WorldWideScience

Sample records for arbitrary turbulence spectrum

  1. Generation of Synthetic Turbulence in Arbitrary Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sørensen, Niels

    A new method for generating synthetic turbulence is presented. The method is intended for generating a turbulent velocity field with a fine spatial resolution but only covering a small moving part of the rotor area of a wind turbine. For this application the Mann and Sandia methods cannot be used...... because of the very high requirements for computer memory. In the present method the auto- and cross-correlation in all three directions is computed from analytical or empirical expressions and the auto- and cross-spectra are determined by using the Wiener-Khinchin relation. From the auto- and cross......-spectra a realization of a velocity field is determined by factorization and Fourier transform as in the Sandia method....

  2. Yang-Mills Spectrum with an Arbitrary Simple Gauge Algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass spectrum of pure Yang-Mills theory in 3 + 1 dimensions is discussed for an arbitrary simple gauge algebra within a quasi gluon picture. The general structure of the low-lying gluelump and glueball spectrum is shown to be common to all algebras, excepted the lightest C = - glueballs that only exist when the gauge algebra is Ar≥2. The shape of the static energy between adjoint sources is also discussed assuming the Casimir scaling hypothesis and finally, the obtained results are shown to be consistent with existing lattice data in the large-N limit of an su(N) gauge algebra. (author)

  3. Spectrum of resistivity gradient driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistivity fluctuation correlation function and electrostatic potential spectrum of resistivity gradient driven turbulence are calculated analytically and compared to the results of three dimensional numerical calculations. Resistivity gradient driven turbulence is characterized by effective Reynolds' numbers of order unity. Steady-state solution of the renormalized spectrum equations yields an electrostatic potential spectrum (circumflex phi2)/sub ktheta/ approx. k/sub theta//sup -3.25/. Agreement of the analytically calculated potential spectrum and mean-square radial velocity with the results of multiple helicity numerical calculations is excellent. This comparison constitutes a quantitative test of the analytical turbulence theory used. The spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is also calculated, and agrees well with that obtained from the numerical computations. 13 refs., 8 figs

  4. Generating Polarization-Entangled Photon Pairs with Arbitrary Joint Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Walton, Z D; Saleh, B E A; Teich, M C; Walton, Zachary D.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a scheme for generating polarization-entangled photons pairs with arbitrary joint spectrum. Specifically, we describe a technique for spontaneous parametric down-conversion in which both the center frequencies and the bandwidths of the down-converted photons may be controlled by appropriate manipulation of the pump pulse. The spectral control offered by this technique permits one to choose the operating wavelengths for each photon of a pair based on optimizations of other system parameters (loss in optical fiber, photon counter performance, etc.). The combination of spectral control, polarization control, and lack of group-velocity matching conditions makes this technique particularly well-suited for a distributed quantum information processing architecture in which integrated optical circuits are connected by spans of optical fiber.

  5. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  6. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  7. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  8. The temperature spectrum generated by frictional heating in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    In every turbulent flow with non-zero viscosity, heat is generated by viscous friction. This heat is then mixed by the velocity field. We consider how heat fluctuations generated this way are injected and distributed over length scales in isotropic turbulence. A triadic closure is derived and numerically integrated. It is shown how the heat fluctuation spectrum depends on the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

  9. The theoretical model of atmospheric turbulence spectrum in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shida; Liu, Shikuo; Xin, Guojun; Liang, Fuming

    1994-12-01

    It is shown that the slope of energy spectrum obtained from the velocity solution of Kdv—Burgers equation lies between —5/3 and—2 in the dilogarithmic coordinates paper. The spectrum is very close to one of Kolmogorov's isotropic turbulence and Frisch's intermittent turbulence in inertial region. In this paper, the Kdv-Burgers equation to describe atmospheric boundary layer turbulence is obtained. In the equation, the 1 / R e corresponds to dissipative coefficient v, R /2 t to dispersive coefficient β, then ( v/2 β)2 corresponds to 1 / R 2 e • Ri. We prove that the wave number corresponding to maximum energy spectrum S(k) decreases with the decrease of stability (i.e., the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 in eddy—containing region. And the spectrim amplitude decreases with the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 (i.e., the decrease of stability). These results are consistent with actual turbulence spectrum of atmospheric surface layer from turbulence data.

  10. Time frequency spectrum of atmospheric turbulence and sweeping hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The present study is focused on the structure of time frequency spectrum.A scaling law for Eulerian time frequency spectrum and the corresponding temporal structure function are calculated from the sweeping hypothesis and Kolmogorov's similarity law regarding spatial structure function.An experiment is designed to study this scaling law in the atmospheric turbulent boundary layer.The results well support the conclusion derived from relevant theoretical analysis.

  11. Energy Spectrum of Buoyancy-Driven Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G.; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux $\\Pi_u$, we demonstrate that for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum $E_u(k) \\sim k^{-11/5}$, the entropy spectrum $E_\\theta(k) \\sim k^{-7/5}$, and $\\Pi_u(k) \\sim k^{-4/5}$, consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence $E_u(k)$ follo...

  12. Quantum Turbulence: Vortex Bundle Collapse and Kolmogorov Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K.

    2015-12-01

    The statement of problem is motivated by the idea of modeling the classical turbulence with a set of chaotic quantized vortex filaments in superfluids. Among various arguments supporting the idea of quasi-classic behavior of quantum turbulence, the strongest, probably, is the k dependence of the spectra of energy, E(k)∝ k^{-5/3} obtained in numerical simulations and experiments. At the same time, the mechanism of classical vs. quantum turbulence is not clarified and the source of the k^{-5/3} dependence is unclear. In this work, we concentrated on the nonuniform vortex bundles. This choice is related to the actively discussed question concerning a role of collapses in the vortex dynamics in formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrate that the nonuniform vortex bundles, which appear in result of nonlinear vortex dynamics, generates an energy spectrum which is close to the Kolmogorov dependence ∝ k^{-5/3}.

  13. Energy Spectrum of Buoyancy-driven Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K; Chatterjee, Anando G

    2014-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulation we demonstrate that stably stratified flows with large Richardson number follow Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling, i.e, the kinetic energy spectrum $E_u(k) \\sim k^{-11/5}$, the entropy spectrum $E_\\theta(k) \\sim k^{-7/5}$, and kinetic energy flux $\\Pi_u(k) \\sim k^{-4/5}$. This is due to the conversion of kinetic energy to potential energy because of buoyancy. We also demonstrate that $E_u(k) \\sim k^{-5/3}$ for stratified flow with weaker buoyancy or smaller Richardson number. We argue that due to the positive energy supply by buoyancy and non-decreasing $\\Pi_u(k)$, Rayleigh B\\'{e}nard convection should follow Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling ($E_u(k) \\sim k^{-5/3}$).

  14. Energy spectrum of stably-stratified and convective turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra; Kumar, Abhishek

    2015-11-01

    In the inertial range of fluid turbulence, the energy flux is constant, while the energy spectrum scales as k - 5 / 3 (k=wavenumber). The buoyancy however could change the phenomenology dramatically. Bolgiano and Obukhov (1959) had conjectured that stably stratified flows (as in atmosphere) exhibits a decrease in the energy flux as k - 4 / 5 due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy, consequently, the energy spectrum scales as k - 11 / 5. We show using detailed numerical analysis that the stably stratified flows indeed exhibit k - 11 / 5 energy spectrum for Froude numbers Fr near unity. The flow becomes anisotropic for small Froude numbers. For weaker buoyancy (large Fr), the kinetic energy follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. However, in convective turbulence, the energy flux is a nondecreasing function of wavenumber since the buoyancy feeds positively into the kinetic energy. Hence, the kinetic energy spectrum is Kolmogorov-like (k - 5 / 3) or shallower. We also demonstrate the above scaling using a shell model of buoyancy-driven turbulence.

  15. Turbulent kinetic energy spectrum in very anisothermal flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain_serra@bbox.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Toutant, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.toutant@univ-Perp.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Bataille, Françoise, E-mail: francoise.bataille@promes.cnrs.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Zhou, Ye, E-mail: yezhou@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we find that the Kolmogorov scaling law is no longer valid when the flow is submitted to strong dilatational effects caused by high temperature gradients. As a result, in addition to the nonlinear time scale, there is a much shorter “temperature gradients” time scale. We propose a model that estimates the time scale of the triple decorrelation incorporating the influences of the temperature gradient. The model agrees with the results from the thermal large-eddy simulations of different Reynolds numbers and temperature gradients. This Letter provides a better understanding of the very anisothermal turbulent flow. -- Highlights: ► Turbulent flows subject to high temperature gradients are considered. ► The new “temperature gradients” time scale is determined. ► A generalized energy spectrum is developed to incorporate the effects of temperature gradient.

  16. Turbulent kinetic energy spectrum in very anisothermal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter, we find that the Kolmogorov scaling law is no longer valid when the flow is submitted to strong dilatational effects caused by high temperature gradients. As a result, in addition to the nonlinear time scale, there is a much shorter “temperature gradients” time scale. We propose a model that estimates the time scale of the triple decorrelation incorporating the influences of the temperature gradient. The model agrees with the results from the thermal large-eddy simulations of different Reynolds numbers and temperature gradients. This Letter provides a better understanding of the very anisothermal turbulent flow. -- Highlights: ► Turbulent flows subject to high temperature gradients are considered. ► The new “temperature gradients” time scale is determined. ► A generalized energy spectrum is developed to incorporate the effects of temperature gradient.

  17. The Turbulence Power Spectrum in Optically Thick Interstellar Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J

    2013-01-01

    The Fourier power spectrum is one of the most widely used statistical tools to analyze the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the interstellar medium. Lazarian & Pogosyan (2004) predicted that the spectral slope should saturate to -3 for an optically thick medium and many observations exist in support of their prediction. However, there have not been any numerical studies to-date testing these results. We analyze the spatial power spectrum of MHD simulations with a wide range of sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers, which include radiative transfer effects of the $^{13}$CO transition. We confirm numerically the predictions of Lazarian & Pogosyan (2004) that the spectral slope of line intensity maps of an optically thick medium saturates to -3. Furthermore, for very optically thin supersonic CO gas, where the density or CO abundance values are too low to excite emission in all but the densest shock compressed gas, we find that the spectral slope is shallower than expected from the column density....

  18. Turbulence strength estimation and super-resolution from an arbitrary set of atmospherically degraded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamek, Steve; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2006-08-01

    In remote sensing, atmospheric turbulence and aerosols limit the image quality. For many practical cases turbulence is shown to be dominant, especially for horizontal close-to-earth imaging in hot environments. In a horizontal long-range imaging it is usually impractical to measure path-averaged refractive index structure constant C n2 (which characterizes the turbulence strength) with conventional equipment. In this paper we propose a method for estimation of C n2 based just on the available recorded turbulence-degraded image sequence. The method exploits the turbulence-induced image "dancing". C n2 is extracted from the estimated image shifts variance. Experimental comparison with C n2 measurements using a scintillometer shows reliable estimation results. We also estimate image motion with sub-pixel accuracy for the purpose of obtaining a high-resolution image by applying a simple super-resolution procedure. Results of super-resolution for real imagery are presented.

  19. On the technique for the recovery of the spectrum of turbulence in astrophysical discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisikalo, D. V.; Kurbatov, E. P.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. N.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Kaygorodov, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    We present a method that can be used to recover the spectrum of turbulence from observations of optically thin emission lines formed in astrophysical discs. Within this method, we analyse how line intensity fluctuations depend on the angular resolution of the instrument, used for the observations. The method allows us to restore the slope of the power spectrum of velocity turbulent pulsations and estimate the upper boundary of the turbulence scale.

  20. Formation of spectrum of accelerated particles and the hydromagnetic turbulence in the variable magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the acceleration of charged particles by the variable magnetic field. The study is based on the determination of spectrum of accelerated particles and the spectrum of hydro magnetic turbulence. We plan the self-consistent system of equation and we also find out the solution of the system for the spectrum of particles and hydro magnetic turbulence with the conditions of effective acceleration in the cosmic space of solar system. (author)

  1. The Analyses of Turbulence Characteristics in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Zhang, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulent characteristics in the atmospheric surface layer are investigated using a data-driven method, Hilbert spectral analysis. The results from empirical mode decomposition display a set of intrinsic mode functions whose characteristic scales suggest a dyadic filter-bank property. It can be concluded from the joint probability density function of the intrinsic mode functions that the turbulent properties are totally different under different stratifications: the amplitudes (or energies) are arranged according to the stability parameter [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] for stable conditions, but tend to cluster randomly for unstable cases. The intermittency analyses reveal that second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display a power-law behaviour in the inertial subrange, and that the scaling exponent functions deviate from the theoretical values due to the strong intermittency in the stable boundary layer.

  2. THE POWER SPECTRUM OF TURBULENCE IN NGC 1333: OUTFLOWS OR LARGE-SCALE DRIVING?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is the turbulence in cluster-forming regions internally driven by stellar outflows or the consequence of a large-scale turbulent cascade? We address this question by studying the turbulent energy spectrum in NGC 1333. Using synthetic 13CO maps computed with a snapshot of a supersonic turbulence simulation, we show that the velocity coordinate spectrum method of Lazarian and Pogosyan provides an accurate estimate of the turbulent energy spectrum. We then apply this method to the 13CO map of NGC 1333 from the COMPLETE database. We find that the turbulent energy spectrum is a power law, E(k) ∝ k -β, in the range of scales 0.06 pc ≤l ≤ 1.5 pc, with slope β = 1.85 ± 0.04. The estimated energy injection scale of stellar outflows in NGC 1333 is linj ∼ 0.3 pc, well resolved by the observations. There is no evidence of the flattening of the energy spectrum above the scale linj predicted by outflow-driven simulations and analytical models. The power spectrum of integrated intensity is also a nearly perfect power law in the range of scales 0.16 pc inj. We conclude that the observed turbulence in NGC 1333 does not appear to be driven primarily by stellar outflows.

  3. Transition from thermal to turbulent equilibrium with a resulting electromagnetic spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent paper [Ziebell et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010701 (2014)] discusses a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of quasi-equilibrium between the particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. Such a system may be an example of the so-called “turbulent quasi-equilibrium.” In the present paper, it is shown on the basis of electromagnetic weak turbulence theory that an initial thermal equilibrium state (i.e., only electrostatic fluctuations and Maxwellian particle distributions) transitions toward the turbulent quasi-equilibrium state with enhanced electromagnetic radiation spectrum, thus demonstrating that the turbulent quasi-equilibrium discussed in the above paper correctly describes the weakly turbulent plasma dynamically interacting with electromagnetic fluctuations, while maintaining a dynamical steady-state in the average sense

  4. Spectrum of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure and response of a polyvinylidence fluoride hydrophone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Huiliang; HE Zuoyong; BAO Xuemei

    2001-01-01

    The point power spectrum density and the wavenumber frequency spectrum density of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure were measured in water-tunnel by use of a φ8 mm hydrophone and a 20-element array, respectively. The non-dimensional representation of measured point power spectrum coincides with the measured results by Bull M. K. et. al. in wind tunnel. The convection peak can be seen clearly in the measured wavenumber frequencyspectrum and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.The response spectrum of a polyvinylidence fluoride (PVDF) hydrophone, which receiving area is 100 mm × 60 mm, was also measured. By comparing it with the response spectrum of the φ8 mm hydrophone, it is shown that the PVDF hyrdophone has a strong wavenumber filtering effect on turbulent-boundary-layer pressure fluctuation.

  5. Investigations of the Turbulent Energy Spectrum in an Oscillating Grid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stephen C.; Honey, Rose E.; Donnelly, Russell J.

    1998-03-01

    We report a novel technique to investigate the turbulent energy spectrum generated by an oscillating grid in water. We suspend tubes of a variety of diameters below the oscillating grid and measure the steady state position in the tube of the turbulent front. This position decreases (becomes closer to the grid) as the tube diameter is decreased. We present a model, in which the tubes act as low-pass filters that exclude eddies larger than the tube diameter, to explain the observations and discuss the implications for the turbulent energy spectrum. We estimate the effect of boundary layers formed on the tubes. due to viscosity before the larger ones. The energy spectrum in cross-sections further and further from the grid is contained in an increasingly narrow range of eddy sizes towards the larger eddies. The tubes, acting as low-pass filters, exclude eddies of size larger than the tube diameter and are only filled with eddies smaller than the tube. Therefore, the turbulence in a smaller tube is expected to decay away before turbulence in a larger tube which contains more larger, longer lived eddies.

  6. Phase noise effects on turbulent weather radar spectrum parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonggil; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate weather spectrum moment estimation is important in the use of weather radar for hazardous windshear detection. The effect of the stable local oscillator (STALO) instability (jitter) on the spectrum moment estimation algorithm is investigated. Uncertainty in the stable local oscillator will affect both the transmitted signal and the received signal since the STALO provides transmitted and reference carriers. The proposed approach models STALO phase jitter as it affects the complex autocorrelation of the radar return. The results can therefore by interpreted in terms of any source of system phase jitter for which the model is appropriate and, in particular, may be considered as a cumulative effect of all radar system sources.

  7. Spectrum and Anisotropy of Turbulence from Multi-Frequency Measurement of Synchrotron Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We consider turbulent synchrotron emitting media that also exhibits Faraday rotation and provide a statistical description of synchrotron polarization fluctuations. In particular, we consider these fluctuations as a function of the spatial separation of the direction of measurements and as a function of wavelength for the same line-of-sight. On the basis of our general analytical approach, we introduce several measures that can be used to obtain the spectral slopes and correlation scales of both the underlying magnetic turbulence responsible for emission and the spectrum of the Faraday rotation fluctuations. We show the synergetic nature of these measures and discuss how the study can be performed using sparsely sampled interferometric data. We also discuss how additional characteristics of turbulence can be obtained, including the turbulence anisotropy, the three dimensional direction of the mean magnetic field. We consider both cases when the synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation regions coincide and wh...

  8. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element approach to non-steady state turbulent fluid flow with application to mould filling in casting

    OpenAIRE

    Gaston, Laurence; Kamara, Alima; Bellet, Michel

    2000-01-01

    This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article : An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element approach to non-steady state turbulent fluid flow with application to mould filling in casting, Gaston L., Kamara A., Bellet M. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 34, 4 (2000) pages 341-369, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1097-0363(20001030)34:4%3C341::AID-FLD64%3E3.0.CO;2-K International audience This paper presents a t...

  9. Coherent structures and turbulent spectrum in solar wind plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R. P.; Yadav, N.; Kumari, Anju [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2013-08-15

    The present paper investigates the localization of a uniform plane kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) due to the coupling with the density/magnetic field fluctuations associated with a magnetosonic wave propagating in the transverse direction, i.e., perpendicular to the background magnetic field. To gain the physical insight into this evolution, a simplified analytical model based on the Mathieu equation has also been studied. Numerical method has also been used to analyse the evolution of KAW. The magnetic fluctuation spectrum follows Kolmogorovian scaling above the proton gyroradius scalelength, which is regarded as the inertial range. Below this scale, a steepened spectrum has been obtained in the dispersive range with power law index ∼−2.5, which continues up to the dissipation range. Our results reveal that the proposed mechanism may be an interesting physical mechanism for transferring the energy from larger lengthscales to smaller lengthscales in the solar wind plasmas. Relevance of the present study with Cluster spacecraft observations has also been discussed.

  10. Scattering of energetic particles by anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a goldreich-sridhar power spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran

    2000-11-27

    Scattering rates for a Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) spectrum of anisotropic, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are calculated in the quasilinear approximation. Because the small-scale fluctuations are constrained to have wave vectors nearly perpendicular to the background magnetic field, scattering is too weak to provide either the mean-free paths commonly used in Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models or the mean-free paths required for acceleration of cosmic rays at quasiparallel shocks. Where strong pitch-angle scattering occurs, it is due to fluctuations not described by the GS spectrum, such as fluctuations generated by streaming cosmic rays. PMID:11082620

  11. The Turbulence Spectrum of Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Ring Survey: A Density-Dependent PCA Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Federrath, Christoph; Brunt, Christopher; Heyer, Mark; Jackson, James; Klessen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence plays a major role in the formation and evolution of molecular clouds. The problem is that turbulent velocities are convolved with the density of an observed region. To correct for this convolution, we investigate the relation between the turbulence spectrum of model clouds, and the statistics of their synthetic observations obtained from Principal Component Analysis (PCA). We apply PCA to spectral maps generated from simulated density and velocity fields, obtained from hydrodynami...

  12. Definition of the local fields of velocity, temperature and turbulent characteristics for axial stabilized fluid in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the temperature fields in rod clads of experimental assemblies a good agreement have been got with use of prior calculations by subchannel code COBRA-IV-I, from results of which an additional information about δt/δX3 distribution was taken. The method of definition the local fields of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, temperature and eddy diffusivities for one-phase axial stabilized fluids in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies with invariable upward geometry was developed. According to this model the AGURA code was worked out to calculate local thermal hydraulic problems in combination with temperature fields in fuel rods and constructive elements of fuel assemblies. The method does not use any prior geometric scales and is based only on invariant local flow parameters: turbulent kinetic energy, velocity field deformation tensor and specific work of inner friction. Verification of this method by available experimental data showed a good agreement of calculation data and findings of velocity and t.k.e. fields, when the secondary flows have not a substantial influence to a balance of axial momentum and turbulent kinetic energy. (author)

  13. Spectrum and Anisotropy of Turbulence from Multi-frequency Measurement of Synchrotron Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2016-02-01

    We consider turbulent synchrotron-emitting media that also exhibit Faraday rotation and provide a statistical description of synchrotron polarization fluctuations. In particular, we consider these fluctuations as a function of the spatial separation of the direction of the measurements and as a function of wavelength for the same line of sight. On the basis of our general analytical approach, we introduce several measures that can be used to obtain the spectral slopes and correlation scales of both the underlying magnetic turbulence responsible for emission and the spectrum of the Faraday rotation fluctuations. We show the synergetic nature of these measures and discuss how the study can be performed using sparsely sampled interferometric data. We also discuss how additional characteristics of turbulence can be obtained, including the turbulence anisotropy and the three-dimensional direction of the mean magnetic field. In addition, we consider the cases when the synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation regions are spatially separated. Appealing to our earlier study, we explain that our new results are applicable to a wide range of spectral indexes of relativistic electrons responsible for synchrotron emission. We expect wide application of our techniques, both with existing synchrotron data sets and with big forthcoming data sets from LOFAR and SKA.

  14. Universality of spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number in isotropic steady turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    Spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number up to 1000 in isotropic steady turbulence has been studied by using very high resolution DNS. Gaussian random force and scalar source which are isotropic and white in time are applied at low wavenumber band. Since the Schmidt number is very large, the system was integrated for 72 large eddy turn over time for the system to forgot the initial state. It is found that the scalar spectrum attains the asymptotic k-1 spectrum in the viscous-convective range and the constant CB is found to be 5.7 which is larger than 4.9 obtained by DNS under the uniform mean scalar gradient. Reasons for the difference are inferred as the Reynolds number effect, anisotropy, difference in the scalar injection, duration of time average, and the universality of the constant is discussed. The constant CB is also compared with the prediction by the Lagrangian statistical theory for the passive scalar. The scalar spectrum in the far diffusive range is found to be exponential, which is consistent with the Kraichnan's spectrum. However, the Kraichnan spectrum was derived under the assumption that the velocity field is white in time, therefore theoretical explanation of the agreement needs to be explored. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 21360082, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  15. Wave turbulence theory for gravitational waves in general relativity: The Space-Time Kolmogorov spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Rica, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of gravitational waves, stimulates the question of the longtime evolution of the space-time fluctuations. Gravitational waves interact themselves through the nonlinear character of Einstein's equations of general relativity. This nonlinear wave interaction allows the spectral energy transfer from mode to mode. According to the wave turbulence theory, the weakly nonlinear interaction of gravitational waves leads to the existence of an irreversible kinetic regime that dominates the longtime evolution. The resulting kinetic equation suggests the existence of an equilibrium wave spectrum and the existence of a non-equilibrium Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum for spatio-temporal fluctuations. Evidence of these solutions extracted in the fluctuating signal of the recent observations will be discussed in the paper. Probably, the present results would be pertinent in the new age of development of gravitational astronomy, as well as, in new tests of General Relativity.

  16. Turbulence in nearly incompressible fluids: density spectrum, flows, correlations and implication to the interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dastgeer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstellar scintillation and angular radio wave broadening measurements show that interstellar and solar wind (electron density fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k-5/3 power spectrum extending over many decades in wavenumber space. The ubiquity of the Kolmogorov-like interstellar medium (ISM density spectrum led to an explanation based on coupling incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD fluctuations to density fluctuations through a 'pseudosound' relation within the context of 'nearly incompressible' (NI hydrodynamics (HD and MHD models. The NI theory provides a fundamentally different explanation for the observed ISM density spectrum in that the density fluctuations can be a consequence of passive scalar convection due to background incompressible fluctuations. The theory further predicts generation of long-scale structures and various correlations between the density, temperature and the (magneto acoustic as well as convective pressure fluctuations in the compressible ISM fluids in different thermal regimes that are determined purely by the thermal fluctuation level. In this paper, we present the results of our two dimensional nonlinear fluid simulations, exploring various nonlinear aspects that lead to inertial range ISM turbulence within the context of a NI hydrodymanics model. In qualitative agreement with the NI predictions and the in-situ observations, we find that i the density fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like spectrum via a passive convection in the field of the background incompressible fluctuations, ii the compressible ISM fluctuations form long scale flows and structures, and iii the density and the temperature fluctuations are anti-correlated.

  17. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ1 : λ2 : λ3 is shown to be about 4:1:−5, compared to about 8:3:−11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume deformations. The results

  18. Localization of Dispersive Alfvén Wave in Solar wind plasmas and Turbulent Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind turbulence at large inertial scales is well known for decades and believed to consist of Alfvén cascade. The inertial range of Solar wind turbulence can be described by a magnetohydrodynamic model. But at small scales the MHD description is not valid. At scales of the order of proton inertial length, Alfvén cascade excites kinetic Alfvén wave or fast wave or whistler wave that carries wave energy to smaller scales. On the other hand, parallel propagating right(R) and left(L) circularly polarized Alfvén/ ion cyclotron wave in the framework of Hall MHD are also thought to be essential ingredients of the solar wind turbulence. Recently, He et.al[1] have used the magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the magnetic helicities in the solar wind turbulence and reported the possible existence of Alfvén -cyclotron waves and their coexistence with the right handed polarized fluctuations. In the present article we intend to study the right circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) and their role in the solar wind turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term causes the dispersion of the AW which, in the present study, is considered on account of the finite frequency (frequency comparable to ion gyro frequency) of the pump wave. Filamentation instability has been reported to occur for the case of circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) propagating parallel to ambient magnetic field. In the present study, the instability arises on account of the transverse density perturbations of the acoustic wave that may couple nonlinearly with the Alfvén wave and the driven ponderomotive force sequentially leads to growth of density perturbations. Numerical simulation involves finite difference method for the time domain and pseudo spectral method for the spatial domain. The power spectrum is investigated which shows a steepening for scales larger than the proton inertial length. These findings have been reported by Alexandrova et al

  19. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry L., E-mail: pjohns86@jhu.edu; Meneveau, Charles [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Center for Environmental and Applied Fluid Mechanics, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ{sub 1} : λ{sub 2} : λ{sub 3} is shown to be about 4:1:−5, compared to about 8:3:−11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume

  20. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  1. Turbulent magnetic energy spectrum and the cancellation function of solar photospheric magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Marschalkó, G

    2014-01-01

    A simple analytical relation of form {\\alpha} = 2 {\\kappa} -1 between the magnetic energy spectral exponent {\\alpha} of the turbulent magnetic field in the solar photosphere and its magnetic flux cancellation exponent {\\kappa}, valid under certain restrictive assumptions, is tested and extended outside its range of validity in a series of Monte Carlo simulations. In these numerical tests artificial "magnetograms" are constructed in 1D and 2D by superposing a discrete set of Fourier modes of the magnetic field distribution with amplitudes following a power law spectrum and measuring the cancellation function on these simulated magnetograms. Our results confirm the validity of the analytical relation and extend it to the domain {\\alpha} 0 as {\\alpha} ---> - infinity. The observationally derived upper limit of 0.38 on {\\kappa} implies {\\alpha} < -0.24 in the granular size range, apparently at odds with a small scale dynamo driven in the inertial range.

  2. Shaping the X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters with AGN feedback and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; Ruszkowski, M

    2014-01-01

    The hot plasma filling galaxy clusters emits copious radiation in the X-ray band. The classic unheated and unperturbed cooling flow model predicts dramatic cooling rates and an isobaric X-ray spectrum with constant differential luminosity distribution, $dL_{\\rm x}/dT \\propto (T/T_{\\rm hot})^0$. Combining past observations, it is however clear that the cores of clusters (and groups) show a strong deficit of emission increasing toward the soft X-ray band: $dL_{\\rm x}/dT \\propto (T/T_{\\rm hot})^{\\alpha=2\\pm1}$. Using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, we show that the deficit arises from the competition of thermal instability condensation and AGN outflow injection. During tight self-regulated feedback, the average luminosity distribution slope is $\\alpha\\approx2$, oscillating within the observed $18$), while pure cooling drives a too shallow slope, $\\alpha<1$. We disentangle the role of heating and turbulence via controlled experiments. Distributed heating alone induces a declining X-ray spectrum with $1<\\alpha&...

  3. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  4. An evaluation method of the neutron fluence and spectrum by measuring the change of isotopic abundance ratios of arbitrary pairs of nuclides on heavy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation method of the neutron fluence and mean spectrum with which samples have been irradiated is proposed. The principle is based on measuring the change of the isotopic abundance ratios of arbitrary pairs of nuclides having different neutron absorption cross sections for both thermal and intermediate neutrons. Advantages of the method are as follows, although sensitivity is lower than that of the ordinary activation method in a short irradiation period. i) Any sample can be used irrespective of irradiation history. ii) Nuclides present as impurities in samples can be used as detectors. iii) Neutron fluences and mean spectra with which samples have been heavily irradiated can be measured with reasonable accuracy, thus making it possible to offer the direct information to radiation damage studies. The present study deals with the principle and applicability of the method. (author)

  5. Sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional turbulence and the energy spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2010-01-01

    Formation of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. The analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the di-vorticity lines...

  6. Establishing arbitrariness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Phillips

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available States have international obligations to ensure that all deprivations of an individual’s liberty are consistent with international human rights law. The majority of provisions in the international human rights law instruments that deal with such deprivations of liberty contain the term ‘arbitrary’, yet there is no clear definition of what this entails. Arbitrariness is defined differently by different supervisory bodies in different cases, and in different contexts; understanding it requires awareness of the different factors affecting how individual deprivations of liberty are examined and understood.A longer version of this article can be found at:http://tinyurl.com/HRD-arbitrary-August2013

  7. Sensitivity of Cosmic-Ray Proton Spectra to the Low-wavenumber Behavior of the 2D Turbulence Power Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a novel ab initio cosmic ray (CR) modulation code that solves a set of stochastic transport equations equivalent to the Parker transport equation, and that uses output from a turbulence transport code as input for the diffusion tensor, is introduced. This code is benchmarked with a previous approach to ab initio modulation. The sensitivity of computed galactic CR proton spectra at Earth to assumptions made as to the low-wavenumber behavior of the two-dimensional (2D) turbulence power spectrum is investigated using perpendicular mean free path expressions derived from two different scattering theories. Constraints on the low-wavenumber behavior of the 2D power spectrum are inferred from the qualitative comparison of computed CR spectra with spacecraft observations at Earth. Another key difference from previous studies is that observed and inferred CR intensity spectra at 73 AU are used as boundary spectra instead of the usual local interstellar spectrum. Furthermore, the results presented here provide a tentative explanation as to the reason behind the unusually high galactic proton intensity spectra observed in 2009 during the recent unusual solar minimum.

  8. Establishing arbitrariness

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Phillips

    2013-01-01

    States have international obligations to ensure that all deprivations of an individual’s liberty are consistent with international human rights law. The majority of provisions in the international human rights law instruments that deal with such deprivations of liberty contain the term ‘arbitrary’, yet there is no clear definition of what this entails. Arbitrariness is defined differently by different supervisory bodies in different cases, and in different contexts; understanding it requires ...

  9. Turbulent Cosmic-Ray Reacceleration and the Curved Radio Spectrum of the Radio Relic in the Sausage Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka; Kimura, Shigeo S

    2016-01-01

    It has often been thought that the northern radio relic in the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 (the "Sausage" Cluster) is associated with cosmic-ray (CR) electrons that are accelerated at a shock through diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. However, recent radio observations have shown that the radio spectrum is curved, which is inconsistent with the prediction of a simple DSA model. Moreover, the CR electron spectrum before being affected by radiative cooling seems to be too hard for the DSA. In this study, we show that these facts are natural consequences if the electrons are reaccelerated in turbulence in the downstream of the shock. In this model, the DSA is not the main mechanism to generate high-energy electrons. We find that the mean free path of the electrons should be much shorter than the Coulomb mean free path for efficient reacceleration. The scale of the turbulent eddies must be smaller than the width of the relic. We also predict hard X-ray spectra of inverse Compton scattering of phot...

  10. Two-time correlation of heat release rate and spectrum of combustion noise from turbulent premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of combustion noise are dictated by the temporal correlation of the overall change of heat release rate fluctuations which has not received sufficient attention in prior studies. In this work, the two-time correlation of the volumetric heat release rate fluctuations within the flame brush and its role in modeling combustion noise spectrum are investigated by analyzing direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent premixed V-flames. This two-time correlation can be well represented by Gaussian-type functions and it captures the slow global variation of the fluctuating heat release rate and hence the low-frequency noise sources of unsteady combustion. The resulting correlation model is applied to predict the far-field noise spectrum from test open flames, and different reference time scales are used to scale this correlation from the DNS data to the test flames. The comparison between predictions and measurements indicates that the correlation models of all reference time scales are capable of reproducing the essential spectral shape including the low- and high-frequency dependencies. Reasonable agreement in the peak frequency, peak sound pressure level, and the Strouhal number scaling of peak frequency is also achieved for two turbulent time scales. A promising convective time scale shows great potential for characterizing the spectral features, yet its predictive capabilities are to be further verified through a longer DNS signal of a bounded flame configuration.

  11. Turbulent cosmic ray reacceleration and the curved radio spectrum of the radio relic in the Sausage Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Kimura, Shigeo S.

    2016-06-01

    It has often been thought that the northern radio relic in the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 (the "Sausage" Cluster) is associated with cosmic ray (CR) electrons that are accelerated at a shock through the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. However, recent radio observations have shown that the radio spectrum is curved, which is inconsistent with the prediction of a simple DSA model. Moreover, the CR electron spectrum before being affected by radiative cooling seems to be too hard for DSA. In this study, we show that these facts are natural consequences if the electrons are reaccelerated in turbulence downstream of the shock. In this model, DSA is not the main mechanism for generating high-energy electrons. We find that the mean free path of the electrons should be much shorter than the Coulomb mean free path for efficient reacceleration. The scale of the turbulent eddies must be smaller than the width of the relic. We also predict hard X-ray spectra of inverse Compton scattering of photons.

  12. Analysis of power spectrum density in the PWR fuel assembly using the 3-dimensional LES turbulent model of Fluent-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulence-induced vibration is an important concern in the design of the spacer grids of nuclear power plants. This study addresses numerically and statistically the effects of random pressures due to turbulent flows upon the fluctuating responses to the power spectrum density in one-dimensional nuclear fuel rod supported simply by the spacer grids. The dynamic forces produced by the pressure fluctuation on the rod surface are calculated by the 3-dimensional large eddy simulation turbulent model in Fluent-6 to simulate the flow field in the same as being measured empirically via pressure transducers. To acquire response to fluctuating pressure, the mode response equation of vibration is used in case of a cylindrical rod in one-dimensional case. The first modal longitudinal joint acceptance integral including a coherence function is also an important parameter affecting the displacement in the form of the root-mean-square of modal responses along with the damping ratio. The root mean square of the lateral displacement in addition to the natural frequency is studied using the power spectral density (PSD) and the longitudinal joint acceptance integral in a fundamental mode. The PSD random pressure on the middle point of the rod shows the typical turbulence pattern: the PSD energy decreases slightly in a low frequency region, but decreases rapidly and linearly with frequency as the frequency exceeds a certain value. The PSD in a very high frequency region is obtained assuming the slope is constant in a logarithmic graph after smoothing the PSD. It turns out that the root-mean-square of displacement ranges from 15 to 40 micro-meter at the maximum value using the mode response equation under the modal damping ratio ranging from 0.01 to 0.05. (authors)

  13. Particle acceleration at shock waves: particle spectrum as a function of the equation of state of the shocked plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Morlino, G.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Vietri, M.

    2007-01-01

    We determine the spectrum of particles accelerated at shocks with arbitrary speed and arbitrary scattering properties for different choices of the equation of state of the downstream plasma. More specifically we consider the effect of energy exchange between the electron and proton thermal components downstream, and the effect of generation of a turbulent magnetic field in the downstream plasma. The slope of the spectrum turns out to be appreciably affected by all these phenomena, especially ...

