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Sample records for aralast baxter healthcare

  1. 77 FR 6057 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 22, Baxter Healthcare Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 22, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, (Pharmaceutical and Biological Intravenous Product Manufacturing), Chicago, IL Pursuant to its... District, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 22, has requested manufacturing authority on behalf of...

  2. Baxter Algebras and Umbral Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li

    2004-01-01

    We apply recent constructions of free Baxter algebras to the study of the umbral calculus. We give a characterization of the umbral calculus in terms of Baxter algebra. This characterization leads to a natural generalization of the umbral calculus that include the classical umbral calculus in a family of $\\lambda$-umbral calculi parameterized by $\\lambda$ in the base ring.

  3. Baxter Aurora dialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas D

    2004-01-01

    With the recent focus on the benefits of more frequent dialysis, the Baxter Aurora dialysis system provides maximum flexibility for therapy prescription, including short daily treatments, long nocturnal treatments, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and online hemodiafiltration, all in a compact, reliable, easy to use system. A self-prompting touch screen user interface mounted on a movable arm provides for comfortable operation, whether sitting and standing. An automatic treatment setup mode facilitates easy treatment setup. Complex menus are eliminated by the use of a hardware key that automatically selects only the prescribed options during power up, eliminating all menus associated with nonprescribed functions and modalities. This prevents the user from becoming confused or accidentally altering the dialysis treatment. Prior to dialysis the instrument goes through an automatic self-test that confirms the operation of internal systems. The screen will dim when there is no action that the patient needs to attend to on the instrument. After dialysis, press the disinfect button and the instrument disinfects itself and shuts off. For patient safety, the "disinfect" menus are not available during dialysis. The instrument can also be programmed to automatically start and rinse at a set time. For remote treatment monitoring, the instrument connects to the Internet. The Aurora records information about the machine's technical status, providing a record of instrument history for easy servicing. The Aurora is a flexible platform that provides the desired renal therapy with ease of use and proper support for the hemodialysis patient when combined with Baxter's 24-hour infrastructure and support. PMID:15043620

  4. Aztec Diamonds and Baxter Permutations

    OpenAIRE

    Canary, Hal

    2003-01-01

    We present a proof of a conjecture about the relationship between Baxter permutations and pairs of alternating sign matrices that are produced from domino tilings of Aztec diamonds. It is shown that if and only if a tiling corresponds to a pair of ASMs that are both permutation matrices, the larger permutation matrix corresponds to a Baxter permutation. There has been a thriving literature on both pattern-avoiding permutations of various kinds and tilings of regions using dominos or rhombuses...

  5. Baxter Algebras, Stirling Numbers and Partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments of Baxter algebras have lead to applications to combinatorics, number theory and mathematical physics. We relate Baxter algebras to Stirling numbers of the first kind and the second kind, partitions and multinomial coefficients. This allows us to apply congruences from number theory to obtain congruences in Baxter algebras.

  6. Fledgling IBM-Baxter joint venture confronts start-up struggles, formidable competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, E

    1990-09-01

    Spectrum Healthcare Solutions, the potentially powerful marriage of software operations at International Business Machines and Baxter Healthcare Corp., has held its own but hasn't jelled as quickly as observers had hoped. While the venture gears up, it faces stiff challenges from competitors.

  7. 77 FR 36997 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Baxter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ...; Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico; (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags and Administration... for the manufacture of pharmaceutical and nutritional intravenous (I.V.) bags, I.V. administration... able to choose the duty rates during customs entry procedures that apply to the filled I.V....

  8. Baxter Q-operator and functional relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Ovchinnikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We obtain the Baxter Q-operators in the Uq(slˆ2 invariant integrable models as a special limits of the quantum transfer matrices corresponding to different spins in the auxiliary space. We derive the Baxter equation from the well-known fusion relations for the transfer matrices. Our method is valid for an arbitrary integrable model corresponding to the quantum group Uq(slˆ2, for example for the XXZ-spin chain.

  9. Rota-Baxter operators on Witt and Virasoro algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu; Liu, Ming; Bai, Chengming; Jing, Naihuan

    2016-10-01

    The homogeneous Rota-Baxter operators on the Witt and Virasoro algebras are classified. As applications, the induced solutions of the classical Yang-Baxter equation and the induced pre-Lie and PostLie algebra structures are obtained.

  10. Baxter'i Balti riike halvustavad plakatid / Uno Schultz ; foto: Emil Schultz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Schultz, Uno, 1956-

    2007-01-01

    rahvusvahelise meditsiinifirma Baxter Rootsi osakonna, Stockholmi äärelinnas Kistas asuva Baxter Medical AB tegevusest puugihammustuste kaudu levivate haiguste vastase kaitsepookimise propageerimisel

  11. A Note on the Baxter-King Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Woitek

    1998-01-01

    Recently, Baxter and King (1995) developed a bandpass filter which overcomes to some extent the well known drawbacks of the Hodrick-Prescott filter. In this paper, the circumstances under which the Baxter-King filter is preferable are identified, and a modification is presented which takes into account spurious side lobes generated by this method.

  12. The Yang-Baxter relation and gauge invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashaev, Rinat

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a quantum dilogarithm over a Pontryagin self-dual LCA group A, we construct an operator solution of the Yang-Baxter equation generalizing the solution of the Faddeev-Volkov model. Based on a specific choice of a subgroup B\\subset A and by using the Weil transformation, we also give a new non-operator interpretation of the Yang-Baxter relation. That allows us to construct a lattice QFT-model of IRF-type with gauge invariance under independent B-translations of local ‘spin’ variables. Dedicated to Professor Rodney Baxter on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

  13. Yang-Baxter invariance of the Nappi-Witten model

    CERN Document Server

    Kyono, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    We study Yang-Baxter deformations of the Nappi-Witten model by adopting a prescription invented by Delduc-Magro-Vicedo. The deformations are specified by skew-symmetric classical $r$-matrices satisfying (modified) classical Yang-Baxter equations. We show that the sigma-model metric is invariant under arbitrary deformations (while the coefficient of $B$-field is changed) by adopting the most general classical $r$-matrix. Then the Yang-Baxter invariance of the background follows from the requirement that the one-loop $\\beta$-function should vanish. As a result, it is shown that the Nappi-Witten model is the unique conformal theory in the present class of Yang-Baxter deformations.

  14. Yang–Baxter sigma models based on the CYBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Takuya, E-mail: takuya.matsumoto@math.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Research and Department of Mathematics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yoshida, Kentaroh, E-mail: kyoshida@gauge.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    It is known that Yang–Baxter sigma models provide a systematic way to study integrable deformations of both principal chiral models and symmetric coset sigma models. In the original proposal and its subsequent development, the deformations have been characterized by classical r-matrices satisfying the modified classical Yang–Baxter equation (mCYBE). In this article, we propose the Yang–Baxter sigma models based on the classical Yang–Baxter equations (CYBE) rather than the mCYBE. This generalization enables us to utilize various kinds of solutions of the CYBE to classify integrable deformations. In particular, it is straightforward to realize partial deformations of the target space without loss of the integrability of the parent theory.

  15. Marsh v Baxter, Kojonup to Canberra: Foresight, Hindsight and Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2016-01-01

    Australia is a global leader in organic production and a minnow in global GMO production. Organic produce consistently sells at a premium, while genetically modified (GM) produce consistently sells at a discount. In the case of Marsh and Baxter, the facts were agreed but their interpretation was not and this proved fatal to the case. This was a dispute between two farmer neighbours at Kojonup, Western Australia. When the GMO moratorium was lifted in WA, Baxter promptly planted Monsanto GM can...

  16. A Unified Algebraic Approach to Classical Yang-Baxter Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Chengming

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the different operator forms of classical Yang-Baxter equation are given in the tensor expression through a unified algebraic method. It is closely related to left-symmetric algebras which play an important role in many fields in mathematics and mathematical physics. By studying the relations between left-symmetric algebras and classical Yang-Baxter equation, we can construct left-symmetric algebras from certain classical r-matrices and conversely, there is a natural classical ...

  17. Rota-Baxter algebras and the Hopf algebra of renormalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi-Fard, K.

    2006-06-15

    Recently, the theory of renormalization in perturbative quantum field theory underwent some exciting new developments. Kreimer discovered an organization of Feynman graphs into combinatorial Hopf algebras. The process of renormalization is captured by a factorization theorem for regularized Hopf algebra characters. Hereby the notion of Rota-Baxter algebras enters the scene. In this work we develop in detail several mathematical aspects of Rota-Baxter algebras as they appear also in other sectors closely related to perturbative renormalization, to wit, for instance multiple-zeta-values and matrix differential equations. The Rota-Baxter picture enables us to present the algebraic underpinning for the Connes-Kreimer Birkhoff decomposition in a concise way. This is achieved by establishing a general factorization theorem for filtered algebras. Which in turn follows from a new recursion formula based on the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. This allows us to generalize a classical result due to Spitzer to non-commutative Rota-Baxter algebras. The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff based recursion turns out to be a generalization of Magnus' expansion in numerical analysis to generalized integration operators. We will exemplify these general results by establishing a simple representation of the combinatorics of renormalization in terms of triangular matrices. We thereby recover in the presence of a Rota-Baxter operator the matrix representation of the Birkhoff decomposition of Connes and Kreimer. (orig.)

  18. Rota-Baxter algebras and the Hopf algebra of renormalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the theory of renormalization in perturbative quantum field theory underwent some exciting new developments. Kreimer discovered an organization of Feynman graphs into combinatorial Hopf algebras. The process of renormalization is captured by a factorization theorem for regularized Hopf algebra characters. Hereby the notion of Rota-Baxter algebras enters the scene. In this work we develop in detail several mathematical aspects of Rota-Baxter algebras as they appear also in other sectors closely related to perturbative renormalization, to wit, for instance multiple-zeta-values and matrix differential equations. The Rota-Baxter picture enables us to present the algebraic underpinning for the Connes-Kreimer Birkhoff decomposition in a concise way. This is achieved by establishing a general factorization theorem for filtered algebras. Which in turn follows from a new recursion formula based on the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. This allows us to generalize a classical result due to Spitzer to non-commutative Rota-Baxter algebras. The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff based recursion turns out to be a generalization of Magnus' expansion in numerical analysis to generalized integration operators. We will exemplify these general results by establishing a simple representation of the combinatorics of renormalization in terms of triangular matrices. We thereby recover in the presence of a Rota-Baxter operator the matrix representation of the Birkhoff decomposition of Connes and Kreimer. (orig.)

  19. Yang-Baxter equations with two Planck constants

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, A; Zotov, A

    2015-01-01

    We consider Yang-Baxter equations arising from its associative analog and study corresponding exchange relations. They generate finite-dimensional quantum algebras which have form of coupled ${\\rm GL}(N)$ Sklyanin elliptic algebras. Then we proceed to a natural generalization of the Baxter-Belavin quantum $R$-matrix to the case ${\\rm Mat}(N,\\mathbb C)^{\\otimes 2}\\otimes {\\rm Mat}(M,\\mathbb C)^{\\otimes 2}$. It can be viewed as symmetric form of ${\\rm GL}(NM)$ $R$-matrix in the sense that the Planck constant and the spectral parameter enter (almost) symmetrically. Such type (symmetric) $R$-matrices are also shown to satisfy the Yang-Baxter like quadratic and cubic equations.

  20. Yang-Baxter equations with two Planck constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A.; Olshanetsky, M.; Zotov, A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider Yang-Baxter equations arising from its associative analog and study the corresponding exchange relations. They generate finite-dimensional quantum algebras which have the form of coupled {{GL}}(N) Sklyanin elliptic algebras. Then we proceed to a natural generalization of the Baxter-Belavin quantum R-matrix to the case {{Mat}}{(N,{{C}})}\\otimes 2\\otimes {{Mat}}{(M,{{C}})}\\otimes 2. It can be viewed as symmetric form of {{GL}}({NM}) R-matrix in the sense that the Planck constant and the spectral parameter enter (almost) symmetrically. Such type (symmetric) R-matrices are also shown to satisfy the Yang-Baxter like quadratic and cubic equations.

  1. Introduction to the Yang-Baxter Equation with Open Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Nichita

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Yang-Baxter equation first appeared in theoretical physics, in a paper by the Nobel laureate C. N. Yang, and in statistical mechanics, in R. J. Baxter’s work. Later, it turned out that this equation plays a crucial role in: quantum groups, knot theory, braided categories, analysis of integrable systems, quantum mechanics, non-commutative descent theory, quantum computing, non-commutative geometry, etc. Many scientists have found solutions for the Yang-Baxter equation, obtaining qualitative results (using the axioms of various algebraic structures or quantitative results (usually using computer calculations. However, the full classification of its solutions remains an open problem. In this paper, we present the (set-theoretical Yang-Baxter equation, we sketch the proof of a new theorem, we state some problems, and discuss about directions for future research.

  2. Baxter Q-Operators and Representations of Yangians

    CERN Document Server

    Bazhanov, Vladimir V; Lukowski, Tomasz; Meneghelli, Carlo; Staudacher, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new approach to Baxter Q-operators by relating them to the theory of Yangians, which are the simplest examples for quantum groups. Here we open up a new chapter in this theory and study certain degenerate solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation connected with harmonic oscillator algebras. These infinite-state solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation serve as elementary, "partonic" building blocks for other solutions via the standard fusion procedure. As a first example of the method we consider sl(n) compact spin chains and derive the full hierarchy of operatorial functional equations for all related commuting transfer matrices and Q-operators. This leads to a systematic and transparent solution of these chains, where the nested Bethe equations are derived in an entirely algebraic fashion, without any reference to the traditional Bethe ansatz techniques.

  3. The Yang-Baxter relation and gauge invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Kashaev, Rinat

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a quantum dilogarithm over a Pontryagin self-dual LCA group $A$, we construct an operator solution of the Yang-Baxter equation generalizing the solution of the Faddeev-Volkov model. Based on a specific choice of a subgroup $B\\subset A$ and by using the Weil transformation, we also give a new non-operator interpretation of the Yang-Baxter relation. That allows us to construct a lattice QFT-model of IRF-type with gauge invariance under independent $B$-translations of local `spin' ...

  4. ℤ3 parafermionic chain emerging from Yang-Baxter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Wei; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-02-01

    We construct the 1D parafermionic model based on the solution of Yang-Baxter equation and express the model by three types of fermions. It is shown that the parafermionic chain possesses both triple degenerate ground states and non-trivial topological winding number. Hence, the parafermionic model is a direct generalization of 1D Kitaev model. Both the and model can be obtained from Yang-Baxter equation. On the other hand, to show the algebra of parafermionic tripling intuitively, we define a new 3-body Hamiltonian based on Yang-Baxter equation. Different from the Majorana doubling, the holds triple degeneracy at each of energy levels. The triple degeneracy is protected by two symmetry operators of the system, ω-parity P and emergent parafermionic operator Γ, which are the generalizations of parity PM and emergent Majorana operator in Lee-Wilczek model, respectively. Both the parafermionic model and can be viewed as SU(3) models in color space. In comparison with the Majorana models for SU(2), it turns out that the SU(3) models are truly the generalization of Majorana models resultant from Yang-Baxter equation.

  5. Schur Polynomials and the Yang-Baxter equation

    CERN Document Server

    Brubaker, Ben; Friedberg, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    We show that within the six-vertex model there is a parametrized Yang-Baxter equation with nonabelian parameter group GL(2)xGL(1) at the center of the disordered regime. As an application we rederive deformations of the Weyl character formule of Tokuyama and of Hamel and King.

  6. Quantum supergroups and solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is developed for systematically constructing trigonometric and rational solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation using the representation theory of quantum supergroups. New quantum R-matrices are obtained by applying the method to the vector representations of quantum osp(1/2) and gl(m/n)

  7. ℤ3 parafermionic chain emerging from Yang-Baxter equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Wei; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We construct the 1D ℤ3 parafermionic model based on the solution of Yang-Baxter equation and express the model by three types of fermions. It is shown that the ℤ3 parafermionic chain possesses both triple degenerate ground states and non-trivial topological winding number. Hence, the ℤ3 parafermionic model is a direct generalization of 1D ℤ2 Kitaev model. Both the ℤ2 and ℤ3 model can be obtained from Yang-Baxter equation. On the other hand, to show the algebra of parafermionic tripling intuitively, we define a new 3-body Hamiltonian H123 based on Yang-Baxter equation. Different from the Majorana doubling, the H123 holds triple degeneracy at each of energy levels. The triple degeneracy is protected by two symmetry operators of the system, ω-parity P [formula in text] and emergent parafermionic operator Γ, which are the generalizations of parity PM and emergent Majorana operator in Lee-Wilczek model, respectively. Both the ℤ3 parafermionic model and H123 can be viewed as SU(3) models in color space. In comparison with the Majorana models for SU(2), it turns out that the SU(3) models are truly the generalization of Majorana models resultant from Yang-Baxter equation. PMID:26902999

  8. The hyperbolic modular double and Yang-Baxter equation

    CERN Document Server

    Chicherin, D

    2015-01-01

    We construct a hyperbolic modular double -- an algebra lying in between the Faddeev modular double for U_q(sl_2) and the elliptic modular double. The intertwining operator for this algebra leads to an integral operator solution of the Yang-Baxter equation associated with a generalized Faddeev-Volkov lattice model introduced by the second author. We describe also the L-operator and finite-dimensional R-matrices for this model.

