARES NO ESTABELECIMENTO DE MUDAS DE EMBAÚBA (Cecropia pachystachya Trec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Carbone Carneiro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (FMA in different levels of P2O5 on the growth of Cecropia pachystachya seedlings in the field. The study consisted of a 5x2 factorial with five levels of P2O5 (zero, 85, 170, 255 and 340 mg.kg-1, with and ithout inoculation with a mixture of FMA. It was used four replications, each one with twelve seedlings. The seeds were sowed in plastic tubes with capacity of 50 cm3 of substratum and stored for 120 days. After this period the seedlings were transplanted to the field, where they remained for another 150 days. Seedling diameter and height were measured at 60 and 120 days, aerial part and root dry matter, and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Diameter, height, leaf area, aerial part dry matter and the number of surviving seedlings were determined after 150 days. None of the factors tested had any effect on seedling growth with one exception; inoculated plants with FMA had more root dry matter. Plants inoculated with smaller doses of P2O5 showed a larger percentage of surviving individuals and more vigorous seedlings. Results suggest that in low fertility soils of and subject to the hydric stress the C. pachystachya seedlings should be inoculated with FMA.

    KEY-WORDS: Native vegetation; mycorrhiza fungi; native species; seedling production; inoculation.

    O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da inoculação com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMA em diferentes doses de P2O5 na formação de mudas de embaúba (Cecropia pachystachya e no seu estabelecimento em campo. O estudo constou de um experimento fatorial 5x2, sendo cinco doses de P2O5

  5. Correlation of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization with plant growth, nodulation, and shoot npk in legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaid, A.; Anjum, T.; Shah, M.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization with different root and shoot growth, nodulation and shoot NPK parameters was studied in three legumes viz. Trifolium alexandrianum, Medicago polymorpha and Melilotus parviflora. The three test legume species showed different patterns of root and shoot growth, nodulation, mycorrhizal colonization and shoot N, P and K content. Different mycorrhizal structures viz. mycelium, arbuscules and vesicles showed different patters of correlation with different studied parameters. Mycelial infection showed an insignificantly positive correlation with root and shoot dry biomass and total root length. Maximum root length was however, negatively associated with mycelial infection. Both arbuscular and vesicular infections were negatively correlated with shoot dry biomass and different parameters of root growth. The association between arbuscular infection and maximum root length was significant. All the three mycorrhizal structures showed a positive correlation with number and biomass of nodules. The association between arbuscular infection and nodule number was significant. Mycelial infection was positively correlated with percentage and total shoot N and P. Similarly percentage N was also positively correlated with arbuscular and vesicular infections. By contrast, total shoot N showed a negative association with arbuscular as well as vesicular infections. Similarly both percentage and total shoot P were negatively correlated with arbuscular and vesicular infections. All the associations between mycorrhizal parameters and shoot K were negative except between vesicular infection and shoot %K. (author)

  6. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Organic Fertilizers Application on Yield Components of Two Wheat Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholamalizadeh Ahangar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was conducted in order to evaluate the direct effects of organic and bio - fertilizers on yield components of two native wheat cultivars, Bolani and cross - Bolani. The experiment conducted as a factorial in a completely randomized design with three replications. Treatment includes fertilizer factor: vermicompost (F1, vermicompost + compost (F2, vermicompost + mycorrhiza (F3, compost + vermicompost + mycorrhiza (F4, compost (F5, mycorrhiza + compost (F6, mycorrhiza (F7 and control (no fertilizer application F8 and cultivar factor includes two cultivar Bolani (C1 and cross - Bolani (C2. The results showed that the interaction effect of combined treatments (F7C2 of high yield (1.13 g.pot-1 obtained. The treatment combination (F7C2 of (0.355 was highest harvest index. The high correlation between weight per plant with plant height, spike length, grain yield and harvest index were observed. Generally the combined application of vermicompost and mycorrhiza cultivar cross - Bolani is more suitable for grain production.