  14. How arbitrary is language?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Qi

    2012-01-01

      To a large degree,language is arbitrary. But there are exceptions to prove that language is not always arbitrary. However,non-arbitrariness is itself inevitably arbitrary. In fact,arbitrariness and non-arbitrariness work together to complete a language. It seems that they contradict to each other, but they actually coexist as a whole in the same unity.

  15. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  16. Quenching the X-ray spectrum of hot halos with AGN outflows and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, M.

    2016-06-01

    I highlight recent advancements in the astrophysics of AGN outflow feedback and diffuse hot gas. Thanks to XMM RGS resolution, we know that the X-ray cores of clusters, groups, and massive galaxies have a strong deficit of soft X-ray emission compared with the classic cooling flow prediction: dL_{x}/dT ∝ (T/T_{hot})^{2±1}. Using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, I show that such deficit arises from the tight self-regulation between thermal instability condensation and AGN outflow feedback. Multiphase filaments condense out of the hot plasma, they rain onto the central SMBH, and boost the AGN outflows via chaotic cold accretion. The sub-relativistic outflows thermalize in the core via shocks and turbulence, releasing more heat in the inner cooler phase, thus inducing the observed soft X-ray decline. I discuss how we can leverage XMM capabilities in the next decade by probing turbulence, conduction, AGN accretion and outflows via the information contained in X-ray spectra and surface brightness. I focus on the importance of selecting a few objects with Ms exposure and how we can unveil multiphase halos through the synergy between simulations and multiwavelength observations.

  17. Universal form of the carrier frequency of scalar and vector paraxial X waves with orbital angular momentum and arbitrary frequency spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Conti, Claudio; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    We report on the dependence of the carrier frequency of a nondiffracting optical pulse on the amount of orbital angular momentum it carries. We provide a unified universal form of such a dependence for the cases of both scalar and vector pulses with arbitrary frequency spectra. For the case of paraxial optical pulses we consider two different examples, namely, pulses with exponentially decaying spectra and Gaussian spectra.

  18. Infrared properties of the energy spectrum in freely decaying isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, W. D.

    2016-01-01

    The low wave number expansion of the energy spectrum takes the well known form E (k ,t ) =E2(t ) k2+E4(t ) k4+⋯ , where the coefficients are weighted integrals against the correlation function C (r ,t ) . We show that expressing E (k ,t ) in terms of the longitudinal correlation function f (r ,t ) immediately yields E2(t ) =0 by cancellation. We verify that the same result is obtained using the correlation function C (r ,t ) , provided only that f (r ,t ) falls off faster than r-3 at large values of r . As power-law forms are widely studied for the purpose of establishing bounds, we consider the family of model correlations f (r ,t ) =αn(t ) r-n , for positive integer n , at large values of the separation r . We find that for the special case n =3 , the relationship connecting f (r ,t ) and C (r ,t ) becomes indeterminate, and (exceptionally) E2≠0 , but that this solution is unphysical in that the viscous term in the Kármán-Howarth equation vanishes. Lastly, we show that E4(t ) is independent of time, without needing to assume the exponential decrease of correlation functions at large distances.

  19. The infrared properties of the energy spectrum in freely decaying isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    McComb, W D

    2014-01-01

    The low wavenumber expansion of the energy spectrum takes the well known form: $ E(k,t) = E_2(t) k^2 + E_4(t) k^4 + ... $, where the coefficients are weighted integrals against the correlation function $C(r,t)$. We show that expressing $E(k,t)$ in terms of the longitudinal correlation function $f(r,t)$ immediately yields $E_2(t)=0$ by cancellation. We verify that the same result is obtained using the correlation function $C(r,t)$, provided only that $f(r,t)$ falls off faster than $r^{-3}$ at large values of $r$. As power-law forms are widely studied for the purpose of establishing bounds, we consider the family of model correlations $f(r,t)=\\alpha_n(t)r^{-n}$, for positive integer $n$, at large values of the separation $r$. We find that for the special case $n=3$, the relationship connecting $f(r,t)$ and $C(r,t)$ becomes indeterminate, and (exceptionally) $E_2 \

  20. Analytic models of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for arbitrary eclipser/star size ratios and arbitrary multiline stellar spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Baluev, Roman V.; Shaidulin, Vakhit Sh.

    2015-01-01

    We present an attempt to improve models of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect by relaxing several restrictive assumptions. We consider the entire multiline stellar spectrum rather than just a single line, use no assumptions about the shape of the lines profiles, and allow arbitrary size ratio for the star and its eclipser. However, we neglect the effect of macro-turbulence and differential rotation. We construct our model as a power series in the stellar rotation velocity, $V\\sin i$, giving a clo...

  1. Analysis of power spectrum density in the PWR fuel assembly using the 3-D LES turbulent model of FLUENT 6.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FIV(fluid-induced vibration) is an important concern in power and process plants especially in nuclear industry subject to high axial and cross flow causing serious problems. This study addresses the effects of random pressures due to turbulent flows upon the vibrational responses to PSD(power spectrum density) in one dimensional rod supported simply at both ends. Though TIV(turbulenceinduced vibration) takes place under parallel flows where axial flow-induced vibration is a much smaller problem than cross-flow vibration, FIV in axial flow generates random pressure fluctuations due to turbulence mainly around the rod surfaces forcing them vibrate randomly. Dynamic forces produced by the total pressure fluctuating on the rod surface are calculated by the 3 dimensional LES (large eddy simulation) turbulent model in FLUENT 6 to simulate the flow field in CFD code. To acquire response to fluctuating pressure, the response equation of vibration is used in case of a cylindrical rod in one dimensional case. The first modal longitudinal joint acceptance integral including coherence function is an important parameter affecting the vibrational responses in the form of root mean square modal response along with the damping ratio. And the fluctuating stagnation pressure PSD at the wall via FFT transformation in turbulent boundary layer is a key to increasing CHF(critical heat flux). The main goal is not only to enhance the CHF but also to reduce FIV simultaneously, and to apply to designing fuel rods and spacer grid assembly including mixing vanes

  2. Turbulent mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Dimotakis, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of turbulent flows to effectively mix entrained fluids to a molecular scale is a vital part of the dynamics of such flows, with wide-ranging consequences in nature and engineering. It is a considerable experimental, theoretical, modeling, and computational challenge to capture and represent turbulent mixing which, for high Reynolds number (Re) flows, occurs across a spectrum of scales of considerable span. This consideration alone places high-Re mixing phenomena beyond the reach o...

  3. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  4. Wavefront propagation in turbulence: an unified approach to the derivation of angular correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodij, Guillaume

    2011-08-01

    A general expression of the spatial correlation functions of quantities related to the phase fluctuations of a wave that have propagated through the atmospheric turbulence are derived. A generalization of the method to integrand containing the product of an arbitrary number of hypergeometric functions is presented. The formalism is able to give the coefficients of phase-expansion functions orthogonal over an arbitrary circularly symmetric weighting function for an isotropic turbulence spectrum, as well as to describe the effect of the finite outer and inner scales of the turbulence and to describe the spherical propagation or to derive the effects of the analytical operators acting on the phase such as the derivatives of any order. The derivation of the generalized integrals with multiparameters is based on the Mellin transforms integration method. PMID:21811336

  5. Turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulence: theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, G; Eidelman, A; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent thermal diffusion is a combined effect of the temperature stratified turbulence and inertia of small particles. It causes the appearance of a non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles in the direction of the turbulent heat flux. This non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles is proportional to the product of the mean particle number density and the effective velocity of inertial particles. The theory of this effect has been previously developed only for small temperature gradients and small Stokes numbers (Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 76}, 224, 1996). In this study a generalized theory of turbulent thermal diffusion for arbitrary temperature gradients and Stokes numbers has been developed. The laboratory experiments in the oscillating grid turbulence and in the multi-fan produced turbulence have been performed to validate the theory of turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulent flows. It has been shown that the ratio of the effective velocity of inertial particles to the characteristic ve...

  6. Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  7. Cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generalization of a transformation due to Kurskov and Ozernoi is used to rewrite the usual equations governing subsonic turbulence in Robertson-Walker cosmological models as Navier-Stokes equations with a time-dependent viscosity. This paper first rederives some well-known results in a very simple way by means of this transformation. The main result however is that the establishment of a Kolmogorov spectrum at recombination appears to be incompatible with subsonic turbulence. The conditions after recombination are also discussed briefly. (author)

  8. Radio wave scattering observations of the solar corona: First-order measurements of expansion velocity and turbulence spectrum using Viking and Mariner 10 spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar conjunction of Mars on 1976 November 25 occurred very near the beginning of solar cycle 21, about 4 months after the first Viking spacecraft arrived at the planet. Radio wave scattering data were collected at 3.6 and 13 cm wavelengths, using the radio link between the Viking orbiters and the Earth. These data allow measurements of solar wind properties over a range of heliocentric radial distance from approx.6 to 44 R/sub sun/ with solar latitudes ranging from -170 to +70. Observations with Mariner 10 during a period of moderate solar activity in 1974 cover from 6 to 24 R/sub sun/ and from approx.200 to near 900. We have found that the temporal frequency variance spectrum of amplitude fluctuations is useful for characterizing the bulk motion of the plasma. This spectrum has an approximately constant low frequency plateau and a power-law high frequency asymptote; the plateau-asymptote intersection frequency provides a measure of the solar wind velocity V. We also obtain the spectral index p of electron density turbulence, Phi/sub N/approx.kappa/sup -p/, where kappa is spatial wavenumber. These results apply to a cylindrical region oriented with its axis along the radio ray path and its center at the point of closest approach to the Sun. The measurements of V and p cover some 78/sup d/ for Viking and 492 for Mariner 10 and show the combined effects of changing heliocentric distance rho, solar latitude theta, and solar longitude Psi, as well as solar activity. The Viking results can be regarded as a function primary of rho and Psi since the observations are concentrated in the equatorial regions when solar activity was near minimum. For Mariner 10, rho, theta, and Psi variations were important. The Viking results show an abrupt change in V(rho) and the turbulence spectral index at approx.15 R/sub sun/

  9. Shell Model for Buoyancy-driven Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we construct shell models for convective turbulence, e.g., Rayleigh B\\'{e}nard convection, and stably-stratified turbulence. We simulate these models in the turbulent regime and show that the convective turbulence exhibits Kolmogorov spectrum for the kinetic energy, while the stably-stratified turbulence show Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling.

  10. Measurements of electric field intensities and of the spectrum of electric fluctuations in relativistic electron beam driven turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to obtain data for determining magnitudes and fluctuation spectra of local electric fields within a turbulent plasma. A 600 keV, 15 ka, 1 μs, 50 ns risetime electron beam is injected into a 20 cm diameter, 60 cm long polycarbonate drift tube containing 10/sup 13/ cm /sup -3/ hydrogen or helium plasmas, constrained by a 2 kgauss axial magnetic field. The transfer of beam kinetic energy to resonant plasma modes is accompanied by large, local electric fields, the average magnitude and fluctuation spectra of which cannot be measured by physical probes. A small plasma gun containing alkaline earth carbonates is used to create plasma doped with appropriate ions, or a small 10 kV electron source is used to ionize 1 mtorr of helium gas in the drift tube. The doping ions or the helium atoms and ions are then excited by laser photons to levels sensitive to the Stark effect or to levels that yield electric field stimulated optical transitions in the vicinity of forbidden lines. A 20 MW, 20 ns XeCl excimer laser is used to pump various dyes to achieve the necessary wavelengths and photon fluxes for these experiments

  11. Dynamics of the modulational instability of a broad Langmuir wave spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulational instability of a Langmuir turbulence spectrum is considered in which the wave group velocities are great compared with the velocity of ion sound. A dispersion equation is obtained which yields the instability threshold and increment for an arbitrary relation between the modulation space scale and the characteristic Langmuir oscillation wavelength. An equation describing the nonlinear stage of instability of one-dimensional longwave perturbations for the case of a small excess over the threshold is derived and solved by the method of the inverse scattering problem. It is found that the transition of the instability to a nonlinear regime resembles the hard excitation of turbulence in hydrodynamics

  12. Multi-scale theory of rotating turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2007-01-01

    We consider turbulence induced by an arbitrary forcing and derive turbulence amplitude and turbulent transport coefficients, first by using a quasi-linear theory and then by using a multi-scale renormalisation analysis. With an isotropic forcing, the quasi-linear theory gives that the turbulent transport coefficients, both parallel and perpendicular to the rotation vector, have the asymptotic scaling $\\Omega^{-1}$ for rapid rotation (i.e. when the rotation rate $\\Omega$ is larger than the inv...

  13. Arbitrary Spin Galilean Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, C R

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Dirac oscillator was proposed as a modification of the free Dirac equation which reproduces many of the properties of the simple harmonic oscillator but accompanied by a strong spin-orbit coupling term. It has yet to be extended successfully to the arbitrary spin S case primarily because of the unwieldiness of general spin Lorentz invariant wave equations. It is shown here using the formalism of totally symmetric multispinors that the Dirac oscillator can, however, be made to accommodate spin by incorporating it into the framework of Galilean relativity. This is done explicitly for spin zero and spin one as special cases of the arbitrary spin result. For the general case it is shown that the coefficient of the spin-orbit term has a 1/S behavior by techniques which are virtually identical to those employed in the derivation of the g-factor carried out over four decades ago.

  14. Universal statistics of density of inertial particles sedimenting in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Lee, Changhoon

    2014-01-01

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in Navier-Stokes turbulence with small ratio $Fr$ of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. We demonstrate that independently of the particles' size or density the particles distribute over fractal set with log-normal statistics determined completely by the Kaplan-Yorke dimension $D_{KY}$. When inertia is not small $D_{KY}$ is proportional to the ratio of integral of spectrum of turbulence multiplied by wave-number and $g$. This ratio is independent of properties of particles so that the particles concentrate on fractal with universal, particles-independent statistics. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions numerically. The considered case includes typical situation of water droplets in clouds.

  15. Analytic models of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for arbitrary eclipser/star size ratios and arbitrary multiline stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Baluev, Roman V

    2015-01-01

    We present an attempt to improve models of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect by relaxing several restrictive assumptions. For our main model of the Doppler anomaly, we consider the entire multiline stellar spectrum rather than just a single line, use no assumptions about the shape of the lines profiles, and allow arbitrary size ratio for the star and its eclipser. However, we neglect the effect of macro-turbulence and differential rotation. We construct our model as a power series in the stellar rotation velocity, $V\\sin i$, giving a closed set of analytic formulae for up to three terms, and assuming quadratic limb-darkening law. We consider three major approaches of determining the Doppler shift: cross-correlation with a predefined template, cross-correlation with an out-of-transit stellar spectrum, and parametric modelling of the spectrum. We reveal that the Doppler anomaly has an additional first-order (in $V\\sin i$) correction term, while previous works primarily deal with only a second-order correction. Thi...

  16. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  17. Invariants of free turbulent decay

    OpenAIRE

    Llor, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    In practically all turbulent flows, turbulent energy decay is present and competes with numerous other phenomena. In Kolmogorov's theory, decay proceeds by transfer from large energy-containing scales towards small viscous scales through the "inertial cascade." Yet, this description cannot predict an actual decay rate, even in the simplest case of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). As empirically observed over 50 years, the steepness of the "infrared" spectrum - at scales larger than ene...

  18. Galaxy formation from annihilation-generated supersonic turbulence in the baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology and the gamma ray background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Following the big-bang baryon symmetric cosmology of Omnes, the redshift was calculated to be on the order of 500-600. It is show that, at these redshifts, annihilation pressure at the boundaries between regions of matter and antimatter drives large scale supersonic turbulence which can trigger galaxy formation. This picture is consistent with the gamma-ray background observations discussed previously. Gravitational binding of galaxies then occurs at a redshift of about 70, at which time vortical turbulent velocities of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power cm/s lead to angular momenta for galaxies comparable with measured values.

  19. MHD turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, that spectral properties of distributed chaos in MHD turbulence with zero mean magnetic field are similar to those of hydrodynamic turbulence. An exception is MHD spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry, when the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ has $\\beta=4/7$.

  20. Arbitrary shape surface Fresnel diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Fresnel diffraction calculation on an arbitrary shape surface is proposed. This method is capable of calculating Fresnel diffraction from a source surface with an arbitrary shape to a planar destination surface. Although such calculation can be readily calculated by the direct integral of a diffraction calculation, the calculation cost is proportional to $O(N^2)$ in one dimensional or $O(N^4)$ in two dimensional cases, where $N$ is the number of sampling points. However, the calculation cost ...

  1. Wave turbulence buildup in a vibrating plate

    CERN Document Server

    Auliel, Maria Ines; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the buildup of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of a vibrating thin elastic plate. Three steps are observed: first a short linear stage, then the turbulent spectrum is constructed by the propagation of a front in wave number space and finally a long time saturation due to the action of dissipation. The propagation of a front at the second step is compatible with scaling predictions from the Weak Turbulence Theory.

  2. Generalised turbulence spectra for broadband noise predictions with the Random Particle Mesh method

    CERN Document Server

    Wohlbrandt, Attila; Guerin, Sebastien; Ewert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    For better comparison to fan broadband noise experiments the Random Particle Mesh (RPM) method is extended to generalised turbulence spectra. The RPM method synthesises turbulent fluctuations by filtering white noise with a Gaussian filter kernel, which in turn gives a Gaussian spectrum. The Gaussian function is smooth and its derivatives and antiderivatives are again Gaussian functions; the Gaussian filter is efficient and finds wide-spread applications in stochastic signal processing. However in many applications Gaussian spectra are not matching physical spectra. E.g. in turbo-machines, the von Karman, Liepmann, and modified von Karman spectra are the most relevant model spectra. In the current paper we show how to analytically derive weighting functions to realise arbitrary spectra which are isotropic and solenoidal using a superposition of weighted Gaussian spectra of differing length scales. The analytic weighting functions for the von Karman , the Liepmann , and the modified von Karman spectra are deri...

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to, and modern account of, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, an active field both in general turbulence theory and in various areas of astrophysics. The book starts by introducing the MHD equations, certain useful approximations and the transition to turbulence. The second part of the book covers incompressible MHD turbulence, the macroscopic aspects connected with the different self-organization processes, the phenomenology of the turbulence spectra, two-point closure theory, and intermittency. The third considers two-dimensional turbulence and compressi

  4. Classifying Serre subcategories via atom spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Kanda, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the atom spectrum of an abelian category as a topological space consisting of all the equivalence classes of monoform objects. In terms of the atom spectrum, we give a classification of Serre subcategories of an arbitrary noetherian abelian category. Moreover we show that the atom spectrum of a locally noetherian Grothendieck category is homeomorphic to its Ziegler spectrum.

  5. Bell inequalities for arbitrary situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a simple way based on the joint global probability distribution to derive CHSH inequalities. Inspired by this derivation we develop a simple method that gives a set of conditions which are necessary for a model to be a local variable theory. This method generates candidate Bell inequalities for models of arbitrary situations in which there are an arbitrary number of particles, measurements and outcomes. With the help of a type of distribution it will be clear that all necessary conditions are Bell inequalities. This work gives a unified way to write Bell inequalities for arbitrary situations. - Highlights: • Constructing CHSH inequalities based on joint global probability distribution. • Constructing conditions which are necessary for a model to be local and realistic. • Bell inequalities for general situations

  6. Non-linear diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unified theory is presented which describes non-linear effects on relative and absolute diffusion of charged particles in a magnetoplasma, in analogy with analogous methods used for diffusion studies of pollutants in the environment. Explicit results are obtained for non-linear diffusion of test particles represented by their guiding centers in a turbulent energy spectrum in K-1 and K-3, which corresponds to recent measurements in the T.F.R. Tokamak. As expected, a BOHM scaling of the absolute diffusion coefficient is obtained for frozen turbulence. The growth of an initially small cloud of particles in an arbitrary turbulent medium corresponds to the process of relative diffusion. It is described by a generalization of the Brownian motion, including a first stage of very slow initial relative diffusion, followed by a stage of rapid expansion of the cloud up to the final stage in which particles become uncorrelated, and Brownian diffusion is reached asymptotically. The stage of exponential growth, observed in fluid turbulence corresponds to the clump effect in plasma turbulence. It is entirely due to the effect of trajectory correlations. The LJAPUNOV exponent of this exponential separation is obtained analytically. Numerical solutions of the diffusion equation are presented for the effective radius of the cloud as function of time in the case of a model spectrum of drift-wave turbulence. When compared with classical Brownian diffusion of uncorrelated particles, the effective ''diffusion coefficient'' for correlated particles is found to be reduced by orders of magnitude for rather long times. Practical implications for experimental situations are also discussed (Barium clouds released in the ionosphere, pellet injection in e.g. Tokamaks)

  7. Arbitrary shape surface Fresnel diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-04-01

    Fresnel diffraction calculation on an arbitrary shape surface is proposed. This method is capable of calculating Fresnel diffraction from a source surface with an arbitrary shape to a planar destination surface. Although such calculation can be readily calculated by the direct integral of a diffraction calculation, the calculation cost is proportional to O(N²) in one dimensional or O(N⁴) in two dimensional cases, where N is the number of sampling points. However, the calculation cost of the proposed method is O(N log N) in one dimensional or O(N² log N) in two dimensional cases using non-uniform fast Fourier transform. PMID:22513646

  8. Arbitrary shape surface Fresnel diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Fresnel diffraction calculation on an arbitrary shape surface is proposed. This method is capable of calculating Fresnel diffraction from a source surface with an arbitrary shape to a planar destination surface. Although such calculation can be readily calculated by the direct integral of a diffraction calculation, the calculation cost is proportional to $O(N^2)$ in one dimensional or $O(N^4)$ in two dimensional cases, where $N$ is the number of sampling points. However, the calculation cost of the proposed method is $O(N \\log N)$ in one dimensional or $O(N^2 \\log N)$ in two dimensional cases using non-uniform fast Fourier transform.

  9. The Interpretation of Saussure’s Arbitrariness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳

    2015-01-01

    According to Saussure,The arbitrary nature of language is"first principle of linguistic".With the development of cognitive science,some exaggerate the importance of iconicity;some even suggest iconicity should replace arbitrariness.What leads to this extreme view is the misunderstanding of arbitrariness.The paper aims at advocating an overall and objective view towards the arbitrary nature of language,putting forward that arbitrariness and iconicity are not incompatible but complementary.

  10. Spectrum Analysis of Wind Profiling Radar Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮征; 慕瑞琪; 魏鸣; 葛润生

    2014-01-01

    Unlike previous studies on wind turbulence spectrum in the planetary boundary layer, this investigation focuses on high-altitude (1-5 km) wind energy spectrum and turbulence spectrum under various weather conditions. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to calculate the wind energy and turbulence spectrum density at high altitudes (1-5 km) based on wind profiling radar (WPR) measurements. The turbulence spectrum under stable weather conditions at high altitudes is expressed in powers within a frequency range of 2 × 10-5-10-3 s-1, and the slope b is between -0.82 and -1.04, indicating that the turbulence is in the transition from the energetic area to the inertial sub-range. The features of strong weather are reflected less obviously in the wind energy spectrum than in the turbulence spectrum, with peaks showing up at different heights in the latter spectrum. Cold windy weather appears over a period of 1.5 days in the turbulence spectrum. Wide-range rainstorms exhibit two or three peaks in the spectrum over a period of 15-20 h, while in severe convective weather conditions, there are two peaks at 13 and 9 h. The results indicate that spectrum analysis of wind profiling radar measurements can be used as a supplemental and helpful method for weather analysis.

  11. Forced fluid dynamics from gravity in arbitrary dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider long wavelength solutions to the Einstein-dilaton system with negative cosmological constant which are dual, under the AdS/CFT correspondence, to solutions of the conformal relativistic Navier-Stokes equations with a dilaton-dependent forcing term. Certain forced fluid flows are known to exhibit turbulence; holographic duals of forced fluid dynamics are therefore of particular interest as they may aid efforts towards an explicit model of holographic steady state turbulence. In recent work, Bhattacharyya et al. have constructed long wavelength asymptotically locally AdS5 bulk spacetimes with a slowly varying boundary dilaton field which are dual to forced fluid flows on the 4−dimensional boundary. In this paper, we generalise their work to arbitrary spacetime dimensions; we explicitly compute the dual bulk metric, the fluid dynamical stress tensor and Lagrangian to second order in a boundary derivative expansion

  12. Turbulence and galactic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2004-01-01

    Interstellar turbulence is driven over a wide range of scales by processes including spiral arm instabilities and supernovae, and it affects the rate and morphology of star formation, energy dissipation, and angular momentum transfer in galaxy disks. Star formation is initiated on large scales by gravitational instabilities which control the overall rate through the long dynamical time corresponding to the average ISM density. Stars form at much higher densities than average, however, and at much faster rates locally, so the slow average rate arises because the fraction of the gas mass that forms stars at any one time is low, ~10^{-4}. This low fraction is determined by turbulence compression, and is apparently independent of specific cloud formation processes which all operate at lower densities. Turbulence compression also accounts for the formation of most stars in clusters, along with the cluster mass spectrum, and it gives a hierarchical distribution to the positions of these clusters and to star-forming...

  13. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  14. Bulk Comptonization by Turbulence in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, J

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent "wave" temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, ra...

  15. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  16. Turbulence patterns and neutrino flavor transitions in high-resolution supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the shock-wave propagation in a core-collapse supernova (SN), matter turbulence may affect neutrino flavor conversion probabilities. Such effects have been usually studied by adding parametrized small-scale random fluctuations (with arbitrary amplitude) on top of coarse, spherically symmetric matter density profiles. Recently, however, two-dimensional (2D) SN models have reached a space resolution high enough to directly trace anisotropic density profiles, down to scales smaller than the typical neutrino oscillation length. In this context, we analyze the statistical properties of a large set of SN matter density profiles obtained in a high-resolution 2D simulation, focusing on a post-bounce time (2 s) suited to study shock-wave effects on neutrino propagation on scales as small as O(100) km and possibly below. We clearly find the imprint of a broken (Kolmogorov-Kraichnan) power-law structure, as generically expected in 2D turbulence spectra. We then compute the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos along representative realizations of the turbulent matter density profiles, and observe no or modest damping of the neutrino crossing probabilities on their way through the shock wave. In order to check the effect of possibly unresolved fluctuations at scales below O(100) km, we also apply a randomization procedure anchored to the power spectrum calculated from the simulation, and find consistent results within ± 1σ fluctuations. These results show the importance of anchoring turbulence effects on SN neutrinos to realistic, fine-grained SN models

  17. The Theories of Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, J; Agostini, L

    1955-01-01

    The theory of turbulence reached its full growth at the end of the 19th century as a result of the work by Boussinesq and Reynolds. It then underwent a long period of stagnation which ended under the impulse given to it by the development of wind tunnels caused by the needs of aviation. Numerous researchers, attempted to put Reynolds' elementary statistical theory into a more precise form. During the war, some isolated scientists - von Weizsacker and Heisenberg in Germany, Kolmogoroff in Russia, Onsager in the U.S.A. - started a program of research. By a system of assumptions which make it possible to approach the structure of turbulence in well-defined limiting conditions quantitatively, they obtained a certain number of laws on the correlations and the spectrum. Since the late reports have improved the mathematical language of turbulence, it was deemed advisable to start with a detailed account of the mathematical methods applicable to turbulence, inspired at first by the work of the French school, above all for the basic principles, then the work of the foreigners, above all for the theory of the spectrum.

  18. Elastic wave turbulence and intermittency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Josserand, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the onset of intermittency for vibrating elastic plate turbulence in the framework of the weak wave turbulence theory using a numerical approach. The spectrum of the displacement field and the structure functions of the fluctuations are computed for different forcing amplitudes. At low forcing, the spectrum predicted by the theory is observed, while the fluctuations are consistent with Gaussian statistics. When the forcing is increased, the spectrum varies at large scales, corresponding to the oscillations of nonlinear structures made of ridges delimited by d cones. In this regime, the fluctuations exhibit small-scale intermittency that can be fitted via a multifractal model. The analysis of the nonlinear frequency shows that the intermittency is linked to the breakdown of the weak turbulence at large scales only.

  19. Fragmentation in turbulent primordial gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O; Klessen, R S; Bromm, V

    2010-01-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of star formation in the early universe that focus on the role of subsonic turbulence, and investigate whether it can induce fragmentation of the gas. We find that dense primordial gas is highly susceptible to fragmentation, even for rms turbulent velocity dispersions as low as 20% of the initial sound speed. The resulting fragments cover over two orders of magnitude in mass, ranging from 0.1 to 40 solar masses. However, our results suggest that the details of the fragmentation depend on the local properties of the turbulent velocity field and hence we expect considerable variations in the resulting stellar mass spectrum in different halos.

  20. Two-dimensional elastic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, S; Boffetta, G; Celani, A; Musacchio, S; 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.055306

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of polymer additives on a two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow at very low Reynolds numbers by direct numerical simulations of the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic model. We find that above the elastic instability threshold the flow develops the elastic turbulence regime recently observed in experiments. We observe that both the turbulent drag and the Lyapunov exponent increase with Weissenberg, indicating the presence of a disordered, turbulent-like mixing flow. The energy spectrum develops a power-law scaling range with an exponent close to the experimental and theoretical expectations.

  1. Polarimetric studies of magnetic turbulence with interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-01-01

    We study statistical properties of synchrotron polarization emitted from media with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We use both synthetic and MHD turbulence simulation data for our studies. We obtain the spatial spectrum and its derivative with respect to wavelength of synchrotron polarization arising from both synchrotron radiation and Faraday rotation fluctuations. In particular, we investigate how the spectrum changes with frequency. We find that our simulations agree with the theoretical predication in Lazarian \\& Pogosyan (2016). We conclude that the spectrum of synchrotron polarization and it derivative can be very informative tools to get detailed information about the statistical properties of MHD turbulence from radio observations of diffuse synchrotron polarization. Especially, they are useful to recover the statistics of turbulent magnetic field as well as turbulent density of electrons. We also simulate interferometric observations that incorporate the effects of noise and finite telesco...

  2. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  3. Generalization of the electronic susceptibility for arbitrary molecular geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Arne; Dreßler, Christian; Ahlert, Paul; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    We generalize the explicit representation of the electronic susceptibility χ[R](r, r') for arbitrary molecular geometries R. The electronic susceptibility is a response function that yields the response of the molecular electronic charge density at linear order to an arbitrary external perturbation. We address the dependence of this response function on the molecular geometry. The explicit representation of the molecular geometry dependence is achieved by means of a Taylor expansion in the nuclear coordinates. Our approach relies on a recently developed low-rank representation of the response function χ[R](r, r') which allows a highly condensed storage of the expansion and an efficient application within dynamical chemical environments. We illustrate the performance and accuracy of our scheme by computing the vibrationally induced variations of the response function of a water molecule and its resulting Raman spectrum.

  4. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore College, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 19081 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  6. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have investigated the solutions of Maxwell's equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the Schrödinger associated with the solutions of Einstein's equations for empty space. It is shown that in some cases the geometric instability leading to turbulence on the mechanism of alternating viscosity, which offered by N.N. Yanenko. The mechanism of generation of matter from dark energy due to the geometric turbulence in the Big Bang has been discussed

  7. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the progress made in understanding plasma turbulence. It has relied heavily on numerical simulations to gain some intuition on the physical processes underlying nonlinear interaction and as a cross check for quantitative estimates derived from weak turbulence theory or DIA-based strong turbulence theory. The mathematical description of plasmas, especially those confined in a magnetic bottle, is far more complex than the Navier-Stokes fluid. Yet because of the dispersion of the plasma eigenmodes, the DIA perhaps has greater validity in a plasma than in a Navier-Stokes fluid. Recent developments in dynamical-systems theory have not yet been implemented in plasma turbulence at the level discussed in other studies for boundary-layer turbulence. This technique has promise for evaluating the behavior of large eddies, which may dominate plasma transport as a low-order system. In the collisionless, kinetic regime, where turbulence in x, v phase space has to be addressed, the new methods involving noneigenmode entities called clumps and holes, need further evolution to gain complete acceptability. For the future, a combination of analytical tools and numerical methods may afford the optimum route. Some examples of this are revireviewed

  8. Quantitative photography of intermittency in surface wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At high amplitudes of excitation surface waves on water distribute their energy according to a Kolmogorov type of turbulent power spectrum. We have used diffusing light photography to measure the power spectrum and to quantify the presence of large structures in the turbulent state

  9. Quantitative photography of intermittency in surface wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W.; Budakian, R.; Putterman, S.J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    At high amplitudes of excitation surface waves on water distribute their energy according to a Kolmogorov type of turbulent power spectrum. We have used diffusing light photography to measure the power spectrum and to quantify the presence of large structures in the turbulent state.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence: An astronomical perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sridhar

    2011-07-01

    Early work on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the 1960s due, independently, to Iroshnikov and Kraichnan (IK) considered isotropic inertial-range spectra. Whereas laboratory experiments were not in a position to measure the spectral index, they showed that the turbulence was strongly anisotropic. Theoretical horizons correspondingly expanded in the 1980s, to accommodate both the isotropy of the IK theory and the anisotropy suggested by the experiments. Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, many years of work on interstellar scintillation suggested that small-scale interstellar turbulence must have a hydromagnetic origin; but the IK spectrum was too flat and the ideas on anisotropic spectra too qualitative to explain the observations. In response, new theories of balanced MHD turbulence were proposed in the 1990s, which argued that the IK theory was incorrect, and made quantitative predictions of anisotropic inertial-range spectra; these theories have since found applications in many areas of astrophysics. Spacecraft measurements of solar-wind turbulence show that there is more power in Alfvén waves that travel away from the Sun than towards it. Theories of imbalanced MHD turbulence have now been proposed to address interplanetary turbulence. This very active area of research continues to be driven by astronomy.

  11. Large scale numerical simulation for superfluid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale numerical simulation of quantum turbulence is performed by using 3-D time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The energy spectrum obeying Kolmogorov law and large scale self-similar structure of quantum vortex tangle are found in a fully developed dumped turbulent state. We confirm that inertial range of the energy spectrum becomes large as the system size of the simulation becomes large that is consistent with the result of the normal fluid turbulence. On the other hand, bottleneck effect near coherent length prevents the inertial range from extending to smaller scale. (author)

  12. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  13. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based FSO system with use of realistic link model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Yu, Zhongyuan; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based free-space optical (FSO) communication by using the Pump turbulence spectrum model which accurately characterizes the realistic FSO link. A comprehensive comparison is made between the Pump and Kolmogorov spectrum models with respect to the turbulence impact. The calculated results show that obtained turbulence-induced crosstalk is lower, which means that a higher channel capacity is projected when the realistic Pump spectrum is used instead of the Kolmogorov spectrum. We believe that our results prove that performance of practical OAM-based FSO is better than one predicted by using the original Kolmogorov turbulence model.

  14. In situ measurements of wind and current speed and relationship between output power and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran Medina, Olmo; Schmitt, François G.; Sentchev, Alexei; Calif, Rudy

    2015-04-01

    In a context of energy transition, wind and tidal energy are sources of clean energy with the potential of partially satisfying the growing demand. The main problem of this type of energy, and other types of renewable energy remains the discontinuity of the electric power produced in different scales, inducing large fluctuations also called intermittency. This intermittency of wind and tidal energy is inherent to the turbulent nature of wind and marine currents. We consider this intermittent power production in strong relation with the turbulent intermittency of the resource. The turbulence theory is multifractal energy cascades models, a classic in physics of turbulence. From earlier studies in atmospheric sciences, we learn that wind speed and the aggregate power output are intermittent and multifractal over a wide range of scales [Calif and Schmitt 2014]. We want to extend this study to a marine current turbine and compare the scaling properties for those renewable energy sources. We consider here coupling between simultaneous velocity time series and output power from a wind turbine and a marine current turbine. Wind turbine data were obtained from Denmark and marine current data from Western Scheldt, Belgium where a prototype of a vertical and horizontal marine current turbines are tested. After an estimation of their Fourier density power spectra, we study their scaling properties in Kolmogorov's theory and the framework of fully developed turbulence. Hence, we employ a Hilbert-based methodology, namely arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis [Calif et al. 2013a, 2013b] to characterize the intermittent property of the wind and marine current velocity in order to characterize the intermittent nature of the fluid. This method is used in order to obtain the spectrum and the corresponding power law for non-linear and non-stationary time series. The goal is to study the non-linear transfer characteristics in a multi-scale and multi-intensity framework.