  9. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions: electrostatics versus adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the repulsive electrostatics against part of the bare adhesion. A theory similar in spirit is developed at nonzero concentrations by assuming an appropriate Baxter model as the reference state. The first-...

  10. Abelian Yang-Baxter Deformations and TsT transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Osten, David

    2016-01-01

    We prove that abelian Yang-Baxter deformations of superstring coset sigma models are equivalent to sequences of commuting TsT transformations, meaning T dualities and coordinate shifts. Our results extend also to fermionic deformations and fermionic T duality, and naturally lead to a TsT subgroup of the superduality group OSp(d_b,d_b|2d_f). In cases like AdS_5 x S^5, fermionic deformations necessarily lead to complex models. As an illustration of inequivalent deformations, we give all six abelian deformations of AdS_3. We comment on the possible dual field theory interpretation of these (super-)TsT models.

  11. Factorial Schur functions and the Yang-Baxter equation

    CERN Document Server

    Bump, Daniel; Nakasuji, Maki

    2011-01-01

    Factorial Schur functions are generalizations of Schur functions that have, in addition to the usual variables, a second family of "shift" parameters. We show that a factorial Schur function times a deformation of the Weyl denominator may be expressed as the partition function of a particular statistical-mechanical system (six vertex model). The proof is based on the Yang-Baxter equation. There is a deformation parameter $t$ which may be specialized in different ways. If $t=-1$, then we recover the expression of the factorial Schur function as a ratio of alternating polynomials. If $t=0$, we recover the description as a sum over tableaux. If $t=\\infty$ we recover a description of Lascoux that was previously considered by McNamara. We also are able to prove using the Yang-Baxter equation the asymptotic symmetry of the factorial Schur functions in the shift parameters. Finally, we give a proof using our methods of the dual Cauchy identity for factorial Schur functions. Thus using our methods we are able to give...

  12. Asymptotic representations and q-oscillator solutions of the graded Yang-Baxter equation related to Baxter Q-operators

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuboi, Zengo

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of asymptotic representations of the Borel subalgebra of the quantum affine superalgebra U_q(gl(M|N)^). This is characterized by Drinfeld rational fractions. In particular, we consider contractions of U_q(gl(M|N))in the FRT formulation and obtain explicit solutions of the graded Yang-Baxter equation in terms of q-oscillator superalgebras. These solutions correspond to L-operators for Baxter Q operators. We define model independent universal Q-operators as the supertrace of the universal R-matrix and write universal T-operators in terms of these Q-operators based on shift operators on the supercharacters. These include our previous work on U_q(sl(2|1)^) case [arXiv:0805.4274] in part, and also give a cue for operator realization of our Wronskian-like formulas on T-and Q-functions in [arXiv:0906.2039, arXiv:1109.5524].

  13. Stability of Cassie-Baxter wetting states on microstructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hao-Yuan; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-10-01

    A stable Cassie-Baxter (CB) wetting state is indispensable for the superhydrophobicity of solid surfaces. In this paper, we analyze the equilibrium and stability of CB wetting states. Using an energy approach, the stability criteria of CB wetting states are established for solid surfaces with either two- or three-dimensional symmetric microstructures. A generic method is presented to calculate the critical pressure at which the CB state on a microstructured solid surface collapses. The method holds for microstructures with arbitrary generatrix, and explicit solutions are derived for a few representative microstructures with a straight or circular generatrix. In addition, some possible strategies are proposed to design surface structures with stable CB wetting states from the viewpoints of geometry and chemistry.

  14. From Baxter Q-operators to local charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frassek, Rouven [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Mathematik und Institut fuer Physik; Albert-Einstein-Institut, Potsdam (Germany). MPI fuer Gravitationsphysik; Meneghelli, Carlo [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik

    2012-10-15

    We discuss how the shift operator and the Hamiltonian enter the hierarchy of Baxter Q-operators in the example of gl(n) homogeneous spin-chains. Building on the construction that was recently carried out by the authors and their collaborators, we find that a reduced set of Q-operators can be used to obtain local charges. The mechanism relies on projection properties of the corresponding R-operators on a highest/lowest weight state of the quantum space. It is intimately related to the ordering of the oscillators in the auxiliary space. Furthermore, we introduce a diagrammatic language that makes these properties manifest and the results transparent. Our approach circumvents the paradigm of constructing the transfer matrix with equal representations in quantum and auxiliary space and underlines the strength of the Q-operator construction.

  15. Experimental realization of the Yang-Baxter Equation via NMR interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vind, F Anvari; Foerster, A; Oliveira, I S; Sarthour, R S; Soares-Pinto, D O; Souza, A M; Roditi, I

    2016-01-01

    The Yang-Baxter equation is an important tool in theoretical physics, with many applications in different domains that span from condensed matter to string theory. Recently, the interest on the equation has increased due to its connection to quantum information processing. It has been shown that the Yang-Baxter equation is closely related to quantum entanglement and quantum computation. Therefore, owing to the broad relevance of this equation, besides theoretical studies, it also became significant to pursue its experimental implementation. Here, we show an experimental realization of the Yang-Baxter equation and verify its validity through a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) interferometric setup. Our experiment was performed on a liquid state Iodotrifluoroethylene sample which contains molecules with three qubits. We use Controlled-transfer gates that allow us to build a pseudo-pure state from which we are able to apply a quantum information protocol that implements the Yang-Baxter equation. PMID:26861686

  16. A 9 × 9 Matrix Representation of Birman-Wenzl-Murakami Algebra and Berry Phase in Yang-Baxter System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Li-Dan; XUE Kang; WANG Gang-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    We present a 9 × 9 S-matrix and E-matrix. A representation of specialized Birman-Wenzl-Murakami algebra is obtained. Starting from the given braid group representation S-matrix, we obtain the trigonometric solution of Yang-Baxter equation. A unitary matrix R(x,φ1,φ2) is generated via the Yang-Baxterization approach. Then we construct a Yang-Baxter Hamiltonian through the unitary matrixR(x, φ1, φ2). Berry phase of this Yang-Baxter system is investigated in detail.

  17. Teleportation-based quantum computation, extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach and Yang-Baxter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Kun; Pang, Jinglong

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of topological features in teleportation-based quantum computation and aims at presenting a detailed review on teleportation-based quantum computation (Gottesman and Chuang in Nature 402: 390, 1999). In the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach, we clearly show that such topological features bring about the fault-tolerant construction of both universal quantum gates and four-partite entangled states more intuitive and simpler. Furthermore, we describe the Yang-Baxter gate by its extended Temperley-Lieb configuration and then study teleportation-based quantum circuit models using the Yang-Baxter gate. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach and the Yang-Baxter gate approach. With these research results, we propose a worthwhile subject, the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach, for physicists in quantum information and quantum computation.

  18. The Hintermann-Merlini-Baxter-Wu and the infinite-coupling-limit Ashkin-Teller models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yuan, E-mail: huangy22@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Deng Youjin, E-mail: yjdeng@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke, E-mail: jacobsen@lpt.ens.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Salas, Jesus, E-mail: jsalas@math.uc3m.es [Grupo de Modelizacion, Simulacion Numerica y Matematica Industrial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Grupo de Teorias de Campos y Fisica Estadistica, Instituto Gregorio Millan, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Unidad asociada al IEM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-11

    We show how the Hintermann-Merlini-Baxter-Wu model (which is a generalization of the well-known Baxter-Wu model to a general Eulerian triangulation) can be mapped onto a particular infinite-coupling-limit of the Ashkin-Teller model. We work out some mappings among these models, also including the standard and mixed Ashkin-Teller models. Finally, we compute the phase diagram of the infinite-coupling-limit Ashkin-Teller model on the square, triangular, hexagonal, and kagome lattices.

  19. Critical behavior of the spin-$1/2$ Baxter-Wu model: Entropic sampling simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, L N; Caparica, A A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we use a refined entropic sampling technique based on the Wang-Landau method to study the spin-$1/2$ Baxter-Wu model. The static critical exponents were determined as $\\alpha=0.6545(68)$, $\\beta=0.0818(30)$, $\\gamma=1.18193(77)$, and $\

  20. R-Matrix and Baxter Q-Operators for the Noncompact SL(N,C Invariant Spin Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey É. Derkachov

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of constructing the SL(N,C invariant solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation is considered. The solutions (R-operators for arbitrarily principal series representations of SL(N,C are obtained in an explicit form. We construct the commutative family of the operators Q_k(u which can be identified with the Baxter operators for the noncompact SL(N,C spin magnet.

  1. The Star Square in the Baxter-Bazhanov Model and the Star-Triangle Relation in the Chiral Potts Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhan-Ning

    In this letter, the connection is found between the "star-square" relation in the Baxter-Bazhanov model and the "star-triangle" relation in the chiral Potts model, which means that the tetrahedron equation of the Baxter-Bazhanov model is a consequence of the latter. The four additional constraints in the tetrahedron equation given by Kashaev et al. hold naturally in respect to the spherical trigonometry parametrizations.

  2. Baxter operators and Hamiltonians for “nearly all” integrable closed gl(n) spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue our systematic construction of Baxter Q-operators for spin chains, which is based on certain degenerate solutions of the Yang–Baxter equation. Here we generalize our approach from the fundamental representation of gl(n) to generic finite-dimensional representations in quantum space. The results equally apply to non-compact representations of highest or lowest weight type. We furthermore fill an apparent gap in the literature, and provide the nearest-neighbor Hamiltonians of the spin chains in question for all cases where the gl(n) representations are described by rectangular Young diagrams, as well as for their infinite-dimensional generalizations. They take the form of digamma functions depending on operator-valued shifted weights

  3. Solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation with extra nonadditive parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a systematic technique to construct solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation which depend not only on a spectral parameter but in addition on further continuous parameters. These extra parameters enter the Yang-Baxter equation in a similar way to the spectral parameter but in a non-additive form. We exploit the fact that quantum non-compact algebras such as Uq(su(1,1)) and type-I quantum superalgebras such as Uq(gl(1 mod 1)) and Uq(gl(2 mod 1)) are known to admit non-trivial one-parameter families of infinite-dimensional and finite-dimensional irreps, respectively, even for generic q. We develop a technique for constructing the corresponding spectral-dependent R-matrices. As examples, we work out the the R-matrices for the three quantum algebras mentioned above in certain representations. (author)

  4. From representations of the braid group to solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic method is developed for constructing solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation from given braid group representations, arising from such finite dimensional irreps of quantum groups that any irrep can be affinized and the tensor product of the irrep with itself is multiplicity-free. The main tool used in the construction is a tensor product graph, whose circuits give rise to consistency conditions. A maximal tree of this graph leads to an explicit formula for the quantum R-matrix when the consistency conditions are satisfied. As examples, new solutions of the Xang-Baxter equations are found, corresponding to braid group generators associated with the symmetric and antisymmetric tensor irreps of Uq[gl(m)], a spinor irrep of Uq[so(2n)], and the minimal irreps of Uq[E6] and Uq[E7]. (orig.)

  5. Solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation with extra nonadditive parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, A.J.; Gould, M.D.; Zhang Yaozhong; Delius, G.W. [Dept. of Math., Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1994-10-07

    We present a systematic technique to construct solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation which depend not only on a spectral parameter but in addition on further continuous parameters. These extra parameters enter the Yang-Baxter equation in a similar way to the spectral parameter but in a non-additive form. We exploit the fact that quantum non-compact algebras such as U{sub q}(su(1,1)) and type-I quantum superalgebras such as U{sub q}(gl(1 mod 1)) and U{sub q}(gl(2 mod 1)) are known to admit non-trivial one-parameter families of infinite-dimensional and finite-dimensional irreps, respectively, even for generic q. We develop a technique for constructing the corresponding spectral-dependent R-matrices. As examples, we work out the the R-matrices for the three quantum algebras mentioned above in certain representations. (author)

  6. The dynamical Yang-Baxter equation, representation theory, and quantum integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    The text is based on an established graduate course given at MIT that provides an introduction to the theory of the dynamical Yang-Baxter equation and its applications, which is an important area in representation theory and quantum groups. The book, which contains many detailed proofs and explicit calculations, will be accessible to graduate students of mathematics, who are familiar with the basics of representation theory of semisimple Lie algebras. - ;The text is based on an established graduate course given at MIT that provides an introduction to the theory of the dynamical Yang-Baxter equation and its applications, which is an important area in representation theory and quantum groups. The book, which contains many detailed proofs and explicit calculations, will be accessible to graduate students of mathematics, who are familiar with the basics of representation theory of semisimple Lie algebras. - ;The book offers a readable introduction to a very interesting, interdisciplinary field. - EMS Newsletter;T...

  7. Solutions to the quantum yang-baxter equation with extra non-additive parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Bracken, A J; Gould, M D; Zhang, Y; Anthony J Bracken; Gustav W Delius; Mark D Gould; Yao-Zhong Zhang

    1994-01-01

    ABSTRACT: We present a systematic technique to construct solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation which depend not only on a spectral parameter but in addition on further continuous parameters. These extra parameters enter the Yang-Baxter equation in a similar way to the spectral parameter but in a non-additive form. We exploit the fact that quantum non-compact algebras such as U_q(su(1,1)) and type-I quantum superalgebras such as U_q(gl(1|1)) and U_q(gl(2|1)) are known to admit non-trivial one-parameter families of infinite-dimensional and finite dimensional irreps, respectively, even for generic q. We develop a technique for constructing the corresponding spectral-dependent R-matrices. As examples we work out the the R-matrices for the three quantum algebras mentioned above in certain representations.

  8. Hopf algebras of rooted forests, cocyles, and free Rota-Baxter algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianjie; Gao, Xing; Guo, Li

    2016-10-01

    The Hopf algebra and the Rota-Baxter algebra are the two algebraic structures underlying the algebraic approach of Connes and Kreimer to renormalization of perturbative quantum field theory. In particular, the Hopf algebra of rooted trees serves as the "baby model" of Feynman graphs in their approach and can be characterized by certain universal properties involving a Hochschild 1-cocycle. Decorated rooted trees have also been applied to study Feynman graphs. We will continue the study of universal properties of various spaces of decorated rooted trees with such a 1-cocycle, leading to the concept of a cocycle Hopf algebra. We further apply the universal properties to equip a free Rota-Baxter algebra with the structure of a cocycle Hopf algebra.

  9. Mark G. Baxter: award for distinguished scientific early career contributions to psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Presents the citation for Mark G. Baxter, who received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (animal learning and behavior, comparative) "for insightful and incisive contributions in studies of learning, memory, attentional processing, executive function, and goal-directed behavior in work that has translated across species." A brief profile and a selected bibliography accompany the citation. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115814

  10. On boundary fusion and functional relations in the Baxterized affine Hecke algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichenko, A., E-mail: babichen@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Mathematics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Regelskis, V., E-mail: v.regelskis@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    We construct boundary type operators satisfying fused reflection equation for arbitrary representations of the Baxterized affine Hecke algebra. These operators are analogues of the fused reflection matrices in solvable half-line spin chain models. We show that these operators lead to a family of commuting transfer matrices of Sklyanin type. We derive fusion type functional relations for these operators for two families of representations.

  11. Deformations of $T^{1,1}$ as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    CERN Document Server

    Crichigno, P Marcos; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-01-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T^{1,1} in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T^{1,1}, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T^{1,1} by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS_5 x T^{1,1}, classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  12. Deformations of T 1 ,1 as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichigno, P. Marcos; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-12-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T 1,1 in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T 1,1, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T 1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS5 × T 1,1 , classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  13. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel. PMID:24701749

  14. General A 9 × 9 Matrix Representation of Birman—Wenzl—Murakami Algebra and Berry Phase in Yang—Baxter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Li-Dan; Xue, Kang; Wang, Gang-Cheng

    2011-02-01

    We present a 9 × 9 S-matrix and E-matrix. A representation of specialized Birman—Wenzl—Murakami algebra is obtained. Starting from the given braid group representation S-matrix, we obtain the trigonometric solution of Yang-Baxter equation. A unitary matrix Ř(x, ϕ1,ϕ2) is generated via the Yang—Baxterization approach. Then we construct a Yang—Baxter Hamiltonian through the unitary matrix Ř(x, ϕ1,ϕ2). Berry phase of this Yang—Baxter system is investigated in detail.

  15. Quantum Yang-Baxter equation and constant R-matrix over Grassmann algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Constant solutions to Yang-Baxter equation are investigated over Grassmann algebra for the case of 6-vertex R-matrix.The general classification of all possible solutions over Grassmann algebra and particular cases with 2,3,4 generators are studied.As distinct from the standard case, when R-matrix over number field can have a maximum 5 nonvanishing elements, we obtain over Grassmann algebra a set of new full 6-vertex solutions. The solutions leading to regular R-matrices which appear in weak Hopf algebras are considered.

  16. On Set-Theoretical Solutions to Quantum Yang-Baxter Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Pei; BAI Cheng-Ming

    2003-01-01

    The problem on the set-theoretical solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation was presented byDrinfel'd as a main unsolved problem in quantum group theory. The set-theoretical solutions are a natural extensionof the usual (linear) solutions. In this paper, we not only give a further study on some known set-theoretical solutions(the Venkov's solutions), but also find a new kind of set-theoretical solutions which have a geometric interpretation.Moreover, the new solutions lead to the metahomomorphisms in group theory.