  7. Facilitation of phosphorus uptake in maize plants by mycorrhizosphere bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battini, Fabio; Grønlund, Mette; Agnolucci, Monica

    2017-01-01

    availability of soil P. This study investigated whether biofertilizers and bioenhancers, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their associated bacteria could enhance growth and P uptake in maize. Plants were grown with or without mycorrhizas in compartmented pots with radioactive P tracers and were...

  8. Triclosan inhibits arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in three wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twanabasu, Bishnu R; Smith, Caleb M; Stevens, Kevin J; Venables, Barney J; Sears, William C

    2013-03-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, plant growth, plant community structure, and ultimately the ecosystem services provided by plants are dependent on the presence and composition of below ground arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities. AM fungi form obligate symbioses with plants providing nutrients to their host plants in exchange for photosynthates. While AM have been found in most wetland ecosystems, the effects of urban contaminants on AM associations are largely unknown. Triclosan (5-chloro-2-[2,4-dichlorophenoxy]phenol; TCS) is a widespread contaminant found in surface waters throughout North America and in addition to antimicrobial properties is purported to have antifungal properties. To determine the effects of TCS on arbuscular mycorrhizal associations, we exposed AM inoculated wetland plant species (Eclipta prostrata, Hibiscus laevis, and Sesbania herbacea) to TCS at concentrations of 0.0, 0.4 and 4.0 μg/L in a continuous flow-through exposure system. TCS exposure caused significant reductions in hyphal and arbuscular colonization while no significant effect was detected for vesicular colonization. Across all species, hyphal colonization was significantly higher in controls (18.58 ± 1.84%) compared to 0.4 and 4.0 μg/L (10.20 ± 1.34% and 9.86 ± 1.32% respectively) TCS treatments. Similarly, arbuscular colonization was significantly higher in the controls (4.58 ± 0.75%) compared to 0.4 μg/L (2.20 ± 0.38%) and 4.0 μg/L (1.22 ± 0.24%) TCS exposures. Since our lowest effect concentration, 0.4 μg/L, lies within the range of concentrations found in North American streams it is plausible that AM colonization has been impacted in streams receiving WWTP effluent. Further studies are required to understand the mechanism of TCS inhibition of mycorrhizal colonization in wetland plant species as well as the potential ecological consequences that a decline in the AM colonization levels may represent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycorrhiza Reduces Adverse Effects of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) on Growth of Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and

  10. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  11. Seedling mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Nina; Rasmussen, Finn N.

    2014-01-01

    rhizoctonious mycelia are presently involved in OSM, presumably evolving secondarily and often in parallel in different orchid clades. Structural features and internal patterns of mycobiont behaviour appear to have remained largely the same, implying that OSM needs only minor physiological adjustment...... to accommodate new mycobionts. Such modifications will have involved checkpoints for recognition/rejection and the formation/breakdown of pelotons. These physiological mechanisms are so far largely unknown. The trophic versatility of the mycobionts and the apparently easy shifts could be a main factor...

  12. Influence of elevated CO2 and mycorrhizae on nitrogen acquisition: contrasting responses in Pinus taeda and Liquidambar styraciflua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, J V; Bassirirad, H; Lussenhop, J; Zerihun, A

    2001-02-01

    An understanding of root system capacity to acquire nitrogen (N) is critical in assessing the long-term growth impact of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) on trees and forest ecosystems. We examined the effects of mycorrhizal inoculation and elevated [CO2] on root ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) uptake capacity in sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Mycorrhizal treatments included inoculation of seedlings with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith in sweetgum and the ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungus Laccaria bicolor (Maire) Orton in loblolly pine. These plants were then equally divided between ambient and elevated [CO2] treatments. After 6 months of treatment, root systems of both species exhibited a greater uptake capacity for NH4+ than for NO3-. In both species, mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased uptake capacity for NO3-, but not for NH4+. In sweetgum, the mycorrhizal effect on NO3- and NH4+ uptake capacity depended on growth [C02]. Similarly, in loblolly pine, the mycorrhizal effect on NO3- uptake capacity depended on growth [CO2], but the effect on NH4+ uptake capacity did not. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly enhanced root nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in both species, but elevated [CO2] increased root NRA only in sweetgum. Leaf NRA in sweetgum did not change significantly with mycorrhizal inoculation, but increased in response to [CO2]. Leaf NRA in loblolly pine was unaffected by either treatment. The results indicate that the mycorrhizal effect on specific root N uptake in these species depends on both the form of inorganic N and the mycorrhizal type. However, our data show that in addressing N status of plants under high [CO2], reliable prediction is possible only when information about other root system adjustments (e.g., biomass allocation to fine roots) is simultaneously considered.