  15. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 90deg observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10 dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite decorrelation region. Numerical predictions of the sound field, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length and time scales, for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal

  16. Soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  17. Controlling arbitrary humidity without convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasnik, Priyanka S; N'guessan, Hartmann E; Tadmor, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we show a way that allows for the first time to induce arbitrary humidity of desired value for systems without convective flow. To enable this novelty we utilize a semi-closed environment in which evaporation is not completely suppressed. In this case, the evaporation rate is determined both by the outer (open) humidity and by the inner (semi-closed) geometry including the size/shape of the evaporating medium and the size/shape of the semi-closure. We show how such systems can be used to induce desired humidity conditions. We consider water droplet placed on a solid surface and study its evaporation when it is surrounded by other drops, hereon "satellite" drops and covered by a semi-closed hemisphere. The main drop's evaporation rate is proportional to its height, in agreement with theory. Surprisingly, however, the influence of the satellite drops on the main drop's evaporation suppression is not proportional to the sum of heights of the satellite drops. Instead, it shows proportionality close to the satellite drops' total surface area. The resultant humidity conditions in the semi-closed system can be effectively and accurately induced using different satellite drops combinations. PMID:26072445

  18. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (Rij-ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  19. General optical scintillation in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruizhong Rao

    2008-01-01

    A general expression of the scintillation index is proposed for optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere under arbitrary fluctuation conditions. The expression depends on extreme behaviors of the scintillation indices under both weak and strong fluctuations. The maximum scintillation index in the onset region and the corresponding Rytov index can be evaluated from the general expression. Plane and spherical waves in the cases of zero and non-zero turbulence inner scale are given as examples for illustration of the general behaviors of scintillation indices.

  20. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  1. Mixing in manipulated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczaj, A K; Geurts, Bernard J.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.

    2006-01-01

    A new computational framework for the simulation of turbulent flow through complex objects and along irregular boundaries is presented. This is motivated by the application of metal foams in compact heat-transfer devices, or as catalyst substrates in process-engineering. The flow-consequences of such complicated objects are incorporated by adding explicit multiscale forcing to the Navier-Stokes equations. The forcing represents the simultaneous agitation of a wide spectrum of length-scales when flow passes through the complex object. It is found that a considerable modulation of the traditional energy cascading can be introduced with a specific forcing strategy. In spectral space, forcing yields strongly localized deviations from the common Kolmogorov scaling law, directly associated with the explicitly forced scales. In addition, the accumulated effect of forcing induces a significant non-local alteration of the kinetic energy including the spectrum for the large scales. Consequently, a manipulation of turbu...

  2. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  3. Burgers turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers model to statistical physics, cosmology, and fluid dynamics. Also Burgers turbulence appeared as one of the simplest instances of a nonlinear system out of equilibrium. The study of random Lagrangian systems, of stochastic partial differential equations and their invariant measures, the theory of dynamical systems, the applications of field theory to the understanding of dissipative anomalies and of multiscaling in hydrodynamic turbulence have benefited significantly from progress in Burgers turbulence. The aim of this review is to give a unified view of selected work stemming from these rather diverse disciplines

  4. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  5. On turbulence in dilatant dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Helmut Z.; Wessling, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new theory on the behaviour of shear-thickening (dilatant) fluids under turbulent conditions. The structure of a dilatant colloidal fluid in turbulent motion may be characterized by (at least) four characteristic length scales: (i) the ‘statistically largest’ turbulent scale, {λ }0, labeling the begin of the inertial part of the wavenumber spectrum; (ii) the energy-containing scale, { L }; (iii) Kolmogorov’s micro-scale, {λ }{ K }, related with the size of the smallest vortices existing for a given kinematic viscosity and forcing; (iv) the inner (‘colloidal’) micro-scale, {λ }i, typically representing a major stable material property of the colloidal fluid. In particular, for small ratios r={λ }i/{λ }{ K }∼ { O }(1), various interactions between colloidal structures and smallest turbulent eddies can be expected. In the present paper we discuss particularly that for ρ ={λ }0/{λ }{ K }\\to { O }(1) turbulence (in the narrow, inertial sense) is strangled and chaotic but less mixing fluid motions remain. We start from a new stochastic, micro-mechanical turbulence theory without empirical parameters valid for inviscid fluids as seen in publications by Baumert in 2013 and 2015. It predicts e.g. von Karman’s constant correctly as 1/\\sqrt{2 π }=0.399. In its generalized version for non-zero viscosity and shear-thickening behavior presented in this contribution, it predicts two solution branches for the steady state: The first characterizes a family of states with swift (inertial) turbulent mixing and small {λ }{ K }, potentially approaching {λ }i. The second branch characterizes a state family with ρ \\to { O }(1) and thus strangled turbulence, ρ ≈ { O }(1). Stability properties and a potential dynamic commuting between the two solution branches had to be left for future research.

  6. S-duality in N = 4 supersymmetric gauge theories with arbitrary gauge group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Goddard, Nuyts and Olive conjecture for electric-magnetic duality in the Yang-Mills theory with an arbitrary gauge group G is extended by including a non-vanishing vacuum angle θ. This extended S-duality conjecture includes the case when the unbroken gauge group in non-Abelian and a definite prediction for the spectrum of dyons results. (author)

  7. Arbitrary orbital angular momentum of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yue; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrary OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the azimuthally varying polarized vector field. The arbitrary OAM has the same characteristics as the well-defined integer OAM: intrinsic OAM, uniform local OAM and intensity ring, and propagation stability. The arbitrary OAM has unique natures: it is allowed to be flexibly tailored and the radius of the focusing ring can have various choices for a desired OAM, which are of great significance to the benefit of surprising applications of the arbitrary OAM.

  8. THE EIGENVALUE PERTURBATION BOUND FOR ARBITRARY MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Li; Jian-xin Chen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present some new absolute and relative perturbation bounds for the eigenvalue for arbitrary matrices, which improves some recent results. The eigenvalue inclusion region is also discussed.

  9. The Sugawara generators at arbitrary level

    OpenAIRE

    Gebert, R.; Koepsell, K.; Nicolai, H.

    1996-01-01

    We construct an explicit representation of the Sugawara generators for arbitrary level in terms of the homogeneous Heisenberg subalgebra, which generalizes the well-known expression at level 1. This is achieved by employing a physical vertex operator realization of the affine algebra at arbitrary level, in contrast to the Frenkel--Kac--Segal construction which uses unphysical oscillators and is restricted to level 1. At higher level, the new operators are transcendental functions of DDF ``osc...

  10. Quantum polar codes for arbitrary channels

    OpenAIRE

    Wilde, Mark M.; Renes, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    We construct a new entanglement-assisted quantum polar coding scheme which achieves the symmetric coherent information rate by synthesizing "amplitude" and "phase" channels from a given, arbitrary quantum channel. We first demonstrate the coding scheme for arbitrary quantum channels with qubit inputs, and we show that quantum data can be reliably decoded by O(N) rounds of coherent quantum successive cancellation, followed by N controlled-NOT gates (where N is the number of channel uses). We a...

  11. Arbitrary Dimensional Schwarzschild-FRW Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chang Jun

    2004-01-01

    The metric of arbitrary dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the background of Friedman-Robertson-Walker universe is presented in the cosmic coordinates system. In particular, the arbitrary dimensional Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric is rewritten in the Schwarzschild coordinates system and basing on which the even more generalized higher dimensional Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric with another extra dimensions is found. The generalized solution shows that the cosmological constant may roots ...

  12. Aspects of wave turbulence in preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of several inflationary models. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since the matter contents are fields instead of usual fluids. Turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the scalar fields. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number that indicates the energy transfer through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system

  13. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  14. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  15. Arbitrary laser beam propagation in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpali, Çağlar; Baykal, Yahya; Nakiboğlu, Cem

    2009-08-01

    The propagation of arbitrary laser beams in free space is examined. For this purpose, starting with an incident field of arbitrary field distribution, the intensity at the receiver plane is formulated via Huygens Fresnel diffraction integral. Arbitrary source field profile is produced by decomposing the source into incremental areas (pixels). The received field through the propagation in free space is found by superposing the contributions from all source incremental areas. The proposed method enables us to evaluate the received intensity originating from any type of source field. Using the arbitrary beam excitation, intensity of various laser beams such as cos-Gaussian, cosh-Gaussian, general type beams are checked to be consistent with the already existing results in literature, and the received intensity distributions are obtained for some original arbitrary beam field profiles. Our received intensity formulation for the arbitrary source field profiles presented in this paper can find application in optics communication links, reflection from rough surfaces, optical cryptography and optical imaging systems.

  16. Burgers Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Bec, Jeremie; Khanin, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers mod...

  17. Controlling turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  18. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  19. Two-dimensional electron magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel type of turbulence, which arises in 2D electron magnetohydrodynamics, is studied by numerical simulation. Energy dissipation rates are found to be independent of the dissipation coefficients. The energy spectrum Ek follows the basic Kolmogorov-type predictions, k-5/3 for kde > 1 and k-7/3 for kde e = electron inertial length) and is hence independent of the linear wave properties. Results are compared with other 2D turbulent systems. (author)

  20. Compressible Turbulence: The Cascade and its Locality

    OpenAIRE

    Aluie, Hussein

    2011-01-01

    We prove that inter-scale transfer of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence is dominated by local interactions. In particular, our results preclude direct transfer of kinetic energy from large-scales directly to dissipation scales, such as into shocks, in high Reynolds number turbulence as is commonly believed. Our assumptions on the scaling of structure functions are weak and enjoy compelling empirical support. Under a stronger assumption on pressure dilatation co-spectrum, we show that ...

  1. Global Theories of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: Excitation by Energetic Particles and Drift Wave Turbulences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs) by both energetic particles (EPs) and drift wave (DW) turbulences taking into account plasma nonuniformities are investigated in this work. The global radial mode structures of EP induced GAM (EGAM) are systematically studied and their properties are found to depend on the nonuniformities of both the GAM continuous spectrum and EP radial profile. For a radially broad EP drive, the eigenmode equation valid for arbitrary EP drift orbit width is derived, and then solved using a Fourier transformation technique. The excited EGAM is shown to strongly couple to the GAM continuous spectrum; resulting in a finite drive threshold in EP density. The cross-scale couplings between micro-, meso- and macro-scales, discussed in this work, are mediated by the EP dynamics and have many interesting similarities with complex behaviors, expected in burning plasmas of fusion interest. The excitation of GAM by DW turbulence accounting for various kinetic dispersiveness and nonuniformities is also investigated, with the paradigm of three-wave resonant parametric decay instability. Considering the scale length of linear DW eigenmode envelope is much smaller than that of particle diamagnetic drift frequency L*, in the linear growth phase, the parametric instability is convective for typical tokamak parameters, when the finite group velocities of GAM and DW sideband are taken into account. This is a case of less practical interest. However, if we look at longer time scales, and finite L* effects are taken into account, the convectively amplified GAM-DW wave-packet pair is reflected at the DW linear turning points, resulting in a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability. DW turbulence spreading with the excitation of GAM is also investigated, with emphasis on quantitative understanding of the dispersiveness associated with kinetic GAM. (author)

  2. Turbulence: mechanics and structure of anomalous scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Gordienko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As the finite correlation time of a force driving turbulence is taken into account, a new, dimensionless parameter occurs in the theory of turbulence. This new parameter is responsible for two different mechanisms of formation of anomalous spectra. The first mechanism is related to the change of a governing parameter, which defines the spectrum of turbulent fluctuation. The second mechanism is associated with spontaneous formation of characteristic scales that differ parametrically from the scale of the external force. The last mechanism can explain the intermittent structure of turbulent flows. The appropriate discrete set of the possible characteristic scales and anomalous spectra has been calculated. The results give a new insight into the concept of universality: there is a set of universal power laws, although occurrence in the spectrum segments described by one or another power law from this set depends on the dimensionless parameter mentioned above. It is noted that for the broad class of geophysical flows, the new dimensionless parameter is connected with the so-called degree of turbulence, which guarantees that the smallness of this parameter, as the degree of turbulence is usually small enough. That explains the important role of the Kolmogorov spectrum in geophysical applications.

  3. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  4. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing. PMID:26274279

  5. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  6. Plasma diagnostics in TFTR using emission of cyclotron radiation at arbitrary frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission of cyclotron radiation at arbitrary wave frequency for diagnostic purposes is discussed. It is shown that the radiation spectrum at arbitrary frequencies is more informative than the first few harmonics and it is suited for diagnosis of superthermal electrons without any open-quotes ad hocclose quotes value of the wall reflection coefficient. Thermal radiation from TFTR is investigated and it is shown that the bulk and the tail of the electron momentum distribution during strong neutral beam injection is a Maxwellian with a single temperature in all ranges of electron energies

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  8. Perturbation Theory for Arbitrary Coupling Strength ?

    CERN Document Server

    Mahapatra, B P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate Borel summability for arbitrary coupling strength in a new formulation of perturbation theory (designated here as "Mean Field Perturbation Theory (MFPT)") by applying it to one dimensional anharmonic-interactions, which includes the case of the quartic and sextic anharmonic oscillators(AHO) and the quartic double-well-oscillator (QDWO).It is well known that the perturbation-series is not Borel-summable for the QDWO in the standard formulation of perturbation theory(SFPT). In contrast, MFPT leads to a Borel-summable perturbation series and accurate values for the energy-spectra for arbitrary (physical) value of the coupling strength in each case as stated above. The general nature and the simplicity of the formulation underlying MFPT leads us to conjecture that this scheme may be applicable to arbitrary interactions in quantum theory.

  9. Study of resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown the resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence (RPGDT) is a likely cause of observed turbulent fluctuations and anomalous transport in magnetically confined plasmas. More recent study of RPGDT found a true saturation criterion and predicted significantly larger pressure diffusivity over simple mixing-length estimate. In this study, we investigate wavenumber spectrum for more detailed characteristics of this driven turbulence and consider an electromagnetic model with electron temperature evolution to study the effect of magnetic fluctuations on thermal transport

  10. Synthetic turbulence methods for leading edge noise predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Gea-Aguilera, Fernando; Xin ZHANG; Chen, Xiaoxian; Gill, James R.; Node-Langlois, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    An advanced digital filter method to generate synthetic turbulence is presented for efficient two- and three-dimensional leading edge noise predictions. The technique, which is based on the Random Particle-Mesh method, produces a turbulent inflow that matches a target isotropic energy spectrum. The discretized equations for the synthetic eddies, and the input parameters needed to recover the desired turbulence statistics, are presented. Moreover, a simple and fast implementatio...

  11. Ribbon Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Vallis, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel forced by an imposed unstable zonal mean flow, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization on the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these result by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the imposed mean flow appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the...

  12. Experiments in turbulent pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torbergsen, Lars Even

    1998-12-31

    This thesis reports experimental results for the mean velocity and turbulence statistics in two straight pipe sections for bulk Reynolds numbers in the range 22000 to 75000. The flow was found consistent with a fully developed state. Detailed turbulence spectra were obtained for low and moderate turbulent Reynolds number. For the pipe centre line location at R{sub {lambda}} = 112, a narrow range in the streamwise power spectrum applied to the -5/3 inertial subrange. However this range was influenced both by turbulence production and viscous dissipation, and therefore did not reflect a true inertial range. The result indicates how the intermediate range between the production and dissipative scales can be misinterpreted as an inertial range for low and moderate R{sub {lambda}}. To examine the universal behaviour of the inertial range, the inertial scaling of the streamwise power spectrum is compared to the inertial scaling of the second order longitudinal velocity structure function, which relate directly by a Fourier transform. Increasing agreement between the Kolmogorov constant C{sub K} and the second order structure function scaling constant C{sub 2} was observed with increasing R{sub {lambda}}. The result indicates that a true inertial range requires several decades of separation between the energy containing and dissipative scales. A method for examining spectral anisotropy is reported and applied to turbulence spectra in fully developed pipe flow. It is found that the spectral redistribution from the streamwise to the two lateral spectra goes primarily to the circumferential component. Experimental results are reported for an axisymmetric contraction of a fully developed pipe flow. 67 refs., 75 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Mixing in Magnetized Turbulent Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent motions are essential to the mixing of entrained fluids and are also capable of amplifying weak initial magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo action. Here we perform a systematic study of turbulent mixing in magnetized media, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include a scalar concentration field. We focus on how mixing depends on the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm, from 1 to 4 and the Mach number, M}, from 0.3 to 2.4. For all subsonic flows, we find that the velocity power spectrum has a k^-5/3 slope in the early, kinematic phase, but steepens due to magnetic back reactions as the field saturates. The scalar power spectrum, on the other hand, flattens compared to k^-5/3 at late times, consistent with the Obukohov-Corrsin picture of mixing as a cascade process. At higher Mach numbers, the velocity power spectrum also steepens due to the presence of shocks, and the scalar power spectrum again flattens accordingly. Scalar structures are more intermittent than velocity structures...

  14. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  15. Spectral measures with arbitrary Hausdorff dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Xin-Rong; Sun, Qiyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider spectral properties of Riesz product measures supported on homogeneous Cantor sets and we show the existence of spectral measures with arbitrary Hausdorff dimensions, including non-atomic zero-dimensional spectral measures and one-dimensional singular spectral measures.

  16. Vacuum Birefringence Caused by Arbitrary Spin Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    We study the propagation of a linearly polarized laser beam in the external transverse magnetic field taking into consideration the vacuum polarization by arbitrary spin particles. Induced ellipticity of the beam are evaluated using the effective Lagrangian. With the help of the PVLAS experimental data, we obtain bounds on masses of charged higher spin particles contributed to ellipticity.

  17. Kraus representation for arbitrary open qubit system

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, D M; Kwek, L C; Oh, C H; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2003-01-01

    We show that the time evolution of an arbitrary open qubit system can always be described in terms of the Kraus representation irrespective of the presence of initial correlations between the open system and its environment. A general scheme on how to construct the Kraus operators for an open qubit system is proposed, which can be generalized to open higher dimensional quantum systems.

  18. Dual local and non-local cascades in 3D turbulent Beltrami flows

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, E; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B.; Nazarenko, S.; A. Naso

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of dual local and non-local cascades in a 3D turbulent Beltrami flow, with inverse energy cascade and direct helicity cascade, by analogy with 2D turbulence. We discuss the corresponding energy spectrum in both local and non-local case. Comparison with a high Reynolds number turbulent von Karman flow is provided and discussed.

  19. Consequences of Symmetries on the Analysis and Construction of Turbulence Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Razafindralandy

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Since they represent fundamental physical properties in turbulence (conservation laws, wall laws, Kolmogorov energy spectrum, ..., symmetries are used to analyse common turbulence models. A class of symmetry preserving turbulence models is proposed. This class is refined such that the models respect the second law of thermodynamics. Finally, an example of model belonging to the class is numerically tested.

  20. Stochastic ion heating by lower hybrid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motion of an ion in a spectrum of lower hybrid waves propagating across a constant magnetic field is examined. In particular, numerical simulation is used to determine the extent to which a turbulent spectrum of these electrostatic waves may accelerate thermal ions (T < 1 eV). The significance of stochastic web development in this heating process is also discussed. 20 refs., 31 figs

  1. A theoretical description of inhomogeneous turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In this LDRD, we have developed a highly compact and descriptive formalism that allows us to broach the theoretically formidable morass of inhomogeneous turbulence. Our formalism has two novel aspects: (a) an adaptation of helicity basis functions to represent an arbitrary incompressible channel flow and (b) the invocation of a hypothesis of random phase. A result of this compact formalism is that the mathematical description of inhomogeneous turbulence looks much like that of homogeneous turbulence--at the moment, the most rigorously explored terrain in turbulence research. As a result, we can explore the effect of boundaries on such important quantities as the gradients of mean flow, mean pressure, triple-velocity correlations and pressure velocity correlations, all of which vanish under the conventional, but artificial, assumption that the turbulence is statistically spatially uniform. Under suitable conditions, we have predicted that a mean flow gradient can develop even when none is initially present

  2. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our ai...

  3. Spinor structure and matter spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Varlamov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Classification of relativistic wave equations is given on the ground of interlocking representations of the Lorentz group. A system of interlocking representations is associated with a system of eigenvector subspaces of the energy operator. Such a correspondence allows one to define matter spectrum, where the each level of this spectrum presents a some state of elementary particle. An elementary particle is understood as a superposition of state vectors in nonseparable Hilbert space. Classification of indecomposable systems of relativistic wave equations is produced for bosonic and fermionic fields on an equal footing (including Dirac and Maxwell equations), since all these fields are equivalent levels of matter spectrum, which differ from each other by the value of mass and spin. It is shown that a spectrum of the energy operator, corresponding to a given matter level, is non-degenerate for the fields of type $(l,0)\\oplus(0,l)$, where $l$ is a spin value, whereas for arbitrary spin chains we have degenerate ...

  4. Strong Turbulence in Low-beta Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchen, C. M.; Pécseli, Hans; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral structure of turbulence in a plasma confined by a strong homogeneous magnetic field was made by means of a fluid description. The turbulent spectrum is divided into subranges. Mean gradients of velocity and density excite turbulent motions, and govern the production...... subrange. The spectra of velocity and potential fluctuations interact in the coupling subrange, and the energy is transferred along the spectrum in the inertia subrange. Applying the method of cascade decomposition, the spectral laws k-3, k-3, k-2 are obtained for the velocity fluctuations, and k-3, k-5, k......-3/2 for the potential fluctuations in the production, coupling and inertia subranges, respectively. The coefficient of Bohm diffusion is reproduced, and its role in electrostatic coupling is derived. Comparison is made with measured power laws reported in the literature, from Q-devices, hot...

  5. Photon Bubble Turbulence in Cold Atomic Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, João D; Ferreira, António V; Terças, Hugo; Kaiser, Robin; Mendonça, José T

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent radiation flow is ubiquitous in many physical systems where light-matter interaction becomes relevant. Photon bubbling, in particular, has been identified as the main source of turbulent radiation transport in many astrophysical objects, such as stars and accretion disks. This mechanism takes place when radiation trapping in optically dense media becomes unstable, leading to the energy dissipation from the larger to the smaller bubbles. Here, we report on the observation of photon bubble turbulence in cold atomic gases in the presence of multiple scattering of light. The instability is theoretically explained by a fluid description for the atom density coupled to a diffusive transport equation for the photons, which is known to be accurate in the multiple scattering regime investigated here. We determine the power spectrum of the atom density fluctuations, which displays an unusual $\\sim k^{-4}$ scaling, and entails a complex underlying turbulent dynamics resulting from the formation of dynamical bu...

  6. Turbulence in a cusp Q device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans; Petersen, P. I.

    1974-01-01

    Spectral measurements are reported of plasma turbulence in the Cs plasma of a Q device, modified to a magnetic cusp geometry. The excitation mechanism for the fluctuations appears to be the centrifugal instability discussed by Chen. A transition from an f−5 to an f−3 power spectrum is observed as...

  7. Signal modeling of turbulence-distorted imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. Susan; Driggers, Ronald G.; Krapels, Keith; Espinola, Richard L.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Cha, Jae

    2009-05-01

    Understanding turbulence effects on wave propagation and imaging systems has been an active research area for more than 50 years. Conventional atmospheric optics methods use statistical models to analyze image degradation effects that are caused by turbulence. In this paper, we intend to understand atmospheric turbulence effects using a deterministic signal processing and imaging theory point of view and modeling. The model simulates the formed imagery by a lens by tracing the optical rays from the target through a band of turbulence. We examine the nature of the turbulence-degraded image, and identify its characteristics as the parameters of the band of turbulence, e.g., its width, angle, and index of refraction, are varied. Image degradation effects due to turbulence, such as image blurring and image dancing, are revealed by this signal modeling. We show that in fact these phenomena can be related not only to phase errors in the frequency domain of the image but also a 2D modulation effect in the image spectrum. Results with simulated and realistic data are provided.

  8. Non-intrinsic ambipolar diffusion in turbulence theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambipolar flow in a turbulent plasma is investigated by combining a WKB treatment of the waves with a turbulent collision operator resulting from either quasi-linear theory or certain renormalized turbulence theories. If the wave momentum has a flow from outgoing waves, then particle diffusion is not intrinsically ambipolar, and the time variation of the electric-potential profile is determined by the turbulent spectrum. However, in most cases of practical interest, as in the drift-wave problem, this effect is small; and, in steady state, equal rates of stochastic diffusion are predicted for electrons and ions

  9. The $Re$-number dependence of the longitudinal dispersion in a turbulent channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Christopher; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    In Taylor's theory, the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flows approaches, on long timescales, a diffusive behavior with a constant diffusivity $K_L$, that depends \\emph{empirically} on the Reynolds number $Re$. We show that the dependence on $Re$ can be determined from the turbulent energy spectrum. By using the intimate connection between the friction factor and longitudinal dispersion in wall-bounded turbulence, we predict different asymptotic scaling laws of $K_L(Re)$ depending on the different turbulent cascades in two-dimensional turbulence. We also explore numerically the $K_L(Re)$ dependence in turbulent channel flows with smooth and rough walls using a lattice Boltzmann method.

  10. Propagation properties of an optical vortex carried by a Bessel-Gaussian beam in anisotropic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Huang, Qingqing

    2016-08-01

    Rytov theory was employed to establish the transmission model for the optical vortices carried by Bessel-Gaussian (BG) beams in weak anisotropic turbulence based on the generalized anisotropic von Karman spectrum. The influences of asymmetry anisotropic turbulence eddies and source parameters on the signal orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode detection probability of partially coherent BG beams in anisotropic turbulence were discussed. Anisotropic characteristics of the turbulence could enhance the OAM mode transmission performance. The spatial partially coherence of the beam source would increase turbulent aberration's effect on the optical vortices. BG beams could dampen the influences of the turbulence because of their nondiffraction and self-healing characteristics. PMID:27505641

  11. Quantum Fidelity for Arbitrary Gaussian States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information, and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.

  12. Quantum fidelity for arbitrary Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Banchi, Leonardo; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.

  13. Potential flow about arbitrary biplane wing sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    A rigorous treatment is given of the problem of determining the two-dimensional potential flow around arbitrary biplane cellules. The analysis involves the use of elliptic functions and is sufficiently general to include the effects of such elements as the section shapes, the chord ratio, gap, stagger, and decalage, which elements may be specified arbitrarily. The flow problem is resolved by making use of the methods of conformal representation. Thus the solution of the problem of transforming conformally two arbitrary contours into two circles is expressed by a pair of simultaneous integral equations, for which a method of numerical solution is outlined. As an example of the numerical process, the pressure distribution over certain arrangements of the NACA 4412 airfoil in biplane combinations is presented and compared with the monoplane pressure distribution.

  14. On Arbitrary Phases in Quantum Amplitude Amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, P

    2000-01-01

    We consider the use of arbitrary phases in quantum amplitude amplification which is a generalization of quantum searching. We prove that the phase condition in amplitude amplification is given by $\\tan(\\phi/2)=\\tan(\\phi/2)(1-2a)$, where $\\phi$ and $\\phi$ are the phases used and where $a$ is the success probability of the given algorithm. Thus the choice of phases depends nontrivially and nonlinearly on the success probability. Utilizing this condition, we give methods for constructing quantum algorithms that succeed with certainty and for implementing arbitrary rotations. We also conclude that phase errors of order up to $\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{a}}$ can be tolerated in amplitude amplification.

  15. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  16. Strong field ionization in arbitrary laser polarizations

    OpenAIRE

    Protopapas, M.; Lappas, D. G.; Knight, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new method for investigating the nonperturbative quantum mechanical interaction of light with atoms in two dimensions, without a basis expansion. This enables us to investigate intense laser-atom interactions with light of arbitrary polarization without approximation, within the model restrictions. Results are presented for the dependence of ionization and high harmonic generation on ellipticity seen in recent experiments. Strong evidence of stabilization in circular polarization...

  17. Arbitrary orbital angular momentum of photons

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Xi-Lin; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons, as a new fundamental degree of freedom, has excited a great diversity of interest, because of a variety of emerging applications. Arbitrarily tunable OAM has gained much attention, but its creation remains still a tremendous challenge. We demonstrate the realization of well-controlled arbitrary OAM in both theory and experiment. We present the concept of general OAM, which extends the OAM carried by the scalar vortex field to the OAM carried by the a...

  18. Acoustic Casimir Pressure for Arbitrary Media

    OpenAIRE

    Barcenas, J.; Reyes, L.; Esquivel-Sirvent, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we derive a general expression for the acoustic Casimir pressure between two parallel slabs made of arbitrary materials and whose acoustic reflection coefficients are not equal. The formalism is based on the calculation of the local density of modes using a Green's function approach. The results for the Casimir acoustic pressure are generalized to a sphere/plate configuration using the proximity theorem

  19. Large eddy simulation of stably stratified turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Stable stratification turbulence, as a common phenomenon in atmospheric and oceanic flows, is an important mechanism for numerical prediction of such flows. In this paper the large eddy simulation is utilized for investigating stable stratification turbulence numerically. The paper is expected to provide correct statistical results in agreement with those measured in the atmosphere or ocean. The fully developed turbulence is obtained in the stable stratification fluid by large eddy simulation with different initial velocity field and characteristic parameters, i.e. Reynolds number Re and Froude number Fr. The evolution of turbulent kinetic energy, characteristic length scales and parameters is analyzed for investigating the development of turbulence in stable stratification fluid. The three-dimensional energy spectra, horizontal and vertical energy spectrum, are compared between numerical simulation and real observation in the atmosphere and ocean in order to test the reliability of the numerical simulation. The results of numerical cases show that the large eddy simulation is capable of predicting the properties of stable stratification turbulence in consistence with real measurements at less computational cost. It has been found in this paper that the turbulence can be developed under different initial velocity conditions and the internal wave energy is dominant in the developed stable stratification turbulence. It is also found that the characteristic parameters must satisfy certain conditions in order to have correct statistical property of stable stratification turbulence in the atmosphere and ocean. The Reynolds number and Froude number are unnecessarily equal to those in atmosphere or ocean, but the Reynolds number must be large enough, say, greater than 10 2 , and Froude number must be less than 0.1. The most important parameter is ReFr 2 which must be greater than 10.

  20. Probing Turbulence in the Coma Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Schücker, P; Miniati, F; Böhringer, H; Briel, U G

    2004-01-01

    Spatially-resolved gas pressure maps of the Coma galaxy cluster are obtained from a mosaic of XMM-Newton observations in the scale range between a resolution of 20 kpc and an extent of 2.8 Mpc. A Fourier analysis of the data reveals the presence of a scale-invariant pressure fluctuation spectrum in the range between 40 and 90 kpc and is found to be well described by a projected Kolmogorov/Oboukhov-type turbulence spectrum. Deprojection and integration of the spectrum yields the lower limit of $\\sim 10$ percent of the total intracluster medium pressure in turbulent form. The results also provide observational constraints on the viscosity of the gas.

  1. Probing turbulence in the Coma galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuecker, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Miniati, F.; Böhringer, H.; Briel, U. G.

    2004-11-01

    Spatially-resolved gas pressure maps of the Coma galaxy cluster are obtained from a mosaic of XMM-Newton observations in the scale range between a resolution of 20 kpc and an extent of 2.8 Mpc. A Fourier analysis of the data reveals the presence of a scale-invariant pressure fluctuation spectrum in the range between 40 and 90 kpc and is found to be well described by a projected Kolmogorov/Oboukhov-type turbulence spectrum. Deprojection and integration of the spectrum yields the lower limit of ˜ 10 percent of the total intracluster medium pressure in turbulent form. The results also provide observational constraints on the viscosity of the gas. Based on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  2. Multiboson Correlation Interferometry with arbitrary single-photon pure states

    OpenAIRE

    Tamma, Vincenzo; Laibacher, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We provide a compact full description of multiboson correlation measurements of arbitrary order N in passive linear interferometers with arbitrary input single-photon pure states. This allows us to physically analyze the novel problem of multiboson correlation sampling at the output of random linear interferometers. Our results also describe general multiboson correlation landscapes for an arbitrary number of input single photons and arbitrary interferometers. In particular, we use two differ...

  3. Solar Wind Turbulence and the Role of Ion Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrova, Olga; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Horbury, Timothy S; Bale, Stuart D

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind is probably the best laboratory to study turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. In addition to the presence of magnetic field, the differences with neutral fluid isotropic turbulence are: weakness of collisional dissipation and presence of several characteristic space and time scales. In this paper we discuss observational properties of solar wind turbulence in a large range from the MHD to the electron scales. At MHD scales, within the inertial range, turbulence cascade of magnetic fluctuations develops mostly in the plane perpendicular to the mean field. Solar wind turbulence is compressible in nature. The spectrum of velocity fluctuations do not follow magnetic field one. Probability distribution functions of different plasma parameters are not Gaussian, indicating presence of intermittency. At the moment there is no global model taking into account all these observed properties of the inertial range. At ion scales, turbulent spectra have a break, compressibility increases and the density fluctuat...

  4. Lessons from hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulent flows, with their irregular behavior, confound any single attempts to understand them. But physicists have succeeded in identifying some universal properties of turbulence and relating them to broken symmetries. (author)

  5. Scintillation index of optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Rui-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A concise expression of the scintillation index is proposed for a plane optical wave and a spherical optical wave both propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with a zero inner scale and a finite inner scale under an arbitrary fluc- tuation condition. The expression is based on both the results in the Rytov approximation under a weak fluctuation condition and the numerical results in a strong fluctuation regime. The maximum value of the scintillation index and its corresponding Rytov index axe evaluated. These quantities are affected by the ratio of the turbulence inner scale to the Frcsnel size.

  6. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a

  7. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of κ-ε modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy κ, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation ε, for each material. Hence a set of κ and ε equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both κ and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe

  8. Power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Moraghan, Anthony; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence through high-resolution three-dimensional isothermal numerical simulations where the turbulence is driven locally in real-space by a simple spherical outflow model. The resulting turbulent flow saturates at an average Mach number of ~2.5 and is analysed through density and velocity power spectra, including an investigation of the evolution of the solenoidal and compressional components. We obtain a shallow density power spectrum with a slope of ~-1.2 attributed to the presence of a network of localised dense filamentary structures formed by strong shock interactions. The total velocity power spectrum slope is found to be ~-2.0, representative of Burgers shock dominated turbulence model. The density weighted velocity power spectrum slope is measured as ~-1.6, slightly less than the expected Kolmogorov scaling value (slope of -5/3) found in previous works. The discrepancy may be caused by the nature of our real space driving model and we suggest ther...

  9. Distinguishing ichthyogenic turbulence from geophysical turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiana, Kandaga; Moum, James N.; Smyth, William D.; Warner, Sally J.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of currents and turbulence beneath a geostationary ship in the equatorial Indian Ocean during a period of weak surface forcing revealed unexpectedly strong turbulence beneath the surface mixed layer. Coincident with the turbulence was a marked reduction of the current speeds registered by shipboard Doppler current profilers, and an increase in their variability. At a mooring 1 km away, measurements of turbulence and currents showed no such anomalies. Correlation with the shipboard echo sounder measurements indicate that these nighttime anomalies were associated with fish aggregations beneath the ship. The fish created turbulence by swimming against the strong zonal current in order to remain beneath the ship, and their presence affected the Doppler speed measurements. The principal characteristics of the resultant ichthyogenic turbulence are (i) low wave number roll-off of shear spectra in the inertial subrange relative to geophysical turbulence, (ii) Thorpe overturning scales that are small compared with the Ozmidov scale, and (iii) low mixing efficiency. These factors extend previous findings by Gregg and Horne (2009) to a very different biophysical regime and support the general conclusion that the biological contribution to mixing the ocean via turbulence is negligible.

  10. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  11. Turbulent flow in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Kumar S.; Sen, Siddhartha

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  12. Statistical features of freely decaying two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryavtsev, A N; Sereshchenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Statistical characteristics of freely decaying two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers are numerically studied. In particular, numerical experiments (with resolution up to $8192\\times 8192$) provide a Kraichnan-type turbulence spectrum $E_k\\sim k^{-3}$. By means of spatial filtration, it is found that the main contribution to the spectrum comes from the sharp vorticity gradients in the form of quasi-shocks. Such quasi-singularities are responsible for a strong angular dependence of the spectrum owing to well-localized (in terms of the angle) jets with minor and/or large overlapping. In each jet, the spectrum decreases as $k^{-3}$. The behavior of the third-order structure function accurately agrees with Kraichnan direct cascade concept corresponding to a constant enstrophy flux. It is shown that the power law exponents $\\zeta_n$ for higher structure functions grow more slowly than the linear dependence of $n$, which testifies to turbulence intermittency.

  13. Nonuniqueness and Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, M A

    1997-01-01

    The possibility is considered that turbulence is described by differential equations for which uniqueness fails maximally, at least in some limit. The inviscid Burgers equation, in the context of Onsager's suggestion that turbulence should be described by a negative absolute temperature, is such a limit. In this picture, the onset of turbulence coincides with the proliferation of singularities which characterizes the failure of uniqueness.

  14. Distributed chaos and inertial ranges in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that appearance of inertial range of scales, adjacent to distributed chaos range, results in adiabatic invariance of an energy correlation integral for isotropic homogeneous turbulence and for buoyancy driven turbulence (with stable or unstable stratification, including Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone). Power spectrum of velocity field for distributed chaos dominated by this adiabatic invariant has a stretched exponential form $\\propto \\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{3/5}$. Results of recent direct numerical simulations have been used in order to support these conclusions.