  17. Yang-Baxter sigma models and Lax pairs arising from κ-Poincaré r-matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Andrzej; Kyono, Hideki; Lukierski, Jerzy; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-04-01

    We study Yang-Baxter sigma models with deformed 4D Minkowski spacetimes arising from classical r-matrices associated with κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra. These classical κ-Poincaré r-matrices describe three kinds of deformations: 1) the standard deformation, 2) the tachyonic deformation, and 3) the light-cone deformation. For each deformation, the metric and two-form B-field are computed from the associated r-matrix. The first two deformations, related to the modified classical Yang-Baxter equation, lead to T-duals of dS4 and AdS4, respectively. The third deformation, associated with the homogeneous classical Yang-Baxter equation, leads to a time-dependent pp-wave background. Finally, we construct a Lax pair for the generalized κ-Poincaré r-matrix that unifies the three kinds of deformations mentioned above as special cases.

  18. Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds from the classical Yang-Baxter equation — towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-06-01

    We consider γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring as Yang-Baxter sigma models with classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). An essential point is that the classical r-matrices are composed of Cartan generators only and then generate abelian twists. We present examples of the r-matrices that lead to real γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring. Finally we discuss a possible classification of integrable deformations and the corresponding gravity solution in terms of solutions of CYBE. This classification may be called the gravity/CYBE correspondence.

  19. Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds from the classical Yang-Baxter equation -- Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    We consider \\gamma-deformations of the AdS_5xS^5 superstring as Yang-Baxter sigma models with classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). An essential point is that the classical r-matrices are composed of Cartan generators only and then generate abelian twists. We present examples of the r-matrices that lead to \\gamma-deformations of the AdS_5xS^5 superstring. Finally we discuss a possible classification of integrable deformations and the corresponding gravity solution in terms of solutions of CYBE. This classification may be called the gravity/CYBE correspondence.

  20. Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds from the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-01-01

    We consider γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring as Yang-Baxter sigma models with classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). An essential point is that the classical r-matrices are composed of Cartan generators only and then generate abelian twists. We present examples of the r-matrices that lead to real γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring. Finally we discuss a possible classification of integrable deformations and the corresponding gravity solution ...

  1. Supercoset construction of Yang-Baxter-deformed AdS×S backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyono, Hideki; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-08-01

    We study Yang-Baxter deformations of the AdS×S superstring with the classical Yang-Baxter equation. We make a general argument on the supercoset construction and present a formula to describe the dilaton in terms of classical r-matrices. The supercoset construction is explicitly performed for some classical r-matrices, and the full backgrounds including the Ramond-Ramond (R-R) sector and dilaton are derived. Within the class of Abelian r-matrices, perfect agreement is shown for well-known examples including gravity duals of non-commutative gauge theories, γ-deformations of S and Schrödinger spacetimes. It is remarkable that the supercoset construction works well, even if the resulting backgrounds are not maximally supersymmetric. In particular, three-parameter γ-deformations of S and Schrödinger spacetimes do not preserve any supersymmetries. As for non-Abelian r-matrices, we will focus upon a specific example. The resulting background does not satisfy the equation of motion of the Neveu-Schwarz-Neveu-Schwarz two-form because the R-R three-form is not closed.

  2. Supercoset construction of Yang-Baxter deformed AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Kyono, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We proceed to study Yang-Baxter deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring with the classical Yang-Baxter equation. We make a general argument on the supercoset construction and present the master formula to describe the dilaton in terms of classical $r$-matrices. The supercoset construction is explicitly performed for some classical $r$-matrices and the full backgrounds including the Ramond-Ramond (R-R) sector and dilaton are derived. Within the class of abelian $r$-matrices, the perfect agreement is shown for well-known examples including gravity duals of non-commutative gauge theories, $\\gamma$-deformations of S$^5$ and Schr\\"odinger spacetimes. It would be remarkable that the supercoset construction works well, even if the resulting backgrounds are not maximally supersymmetric. In particular, three-parameter $\\gamma$-deformations of S$^5$ and Schr\\"odinger spacetimes do not preserve any supersymmetries. As for non-abelian $r$-matrices, we will focus upon a specific example. The resulting backgroun...

  3. Yang–Baxter deformations, AdS/CFT, and twist-noncommutative gauge theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn J. van Tongeren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We give an AdS/CFT interpretation to homogeneous Yang–Baxter deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring as noncommutative deformations of the dual gauge theory, going well beyond the canonical noncommutative case. These homogeneous Yang–Baxter deformations can be of so-called abelian or jordanian type. While abelian deformations have a clear interpretation in string theory and many already had well understood gauge theory duals, jordanian deformations appear novel on both counts. We discuss the symmetry structure of the deformed string from the uniformizing perspective of Drinfeld twists and indicate that this structure can be realized on the gauge theory side by considering theories on various noncommutative spaces. We then conjecture that these are the gauge theory duals of our strings, modulo subtleties involving singularities. We support this conjecture by a brane construction for two jordanian examples, corresponding to noncommutative spaces with [x−,⋆xi]∼xi (i=1,2. We also discuss κ-Minkowski type deformations of AdS5×S5, one of which may be the gravity dual of gauge theory on spacelike κ-Minkowski space.

  4. Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence beyond integrability — Yang-Baxter deformations of T1,1 —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos Crichigno, P.; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    Yang-Baxter sigma models, proposed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, have been recognized as a powerful framework for studying integrable deformations of two dimensional non-linear sigma models. In this short article, as an important generalization, we review a non-integrable sigma model in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach based on [arXiv:1406.2249]. In particular, we discuss a family of deformations of the 5D Sasaki-Einstein manifold T1,1, instead of the standard deformations of the 5-sphere S5. For this purpose, we first describe a novel construction of T1,1 as a supercoset, and provide a physical interpretation of this construction from viewpoint of the dual Klebanov-Witten field theory. Secondly, we consider a 3-parameter deformation of T1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form completely agree with the ones previously obtained via TsT (T-dual - shift - T-dual) transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. Our result indicates that what we refer to as the gravity/CYBE(Classical Yang-Baxter Equation) correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cosets.

  5. Solution of the graded Yang-Baxter equation associated with the vector representation of Uq(osp(M/2n))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general method of constructing spectral parameter-dependent solutions of the graded Yang-Baxter equation using quantum supergroups is briefly reviewed. Using this method, a quantum R-matrix associated with the vector representation of Uq(osp(M/2n)) is obtained for all M and n. (orig.)

  6. On discrete three-dimensional equations associated with the local Yang-Baxter relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashaev, R. M.

    1996-12-01

    The local Yang-Baxter equation (YBE), introduced by Maillet and Nijhoff, is a proper generalization to three dimensions of the zero curvature relation. Recently, Korepanov has constructed an infinite set of integrable three-dimensional lattice models, and has related them to solutions to the local YBE. The simplest Korepanov model is related to the star-triangle relation in the Ising model. In this Letter the corresponding discrete equation is derived. In the continuous limit it leads to a differential three-dimensional equation, which is symmetric with respect to all permutations of the three coordinates. A similar analysis of the star-triangle transformation in electric networks leads to the discrete bilinear equation of Miwa, associated with the BKP hierarchy. Some related operator solutions to the tetrahedron equation are also constructed.

  7. Critical Behavior of the Spin-1/2 Baxter-Wu Model: Entropic Sampling Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, L. N.; Ferreira, L. S.; Leão, S. A.; Caparica, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we use a refined entropic sampling technique based on the Wang-Landau method to study the spin- 1/2 Baxter-Wu model. We adopt the total magnetization as the order parameter and, as a result, do not divide the system into three sub-lattices. The static critical exponents were determined as α = 0.6697(54), β = 0.0813(67), γ = 1.1772(33), and ν = 0.6574(61). The estimate for the critical temperature was T c = 2.26924(2). We compare the present results with those obtained from other well-established approaches, and we find a very good closeness with the exact values, besides the high precision reached for the critical temperature.

  8. Baxter's Q-operators and operatorial Backlund flow for quantum (super)-spin chains

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Vladimir; Tsuboi, Zengo

    2010-01-01

    We propose the operatorial form of Baxter's TQ-relations in a general form of the operatorial B\\"acklund flow describing the nesting process for the inhomogeneous rational gl(K|M) quantum (super)spin chains with twisted periodic boundary conditions. The full set of Q-operators and T-operators on all levels of nesting is explicitly defined. The results are based on a generalization of the identities among the group characters and their group co-derivatives with respect to the twist matrix, found by one of the authors and P.Vieira [V.Kazakov and P.Vieira, JHEP 0810 (2008) 050 [arXiv:0711.2470

  9. Open spin chains with generic integrable boundaries: Baxter equation and Bethe ansatz completeness from SOV

    CERN Document Server

    Kitanine, N; Niccoli, G

    2014-01-01

    We solve the longstanding problem to define a functional characterization of the spectrum of the transfer matrix associated to the most general spin-1/2 representations of the 6-vertex reflection algebra for general inhomogeneous chains. The corresponding homogeneous limit reproduces the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of the spin-1/2 open XXZ and XXX quantum chains with the most general integrable boundaries. The spectrum is characterized by a second order finite difference functional equation of Baxter type with an inhomogeneous term which vanishes only for some special but yet interesting non-diagonal boundary conditions. This functional equation is shown to be equivalent to the known separation of variable (SOV) representation hence proving that it defines a complete characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum. The polynomial character of the Q-function allows us then to show that a finite system of equations of generalized Bethe type can be similarly used to describe the complete transfer matrix spectru...

  10. II Mesa de Trabajo Baxter-SENPE: Nutrición Parenteral Periférica II Baxter-SENPE workshop: peripheral parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García de Lorenzo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available En la IIa Mesa de Trabajo BAXTER-SENPE un grupo multidisciplinario de expertos en nutrición debate sobre las indicaciones, ventajas e inconvenientes de la Nutrición Parenteral Periférica (NPP, definiéndose ésta como una NP compuesta por los tres principios inmediatos, vitaminas y minerales. Su composición implica una razón H d C: Lípidos de 60:40, un límite en el aporte diario lipídico (1,3 g/kg de peso/día y no más del 30 % de las calorías totales y una carga nitrogenada que no supere los 10 gramos de nitrógeno en un volumen máximo de 2500 ml. La NPP permite su administración por vía periférica debido a presentar una osmolaridad menor de 800 mOsml y un pH entre 6,0 y 7,4; de esta forma evita los posibles efectos deletéreos del acceso venoso central. A día de hoy la NPP puede llegar a suponer el 50 % de las NPs prescritas en un centro hospitalario. Los estudios de eficacia, seguridad y farmacoeconomía demuestran que la NPP es un recurso terapéutico muy útil en determinadas situaciones clínicas tanto médicas como quirúrgicas para evitar el deterioro metabólico-nutricional del paciente lo que repercute en una reducción significativa de las complicaciones, disminuye significativamente el número de exploraciones y acorta la estancia hospitalaria.During the II BAXTER-SENPE workshop, a multidisciplinary nutrition expert committee discusses on indications, advantages and drawbacks of Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition (PPN, being defined as PN compounded by the three essential elements, vitamins, and minerals. Its composition implies a CH: lipids ratio of 60:40, a limited lipid daily intake (1.3 g/kg of body weight/day and no more than 30% of total calories, and a nitrogen load not higher than 10 g of nitrogen in a maximum volume of 2500 mL. PPN can be administered by the peripheral route since its osmolarity is lower than 800 mOsm/L and pH is 6.0-7.4; in this way, possible adverse affects of central venous accesses are

  11. Experimental evaluation of effect on Cassie-Baxter equation of surface roughness with application to soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Gowenlock, Cathren; Hallin, Ingrid; Mabbett, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Manifestation of soil water repellency depends both on the surface chemistry and the physical structure of the particles making up the soil. In materials science the effect of physical structure on water repellency is often explained by the Cassie-Baxter equation. Recently, a few attempts have been made to explain water repellency of soil using the Cassie-Baxter equation for hexagonally-arrayed spheres on a flat plane. Experimental verification of this conceptual model using glass beads as model soil particles has been left somewhat incomplete, as the experimentally measured contact angles do not match well those expected from theory. This might be caused by a failure to generate a perfect arrangement of particles. Therefore, we have aimed to obtain highly precise arrangements of glass beads as model soil particles using 3D printing technology. Our aim is to generate particle frames of precise hexagonal arrangement with particles at differing separations, and to measure the water contact angles upon the particle arrays optically using a goniometer. In this contribution, we report our preliminary results in which we explore the applicability of the Cassie-Baxter equation to such regular arrays as both separation distance and surface roughness is varied. This research has been funded by Bridging the Gap in Swansea University, UK.

  12. Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence beyond integrability -- Yang-Baxter deformations of $T^{1,1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Crichigno, P Marcos; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-01-01

    Yang-Baxter sigma models, proposed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, have been recognized as a powerful framework for studying integrable deformations of two-dimensional non-linear sigma models. In this short article, as an important generalization, we review a non-integrable sigma model in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach based on [arXiv:1406.2249]. In particular, we discuss a family of deformations of the 5D Sasaki-Einstein manifold $T^{1,1}$, instead of the standard deformations of the $5$-sphere S$^5$. For this purpose, we first describe a novel construction of $T^{1,1}$ as a supercoset, and provide a physical interpretation of this construction from viewpoint of the dual Klebanov-Witten field theory. Secondly, we consider a $3$-parameter deformation of $T^{1,1}$ by using classical $r$-matrices satisfying the classical Yang--Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form completely agree with the ones previously obtained via TsT (T-dual -- shift -- T-dual) transformations, and conta...

  13. Homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations as non-abelian duals of the AdS_5 sigma-model

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the Yang-Baxter deformation of the symmetric space sigma-model parameterized by an r-matrix solving the homogeneous (classical) Yang-Baxter equation is equivalent to the non-abelian dual of the undeformed model with respect to a subgroup determined by the structure of the r-matrix. We explicitly demonstrate this on numerous examples in the case of the AdS_5 sigma-model. The same should also be true for the full AdS_5 x S^5 supercoset model, providing an explanation for and generalizing several recent observations relating homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations based on non-abelian r-matrices to the undeformed AdS_5 x S^5 model by a combination of T-dualities and non-linear coordinate redefinitions. This also includes the special case of deformations based on abelian r-matrices, which correspond to TsT transformations: they are equivalent to non-abelian duals of the original model with respect to a central extension of abelian subalgebras.

  14. Beyond Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter: second-order effects on the wetting of rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid; Moghadam, Afsaneh Dorri; Rohatgi, Pradeep; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2014-08-12

    The Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models are almost exclusively used to explain the contact angle dependence of the structure of rough and patterned solid surfaces. However, these two classical models do not always accurately predict the wetting properties of surfaces since they fail to capture the effect of many interactions occurring during wetting, including, for example, the effect of the disjoining pressure and of crystal microstructure, grains, and defects. We call such effects the second-order effects and present here a model showing how the disjoining pressure isotherm can affect wettability due to the formation of thin liquid films. We measure water contact angles on pairs of metallic surfaces with nominally the same Wenzel roughness obtained by abrasion and by chemical etching. These two methods of surface roughening result in different rough surface structure, thus leading to different values of the contact angle, which cannot be captured by the Wenzel- and Cassie-type models. The chemical and physical changes that occur on the stainless steel and aluminum alloy surfaces as a result of intergranular corrosion, along with selective intermetallic dissolution, lead to a surface roughness generated on the nano- and microscales. PMID:25051526

  15. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  16. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  17. Healthcare compunetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Andy; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Bos, Lodewijk

    2004-01-01

    Changes in life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and health seeking behaviour are having an impact on the demand for care. Such changes could occur across the whole population, or for specific groups. Changes for specific groups will be particularly affected by policy initiatives, while both these and wider changes will be affected by people's levels of engagement with their health and the health service itself. Levels of education, income and media coverage of health issues are also important. These factors could also encourage an increase in people caring for themselves and their families or community. People are now expecting a patient-centred service with safe high quality treatment, comfortable accommodation services, fast access and an integrated joined-up system. The uptake of integrated Information and Communication technologies (ICT) will be crucial. Healthcare Compunetics, the combination of computing and networking customised for medical and care, will provide the common policy and framework for combined multi-disciplinary research, development, implementation and usage. PMID:15747899

  18. Why do pigeon feathers repel water? Hydrophobicity of pennae, Cassie-Baxter wetting hypothesis and Cassie-Wenzel capillarity-induced wetting transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Stein, Tamir; Whyman, Gene; Bormashenko, Ester

    2007-07-01

    Wetting of pigeon feathers has been studied. It was demonstrated that the Cassie-Baxter wetting regime is inherent for pigeon pennae. The water drop, supported by network formed by barbs and barbules, sits partially on air pockets. Small static apparent angle hysteresis justifies the Cassie-Baxter wetting hypothesis. A twofold structure of a feather favors large contact angles and provides its water repellency. Cassie-Wenzel transition has been observed under drop evaporation, when drop radius becomes small enough for capillarity-induced water penetration into the protrusions, formed by barbules.