  13. Solanum nigrum grown in contaminated soil: Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on zinc accumulation and histolocalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Ana P.G.C.; Oliveira, Rui S.; Samardjieva, Kalina A.; Pissarra, Jose; Rangel, Antonio O.S.S.; Castro, Paula M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Zn tissue accumulation in Solanum nigrum grown in a non-contaminated and a naturally contaminated Zn matrix and the effect of inoculation with different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on metal uptake were assessed. S. nigrum grown in the contaminated soil always presented higher Zn accumulation in the tissues, accumulating up to 1622 mg Zn kg -1 . The presence of both Glomus claroideum and Glomus intraradices enhanced the uptake and accumulation of Zn by S. nigrum (up to 83 and 49% higher Zn accumulation, respectively). The main deposits of the metal were found in the intercellular spaces and in the cell walls of the root tissues, as revealed by autometallography, with the inoculation with different AMF species causing no differences in the location of Zn accumulation. These findings indicate that S. nigrum inoculated with selected heavy metal tolerant AMF presents extracting and accumulating capacities, constituting a potentially suitable remediation method for Zn polluted soils. - Zn accumulation by S. nigrum is enhanced by AMF and the metal storage in the tissues at the root level occurs mainly in the cell walls and in the intercellular spaces

  14. Associação micorrízica e teores de nutrientes nas folhas de cupuaçuzeiro (Theobroma grandiflorum e guaranazeiro (Paullinia cupana de um sistema agroflorestal em Manaus, Amazonas Arbuscular mycorrhizal association and foliar nutrient concentrations of cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum and guaraná (Paullinia cupana plants in an agroforestry system in Manaus, AM, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Oliveira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As micorrizas arbusculares podem ser importantes na nutrição das plantas em solos ácidos e de baixa fertilidade, como são os da Amazônia de modo geral. Avaliaram-se a colonização radicular por fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs nativos e os teores de nutrientes em cupuaçuzeiro e guaranazeiro em um sistema agroflorestal no município de Manaus, Amazonas. Dez plantas de cada espécie foram selecionadas, das quais foram coletadas amostras de raiz, folha e solo durante o período seco e chuvoso da região de Manaus. Os guaranazeiros e os cupuaçuzeiros apresentaram maior colonização radicular por FMAs na época chuvosa. Os teores foliares de Ca, Mg, K, P, Zn, Cu e Mn nas duas espécies não foram influenciados pelas épocas de amostragem. O teor de Fe nas folhas dos cupuaçuzeiros foi maior na época chuvosa, enquanto o dos guaranazeiros, na época seca. A colonização micorrízica correlacionou-se com a concentração foliar de Ca, Mg, P e Cu nos cupuaçuzeiros e com a de Ca, Fe, Zn e Cu nos guaranazeiros.Arbuscular mycorrhiza can be important for plant nutrition in acid and low fertility soils such as those of the Amazon. The present study evaluated the mycorrhizal colonization by native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and nutrient concentrations of cupuassu and guarana leaves in an agroforestry system in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. Ten plants of each species were selected, of which the roots, soil and leaves were sampled during the rainy and dry seasons. Guarana and cupuassu trees presented higher levels of AMF colonization during the rainy season. Ca, Mg, K, P, Zn, Cu, and Mn concentrations in both species were not affected by the season. Fe concentration was higher during the rainy season in the cupuassu leaves, but higher in the dry season in the guarana leaves. Mycorrhizal colonization correlated with Ca, Mg, P, and Cu concentrations in cupuassu plants and with Ca, Fe, Zn, and Cu in guarana plants.