  15. Gaussian quadrature formulae for arbitrary positive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Andrew D; Atchley, William R

    2006-01-01

    We present computational methods and subroutines to compute Gaussian quadrature integration formulas for arbitrary positive measures. For expensive integrands that can be factored into well-known forms, Gaussian quadrature schemes allow for efficient evaluation of high-accuracy and -precision numerical integrals, especially compared to general ad hoc schemes. In addition, for certain well-known density measures (the normal, gamma, log-normal, Student's t, inverse-gamma, beta, and Fisher's F) we present exact formulae for computing the respective quadrature scheme. PMID:19455218

  16. Gaussian Quadrature Formulae for Arbitrary Positive Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Atchley

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present computational methods and subroutines to compute Gaussian quadrature integration formulas for arbitrary positive measures. For expensive integrands that can be factored into well-known forms, Gaussian quadrature schemes allow for efficient evaluation of high-accuracy and -precision numerical integrals, especially compared to general ad hoc schemes. In addition, for certain well-known density measures (the normal, gamma, log-normal, Student’s t, inversegamma, beta, and Fisher’s F we present exact formulae for computing the respective quadrature scheme.

  17. Sampling to estimate arbitrary subset sums

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Nick; Lund, Carsten; Thorup, Mikkel

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a set of weighted items, we want to create a generic sample of a certain size that we can later use to estimate the total weight of arbitrary subsets. For this purpose, we propose priority sampling which tested on Internet data performed better than previous methods by orders of magnitude. Priority sampling is simple to define and implement: we consider a steam of items i=0,...,n-1 with weights w_i. For each item i, we generate a random number r_i in (0,1) and create a priority ...

  18. Circuits with arbitrary gates for random operators

    OpenAIRE

    Jukna, S.; Schnitger, G.

    2010-01-01

    We consider boolean circuits computing n-operators f:{0,1}^n --> {0,1}^n. As gates we allow arbitrary boolean functions; neither fanin nor fanout of gates is restricted. An operator is linear if it computes n linear forms, that is, computes a matrix-vector product y=Ax over GF(2). We prove the existence of n-operators requiring about n^2 wires in any circuit, and linear n-operators requiring about n^2/\\log n wires in depth-2 circuits, if either all output gates or all gates on the middle laye...

  19. Path integrals for arbitrary canonical transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics are studied. This formalism is generalized to arbitrary canonical transformations, by means of an association between path integral probalility amplitudes and classical generators of transformations, analogous to the usual Hamiltonian time development phase space expression. Such association turns out to be equivalent to the Weyl quantization rule, and it is also shown that this formalism furnishes a path integral representation for a Lie algebra of a given set of classical generators. Some physical considerations about the path integral quantization procedure and about the relationship between classical and quantum dynamical structures are also discussed. (Author)

  20. The exact equation of motion of a simple pendulum of arbitrary amplitude: a hypergeometric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motion of a simple pendulum of arbitrary amplitude is usually treated by approximate methods. By using generalized hypergeometric functions, it is however possible to solve the problem exactly. In this paper, we provide the exact equation of motion of a simple pendulum of arbitrary amplitude. A new and exact expression for the time of swinging of a simple pendulum from the vertical position to an arbitrary angular position θ is given by equation (3.10). The time period of such a pendulum is also exactly expressible in terms of hypergeometric functions. The exact expressions thus obtained are used to plot the graphs that compare the exact time period T(θ0) with the time period T(0) (based on simple harmonic approximation). We also compare the relative difference between T(0) and T(θ0) found from the exact equation of motion with the usual perturbation theory estimate. The treatment is intended for graduate students, who have acquired some familiarity with the hypergeometric functions. This approach may also be profitably used by specialists who encounter during their investigations nonlinear differential equations similar in form to the pendulum equation. Such nonlinear differential equations could arise in diverse fields, such as acoustic vibrations, oscillations in small molecules, turbulence and electronic filters, among others.

  1. Radio Halo Formation through Magneto-turbulent Particle Acceleration in Clusters of Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ohno, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Shibata, Shinpei

    2002-01-01

    We developed a magneto-turbulent model for the cosmic ray (CR) electrons seen in the radio halo clusters of galaxies. Steady state momentum distribution functions of the CR electrons are calculated for given spectra of the turbulent Alfven waves. The radio spectrum produced by the obtained CR electron distribution is compared to the observed radio spectrum of the Coma radio halo. We find that the observed radio spectrum of the Coma cluster is well reproduced when the spectral index of the tur...

  2. Turbulence in the Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    We study supernova-driven galactic outflows as a mechanism for injecting turbulence in the intergalactic medium (IGM) far from galaxies. To this aim we follow the evolution of a 10^13 Msun galaxy along its merger tree, with carefully calibrated prescriptions for star formation and wind efficiencies. At z~3 the majority of the bubbles around galaxies are old (ages >1Gyr), i.e. they contain metals expelled by their progenitors at earlier times; their filling factor increases with time reaching about 10% at z<2. The energy deposited by these expanding shocks in the IGM is predominantly in kinetic form (mean energy density of 1 \\mu eV cm^-3, about 2-3 x the thermal one), which is rapidly converted in disordered motions by instabilities, finally resulting in a fully developed turbulent spectrum whose evolution is followed through a spectral transfer function approach. The derived mean IGM turbulent Doppler parameter, b_t, peaks at z~1 at about 1.5 km/s with maximum b_t = 25 km/s. The shape of the b_t distributi...

  3. On the Nature of Magnetic Turbulence in Rotating, Shearing Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Justin; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to $k^{-2}$, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence $k^{-3/2}$. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states -- their intensity $v_0$ and their outer scale $\\lambda_0$ satisfy the balance condition $v_0/\\lambda_0\\sim \\mathrm d\\Omega/\\mathrm d\\ln r$, where $\\mathrm d\\Omega/\\mathrm d\\l...

  4. PROPAGATION OF ADAPTIVELY CORRECTED LASER BEAMS THROUGH A TURBULENT ATMOSPHERE

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonnette, L

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model for solving the propagation problem of laser beams travelling in atmospheric turbulence and corrected by adaptive optics. The modeling of the adaptive optics is mathematically simple but sufficiently general to encompass the majority of the existing systems. The method allows the prediction of the average irradiance and the irradiance variance beam profiles for arbitrary scintillation levels. Typical solutions are presented for 3.8 and 10.6 µm laser b...

  5. Universal statistics of density of inertial particles sedimenting in turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Park, Yongnam; Harduf, Roei; Lee, Changhoon

    2014-01-01

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in Navier-Stokes turbulence with small ratio $Fr$ of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. We demonstrate that independently of the particles' size or density the particles distribute over fractal set with log-normal statistics determined completely by the Kaplan-Yorke dimension $D_{KY}$. When inertia is not small $D_{KY...

  6. Turbulent Soret Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We show, by direct numerical simulations, that heavy inertial particles (with Stokes number ${\\rm St}$) in inhomogeneously forced statistically stationary turbulent flows cluster at the minima of turbulent kinetic energy. We further show that two turbulent transport processes, turbophoresis and turbulent diffusion together determine the spatial distribution of the particles. The ratio of the corresponding transport coefficient -- the turbulent Soret coefficient -- increases with ${\\rm St}$ for small ${\\rm St}$, reaches a maxima for ${\\rm St}\\approx 10$ and decreases as $\\sim {\\rm St}^{-0.33}$ for large ${\\rm St}$.

  7. Introduction to quantum turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenghi, Carlo F; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2014-03-25

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  8. Cognitive radios for dynamic spectrum access - polyphase multipath radio circuits for dynamic spectrum access

    OpenAIRE

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Shrestha, Rameswor; Mensink, Eisse; Arkesteijn, Vincent J.; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic access of unused spectrum via a cognitive radio asks for flexible radio circuits that can work at an arbitrary radio frequency. This article reviews techniques to realize radios without resorting to frequency selective dedicated filters. In particular, a recently proposed polyphase multipath technique canceling harmonics and sidebands is discussed. Using this technique, a wideband and flexible power upconverter with a clean output spectrum has been realized on a CMOS chip, aiming at f...

  9. Multidimensional Potential Burgers Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We consider the multidimensional generalised stochastic Burgers equation in the space-periodic setting: partial {u}/partial t+(nabla f({u}) \\cdot nabla) {u}-ν Δ {u}= nabla η, quad t ≥ 0, {x} in{T}^d=({R}/ {Z})^d, under the assumption that u is a gradient. Here f is strongly convex and satisfies a growth condition, ν is small and positive, while η is a random forcing term, smooth in space and white in time. For solutions u of this equation, we study Sobolev norms of u averaged in time and in ensemble: each of these norms behaves as a given negative power of ν. These results yield sharp upper and lower bounds for natural analogues of quantities characterising the hydrodynamical turbulence, namely the averages of the increments and of the energy spectrum. These quantities behave as a power of the norm of the relevant parameter, which is respectively the separation ℓ in the physical space and the wavenumber k in the Fourier space. Our bounds do not depend on the initial condition and hold uniformly in {ν}. We generalise the results obtained for the one-dimensional case in [10], confirming the physical predictions in [4, 30]. Note that the form of the estimates does not depend on the dimension: the powers of {ν, |{{k}}|, ℓ} are the same in the one- and the multi-dimensional setting.

  10. Low-to-high confinement transition mediated by turbulence radial wave number spectral shift in a fusion plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Wang, H. Q.;

    2016-01-01

    number spectrum of turbulence, as evidenced here, for the first time, by the direct observation of a turbulence radial wave number spectral shift and turbulence structure tilting prior to the L-H transition at tokamak edge by direct probing. This new mechanism does not require a pretransition overshoot...

  11. Building blocks of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, Marc; Roland, Nicolas; Hof, Bjoern

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature and although the equations governing fluid flow are well known, there are no analytical expressions that describe the complexity of turbulent motion. The nonlinear nature and the large number of spatial and temporal degrees of freedom turn this into one of the most challenging problems in mathematics and the physical sciences alike. We here report the discovery of unstable localised solutions for pipe flow that share key spatial characteristics of turbulence in the intermittent regime. While their temporal dynamics are very simple, much of the spatial complexity found in low Reynolds number turbulence is already encoded in them. We furthermore demonstrate how turbulent transients arise from one such solution branch. Our observations shed light on the origin of turbulence and link the localised structures commonly observed in turbulent flows to invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. New trends in turbulence; Turbulence: nouveaux aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieur, M. [Institut National Polytechnique, LEGI/INPG, Institut de Mecanique, UMR 101, 38 - Grenoble (France); Yaglom, A. [Institut of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[MIT, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Cambridge, MA (United States); David, F. [CEA Saclay, SPhT, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    According to a Russian scientist, the flow of fluids actually met both in nature and engineering practice are turbulent in the overwhelmingly majority of cases. This document that reviews all the progress made recently in the understanding of turbulence, is made up of 10 courses. Course 1 ''a century of turbulence'' deals with the linear and non-linear points of views. In course 2 ''measures of anisotropy and the universal properties of turbulence'' the author gives a very complete account of fully developed turbulence experimental data both in the laboratory and in the atmosphere. Course 3 ''large-eddy simulations of turbulence (LES)'', LES are powerful tools to simulate the coherent vortices formation and evolution in a deterministic way. In Course 4 ''statistical turbulence modelling for the computation of physically complex flows'' the author describes methods used for predicting statistical industrial flows, where the geometry is right now too complex to allow the use of LES. In course 5 ''computational aero-acoustics'' an informative review of computational aero-acoustics with many applications to aircraft noise, is made. In course 6 ''the topology of turbulence'' the author presents the basis of topological fluid dynamics and stresses the importance of helicity in neutral and in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows. In course 7 ''burgulence'' the authors deal with finite-time singularities, but mostly on the basis of Burger equations in one or several dimensions with the formation of multiple shocks. In course 8 ''2-dimensional turbulence'' the author presents numerous examples of 2D turbulence in the laboratory (rotating or MHD flows, plasmas), in the ocean and in the planetary atmosphere. Course 9 ''analysing and computing turbulent flows using wavelets'' is a useful presentation of

  13. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated. PMID:24329368

  14. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    companion paper Rooker et al provide a very interesting study on the generation and detection of 'whistler waves' induced space plasma turbulence at Gakona (Alaska). Physics of atmosphere. Five papers are devoted to the physics of atmosphere. Byalko presents the first experimental observation of a new hydrodynamic phenomenon, the underwater tornado. Herring and Kimura provide a review on recent results on homogeneous stably stratified turbulence. Pouquet et al use a high-resolution direct numerical simulation of rotating helical turbulence to obtain new numerical results on the inverse energy cascade in rotating flows. Tailleux discusses energy conversion and dissipation in depth in mixing flows. Zagumennyi and Chashechkin study the structure of convective flows driven by density variations in a stratified fluid by means of experiments and numerical simulations. Geophysics and Earth science. Three papers are dedicated to geophysics and Earth science. Jinadasa et al investigate small-scale and lateral intermittency of oceanic microstructure in the pycnocline. Shrira and Townsend review on a plausible mechanism of deep-ocean mixing caused by near-inertial waves in the abyssal ocean. Using numerical simulations, Imazio and Mininni study how helicity affects the spectrum of a passive scalar in rotating turbulent flows. Combustion. Two papers deal with flows with chemical reactions. Meshram used the Lewis-Kraichnan space-time version of Hopf's functional formalism to investigate turbulence with chemical reaction. Watanabe et al carry out experiments on a turbulent plane liquid jet with a second-order chemical reaction. Theoretical aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics. Six papers are devoted to fundamental aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics. Chen et al present state-of-the-art work on exact and direct derivation of macroscopic theoretical description for a flow at arbitrary Knudsen number from the Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic theory with constant relaxation time

  15. Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis of Probability Distributions in Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chin; Chang, Tien

    2015-11-01

    Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) was introduced by Chang and Wu (2008) to describe the multifractal characteristic of intermittent events. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has successfully been applied to MHD turbulence simulations and turbulence data observed in various space plasmas. In this paper, the technique is applied to the probability distributions in the inertial range of the turbulent fluid flow, as given in the vast Johns Hopkins University (JHU) turbulence database. In addition, a refined method of finding the continuous ROMA spectrum and the scaled probability distribution function (PDF) simultaneously is introduced.

  16. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A.; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-01

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin S≤ft(=1/2,1,3/2,\\ldots \\right) using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a ‘spin spiral’. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins—an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction.

  17. Buoyancy driven turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, laboratory experiments and atmospheric measurements, that buoyancy driven turbulence exhibits a broad diversity of the types of distributed chaos with its stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$. The distributed chaos with $\\beta = 1/3$ (determined by the helicity correlation integral) is the most common feature of the stably stratified turbulence (due to the strong helical waves presence). These waves mostly dominate spectral properties of the vertical component of velocity field, while the horizontal component is dominated by the diffusive processes both for the weak and strong stable stratification ($\\beta =2/3$). For the last case influence of the low boundary can overcome the wave effects and result in $\\beta =1/2$ for the vertical component of the velocity field (the spontaneous breaking of the space translational symmetry - homogeneity). For the unstably stratified turbulence in the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone the di...

  18. Zonal Flows and Turbulence in Fluids and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    In geophysical and plasma contexts, zonal flows are well known to arise out of turbulence. We elucidate the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence without zonal flows to statistically inhomogeneous turbulence with steady zonal flows. Starting from the Hasegawa--Mima equation, we employ both the quasilinear approximation and a statistical average, which retains a great deal of the qualitative behavior of the full system. Within the resulting framework known as CE2, we extend recent understanding of the symmetry-breaking `zonostrophic instability'. Zonostrophic instability can be understood in a very general way as the instability of some turbulent background spectrum to a zonally symmetric coherent mode. As a special case, the background spectrum can consist of only a single mode. We find that in this case the dispersion relation of zonostrophic instability from the CE2 formalism reduces exactly to that of the 4-mode truncation of generalized modulational instability. We then show that zonal flow...

  19. Lidar sounding of the optical parameter of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvich, A. S.; Fortus, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a lidar intended for clear air turbulence (CAT) positioning on the basis of the backscatter enhancement (BSE) effect is analyzed using a turbulence model with a power-law spectrum. Systematic distortions occurring due to a need to regularize the lidar positioning problem solution are estimated. It is shown that the effect of molecular viscosity of air on the positioning result can be neglected if the wave parameter, which characterizes the diffraction manifestation, is higher than 3. This corresponds to sounding ranges of more than 1 km for optical or UV lidars. The analysis results show that the BSE lidar positioning accuracy weakly depends on the exponent in the turbulence spectrum in regions of severe turbulence. The results can justify a physical experiment for the design of an aircraft system for the lidar detection of CAT regions ahead of the flight course.

  20. Triad interactions in multi-scale ITG/TEM/ETG turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeyama, Shinya; Watanabe, Tomohiko; Idomura, Yasuhiro; Nakata, Motoki; Ishizawa, Akihiro; Nunami, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    Most of turbulent transport studies assume scale separation between electron- and ion-scale turbulence. However, latest massively parallel simulations based on gyrokinetics reveal that multi-scale interactions between electron- and ion-scale turbulence can influence turbulent transport [S. Maeyama, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255002 (2015)]. The physical mechanism is investigated by applying triad transfer analysis. It is revealed that short-wave-length ITG turbulent eddies stabilize electron-scale streamers. Additionally, it is found that electron-scale turbulence has a damping effect on zonal flows. As a result, turbulent transport spectrum obtained from the multi-scale turbulence simulation differs from the sum of ones obtained from single-scale simulations. We will discuss gyrokinetic triad transfer analysis and the applicability of its fluid approximation, and explain the physical mechanism of multi-scale interactions by means of triad transfer analysis.

  1. Discrete Equilibrium Sampling with Arbitrary Nonequilibrium Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hamze, Firas

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel framework for performing statistical sampling, expectation estimation, and partition function approximation using \\emph{arbitrary} heuristic stochastic processes defined over discrete state spaces. Using a highly parallel construction we call the \\emph{sequential constraining process}, we are able to simultaneously generate states with the heuristic process and accurately estimate their probabilities, even when they are far too small to be realistically inferred by direct counting. After showing that both theoretically correct importance sampling and Markov chain Monte Carlo are possible using the sequential constraining process, we integrate it into a methodology called \\emph{state space sampling}, extending the ideas of state space search from computer science to the sampling context. The methodology comprises a dynamic data structure that constructs a robust Bayesian model of the statistics generated by the heuristic process subject to an accuracy constraint, the posterior Kullback-Leibl...

  2. ABJM Wilson loops in arbitrary representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honda, Masazumi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Moriyama, Sanefumi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Kobayashi Maskawa Inst. and Graduate School of Mathematics; Okuyama, Kazumi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-06-15

    We study vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of circular half BPS Wilson loops in arbitrary representations in ABJM theory. We find that those in hook representations are reduced to elementary integrations thanks to the Fermi gas formalism, which are accessible from the numerical studies similar to the partition function in the previous studies. For non-hook representations, we show that the VEVs in the grand canonical formalism can be exactly expressed as determinants of those in the hook representations. Using these facts, we can study the instanton effects of the VEVs in various representations. Our results are consistent with the worldsheet instanton effects studied from the topological string and a prescription to include the membrane instanton effects by shifting the chemical potential, which has been successful for the partition function.

  3. ABJM Wilson loops in arbitrary representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of circular half BPS Wilson loops in arbitrary representations in ABJM theory. We find that those in hook representations are reduced to elementary integrations thanks to the Fermi gas formalism, which are accessible from the numerical studies similar to the partition function in the previous studies. For non-hook representations, we show that the VEVs in the grand canonical formalism can be exactly expressed as determinants of those in the hook representations. Using these facts, we can study the instanton effects of the VEVs in various representations. Our results are consistent with the worldsheet instanton effects studied from the topological string and a prescription to include the membrane instanton effects by shifting the chemical potential, which has been successful for the partition function.

  4. Metamaterial Electromagnetic Superabsorber with Arbitrary Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic superabsorber that has larger absorption cross section than its real size may be a novel photothermal device with improved solar energy conversion rates. Based on a transformation optical approach, the material parameters for a two-dimensional (2D metamaterial-assisted electromagnetic superabsorber with arbitrary geometries are derived and validated by numerical simulation. We find that for the given geometry size, the absorption cross section of the superabsorber using nonlinear transformation is larger than that using linear transformation. These transformations can also be specialized to the designing the N-sided regular polygonal superabsorber just by changing the contour equation. All theoretical and numerical results validate the material parameters for the 2D electromagnetic superabsorber we have developed.

  5. ABJM Wilson Loops in Arbitrary Representations

    CERN Document Server

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki; Moriyama, Sanefumi; Okuyama, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    We study vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of circular half BPS Wilson loops in arbitrary representations in ABJM theory. We find that those in hook representations are reduced to elementary integrations thanks to the Fermi gas formalism, which are accessible from the numerical studies similar to the partition function in the previous studies. For non-hook representations, we show that the VEVs in the grand canonical formalism can be exactly expressed as determinants of those in the hook representations. Using these facts, we can study the instanton effects of the VEVs in various representations. Our results are consistent with the worldsheet instanton effects studied from the topological string and a prescription to include the membrane instanton effects by shifting the chemical potential, which has been successful for the partition function.

  6. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a 'condensate', that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small kllel)). A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model

  7. Superfluid (quantum) turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    Properties of distributed chaos in superfluid (quantum) turbulence have been studied using the data of recent direct numerical simulations (HVBK two-fluid model for He II, and a moving grid in the frames of Gross-Pitaevskii model of the Bose-Einstein condensates at low temperatures). It is found that for the viscous (normal) component of the velocity field in He II the viscosity dominates the distributed chaos with the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ and $\\beta = 2/3$. For the superfluid component the distributed chaos is dominated by the vorticity correlation integral with $\\beta =1/2$ (the soft spontaneous breaking of the space translational symmetry - homogeneity). For very low temperature the distributed chaos is tuned to the large-scale coherent motions: the viscous (normal) component is tuned to the fundamental mode, whereas the superfluid component is subharmonically tuned. For the Gross-Pitaevskii superfluid turbulence incompressible part of the energy spectrum (containing ...

  8. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of Schmidt number

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Schmidt number on passive scalar transport in forced compressible turbulence. In the inertial-convective range the scalar spectrum followed the k^{-5/3} power law. For Sc >> 1, there appeared a k^{-1} power law in the viscous-convective range, while for Sc > 1, the scalar field rolled up and got mixed sufficiently. However, for Sc > 1 and Sc > 1 and Sc << 1 flows decayed faster than the theoretical prediction of k^{-2/3} for incompressible flows. Finally, the comparison with incompressible results showed that the scalar in compressible turbulence with Sc=1 lacked a conspicuous bump structure in its spectrum, but was more intermittent in the dissipative range.

  9. The shell model approach to the rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M

    2003-01-01

    Applications of the shell model of turbulence to the case of rapidly rotating bodies are considered. Starting from the classical GOY model we introduce the Coriolis force and obtain a $\\sim k^{-2}$ spectrum for 3D hydrodynamical turbulence for the free decay regime as well for the regime with external forcing. Additional modifications of the GOY model providing a realistic form of the helicity are proposed.

  10. Double layer formed by beam driven ion-acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small amplitudes steady-state ion-acoustic double layers are observed to form in a plasma transversed by a beam of cold electrons. The importance of turbulence in maintaining the double layer is demonstrated. The measured wave spectrum is in approximate agreement with models deriveted from renornalized turbulence theory. The general features of the double layer are compared with results from particle simulation studies. (author)

  11. Submodels of the generalization of the Leith model of the phenomenological theory of turbulence and of the model of nonlinear diffusion in the inhomogeneous media without absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a nonlinear equation which is equivalent to an equation of generalization of the Leith model of turbulence and to the equation of the model of nonlinear diffusion in an inhomogeneous media without absorption. Using this equation, all submodels admitting continuous Lie transformation groups, acting on the set of solutions of the equations of these submodels are obtained. For obtained submodels, all invariant submodels are found. All essentially distinct invariant solutions describing these invariant submodels are found explicitly, or their finding is reduced to solving nonlinear integral equations. The integral equations defining these solutions reveal new possibilities for analytical and numerical studies. The presence of arbitrary constants in these equations allows one to apply them to the study of different boundary value problems. We have proved the existence and uniqueness of the solution for some boundary value problems. We have investigated the following boundary value problems: (1) a distribution of front-density turbulent kinetic energy in a framework of the generalizion of the Leith model of wave turbulence for which either the spectrum and its wavenumber derivative or the spectrum and its time derivative are given at the initial moment of time at a fixed wavenumber; (2) a nonlinear diffusion process in an inhomogeneous media without absorption, for which either the concentration and its gradient or the concentration and its rate of change are given at the initial moment of time at a fixed point. Under certain additional conditions we have established the existence and uniqueness of the solutions to boundary value problems describing these processes. (paper)

  12. Wave turbulent diffusion due to the Doppler shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, A. M.

    2006-08-01

    Turbulent diffusion of a passive tracer caused by a random wavefield is believed to be quadratic with respect to the energy spectrum ɛk of the velocity field (i.e. proportional to epsi4, where epsi is the order of the wave amplitudes). So, the wave turbulent diffusion (say, on the ocean surface or in the air) is often believed to be dominated by the turbulent diffusion due to the incompressible flow. In this paper, we show that the wave turbulent diffusion can be associated with the Doppler shift and find that the wave turbulent diffusion can be more significant than previously thought. This mechanism works if the velocity field is compressible and statistically anisotropic, with the result that the wave system has a significant Stokes drift. The contribution of this mechanism has a lower order in epsi. We confirm our results with numerical simulations. To derive these results, we develop the statistical near-identity transformation.

  13. An Arbitrary Benchmark CAPM: One Additional Frontier Portfolio is Sufficient

    OpenAIRE

    Ekern, Steinar

    2008-01-01

    The benchmark CAPM linearly relates the expected returns on an arbitrary asset, an arbitrary benchmark portfolio, and an arbitrary MV frontier portfolio. The benchmark is not required to be on the frontier and may be non-perfectly correlated with the frontier portfolio. The benchmark CAPM extends and generalizes previous CAPM formulations, including the zero beta, two correlated frontier portfolios, riskless augmented frontier, and inefficient portfolio versions. The covariance between the of...

  14. Interdisciplinary aspects of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kupka, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    What do combustion engines, fusion reactors, weather forecast, ocean flows, our sun, and stellar explosions in outer space have in common? Of course, the physics and the length and time scales are vastly different in all cases, but it is also well known that in all of them, on some relevant length scales, the material flows that govern the dynamical and/or secular evolution of the systems are chaotic and often unpredictable: they are said to be turbulent. The interdisciplinary aspects of turbulence are brought together in this volume containing chapters written by experts from very different fields, including geophysics, astrophysics, and engineering. It covers several subjects on which considerable progress was made during the last decades, from questions concerning the very nature of turbulence to some practical applications. These subjects include: a basic introduction into turbulence, statistical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics, turbulent convection in stars, atmospheric turbulence in the context of nume...

  15. One-dimensional turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A.R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  16. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  17. Finite element method application for turbulent and transitional flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sváček Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is interested in numerical simulations of the interaction of the fluid flow with an airfoil. Particularly, the problem of the turbulent flow around the airfoil with elastic support is considered. The main attention is paid to the numerical approximation of the flow problem using the finite element approximations. The laminar - turbulence transition of the flow on the surface airfoil is considered. The chois of the transition model is discussed. The transition model based on the two equation k−ω turbulence model is used. The structure motion is described with the aid of two degrees of freedom. The motion of the computational domain is treated with the aid of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. Numerical results are shown.

  18. Feedback Control of Turbulent Shear Flows by Genetic Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Duriez, Thomas; von Krbek, Kai; Bonnet, Jean-Paul; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Gautier, Nicolas; Aider, Jean-Luc; Raibaudo, Cedric; Cuvier, Christophe; Stanislas, Michel; Debien, Antoine; Mazellier, Nicolas; Kourta, Azeddine; Brunton, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent shear flows have triggered fundamental research in nonlinear dynamics, like transition scenarios, pattern formation and dynamical modeling. In particular, the control of nonlinear dynamics is subject of research since decades. In this publication, actuated turbulent shear flows serve as test-bed for a nonlinear feedback control strategy which can optimize an arbitrary cost function in an automatic self-learning manner. This is facilitated by genetic programming providing an analytically treatable control law. Unlike control based on PID laws or neural networks, no structure of the control law needs to be specified in advance. The strategy is first applied to low-dimensional dynamical systems featuring aspects of turbulence and for which linear control methods fail. This includes stabilizing an unstable fixed point of a nonlinearly coupled oscillator model and maximizing mixing, i.e.\\ the Lyapunov exponent, for forced Lorenz equations. For the first time, we demonstrate the applicability of genetic p...

  19. Langevin approach to generate synthetic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sagues, F; Careta, A

    1997-01-01

    We present an analytical scheme, easily implemented numerically, to generate synthetic Gaussian turbulent flows by using a linear Langevin equation, where the noise term acts as a stochastic stirring force. The characteristic parameters of the velocity field are well introduced, in particular the kinematic viscosity and the spectrum of energy. As an application, the diffusion of a passive scalar is studied for two different energy spectra. Numerical results are compared favorably with analytical calculations.

  20. Depression of nonlinearity in decaying isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations of decaying isotropic Navier--Stokes turbulence exhibit depression of the normalized mean-square nonlinear term to 57% of the value for a Gaussianly distributed velocity field with the same instantaneous velocity spectrum. Similar depression is found for dynamical models with random coupling coefficients (modified Betchov models). This suggests that the depression is dynamically generic rather than specifically driven by alignment of velocity and vorticity

  1. Geometrical critical phenomena on a random surface of arbitrary genus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical mechanics of self-avoiding walks (SAW) or of the O(n)-loop model on a two-dimensional random surface are shown to be exactly solvable. The partition functions of SAW and surface configurations (possibly in the presence of vacuum loops) are calculated by planar diagram enumeration techniques. Two critical regimes are found: a dense phase where the infinite walks and loops fill the infinite surface, the non-filled part staying finite, and a dilute phase where the infinite surface singularity on the one hand, and walk and loop singularities on the other, merge together. The configuration critical exponents of self-avoiding networks of any fixed topology G, on a surface with arbitrary genus H, are calculated as universal functions of G and H. For self-avoiding walks, the exponents are built from an infinite set of basic conformal dimensions associated with central charges c = -2 (dense phase) and c = 0 (dilute phase). The conformal spectrum ΔL, L ≥ 1 associated with L-leg star polymers is calculated exactly, for c = -2 and c = 0. This is generalized to the set of L-line 'watermelon' exponents ΔL of the O(n) model on a random surface. The divergences of the partition functions of self-avoiding networks on the random surface, possibly in the presence of vacuum loops, are shown to satisfy a factorization theorem over the vertices of the network. This provides a proof, in the presence of a fluctuating metric, of a result conjectured earlier in the standard plane. From this, the value of the string susceptibility γstr(H,c) is extracted for a random surface of arbitrary genus H, bearing a field theory of central charge c, or equivalently, embedded in d=c dimensions. Lastly, by enumerating spanning trees on a random lattice, we solve the similar problem of hamiltonian walks on the (fluctuating) Manhattan covering lattice. We also obtain new results for dilute trees on a random surface. (orig./HSI)

  2. Scour monitoring via turbulent open channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scour is the leading cause of bridge failure in the United States. It can result in the loss of lives and costs millions to repair the damage. A novel method is proposed for monitoring scour that exploits the turbulence in natural channels. The method utilizes the dynamic pressure associated with the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the flow to excite a flexible plate. A semi-empirical model is developed to describe the interaction of turbulent open channel flow with the plate. The model describes the variation of turbulent velocity fluctuations across the flow depth in an open channel resulting in a method for determining the average dynamic pressure on the flexible plate. The dynamic response of the plate is then modeled by superimposing the response of multiple modes of the disk to the random, turbulent dynamic pressure spectrum. The model is verified considering the pressure integration across the plate surface to ensure converged solutions. Due to the uncertainties in the material properties of the plate, the experimentally determined natural frequencies and vibration measurements are used to calibrate the model. The calibrated model predictions are then compared against an independent dataset for validation. In addition to describing the physical operation of the device, the semi-empirical model is also employed to optimize the field device. Measurements made using the field device also confirmed the model results, even in a non-design, misaligned flow condition. (paper)

  3. Imbalanced relativistic force-free magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When magnetic energy density is much larger than that of matter, as in pulsar/black hole magnetospheres, the medium becomes force-free and we need relativity to describe it. As in non-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Alfvénic MHD turbulence in the relativistic limit can be described by interactions of counter-traveling wave packets. In this paper, we numerically study strong imbalanced MHD turbulence in such environments. Here, imbalanced turbulence means the waves traveling in one direction (dominant waves) have higher amplitudes than the opposite-traveling waves (sub-dominant waves). We find that (1) spectrum of the dominant waves is steeper than that of sub-dominant waves, (2) the anisotropy of the dominant waves is weaker than that of sub-dominant waves, and (3) the dependence of the ratio of magnetic energy densities of dominant and sub-dominant waves on the ratio of energy injection rates is steeper than quadratic (i.e., b+2/b−2∝(ϵ+/ϵ−)n with n > 2). These results are consistent with those obtained for imbalanced non-relativistic Alfvénic turbulence. This corresponds well to the earlier reported similarity of the relativistic and non-relativistic balanced magnetic turbulence.

  4. Phase-space structure in plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma turbulence driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is theoretically studied with high-resolution Eulerian kinetic simulations. A spectral analysis of the velocity distribution function in the slab ITG turbulence clarifies how the entropy variable associated with the fine scale structure of the distribution function is produced by the turbulent heat transport in the presence of the temperature gradient, transferred from macro- to micro-scales in the velocity space through phase-mixing processes, and dissipated by collisions. The entropy spectral function is analytically derived and confirmed by the simulation result. It is shown that the entropy spectrum obeys a power law in the range that is free from instability sources and collisional dissipation. The Eulerian gyrokinetic simulation of the toroidal ITG turbulence yields the ion thermal diffusivity in the steady turbulent state, in which the balance between the entropy production by the ion thermal transport and the collisional dissipation is verified. A formula for a long time behavior of the zonal flow potential in helical systems is analytically derived, by which collisionless zonal flow dynamics in tokamaks and helical plasmas are compared. A good agreement between the formula and the gyrokinetic simulation results is obtained. (authors)

  5. The residual energy in freely decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation for incompressible isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence a prediction for the inertial range scaling of the residual energy spectrum, ERk= vertical bar Ekkinetic - Emagnetick vertical bar ∼ k-7/3, is obtained. This scaling, while in contradiction to earlier theoretical results, is shown to be in agreement with high-resolution direct numerical simulations of nonhelical decaying MHD turbulence. The underlying phenomenology states a dynamic quasi-equilibrium of the small-scale turbulent dynamo and the Alfven effect

  6. Spectral properties of electromagnetic turbulence in plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaikh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the nonlinear turbulent processes associated with electromagnetic waves in plasmas. We focus on low-frequency (in comparison with the electron gyrofrequency nonlinearly interacting electron whistlers and nonlinearly interacting Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD fluctuations in a magnetized plasma. Nonlinear whistler mode turbulence study in a magnetized plasma involves incompressible electrons and immobile ions. Two-dimensional turbulent interactions and subsequent energy cascades are critically influenced by the electron whisters that behave distinctly for scales smaller and larger than the electron skin depth. It is found that in whistler mode turbulence there results a dual cascade primarily due to the forward spectral migration of energy that coexists with a backward spectral transfer of mean squared magnetic potential. Finally, inclusion of the ion dynamics, resulting from a two fluid description of the H-MHD plasma, leads to several interesting results that are typically observed in the solar wind plasma. Particularly in the solar wind, the high-time-resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of the MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high-frequency regime. In the latter, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD model and a finite frequency effect (in comparison with the ion gyrofrequency arising from the ion inertia is essentially included to discern the dynamics of the smaller length scales (in comparison with the ion skin depth. This leads to a nonlinear H-MHD model, which is presented in this paper. With the help of our 3-D H-MHD code, we find that the characteristic turbulent interactions in the high-frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic-Alfvén time-scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic-Alfvén interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of the kinetic and magnetic energies.

  7. String Theory and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  8. String Theory and Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje(Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA); Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  9. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  10. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbu...

  11. Inhomogeneous turbulence in magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is expected to play an essential role in enhancing magnetic reconnection. Turbulence associated with magnetic reconnection is highly inhomogeneous: it is generated by inhomogeneities of the field configuration such as the velocity shear, temperature gradient, density stratification, magnetic shear, etc. This self-generated turbulence affects the reconnection through the turbulent transport. In this reconnection--turbulence interaction, localization of turbulent transport due to dynamic balance between several turbulence effects plays an essential role. For investigating inhomogeneous turbulence in a strongly nonlinear regime, closure or turbulence modeling approaches provide a powerful tool. A turbulence modeling approach for the magnetic reconnection is introduced. In the model, the mean-field equations with turbulence effects incorporated are solved simultaneously with the equations of turbulent statistical quantities that represent spatiotemporal properties of turbulence under the effect of large-scale field inhomogeneities. Numerical simulations of this Reynolds-averaged turbulence model showed that self-generated turbulence enhances magnetic reconnection. It was pointed out that reconnection states may be divided into three category depending on the turbulence level: (i) laminar reconnection; (ii) turbulent reconnection, and (iii) turbulent diffusion. Recent developments in this direction are also briefly introduced, which includes the magnetic Prandtl number dependence, spectral evolution, and guide-field effects. Also relationship of this fully nonlinear turbulence approach with other important approaches such as plasmoid instability reconnection will be discussed.