  19. Integrable deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation -- Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence --

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-01-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ can be characterized by classical $r$-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as `the gravity/CYBE correspondence.' We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for $\\beta$-deformations of the ${\\cal N} = 4$ super...

  20. On q-deformed symmetries as Poisson-Lie symmetries and application to Yang-Baxter type models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delduc, F.; Lacroix, S.; Magro, M.; Vicedo, B.

    2016-10-01

    Yang-Baxter type models are integrable deformations of integrable field theories, such as the principal chiral model on a Lie group G or σ-models on (semi-)symmetric spaces G/F. The deformation has the effect of breaking the global G-symmetry of the original model, replacing the associated set of conserved charges by ones whose Poisson brackets are those of the q-deformed Poisson-Hopf algebra {{\\mathscr{U}}}q({g}). Working at the Hamiltonian level, we show how this q-deformed Poisson algebra originates from a Poisson-Lie G-symmetry. The theory of Poisson-Lie groups and their actions on Poisson manifolds, in particular the formalism of the non-abelian moment map, is reviewed. For a coboundary Poisson-Lie group G, this non-abelian moment map must obey the Semenov-Tian-Shansky bracket on the dual group {G}* , up to terms involving central quantities. When the latter vanish, we develop a general procedure linking this Poisson bracket to the defining relations of the Poisson-Hopf algebra {{\\mathscr{U}}}q({g}), including the q-Poisson-Serre relations. We consider reality conditions leading to q being either real or a phase. We determine the non-abelian moment map for Yang-Baxter type models. This enables to compute the corresponding action of G on the fields parametrising the phase space of these models.

  1. Communicating with Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Change See More of Resources Communicating with Healthcare Professionals Updated:Nov 16,2015 Adapted from the National ... gained by improving communication between family caregivers and healthcare professionals. Positive outcomes include: Better care for the patient ...

  2. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  3. Rota-Baxter Algebras on Quasi Hopf Module Algebras%拟Hopf-模上的Rota-Baxter代数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程腾; 王顶国; 程诚

    2014-01-01

    Let H be a Hopf algebra,the main aim of this paper is to extend the theorem of Hopf(co) quasigroup.Let H be a Hopf quasigroup and (M,φ)be an right quasi H-Hopf module algebra,then (M, P )is a Rata-Baxter algebra of weight-1 .%把 Run-qiang Jian文中的H 为 Hopf代数的情况推广到H 为 Hopf(余)拟群,其主要结论:设H是 Hopf拟群,(M,φ)是一右拟H-Hopf模代数,则(M,P)是权为-1的 Rota-Baxter代数。

  4. [Results of primary healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponchel, J L

    2004-01-01

    The concept of primary healthcare was formulated at the international conference held in Alma-Ata (USSR) on September 6 to 12, 1978. Over the past quarter-century, the term "primary healthcare" has been widely used as a basis for implementing healthcare policies in various nations, especially those considered as developing countries. However many programs initiated in the name of the primary healthcare concept have only partially complied with the spirit of the final declaration of Alma-Ata. Analysis of the healthcare in Mali shows that the system followed that evolution. Although considerable time and energy were regrettably wasted in implementing the village health agent strategy, this phase may have been a necessary step in the political development of the state at that time. Recent changes in the country's healthcare system in compliance with the original principles of primary healthcare show that the 1978 declaration is sound and remains pertinent as democracy makes further gains in the world. PMID:15816127

  5. Taiwan's healthcare report 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Chan, Willie Sai

    2010-12-01

    Times are changing. Taiwan is one of the richest countries in the Asia Pacific region. It enacted its single-payer national health insurance program in 1995: in all estimates, it has been very successful. It has a strong healthcare system and the universal health insurance ensures that all citizens have grown to expect a high level of care. Healthcare systems are designed to meet the healthcare needs of target populations. There are a wide variety of healthcare systems around the world. In some countries, healthcare system planning is distributed among market participants, whereas in others planning is made more centrally among governments, trade unions, charities, religions, or other co-ordinated bodies to deliver planned healthcare services targeted to the populations they serve. However, healthcare planning has often been evolutionary rather than revolutionary. In healthcare all work carried out must be at the highest quality, and a much higher proportion of resources must be invested in quality in healthcare. The aim of this report is to give an overview of the healthcare service provision in Taiwan. PMID:23199110

  6. Healthcare financing in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananatu, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Malaysian healthcare system and its method of financing. The development of the healthcare delivery system in Malaysia is commendable. However, the strength and weaknesses of the public healthcare system and the financing problems encountered are also discussed. Cost of healthcare and funding of both the public and private sectors were also revealed. One must optimise the advantages of operating a health financing scheme which is affordable and controllable which contribute towards cost-containment and quality assurance. Thus, there is a need for the establishment of a National Healthcare Financing, a mechanism to sustain the healthcare delivery network and operate it as a viable option. A model of the National Health Financing Scheme (NHFS) was proposed.

  7. Social marketing in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Radha Aras

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundSocial marketing is an important tool in the delivery ofhealthcare services. For any healthcare programme orproject to be successful, community/consumer participationis required. The four principles of social marketing can guidepolicymakers and healthcare providers to successfully planand implement health programmes.AimTo review the existing literature in order to project thebenefits of social marketing in healthcare.MethodA search of periodical literature by the author involvingsoc...

  8. Integrable deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S5 can be charactered by classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as the gravity/CYBE correspondence. We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for β-deformations of the N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS5 × T1,1 as a generalization

  9. Integrable deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-11-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S5 can be charactered by classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as the gravity/CYBE correspondence. We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for β-deformations of the N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS5 × T1,1 as a generalization.

  10. Integrable deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation -- Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence --

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ can be characterized by classical $r$-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as `the gravity/CYBE correspondence.' We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for $\\beta$-deformations of the ${\\cal N} = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS$_5\\times T^{1,1}$ as a generalization.

  11. Why healthcare providers merge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities. PMID:26055501

  12. On q-deformed symmetries as Poisson-Lie symmetries and application to Yang-Baxter type models

    CERN Document Server

    Delduc, Francois; Magro, Marc; Vicedo, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Yang-Baxter type models are integrable deformations of integrable field theories, such as the principal chiral model on a Lie group $G$ or $\\sigma$-models on (semi-)symmetric spaces $G/F$. The deformation has the effect of breaking the global $G$-symmetry of the original model, replacing the associated set of conserved charges by ones whose Poisson brackets are those of the $q$-deformed Poisson-Hopf algebra $\\mathscr U_q(\\mathfrak g)$. Working at the Hamiltonian level, we show how this $q$-deformed Poisson algebra originates from a Poisson-Lie $G$-symmetry. The theory of Poisson-Lie groups and their actions on Poisson manifolds, in particular the formalism of the non-abelian moment map, is reviewed. For a coboundary Poisson-Lie group $G$, this non-abelian moment map must obey the Semenov-Tian-Shansky bracket on the dual group $G^*$, up to terms involving central quantities. When the latter vanish, we develop a general procedure linking this Poisson bracket to the defining relations of the Poisson-Hopf algebra...

  13. Migrants' access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-01-01

    There are strong pragmatic and moral reasons for receiving societies to address access to healthcare for migrants. Receiving societies have a pragmatic interest in sustaining migrants' health to facilitate integration; they also have a moral obligation to ensure migrants' access to healthcare...... according to international human rights principles. The intention of this thesis is to increase the understanding of migrants' access to healthcare by exploring two study aims: 1) Are there differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy I and II); and 2) Why...... are there possible differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy III and IV). The thesis builds on different methodological approaches using both register-based retrospective cohort design, cross-sectional design and survey methods. Two different measures of access were...

  14. Possibilities for Healthcare Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Szolovits

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computing technology promise to aid in achieving the goals of healthcare.We review how such changes can support each of the goá1s of healthcare as identified by the U.S.Institute of Medicine:safety,effectiveness,patient-centricity,timeliness,efficiency,and equitability.We also describe current foci of computing technology research aimed at realizing the ambitious goals for health information technology that have been set by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Health Reform Act of 2010.Finally,we mention efforts to build health information technologies to support improved healthcare delivery in developing countries.

  15. Turnover among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ben D

    2009-01-01

    Turnover among healthcare professionals is a costly consequence. The existing body of knowledge on healthcare professional turnover is correlated with job satisfaction levels. A landmark study differentiated 2 areas of job satisfaction categories: satisfiers and dissatisfiers (intrinsic and extrinsic motivators). The aim of this article is to examine existing research on precursors of turnover, such as burnout behaviors experienced by healthcare professionals, job satisfaction levels, employee organizational commitment, health complications which precede turnover, some current strategies to reduce turnover, and some effects CEO turnover has on employee turnover intentions.

  16. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  17. Healthcare Associated Infections - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - national data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  18. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  19. Coproduction of healthcare service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names—patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always ‘coproduced’. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  20. Healthcare Under Fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Tension between patients and hospital staff, insufficient health insurance coverage, and a limited supply of quality medical services are pressurizing China’s healthcare system reform Doctors and nurses, normally seen as protecting their patients, are in

  1. Coproduction of healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names-patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always 'coproduced'. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  2. Healthcare Facility Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MAP:http://tinyurl.com/HealthcareFacilityLocationsMap The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Center for Health Care Quality, Licensing and Certification...

  3. Healthcare Software Assurance

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Jason G.; Pauley, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Dru...

  4. The Cuban National Healthcare System: Characterization of primary healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Regina DAL PRÁ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a report on the experience of healthcare professionals in Florianópolis, who took the course La Atención Primaria de Salud y la Medicina Familiar en Cuba [Primary Healthcare and Family Medicine in Cuba], in 2014. The purpose of the study is to characterize the healthcare units and services provided by the Cuban National Healthcare System (SNS and to reflect on this experience/immersion, particularly on Cuba’s Primary Healthcare Service. The results found that in comparison with Brazil’s Single Healthcare System (SUS Cuba’s SNS Family Healthcare (SF service is the central organizing element of the Primary Healthcare Service. The number of SF teams per inhabitant is different than in Brazil; the programs given priority in the APS are similar to those in Brazil and the intersectorial nature and scope of the services prove to be effective in the resolution of healthcare problems.

  5. Healthcare is primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  6. Queueing for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palvannan, R Kannapiran; Teow, Kiok Liang

    2012-04-01

    Patient queues are prevalent in healthcare and wait time is one measure of access to care. We illustrate Queueing Theory-an analytical tool that has provided many insights to service providers when designing new service systems and managing existing ones. This established theory helps us to quantify the appropriate service capacity to meet the patient demand, balancing system utilization and the patient's wait time. It considers four key factors that affect the patient's wait time: average patient demand, average service rate and the variation in both. We illustrate four basic insights that will be useful for managers and doctors who manage healthcare delivery systems, at hospital or department level. Two examples from local hospitals are shown where we have used queueing models to estimate the service capacity and analyze the impact of capacity configurations, while considering the inherent variation in healthcare. PMID:20703697

  7. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    for sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays...... a dialog about DGNB and energy concept is important even before anyone start sketching. Experiences with the different approaches will be further outlined in the paper.Future research has the intention to collect further knowledge about DGNB and DMaDP in practise. This project was limited to Healthcare...

  8. Costing Practices in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Christopher; Kern, Anja; Laguecir, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    .e., Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) systems, and costing practices. DRG-based payment systems strongly influence costing practices in multiple ways. In particular, setting DRG tariffs requires highly standardized costing practices linked with specific skill sets from management accountants and brings other......The rising cost of healthcare is a globally pressing concern. This makes detailed attention to the way in which costing is carried out of central importance. This article offers a framework for considering the interdependencies between a dominant element of the contemporary healthcare context, i...... jurisdictions (e.g., clinical coding) to bear on costing practice. These factors contribute to the fragmentation of the jurisdiction of management accounting....

  9. Advanced healthcare materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Advanced materials are attracting strong interest in the fundamental as well as applied sciences and are being extensively explored for their potential usage in a range of healthcare technological and biological applications. Advanced Healthcare Nanomaterials summarises the current status of knowledge in the fields of advanced materials for functional therapeutics, point-of-care diagnostics, translational materials, up and coming bio-engineering devices. The book highlights the key features which enable engineers to design stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles, novel biomaterials, nan

  10. Factors Influencing Healthcare Service Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality.

  11. Social marketing in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Aras

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSocial marketing is an important tool in the delivery ofhealthcare services. For any healthcare programme orproject to be successful, community/consumer participationis required. The four principles of social marketing can guidepolicymakers and healthcare providers to successfully planand implement health programmes.AimTo review the existing literature in order to project thebenefits of social marketing in healthcare.MethodA search of periodical literature by the author involvingsocial marketing and marketing concepts in health wascarried out. Items were identified initially through healthorientedindexing services such as Medline, Health STARand Cinahl, using the identifiers “social marketing“ and“marketing in health”. An extensive search was also carriedout on educational database ERIC.ResultsA literature review of various studies on social marketingindicated that the selection of the right product (accordingto the community need at the right place, with the rightstrategy for promotion and at the right price yields goodresults. However, along with technical sustainability(product, price, promotion and place, financialsustainability, institutional sustainability and marketsustainability are conducive factors for the success of socialmarketing.ConclusionThe purpose of this literature review was to ascertain thelikely effectiveness of social marketing principles andapproaches and behaviour change communication towardshealth promotion.It is important for all healthcare workers to understand andrespond to the public’s desires and needs and routinely useconsumer research to determine how best to help thepublic to solve problems and realise aspirations. Socialmarketing can optimise public health by facilitatingrelationship-building with consumers and making their liveshealthier.

  12. Access to effective healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Access to effective healthcare is in particular challenging for vulnerable and socially disadvantaged patients. Patients with chronic conditions are over-represented in these lower socioeconomic (LSES) groups. No generic review integrating the evidence on Self-Management support interventions in ...

  13. Untangling healthcare competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, I C; McDaniel, R R

    1993-11-01

    Traditional approaches to competition may be inappropriate for healthcare providers. Neoclassical economics makes the implicit assumption that a single actor embodies consumption, compensation, and benefit from a transaction. In healthcare, this assumption does not hold. Instead, such actions are accomplished by three separate actors--consumers (physicians), customers (third-party payers), and clients (patients). A hospital simultaneously competes in three arenas. Hospitals compete for physicians along a technological dimension. Competition for third-party payers takes on a financial dimension. Hospitals compete for patients along a marketing dimension. Because of the complex marketplace interactions among hospital, patient, physician, and third-party payer, the role of price in controlling behavior is difficult to establish. The dynamics underlying the hospital selection decision--that is, the decision maker's expectations of services and the convenience of accessing services--must also be considered. Healthcare managers must understand the interrelationships involved in the three-pronged competitive perspective for several reasons. This perspective clarifies the multiple facets of competition a hospital faces. It also disentangles the actions previously fulfilled by the traditional single buyer. It illuminates the critical skills underlying the competition for each audience. Finally, it defines the primary criterion each audience uses in sorting among hospitals. Recognition of the multifaceted nature of competition among healthcare providers will help demystify market behavior and thereby improve internal organizational communication systems, managers' ability to focus on appropriate activities, and the hospital's ability to adapt to changing market conditions.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) Share Compartir Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings On this Page What ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  15. STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Odigie, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are exposed to several job stressors that can adversely affect both their mental and physical health, decrease their efficiency at work, for a successful intervention, the causes and management of stress in any healthcare unit or among healthcare professionals must be diligently documented. The aim of this study is to explore issues on specific occupational stress related to job performance, the role of healthcare in stress management and the effects of job resourc...

  16. Lean six sigma in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Henk; Verver, John P S; van den Heuvel, Jaap; Bisgaard, Soren; Does, Ronald J M M

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare, as with any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient, and up-to-date. This article outlines a methodology and presents examples to illustrate how principles of Lean Thinking and Six Sigma can be combined to provide an effective framework for producing systematic innovation efforts in healthcare. Controlling healthcare cost increases, improving quality, and providing better healthcare are some of the benefits of this approach.

  17. HEALTHCARE MARKETING - A RELATIONAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    CAZACU Lavinia; OPRESCU, Alina Elena

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the unique characteristics of healthcare services, the challenges faced in the implementation of marketing principles into the healthcare services sector and also the behavior tendencies of the healthcare consumer. Taking into account the differences between healthcare services and other services and the importance of the doctor-patient relationship, a new marketing approach seems to be a solution for all problems and a response for all unanswered questions. A revi...

  18. [Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo Caldeira; Malik, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and services; financial; and information. PMID:23099762

  19. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the He...