  15. Novel root-fungus symbiosis in Ericaceae: sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza formed by a hitherto undescribed basidiomycete with affinities to Trechisporales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vohník

    Full Text Available Ericaceae (the heath family are widely distributed calcifuges inhabiting soils with inherently poor nutrient status. Ericaceae overcome nutrient limitation through symbiosis with ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM fungi that mobilize nutrients complexed in recalcitrant organic matter. At present, recognized ErM fungi include a narrow taxonomic range within the Ascomycota, and the Sebacinales, basal Hymenomycetes with unclamped hyphae and imperforate parenthesomes. Here we describe a novel type of basidiomycetous ErM symbiosis, termed 'sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza', discovered in two habitats in mid-Norway as a co-dominant mycorrhizal symbiosis in Vaccinium spp. The basidiomycete forming sheathed ErM possesses clamped hyphae with perforate parenthesomes, produces 1- to 3-layer sheaths around terminal parts of hair roots and colonizes their rhizodermis intracellularly forming hyphal coils typical for ErM symbiosis. Two basidiomycetous isolates were obtained from sheathed ErM and molecular and phylogenetic tools were used to determine their identity; they were also examined for the ability to form sheathed ErM and lignocellulolytic potential. Surprisingly, ITS rDNA of both conspecific isolates failed to amplify with the most commonly used primer pairs, including ITS1 and ITS1F + ITS4. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear LSU, SSU and 5.8S rDNA indicates that the basidiomycete occupies a long branch residing in the proximity of Trechisporales and Hymenochaetales, but lacks a clear sequence relationship (>90% similarity to fungi currently placed in these orders. The basidiomycete formed the characteristic sheathed ErM symbiosis and enhanced growth of Vaccinium spp. in vitro, and degraded a recalcitrant aromatic substrate that was left unaltered by common ErM ascomycetes. Our findings provide coherent evidence that this hitherto undescribed basidiomycete forms a morphologically distinct ErM symbiosis that may occur at significant levels under natural conditions, yet

  16. Diversispora celata sp. nov: molecular ecology and phylotaxonomy of an inconspicuous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamper, H.A.; Walker, C.; Schüßler, A.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing numbers of taxonomically unassigned phylotypes reported in molecular ecological studies contrast with the few formally described arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; Glomeromycota). Here, a species new to science with Glomus-like spores is phylogenetically, morphologically and

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidinger, S.; Eschen, R.; Gange, A.C.; Finch, P.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF

  18. Global assessment of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus diversity reveals very low endemism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davison, J.; Moora, M.; Öpik, M.; Adholeya, A.; Ainsaar, L.; Bâ, A.; Burla, S.; Diedhiou, A. G.; Hiiesalu, Inga; Jairus, T.; Johnson, N. C.; Kane, A.; Koorem, K.; Kochar, M.; Ndiaye, C.; Pärtel, M.; Reier, Ü.; Saks, Ü.; Singh, R.; Vasar, M.; Zobel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 349, č. 6251 (2015), 970-973 ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * 454 sequencing * diversity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 34.661, year: 2015

  19. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants. PMID:20007181

  20. Resistance to high level of Cu (Copper) by arbuscular mycorrhizal, saprobe Fungi and Eucalyptus globules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arriagada, C.; Pereira, G.; Machuca, A.; Alvear, M.; Martin, J.; Ocampo, J.

    2009-07-01

    The effects of saprobe and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on growth, chorophyll, root length colonization and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity was measured in Eucalyptus globulus Labill., plants growing in soil with high level of Cu were investigated. The application of Cu inhibited the development of mycelia of the saprobe fungi Fusarium concolor and Trichoderma koningii and the hyphal length of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM) Glomus mosseaae and G. deserticola in vitro. (Author)