  12. Analytic models of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for arbitrary eclipser/star size ratios and arbitrary multiline stellar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, Roman V.; Shaidulin, Vakhit Sh.

    2015-12-01

    We present an attempt to improve models of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect by relaxing several restrictive assumptions. We consider the entire multiline stellar spectrum rather than just a single line, use no assumptions about the shape of the lines profiles, and allow arbitrary size ratio for the star and its eclipser. However, we neglect the effect of macroturbulence and differential rotation. We construct our model as a power series in the stellar rotation velocity, V sin i, giving a closed set of analytic formulae for up to three terms, and assuming quadratic limb-darkening law. We consider three major approaches of determining the Doppler shift: cross-correlation with a predefined template, cross-correlation with an out-of-transit stellar spectrum, and parametric modelling of the spectrum. A numerical testcase revels that our model preserves good accuracy for the rotation velocity of up to the limit of two to three times the average linewidth in the spectrum. We also apply our approach to the Doppler data of HD 189733, for which we obtain an improved model of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with two correction terms, and derive a reduced value for V sin i.

  13. Plasma turbulence and kinetic instabilities at ion scales in the expanding solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr; Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca; Travnicek, Pavel M

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2-D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly-polarized, random-phase Alfv\\'enic fluctuations which have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops, magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overco...

  14. Understanding rigid body motion in arbitrary dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Leyvraz, Francois

    2014-01-01

    Why would anyone wish to generalize the already unappetizing subject of rigid body motion to an arbitrary number of dimensions? At first sight, the subject seems to be both repellent and superfluous. The author will try to argue that an approach involving no specifically three-dimensional constructs is actually easier to grasp than the traditional one and might thus be generally useful to understand rigid body motion both in three dimensions and in the general case. Specific differences between the viewpoint suggested here and the usual one include the following: here angular velocities are systematically treated as antisymmetric matrices, a symmetric tensor $I$ quite different from the moment of inertia tensor plays a central role, whereas the latter is shown to be a far more complex object, namely a tensor of rank four. A straightforward way to define it is given. The Euler equation is derived and the use of Noether's theorem to obtain conserved quantities is illustrated. Finally the equation of motion for ...

  15. Electron plasma oscillations at arbitrary Debye lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solution is presented for electron plasma oscillation in a thermalized homogeneous plasma, at arbitrary ratios between the Debye length λD and the perturbation wave length λ. The limit λD D >> λ corresponds to the free-streaming limit of strong kinetic phase-mixing due to large particle excursions. A strong large Debye distance (LDD) effect already appears when λD > approx λ. The initial amplitude of the fluid-like contribution to the macroscopic density perturbation then becomes small as compared to the contribution from the free-streaming part. As a consequence, only a small fraction of the density perturbation remains after a limited number of kinetic damping times of the free-streaming part. The analysis further shows that a representation in terms of normal model of the form exp(-iωt) leads to amplitude factors of these modes which are related to each other and which depend on the combined free-streaming and fluid behaviour of the plasma. Consequently, these modes are coupled and cannot be treated as being independent of each other. (au)

  16. Including Arbitrary Antenna Patterns in Microwave Imaging of Buried Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph

    A linear inversion scheme for microwave imaging of buried objects is presented in which arbitrary antennas are accounted for through their plane-wave transmitting and receiving spectra......A linear inversion scheme for microwave imaging of buried objects is presented in which arbitrary antennas are accounted for through their plane-wave transmitting and receiving spectra...

  17. Turbulence compensation: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Schutte, Klamer; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-06-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  18. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect of...

  19. Seesaw mechanism in turbulence and turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Theory of nonlocal transport has been developed, based upon the statistical theory of plasma turbulence. Essence is that fluctuations (with long radial correlation length) can be excited by nonlinear processes, although they are linearly stable. Experiments have reported the non-diffusive mechanisms in rapid response of transport between distant radii. Simulations have demonstrated that transport barrier can be established while increasing linear growth rate of local instabilities. These await application of theory of nonlocal transport. Example of such nonlinearly-driven, meso-scale fluctuations is the zonal flow (ZF). ZFs grow extracting energy from microscopic fluctuations so as to reduce the turbulence and turbulent transport. Because the radial correlation length of ZF is longer than those for microscopic fluctuations, which are inducing turbulent transport, ZF, which is driven fluctuations at one radius, can suppress fluctuations at distant radii. Thus, the fluctuations exchange energy over the distance that is much longer than autocorrelation length of microscopic fluctuations. This mechanism induces new nonlocal interactions in turbulent transport. That is, strong fluctuations at particular radius can suppress fluctuations at different radius, via induction of ZFs. Stronger fluctuations suppress weaker fluctuations. This is called the seesaw mechanism via ZFs. Owing to this mechanism, the turbulence transport is not determined by local parameters alone, but by parameters at far distance. The transient response is much faster than the process governed by diffusive processes. [This work is partly supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Specially-Promoted Research (16002005), the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (19360418) and collaboration programme of NIFS.] (author)

  20. A mesh partitioning algorithm for preserving spatial locality in arbitrary geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivarti, Girish V.; Salehi, M. Mahdi; Bushe, W. Kendal

    2015-01-01

    A space-filling curve (SFC) is a proximity preserving linear mapping of any multi-dimensional space and is widely used as a clustering tool. Equi-sized partitioning of an SFC ignores the loss in clustering quality that occurs due to inaccuracies in the mapping. Often, this results in poor locality within partitions, especially for the conceptually simple, Morton order curves. We present a heuristic that improves partition locality in arbitrary geometries by slicing a Morton order curve at points where spatial locality is sacrificed. In addition, we develop algorithms that evenly distribute points to the extent possible while maintaining spatial locality. A metric is defined to estimate relative inter-partition contact as an indicator of communication in parallel computing architectures. Domain partitioning tests have been conducted on geometries relevant to turbulent reactive flow simulations. The results obtained highlight the performance of our method as an unsupervised and computationally inexpensive domain partitioning tool.

  1. Wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid submitted to a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, François; Falcon, Eric

    2008-01-01

    We report the observation of wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid mechanically forced and submitted to a static normal magnetic field. We show that magnetic surface waves arise only above a critical field. The power spectrum of their amplitudes displays a frequency-power law leading to the observation of a magnetic wave turbulence regime which is experimentally shown to involve a 4-wave interaction process. The existence of the regimes of gravity, magnetic and capillary wave turbule...

  2. Analytical reconstruction of isotropic turbulence spectra based on the Gaussian transform

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlbrandt, Attila; Hu, Nan; Guerin, Sebastien; Ewert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The Random Particle Mesh (RPM) method used to simulate turbulence-induced broadband noise in several aeroacoustic applications is extended to realise isotropic turbulence spectra. With this method turbulent fluctuations are synthesised by filtering white noise with a Gaussian filter kernel that in turn gives a Gaussian spectrum. The Gaussian function is smooth and its derivatives and integrals are again Gaussian functions. The Gaussian filter is efficient and finds wide-spread applications in...

  3. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-05-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  4. Origin of Perpendicular Scales in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V. L.

    2015-10-01

    Results of a study of dispersive Alfvén modes propagating outward from the Sun in streaming inhomogeneous plasma are presented for the inner heliosphere (≲1 AU) region. The results clearly show that a combination of nonlinear wave-particle and wave-wave interactions of outward-only Alfvén modes initially propagating along the local background magnetic field is perfectly capable of explaining the prevalence of turbulent energy in perpendicular ({k}\\perp ) scales over energy contained in scales propagating parallel ({k}\\parallel ) to the local magnetic field perturbations observed in the solar wind. The currently agreed on explanation for this anisotropy, as well as for the scale dependence of wave energy spectra, involves various nonlinear models of imbalanced incompressible MHD turbulence that require a mixture of inward and outward propagating waves to fuel a nonlinear cascade of energy into the {k}\\perp spectrum. The presented approach, for the first time, bridges a gap between week and strong turbulence theories—the interplay of wave-particle and wave-wave processes allows us to obtain strong turbulence scalings from seemingly week turbulence wave resonances. The reported results have a major implication on the current theories of solar wind turbulence and may require a complete overhaul of the state-of-the-art turbulence paradigm, including reassessment and reevaluation of the magnitude and directions (outward \\rightleftarrows inward; {k}\\perp \\rightleftarrows {k}\\parallel ) of the turbulent cascades that are necessary to explain the observations.

  5. Stochastic superparameterization in quasigeostrophic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we expand and develop the authors' recent proposed methodology for efficient stochastic superparameterization algorithms for geophysical turbulence. Geophysical turbulence is characterized by significant intermittent cascades of energy from the unresolved to the resolved scales resulting in complex patterns of waves, jets, and vortices. Conventional superparameterization simulates large scale dynamics on a coarse grid in a physical domain, and couples these dynamics to high-resolution simulations on periodic domains embedded in the coarse grid. Stochastic superparameterization replaces the nonlinear, deterministic eddy equations on periodic embedded domains by quasilinear stochastic approximations on formally infinite embedded domains. The result is a seamless algorithm which never uses a small scale grid and is far cheaper than conventional SP, but with significant success in difficult test problems. Various design choices in the algorithm are investigated in detail here, including decoupling the timescale of evolution on the embedded domains from the length of the time step used on the coarse grid, and sensitivity to certain assumed properties of the eddies (e.g. the shape of the assumed eddy energy spectrum). We present four closures based on stochastic superparameterization which elucidate the properties of the underlying framework: a ‘null hypothesis’ stochastic closure that uncouples the eddies from the mean, a stochastic closure with nonlinearly coupled eddies and mean, a nonlinear deterministic closure, and a stochastic closure based on energy conservation. The different algorithms are compared and contrasted on a stringent test suite for quasigeostrophic turbulence involving two-layer dynamics on a β-plane forced by an imposed background shear. The success of the algorithms developed here suggests that they may be fruitfully applied to more realistic situations. They are expected to be particularly useful in providing accurate and

  6. Elasto-inertial turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-06-25

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called "maximum drag reduction" asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  7. Sound generation by turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, A.P.; Hynes, T.P. [Cambridge Univ., Dept. of Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    Sound is a weak by-product of a subsonic turbulent flow. The main convective elements of the turbulence are silent and it is only spectral components with supersonic phase speeds that couple to the far-field sound. This paper reviews recent work on sound generation by turbulence. Just as there is a hierarchy of numerical models for turbulence (scaling, RANS, LES and DNS), there are different approaches for relating the near-field turbulence to the far-field sound. Kirchhoff approaches give the far-field sound in a straightforward way, but provide little insight into the sources of sound. Acoustic analogies can be used with different base flows to describe the propagation effects and to highlight the major noise producing regions. (authors)

  8. Turbulent Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Lehner, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We show that rapidly-spinning black holes can display turbulent gravitational behavior which is mediated by a new type of parametric instability. This instability transfers energy from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies--- a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse energy cascade displayed by 2+1-dimensional turbulent fluids. Our finding reveals a path towards gravitational turbulence for perturbations of rapidly-spinning black holes, and provides the first evidence for gravitational turbulence in an asymptotically flat spacetime. Interestingly, this finding predicts observable gravitational wave signatures from such phenomena in black hole binaries with high spins and gives a gravitational description of turbulence relevant to the fluid-gravity duality.

  9. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    stochastic turbulence model based on ambit processes is proposed. It is shown how a prescribed isotropic covariance structure can be reproduced. Non-Gaussian turbulence models are obtained through non-Gaussian Lévy bases or through volatility modulation of Lévy bases. As opposed to spectral models operating......This thesis addresses stochastic modelling of turbulence with applications to wind energy in mind. The primary tool is ambit processes, a recently developed class of computationally tractable stochastic processes based on integration with respect to Lévy bases. The subject of ambit processes is...... still undergoing rapid development. Turbulence and wind energy are vast and complicated subjects. Turbulence has structures across a wide range of length and time scales, structures which cannot be captured by a Gaussian process that relies on only second order properties. Concerning wind energy, a wind...

  10. Arbitrary Shape Deformation in CFD Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Sculptor(R) is a commercially available software tool, based on an Arbitrary Shape Design (ASD), which allows the user to perform shape optimization for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design. The developed software tool provides important advances in the state-of-the-art of automatic CFD shape deformations and optimization software. CFD is an analysis tool that is used by engineering designers to help gain a greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components being designed. The next step in the engineering design process is to then modify, the design to improve the components' performance. This step has traditionally been performed manually via trial and error. Two major problems that have, in the past, hindered the development of an automated CFD shape optimization are (1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and (2) inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification. The ASD that has been developed as part of the Sculptor(R) software tool is a major advancement in solving these two issues. First, the ASD allows the CFD designer to freely create his own shape parameters, thereby eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the CAD model parameters. Then, the software performs a smooth volumetric deformation, which eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change (which is how this process had previously been achieved). Sculptor(R) can be used to optimize shapes for aerodynamic and structural design of spacecraft, aircraft, watercraft, ducts, and other objects that affect and are affected by flows of fluids and heat. Sculptor(R) makes it possible to perform, in real time, a design change that would manually take hours or days if remeshing were needed.

  11. Multiplicative asset exchange with arbitrary return distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conservative wealth exchange process derived from trade interactions is modeled as a multiplicative stochastic transference of value, where each interaction multiplies the wealth of the poorest of the two intervening agents by a random gain η = 1 + κ, with κ a random return. Analyzing the kinetic equation for the wealth distribution P(w, t), general properties are derived for arbitrary return distributions π(κ). If the geometrical average of the gain is larger than one, i.e. if (lnη)π > 0, in the long time limit a nontrivial equilibrium wealth distribution P(w) is attained. Whenever (lnη)π π of the poor agent is positive. In the stable phase, P(w) behaves as w(T−1) for w→0, and we find T exactly. This exponent is nonzero in the stable phase but goes to zero on approach to the condensation interface. The exact wealth distribution can be obtained analytically for the particular case of Kelly betting, and it turns out to be an exponential P(w) = e−w. We show, however, that our model is never reversible, no matter what π(κ) is. In the condensing phase, the wealth of an agent with relative rank x is found to be w(x, t) ∼ ext(lnη)π for finite times t. The wealth distribution is consequently P(w) ∼ 1/w for finite times, while all wealth ends up in the hands of the richest agent for large times. Numerical simulations are carried out and found to satisfactorily compare with the above-mentioned analytical results

  12. A generalized transformation to convert an arbitrary perfect electric conductor into another arbitrary dielectric object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Lujun; Zhou Daming; Wang Jian; Li Guanhai; Li Zhifeng; Chen Xiaoshuang; Lu Wei, E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 200083 Shanghai (China)

    2011-06-15

    A generalized transformation is proposed to design an illusion device. The device can reshape an arbitrarily shaped perfect electrical conductor (PEC) into another dielectric object with arbitrary geometry. Such a device can evolve into an ideal invisibility cloak with non-conformal boundaries if the virtual space is filled with air. Furthermore, the validity of our proposed transformation is confirmed by two specific devices. One is to convert a regular polygonal PEC cylinder into a circular dielectric cylinder. Another one is to reshape a circular PEC cylinder into a regular polygonal dielectric cylinder.

  13. Implicit large eddy simulations of anisotropic weakly compressible turbulence with application to core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) In the implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) paradigm, the dissipative nature of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes is exploited to provide an implicit model of turbulence. Recent 3D simulations suggest that turbulence might play a crucial role in core-collapse supernova explosions, however the fidelity with which turbulence is simulated in these studies is unclear. Especially considering that the accuracy of ILES for the regime of interest in CCSN, weakly compressible and strongly anisotropic, has not been systematically assessed before. In this paper we assess the accuracy of ILES using numerical methods most commonly employed in computational astrophysics by means of a number of local simulations of driven, weakly compressible, anisotropic turbulence. We report a detailed analysis of the way in which the turbulent cascade is influenced by the numerics. Our results suggest that anisotropy and compressibility in CCSN turbulence have little effect on the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and a...

  14. Jeans criterion in a turbulent medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzola, S.; Falgarone, E.; Heyvaerts, J.; Perault, M.; Puget, J. L.

    1986-10-01

    According to the classical Jeans analysis, all the molecular clouds of mass larger than a few 100 M(solar), size larger than about 1pc and kinetic temperature Tk less than 30K are gravitationally unstable. We have shown that in clouds supported by internal supersonic motions, local gravitational instabilities may appear within molecular clouds which are globally stable. The argument is threefold: (1) when the turbulent kinetic energy is included into the internal energy term, the virial equilibrium condition shows that molecular clouds such as those observed, which are gravitationally unstable according to the Jeans criterion, are indeed globally stable if supported by a turbulent velocity field of power spectrum steeper than 3; (2) 2D compressible hydrodynamical simulations show that a supersonic turbulent velocity field generates a turbulent pressure within clouds, the gradients of which stabilize the unstable scales (i.e., the largest scales and the cloud itself) against gravitational collapse; (3) an analysis similar to the Jeans approach but including the turbulent pressure gradient term, gives basically the same results as those given in (1). Clouds of mean density lower than a critical value are found to be stable even though more massive than their Jeans mass. In clouds of mean density larger than that critical value, the gravitational instability appears only over a range of scales smaller than the cloud size, the largest scales being stable. In practice, the observed mean densities are lower than this critical value: the observation of a small number of cores and stars of a few solar masses embedded in clouds of several hundred solar masses can only be understood in terms of small scale density fluctuations of large amplitude generated by the supersonic turbulence which would occasionally overtake the limit of gravitational stability.

  15. Numerical studies of the ABJM theory for arbitrary N at arbitrary coupling constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Masanori; Honda, Masazumi; Honma, Yoshinori; Nishimura, Jun; Shiba, Shotaro; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    We show that the ABJM theory, which is an {N} = {6} superconformal U( N) × U( N) Chern-Simons gauge theory, can be studied for arbitrary N at arbitrary coupling constant by applying a simple Monte Carlo method to the matrix model that can be derived from the theory by using the localization technique. This opens up the possibility of probing the quantum aspects of M-theory and testing the AdS4/CFT3 duality at the quantum level. Here we calculate the free energy, and confirm the N 3/2 scaling in the M-theory limit predicted from the gravity side. We also find that our results nicely interpolate the analytical formulae proposed previously in the M-theory and type IIA regimes. Furthermore, we show that some results obtained by the Fermi gas approach can be clearly understood from the constant map contribution obtained by the genus expansion. The method can be easily generalized to the calculations of BPS operators and to other theories that reduce to matrix models.

  16. Non-locality and Intermittency in 3D Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Laval, J. -P.; B. Dubrulle; Nazarenko, S.(Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF), Sarov, Russia)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to determine the influence of the non-local and local interactions on the intermittency corrections in the scaling properties of 3D turbulence. We show that neglect of local interactions leads to an enhanced small-scale energy spectrum and to a significantly larger number of very intense vortices (tornadoes) and stronger intermittency. On the other hand, neglect of the non-local interactions results in even stronger small-scale spectrum but significantly weaker ...

  17. Kolmogorov's law for two-dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Celani, A.; Prandi, R.; Boffetta, G

    1997-01-01

    The analogue of the Kolmogorov's four-fifths law is derived for two-dimensional, homogeneous, isotropic EMHD turbulence in the energy cascade inertial range. Direct numerical simulations for the freely decaying case show that this relation holds true for different values of the adimensional electron inertial length scale, $d_e$. The energy spectrum is found to be close to the expected Kolmogorov spectrum.

  18. Periodically kicked turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  19. Non-gaussian turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J. [NEG Micon Project Development A/S, Randers (Denmark); Hansen, K.S. [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, B.J. [VESTAS Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Nielsen, M. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The pdf`s of atmospheric turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour is being investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity. Models for non-Gaussian turbulence have been developed, by which artificial turbulence can be generated with specified distributions, spectra and cross-correlations. The artificial time series will then be used in load models and the resulting loads in the Gaussian and the non-Gaussian cases will be compared. (au)

  20. Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG Hydrocode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denissen, Nicholas A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reisner, Jon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29

    The BHR-2 turbulence model, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for variable density and compressible flows, is implemented in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode, FLAG. The BHR-2 formulation is discussed, with emphasis on its connection to multi-component flow formulations that underlie FLAG's treatment of multi-species flow. One-dimensional and two-dimensional validation tests are performed and compared to experiment and Eulerian simulations. Turbulence is an often studied and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and modeling its effects is essential in many practical applications. Specifically the behavior of turbulence in the presence of strong density gradients and compressibility is of fundamental importance in applications ranging from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) [1], supernovae [2], and atmospheric flows. The BHR closure approach [3] seeks to model the physical processes at work in variable density turbulence including Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) [4], Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) [5], and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) [6], driven turbulence. The effectiveness of the BHR-2 implementation has been demonstrated for variable density mixing in the KH, RT, and RM cases in an Eulerian framework [7]. The primary motivation of the present work is to implement the BHR-2 turbulence model in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code FLAG. The goal is not only to demonstrate results in agreement with previous Eulerian calculations, but also document behavior that arises from the underlying differences in code philosophy.

  1. Arbitrary Phase Vocoders by means of Warping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpaolo Evangelista

    2013-08-01

    duration and/or frequency dependent bandwidth. As an example, in a constant Q frequency band allocation, the ratios of center band frequencies over bandwidth remains constant, so that the frequency bands become wider and wider as center frequency increases, similarly to the frequency distance of 12-tone scale notes or of octaves.While time-frequency allocation can be performed in an arbitrary way, the ability to reconstruct the original signal from Vocoder analysis data is essential in sound processing and transformation applications. Moreover, even the analysis or the production of spectrograms benefits from the perfect reconstruction property if one needs to be confident that no important information is hidden, which serves to completely describe the signal.

  2. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  3. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  4. Ambiguities in the deduction of rest frame fluctuation spectrums from spectrums computed in moving frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of interpretation of power spectrums computed by Fourier analysis of data time series taken in frames moving with respect to the medium containing the fluctuations is examined. It is found that no unique connection exists between the rest frame power spectrum as a function of scale length and the derived power spectrum as a function 'frequency' computed from the time series data taken in the moving frame. This caused by a complex Doppler-shifting phenomenon that leads to a basically aliased frequency spectrum in the moving frame. Examples of nonuniqueness are given for various types of rest frame density or wave turbulence that lead to the same frequency dependence of the power spectrum computed in the moving frame. This has implications for the past interpretations of power spectrums of density or magnetic field fluctuations from satellites or interplanetary probes

  5. Teleportation of an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of multiqudit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a scheme to teleport an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of multiqutrit via classical correlation and classical communication. To teleport an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of N qutrits, N classically correlated pairs of two qutrits are used as channel. The sender (Alice) makes Fourier transform and conditional gate (i.e., XOR(3) gate) on her qutrits and does measurement in appropriate computation bases. Then she sends N ctrits to the receiver (Bob). Based on the received information, Bob performs the corresponding unitary transformation on his qutrits and obtains the teleported state. Teleportation of an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of multiqudit is also discussed

  6. Teleportation of an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of multiqudit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qian-Hua; Lin, Xiu-Min; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Gong-Wei; Chen, Li-Bo; Gu, Yong-Jian

    2008-03-01

    This paper proposes a scheme to teleport an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of multiqutrit via classical correlation and classical communication. To teleport an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of N qutrits, N classically correlated pairs of two qutrits are used as channel. The sender (Alice) makes Fourier transform and conditional gate (i.e., XOR(3) gate) on her qutrits and does measurement in appropriate computation bases. Then she sends N ctrits to the receiver (Bob). Based on the received information, Bob performs the corresponding unitary transformation on his qutrits and obtains the teleported state. Teleportation of an arbitrary mixture of diagonal states of multiqudit is also discussed.

  7. Feynman propagator for an arbitrary half-integral spin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄时中; 张鹏飞; 阮图南; 祝玉灿; 郑志鹏

    2003-01-01

    Based on the solution to Bargmann-Wigner equation for a particle with arbitrary half-integral spin, a direct derivation of the projection operator and propagator for a particle with arbitrary half-integral spin is worked out. The projection operator constructed by Behrends and Fronsdal is re-deduced and confirmed and simplified, the general commutation rules and Feynman propagator with additional non-covariant terms for a free particle with arbitrary half-inteRzal spin are derived, and explicit expressions for the propagators for spins 3/2, 5/2 and 7/2 are provided.

  8. Sequential recall of meaningful and arbitrary sequences by orangutans and human children: Does content matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Elizabeth; Price, Elizabeth E; Subiaul, Francys

    2016-01-01

    Do visual cues such as size, color, and number facilitate sequential recall in orangutans and human children? In Experiment 1, children and adult orangutans solved two types of sequences, arbitrary (unrelated pictures) and meaningful (pictures varied along a spectrum according to the size, color, or number of items shown), in a touchscreen paradigm. It was found that visual cues did not increase the percentage of correct responses for either children or orangutans. In order to demonstrate that the failure to spontaneously seriate along these dimensions was not due to a general inability to perceive the dimensions nor to an inability to seriate items, in Experiment 2, orangutans were trained on one type of sequence and tested on novel sequences organized according to the same rule (i.e., pictures varied on the number spectrum only). The orangutans performed significantly better on novel meaningful sequences in this task than on novel arbitrary sequences. These results indicate that, while orangutans and human children share the ability to learn how to order items according to their size, color, or number, both orangutans and humans lack a cognitive propensity to spontaneously (i.e., without prior training or enculturation) order multiple items by size, color, or number. PMID:26298671

  9. Decaying Turbulence in the Generalised Burgers Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    We consider the generalised Burgers equation where f is strongly convex and ν is small and positive. We obtain sharp estimates for Sobolev norms of u (upper and lower bounds differ only by a multiplicative constant). Then, we obtain sharp estimates for the dissipation length scale and the small-scale quantities which characterise the decaying Burgers turbulence, i.e., the structure functions and the energy spectrum. The proof uses a quantitative version of an argument by Aurell et al. (J Fluid Mech 238:467-486, 1992). Note that we are dealing with decaying, as opposed to stationary turbulence. Thus, our estimates are not uniform in time. However, they hold on a time interval [ T 1, T 2], where T 1 and T 2 depend only on f and the initial condition, and do not depend on the viscosity. These results allow us to obtain a rigorous theory of the one-dimensional Burgers turbulence in the spirit of Kolmogorov's 1941 theory. In particular, we obtain two results which hold in the inertial range. On one hand, we explain the bifractal behaviour of the moments of increments, or structure functions. On the other hand, we obtain an energy spectrum of the form k -2. These results remain valid in the inviscid limit.

  10. Inverse turbulent cascade in swarming sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa; Plouraboue, Franck; Inra, Cnrs, Umr, F-37380 Nouzilly, France Team; Université de Toulouse, Inpt, Ups, Imft, Umr 5502, France Team

    2014-11-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small scale turbulence arising where viscosity effects are dominant. We report the first observation of an universal inverse enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of velocity field power-spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in two-dimensional turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures the size of which provides turbulence's integral scale. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-two-dimensional turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interaction and alignment, a state of active matter that we call ``swarming liquid crystal.'' We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation. The implication of multi-scale collective dynamics of sperm's collective motility for fertility assessment is discussed. This work has been supported by the French Agence Nationale pour la Recherche (ANR) in the frame of the Contract MOTIMO (ANR-11-MONU-009-01). We thank Pierre Degond, Eric Climent, Laurent Lacaze and Frédéric Moulin for interesting discussions.

  11. Near isotropic behaviour of turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Dinesh; Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy in turbulent convection in a 3D box using direct numerical simulation. We compute the anisotropic parameter $A = u_\\perp^{2}/(2u_{\\parallel}^{2})$, where $u_{\\perp}$ and $u_{\\parallel}$ are the components of velocity perpendicular and parallel to the buoyancy direction, the shell and ring spectra, and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We observe that the flow is nearly isotropic for the Prandtl number $\\mathrm{Pr} \\approx 1$, but the anisotropy increases with the Prandtl number. For $\\mathrm{Pr}=\\infty$, $A \\approx 0.3$, thus anisotropy is not very significant even in extreme cases. We also observe that $u_{\\parallel}$ feeds energy to $u_{\\perp}$ via pressure. The computation of shell-to-shell energy transfers show that the energy transfer in turbulent convection is local and forward, similar to fluid turbulence. These results are consistent with the Kolmogorov's spectrum observed by Kumar et al.~[Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 90}, 023016 (2014)] for turbulent convection.

  12. Turbulence in two dimensional visco - elastic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Das, Amita; Patel, Bhavesh G; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-01-01

    The properties of decaying turbulence is studied with the help of a Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) fluid model in the context of two dimensional visco - elastic medium such as a strongly coupled dusty plasma system. For the incompressible case considered here however, the observations are valid for a wider class of visco - elastic systems not necessarily associated with plasmas only. Our observations show that an initial spectrum that is confined in a limited domain of wave numbers becomes broad, even when the Reynold's number is much less than the critical value required for the onset of turbulence in Newtonian fluids. This is a signature of elastic turbulence where Weissenberg's number also plays a role in the onset of turbulence. This has been reported in several experiments. It is also shown that the existence of memory relaxation time parameter and the transverse shear wave inhibit the normal process (for 2-D systems) of inverse spectral cascade in this case. A detailed simulation study has been carried ...

  13. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  14. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  15. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Devranjan; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance however are more complicated (e.g. blood, polymer melts or paints), they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We here demonstrate for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but it is suppressed and replaced by a new type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT). EIT is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence and the dynamical properties differ significantly. In particular the drag is strongly reduced and the observed friction scaling resolves a longstanding puzzle in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics regarding the nature of the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote. Theoretical considerations imply that EIT will arise in complex fluid...

  16. Scrambled and Unscrambled Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramaprabhu, P; Lawrie, A G W

    2013-01-01

    The linked fluid dynamics videos depict Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence when driven by a complex acceleration profile involving two stages of acceleration interspersed with a stage of stabilizing deceleration. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs at the interface separating two fluids of different densities, when the lighter fluid is accelerated in to the heavier fluid. The turbulent mixing arising from the development of the miscible RT instability is of key importance in the design of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules, and to the understanding of astrophysical events, such as Type Ia supernovae. By driving this flow with an accel-decel-accel profile, we have investigated how structures in RT turbulence are affected by a sudden change in the direction of the acceleration first from destabilizing acceleration to deceleration, and followed by a restoration of the unstable acceleration. By studying turbulence under such highly non-equilibrium conditions, we hope to develop an understanding of the response and ...

  17. Color of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zare, Armin; Georgiou, Tryphon T

    2016-01-01

    Second-order statistics of turbulent flows can be obtained either experimentally or via direct numerical simulations. Statistics reflect fundamentals of flow physics and can be used to develop low-complexity turbulence models. Due to experimental or numerical limitations it is often the case that only partial flow statistics can be reliably known, i.e., only certain correlations between a limited number of flow field components are available. Thus, it is of interest to complete the statistical signature of the flow field in a way that is consistent with the known dynamics. This is an inverse problem and our approach utilizes stochastically-forced linearization around turbulent mean velocity profile. In general, white-in-time stochastic forcing is not sufficient to explain turbulent flow statistics. In contrast, colored-in-time forcing of the linearized equations allows for exact matching of available correlations. To accomplish this, we develop dynamical models that generate the required stochastic excitation...

  18. Aeroelectric structures and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Anisimov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex electrical measurements with the use of sodar data show that electric field pulsation analysis is useful for electrodynamics/turbulence monitoring under different conditions. In particular, the number of aeroelectric structures (AES generated per hour is a convenient measure of the turbulence intensity. During convectively unstable periods, as many as 5–10 AES form per hour. Under stable conditions, AES occasionally form as well, indicating the appearance of occasional mixing events reflected in the electric field perturbations. AES magnitudes under stable conditions are relatively small, except in special cases such as high humidity and fog. The analysis of electric field (EF spectra gives additional useful information on the parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer and its turbulence. A rather sharp change in the spectrum slope takes place in the vicinity of 0.02 Hz under stable conditions. The characteristic slope of the spectrum and its change are reproduced in a simple model of EF formation.

  19. Rossby-wave turbulence in a rapidly rotating sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Schaeffer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a quasi-geostrophic numerical model to study the turbulence of rotating flows in a sphere, with realistic Ekman friction and bulk viscous dissipation. The forcing is caused by the destabilization of an axisymmetric Stewartson shear layer, generated by differential rotation, resulting in a forcing at rather large scales. The equilibrium regime is strongly anisotropic and inhomogeneous but exhibits a steep m-5 spectrum in the azimuthal (periodic direction, at scales smaller than the injection scale. This spectrum has been proposed by Rhines for a Rossby wave turbulence. For some parameter range, we observe a turbulent flow dominated by a large scale vortex located in the shear layer, reminding us of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter.

  20. Experimental Strong Turbulent Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments at ORNL are exploring the strong turbulent interaction between a steady-state, magnetically collimated electron beam and its self-generated plasma. The technology to maximize ion heating is being developed in Burnout V, a simple mirror device with magnetic fields of 50-25-50 kG, and with an axial electron beam (6 A at 10 kV) which gives a beam power density in the plasma exceeding one kW cm-3. Necessary, but not sufficient, evidence for a true thermonuclear temperature is the observed 103 s-1 cm-3 plasma source of 3-MeV protons identifying D-D reactions. Spectral measurements of recombination radiation reveal a line width corresponding to an ion energy of 0.5 keV. Analysis of charge-exchanged neutral atoms reveals the energy spectrum in more detail with a maximum between 100-500 eV and as much as 10 percent near one keV. A flux of 3 x 1014 cm-2 s-1 of 100 keV deuterons escapes the midplane perimeter. Calorimetric probes measure a plasma heating effect equivalent to 0.5 keV ion bombardment at 2.5 x 1012 cm-3 . The rate of decrease of spectral radiation toward the plasma centre establishes an electron density of at least 2,5 x 1012 cm3 . The confinement time, 2 x 104 s estimated from density and energy balance, agrees well with the measured spectral light decay time and is equivalent to hundreds of ion transits through the plasma. Ion heating has been observed to increase strongly with increasing magnetic field strength, suggesting a direction for future development. In previous experiments electrons were heated to temperatures exceeding 100 keV with densities greater than 1011 cm-3. To study these oscillations, special impedance-matched probes now have been used to measure plasma electron oscillation frequencies up to 4 kMc, coherence times, and electric field values with the aid of travelling-wave tube oscilloscopes. Simple methods related to correlation techniques have been used to estimate the auto- and cross-correlations on the signals observed on

  1. Simulations of nonhelical hydromagnetic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Haugen, N E L; Dobler, W; Haugen, Nils Erland L.; Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Nonhelical hydromagnetic forced turbulence is investigated using large scale simulations on up to 256 processors and 1024^3 meshpoints. The magnetic Prandtl number is varied between 0.3 and 30, although in most cases it is unity. When the magnetic Reynolds number is based on the inverse forcing wavenumber, the critical value for dynamo action is shown to be between 25 and 35 for a range of different forcing scales and magnetic Prandtl numbers. The Kazantsev k^{3/2} spectrum for magnetic energy is confirmed for the kinematic regime, i.e. when nonlinear effects are still unimportant and when the magnetic Prandtl number is unity. In the nonlinear regime, the energy budget converges for large Reynolds numbers (around 1000) such that about 70% is in kinetic energy and about 30% is in magnetic energy. The energy dissipation rates are converged to 30% viscous dissipation and 70% resistive dissipation. Second order structure functions of the Elsasser variables give evidence for a k^{-5/3} spectrum. Nevertheless, the ...

  2. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W., E-mail: wendell.horton@gmail.com; Michoski, C. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78654 (United States); Peysson, Y.; Decker, J. [CEA, IRFM, 13108, Saint-Paul, Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  3. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  4. Gravity surface wave turbulence in a laboratory flume

    OpenAIRE

    Denissenko, Petr; Lukaschuk, Sergei; Nazarenko, Sergey

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental results for water wave turbulence excited by piston-like programmed wavemakers in a water flume with horisontal dimensions 6x12x1.5 meters. Our main finding is that for a wide range of excitation amplitudes the energy spectrum has a power-law scaling, $E_\\omega \\sim \\omega^{-\

  5. The Case for 2-D Turbulence in Antarctic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Humi, Mayer

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we examine the data that was collected at Haley Station in Antarctica on June 22, 1987. Using a test devised by Dewan we interpret the flow as one which represents two-dimensional turbulence. We also construct a model to interpret the spectrum of this data which is almost independent of the wave number for a range of frequencies.

  6. Turbulence in magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics describes dynamics in electrically conductive fluids. These occur in our environment as well as in our atmosphere and magnetosphere, and play a role in the sun's interaction with our planet. This work gives the basic information on turbulence in nature, comprising the needed equations, notions and numerical simulations. The current state of our knowledge and future implications of MHD turbulence are outlined systematically. It is indispensable for all scientists engaged in research of our atmosphere and in space science.