  20. Healthcare in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, Nyi Nyi; Myat Cho, Su; Htun, Nang Mie Mie; Yu Mon Saw; Myint, Myat Noe Htin Aung; Aoki, Fumiko; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Myanmar transitioned to a civilian government in March, 2011. Although the democratic process has accelerated since then, many problems in the field of healthcare still exist. Since there is a limited overview on the healthcare in Myanmar, this article briefly describes the current states surrounding health services in Myanmar. According to the Census 2014, the population in the Republic of the Union of Myanmar was 51,410,000. The crude birth rate in the previous one year was estimated to be 18.9 per 1,000, giving the annual population growth rate of 0.89% between 2003 and 2014. The Ministry of Health reorganized into six departments. National non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations support healthcare, as well as international non-governmental organizations. Since hospital statistics by the government cover only public facilities, the information on private facilities is limited. Although there were not enough medical doctors (61 per 100,000 population), the number of medical students was reduced from 2,400 to 1,200 in 2012 to ensure the quality of medical education. The information on causes of death in the general population could not be retrieved, but some data was available from hospital statistics. Although the improvement was marked, the figures did not reach the levels set by Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. A trial prepaid health insurance system started in July 2015, to be followed by evaluation one year later. There are many international donors, including the Japan International Cooperation Agency, supporting health in Myanmar. With these efforts and support, a marked progress is expected in the field of healthcare. PMID:27303099

  1. Social Networking Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Leigh; de Leastar, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    The world of “Social Networking”, a cultural phenomenon of recent years, has evolved an application paradigm, Instant Messaging (IM), into a feature rich, highly interactive and context sensitive service delivery environment. Terms such as buddy lists, presence and IM-bots have emerged as building blocks for services that significantly enhance the user experience. Mapping this paradigm to healthcare can deliver a highly innovative communication platform for information sharing, monitoring and...

  2. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    1995-01-01

    When it comes to electronic data processing in healthcare, we offer a guarded, but hopeful, prognosis. To be sure, the age of electronic information processing has hit healthcare. Employers, insurance companies, hospitals, physicians and a host of ancillary service providers are all being ushered into a world of high speed, high tech electronic information. Some are even predicting that the health information business will grow from $20 billion to over $100 billion in a decade. Yet, out industry lags behind other industries in its overall movement to the paperless world. Selecting and installing the most advanced integrated information system isn't a simple task, as we've seen. As in life, compromises can produce less than optimal results. Nevertheless, integrated healthcare systems simply won't achieve their goals without systems designed to support the operation of a continuum of services. That's the reality! It is difficult to read about the wonderful advances in other sectors, while realizing that many trees still fall each year in the name of the health care industry. Yes, there are some outstanding examples of organizations pushing the envelop in a variety of areas. Yet from a very practical standpoint, many (like our physician's office) are still struggling or are on the sidelines wondering what to do. Given the competitive marketplace, organizations without effective systems may not have long to wonder and wait.

  3. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  4. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company (Portland), Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009020603. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-13

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting site is located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ATSDR considers the site to have been a public health hazard for former plant workers because of past ingestion exposure to arsenic, creosote, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans at levels of public health concern. The site also poses an ongoing and future public health hazard because people might encounter hazardous chemicals along the shoreline on or near the site at levels that can damage the skin, as was reported to have happened to two boys. Finally, dioxin levels would pose a public health hazard if people subsist on crayfish and suckers contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  5. Data mining applications in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hian Chye; Tan, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Data mining has been used intensively and extensively by many organizations. In healthcare, data mining is becoming increasingly popular, if not increasingly essential. Data mining applications can greatly benefit all parties involved in the healthcare industry. For example, data mining can help healthcare insurers detect fraud and abuse, healthcare organizations make customer relationship management decisions, physicians identify effective treatments and best practices, and patients receive better and more affordable healthcare services. The huge amounts of data generated by healthcare transactions are too complex and voluminous to be processed and analyzed by traditional methods. Data mining provides the methodology and technology to transform these mounds of data into useful information for decision making. This article explores data mining applications in healthcare. In particular, it discusses data mining and its applications within healthcare in major areas such as the evaluation of treatment effectiveness, management of healthcare, customer relationship management, and the detection of fraud and abuse. It also gives an illustrative example of a healthcare data mining application involving the identification of risk factors associated with the onset of diabetes. Finally, the article highlights the limitations of data mining and discusses some future directions. PMID:15869215

  6. Script of Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Many new product designs are currently being implemented in the healthcare sector, and this presents designers with challenges involved in socially innovative design. In this paper, we argue that designing assistive technologies requires focus on multiple users and use practices. We see the design...... a mutual adaptation process in their daily practice, and how this adaptation varies in different cases.The human/non-human actor perspective focuses on the relation between the designed artifact and the user in specific situations. The analysis leads to a central question: How does the scripting...

  7. Constructing Healthcare Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Holm Jacobsen, Peter; Tryggestad, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to inquire into the role of project visualisations in shaping healthcare spaces and practices. The study draws upon an ethnographic field study from a large on-going hospital construction project in Denmark, and focuses on the early phases of on-boarding the design team...... into the project organisation. The theoretical contribution concerns the ways in which project visualisations plays an active role in developing novel conceptions of space and how these are mobilized in the process of on-boarding, in terms of 1. Design space (especially the engagement of users in the design...

  8. SOA governance in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilakopoulos, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is increasingly adopted by many sectors, including healthcare. Due to the nature of healthcare systems there is a need to increase SOA adoption success rates as the non integrated nature of healthcare systems is responsible for medical errors that cause the loss of tens of thousands patients per year. Following our previous research [1] we propose that SOA governance is a critical success factor for SOA success in healthcare. Literature reports multiple SOA governance models that have limitations and they are confusing. In addition to this, there is a lack of healthcare specific SOA governance models. This highlights a literature void and thus the purpose of this paper is to proposed a healthcare specific SOA governance framework. PMID:23823423

  9. Healthcare technology and technology assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, James H.; Hwang, Raymond; Bozic, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    New technology is one of the primary drivers for increased healthcare costs in the United States. Both physician and industry play important roles in the development, adoption, utilization and choice of new technologies. The Federal Drug Administration regulates new drugs and new medical devices, but healthcare technology assessment remains limited. Healthcare technology assessment originated in federal agencies; today it is decentralized with increasing private sector efforts. Innovation is ...

  10. Quality assessment of healthcare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Koubeková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Quality assessment of healthcare systems is considered to be the basic tool of developing strategic concepts in healthcare quality improvement and has a great impact on quality of life. The thesis' main focus is on possibilities of quality assessment on international quality model level and its transformation into national structures. It includes teoretical points of quality and economic evaluation of quality in healthcare. The objective is to assess the participation of czech hospitals in he...

  11. Occupational Outlook Handbook: Healthcare Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurses ( APRNs ), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of ... Health and Safety Specialists Occupational health and safety specialists analyze many ...

  12. Healthcare regulatory concepts in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Robson Rocha de; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon

    2012-06-01

    The healthcare regulatory concepts used in Brazilian scientific publications on healthcare management were reviewed. A typo-logical classification for regulatory concepts was developed from the most current ideas in five disciplines: life sciences, law, economics, sociology and political science. Four ideas stood out: control, balance, adaptation and direction, with greatest emphasis on the technical nature of regulation. The political nature of regulation was secondary. It was considered that dis-cussion of healthcare regulatory concepts was connected with comprehension of the role that the state plays in this sector. De-finition of the forms of state intervention is the key convergence point between the different ways of conceptualizing healthcare regulation.

  13. Designing better healthcare environments: interprofessional competencies in healthcare design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gerri; Zimring, Craig; Chuzi, Joshua; Dutcher, Diane

    2010-07-01

    There has been considerable interest in bridging educational programs in the United States across healthcare, architecture, industrial design, and human computing disciplines to design more effective and safer healthcare environments. New combinations of professionals including those outside the traditional healthcare disciplines are coming together to solve quality and safety problems and to re-envision the physical and social design of healthcare organizations. Little is known about the knowledge and skills essential to integrate these diverse perspectives and pose innovative solutions. A set of seven interprofessional competencies were identified through review of the literature, interviews of faculty and leaders in the field, and experience of the authors teaching interprofessional courses in healthcare design. The relevance and feasibility of these competencies were assessed through expert review by faculty and consultants and implementation in multiple courses.

  14. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way.

  15. Healthcare technology in the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2011-01-01

    The dissertation explores through ethnographic field studies ways in which negotiations and transformations take place when healthcare technology is introduced to the home. With the increased focus on tele-medical solutions and on supporting patient self-care through new healthcare technologies...

  16. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  17. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  18. [The primary healthcare centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  19. Technology and healthcare costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine in the 21 st century is increasingly dependent on technology. Unlike in many other areas, the cost of medical technology is not declining and its increasing use contributes to the spiraling healthcare costs. Many medical professionals equate progress in medicine to increasing use of sophisticated technology that is often expensive and beyond the reach of the average citizen. Pediatric heart care is very technology-intensive and therefore very expensive and beyond the reach of the vast majority of children in the developing world. There is an urgent need to address this situation through development and use of appropriate technology in accordance with the needs and priorities of the society. A number of simple and inexpensive quality measures that have the potential of improving outcomes substantially without the need for expensive equipment should be instituted before embracing high-end technology. Innovations to reduce costs that are commonly used in limited resource environments should be tested systematically.

  20. A Framework for Healthcare Planning and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Erwin W.; Houdenhoven, van Mark; Hulshof, Peter J.H.; Hall, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Rising expenditures spur healthcare organizations to organize their processes more efficiently and effectively. Unfortunately, healthcare planning and control lags behind manufacturing planning and control. We analyze existing planning and control concepts or frameworks for healthcare operations man

  1. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines how marketing managers face increasingly difficult management and it emphasizes one more time the importance of marketing in the internal organizational structure. Also it shows the direct connection between the marketing strategy, the Quality of Healthcare and marketing planning in the internal organization of Private Healthcare Practice in Romania. Also it concludes that marketing planning in healthcare has to be very precised in order to achieve some major objectives: customer care, financial stability, equilibrium between stakeholders and shareholders and future improvement in communication to customers. The marketing strategies and programs discussed in this paper follow the analysis of the 4Ps of Healthcare Marketing Services and propose call to action plans and possibilities that might result in a more particular case study analysis of the Romanian Healthcare Market.

  2. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in non-clinical settings such as the private home can challenge, among others, older adults. To support such unsupervised care activities, an increasingly number of reminders and monitoring systems are being designed. However, most...... of these systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account...... for the home setting and people’s everyday activities....

  3. Governance mechanisms for healthcare apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Konstantinos; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kyng, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the `app store' concept has challenged the way software is distributed and marketed: developers have easier access to customers, while customers have easy access to innovative applications. Apps today are increasingly focusing on more "mission-critical" areas like healthcare...... with the Apple AppStore counting more than 40,000 apps under the category "health & fitness". This rapid development of healthcare apps increases the necessity of governance as, currently, healthcare apps are not thoroughly governed. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission only have...

  4. PUBLIC FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in Poland is mainly financed by public sector entities, among them the National Health Fund (NFZ, state budget and local government budgets. The task of the National Health Fund, as the main payer in the system, is chiefly currently financing the services. The state budget plays a complementary role in the system, and finances selected groups of services, health insurance premiums and investments in healthcare infrastructure. The basic role of the local governments is to ensure access to the services, mostly by performing ownership functions towards healthcare institutions.

  5. [Tuberculosis in healthcare workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, A

    2009-01-01

    Perception and knowledge of the TB-infection risk in healthcare workers (HCWs) changed profoundly in Germany during the past few years. Molecular-epidemiological studies and a comprehensive review of the existing evidence concerning the infection risk for HCWs lead to the conclusion that TB in HCWs is often caused by infection at the workplace. In the Hamburg Fingerprint Study, 80 % of the TB cases in HCWs were caused by infections at the workplace. In a similar Dutch study 43 % of all cases were work-related. Besides of the well-known risks in TB wards and laboratories, an increased risk for infection should be assumed for paramedics, in emergency rooms, for HCWs caring for the elderly or for workers with close contact to high-risk groups (homeless people, i. v. drug users, migrants from high-incidence countries). TB in a HCW working in these fields can be recognised as an occupational disease (OD) without identifying a particular source of infection. For all other HCWs, the German occupational disease law requires the identification of a source case before TB in an HCW can be accepted as an OD. Even though the proportion of work-related TB in HCWs is higher than was assumed before previously, the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) is lower than expected. In an ongoing evaluation study of the interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) LTBI prevalence in HCWs is 10 %. Prevention strategies in Germany should be reconsidered in the light of these new findings.

  6. [Healthcare patient loyalty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    If the "old economy" preached standardization of products/services in order to reduce costs, the "new economy" is based on the recognition of the needs and the management of information. It is aimed at providing better and more usable services. One scenario is a national health service with regional management but based on competition between hospitals/companies.This led to a different handling of the user/patient, which has become the center of the health system: marketing seeks to retain the patient, trying to push a client-patient to not change their healthcare service provider. In costs terms, it is more economical to retain a customer rather than acquire a new one: a satisfied customer is also the best sounding board for each company. Customer equity is the management of relations with patients which can result in a greater customer value: it is possible to recognize an equity of the value, of the brand and of the report. Loyalty uses various marketing activities (basic, responsive, responsible, proactive and collaborative): each hospital/company chooses different actions depending on how many resources it plans to invest in loyalty. PMID:27374397

  7. Leveraging Digital Innovation in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Carol V.; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margun;

    2014-01-01

    and security concerns, fragmented markets, and misaligned incentives across stakeholders. The panel will focus on this apparent paradox and highlight the potential of big data, cloud and mobile computing for achieving better health. The panel co-chairs will introduce differences in healthcare delivery...... investments in digital infrastructures. New technologies are leveraged to achieve widespread 24x7 disease management, patients’ wellbeing, home-based healthcare and other patient-centric service innovations. Yet, digital innovations in healthcare face barriers in terms of standardization, data privacy...... landscapes in selected countries. Then panelists with expertise in digital data streams, cloud, and mobile computing will present concrete examples of healthcare service innovations that have the potential to address one or more of the global goals. ECIS attendees are invited to join a debate about...

  8. Healthcare IT and Patient Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter; Bødker, Keld; Hertzum, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    This short paper outlines a recently initiated research project that concerns healthcare information systems and patient empowerment. Drawing on various theoretical backgrounds, Participatory Design (PD), Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), and Science...

  9. Business process modeling in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Francisco; Garcia, Felix; Calahorra, Luis; Llorente, César; Gonçalves, Luis; Daniel, Christel; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the process point of view is not restricted to a specific enterprise sector. In the field of health, as a result of the nature of the service offered, health institutions' processes are also the basis for decision making which is focused on achieving their objective of providing quality medical assistance. In this chapter the application of business process modelling - using the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) standard is described. Main challenges of business process modelling in healthcare are the definition of healthcare processes, the multi-disciplinary nature of healthcare, the flexibility and variability of the activities involved in health care processes, the need of interoperability between multiple information systems, and the continuous updating of scientific knowledge in healthcare.

  10. Healthcare information technology and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Thomas H; Bates, David W; Berner, Eta S; Bernstam, Elmer V; Covvey, H Dominic; Frisse, Mark E; Graf, Thomas; Greenes, Robert A; Hoffer, Edward P; Kuperman, Gil; Lehmann, Harold P; Liang, Louise; Middleton, Blackford; Omenn, Gilbert S; Ozbolt, Judy

    2013-01-01

    At the 2011 American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) Winter Symposium we studied the overlap between health IT and economics and what leading healthcare delivery organizations are achieving today using IT that might offer paths for the nation to follow for using health IT in healthcare reform. We recognized that health IT by itself can improve health value, but its main contribution to health value may be that it can make possible new care delivery models to achieve much larger value. Health IT is a critically important enabler to fundamental healthcare system changes that may be a way out of our current, severe problem of rising costs and national deficit. We review the current state of healthcare costs, federal health IT stimulus programs, and experiences of several leading organizations, and offer a model for how health IT fits into our health economic future.

  11. Control of corruption in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article on corruption in Indian healthcare in the BMJ has triggered a hot debate and numerous responses (1, 2, 3, 4). We do agree that corruption in Indian healthcare is a colossal issue and needs to be tackled urgently (5). However, we want to highlight that corruption in healthcare is not a local phenomenon confined to the Indian subcontinent, though India does serve as a good case study and intervention area due to the magnitude of the problem and the country's large population (6). Good governance, strict rules, transparency and zero tolerance are some of the strategies prescribed everywhere to tackle corruption. However, those entrusted with implementing good governance and strict rules in India need to go through a process of introspection to carry out their duties in a responsible fashion. At present, it looks like a no-win situation. In this article, we recommend education in medical ethics as the major intervention for dealing with corruption in healthcare.

  12. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Edwards, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    that different mind sets and different rationalities between different types of healthcare professionals act as a major barrier for lean management in healthcare. The hypotheses are tested and discussed through four case studies. Using empirical research from four case studies the paper will continue...... by discussing these four hypotheses. The cases where followed over a period of one year and the researchers gathered a substantial amount of data concerning the lean implementation processes. Based on an analysis of the case data hypotheses one is rejected whereas hypotheses two, three, and four are supported......The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...

  13. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with heart failure ... good relationships with all the members of this team. Learn to talk to them openly and honestly ...

  14. Lean Six Sigma in Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. de Koning; J.P.S. Verver; J. van den Heuvel; S. Bisgaard; R.J.M.M. Does

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: Cost reduction; efficiency; innovation; quality improvement; service management. Abstract Healthcare, as any other service operation, requires systematic innovation efforts to remain competitive, cost efficient and up to date. In this article, we outline a methodology and present examples

  15. Machine learning in healthcare informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, U; Dua, Prerna

    2014-01-01

    The book is a unique effort to represent a variety of techniques designed to represent, enhance, and empower multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional machine learning research in healthcare informatics. The book provides a unique compendium of current and emerging machine learning paradigms for healthcare informatics and reflects the diversity, complexity and the depth and breath of this multi-disciplinary area. The integrated, panoramic view of data and machine learning techniques can provide an opportunity for novel clinical insights and discoveries.

  16. Customer relationship management in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    GHAZİ ASGAR, Mahsa; SHAHRİ, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Background and purpose: Customer relationship management research is utilized to explain the need for a more patient-oriented support. This paper argues about customer relationship managemet in healthcare Method: the present article has utilized the valid resources in the subject under study. Conclusion: CRM tools and strategies will be implemented in the marketing and service layer. The healthcare organization should perform re-engineering process to adapt their CRM strategy and to...

  17. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational) perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines h...

  18. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way. PMID:24326705

  19. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Belle; Raghuram Thiagarajan; S. M. Reza Soroushmehr; Fatemeh Navidi; Daniel A Beard; Kayvan Najarian

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is sti...

  20. HEALTHCARE: A COMPLEX SERVICE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James M. TIEN; Pascal J. GOLDSCHMIDT-CLERMONT

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare is indeed a complex service system, one requiring the technobiology approach of systems engineering to underpin its development as an integrated and adaptive system. In general, healthcare services are carried out with knowledge-intensive agents or components which work together as providers and consumers to create or co-produce value. Indeed, the engineering design of a healthcare system must recognize the fact that it is actually a complex integration of human-centered activities that is increasingly dependent on information technology and knowledge. Like any service system, healthcare can be considered to be a combination or recombination of three essential components-people (characterized by behaviors, values, knowledge, etc.), processes (characterized by collaboration, customization, etc.) and products (characterized by software, hardware, infrastructures, etc.). Thus, a healthcare system is an integrated and adaptive set of people, processes and products. It is, in essence, a system of systems which objectives are to enhance its efficiency (leading to greater interdependency) and effectiveness (leading to improved health). Integration occurs over the physical, temporal, organizational and functional dimensions, while adaptation occurs over the monitoring, feedback, cybernetic and learning dimensions. In sum, such service systems as healthcare are indeed complex, especially due to the uncertainties associated with the human-centered aspects of these systems. Moreover, the system complexities can only be dealt with methods that enhance system integration and adaptation.

  1. LEAN thinking in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorma, Tapani; Tiirinki, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Turkki, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes have been achieved or expected by using it. The main focus is in managing and developing patient and treatment processes. Design/methodology/approach - A mixed-method approach incorporating the Webropol survey was used. Findings - LEAN is quite a new concept in Finnish public healthcare. It is mainly used as a development tool to seek financial savings and to improve the efficiency of patient processes, but has not yet been deeply implemented. However, the experiences from LEAN initiatives have been positive, and the methodology is already quite well-known. It can be concluded that, because of positive experiences from LEAN, the environment in Finnish healthcare is ready for the deeper implementation of LEAN. Originality/value - This paper evaluates the usage of LEAN thinking for the first time in the public healthcare system of Finland as a development tool and a management system. It highlights the implementation and achieved results of LEAN thinking when used in the healthcare environment. It also highlights the expectations for LEAN thinking in Finnish public healthcare.

  2. Serial murder by healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorker, Beatrice Crofts; Kizer, Kenneth W; Lampe, Paula; Forrest, A R W; Lannan, Jacquetta M; Russell, Donna A

    2008-01-01

    The prosecution of Charles Cullen, a nurse who killed at least 40 patients over a 16-year period, highlights the need to better understand the phenomenon of serial murder by healthcare professionals. The authors conducted a LexisNexis search which yielded 90 criminal prosecutions of healthcare providers that met inclusion criteria for serial murder of patients. In addition we reviewed epidemiologic studies, toxicology evidence, and court transcripts, to provide data on healthcare professionals who have been prosecuted between 1970 and 2006. Fifty-four of the 90 have been convicted; 45 for serial murder, four for attempted murder, and five pled guilty to lesser charges. Twenty-four more have been indicted and are either awaiting trial or the outcome has not been published. The other 12 prosecutions had a variety of legal outcomes. Injection was the main method used by healthcare killers followed by suffocation, poisoning, and tampering with equipment. Prosecutions were reported from 20 countries with 40% taking place in the United States. Nursing personnel comprised 86% of the healthcare providers prosecuted; physicians 12%, and 2% were allied health professionals. The number of patient deaths that resulted in a murder conviction is 317 and the number of suspicious patient deaths attributed to the 54 convicted caregivers is 2113. These numbers are disturbing and demand that systemic changes in tracking adverse patient incidents associated with presence of a specific healthcare provider be implemented. Hiring practices must shift away from preventing wrongful discharge or denial of employment lawsuits to protecting patients from employees who kill.

  3. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  4. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  5. Systems design for remote healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a multidisciplinary overview of the design and implementation of systems for remote patient monitoring and healthcare. Readers are guided step-by-step through the components of such a system and shown how they could be integrated in a coherent framework for deployment in practice. The authors explain planning from subsystem design to complete integration and deployment, given particular application constraints. Readers will benefit from descriptions of the clinical requirements underpinning the entire application scenario, physiological parameter sensing techniques, information processing approaches and overall, application dependent system integration. Each chapter ends with a discussion of practical design challenges and two case studies are included to provide practical examples and design methods for two remote healthcare systems with different needs. ·         Provides a multi-disciplinary overview of next-generation mobile healthcare system design; ·         Includes...

  6. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    New video technologies are emerging to facilitate collaboration in emergency healthcare. One such technology is 3D telepresence technology for medical consultation (3DMC) that may provide richer visual information to support collaboration between medical professionals to, ideally, enhance patient...... care in real time. Today only an early prototype of 3DMC exists. To better understand 3DMC's potential for adoption and use in emergency healthcare before large amounts of development resources are invested we conducted a visioning study. That is, we shared our vision of 3DMC with emergency room...... physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof...

  7. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  8. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Belle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  9. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  10. Caring for healthcare professionals: improving prevention in occupational healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Ketelaar

    2014-01-01

    How can healthcare professionals be supported to stay healthy and well-functioning at work? Working in nursing involves dealing with specific job demands which can have an impact on nurses’ health. In turn, health problems can affect their work functioning, with possible negative consequences for nu

  11. Social media disruptive change in healthcare : responses of healthcare providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    2016-01-01

    Social media represent specific types of technologies that are end-user driven and end-users are able to drive disruptive change giving little time to organizations to react. With rapid and powerful emergence of social media communities in healthcare, this sector is faced with new and alternative av

  12. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  13. Control of corruption in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article on corruption in Indian healthcare in the BMJ has triggered a hot debate and numerous responses (1, 2, 3, 4). We do agree that corruption in Indian healthcare is a colossal issue and needs to be tackled urgently (5). However, we want to highlight that corruption in healthcare is not a local phenomenon confined to the Indian subcontinent, though India does serve as a good case study and intervention area due to the magnitude of the problem and the country's large population (6). Good governance, strict rules, transparency and zero tolerance are some of the strategies prescribed everywhere to tackle corruption. However, those entrusted with implementing good governance and strict rules in India need to go through a process of introspection to carry out their duties in a responsible fashion. At present, it looks like a no-win situation. In this article, we recommend education in medical ethics as the major intervention for dealing with corruption in healthcare. PMID:26592785

  14. Performance indicators: healthcare professionals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to capture factors behind professional views of indicator usefulness as a common structure for assessing healthcare performance and their important characteristics to design limited key performance indicators (PIs) for holistic hospital management. Design/methodology/approach - Two surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires, in which hospital manager/staff respondents were asked to rate the 52 PIs' usefulness. In total, 228 manager and 894 staff responses were collected. Findings - Eight factors were elicited from manager and staff responses as performance measures with 72 percent cumulative variance accounted for. Hospital managers and staff showed similar performance measure perceptions: high-utility acknowledgment on safety, operational efficiency and patient/employee satisfaction but relatively low-employee development concerns. Manager indicator usefulness perceptions were rather homogeneous and significantly higher than staff for almost all performance measures. Practical implications - Homogeneous manager views mean that a single key PI set for hospital management may be established regardless of hospital attributes. The following aspects may be measures that should be managed in a healthcare organization based on their key PIs: patient/employee safety, operational efficiency, financial effectiveness and patient/employee satisfaction. Originality/value - This is a pilot study on hospital management PIs in Japan. The eight-dimensional factor structure and findings about healthcare provider perceptions may be useful for healthcare management. PMID:27477935

  15. [Patients' increasing role in healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Cinzia

    2016-03-01

    Since the late '90s citizens have been increasingly involved in healthcare, thanks to a shift in access to healthcare information, greater patients' and citizens' awareness about their rights and needs, and a change in physicians' attitudes and behavior. At the same time, to ensure the sustainability of the national health services, patients' needs are increasingly being examined in relation to the services and interventions needed, and to foster informed demand by patients and citizens, and appropriate prescriptions by physicians. Nowadays, patients already have a section in an authoritative medical journal. Working with clinicians, they set research priorities and the outcomes to be studied. Especially in UK and USA, they are invited to participate in the design and development of trials and in deciding which trials should be funded. The situation varies widely in different countries, though involving citizens in healthcare decisions is a common mantra. Even when they consult a clinician, the patients' role has evolved. People ask for information more often and want an active part in decisions about their health. Physicians start to pay more attention to the person and the social context, feelings and emotions, and person-centered care has become a reference in the doctor-patient relationship. This article offers an overview of the changing roles of patients and citizens in healthcare.

  16. Managing healthcare information: analyzing trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Eva; Eriksson, Nomie; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative research approach is applied using two case studies. The data analysis of these studies generated a problem list, which was mapped to a trust matrix. Findings - Results demonstrate flaws in current practices and point to achieving balance between organizational, person and technology trust perspectives. The analysis revealed three challenge areas, to: achieve higher trust in patient-focussed healthcare; improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals; and establish clear terminology. By taking trust into account, a more holistic perspective on healthcare can be achieved, where trust can be obtained and optimized. Research limitations/implications - A trust matrix is tested and shown to identify trust problems on different levels and relating to trusting beliefs. Future research should elaborate and more fully address issues within three identified challenge areas. Practical implications - The trust matrix's usefulness as a tool for organizations to analyze trust problems and issues is demonstrated. Originality/value - Healthcare trust issues are captured to a greater extent and from previously unchartered perspectives. PMID:27477934

  17. IT Support for Healthcare Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, R.; Reichert, M.U.

    2005-01-01

    Patient treatment processes require the cooperation of different organizational units and medical disciplines. In such an environment an optimal process support becomes crucial. Though healthcare processes frequently change, and therefore the separation of the flow logic from the application code se

  18. Entrepreneurship in agriculture and healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Jan; Hulsink, Willem; Grin, John

    2016-01-01

    Care farming provides an interesting context of multifunctional agriculture where farmers face the challenge of having to bridge the gap between agriculture and healthcare and acquire new customers, partners and financial resources from the care sector. We compared different entry strategies of d

  19. Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare & Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    will pay. Disruptive Innovation in context of the author’s body of work in healthcare and rehabilitation relates to how development of a cloud-based converged infrastructure resource, similar to that conceived in a national (Danish) study titled Humanics, can act as an accessible data and knowledge...

  20. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Ton A.M.; Stegwee, Robert A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information an

  1. Making Franchising in Healthcare Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Nijmeijer (Karlijn J.)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Business format franchising is a form of interorganizational cooperation that originates from the business sector. It is increasingly used in a variety of healthcare services to reach positive results. In a franchise system contractual arrangements are made between two

  2. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  3. Body Area Networks for Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, V.M.; Bults, R.G.A.; Konstantas, D.; Vierhout, P.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this research proposal is the design and development of novel applications and services targeting 4G wireless technologies. In previous papers [1, 2] we presented a vision of two future healthcare applications which we call Virtual Trauma Team and Virtual Homecare Team. These are two

  4. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider.

  5. Innovation in medicine and healthcare 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Torro, Carlos; Tanaka, Satoshi; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2016-01-01

    Innovation in medicine and healthcare is an interdisciplinary research area, which combines the advanced technologies and problem solving skills with medical and biological science. A central theme of this proceedings is Smart Medical and Healthcare Systems (modern intelligent systems for medicine and healthcare), which can provide efficient and accurate solution to problems faced by healthcare and medical practitioners today by using advanced information communication techniques, computational intelligence, mathematics, robotics and other advanced technologies. The techniques developed in this area will have a significant effect on future medicine and healthcare.    The volume includes 53 papers, which present the recent trend and innovations in medicine and healthcare including Medical Informatics; Biomedical Engineering; Management for Healthcare; Advanced ICT for Medical and Healthcare; Simulation and Visualization/VR for Medicine; Statistical Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence; Smart Medic...

  6. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  7. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  8. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, van de Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity is

  9. [Fostering LGBT-friendly healthcare services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Han-Ting; Chen, Mu-Hong; Ku, Wen-Wei

    2015-02-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) patients suffer from stigma and discrimination when seeking healthcare. A large LGBT healthcare survey revealed that 56% of gay patients and 70% of transgender patients suffered some type of discrimination while seeking healthcare in 2014. The fostering of LGBT-friendly healthcare services is not just an advanced step of gender mainstreaming but also a fulfillment of health equality and equity. Additionally, LGBT-friendly healthcare services are expected to provide new opportunities for healthcare workers. Therefore, proactive government policies, education, research, and clinical practice should all encourage the development of these healthcare services. We look forward to a well-developed LGBT-friendly healthcare system in Taiwan. PMID:25631181

  10. Job satisfaction in health-care organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Kavita Bhatnagar; Kalpana Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations.

  11. General Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button General Information About MRSA in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Problem? Who is at Risk, and How is MRSA Spread in Healthcare Settings? MRSA is usually spread ...

  12. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    OpenAIRE

    A. Garefalakis; G. Mantalis; E. Vourgourakis; K. Spinthiropoulos; Ch. Lemonakis

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcar...

  13. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    OpenAIRE

    Christiana Balan; Petronela-Simona Mantaluta

    2013-01-01

    The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focu...

  14. Healthcare Industry Improvement with Business Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Laura IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper highlights the advantages of big data analytics and business intelligence in the healthcare industry. In the paper are reviewed the Real-Time Healthcare Analytics Solutions for Preventative Medicine provided by SAP and the different ideas realized by possible customers for new applications in Healthcare industry in order to demonstrate that the healthcare system can and should benefit from the new opportunities provided by ITC in general and big data analytics in particular.

  15. Redefining the Core Competencies of Future Healthcare Executives under Healthcare Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Dianne B.; Ayadi, M. Femi

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare industry has evolved over the years, so too has the administration of healthcare organizations. The signing into law of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has brought additional changes to the healthcare industry that will require changes to the healthcare administration curriculum. The movement toward a…

  16. The status of TQM in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, M M; Meacham, K A; Alavi, J

    1998-01-01

    The face of the healthcare industry has changed dramatically over the last few years. This study examines the literature related to Total Quality Management (TQM) and Benchmarking (BM) applications in healthcare. Recommendations for healthcare managers and administrators, as they chart operational and strategic directions for their organization, are provided. In this context, a conceptual framework which stresses the significance of viewing the healthcare organization as an open system is provided. The framework underscores the fact that TQM and BM efforts should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, these efforts should be viewed as an integral part of the operational and strategic facets of the healthcare organization.

  17. Mobile Healthcare System using NFC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Devendran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although primary care physicians are increasingly interested in adopting electronic medical record (EMR systems, few use such systems in practice. Mobile devices offer new ways for users to access health care data and services in a secure and user-friendly environment. Mobile healthcare (m-healthcare systems are regarded as a solution to healthcare costs without reducing the quality of patient care. We are developing a basic architecture for m-healthcare services using Near Field Communication (NFC to facilitate the provisioning of healthcare to people anywhere, anytime using mobile devices that are connected through wireless communication technologies.

  18. Public policy and healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuwer, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Public policy in healthcare affects physician and patient choices. In many ways it may limit choices. These choices present conflicts that are discussed here. Some issues depend on the laws enacted to enable either a single-payer system or that mixed with a private-payer system. In each case, the systems attain some cost controls through means such as gatekeepers, long wait lists, authorization processes, national fee schedules, complex coding schemes, or placing physicians on salary. National health systems are compared here. No one system has proven completely satisfactory, and each has its advantages. There are many factors that contribute to the escalating costs of care that lead to many healthcare public policies to constrain costs. Initiatives to incentivize preventive actions are a more positive step, but ones that are difficult to define in detail.

  19. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research. PMID:27441404

  20. Strategic planning in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Perera, Francisco de Paula; Peiró, Manel

    2012-08-01

    Strategic planning is a completely valid and useful tool for guiding all types of organizations, including healthcare organizations. The organizational level at which the strategic planning process is relevant depends on the unit's size, its complexity, and the differentiation of the service provided. A cardiology department, a hemodynamic unit, or an electrophysiology unit can be an appropriate level, as long as their plans align with other plans at higher levels. The leader of each unit is the person responsible for promoting the planning process, a core and essential part of his or her role. The process of strategic planning is programmable, systematic, rational, and holistic and integrates the short, medium, and long term, allowing the healthcare organization to focus on relevant and lasting transformations for the future.