  7. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  8. Turbulent Flames in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1994-05-01

    First results of three-dimensional simulations of a thermonuclear flame in Type Ia supernovae are obtained using a new flame-capturing algorithm, and a PPM hydrodynamical code. In the absence of gravity, the flame is stabilized with respect to the Landau (1944) instability due to the difference in the behaviour of convex and concave portions of the perturbed flame front. The transition to turbulence in supernovae occurs on scales =~ 0.1 - 10 km in agreement with the non-linear estimate lambda =~ 2pi D(2_l/geff) based on the Zeldovich (1966) model for a perturbed flame when the gravity acceleration increases; D_l is the normal speed of the laminar flame, and geff is the effective acceleration. The turbulent flame is mainly spread by large scale motions driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Small scale turbulence facilitates rapid incineration of the fuel left behind the front. The turbulent flame speed D_t approaches D_t =~ U', where U' is the root mean square velocity of turbulent motions, when the turbulent flame forgets initial conditions and reaches a steady state. The results indicate that in a steady state the turbulent flame speed should be independent of the normal laminar flame speed D_l. The three-dimensional results are in sharp contrast with the results of previous two-dimensional simulations which underestimate flame speed due to the lack of turbulent cascade directed in three dimensions from big to small spatial scales. The work was supported by the NSF grants AST 92-18035 and AST 93-005P.

  9. On Turbulent Reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Diamond, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of turbulent reconnection in 2D and 3D reduced MHD by calculating the effective dissipation due to coupling between small-scale fluctuations and large-scale magnetic fields. Sweet-Parker type balance relations are then used to calculate the global reconnection rate. Two approaches are employed -- quasi-linear closure and an eddy-damped fluid model. Results indicate that despite the presence of turbulence, the reconnection rate remains inversely proportional to $\\sqrt{R...

  10. Flavor evolution of supernova neutrinos in turbulent matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrino signal from the next galactic supernova carries with it an enormous amount of information on the explosion mechanism of a core-collapse supernova, as well as on the stellar progenitor and on the neutrinos themselves. In order to extract this information we need to know how the neutrino flavor evolves over time due to the interplay of neutrino self-interactions and matter effects. Additional turbulence in the supernova matter may impart its own signatures on the neutrino spectrum, and could partly obscure the imprints of collective and matter effects. We investigate the neutrino flavor evolution due to neutrino self-interactions, matter effects due to the shock wave propagation, and turbulence in three progenitors with masses of 8.8 M⊙, 10.8 M⊙ and 18.0 M⊙. In the lightest progenitor we find that the impact of moderate turbulence of the order 10% is limited and occurs only briefly early on. This makes the signatures of collective and matter interactions relatively straightforward to interpret. Similarly, with moderate turbulence the two heavier progenitors exhibit only minor changes in the neutrino spectrum, and collective and matter signatures persists. However, when the turbulence is increased to 30% and 50% the high density matter resonance features in the neutrino spectrum get obscured, while new features arise in the low density resonance channel and in the non-resonant channels. We conclude that with moderate amounts of turbulence spectral features of collective and matter interactions survive in all three progenitors. For the larger amounts of turbulence in the 10.8 M⊙ and 18.0 M⊙ progenitor new features arise, as others disappear

  11. Symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a linear finite element space,two symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions are constructed and analyzed.Some relationships between the finite element method and the finite difference method are addressed,too.

  12. Arbitrary orbital angular momentum addition in second harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation performed with optical vortices with different topological charges imprinted on orthogonal polarizations. Besides the intuitive charge doubling, we implement arbitrary topological charge addition on the second harmonic field using polarization as an auxiliary parameter. (paper)

  13. Symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiaoying; YANG Zhang; ZHOU Aihui

    2008-01-01

    Based on a linear finite element space, two symmetric finite volume schemes for eigenvalue problems in arbitrary dimensions are constructed and analyzed. Some relationships between the finite element method and the finite difference method are addressed, too.

  14. ON QUADRATURE FORMULAE FOR SINGULAR INTEGRALS OF ARBITRARY ORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜金元

    2004-01-01

    Some quadrature formulae for the numerical evaluation of singular integrals of arbitrary order are established and both the estimate of remainder and the convergence of each quadrature formula derived here are also given.

  15. Novel FBG Writing System With Arbitrary Amplitude and Phase Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.J.; Pan; Claire; Gu; Albert; Li; Henry; He

    2003-01-01

    FBGs with arbitrary apodization and phase have been fabricated by constantly moving fibers with a highly precision air bearing translation stage while a CW UV laser beam is switched on/off by triggers with nanosecond accuracy.

  16. Turbulent current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density

  17. Turbulent Plasmoid Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, Fabien; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    The plasmoid instability may lead to fast magnetic reconnection through long current sheets(CS). It is well known that large-Reynolds-number plasmas easily become turbulent. We address the question whether turbulence enhances the energy conversion rate of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. We carry out appropriate numerical MHD simulations, but resolving simultaneously the relevant large-scale (mean-) fields and the corresponding small-scale, turbulent, quantities by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) is not possible. Hence we investigate the influence of small scale turbulence on large scale MHD processes by utilizing a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model. We verify the applicability of our SGS model and then use it to investigate the influence of turbulence on the plasmoid instability. We start the simulations with Harris-type and force-free CS equilibria in the presence of a finite guide field in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. We use the DNS results to investigate the growt...

  18. Fission Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  19. Statistical Study of Turbulence: Spectral Functions and Correlation Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkiel, Francois N.

    1958-01-01

    In reading the publications on turbulence of different authors, one often runs the risk of confusing the various correlation coefficients and turbulence spectra. We have made a point of defining, by appropriate concepts, the differences which exist between these functions. Besides, we introduce in the symbols a few new characteristics of turbulence. In the first chapter, we study some relations between the correlation coefficients and the different turbulence spectra. Certain relations are given by means of demonstrations which could be called intuitive rather than mathematical. In this way we demonstrate that the correlation coefficients between the simultaneous turbulent velocities at two points are identical, whether studied in Lagrange's or in Euler's systems. We then consider new spectra of turbulence, obtained by study of the simultaneous velocities along a straight line of given direction. We determine some relations between these spectra and the correlation coefficients. Examining the relation between the spectrum of the turbulence measured at a fixed point and the longitudinal-correlation curve given by G. I. Taylor, we find that this equation is exact only when the coefficient is very small.

  20. A group-kinetic theory of turbulent collective collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective is the derivation of the kinetic equation of turbulence which has a memory in the turbulent collision integral. We consider the basic pair-interaction, and the interaction between a fluctuation and the organized cluster of other fluctuations in the collection systems, called the multiple interaction. By a group-scaling procedure, a fluctuation is decomposed into three groups to represent the three coupled transport processes of evolution, transport coefficient, and relaxation. The kinetic equation of the scaled singlet distribution is capable of investigating the spectrum of turbulence without the need of the knowledge of the pair distribution. The exact propagator describes the detailed trajectory in the phase space, and is fundamental to the Lagrangian-Eulerian transformation. We calculate the propagator and its scaled groups by means of a probability of retrograde transition. Thus our derivation of the kinetic equation of the distribution involves a parallel development of the kinetic equations of the propagator and the transition probability. In this way, we can avoid the assumptions of independence and normality. Our result shows that the multiple interaction contributes to a shielding and an enchancement of the collision in weak turbulence and strong turbulence, respectively. The weak turbulence is dominated by the wave resonance, and the strong turbulence is dominated by the diffusion

  1. Nonlinear Flow Generation By Electrostatic Turbulence In Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global gyrokinetic simulations have revealed an important nonlinear flow generation process due to the residual stress produced by electrostatic turbulence of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and trapped electron modes (TEM). In collisionless TEM (CTEM) turbulence, nonlinear residual stress generation by both the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of broken symmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum is identified for the first time. Concerning the origin of the symmetry breaking, turbulence self-generated low frequency zonal flow shear has been identified to be a key, universal mechanism in various turbulence regimes. Simulations reported here also indicate the existence of other mechanisms beyond E - B shear. The ITG turbulence driven 'intrinsic' torque associated with residual stress is shown to increase close to linearly with the ion temperature gradient, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations in various devices. In CTEM dominated regimes, a net toroidal rotation is driven in the cocurrent direction by 'intrinsic' torque, consistent with the experimental trend of observed intrinsic rotation. The finding of a 'flow pinch' in CTEM turbulence may offer an interesting new insight into the underlying dynamics governing the radial penetration of modulated flows in perturbation experiments. Finally, simulations also reveal highly distinct phase space structures between CTEM and ITG turbulence driven momentum, energy and particle fluxes, elucidating the roles of resonant and non-resonant particles.

  2. Nonlinear Flow Generation By Electrostatic Turbulence In Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.

    2010-07-07

    Global gyrokinetic simulations have revealed an important nonlinear flow generation process due to the residual stress produced by electrostatic turbulence of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and trapped electron modes (TEM). In collisionless TEM (CTEM) turbulence, nonlinear residual stress generation by both the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of broken symmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum is identified for the first time. Concerning the origin of the symmetry breaking, turbulence self-generated low frequency zonal flow shear has been identified to be a key, universal mechanism in various turbulence regimes. Simulations reported here also indicate the existence of other mechanisms beyond E × B shear. The ITG turbulence driven “intrinsic” torque associated with residual stress is shown to increase close to linearly with the ion temperature gradient, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations in various devices. In CTEM dominated regimes, a net toroidal rotation is driven in the cocurrent direction by “intrinsic” torque, consistent with the experimental trend of observed intrinsic rotation. The finding of a “flow pinch” in CTEM turbulence may offer an interesting new insight into the underlying dynamics governing the radial penetration of modulated flows in perturbation experiments. Finally, simulations also reveal highly distinct phase space structures between CTEM and ITG turbulence driven momentum, energy and particle fluxes, elucidating the roles of resonant and non-resonant particles.

  3. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    counterparts at the molecular level. In addition, equations are given for multicomponent reacting systems. The chapter ends with miscellaneous topics, including DNS (idea of) the energy cascade, and RANS. Chapter 5 is devoted to stochastic models for the large scales of turbulence. Langevin-type models for velocity (and particle position) are presented, and their various consequences for second-order single-point correlations (Reynolds stress components, Kolmogorov constant) are discussed. These models are then presented for the scalar. The chapter ends with compressible high-speed flows and various models, ranging from k-ε to hybrid RANS-pdf. Stochastic models for small-scale turbulence are addressed in chapter 6. These models are based on the concept of a filter density function (FDF) for the scalar, and a more conventional SGS (sub-grid-scale model) for the velocity in LES. The final chapter, chapter 7, is entitled 'The unification of turbulence models' and aims at reconciling large-scale and small-scale modelling. This book offers a timely survey of techniques in modern computational fluid mechanics for turbulent flows with reacting scalars. It should be of interest to engineers, while the discussion of the underlying tools, namely pdfs, stochastic and statistical equations should also be attractive to applied mathematicians and physicists. The book's emphasis on local pdfs and stochastic Langevin models gives a consistent structure to the book and allows the author to cover almost the whole spectrum of practical modelling in turbulent CFD. On the other hand, one might regret that non-local issues are not mentioned explicitly, or even briefly. These problems range from the presence of pressure-strain correlations in the Reynolds stress transport equations to the presence of two-point pdfs in the single-point pdf equation derived from the Navier--Stokes equations. (One may recall that, even without scalar transport, a general closure problem for turbulence statistics

  4. Renormalization Group Analysis of Weakly Rotating Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓宏; 周全

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic renormalization group (RNG) analysis is applied to the investigation of the behavior of the infrared limits of weakly rotating turbulence. For turbulent How subject to weak rotation, the anisotropic part in the renormalized propagation is considered to be a perturbation of the isotropic part. Then, with a low-order approximation, the coarsening procedure of RNG transformation is performed. After implementing the coarsening and rescaling procedures, the RNG analysis suggests that the spherically averaged energy spectrum has the scaling behavior E(k) ∝ k11/5 for weakly rotating turbulence. It is also shown that the Coriolis force will disturb the stability of the Kolmogorov -5/3 energy spectrum and will change the scaling behavior even in the case of weak rotation.%Dynamic renormalization group(RNG)analysis is applied to the investigation of the behavior of the infrared limits of weakly rotating turbulence.For turbulent flow subject to weak rotation,the anisotropic part in the renormalized propagation is considered to be a perturbation of the isotropic part.Then,with a low-order approximation,the coarsening procedure of RNG transformation is performed.After implementing the coarsening and rescaling procedures,the RNG analysis suggests that the spherically averaged energy spectrum has the scaling behavior E(k)∝ k-11/5 for weakly rotating turbulence.It is also shown that the Coriolis force will disturb the stability of the Kolmogorov-5/3 energy spectrum and will change the scaling behavior even in the case of weak rotation.

  5. Closed description of arbitrariness in resolving quantum master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    In the most general case of the Delta exact operator valued generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion operator, we present a closed solution for the transformed master action in terms of the original master action in the closed form of the corresponding path integral. We show in detail how that path integral reduces to the known result in the case of being the Delta exact generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion function.

  6. Closed description of arbitrariness in resolving quantum master equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Batalin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the most general case of the Delta exact operator valued generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion operator, we present a closed solution for the transformed master action in terms of the original master action in the closed form of the corresponding path integral. We show in detail how that path integral reduces to the known result in the case of being the Delta exact generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion function.

  7. Sunrise: Polychromatic Dust Radiative Transfer in Arbitrary Geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Patrik

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes Sunrise, a parallel, free Monte-Carlo code for the calculation of radiation transfer through astronomical dust. Sunrise uses an adaptive-mesh refinement grid to describe arbitrary geometries of emitting and absorbing/scattering media, with spatial dynamical range exceeding 10^4, and it can efficiently generate images of the emerging radiation at arbitrary points in space. In addition to the monochromatic radiative transfer typically used by Monte-Carlo codes, Sunrise is c...

  8. CMOS circuits generating arbitrary chaos by using pulsewidthmodulation techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Morie, Takashi; Sakabayashi, S; Nagata, M.; Iwata, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes CMOS circuits generating arbitrary chaotic signals. The proposed circuits implement discrete-time continuous-state dynamics by means of analog processing in a time domain. Arbitrary nonlinear transformation functions can be generated by using the conversion from an analog voltage to a pulsewidth modulation (PWM) signal; for the transformation, time-domain nonlinear voltage waveforms having the same shape as the inverse function of the desired transformation function are u...

  9. Closed description of arbitrariness in resolving quantum master equation

    CERN Document Server

    Batalin, Igor A

    2016-01-01

    In the most general case of the Delta exact operator valued generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion operator, we present a closed solution for the transformed master action in terms of the original master action in the closed form of the corresponding path integral. We show in detail how that path integral reduces to the known result in the case of being the Delta exact generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion function.

  10. Spread of arbitrary conventions among chimpanzees: a controlled experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnie, Kristin E.; Horner, Victoria; Whiten, Andrew; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2006-01-01

    Wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have a rich cultural repertoire—traditions common in some communities are not present in others. The majority of reports describe functional, material traditions, such as tool use. Arbitrary conventions have received far less attention. In the same way that observations of material culture in wild apes led to experiments to confirm social transmission and identify underlying learning mechanisms, experiments investigating how arbitrary habits or conventions a...

  11. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in imbalanced MHD turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, Martin S; Teaca, Bogdan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-angle scattering rates for cosmic-ray particles in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with imbalanced turbulence are calculated for fully evolving electromagnetic turbulence. We compare with theoretical predictions derived from the quasilinear theory of cosmic-ray diffusion for an idealized slab spectrum and demonstrate how cross helicity affects the shape of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient. Additional simulations in evolving magnetic fields or static field configurations provide evidence that the scattering anisotropy in imbalanced turbulence is not primarily due to coherence with propagating Alfven waves, but an effect of the spatial structure of electric fields in cross-helical MHD turbulence.

  12. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  13. Evolution properties of partially coherent flat-topped vortex hollow beam in oceanic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dajun; Wang, Yaochuan; Yin, Hongming

    2015-12-10

    Employing the theory of coherence, the partially coherent flat-topped vortex hollow beam is first introduced. The analytical propagation equation for a partially coherent flat-topped vortex hollow beam in oceanic turbulence is derived by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral and the spectrum of oceanic turbulence. The influences of coherence length, beam order N, the topological charge M, and the parameters of oceanic turbulence on evolution properties of partially coherent flat-topped vortex hollow beams propagating in oceanic turbulence are obtained by using the numerical examples. PMID:26836879

  14. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E x B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics

  15. Wind speed power spectrum analysis for Bushland, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggleston, E.D. [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Bushland, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Numerous papers and publications on wind turbulence have referenced the wind speed spectrum presented by Isaac Van der Hoven in his article entitled Power Spectrum of Horizontal Wind Speed Spectrum in the Frequency Range from 0.0007 to 900 Cycles per Hour. Van der Hoven used data measured at different heights between 91 and 125 meters above the ground, and represented the high frequency end of the spectrum with data from the peak hour of hurricane Connie. These facts suggest we should question the use of his power spectrum in the wind industry. During the USDA - Agricultural Research Service`s investigation of wind/diesel system power storage, using the appropriate wind speed power spectrum became a significant issue. We developed a power spectrum from 13 years of hourly average data, 1 year of 5 minute average data, and 2 particularly gusty day`s 1 second average data all collected at a height of 10 meters. While the general shape is similar to the Van der Hoven spectrum, few of his peaks were found in the Bushland spectrum. While higher average wind speeds tend to suggest higher amplitudes in the high frequency end of the spectrum, this is not always true. Also, the high frequency end of the spectrum is not accurately described by simple wind statistics such as standard deviation and turbulence intensity. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Integrable turbulence and formation of rogue waves

    CERN Document Server

    Agafontsev, D S

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the focusing Nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation we study numerically the nonlinear stage of the modulation instability (MI) of the condensate. As expected, the development of the MI leads to formation of "integrable turbulence" [V.E. Zakharov, Turbulence in integrable systems, Stud. in Appl. Math. 122, no. 3, 219-234, (2009)]. We study the time evolution of it's major characteristics averaged across realizations of initial data - the condensate solution seeded by small random noise with fixed statistical properties. The measured quantities are: (1) wave-action spectrum and spatial correlation function, (2) the probability density function (PDF) of wave amplitudes and their momenta, and (3) kinetic and potential energies.

  17. Compressible Turbulence: The Cascade and its Locality

    CERN Document Server

    Aluie, Hussein

    2011-01-01

    We prove that inter-scale transfer of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence is dominated by local interactions. In particular, our results preclude direct transfer of kinetic energy from large-scales directly to dissipation scales, such as into shocks, in high Reynolds number turbulence as is commonly believed. Our assumptions on the scaling of structure functions are weak and enjoy compelling empirical support. Under a stronger assumption on pressure dilatation co-spectrum, we show that mean kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional "conversion" range. Our analysis establishes the existence of an ensuing inertial range over which mean SGS kinetic energy flux becomes constant, independent of scale. Over this inertial range, mean kinetic energy cascades locally and in a conservative fashion, despite not being an invariant.

  18. The performance of heterodyne detection system for partially coherent beams in turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengqiang, Li; Tingfeng, Wang; Heyong, Zhang; Jingjiang, Xie; Lisheng, Liu; Shuai, Zhao; Jin, Guo

    2015-12-01

    The performance of heterodyne system is discussed for partially coherent beams in turbulent atmosphere by introducing turbulence spectrum of refractive-index fluctuations. Several analytic formulae for the heterodyne detection system using the partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beam are presented. Based on Tatarskii spectrum model, some numerical results are given for the variation in the heterodyne efficiency with the misalignment angle, detector diameter, turbulence conditions, and parameters of the overlapping beams. According to the numerical results, we find that the turbulent atmosphere degrades the heterodyne efficiency significantly, and the variation in heterodyne efficiency is even slower against the misalignment angle in turbulence. For the deterministic received signal and the detector, the performance of the heterodyne detection can be adjusted by controlling the local oscillator signal parameters.

  19. Wave turbulence in shallow water models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark di Leoni, P; Cobelli, P J; Mininni, P D

    2014-06-01

    We study wave turbulence in shallow water flows in numerical simulations using two different approximations: the shallow water model and the Boussinesq model with weak dispersion. The equations for both models were solved using periodic grids with up to 2048{2} points. In all simulations, the Froude number varies between 0.015 and 0.05, while the Reynolds number and level of dispersion are varied in a broader range to span different regimes. In all cases, most of the energy in the system remains in the waves, even after integrating the system for very long times. For shallow flows, nonlinear waves are nondispersive and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with ∼k{-2} scaling. For deeper (Boussinesq) flows, the nonlinear dispersion relation as directly measured from the wave and frequency spectrum (calculated independently) shows signatures of dispersion, and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with predictions of weak turbulence theory, ∼k{-4/3}. In this latter case, the nonlinear dispersion relation differs from the linear one and has two branches, which we explain with a simple qualitative argument. Finally, we study probability density functions of the surface height and find that in all cases the distributions are asymmetric. The probability density function can be approximated by a skewed normal distribution as well as by a Tayfun distribution. PMID:25019897

  20. Wave turbulence in shallow water models

    CERN Document Server

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2013-01-01

    We study wave turbulence in shallow water flows in numerical simulations using two different approximations: the shallow water model, and the Boussinesq model with weak dispersion. The equations for both models were solved using periodic grids up to $2048^2$ points. In all simulations, the Froude number varies between 0.05 and 0.015, while the Reynolds number and level of dispersion are varied to span different regimes. In all cases, most of the energy in the system remains in the waves, even after integrating the system for very long times. For shallow flows, non-linear waves are non-dispersive and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with $k^{-2}$ scaling. For deeper (Boussinesq) flows, the non-linear dispersion relation as directly measured from the wave and frequency spectrum (each calculated independently) shows signatures of dispersion, and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with predictions of weak turbulence theory, $k^{-4/3}$ In this later case, the non-linear dispersion relatio...

  1. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pak-Tao Leung; Carl H. Gibson

    2004-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-turbulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  2. Cancellation exponents and multifractal scaling laws in the solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carbone

    Full Text Available Some signed measures in turbulence are found to be sign-singular, that is their sign reverses continuously on arbitrary finer scales with a reduction of the cancellation between positive and negative contributions. The strength of the singularity is characterized by a scaling exponent κ, the cancellation exponent. In the present study by using some turbulent samples of the velocity field obtained from spacecraft measurements in the interplanetary medium, we show that sign-singularity is present everywhere in low-frequency turbulent samples. The cancellation exponent can be related to the characteristic scaling laws of turbulence. Differences in the values of κ, calculated in both high- and low-speed streams, allow us to outline some physical differences in the samples with different velocities.

  3. Stochastic Gyroresonant Acceleration for Hard Electron Spectra of Blazars: Effect of Damping of Cascading Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kakuwa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic acceleration of nonthermal electrons is investigated in the context of hard photon spectra of blazars. It is well known that this acceleration mechanism can produce a hard electron spectrum of $m \\equiv \\partial \\ln n_{\\rm e}(\\gamma)/\\partial \\ln \\gamma = 2$ with the high-energy cutoff, called an ultrarelativistic Maxwellian-like distribution, where $n_{\\rm e}(\\gamma)$ is an electron energy spectrum. We revisit the formation of this characteristic spectrum, considering a particular situation where the electrons are accelerated through gyroresonant interaction with magnetohydrodynamic wave turbulence driven by the turbulent cascade. By solving kinetic equations of the turbulent fields, electrons, and photons emitted via the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process, we demonstrate that in the non-test-particle treatment, the formation of a Maxwellian-like distribution is prevented by the damping effect on the turbulent fields due to the electron acceleration, at least unless an extreme parameter value ...

  4. Effects of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. We have developed the analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the...... divorticity lines. Compressibility of this mapping can be considered as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. For two-dimensional turbulence in the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k−3 at large...... k, resembling the Kraichnan spectrum for the enstrophy cascade. For turbulence with weak anisotropy the k dependence of the spectrum due to the sharp gradients coincides with the Saffman spectrum, E(k)~k−4. We have compared the analytical predictions with direct numerical solutions of the two...

  5. The mean velocity profile of near-wall turbulent flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2014-01-01

    The issue of analytical derivation of the mean velocity profile in a near-wall turbulent flow is revisited in the context of a two-dimensional channel flow. An approach based on the use of dispersion relations for the flow velocity is developed. It is shown that for an incompressible flow conserving vorticity, there exists a decomposition of the velocity field into rotational and potential components, such that the restriction of the former to an arbitrary cross-section of the channel is a fu...

  6. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  7. Turbulence Visualization at the Terascale on Desktop PCs

    KAUST Repository

    Treib, M.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the ongoing efforts in turbulence research, the universal properties of the turbulence small-scale structure and the relationships between small-and large-scale turbulent motions are not yet fully understood. The visually guided exploration of turbulence features, including the interactive selection and simultaneous visualization of multiple features, can further progress our understanding of turbulence. Accomplishing this task for flow fields in which the full turbulence spectrum is well resolved is challenging on desktop computers. This is due to the extreme resolution of such fields, requiring memory and bandwidth capacities going beyond what is currently available. To overcome these limitations, we present a GPU system for feature-based turbulence visualization that works on a compressed flow field representation. We use a wavelet-based compression scheme including run-length and entropy encoding, which can be decoded on the GPU and embedded into brick-based volume ray-casting. This enables a drastic reduction of the data to be streamed from disk to GPU memory. Our system derives turbulence properties directly from the velocity gradient tensor, and it either renders these properties in turn or generates and renders scalar feature volumes. The quality and efficiency of the system is demonstrated in the visualization of two unsteady turbulence simulations, each comprising a spatio-temporal resolution of 10244. On a desktop computer, the system can visualize each time step in 5 seconds, and it achieves about three times this rate for the visualization of a scalar feature volume. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  8. Spectra and structure functions in nonhelical hydromagnetic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Haugen, N E L; Dobler, W; Haugen, Nils Erland L.; Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Nonhelical hydromagnetic turbulence without imposed magnetic field is considered. The magnetic field is entirely due to dynamo action. The structure function exponents scale approximately like in nonmagnetic turbulence and follow the She-Leveque scaling for predominantly one-dimensional (tube-like) dissipative structures. Throughout the inertial range the spectral magnetic energy exceeds the kinetic energy by a factor of 2 to 3, and both spectra are approximately parallel. At first glance, the total energy spectrum seems to be close to k^{-3/2}, but there is a strong bottleneck effect and it is suggested that the asymptotic spectrum is k^{-5/3}. This is supported by the value of the second order structure function exponent that is found to be \\zeta_2=0.70, suggesting a k^{-1.70} spectrum.

  9. Reynolds-number dependence of the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Christopher; Angheluta, Luiza; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    In Taylor's theory, the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flows approaches, on long time scales, a diffusive behavior with a constant diffusivity K_{L}, which depends empirically on the Reynolds number Re. We show that the dependence on Re can be determined from the turbulent energy spectrum. By using the intimate connection between the friction factor and the longitudinal dispersion in wall-bounded turbulence, we predict different asymptotic scaling laws of K_{L}(Re) depending on the different turbulent cascades in two-dimensional turbulence. We also explore numerically the K_{L}(Re) dependence in turbulent channel flows with smooth and rough walls using a lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:27176402

  10. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsiste...

  11. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  12. Far-dissipation range of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navier-Stokes turbulence at low Reynolds number (scrRλ∼15) is studied by high-resolution computer simulation. The energy spectrum in the range 5kdd is well fitted by kαexp(-ck/kd), where kd is the Kolmogorov dissipation wave number, α∼3.3 and c∼7.1. High-order spatial derivatives of the velocity field exhibit strong intermittency, associated with gentle spatial variation of large-scale structure rather than with sparse, intense small-scale structures. Analysis by the direct-interaction approximation, which ignores intermittency, gives α=3, c∼11

  13. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, P T; Leung, Pak Tao; Gibson, Carl H.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified flu...

  14. Non-Kolmogorov cascade of helicity driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kessar, Mouloud; Stepanov, Rodion; Balarac, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    We solve the Navier-Stokes equations with two simultaneous forcings. One forcing is applied at a given large-scale and it injects energy. The other forcing is applied at all scales belonging to the inertial range and it injects helicity. In this way we can vary the degree of turbulence helicity from non helical to maximally helical. We find that increasing the rate of helicity injection does not change the energy flux. On the other hand the level of total energy is strongly increased and the energy spectrum gets steeper. The energy spectrum spans from a Kolmogorov scaling law $k^{-5/3}$ for a non-helical turbulence, to a non-Kolmogorov scaling law $k^{-7/3}$ for a maximally helical turbulence. In the later case we find that the characteristic time of the turbulence is not the turnover time but a time based on the helicity injection rate. We also analyse the results in terms of helical modes decomposition. For a maximally helical turbulence one type of helical mode is found to be much more energetic than the o...

  15. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  16. Turbulent mixing and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, S I; Sreenivasan, K R

    2010-04-13

    Turbulence is a supermixer. Turbulent mixing has immense consequences for physical phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales under both high- and low-energy-density conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic confinement systems; governs dynamics of supernovae, accretion disks and explosions; dominates stellar convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics; affects premixed and non-premixed combustion; controls standard turbulent flows (wall-bounded and free-subsonic, supersonic as well as hypersonic); as well as atmospheric and oceanic phenomena (which themselves have important effects on climate). In most of these circumstances, the mixing phenomena are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics. While each article in this collection dwells on a specific problem, the purpose here is to seek a few unified themes amongst diverse phenomena. PMID:20211872

  17. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  18. Turbulent Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability—which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold—akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies—a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2 +1 )-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  19. Strong Imbalanced Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, A

    2007-01-01

    We consider imbalanced, or cross-helical MHD Alfvenic turbulence where the waves traveling in one direction have higher amplitudes than the opposite waves. This paper is dedicated to so-called strong turbulence, which cannot be treated perturbatively. Our main result is that the anisotropy of the weak waves is stronger than the anisotropy of a strong waves. This seemingly contradicts the conventional interpretation of so-called critical balance (Goldreich, Sridhar 1995). We propose that critical balance, that was originally conceived as a causality argument, has to be amended by what we call a propagation argument. This revised formulation is consistent with the old one in the balanced case, and is able to include the imbalanced case. We also provide phenomenological model of energy cascading and discuss possibility of self-similar solutions in a realistic setup of driven turbulence.

  20. Magnetic turbulence in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a discussion of the disruption process, it is concluded that this process plausibly consists of the onset of a fine grain turbulence. This turbulence must be able to produce the large values of the inductive electric field which are associated with the reorganization of the poloidal flux and the current density on the magnetic surfaces. It is then plausible that the turbulence belongs to a class of 'rippling' modes, that may explain the experimental values for the magnetic perturbations corresponding to a substantial radial ergodicity of the flux lines. The stability of the modes in the presence of such an ergodicity is accordingly considered. It is found that the modes may be unstable even in collisionless regime, the ergodicity playing a role similar to the resistivity to partially remove the M.H.D. constraint

  1. Analysis of turbulence spectrum in the TBR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluctuation signals of ion saturation current in plasma edge of the TBR-1 tokamak were measured, using three Langmuir probes aligned to toroidal magnetic field direction, for detecting trapped particle modes in this region. The construction of Langmuir probes is also described. The dispersion relation and respective spectra were obtained using spectral technique developed by Powers et all. The index of spectra decay for high frequencies, as well as radial variation of these index and fluctuation levels, were also determined. (M.C.K.)

  2. Weak turbulence of gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Korotkevich, A. O.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2003-01-01

    For the first time weak turbulent theory was demonstrated for the surface gravity waves. Direct numerical simulation of the dynamical equations shows Kolmogorov turbulent spectra as predicted by analytical analysis from kinetic equation.

  3. Protostellar outflow-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, C D

    2007-01-01

    Protostellar outflows crisscross the regions of star cluster formation, stirring turbulence and altering the evolution of the forming cluster. We model the stirring of turbulent motions by protostellar outflows, building on an observation that the scaling law of supersonic turbulence implies a momentum cascade analogous to the energy cascade in Kolmogorov turbulence. We then generalize this model to account for a diversity of outflow strengths, and for outflow collimation, both of which enhance turbulence. For a single value of its coupling coefficient the model is consistent with turbulence simulations by Li & Nakamura and, plausibly, with observations of the NGC 1333 cluster-forming region. Outflow-driven turbulence is strong enough to stall collapse in cluster-forming regions for several crossing times, relieving the mismatch between star formation and turbulent decay rates. The predicted line-width-size scaling implies radial density indices between -1 and -2 for regions supported by outflow-driven tu...

  4. TOURIST BUSINESS IN TURBULENCE

    OpenAIRE

    KLIMOVA T.B.; VISHNEVSKAYA E.V.

    2015-01-01

    Russian tourist business works in an extreme mode, and the basic tone is set by turbulence, risk and uncertainty. The article deals with the factors of turbulence which engulfed the tourism industry with a «whirling flood». The main causes of the impact on the tourist market are: devaluation of the rouble, the bankruptcy of the largest tour operators and Transaero Airlines, the sanctions of the West, the introduction of fingerprinting for Russian tourists, as well as the causes of non-economi...

  5. Artificial ionospheric turbulence (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is an analysis of artificial ionospheric turbulence (AIT) arising near the level at which a powerful wave is reflected with ordinary polarization. AIT is an inhomogeneous structure in the ionosphere with a size on the order of centimeters or tens of kilometers and with characteristic frequencies from a fraction of a hertz (aperiodic inhomogeneity) to several megahertz (plasma waves). The authors are primarily concerned with small-scale artificial ionospheric turbulence (SAIT), i.e., with inhomogeneities that are greatly extended along the geomagnetic field with transverse dimensions that are less than the wavelengths of the perturbing waves - the pumping waves (PW) - in a vacuum

  6. Approximate analytical solutions of arbitrary ι-wave bound states for the ring-shaped-like Hulthen potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ring-shaped-like Hulthen potential where Hulthen potential is surrounded by ring-shaped-like inversed square potential is proposed in this paper. By using the analytical method of function, the exact bound state solutions of Schrodinger equation to the ring-shaped-like Hulthen potential are presented within the framework of an exponential approximation of the centrifugal potential for arbitrary ι-states. The normalized angular and radial wave function expressed in terms of Jacobi polynomials are presented. The energy spectrum equations are obtained. The wave function and energy spectrum equations of the system are related to three quantum numbers and parameters of ring-shaped-like Hulthen potential. The energy spectrum equations of Hulthen, Hartmann and Makarov potentials are the special cases of the ring-shaped-like Hulthen potential. (authors)

  7. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, H

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo $\\alpha$-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is electrostatic or due to the electron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity except for resistive effects and a small battery effect. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  8. Indirect Dark Matter Signatures in the Cosmic Dark Ages II. Ionization, Heating and Photon Production from Arbitrary Energy Injections

    CERN Document Server

    Slatyer, Tracy R

    2015-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-alpha photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this note we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the ne...

  9. An overview of turbulence compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, K.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Iersel, M. van; Doelman, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification

  10. Self-forces on static bodies in arbitrary dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Harte, Abraham I; Taylor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We derive exact expressions for the scalar and electromagnetic self-forces and self-torques acting on arbitrary static extended bodies in arbitrary static spacetimes with any number of dimensions. Non-perturbatively, our results are identical in all dimensions. Meaningful point particle limits are quite different in different dimensions, however. These limits are defined and evaluated, resulting in simple "regularization algorithms" which can be used in concrete calculations. In these limits, self-interaction is shown to be progressively less important in higher numbers of dimensions; it generically competes in magnitude with increasingly high-order extended-body effects. Conversely, we show that self-interaction effects can be relatively large in $1+1$ and $2+1$ dimensions. Our motivations for this work are twofold: First, no previous derivation of the self-force has been provided in arbitrary dimensions, and heuristic arguments presented by different authors have resulted in conflicting conclusions. Second,...

  11. Personality mobility as arbitrary management conduct and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyushenko A.А.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A concept «Personality mobility» is considered in the light of pictures of arbitrary management conduct and activity of a man. The analysis of psychological pedagogical literature is conducted. Concept «co-ordination», «adroitness», «arbitrary management», «personality mobility» very near on the rich in content essence. A concept «Personality mobility» is more wide and more precisely represents the capacity of man for conscious, intentional motive activity. Exactly this concept is more clear and acceptable to description of character and essence of management motive activity. Consciousness and premeditation is considered the basic signs of arbitrary activity.

  12. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Li, P S; McKee, C F; Fisher, R

    2008-04-10

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256{sup 3} and 512{sup 3} simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li et al. (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectra compared to the ideal MHD case. Changes in the density PDF, total magnetic energy, and ionization fraction are determined as a function of the AD Reynolds number. The power spectra for the neutral gas properties of a strongly magnetized medium with a low AD Reynolds number are similar to those for a weakly magnetized medium; in particular, the power spectrum of the neutral velocity is close to that for Burgers turbulence.

  13. Classes of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulent decay

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We classify our time-dependent solutions by their evolutionary tracks in parametric plots between instantaneous scaling exponents. We find distinct classes of solutions evolving along specific trajectories toward points on a line of self-similar solutions. These trajectories are determined by the underlying physics governing individual cases, and not by the initial conditions, as is widely assumed. In the helical case, even for a scale-invariant initial spectrum (inversely proportional to wavenumber k), the solution evolves along the same trajectory as for a Batchelor spectrum (proportional to k^4). All of our self-similar solutions have an intrinsic subinertial range close to k^4$.