  1. Multicultural healthcare: a transatlantic project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Jokinen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is increasingly multicultural, posing a challenge for nurse educators in both Europe and the United States. Nursing education faculties are responding to the challenge of internationalization, for instance, by participating in international student exchange projects to foster students' intercultural competence. The authors describe an educational model constructed during a transatlantic project between European and American universities. The benefits of the project from the Finnish partner's perspective are also reported. PMID:17496825

  2. Healthcare Energy Metering Guidance (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    This brochure is intended to help facility and energy managers plan and prioritize investments in energy metering. It offers healthcare-specific examples of metering applications, benefits, and steps that other health systems can reproduce. It reflects collaborative input from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and the health system members of the DOE Hospital Energy Alliance's Benchmarking and Measurement Project Team.

  3. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  4. Multicultural healthcare: a transatlantic project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Jokinen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is increasingly multicultural, posing a challenge for nurse educators in both Europe and the United States. Nursing education faculties are responding to the challenge of internationalization, for instance, by participating in international student exchange projects to foster students' intercultural competence. The authors describe an educational model constructed during a transatlantic project between European and American universities. The benefits of the project from the Finnish partner's perspective are also reported.

  5. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakdaman, Masoud; Zeinahvazi, Milad; Zohoori, Bahareh; Nasiri, Fardokht; Yew Wong, Kuan

    2013-02-01

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  6. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Spil, Ton A.M.; Stegwee, Robert A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information and communication technologies (ICT). The ICT developments are a challenge in two directions: internally towards massive data warehouses, and externally towards Internet dissemination. These new tech...

  7. Legitimate Allocation of Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper; Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    governing priorities among groups of patients. The Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) framework suggests an ingenious solution to this problem of moral disagreement. Rather than advocating any substantive distributive principle, its advocates propose a feasible set of conditions, which, if met......Citizens' consent to political decisions is often regarded as a necessary condition of political legitimacy. Consequently, legitimate allocation of healthcare has seemed almost unattainable in contemporary pluralistic societies. The problem is that citizens do not agree on any single principle...

  8. Nonverbal Accommodation in Healthcare Communication

    OpenAIRE

    D’Agostino, Thomas A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examined patterns of nonverbal accommodation within healthcare interactions and investigated the impact of communication skills training and gender concordance on nonverbal accommodation behavior. The Nonverbal Accommodation Analysis System (NAAS) was used to code the nonverbal behavior of physicians and patients within 45 oncology consultations. Cases were then placed in one of seven categories based on patterns of accommodation observed across the interaction. Results...

  9. Bluetooth: Opening a Blue Sky for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been a blossoming of developing mobile healthcare programs. Bluetooth technology, which has the advantages of being low-power and inexpensive, whilst being able to transfer moderate amounts of data over a versatile, robust and secure radio link, has been widely applied in mobile healthcare as a replacement for cables. This paper discussed the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare. It started with the brief description of the history of Bluetooth technology, its technical characteristics, and the latest developments. Then the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare sector were reviewed. The applications are based on two basic types of links of Bluetooth technology: point-to-point link and point-to-multipoint link. The special requirements from healthcare and the challenges of successful application of Bluetooth in healthcare will be discussed. At last the future development of Bluetooth technology and its impacts on healthcare were envisioned.

  10. Conflict resolution in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipcamon, James D; Mainwaring, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Conflict causes decided tension in the workplace and often produces poor professional outcomes. A manager dealing with conflict can experience a crisis of confidence and often ends up second-guessing himself or herself, regardless of how a situation has been handled. In some organizations, conflict is not viewed positively or as an opportunity for improvement. In these organizations, most individuals will see conflict as being unproductive, unpleasant, and a waste of time and energy. Yet, conflict provides employees with critical feedback on how things are going. When viewed in a positive context, even personality conflicts may provide information to the healthcare manager about what is not working in the organization. If conflict is not directed and controlled, it can have damaging effects in the workplace, stifling the growth of departments and deflating employee morale. Our job as healthcare managers is to deal with conflict so that it does not decrease productivity or detract from the provision of patient-centered care. There are 4 general sources for interpersonal conflict: personal differences, informational deficiency, role incompatibility, and environmental stress. There are 5 common responses used in dealing with conflict: forcing, accommodating, avoiding, compromising, and collaborating. Healthcare managers should become comfortable with using all of these approaches.

  11. Healthcare Workers and Workplace Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Pinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is a threatening worldwide public health problem. Healthcare workers have under particular risk of workplace violence, and they are being exposed to violence 4-16 times more than other service workers. The frequency of violence in the health sector in the world has indicated in different range of results since there is no consistent definition of workplace violence and differences in research methodology (any type of violence: 22,0% - 60,0%; physical violence: 2,6% - 57,0%; verbal violence: 24,3% - 82,0%; sexual harassment: %1,9 - 10,5%. All healthcare workers have right to work in a safe working place. The safety of healthcare workers should deserve the same priority as patient safety. Various risk factors including social, cultural, environmental, organizational and personal elements play a role in the formation of workplace violence that is very important for our country. Considering all those factors, the workplace violence in health sector should be seriously handled and the strategies and policies must be developed for prevention. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 315-326

  12. Patient Safety and Healthcare Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Toska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to a variety of circumstances and world-wide research findings, patient safety andquality care during hospitalization have emerged as major issues. Patient safety deficits may burdenhealth systems as well as allocated resources. The international community has examined severalproposals covering general and systemic aspects in order to improve patient safety; several long-termprograms and strategies have also been implemented promoting the participation of health-relatedagents, and also government agencies and non-governmental organizations.Aim: Those factors that have negative correlations with patient safety and quality healthcare weredetermined; WHO and EU programs as well as the Greek health policy were also reviewed.Method: Local and international literature was reviewed, including EU and WHO official publications,by using the appropriate keywords.Conclusions: International cooperation on patient safety is necessary in order to improvehospitalization and healthcare quality standards. Such incentives depend heavily on establishing worldwideviable and effective health programs and planning. These improvements also require further stepson safe work procedures, environment safety, hazard management, infection control, safe use ofequipment and medication, and sufficient healthcare staff.

  13. Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Montero-Simó

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08. The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers.

  14. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Balan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focuses on the relationship between the inputs and outputs of the system. Approach In order to assess the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system we use Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Both input and output healthcare indicators are observed for the period 1999-2010 and the years when healthcare inputs have been used efficiently are identified. Results The results show that human, financial, and technological resources have been used at maximum capacity in 1999, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010. Implications Though efficiency is defined differently by diverse stakeholders, healthcare policies should focus on rising the responsibility of communities and individuals for better treatments and services and better access to information on healthcare providers. Value The paper is an empirically based study of the healthcare resources allocation in Romania.

  15. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  16. Stakeholders' Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    Full Text Available An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana.Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data.There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service.Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved.

  17. Healthcare succession planning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian K; Muise, Melanie; Cummings, Greta; Newburn-Cook, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Succession planning is a business strategy that has recently gained attention in the healthcare literature, primarily because of nursing shortage concerns and the demand for retaining knowledgeable personnel to meet organizational needs. Little research has been conducted in healthcare settings that clearly defines best practices for succession planning frameworks. To effectively carry out such organizational strategies during these challenging times, an integrative review of succession planning in healthcare was performed to identify consistencies in theoretical approaches and strategies for chief nursing officers and healthcare managers to initiate. Selected articles were compared with business succession planning to determine whether healthcare strategies were similar to best practices already established in business contexts. The results of this integrative review will aid leaders and managers to use succession planning as a tool in their recruitment, retention, mentoring, and administration activities and also provide insights for future development of healthcare succession planning frameworks.

  18. Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S S-L; Gao, G; Koch, S

    2015-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Big Data and Analytics in Healthcare". The amount of data being generated in the healthcare industry is growing at a rapid rate. This has generated immense interest in leveraging the availability of healthcare data (and "big data") to improve health outcomes and reduce costs. However, the nature of healthcare data, and especially big data, presents unique challenges in processing and analyzing big data in healthcare. This Focus Theme aims to disseminate some novel approaches to address these challenges. More specifically, approaches ranging from efficient methods of processing large clinical data to predictive models that could generate better predictions from healthcare data are presented.

  19. Requirements for Interoperability in Healthcare Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Noumeir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability is a requirement for the successful deployment of Electronic Health Records (EHR. EHR improves the quality of healthcare by enabling access to all relevant information at the diagnostic decision moment, regardless of location. It is a system that results from the cooperation of several heterogeneous distributed subsystems that need to successfully exchange information relative to a specific healthcare process. This paper analyzes interoperability impediments in healthcare by first defining them and providing concrete healthcare examples, followed by discussion of how specifications can be defined and how verification can be conducted to eliminate those impediments and ensure interoperability in healthcare. This paper also analyzes how Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE has been successful in enabling interoperability, and identifies some neglected aspects that need attention.

  20. Information analytics for healthcare service discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lily; Yamin, Mohammad; Mushi, Cleopa; Liu, Kecheng; Alsaigh, Mohammed; Chen, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of being 'patient-centric' is a challenge to many existing healthcare service provision practices. This paper focuses on the issue of referrals, where multiple stakeholders, such as General Practitioners (GPs) and patients, are encouraged to make a consensual decision based on patients' needs. In this paper, we present an ontology-enabled healthcare service provision, which facilitates both patients and GPs in jointly deciding upon the referral decision. In the healthcare service provision model, we define three types of profiles which represent different stakeholders' requirements. This model also comprises a set of healthcare service discovery processes: articulating a service need, matching the need with the healthcare service offerings, and deciding on a best-fit service for acceptance. As a result, the healthcare service provision can carry out coherent analysis using personalised information and iterative processes that deal with requirements which change over time.

  1. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS. PMID:26656389

  2. Process improvement in healthcare: Overall resource efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mast, de, J.; Kemper, B; Does, R.J.M.M.; Mandjes, M.; Bijl, van der, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a unifying and quantitative conceptual framework for healthcare processes from the viewpoint of process improvement. The work adapts standard models from operation management to the specifics of healthcare processes. We propose concepts for organizational modeling of healthcare processes, breaking down work into micro processes, tasks, and resources. In addition, we propose an axiological model which breaks down general performance goals into process metrics. The co...

  3. Sustainable Healthcare - A National Swedish Innovation Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Pereno, Amina

    2015-01-01

    For the past year a constellation of different stakeholders have been working with a National Swedish Innovation Agenda on Sustainable Healthcare. Numerous meetings, workshops and interviews have been conducted to sort out what actions need to be implemented so that Sustainable Healthcare can grow and become a bigger part of the Swedish innovation, economy and export. This short English version of the Innovation Agenda summarizes the definition of sustainable healthcare, key stakeholders of s...

  4. Complexity science and leadership in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    2001-10-01

    The emerging field of complexity science offers an alternative leadership strategy for the chaotic, complex healthcare environment. A survey revealed that healthcare leaders intuitively support principles of complexity science. Leadership that uses complexity principles offers opportunities in the chaotic healthcare environment to focus less on prediction and control and more on fostering relationships and creating conditions in which complex adaptive systems can evolve to produce creative outcomes. PMID:11676217

  5. Enterprise Resource Planning systems in healthcare sector

    OpenAIRE

    Mucheleka, M. (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis work was to find out how Enterprise Resource Planning systems (ERP) have been used in the healthcare sector and how ERP systems could be used to improve the healthcare services. Some findings were discussed and recommendations were made about how ERP systems could be used in the healthcare sector. The thesis was written using literature review research method. Literature is the study that involves gathering and studying earlier knowledge about a specific topic ...

  6. A proposed rural healthcare ethics agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W.; Pomerantz, A; Howard, K; Bushy, A

    2007-01-01

    The unique context of the rural setting provides special challenges to furnishing ethical healthcare to its approximately 62 million inhabitants. Although rural communities are widely diverse, most have the following common features: limited economic resources, shared values, reduced health status, limited availability of and accessibility to healthcare services, overlapping professional–patient relationships and care giver stress. These rural features shape common healthcare ethical issues, ...

  7. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    OpenAIRE

    Vrugt, van de, Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity issues and improving efficiency in the delivery of healthcare, but appears to be lacking implementation in practice. This thesis displays OR research that focuses both on theoretical results and prac...

  8. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P.; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2013-01-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the ...

  9. Contact Allergy in Danish Healthcare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Sommerlund, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitis in healthcare workers is a pan-European problem. We conducted a retrospective observational study of the patch-test results of 1402 healthcare workers and 1402 matched controls with contact dermatitis who were treated at 3 hospitals departments in Denmark between 2007 and 2014...... in healthcare workers was significantly associated with having occupational contact dermatitis, hand dermatitis and older age. In conclusion, we report here a potential problem of contact allergy to thiurams in healthcare workers with contact dermatitis. Legislative authorities may in the future focus...

  10. Value-based procurement: Canada's healthcare imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Value-based healthcare models are being adopted globally to maximize value for patients. Given that procurement is at the heart of purchasing value, value-based procurement goes hand in hand with value-based healthcare. Shifting procurement's traditional focus on short-term cost savings to a more holistic objective that includes health system performance and patient outcomes, giving preference to longer-term cost efficiencies, and working with suppliers to identify opportunities to develop more innovative products and services, is proving successful in leading jurisdictions. This article presents an overview of value within healthcare systems and how healthcare value-based procurement is being implemented across various jurisdictions. PMID:27278137

  11. Healthcare operations management through use of simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafee, Navonil; Williams, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades healthcare organisations have grown in size and complexity and healthcare costs have outpaced economic growth. In countries where healthcare is publicly-funded, increasing costs have traditionally meant a rise in the healthcare budgets in real terms; however, the ongoing global financial and economic crisis (2007-present) has had spending implications on governmental budgets for public resources in several countries. This apparent contradiction - "provide better service at a lesser cost" - which may last for years to come therefore necessitates the careful use of the allo

  12. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool. PMID:21841396

  13. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garefalakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcare organizations improves their functionality, simplifies their business processes, assure the quality of care services and helps their management accounting and controlling. This study presents also the stages required for the implementation of ERP system in healthcare organizations. This study utilizes a literature review in order to reach the research conclusions. Specifically, through related case studies and research, it examines how ERP systems are used to evaluate the better functionality of the healthcare organizations, addressing in parallel important problems, and possible malfunctions. The implementation of ERP systems in healthcare organizations promises to evolve and align strictly to the organizations’ corporate objectives and high-levels of healthcare quality. In order to accomplish this goal, the right decisions should be made by the managers of the healthcare organization regarding the choice of the appropriate ERP system following its installation and its application. Limited research exists on the significance ERP systems implementation in healthcare organizations, while possible dysfunctions and challenges during its installation and implementation are recorded. Therefore, new evidence in the significance of ERP systems in healthcare organization is provided.

  14. Developing Ethical Competence in Healthcare Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenström, Erica; Ohlsson, Jon; Höglund, Anna T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight essential learning processes to develop healthcare managers' ethical competence. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews…

  15. Quality-driven efficiency in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky

    2012-01-01

    During the upcoming decades, healthcare organizations face the challenge to deliver more patient care, of higher quality, and with less financial and human resources. The goal of this thesis is to help and guide healthcare professionals making their organizations future-proof. Building on techniques

  16. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  17. Process improvement in healthcare: Overall resource efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Mast; B. Kemper; R.J.M.M. Does; M. Mandjes; Y. van der Bijl

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a unifying and quantitative conceptual framework for healthcare processes from the viewpoint of process improvement. The work adapts standard models from operation management to the specifics of healthcare processes. We propose concepts for organizational modeling of healt

  18. Tailor-made quality systems in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, JD; Broekhuis, H

    2000-01-01

    At present many healthcare organizations are being pressed by national governments or client groups to develop and implement quality systems. Unfortunately, not much is known about the development and implementation of these systems in healthcare organizations. There still are definition questions t

  19. Integrating Healthcare Ethical Issues into IS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellucci, Leigh W.; Layman, Elizabeth J.; Campbell, Robert; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Federal initiatives are encouraging the increase of IS graduates to work in the healthcare environment because they possess knowledge of datasets and dataset management that are key to effective management of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information technology (IT). IS graduates will be members of the healthcare team, and as such,…

  20. Healthcare Identifiers legislation: a whiff of fourberie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Danuta

    2010-05-01

    The Healthcare Identifiers Bill 2010 (Cth), which will establish "the national e-health Healthcare Identifiers Service to provide that patients, healthcare providers and provider organisations can be consistently identified", is in the process of being enacted by the Australian Federal Parliament. The legislation will enable the government to assign to each "healthcare recipient" a 26-digit electronic "Healthcare Identifier", which will be accessible, with or without the recipient's consent, to a broad range of health care service providers as well as other entities. The individual Healthcare Identifier file will initially contain such identifying information as, where applicable, the Medicare number and/or the Veterans' Affairs number; name; address; gender; date of birth; and "the date of birth accuracy indicator" presumably birth certificate. However, since each "service" provided by a health care provider to a health care recipient will be automatically recorded on each individual's Healthcare Identifier file, in time these electronic files should contain a full record of such services or contacts. Moreover, the Healthcare Identifiers are considered a "key" to, or a "foundation stone" for, the implementation of the shared electronic health records scheme, because they will enable linkage with and retrieval of each patient's clinical records throughout the health care service system. However, there has been virtually no discussion about the legal, ethical and social implications of this legislation. PMID:20552931

  1. Individualized Healthcare Plans (IHP). Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that students whose healthcare needs affect or have the potential to affect safe and optimal school attendance and academic performance require the professional school nurse to write an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP), in collaboration with the student, family, educators,…

  2. Discourse Analysis of Encouragement in Healthcare Manga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Smith, Ian; Uchimura, Mari

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how healthcare professionals use encouragement. Focusing on GAMBARU ["to try hard"], forty-one scenes were collected from healthcare manga. Each scene of encouragement was analyzed from three perspectives; the contextual background of the communication, the relationship with the patients and the patients' response to the…

  3. The Roadside Healthcare Facility Location Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. de Vries (Harwin); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Providing African truck drivers with adequate access to healthcare is an effective way to reduce the burden and the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases. Therefore, NGO North Star Alliance builds a network of healthcare facilities along major African trucking rou

  4. Healthcare priority setting in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukachi, Salome A.; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Siso, Jared Maaka;

    2014-01-01

    improves the priority setting decisions. This paper describes the healthcare priority setting processes in Malindi district, Kenya, prior to the implementation of A4R in 2008 and evaluates the process for its conformance with the conditions for A4R. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions with key...... players in the Malindi district health system and a review of key policy documents and national guidelines show that the priority setting process in the district relies heavily on guidelines from the national level, making it more of a vertical, top-down orientation. Multilateral and donor agencies......, national government, budgetary requirements, traditions and local culture influence the process. The four conditions of A4R are present within the priority setting process, albeit to varying degrees and referred to by different terms. There exists an opportunity for A4R to provide a guiding approach within...