  14. A computer-based simulator of the atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, Petr A.

    2015-11-01

    Computer software for modeling the atmospheric turbulence is developed on the basis of a time-varying random medium simulation algorithm and a split-step Fourier transform method for solving a wave propagation equation. A judicious choice of the simulator parameters, like the velocity of the evolution and motion of the medium, turbulence spectrum and scales, enables different effects of a random medium on the optical wavefront to be simulated. The implementation of the simulation software is shown to be simple and efficient due to parallel programming functions from the MKL Intel ® Parallel Studio libraries.

  15. Freely Decaying Weak Turbulence for Sea Surface Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A. R.; Serio, M.; Resio, D.; Pushkarev, A.; Zakharov, V. E.; Brandini, C.

    2002-09-01

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of |k|-2.5. We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  16. A Model for the Saturation of the Turbulent Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e. on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e. the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present the first scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover timescale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales...

  17. Spectral properties of decaying turbulence in electron magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral properties of decaying turbulence in 2(1/2)-dimensional electron magnetohydrodynamics are studied numerically. In the range kde-7/3 and k-13/3, respectively. The self-similar decay state of the turbulence is reached after an initial phase of fast exchange between the axial and poloidal magnetic energies. The time behavior t-2/3 of the total energy is found to be consistent with that obtained from selective decay. The maximum of the energy spectrum shifts towards low mode numbers and decays in time as t-1, in agreement with the infrared scaling of the turbulence. In the large de limit, both energy and mean square generalized momentum exhibit direct cascades. No stationary turbulent state could be found as long as the axial kinetic energy is large as compared to the poloidal kinetic energy initially. The global physical quantities decay well before turbulent macroscopic quantities have established similar space-time behavior, and the turbulence is infected by the lack of stationarity. The system decouples into a Navier-Stokes equation and a passive scalar equation only if the poloidal kinetic energy is larger than or equal to the axial kinetic energy. In this limit the k-5/3 and k-3 spectra of the poloidal kinetic energy are recovered

  18. Statistical mechanics of 2D turbulence with a prior vorticity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2009-01-01

    We adapt the formalism of the statistical theory of 2D turbulence in the case where the Casimir constraints are replaced by the specification of a prior vorticity distribution. A phenomenological relaxation equation is obtained for the evolution of the coarse-grained vorticity. This equation monotonically increases a generalized entropic functional (determined by the prior) while conserving circulation and energy. It can be used as a thermodynamical parametrization of forced 2D turbulence, or as a numerical algorithm to construct (i) arbitrary statistical equilibrium states in the sense of Ellis-Haven-Turkington (ii) particular statistical equilibrium states in the sense of Miller-Robert-Sommeria (iii) arbitrary stationary solutions of the 2D Euler equation that are formally nonlinearly dynamically stable according to the Ellis-Haven-Turkington stability criterion refining the Arnold theorems.

  19. Antiperiodic XXZ Chains with Arbitrary Spins: Complete Eigenstate Construction by Functional Equations in Separation of Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli, Giuliano; Terras, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Generic inhomogeneous integrable XXZ chains with arbitrary spins are studied by means of the quantum separation of variables (SOV) method. Within this framework, a complete description of the spectrum (eigenvalues and eigenstates) of the antiperiodic transfer matrix is derived in terms of discrete systems of equations involving the inhomogeneity parameters of the model. We show here that one can reformulate this discrete SOV characterization of the spectrum in terms of functional T - Q equations of Baxter's type, hence proving the completeness of the solutions to the associated systems of Bethe-type equations. More precisely, we consider here two such reformulations. The first one is given in terms of Q-solutions, in the form of trigonometric polynomials of a given degree , of a one-parameter family of T - Q functional equations with an extra inhomogeneous term. The second one is given in terms of Q-solutions, again in the form of trigonometric polynomials of degree but with double period, of Baxter's usual (i.e., without extra term) T - Q functional equation. In both cases, we prove the precise equivalence of the discrete SOV characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum with the characterization following from the consideration of the particular class of Q-solutions of the functional T - Q equation: to each transfer matrix eigenvalue corresponds exactly one such Q-solution and vice versa, and this Q-solution can be used to construct the corresponding eigenstate.

  20. Topological flat band models with arbitrary Chern numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shuo; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Sarma, S. Das

    2012-01-01

    We report the theoretical discovery of a systematic scheme to produce topological flat bands (TFBs) with arbitrary Chern numbers. We find that generically a multi-orbital high Chern number TFB model can be constructed by considering multi-layer Chern number C=1 TFB models with enhanced translational symmetry. A series of models are presented as examples, including a two-band model on a triangular lattice with a Chern number C=3 and an $N$-band square lattice model with $C=N$ for an arbitrary ...

  1. Hadrons of arbitrary spin and heavy quark symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a general construction of the spin content of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes (covariant wave functions) for heavy hadrons with arbitrary orbital excitations, using representations of l x O(3, 1). These wave functions incorporate the symmetries manifest in the heavy quark limit. In the baryonic sector we clearly differentiate between the Λ and Σ-type excited baryons. We then use the trace formalism to evaluate the weak transitions of ground state heavy hadrons to arbitrary excited heavy hadrons. The contributions of excited states to the Bjorken sum rule are also worked out in detail. (author). 21 refs

  2. Probabilistic teleportation of an arbitrary three-particle state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xiu; Li Hong-Cai

    2005-01-01

    A scheme for teleporting an arbitrary and unknown three-particle state from a sender to either one of two receivers is proposed. The quantum channel is composed of a two-particle non-maximally entangled state and two three-particle non-maximally entangled W states. An arbitrary three-particle state can be perfectly teleported probabilistically if the sender performs three generalized Bell-state measurements and sends to the two receivers the classical result of these measurements, and either one of the two receivers adopts an appropriate unitary transformation conditioned on the suitable measurement outcomes of the other receiver. All kinds of unitary transformations are given in detail.

  3. Probabilistic teleportation of an arbitrary pure state of two atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao; Wu Huai-Zhi; Su Wan-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In the context of microwave cavity QED, this paper proposes a new scheme for teleportation of an arbitrary pure state of two atoms. The scheme is very different from the previous ones which achieve the integrated state measurement,it deals in a probabilistic but simplified way. In the scheme, no additional atoms are involved and thus only two atoms are required to be detected. The scheme can also be used for the teleportation of arbitrary pure states of many atoms or two-mode cavities.

  4. The sewing technique and correlation functions on arbitrary Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe in the case of free bosonic and fermionic theories the sewing procedure, that is a very convenient way for constructing correlation functions of these theories on an arbitrary Riemann surface from their knowledge on the sphere. The fundamental object that results from this construction is the N-point g-loop vertex. It summarizes the information of all correlation functions of the theory on an arbitrary Riemann surface. We then check explicitly the bosonization rules and derive some useful formulas. (orig.)

  5. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In wave turbulence, which is made by nonlinear interactions among waves, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, where separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from weak nonlinearity is assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived in wave turbulence without assuming the weak nonlinearity according to Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successful in Navier–Stokes turbulence. The DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence. -- Highlights: ► Direct-Interaction Approximation is applied to wave turbulence. ► The DIA equations describe non-weak wave turbulent statistics. ► They can be applied to spatio-temporal intermittent structures. ► The conventional kinetic equation is recoverable in the weak nonlinear limit.

  6. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tziperman, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  7. Turbulence in toroidally confined plasma: ion temperature gradient driven turbulence: dynamics of magnetic relaxation in current carrying plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to two studies of low-frequency turbulence in toroidally confined plasma. Low-frequency turbulence is believed to play an important role in anomalous transport in toroidal confinement devices. The first study pertains the development of an analytic theory of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence in tokamaks. Energy conserving, renormalized spectrum equations are derived and solved in order to obtain the spectra of stationary ion temperature gradient driven turbulence. Corrections to mixing length estimates are calculated explicitly. The resulting anomalous ion thermal diffusivity is derived and is found to be consistent with experimentally-deduced ion thermal diffusivities. The associated electron thermal diffusivity, particle and heat-pinch velocities are also calculated. The second study is devoted to the role of multiple helicity nonlinear interactions of tearing modes and dynamics of magnetic relaxation in a high-temperature current carrying plasma. To extend the resistive MHD theory of magnetic fluctuations and dynamo activity observed in the reversed field pinch, the fluid equations for high temperature regime are derived and basic nonlinear interaction mechanism and the effects of diamagnetic corrections to the MHD turbulence theory are studied for the case of fully developed, densely packed turbulence

  8. Passive Lossless Huygens Metasurfaces for Conversion of Arbitrary Source Field to Directive Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical formulation of the interaction between a given source field and a scalar Huygens metasurface (HMS), a recently introduced promising concept for wavefront manipulation based on a sheet of orthogonal electric and magnetic dipoles. Utilizing the equivalent surface impedance representation of these metasurfaces, we establish that an arbitrary source field can be converted into directive radiation via a passive lossless HMS if two physical conditions are met: local power conservation and local impedance equalization. Expressing the fields via their plane-wave spectrum and harnessing the slowly-varying envelope approximation we obtain semi-analytical formulae for the scattered fields, and prescribe the surface reactance required for the metasurface implementation. The resultant design procedure indicates that the local impedance equalization induces a Fresnel-like reflection, while local power conservation forms a radiating virtual aperture which follows the total excitation field magni...

  9. Photonic generation of arbitrary waveforms based on incoherent wavelength-to-time mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Jian-Ji; Luo Bo-Wen; Yu Yuan; Zhang Xin-Liang

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a radio frequency arbitrary waveform generator using the incoherent wavelengthto-time mapping technique.The system is implemented by amplitude modulation of a broadband optical resource whose spectrum is reshaped by a programmable optical pulse shaper and transmitted over a single mode fiber link.The shape of the generated waveform is controlled by the optical pulse shaper,and the fiber link introduces a certain group velocity delay to implement wavelength-to-time mapping.Assisted by the flexible optical pulse shaper,we obtain different shapes of optical waveforms,such as rectangle,triangle,and sawtooth waveforms.Furthermore,we also demonstrate ultra-wideband generation,such as Gaussian monocycle,doublet,and triplet waveforms,using the incoherent technique.

  10. Magneto-optical response in the arbitrary-Chern number topological phase on square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the magneto-optical response in the arbitrary-Chern number topological phase. Based on the Dirac theory, we derive the analytic expressions for the magneto-optical response. More importantly, we construct the model on the possible square lattice and make the numerical calculations with the exact diagonalization method. We find the analytical and numerical results are in good agreement with each other. For the optical absorption spectrum, the low-energy absorptive peaks and the corresponding hopping processes are distinct in different Chern number phases, heavily depending on the filling factor of the system. While for the optical Hall conductivities, the physical mechanisms are revealed for the dichroism of the absorption peaks in response to the right- and left-circularly polarized light. We discuss the feasibility of these results in experiment.

  11. Renormalized perturbation theory: Vlasov-Poisson System, weak turbulence limit and gyrokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Self-consistency of the renormalized perturbation theory is demonstrated by applying it to the Vlasov-Poisson System and showing that the theory has the correct weak turbulence limit. Energy conservation is proved to arbitrary high order for the electrostatic drift waves. The theory is applied to derive renormalized equations for a low-β gyrokinetic system. Comparison of our theory with other current theories is presented. 22 refs

  12. Beyond the Steady-State: Analytical Study of Network Growth at Arbitrary Times, for Arbitrary Initial Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    In studying network growth, the conventional approach is to devise a growth mechanism, quantify the evolution of a statistic or distribution (such as the degree distribution), and then solve the equations in the steady state (the infinite-size limit). Consequently, empirical studies also seek to verify the steady-state prediction in real data. The caveat concomitant with confining the analysis to this time regime is that no real system has infinite size; most real growing networks are far from the steady state. This underlines the importance of finite-size analysis. In this paper, we consider the shifted-linear preferential attachment as an illustrative example of arbitrary-time network growth analysis. We obtain the degree distribution for arbitrary initial conditions at arbitrary times. We corroborate our theoretical predictions with Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  14. Remarks on turbulent constitutive relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that the concept of turbulent constitutive relations can be used to construct general models for various turbulent correlations. Some of the Generalized Cayley-Hamilton formulas for relating tensor products of higher extension to tensor products of lower extension are introduced. The combination of dimensional analysis and invariant theory can lead to 'turbulent constitutive relations' (or general turbulence models) for, in principle, any turbulent correlations. As examples, the constitutive relations for Reynolds stresses and scalar fluxes are derived. The results are consistent with ones from Renormalization Group (RNG) theory and two-scale Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA) method, but with a more general form.

  15. Radio Wave Scintillations and Models of Interstellar Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1998-05-01

    There are a number of well-established observational results from radio scintillations which have implications for the nature of interstellar turbulence. Among such results are evidence for anisotropy and a Kolmogorov spectrum for the density irregularities. It is probable the galactic magnetic field organizes these irregularities so that spatial gradients along the field are much less than those perpendicular to the field. Such a behavior for turbulence is predicted by theories of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in which the amplitude is small. The turbulence is then described by a theory termed reduced magnetohydrodynamics. A limiting case of reduced magnetohydrodynamics is two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics, in which the direction of the large scale magnetic field z defines the ignorable coordinate. Two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics consists of a pair of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations for the velocity stream function psi and the z component of the magnetic vector potential A_z. A number of observed features of interstellar turbulence can be identified with solutions to the equations of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. Examples are the development of Kolmogorov-like spectra for the velocity and magnetic field from a wide class (although not totally general) initial conditions, a natural explanation for the formation of intermittancy in turbulence, and the rapid development of small scale, large spatial wavenumber fluctuations, in contrast to the eddy cascade of hydrodynamic turbulence. The equations of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics may serve as a simple but tractable model of interstellar plasma turbulence that may complement and be superior to the traditional model of an ensemble of magnetohydrodynamic waves.

  16. Laboratory Experiments on Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Falcon, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This review paper is devoted to a presentation of recent progress in wave turbulence. I first present the context and state of the art of this field of research both experimentally and theoretically. I then focus on the case of wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid, and I discuss the main results obtained by our group: caracterization of the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes, the first observation of intermittency in wave turbulence, the occurrence of strong fluctuations of injected power in the fluid, the observation of a pure capillary wave turbulence in low gravity environment and the observation of magnetic wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid. Finally, open questions in wave turbulence are discussed.

  17. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  18. Probabilistic Teleportation of an Arbitrary n-Particle Entangled State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIYong-Jun; FANGJian-Xing; ZHUShi-Qun; GUOZhan-Ying

    2005-01-01

    A scheme for teleporting an arbitrary n-particle entangled state via n pairs of non-maximally entangled states is proposed. The probability of successful teleportation is determined only by the smaller coefficients of the partially entangled pairs. The method is very easy to be realized.

  19. Dynamics of number systems computation with arbitrary precision

    CERN Document Server

    Kurka, Petr

    2016-01-01

    This book is a source of valuable and useful information on the topics of dynamics of number systems and scientific computation with arbitrary precision. It is addressed to scholars, scientists and engineers, and graduate students. The treatment is elementary and self-contained with relevance both for theory and applications. The basic prerequisite of the book is linear algebra and matrix calculus. .

  20. Criterion for faithful teleportation with an arbitrary multiparticle channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chi-Yee; Zhang, Zhan-Jun

    2009-08-01

    We present a general criterion which allows one to judge if an arbitrary multiparticle entanglement channel can be used to teleport faithfully an unknown quantum state of a given dimension. We also present a general multiparticle teleportation protocol which is applicable for all channel states satisfying this criterion.

  1. Pair Production of Arbitrary Spin Particles by Electromagnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kruglov, S I

    2004-01-01

    The exact solutions of the wave equation for arbitrary spin particles in the field of the soliton-like electric impulse were obtained. The differential probability of pair production of particles by electromagnetic fields has been evaluated on the basis of the exact solutions. As a particular case, the particle pair producing in the constant and uniform electric field were studied.

  2. Zero Cycles on Certain Surfaces in Arbitrary Characteristic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Ravindra

    2006-02-01

    Let be a field of arbitrary characteristic. Let be a singular surface defined over with multiple rational curve singularities and suppose that the Chow group of zero cycles of its normalisation $\\overline{S}$ is finite dimensional. We give numerical conditions under which the Chow group of zero cycles of is finite dimensional.

  3. Mathematical model of bisubject qualimetric arbitrary objects evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, A.

    2016-04-01

    An analytical basis and the process of formalization of arbitrary objects bisubject qualimetric evaluation mathematical model information spaces are developed. The model is applicable in solving problems of control over both technical and socio-economic systems for objects evaluation using systems of parameters generated by different subjects taking into account their performance and priorities of decision-making.

  4. Canonical Quantum Teleportation of Two-Particle Arbitrary State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Xiang; ZHU Shi-Qun

    2005-01-01

    The canonical quantum teleportation of two-particle arbitrary state is realized by means of phase operator and number operator. The maximally entangled eigenstates between the difference of phase operators and the sum of number operators are considered as the quantum channels. In contrast to the standard quantum teleportation, the different unitary local operation of canonical teleportation can be simplified by a general expression.

  5. Anyons, modular invariance and anyon gauge for arbitrary rational statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform the implementation of modular invariance for a system of free anyons on a torus, described by means of the Chern-Simons action, for arbitrary rational Chern-Simons coupling constant. We explain in which sense the 'anyon gauge', in which the wavefunction is multivalued, can be achieved on the torus. (orig.)

  6. Garbage-free reversible constant multipliers for arbitrary integers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for constructing reversible circuitry for multiplying integers by arbitrary integer constants. The method is based on Mealy machines and gives circuits whose size are (in the worst case) linear in the size of the constant. This makes the method unsuitable for large constants, ......, but gives quite compact circuits for small constants. The circuits use no garbage or ancillary lines....

  7. The Relativistic Generalization of the Gravitational Force for Arbitrary Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Qadir, A; Qadir, Asghar

    1992-01-01

    It has been suggested that re-expressing relativity in terms of forces could provide fresh insights. The formalism developed for this purpose only applied to static, or conformally static, space-times. Here we extend it to arbitrary space-times. It is hoped that this formalism may lead to a workable definition of mass and energy in relativity.

  8. Simpler Online Updates for Arbitrary-Order Central Moments

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiangrui

    2015-01-01

    Statistical moments are widely used in descriptive statistics. Therefore efficient and numerically stable implementations are important in practice. Pebay [1] derives online update formulas for arbitrary-order central moments. We present a simpler version that is also easier to implement.

  9. Rainbows in the grass. II. Arbitrary diagonal incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Charles L; Lock, James A; Fleet, Richard W

    2008-12-01

    We consider external reflection rainbow caustics due to the reflection of light from a pendant droplet where the light rays are at an arbitrary angle with respect to the horizontal. We compare this theory to observation of glare spots from pendant drops on grass; we also consider the potential application of this theory to the determination of liquid surface tension. PMID:19037345

  10. Electronic interaction anisotropy between atoms in arbitrary angular momentum states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krems, R.V.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Dalgarno, A.

    2004-01-01

    A general tensorial expansion for the interaction potential between two atoms in arbitrary angular momentum states is derived and the relations between the expansion coefficients and the Born-Oppenheimer potentials of the diatomic molecule are obtained. It is demonstrated that a complete expansion o

  11. Unveiling Reality of the Mind: Cultural Arbitrary of Consumerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su-Jin

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural arbitrary of consumerism by focusing on a personal realm. That is, I discuss what consumerism appeals to and how it flourishes in relation to our minds. I argue that we need to unveil reality of the mind, be aware of ourselves in relation to the perpetuation of consumerism, in order to critically intervene in the…

  12. Arbitrary unitary transformations on optical states using a quantum memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Geoff T.; Pinel, Olivier; Hosseini, Mahdi; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2014-12-04

    We show that optical memories arranged along an optical path can perform arbitrary unitary transformations on frequency domain optical states. The protocol offers favourable scaling and can be used with any quantum memory that uses an off-resonant Raman transition to reversibly transfer optical information to an atomic spin coherence.

  13. Public Announcements in Strategic Games with Arbitrary Strategy Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Apt, Krzysztof R.; Zvesper, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    In [Van Benthem 2007] the concept of a public announcement is used to study the effect of the iterated elimination of strictly dominated strategies. We offer a simple generalisation of this approach to cover arbitrary strategic games and many optimality notions. We distinguish between announcements of optimality and announcements of rationality.

  14. Restriction Theorem for Principal bundles in Arbitrary Characteristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurjar, Sudarshan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to prove two basic restriction theorem for principal bundles on smooth projective varieties in arbitrary characteristic generalizing the analogues theorems of Mehta-Ramanathan for vector bundles. More precisely, let G be a reductive algebraic group over an algebraically c...

  15. Quantum electrodynamics with arbitrary charge on a noncommutative space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wan-Ping; CAI Shao-Hong; LONG Zheng-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Using the Seiberg-Witten map,we obtain a quantum electrodynamics on a noncommutative space,which has arbitrary charge and keep the gauge invariance to at the leading order in theta.The one-loop divergence and Compton scattering are reinvestigated.The uoncommutative effects are larger than those in ordinary noncommutative quantum electrodynamics.

  16. Existence of minimal surfaces of arbitrary large Morse index

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haozhao; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    We show that in a closed 3-manifold with a generic metric of positive Ricci curvature, there are minimal surfaces of arbitrary large Morse index, which partially confirms a conjecture by F. Marques and A. Neves. We prove this by analyzing the lamination structure of the limit of minimal surfaces with bounded Morse index.

  17. Satellite sensing of submerged fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2004-11-01

    Surface brightness anomalies from a submerged municipal wastewater outfall trapped by buoyancy in an area 0.1 km^2 are surprisingly detected from space satellites in areas > 200 km^2. How is this possible? Microstructure measurements near the outfall diffuser reveal enhanced turbulence and temperature dissipation rates above the 50 m trapping depth. Near-vertical radiation of internal waves by fossil and zombie turbulence microstructure patches produce wind ripple smoothing with 30-50 m internal wave patterns in surface Fourier brightness anomalies near the outfall. Detections at 10-14 km distances are at 100-220 m bottom boundary layer (BBL) fossil turbulence scales. Advected outfall fossils form zombie turbulence patches in internal wave patterns as they extract energy, vorticity, turbulence and ambient vertical internal wavelength information as their density gradients are tilted by the waves. As the zombies fossilize, patterned energy radiates near-vertically to produce the detected Fourier anomalies. Zombie turbulence patches beam extracted energy in a preferred direction with a special frequency, like energized metastable molecules in a chemical maser. Thus, kilowatts to produce the submerged field of advected fossil outfall turbulence patches are amplified by beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) into megawatts of turbulence dissipation to affect sea surface brightness on wide surface areas using gigawatts of BBL fossil turbulence wave energy available.

  18. Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Thalabard, Simon; Galtier, Sebastien; Sergey, Medvedev

    2015-01-01

    Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argu...

  19. Mechanics of inhomogeneous turbulence and interfacial layers

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, J.C.R; Eames, I; Westerweel, J.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanics of inhomogeneous turbulence in and adjacent to interfacial layers bounding turbulent and non-turbulent regions are analysed. Different mechanisms are identified according to the straining by the turbulent eddies in relation to the strength of the mean shear adjacent to, or across, the interfacial layer. How the turbulence is initiated and the topology of the region of turbulence are also significant factors. Specifically the cases of a layer of turbulence bounded on one, or two,...

  20. Power Spectrum Estimation of Randomly Sampled Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara M.; Buchhave, Preben; K. George, William

    2014-01-01

    The random, but velocity dependent, sampling of the LDA presents non-trivial signal processing challengesdue to the high velocity bias and the arbitrariness of particle path through the measuring volume, among other factors.To obtain the desired non-biased statistics, it has previously been shown...... proportional to velocity magnitude that consist of well-defined frequency content, which makes bias easy to spot. The idea is that if the algorithms are not able to produce correct statistics from this simple signal, then they will certainly not be able to function well for a more complex measured LDA signal...... high data rate and low inherent bias, respectively, while residence time weighting provides non-biased estimates regardless of setting. The free-running processor was also tested and compared to residence time weighting using actual LDA measurements in a turbulent round jet. Power spectra from...

  1. Power Spectrum Estimation of Randomly Sampled Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, C. M.; Buchhave, P.; K. George, W.

    The random, but velocity dependent, sampling of the LDA presents non-trivial signal processing challenges due to the high velocity bias and the arbitrariness of particle path through the measuring volume, among other factors. To obtain the desired non-biased statistics, it has previously been shown...... algorithms are not able to produce correct statistics from this simple signal, then they will certainly not be able to function well for a more complex measured LDA signal. This is, of course, true also for other methods that are based on the tested algorithms. The extremes are tested by increasing, e......, respectively. Residence time weighting provides non-biased estimates regardless of setting. The free-running processor was also tested and compared to residence time weighting using actual LDA measurements in a turbulent round jet. Power spectra from measurements on the jet centerline and the outer part of the...

  2. Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Zhdankin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

  3. On the evolution of the primordial cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the primordial cosmic turbulence in the big-bang universe is studied by numerical integration of the spectral equation derived by Nariai and closed by Heisenberg's hypothesis. In order to examine whether the turbulence can survive by the epoch of the plasma recombination, the equation is dealt with by taking full account of the viscosity effect. The main conclusion is that the resulting spectrum survived against the viscous decay depends on the initial spectral shape which is assumed at the epoch t sub(eq) when the density of matter is equal to that of radiation. The Taylor's micro-scale is also calculated which is available to determine the fate of the primordial cosmic turbulence. (author)

  4. Space-time resolved wave turbulence in a vibrating plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelli, Pablo; Petitjeans, Philippe; Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent; Mordant, Nicolas

    2009-11-13

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wave-vector-frequency (k, omega) Fourier spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D (k, omega) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wave-number-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak nonlinear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence. PMID:20365984

  5. Fully Lagrangian Renormalized Approximation theory of fluid turbulence: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss our refinement and extension of the work of Y. Kaneda on a Lagrangian Renormalized Approximation (LRA) for homogeneous hydrodynamic turbulence. Kaneda's results are important to the development of a consistent theory of turbulence because the LRA theory successfully overcomes the failure of other turbulence theories (namely the Direct Interaction Approximation) to predict the Kolmogorov wavenumber spectrum. It is thought that this success is due to the use of a Lagrangian rather than Eulerian description of the fluid so that convection of the small eddies by the large ones is properly treated. However, some aspects of these results are puzzling and are considered here. For example, the form of the correlation function and the value of the Kolmogorov constant, K, depend on the choice of the form of the correlation function

  6. Microelectrokinetic turbulence in microfluidics at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiren; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    There is commonly no turbulence in microfluidics, and the flows are believed to be either laminar or chaotic, since Reynolds number (Re) in microflows is usually on the order of unity or lower. However, we recently demonstrated that it is possible to achieve turbulence with low Re (based on the measured flow velocity and the width of the channel entrance) when a pressure-driven flow is electrokinetically forced in a quasi T-microchannel. To be able to measure high frequency velocity fluctuations in microchannels, a velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, called a laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer, is developed. Here we characterize the microelectrokinetic turbulence and observe some typical and important features of high Re flows, such as Kolmogorov -5 /3 spectrum of velocity fluctuation, which usually can be realized only at very high Re in macroturbulent flows.

  7. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Croitoru, A; Vlad, M; Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the ExB diffusion of fusion born \\alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. We determine the transport regimes for a realistic model that has the characteristics of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or of the trapped electron modes (TEM) driven turbulence. It includes a spectrum of potential fluctuations that is modeled using the results of the numerical simulations, the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity and the parallel motion. Our semi-analytical statistical approach is based on the decorrelation trajectory method (DTM), which is adapted to the gyrokinetic approximation. We obtain the transport coefficients as a function of the parameters of the turbulence and of the energy of the \\alpha particle. According to our results, signficant turbulent transport of the \\alpha particles can appear only at energies of the order of 100KeV. We determine the corresponding conditions.

  8. The acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in turbulent cosmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis concentrates on the acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in turbulent cosmic plasmas. The stochastic acceleration of relativistic electrons by long-wavelength weak magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is considered and a model is discussed that allows the determination of both the electron energy spectrum and the wavenumber spectrum of the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a consistent way. The question of second phase acceleration in large solar flares and the precise form of the force exerted on the background plasma when Alfven waves are generated by fast particles are considered. The energy balance in the shock wave acceleration, the propagation of energetic particles in a high β plasma (β>102) and sheared flow as a possible source of plasma turbulence for a magnetized plasma with field-aligned flow, are discussed. (Auth./C.F.)

  9. Compressible turbulence with slow-mode waves observed in the bursty bulk flow of plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tieyan; Cao, Jinbin; Fu, Huishan; Meng, Xuejie; Dunlop, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report the evidence of compressible turbulence with slow-mode waves in a bursty bulk flow of plasma sheet. This compressible turbulence is characterized by a multiscale (1-60 s) anticorrelation between plasma density and magnetic field strength. Besides, the magnetic compressibility spectrum stays nearly constant at all the measured frequencies. Furthermore, the turbulence energy distributions are anisotropic with k⊥ > k//, and the dispersion relation is consistent with slow-mode prediction. The fluctuations of density and magnetic field have similar double slope spectrum and kurtosis. These results suggest that the slow waves are involved in the intermittent turbulence cascade from MHD to ion kinetic scales, which may have significant implications for the energy transfer in the plasma sheet.

  10. Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA of probability distributions in fluid turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Wu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA was introduced by Chang and Wu (2008 to describe the multifractal characteristic of intermittent events. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has successfully been applied to MHD turbulence simulations and turbulence data observed in various space plasmas. In this paper, the technique is applied to the probability distributions in the inertial range of the turbulent fluid flow, as given in the vast Johns Hopkins University (JHU turbulence database. In addition, a new way of finding the continuous ROMA spectrum and the scaled probability distribution function (PDF simultaneously is introduced.

  11. Oscillating grids turbulence generator for turbulent transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Eidelman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating grids turbulence generator was constructed for studies of two new effects associated with turbulent transport of particles, turbulent thermal diffusion and clustering instability. These effects result in formation of large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of particles. The advantage of this experimental set-up is the feasibility to study turbulent transport in mixtures with controllable composition and unlimited observation time. For flow measurements we used Particle Image Velocimetry with the adaptive multi-pass algorithm to determine a turbulent velocity field and its statistical characteristics. Instantaneous velocity vector maps, flow streamlines and probability density function of velocity field demonstrate properties of turbulence generated in the device.

  12. Area of turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.   The last day of data collection, tired but satisfied after seven intense days of measurements. Around the cryostat, from left to right: Philippe-E. Roche, Éléonore Rusaouen (CNRS),
Olivier Pirotte, Jean-Marc Quetsch (CERN), Nicolas Friedlin (CERN),
Vladislav Benda (CERN). Not in the photo: Laurent Le Mao (CERN), Jean-Marc Debernard (CERN), 
Jean-Paul Lamboy (CERN), Nicolas Guillotin (CERN), Benoit Chabaud (Grenoble Uni), and Gregory Garde (CNRS). CERN has a unique cryogenic facility in hall SM18, consisting of 21 liquid-helium-cooled test stations. While this equipment was, of course, designed for testing parts of CERN's acce...

  13. Turbulent multiphase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  14. The turbulent ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Nihoul, J.C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The variability of the ocean over a wide range of scales, from the megameter to the millimeter, is examined in the light of turbulence theory.The geophysical constraints which arise from the Earth's rotation and curvature and from the stratification are discussed with emphasis on the role they can play at different scales in inducing instabilities and a transfer of energy to other scales of motion.

  15. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian-Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  16. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on the transmission of orbital angular momentum for Whittaker-Gaussian laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixin; Cheng, Mingjian; Zhu, Yun; Gao, Jie; Dan, Weiyi; Hu, Zhengda; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the effects of turbulence on the detection probability spectrum and the mode weight of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) for Whittaker-Gaussian (WG) laser beams in weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence channels. Our numerical results show that WG beam is a better light source for mitigating the effects of turbulence with several adjustable parameters. The real parameters of WG beams γ and W0, which have significant effects on the mode weight, have no influence on the detection probability spectrum. Larger signal OAM quantum number, shorter wavelength, smaller beamwidth and coherence length will lead to the lower detection probability of the signal OAM mode. PMID:25321585

  17. A mesh partitioning algorithm for preserving spatial locality in arbitrary geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •An algorithm for partitioning computational meshes is proposed. •The Morton order space-filling curve is modified to achieve improved locality. •A spatial locality metric is defined to compare results with existing approaches. •Results indicate improved performance of the algorithm in complex geometries. -- Abstract: A space-filling curve (SFC) is a proximity preserving linear mapping of any multi-dimensional space and is widely used as a clustering tool. Equi-sized partitioning of an SFC ignores the loss in clustering quality that occurs due to inaccuracies in the mapping. Often, this results in poor locality within partitions, especially for the conceptually simple, Morton order curves. We present a heuristic that improves partition locality in arbitrary geometries by slicing a Morton order curve at points where spatial locality is sacrificed. In addition, we develop algorithms that evenly distribute points to the extent possible while maintaining spatial locality. A metric is defined to estimate relative inter-partition contact as an indicator of communication in parallel computing architectures. Domain partitioning tests have been conducted on geometries relevant to turbulent reactive flow simulations. The results obtained highlight the performance of our method as an unsupervised and computationally inexpensive domain partitioning tool

  18. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    In wave turbulence, which is made by nonlinear interactions among waves, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, where separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from weak nonlinearity is assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived in wave turbulence without assuming the weak nonlinearity according to Direct-Interaction Approximation ...

  19. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma flows with an MHD-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of General Magnetic Reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip-velocity source vector, which gives the rate of development of slip velocity per unit arc length of field line. The slip source vector is the ratio of the curl of the non ideal electric field in the Generalized Ohm's Law and the magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with magnetic null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of the quasi potential (integral of parallel electric field along field lines). In a turbulent inertial range the curl becomes extremely large while the parallel component is tiny, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution of this paradox is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial-range only in a weak sense which does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution i...

  20. Zooplankton intermittency and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, François G.

    2010-05-01

    Planktonic organisms usually live in a turbulent world. Since marine turbulence is characterized by very high Reynolds numbers, it possesses very intermittent fluctuations which in turn affect marine life. We consider here such influence on zooplankton on 2 aspects. First we consider zooplankton motion in the lab. Many copepods display swimming abilities. More and more species have been recently recorded using normal or high speed cameras, and many trajectories have been extracted from these movies and are now available for analysis. These trajectories can be complex, stochastic, with random switching from low velocity to high velocity events and even jumps. These complex trajectories show that an adequate modeling is necessary to understand and characterize them. Here we review the results published in the literature on copepod trajectories. We discuss the random walk, Levy walk modeling and introduce also multifractal random walks. We discuss the way to discriminate between these different walks using experimental data. Stochastic simulations will be performed to illustrate the different families. Second, we consider zooplankton contact rates in the framework of intermittent turbulence. Intermittency may have influence on plankton contact rates. We consider the Particle Stokes number of copepods, in a intermediate dissipation range affected by intermittent fluctuations. We show that they may display preferential concentration effects, and we consider the influence on contact rates of this effect in the intermediate dissipation range.

  1. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  2. Turbulence and fossil turbulence lead to life in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than all the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Fossil turbulence is a perturbation produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid ceases to be turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Because vorticity is produced at small scales, turbulence must cascade from small scales to large, providing a consistent physical basis for Kolmogorovian universal similarity laws. Oceanic and astrophysical mixing and diffusion are dominated by fossil turbulence and fossil turbulent waves. Observations from space telescopes show turbulence and vorticity existed in the beginning of the universe and that their fossils persist. Fossils of big bang turbulence include spin and the dark matter of galaxies: clumps of ∼1012 frozen hydrogen planets that make globular star clusters as seen by infrared and microwave space telescopes. When the planets were hot gas, they hosted the formation of life in a cosmic soup of hot-water oceans as they merged to form the first stars and chemicals. Because spontaneous life formation according to the standard cosmological model is virtually impossible, the existence of life falsifies the standard cosmological model. (paper)

  3. Non-elliptic wavevector anisotropy for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A model of non-elliptic wavevector anisotropy is developed for the inertial-range spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and is presented in the two-dimensional wavevector domain spanning the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. The non-elliptic model is a variation of the elliptic model with different scalings along the parallel and the perpendicular components of the wavevectors to the mean magnetic field. The non-elliptic anisotropy model reproduces the smooth transition of the power-law spectra from an index of -2 in the parallel projection with respect to the mean magnetic field to an index of -5/3 in the perpendicular projection observed in solar wind turbulence, and is as competitive as the critical balance model to explain the measured frequency spectra in the solar wind. The parameters in the non-elliptic spectrum model are compared with the solar wind observations.

  4. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien

    2012-11-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is investigated through three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We show that the Hall effect induces a spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the turbulent dynamics. The normalized magnetic polarization is introduced to separate the right- (R) and left-handed (L) fluctuations. A classical k(-7/3) spectrum is found at small scales for R magnetic fluctuations which corresponds to the electron MHD prediction. A spectrum compatible with k(-11/3) is obtained at large-scales for the L magnetic fluctuations; we call this regime the ion MHD. These results are explained heuristically by rewriting the Hall MHD equations in a succinct vortex dynamical form. Applications to solar wind turbulence are discussed. PMID:23215387

  5. Density Studies of MHD Interstellar Turbulence: Statistical Moments, Correlations and Bispectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Falceta-Goncalves, D.; Kowal, G.; Lazarian, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a number of statistical tools for obtaining studying turbulence in molecular clouds and diffuse interstellar medium. For our tests we used of three-dimensional 512 cube compressible MHD isothermal simulations performed for different sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers. We introduce the bispectrum, a new tool for statistical studies of the interstellar medium which, unlike an ordinary power spectrum of turbulence, preserves the phase information of the stochastic field. We show that the...

  6. Passive scalars: mixing, diffusion and intermittency in helical and non-helical rotating turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Imazio, P. Rodriguez; Mininni, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    We use direct numerical simulations to compute structure functions, scaling exponents, probability density functions and turbulent transport coefficients of passive scalars in turbulent rotating helical and non-helical flows. We show that helicity affects the inertial range scaling of the velocity and of the passive scalar when rotation is present, with a spectral law consistent with $\\sim k_{\\perp}^{-1.4}$ for the passive scalar variance spectrum. This scaling law is consistent with the phen...

  7. A NEW COSMIC RAY TRANSPORT THEORY IN PARTIALLY TURBULENT SPACE PLASMAS: EXTENDING THE QUASILINEAR APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new transport theory of cosmic rays in magnetized space plasmas with axisymmetric incompressible magnetic turbulence is developed extending the quasilinear approximation to the particle orbit. Arbitrary gyrophase deviations from the unperturbed spiral orbits in the uniform magnetic field are allowed. For quasi-stationary and spatially homogeneous magnetic turbulence, we derive the small Larmor radius approximation gyrophase-averaged cosmic ray Fokker-Planck coefficients. The generalized Fokker-Planck coefficients correctly reduce to their known quasilinear values in the corresponding limit. New forms of the quasilinear Fokker-Planck coefficients in axisymmetric turbulence are derived which no longer involve infinite sums of products of Bessel functions, which facilitate their numerical computation for specified turbulence field correlation tensors. The Fokker-Planck coefficients for arbitrary phase orbits of the cosmic ray particles provide strict upper limits for the perpendicular and pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficients, which in turn yield strict upper and lower limits for the perpendicular and parallel spatial diffusion coefficients, respectively, describing the spatial diffusion of the isotropic part of the cosmic ray phase space density. For the associated mean free paths, we find for this general case that the product of the minimum parallel mean free path with the sum of the maximum perpendicular mean free paths equals R2L, where RL denotes the cosmic ray gyroradius.

  8. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit; Prasad Perlekar; Samriddhi Sankar Ray

    2009-07-01

    We present an introductory overview of several challenging problems in the statistical characterization of turbulence. We provide examples from fluid turbulence in three and two dimensions, from the turbulent advection of passive scalars, turbulence in the one-dimensional Burgers equation, and fluid turbulence in the presence of polymer additives.

  9. Finite size source effects and the correlation of neutrino transition probabilities through supernova turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kneller, James P

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) The transition probabilities describing the evolution of a neutrino with a given energy along some ray through a turbulent supernova are random variates unique to each ray. If the source of the neutrinos were a point then all neutrinos of a given energy and emitted at the same time which were detected in some far off location would have seen the same turbulent profile therefore their transition probabilities would be exactly correlated. But if the source has a finite size then the profiles seen by neutrinos emitted from different points at the source will have seen different turbulence and the correlation of the transition probabilities will be reduced. In this paper we study the correlation of the neutrino transition probabilities through turbulent supernova profiles as a function of the separation between the emission points using an isotropic and an anisotropic power spectrum for the random field used to model the turbulence. The spectral features in the high density resonance mixing channel of ...

  10. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  11. Dynamics of fluctuating magnetic fields in turbulent dynamos incorporating ambipolar drifts

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, K

    1997-01-01

    Turbulence with a large magnetic Reyonolds number, generically leads to rapidly growing magnetic noise over and above any mean field. We revisit the dynamics of this fluctuating field, in homogeneous, isotropic, helical turbulence. Assuming the turbulence to be Markovian, we first rederive, in a fairly transparent manner, the equation for the mean field, and corrected Fokker-Plank type equations for the magnetic correlations. In these equations, we also incorporate the effects of ambipolar drift which would obtain if the turbulent medium has a significant neutral component. We apply these equations to discuss a number of astrophysically interesting problems: (a) the small scale dynamo in galactic turbulence with a model Kolmogorov spectrum, incorporating the effect of ambipolar drift; (b) current helicity dynamics and the quasilinear corrections to the alpha effect; (c) growth of the current helicity and large-scale magnetic fields due to nonlinear effects.

  12. Stochastic Gyroresonant Acceleration for Hard Electron Spectra of Blazars: Effect of Damping of Cascading Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuwa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic acceleration of nonthermal electrons is investigated in the context of hard photon spectra of blazars. It is well known that this acceleration mechanism can produce a hard electron spectrum of m≡ ∂ {ln}{n}{{e}}(γ )/∂ {ln}γ =2 with the high-energy cutoff, called an ultrarelativistic Maxwellian-like distribution, where {n}{{e}}(γ ) is an electron energy spectrum. We revisit the formation of this characteristic spectrum, considering a particular situation where the electrons are accelerated through gyroresonant interaction with magnetohydrodynamic wave turbulence driven by the turbulent cascade. By solving kinetic equations of the turbulent fields, electrons, and photons emitted via the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process, we demonstrate that in the non-test-particle treatment, the formation of a Maxwellian-like distribution is prevented by the damping effect on the turbulent fields due to the electron acceleration, at least unless an extreme parameter value is chosen. Instead, a softer electron spectrum with the index of m ≈ -1 is produced if the Kolmogorov-type cascade is assumed. The SSC spectrum that originates from the resultant softer electron spectrum is still hard, but somewhat softer and broader than the case of m = 2. This change of achievable hardness should be noted when this basic particle acceleration scenario is accurately tested with observations of hard photon spectra.

  13. Tackling turbulent flows in engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Anupam [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Applied Mechanics

    2011-07-01

    The emphasis of this book is on engineering aspects of fluid turbulence. The book explains for example how to tackle turbulence in industrial applications. It is useful to several disciplines, such as, mechanical, civil, chemical, aerospace engineers and also to professors, researchers, beginners, under graduates and post graduates. The following issues are emphasized in the book: - Modeling and computations of engineering flows: The author discusses in detail the quantities of interest for engineering turbulent flows and how to select an appropriate turbulence model; Also, a treatment of the selection of appropriate boundary conditions for the CFD simulations is given. - Modeling of turbulent convective heat transfer: This is encountered in several practical situations. It basically needs discussion on issues of treatment of walls and turbulent heat fluxes. - Modeling of buoyancy driven flows, for example, smoke issuing from chimney, pollutant discharge into water bodies, etc. (orig.)

  14. Transition to turbulence in ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed bifurcation analysis and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A striking finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, the onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence can be greatly facilitated by using ferrofluids, opening up...

  15. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A. R.; Resio, D.; Pushkarev, A.; Zakharov, V.; Serio, M.; Brandini, C.

    2002-01-01

    We study numerically the generation of power laws in the framework of weak turbulence theory for surface gravity waves in deep water. Starting from a random wave field, we let the system evolve numerically according to the nonlinear Euler equations for gravity waves in infinitely deep water. In agreement with the theory of Zakharov and Filonenko, we find the formation of a power spectrum characterized by a power law of the form of $|{\\bf k}|^{-2.5}$.

  16. A glimpse of fluid turbulence from the molecular scale

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of freely decaying turbulence in three-dimensional space are reported. Fluid components are defined from the microscopic states by eliminating thermal components from the coarse-grained fields. The energy spectrum of the fluid components is observed to scale reasonably well according to Kolmogorov scaling determined from the energy dissipation rate and the viscosity of the fluid, even though the Kolmogorov length is of the order of the molecular scale. © 2014 The Authors.

  17. High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a Lagrangian model

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, J. Pietarila; P. D. Mininni; Pouquet, A.

    2011-01-01

    With the help of a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence tested previously, we explore high Reynolds number regimes up to equivalent resolutions of 6000^3 grid points in the absence of forcing and with no imposed uniform magnetic field. For the given initial condition chosen here, with equal kinetic and magnetic energy, the flow ends up being dominated by the magnetic field, and the dynamics leads to an isotropic Iroshnikov-Kraichnan energy spectrum. However, the locally anisotropic m...

  18. The collisional interaction of a beam of charged particles with a hydrogen target of arbitrary ionization level. [chromospheric heating during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The classical theory of scattering under the Coulomb potential of both charged and neutral particles is used to derive formulae for the energy deposition rate and mean scattering of a beam of charged particles interacting with a cold hydrogen target of arbitrary ionization level as a function of the column density traversed by the beam. These general results hold for any form of stable injection energy spectrum, and their relevance to the existing literature on chromospheric heating during solar flares is discussed.

  19. The spectrum of the anomalous dimensions of the composite operators in the $\\varepsilon$- expansion in the scalar $\\phi^{4}$ - field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Derkachov, S E

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum of the anomalous dimensions of the composite operators (with arbitrary number of fields n and derivatives l) in the scalar \\phi^4 - theory in the first order of the \\epsilon -expansion is investigated. The exact solution for the operators with number of fields \\leq 4 is presented. The behaviour of the anomalous dimensions in the large l limit has been analyzed. It is given the qualitative description of the structure of the spectrum for the arbitrary n.

  20. Galactic turbulence and paleoclimate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet regression detrended fluctuations of the reconstructed temperature for the past three ice ages: approximately 340000 years (Antarctic ice cores isotopic data), exhibit clear evidences of the galactic turbulence modulation up to 2500 years time-scales. The observed strictly Kolmogorov turbulence features indicates the Kolmogorov nature of galactic turbulence, and provide explanation to random-like fluctuations of the global temperature on the millennial time scales.

  1. Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container

    CERN Document Server

    Issenmann, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the role of the forcing on gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Previous laboratory experiments using spatially localized forcing (vibrating blades) have shown that the frequency power-law exponent of the gravity wave spectrum depends on the forcing parameters. By horizontally vibrating the whole container, we observe a spectrum exponent that does not depend on the forcing parameters for both gravity and capillary regimes. This spatially extended forcing leads to a gravity spectrum exponent in better agreement with the theory than by using a spatially localized forcing. The role of the vessel shape has been also studied. Finally, the wave spectrum is found to scale linearly with the injected power for both regimes whatever the forcing type used.

  2. The influence of zonal ExB flows on edge turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on fluid, gyrofluid and gyrokinetic numerical studies of edge turbulence in both tokamak and stellarator geometry, regarding both its physical character and its interaction with the flux surface averaged ('zonal') ExB flows and magnetic fields. We run several electromagnetic models under drift ordering in globally consistent flux tube geometry: three fluid models of increasing complexity, a gyrofluid model, and a collisionless gyrokinetic phase space continuum model. All treat both electron and ion dynamics. The fluid models employ a Landau closure for the parallel heat fluxes, which are treated dynamically. The fluid and gyrofluid models all run at arbitrary collisionality. We find turbulence of drift wave and ion temperature gradient mode (ITG) character at all parameters of interest to experiment. Although an ExB shear layer imposed by the equilibrium is effective in suppressing turbulence, a strong enough shear layer to account for the L-to-H confinement transition is never self-generated by the turbulence in three dimensions. The turbulence correlation length is more sensitive to the equilibrium ExB shear than to any other parameter. Zonal fields in contrast to zonal flows have little effect below the ideal MHD boundary. Similar results are found for both stellarator and tokamak geometry, in agreement with experimentally observed universality of turbulence. (author)

  3. Spectral Properties of MHD Turbulence in 2.5-Dimensional Compressible Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shuchao; MA Zhiwei

    2009-01-01

    Spectral properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a strong back-ground mean magnetic field in 2.5-dime nsional compressible plasmas are studied by high-resolutionnumerical simulations. The spatial properties of MHD turbulences and the energy transfer pro-cess in the k-space are analyzed through angle-averaged energy spectrum. It is found that in the inertial phase, the energy spectrum index of compressible MHD turbulences during the decaying phase is evolved with time. The index varies in a quite wide regime from Kolmogorov's 5/3 to IK's 3/2 during the late simulation period. The energy spectrum index in the later nonlinear stage is also dependent on the chosen initial conditions. The spectral index increases with the increase of the initial magnetic fluctuation while the index decreases with the increase of the initial flow perturbation.

  4. A Lagrangian PDF Model for the Scalar Dissipation in Homogeneous Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rodney O.

    1996-11-01

    The scalar dissipation is a key quantity in the description of turbulent mixing. The spectral relaxation model (SRM) was developed to account for the effect of the evolution of the scalar spectrum on the mean scalar dissipation , and it successfully predicts the observed (DNS, grid turbulence) dependence on Re, Sc (>= 1), and the initial scalar spectrum without recourse to fitting parameters. In this work, we present a Lagrangian PDF version (LSRM) for the PDF of ɛ_φ conditioned on the turbulent vortex stretching history of Kolmogorov-scale fluid particles. In homogeneous turbulence, the LSRM is coupled to a Lagrangian PDF model for the turbulent dissipation (ɛ) which strongly influences the statistics of ɛ_φ. Closure of scalar molecular dissipation term () is carried out using the Fokker-Planck model that was developed earlier for the joint scalar, scalar gradient PDF following fluid particles with the identical vortex stretching histories. Model predictions for inert scalar mixing in homogeneous turbulence with and without a uniform mean scalar gradient are compared to DNS data. In particular, the effect of the mean scalar gradient on the correlation between ɛ_φ and ɛ (i.e. local anisotropy) is examined, as well as the effect of the initial scalar spectrum and small-scale random vortex stretching on non-Gaussian behavior of the scalar PDF.

  5. Asymptotic expansion and statistical description of turbulent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to studying turbulent systems is presented in which an asymptotic expansion of the general dynamical equations is performed prior to the application of statistical methods for describing the evolution of the system. This approach has been applied to two specific systems: anomalous drift wave turbulence in plasmas and homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in fluids. For the plasma case, the time and length scales of the turbulent state result in the asymptotic expansion of the Vlasov/Poisson equations taking the form of nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. Questions regarding this theory and modern Hamiltonian perturbation methods are discussed and resolved. A new alternative Hamiltonian method is described. The Eulerian Direct Interaction Approximation (EDIA) is slightly reformulated and applied to the equations of nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. Using a similarity transformation technique, expressions for the thermal diffusivity are derived from the EDIA equations for various geometries, including a tokamak. In particular, the unique result for generalized geometry may be of use in evaluating fusion reactor designs and theories of anomalous thermal transport in tokamaks. Finally, a new and useful property of the EDIA is pointed out. For the fluid case, an asymptotic expansion is applied to the Navier-Stokes equation and the results lead to the speculation that such an approach may resolve the problem of predicting the Kolmogorov inertial range energy spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. 45 refs., 3 figs

  6. Vorticity and turbulence effects in fluid structure interaction an application to hydraulic structure design

    CERN Document Server

    Brocchini, M

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a collection of 11 research and review papers devoted to the topic of fluid-structure interaction.The subject matter is divided into chapters covering a wide spectrum of recognized areas of research, such as: wall bounded turbulence; quasi 2-D turbulence; canopy turbulence; large eddy simulation; lake hydrodynamics; hydraulic hysteresis; liquid impacts; flow induced vibrations; sloshing flows; transient pipe flow and air entrainment in dropshaft.The purpose of each chapter is to summarize the main results obtained by the individual research unit through a year-long activity

  7. Topological flat band models with arbitrary Chern numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Das Sarma, S.

    2012-12-01

    We report the theoretical discovery of a systematic scheme to produce topological flat bands (TFBs) with arbitrary Chern numbers. We find that generically a multiorbital high Chern number TFB model can be constructed by considering multilayer Chern number C=1 TFB models with enhanced translational symmetry. A series of models are presented as examples, including a two-band model on a triangular lattice with a Chern number C=3 and an N-band square lattice model with C=N for an arbitrary integer N. In all these models, the flatness ratio for the TFBs is larger than 30 and increases with increasing Chern number. In the presence of appropriate interparticle interactions, these models are likely to lead to the formation of Abelian and non-Abelian fractional Chern insulators. As a simple example, we test the C=2 model with hardcore bosons at 1/3 filling, and an intriguing fractional quantum Hall state is observed.

  8. Generation of Electromagnetic Waves with Arbitrary Orbital Angular Momentum Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li; Hong, Wei; Hao, Zhang-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) for radio communication. Here we experimentally demonstrate a planar-spiral phase plate (planar-SPP) for generating arbitrary mixed OAM beams. This proposed planar-SPP uses the concept of transmit array antenna having a perforated substrate to control the outputting phase for generating beams carrying OAM with arbitrary modes. As demonstrations, three planar-SPPs with a single OAM mode and two mixed OAM modes around 94 GHz have been investigated with design and experiments in this paper, respectively. The typical experimental intensity and phase patterns show that the proposed method of generating OAM beams really works. PMID:24770669

  9. Experimental remote preparation of arbitrary photon polarization states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate an experiment for remote preparation of arbitrary photon polarization states. With local operations, polarization measurement, and one way classical communication, any states lying on and inside the Poincare sphere can be remotely prepared. For arbitrary pure states, the efficiency is 100% with a communication cost of one entanglement bit and two classical bits. For mixed states, polarization insensitive measurement is introduced and the classical communication cost is one bit. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) is employed as an entanglement source. The remotely prepared qubits are estimated via quantum tomography process and fidelity between the experimentally prepared state and the expected state is considered to test the data. We achieve remote preparation of 13 states with fidelities all above 0.994

  10. Quantum teleportation of an arbitrary superposition of atomic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiong; Fang, Xi-Ming

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes a scheme to teleport an arbitrary multi-particle two-level atomic state between two parties or an arbitrary zero- and one-photon entangled state of multi-mode between two high-Q cavities in cavity QED. This scheme is based on the resonant interaction between atom and cavity and does not involve Bell-state measurement. It investigates the fidelity of this scheme and find out the case of this unity fidelity of this teleportation. Considering the practical case of the cavity decay, this paper finds that the condition of the unity fidelity is also valid and obtains the effect of the decay of the cavity on the successful probability of the teleportation.

  11. Sunrise: Polychromatic Dust Radiative Transfer in Arbitrary Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, P

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes Sunrise, a parallel, free Monte-Carlo code for the calculation of radiation transfer through astronomical dust. Sunrise uses an adaptive-mesh refinement grid to describe arbitrary geometries of emitting and absorbing/scattering media, with spatial dynamical range exceeding 10^4, and it can efficiently generate images of the emerging radiation at arbitrary points in space. In addition to the monochromatic radiative transfer typically used by Monte-Carlo codes, Sunrise is capable of propagating a range of wavelengths simultaneously. This ``polychromatic'' algorithm gives significant improvements in efficiency and accuracy when spectral features are calculated. Sunrise is used to study the effects of dust in hydrodynamic simulations of interacting galaxies, and the procedure for this is described. The code is tested against previously published results.

  12. Fluid flow over arbitrary bottom topography in a channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Srikumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional free surface potential flow over an arbitrary bottom in a channel is considered to analyze the behavior of the free surface profile using linear theory. It is assumed that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible and flow is irrotational. Perturbation analysis in conjunction with Fourier transform technique is employed to determine the first order corrections of some important physical quantities such as free surface profile, velocity potential, etc. From the practical point of view, one arbitrary bottom topography is considered to determine the free surface profile since the free surface profile depends on the bottom topography. It is found that the free surface profile is oscillatory in nature, representing a wave propagating downstream and no wave upstream.

  13. Locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Bao; Yang, Ying-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    As we know, unextendible product basis (UPB) is an incomplete basis whose members cannot be perfectly distinguished by local operations and classical communication. However, very little is known about those incomplete and locally indistinguishable product bases that are not UPBs. In this paper, we first construct a series of orthogonal product bases that are completable but not locally distinguishable in a general m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3) quantum system. In particular, we give so far the smallest number of locally indistinguishable states of a completable orthogonal product basis in arbitrary quantum systems. Furthermore, we construct a series of small and locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3). All the results lead to a better understanding of the structures of locally indistinguishable product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system.

  14. Optimizing the controllability of arbitrary networks with genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to optimize networks' controllability has become a common and urgent problem. In this paper, we develop an efficient genetic algorithm oriented optimization tool to optimize the controllability of arbitrary networks consisting of both state nodes and control nodes under Popov-Belevitch-Hautus rank condition. The experimental results on a number of benchmark networks show the effectiveness of this method and the evolution of network topology is captured. Furthermore, we explore how network structure affects its controllability and find that the sparser a network is, the more control nodes are needed to control it and the larger the differences between node degrees, the more control nodes are needed to achieve the full control. Our framework provides an alternative to controllability optimization and can be applied to arbitrary networks without any limitations.

  15. Quantum teleportation of an arbitrary superposition of atomic states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qiong; Fang Xi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme to teleport an arbitrary multi-particle two-level atomic state between two parties or an arbitrary zero- and one-photon entangled state of multi-mode between two high-Q cavities in cavity QED.This scheme is based on the resonant interaction between atom and cavity and does not involve Bell-state measurement.It investigates the fidelity of this scheme and find out the case of this unity fidelity of this teleportation.Considering the practical case of the cavity decay,this paper finds that the condition of the unity fidelity is also valid and obtains the effect of the decay of the cavity on the successful probability of the teleportation.

  16. The arbitrary l continuum states of the hyperbolic molecular potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Gao-Feng, E-mail: fgwei_2000@163.com [School of Physics and Mechatronics Engineering, Xi' an University of Arts and Science, Xi' an 710065 (China); Chen, Wen-Li, E-mail: physwlchen@163.com [Department of Basic Science, Xi' an Peihua University, Xi' an 710065 (China); Dong, Shi-Hai, E-mail: dongsh2@yahoo.com [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Within the framework of partial-wave method, we study in this Letter the arbitrary l continuum states of the Schrödinger equation with the hyperbolic molecular potential in terms of an improved approximation to the centrifugal term. We present the normalized radial wave functions and obtain analytical formula of phase shifts. In addition, the corresponding bound states are also discussed by studying the analytical properties of the scattering amplitude. We calculate the energy spectra and scattering phase shifts by the improved, previous approximations and the accurate methods, respectively and find that the improved approximation is better than the previous one since the present results are in better agreement with the accurate ones. - Highlights: • The hyperbolic potential with arbitrary l state is solved. • Improved approximation to centrifugal term is used. • Phase shift formula is derived analytically. • Accurate results are compared with the present results.

  17. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Ulrich, T. J.; Payan, Cédric; Rivière, Jacques; Lake, Colton R.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is a powerful and established technique for measuring elastic constants of a material with general anisotropy. The first step of this technique consists of extracting resonance frequencies and damping from the vibrational frequency spectrum measured on a sample with free boundary conditions. An inversion technique is then used to retrieve the elastic tensor from the measured resonance frequencies. As originally developed, RUS has been mostly applicable to (i) materials with small damping such that the resonances of the sample are well separated and (ii) samples with simple geometries for which analytical solutions exist. In this paper, these limitations are addressed with a new RUS approach adapted to materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry. Resonances are extracted by fitting a sum of exponentially damped sinusoids to the measured frequency spectrum. The inversion of the elastic tensor is achieved with a genetic algorithm, which allows searching for a global minimum within a discrete and relatively wide solution space. First, the accuracy of the proposed approach is evaluated against numerical data simulated for samples with isotropic symmetry and transversely isotropic symmetry. Subsequently, the applicability of the approach is demonstrated using experimental data collected on a composite structure consisting of a cylindrical sample of Berea sandstone glued to a large piezoelectric disk. In the proposed experiments, RUS is further enhanced by the use of a 3-D laser vibrometer allowing the visualization of most of the modes in the frequency band studied.

  18. Antiperiodic XXZ chains with arbitrary spins: Complete eigenstate construction by functional equations in separation of variables

    CERN Document Server

    Niccoli, G

    2014-01-01

    Generic inhomogeneous integrable XXZ chains with arbitrary spins are studied by means of the quantum separation of variables (SOV) method. Within this framework, a complete description of the spectrum (eigenvalues and eigenstates) of the antiperiodic transfer matrix is derived in terms of discrete systems of equations involving the inhomogeneity parameters of the model. We show here that one can reformulate this discrete SOV characterization of the spectrum in terms of functional T-Q equations of Baxter's type, hence proving the completeness of the solutions to the associated systems of Bethe-type equations. More precisely, we consider here two such reformulations. The first one is given in terms of Q-solutions, in the form of trigonometric polynomials of a given degree $N_s$, of a one-parameter family of T-Q functional equations with an extra inhomogeneous term. The second one is given in terms of Q-solutions, again in the form of trigonometric polynomials of degree $N_s$ but with double period, of Baxter's ...

  19. Front dynamics in turbulent media

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, A C; Sancho, J M

    1997-01-01

    A study of a stable front propagating in a turbulent medium is presented. The front is generated through a reaction-diffusion equation, and the turbulent medium is statistically modeled using a Langevin equation. Numerical simulations indicate the presence of two different dynamical regimes. These regimes appear when the turbulent flow either wrinkles a still rather sharp propagating interfase or broadens it. Specific dependences of the propagating velocities on stirring intensities appropriate to each case are found and fitted when possible according to theoretically predicted laws. Different turbulent spectra are considered.

  20. Wave turbulence in magnetized plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galtier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent progress on wave turbulence for magnetized plasmas (MHD, Hall MHD and electron MHD in the incompressible and compressible cases. The emphasis is made on homogeneous and anisotropic turbulence which usually provides the best theoretical framework to investigate space and laboratory plasmas. The solar wind and the coronal heating problems are presented as two examples of application of anisotropic wave turbulence. The most important results of wave turbulence are reported and discussed in the context of natural and simulated magnetized plasmas. Important issues and possible spurious interpretations are also discussed.

  1. Generic Multiuser Coordinated Beamforming for Underlay Spectrum Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Denkovski, Daniel; Atanasovski, Vladimir; Gavrilovska, Liljana; Mähönen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    The beamforming techniques have been recently studied as possible enablers for underlay spectrum sharing. The existing beamforming techniques have several common limitations: they are usually system model specific, cannot operate with arbitrary number of transmit/receive antennas, and cannot serve arbitrary number of users. Moreover, the beamforming techniques for underlay spectrum sharing do not consider the interference originating from the incumbent primary system. This work extends the common underlay sharing model by incorporating the interference originating from the incumbent system into generic combined beamforming design that can be applied on interference, broadcast or multiple access channels. The paper proposes two novel multiuser beamforming algorithms for user fairness and sum rate maximization, utilizing newly derived convex optimization problems for transmit and receive beamformers calculation in a recursive optimization. Both beamforming algorithms provide efficient operation for the interfer...

  2. The nonlinear interaction of two-crossed focussed ultrasonic beams in the presence of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, Stephen C.

    1988-06-01

    This paper examines the scattering of a nonlinearly generated sum frequency acoustic wave component from a region of turbulence defined by the overlap volume of two mutually perpendicular crossed focussed ultrasonic beams. The scattered sum frequency pressure amplitude is measured at different radial scan positions across the jet flow stream providing conclusions that explain some qualitative results governing the sum frequency scattering mechanism. Information about the instantaneous velocity components of the turbulent field in the sound-sound interaction volume is measured with an electronic spectrum analyzer. Average spectral shapes of the spectrum near the sum frequency represent information about the probability distribution function of the turbulent velocities. Acoustic measurements are correlated with velocity measurements of circular jets. These correlations demonstrate that the focussed crossed beam apparatus is an effective diagnostic tool for the experimental study of turbulent fluid fields in water. The results of the nonlinear crossed beam experiments indicate the apparatus can be utilized as a diagnostic tool to measure some parameters of turbulent velocity. The measured pressure of the radiated sum frequency correlates with turbulent velocities in the interaction region. Measurements of the Doppler shift and sum-frequency broadening are used to determine mean velocity and turbulent rms velocities respectively.

  3. Arbitrary-order parasupersymmetric coherent states of quantum harmonic oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, H. [Faculty of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: Hfakhri@ark.tabrizu.ac.ir; Bahadori, M.E. [Faculty of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz (IR): Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences, Tabriz (Iran)]. E-mail: Msph0977@ark.tabrizu.ac.ir

    2000-10-13

    The eigenstates of arbitrary-order parasupersymmetric Hamiltonian p corresponding to a particle with spin p/2 in the presence of a harmonic oscillator potential and constant magnetic field directed along the z-axis are constructed in terms of eigenstates of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. Also, parasupersymmetric coherent states with degenerate multiplicity of an ad hoc bosonic annihilation operator of parasupersymmetric eigenstates of the Hamiltonian mentioned above are calculated. (author)

  4. Arbitrary-order parasupersymmetric coherent states of quantum harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eigenstates of arbitrary-order parasupersymmetric Hamiltonian p corresponding to a particle with spin p/2 in the presence of a harmonic oscillator potential and constant magnetic field directed along the z-axis are constructed in terms of eigenstates of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. Also, parasupersymmetric coherent states with degenerate multiplicity of an ad hoc bosonic annihilation operator of parasupersymmetric eigenstates of the Hamiltonian mentioned above are calculated. (author)

  5. Arbitrary rotation and entanglement of flux SQUID qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Kis, Z

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new approach for the arbitrary rotation of a three-level SQUID qubit and describe a new strategy for the creation of coherence transfer and entangled states between two three-level SQUID qubits. The former is succeeded by exploring the coupled-uncoupled states of the system when irradiated with two microwave pulses, and the latter is succeeded by placing the SQUID qubits into a microwave cavity and used adiabatic passage methods for their manipulation.

  6. Solving the Homogeneous Boltzmann Equation with Arbitrary Scattering Kernel

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenegger, A.

    2008-01-01

    With applications in astroparticle physics in mind, we generalize a method for the solution of the nonlinear, space homogeneous Boltzmann equation with isotropic distribution function to arbitrary matrix elements. The method is based on the expansion of the matrix element in terms of two cosines of the "scattering angles". The scattering functions used by previous authors in particle physics for matrix elements in Fermi-approximation are retrieved as lowest order results in this expansion. Th...

  7. Quantification of Entanglement of Teleportation in Arbitrary Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Sazim, Sk; Adhikari, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pramanik, T.

    2012-01-01

    We study bipartite entangled states in arbitrary dimensions and obtain different bounds for the entanglement measures in terms of teleportation fidelity. We find that there is a simple relation between negativity and teleportation fidelity for pure states but for mixed states, an upper bound is obtained for negativity in terms of teleportation fidelity using convex-roof extension negativity (CREN). However, with this it is not clear how to distinguish betweeen states useful for teleportation ...

  8. Self-forces on static bodies in arbitrary dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Abraham I.; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Taylor, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We derive exact expressions for the scalar and electromagnetic self-forces and self-torques acting on arbitrary static extended bodies in arbitrary static spacetimes with any number of dimensions. Nonperturbatively, our results are identical in all dimensions. Meaningful point particle limits are quite different in different dimensions, however. These limits are defined and evaluated, resulting in simple "regularization algorithms" which can be used in concrete calculations. In these limits, self-interaction is shown to be progressively less important in higher numbers of dimensions; it generically competes in magnitude with increasingly high-order extended-body effects. Conversely, we show that self-interaction effects can be relatively large in 1 +1 and 2 +1 dimensions. Our motivations for this work are twofold: First, no previous derivation of the self-force has been provided in arbitrary dimensions, and heuristic arguments presented by different authors have resulted in conflicting conclusions. Second, the static self-force problem in arbitrary dimensions provides a valuable test bed with which to continue the development of general, nonperturbative methods in the theory of motion. Several new insights are obtained in this direction, including a significantly improved understanding of the renormalization process. We also show that there is considerable freedom to use different "effective fields" in the laws of motion—a freedom which can be exploited to optimally simplify specific problems. Different choices give rise to different inertias, gravitational forces, and electromagnetic or scalar self-forces, but there is a sense in which none of these quantities are individually accessible to experiment. Certain combinations are observable, however, and these remain invariant under all possible field redefinitions.

  9. Universality and Borel summability of arbitrary quartic tensor models

    OpenAIRE

    Delepouve, Thibault; Gurau, Razvan; Rivasseau, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We extend the study of \\emph{melonic} quartic tensor models to models with arbitrary quartic interactions. This extension requires a new version of the loop vertex expansion using several species of intermediate fields and iterated Cauchy-Schwarz inequalities. Borel summability is proven, uniformly as the tensor size $N$ becomes large. Every cumulant is written as a sum of explicitly calculated terms plus a remainder, suppressed in $1/N$. Together with the existence of the large $N$ limit of ...

  10. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at mul...

  11. Entangling two oscillators with arbitrary asymmetric initial states

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Su, Qi-Ping; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Nori, Franco; Han, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    A Hamiltonian is presented, which can be used to convert any asymmetric state $|\\varphi \\rangle_{a}|\\phi \\rangle_{b}$ of two oscillators $a$ and $b$ into an entangled state. Furthermore, with this Hamiltonian and local operations only, two oscillators, initially in any asymmetric initial states, can be entangled with a third oscillator. The prepared entangled states can be engineered with an arbitrary degree of entanglement. A discussion on the realization of this Hamiltonian is given. Numeri...

  12. Ordering and transport in generalized continua with arbitrary order parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With reference to two phase solids, Gurtin has recently formulated a unified framework for Ginzburg-Landau's and Cahn-Hilliard's equations. The present paper deals with its possible extension to generalized continua described by arbitrary tensor-order parameters. The role of the configurational entropy is discussed in detail. Such an entropy allows to obtain kinetic rules even in the theoretical limit case of frictionless materials. (orig.)

  13. Ordering and transport in generalized continua with arbitrary order parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano, P.M.; Augusti, G. [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Strutturale e Geotecnica

    1998-11-01

    With reference to two phase solids, Gurtin has recently formulated a unified framework for Ginzburg-Landau`s and Cahn-Hilliard`s equations. The present paper deals with its possible extension to generalized continua described by arbitrary tensor-order parameters. The role of the configurational entropy is discussed in detail. Such an entropy allows to obtain kinetic rules even in the theoretical limit case of frictionless materials. (orig.) 15 refs.

  14. Multilevel Polarization of Polar Codes Over Arbitrary Discrete Memoryless Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Sahebi, Aria G.; Pradhan, S. Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that polar codes achieve the symmetric capacity of discrete memoryless channels with arbitrary input alphabet sizes. It is shown that in general, channel polarization happens in several, rather than only two levels so that the synthesized channels are either useless, perfect or "partially perfect". Any subset of the channel input alphabet which is closed under addition, induces a coset partition of the alphabet through its shifts. For any such partition of the input alphabet, ther...

  15. Consistency Conditions for Brane Worlds in Arbitrary Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Leblond, F; Winters, D J; Leblond, Frederic; Myers, Robert C.; Winters, David J.

    2001-01-01

    We consider ``brane world sum rules'' for compactifications involving an arbitrary number of spacetime dimensions. One of the most striking results derived from such consistency conditions is the necessity for negative tension branes to appear in five--dimensional scenarios. We show how this result is easily evaded for brane world models with more than five dimensions. As an example, we consider a novel realization of the Randall--Sundrum scenario in six dimensions involving only positive tension branes.

  16. Entanglement of arbitrary spin fields in noninertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We generalize the study of fermionic and bosonic entanglement in noninertial frames to fields of arbitrary spin and beyond the single-mode approximation. After the general analysis we particularize for two interesting cases: entanglement between an inertial and an accelerated observer for massless fields of spin 1 (electromagnetic) and spin 3/2 (Rarita-Schwinger). We show that, in the limit of infinite acceleration, no significant differences appear between the different spin fields for the states considered.

  17. Probabilistic Teleportation of an Arbitrary Two-particle State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾永建; 郑亦庄; 郭光灿

    2001-01-01

    A scheme for the teleportation of an arbitrary two-particle state via two non-maximally entangled particle pairsis proposed. We show that teleportation can be successfully realized with a certain probability if the receiveradopts an appropriate unitary-reduction strategy. A specific strategy is provided in detail The probability of successful teleportation is determined by the smaller coefficients of the two entangled pairs.

  18. Bark frequency transform using an arbitrary order allpass filter1

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Prasanta Kumar; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an arbitrary order stable allpass filter structure for frequency transformation from Hertz to Bark scale. According to the proposed filter structure, the first order allpass filter is causal, but the second and higher order allpass filters are non-causal. We find that the accuracy of the transformation significantly improves when a second or higher order allpass filter is designed compared to a first order allpass filter. We also find that the RMS error of the transformation monoto...

  19. One-plaquette (2 + 1)-model with arbitrary action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates a one-plaquette model with arbitrary lattice action for the compact group G(N) in the framework of the Hamiltonian approach. The 1/N perturbation theory an the strong coupling expansion are considered in the model. The existence of a phase transition of the third kind in the limit of large N is proved for a large class of one-plaquette actions

  20. One-plaquette (2 + 1)-model with arbitrary action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azakov, S.I.

    1985-08-01

    This paper investigates a one-plaquette model with arbitrary lattice action for the compact group G(N) in the framework of the Hamiltonian approach. The 1/N perturbation theory an the strong coupling expansion are considered in the model. The existence of a phase transition of the third kind in the limit of large N is proved for a large class of one-plaquette actions.