  5. Study on healthcare magnetic concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yushan; DONG Faqin; FENG Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic concrete was prepared by adding SrFe12O9 magnetic functional elementary material into concrete, and its magnetism was charged by magnetizing machine. The effect of SrFe12O9 content on magnetic field intensity and the attenuation of magnetic field intensity were investigated in different medium. The blood viscosity of rats kept in magnetic concrete was carried out. The results show that magnetic concrete can be prepared by adding SrFe12O9, and magnetic fields intensity increases with the augment of ferrite content. The attenuation of magnetic fields is mainly related with the density of medium, but it is secondary to the properties of medium. The blood viscosity of rats decreases under magnetic condition, but the blood cells remain the same as before. Experimental results support that magnetic concrete has great healthcare function.

  6. Understanding bullying in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Bullying is a pervasive problem in healthcare organisations. Inquiries and reports on patient care and poor practice in the NHS have emphasised the substantial negative effects this behaviour may have on patient care. If bullying is to be addressed, it is crucial we develop clarity about what behaviours constitute bullying and how these behaviours differ from other negative behaviours in the workplace. It is important that we recognise the extent of the problem; statistics on the prevalence of bullying are likely to be an underestimate because of under-reporting of bullying. Effective interventions may only be designed and implemented if there is knowledge about what precipitates bullying and the magnitude of the changes required in organisations to tackle bullying. Individuals should also be aware of the options that are available to them should they be the target of bullying behaviour and what they should do if they witness bullying in their workplace. PMID:26639294

  7. Imagined Potentialities of Healthcare Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on health care technologies and initiatives, particularly, Electronic Health Records (EHRs). These technologies are ascribed various potentialities, attributing them the capacity to do a wide range of things, from improving efficiency to saving medical costs and even saving......, and actions taken toward, these technologies. To better understand the material and discursive processes that are at play in shaping our present and future understanding of EHR technologies, the paper offers the analytical notion of imagined potentialities, whereby a technology is imagined to possess...... into existence, to produce growth, development, etc. The adjective imagined is added to convey the resources of imagination that are at play in shaping futures of healthcare technologies. These are derived from the world as it is but also as it is imagined to be. I argue that imagined potentialities can re...

  8. Integration of mental healthcare into primary healthcare in Lagos, Nigeria: the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele O. Coker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Lagos State Ministry of Health recently launched its Mental Health Policy aimed at addressing the mental health needs the residents of the State. The policy also aimed at reducing the mental disorders treatment gap in the state by integrating mental healthcare into the primary healthcare in order to make mental healthcare services closer and accessible for residents of the State. This paper therefore critically reviews the rationale for the integration, magnitude of problems in Lagos State with regards to mental healthcare services, available resources, challenges in providing mental healthcare services, recommendations for successful integration, the necessary advocacy needed to implement the integration and benefits of the integration.

  9. [Cartography of healthcare for pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Raimunda Magalhães da; Costa, Milena Silva; Matsue, Regina Yoshie; Sousa, Girliani Silva de; Catrib, Ana Maria Fontenelle; Vieira, Luiza Jane Eyre de Souza

    2012-03-01

    This work uses cartography as a method for mapping the trajectory of primary healthcare provided to pregnant women. The scope of the study comprises 9 Basic Healthcare Units located in the city of Juazeiro do Norte in the State of Ceará. In all, fifteen women in the 37th to 39th week of pregnancy were selected. Interviews were conducted with these women during the period from January to June 2010. The cartographic findings were depicted in stages in the flowchart, which exposed lacunas in prenatal healthcare, such as the low number of oncotic cytology exams conducted and the lack of educational counseling. Nevertheless, in the interviews, a significant number of pregnant women expressed satisfaction with the prenatal care provided. The good relationships developed between the healthcare professionals and the pregnant women were the main reason that led them to continue the treatment. This fact reinforces the importance of dialogue between these two actors for the success of prenatal healthcare.

  10. Guest editorial. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Valerdi, Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    The use of integrated information systems for healthcare has been started more than a decade ago. In recent years, rapid advances in information integration methods have spurred tremendous growth in the use of integrated information systems in healthcare delivery. Various techniques have been used for probing such integrated systems. These techniques include service-oriented architecture (SOA), EAI, workflow management, grid computing, and others. Many applications require a combination of these techniques, which gives rise to the emergence of enterprise systems in healthcare. Development of the techniques originated from different disciplines has the potential to significantly improve the performance of enterprise systems in healthcare. This editorial paper briefly introduces the enterprise systems in the perspective of healthcare informatics. PMID:22760931

  11. Healthcare Data Analytics on the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Bhattacharya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meaningful analysis of voluminous health information has always been a challenge in most healthcare organizations. Accurate and timely information required by the management to lead a healthcare organization through the challenges found in the industry can be obtained using business intelligence (BI or business analytics tools. However, these require large capital investments to implement and support the large volumes of data that needs to be analyzed to identify trends. They also require enormous processing power which places pressure on the business resources in addition to the dynamic changes in the digital technology. This paper evaluates the various nuances of business analytics of healthcare hosted on the cloud computing environment. The paper explores BI being offered as Software as a Service (SaaS solution towards offering meaningful use of information for improving functions in healthcare enterprise. It also attempts to identify the challenges that healthcare enterprises face when making use of a BI SaaS solution.

  12. Register-based studies of healthcare costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Christiansen, Terkel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and a few examples of how national registers are used in analyses of healthcare costs in Denmark. Research topics: The paper focuses on health economic analyses based on register data. For the sake of simplicity, the studies are divided...... into three main categories: economic evaluations of healthcare interventions, cost-of-illness analyses, and other analyses such as assessments of healthcare productivity. Conclusion: We examined a number of studies using register-based data on healthcare costs. Use of register-based data renders...... a comprehensive data material, often in the form of time series, which is very useful in health economic analyses. The disadvantage of register-based data is the use of tariffs, charges, or market prices as proxies for costs in the computation of healthcare costs....

  13. Architecture Capabilities to Improve Healthcare Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ebrahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physical environment of healthcare buildings has great importance in issues such as patient safety, functional efficiency, user satisfaction, healthcare outcomes, and energy and resources consumption.Objectives: The present study assesses physical environments of Iranian healthcare buildings.Materials and Methods: This study was performed using a descriptive-analytical method. Data collection was carried out via a written questionnaire.Results: Based on the findings of this study, "functional efficiency", "user satisfaction", "environmental issues", "patient safety”, “accountability in incidents and disasters", and "flexibility" are regarded as the most issues in the country's hospitals. Also, none of the parameters is "without any problem" and has a "desirable status".Conclusions: According to the responses, all of the healthcare buildings in this research had flaws in their physical environment, which require attention. Thus, it is necessary to review and pay more attention to the architecture of the country's healthcare buildings.

  14. Healthcare Data Gateways: Found Healthcare Intelligence on Blockchain with Novel Privacy Risk Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao; Wang, Huiju; Jin, Dawei; Li, Mingqiang; Jiang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Healthcare data are a valuable source of healthcare intelligence. Sharing of healthcare data is one essential step to make healthcare system smarter and improve the quality of healthcare service. Healthcare data, one personal asset of patient, should be owned and controlled by patient, instead of being scattered in different healthcare systems, which prevents data sharing and puts patient privacy at risks. Blockchain is demonstrated in the financial field that trusted, auditable computing is possible using a decentralized network of peers accompanied by a public ledger. In this paper, we proposed an App (called Healthcare Data Gateway (HGD)) architecture based on blockchain to enable patient to own, control and share their own data easily and securely without violating privacy, which provides a new potential way to improve the intelligence of healthcare systems while keeping patient data private. Our proposed purpose-centric access model ensures patient own and control their healthcare data; simple unified Indicator-Centric Schema (ICS) makes it possible to organize all kinds of personal healthcare data practically and easily. We also point out that MPC (Secure Multi-Party Computing) is one promising solution to enable untrusted third-party to conduct computation over patient data without violating privacy. PMID:27565509

  15. Health insurance coverage, income distribution and healthcare quality in local healthcare markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianov, Damian S; Pagán, José A

    2013-08-01

    We develop a theoretical model of a local healthcare system in which consumers, health insurance companies, and healthcare providers interact with each other in markets for health insurance and healthcare services. When income and health status are heterogeneous, and healthcare quality is associated with fixed costs, the market equilibrium level of healthcare quality will be underprovided. Thus, healthcare reform provisions and proposals to cover the uninsured can be interpreted as an attempt to correct this market failure. We illustrate with a numerical example that if consumers at the local level clearly understand the linkages between health insurance coverage and the quality of local healthcare services, health insurance coverage proposals are more likely to enjoy public support.

  16. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management: Experiences from the Danish healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...... of the well-known and universal lean management principles in the context of the healthcare this paper will attempt to formulate and test four hypotheses about possible barriers to the successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The first hypothesis states that lean management in healthcare...... still is in its infancy and it is just a matter of letting sufficient time pass in order have a successful implementation of lean in all areas of healthcare. The second hypothesis states that a major barrier to lean management in healthcare simply is lacking understanding of the lean concepts leading...

  17. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for..., Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, NCEZID, CDC, l600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop A-07,...

  18. 78 FR 62636 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... surveillance of healthcare associated infections (HAI) and antimicrobial resistance, and developing a process... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Healthcare Quality Promotion, the Director, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious...

  19. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in...

  20. Healthcare professionals' self-reported experiences and preferences related to direct healthcare professional communications : a survey conducted in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, S.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; de Graeff, P.A.; Straus, S.M.; Mol, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. Obje

  1. Healthcare Professionals' Self-Reported Experiences and Preferences Related to Direct Healthcare Professional Communications A Survey Conducted in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, Sigrid; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; Straus, Sabine M. J. M.; Mol, Peter G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. Obje

  2. Monitoring: the eyes and ears of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donabedian, A

    1988-11-01

    Society and the healthcare profession are bound by a contract, sealed with the healthcare practitioner's obligation to competence, integrity, and humaneness. Society confers privileges on the practitioner, who, in turn, accepts the obligations that society also imposes. Nevertheless, repeated assessments under all sorts of conditions have revealed unexpected, often serious defects in the quality of healthcare. The quality of healthcare depends on the performance of practitioners in a healthcare system--how much and how they improve health. The means used should be socially legitimate, acceptable to patients, and economically efficient. Some key elements and considerations in the performance of a healthcare system include patient care, population care, patient access to the system, outcomes, patient satisfaction, and the nature of the patient-practitioner encounter. Not knowing how to assess technical care, patients judge quality mainly by the attributes of the interpersonal relationship with practitioners--personal interest, empathy, responsiveness, and trust--and by whether the outcomes of care meet their expectations. Some requirements for maintaining and enhancing quality include values, human and material resources, knowledge, system design, and performance monitoring. Without a commitment to quality, healthcare practitioners betray not only those who trust them, but also themselves. PMID:10290847

  3. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  4. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2013-09-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  5. Board Governance: Transformational Approaches Under Healthcare Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastocki, Deborah K

    2015-01-01

    Previous successes of healthcare organizations and effective governance practices in the pre-reform environment are not predictive of future success. Healthcare has been through numerous phases of growth and development using tried-and-true strategies. The challenge is that our toolbox does not contain what is needed to build the future healthcare delivery systems required in the post-reform world. Healthcare has had a parochial focus at the local level, with some broadening of horizons at the state and national levels. But healthcare delivery is now a global issue that requires a totally different perspective, and many countries are confronting similar issues. US healthcare reform initiatives have far-reaching implications. Compounding the reform dynamics are the simultaneously occurring, gamechanging accelerants such as enabling information technologies and mobile health, new providers of healthcare, increased consumer demands, and limited healthcare dollars, to name a few. Operating in this turbulent environment requires transformational board, executive, and physician leadership because traditional ways of planning for incremental change and attempting to time those adjustments can prove disastrous. Creating the legacy healthcare system for tomorrow requires governing boards and executive leadership to act today as they would in the desired future system. Boards need to create a culture that fosters.innovation with a tolerance for risk and some failure. To provide effective governance, boards must essentially develop new skills, expertise, and ways of thinking. The rapid rate of change requires board members to possess certain capabilities, including the ability to deal with ambiguity and uncertainty while demonstrating flexibility and adaptability, all with a driving commitment to metrics and results. This requires development plans for both individual members and the overall board. In short, the board needs to function differently, particularly regarding the

  6. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareli M Claassens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. METHODS: One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. RESULTS: The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02 as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08. In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08. CONCLUSION: The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB.

  7. Retrenchment strategies and tactics for healthcare executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, H J; Smith, H L

    1985-01-01

    Retrenchment is a problem confronting many public, private, and voluntary healthcare organizations. With budgetary restrictions in the public sector and the shift toward prospective payment systems and diagnosis-related reimbursement by third-party payors, healthcare executives must address several dilemmas and choices. Yet, retrenchment should not necessarily be viewed as a problem with limited alternatives. It may represent a time for capitalizing on opportunities and for creating innovation within healthcare institutions. Indeed, innovation may represent the only means for survival. This article evaluates the management strategies that transform retrenchment from a problem into an opportunity.

  8. E-Healthcare Supported by Big Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqi Liu; Jiafu Wan; Shenghua He; Yanlin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The era of open information in healthcare has arrived. E-healthcare supported by big data supports the move toward greater trans-parency in healthcare by making decades of stored health data searchable and usable. This paper gives an overview the e-health-care architecture. We discuss the four layers of the architecture-data collection, data transport, data storage, and data analysis-as well as the challenges of data security, data privacy, real-time delivery, and open standard interface. We discuss the necessity of establishing an impeccably secure access mechanism and of enacting strong laws to protect patient privacy.

  9. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. PMID:12563583

  10. Innovation in healthcare: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberg, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Innovation is a frequently used buzzword in healthcare. This article will clarify innovation as a process requiring leadership, among other factors, in order to occur. The concept of innovation will be defined, as well as the precedents and consequences. This exploration will serve as the definition of healthcare innovation and provide a clearer definition for future literature and research in healthcare, especially related to leadership and change. It is the purpose for this article to allow the reader to think about innovation in a critical manner and begin to add substantive meaning related to it.

  11. Technology and the future of healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Thimbleby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare changes dramatically because of technological developments, from anesthetics and antibiotics to magnetic resonance imaging scanners and radiotherapy. Future technological innovation is going to keep transforming healthcare, yet while technologies (new drugs and treatments, new devices, new social media support for healthcare, etc will drive innovation, human factors will remain one of the stable limitations of breakthroughs. No predictions can satisfy everybody; instead, this article explores fragments of the future to see how to think more clearly about how to get where we want to go.

  12. Championship management for healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    2000-01-01

    Stakeholders will put increasing pressure on integrated health systems (IHS) for measured performance, demanding data on quality and patient satisfaction, while simultaneously pressing for lower cost. The changes to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission) and the growing importance of the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) are simply forerunners of an intensifying trend. Quality of care in particular will face increasing scrutiny. Achieving competitive targets in these areas will also require measures addressing demand and worker satisfaction. "Balanced scorecard" approaches will allow IHS and their accountable work groups to track performance on several dimensions and establish integrated goals or targets. Those with consistently good scores will be labeled "champions." Champions will support the multidimensional measures with improved decision processes. About eight major processes will be central--governance/strategic management, clinical quality, clinical organization, financial planning, planning and marketing, information services, human resources, and plant services. It is possible to map these processes to the criteria of the Joint Commission, NCQA, and Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. The processes themselves can be measured and common weaknesses identified and corrected. Champions share some common characteristics that seem to arise from the combination of processes and measures. Among these characteristics are service line orientation, extensive partnering with other organizations, and the possibility of outsourcing organizational components.

  13. Championship management for healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    2000-01-01

    Stakeholders will put increasing pressure on integrated health systems (IHS) for measured performance, demanding data on quality and patient satisfaction, while simultaneously pressing for lower cost. The changes to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission) and the growing importance of the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) are simply forerunners of an intensifying trend. Quality of care in particular will face increasing scrutiny. Achieving competitive targets in these areas will also require measures addressing demand and worker satisfaction. "Balanced scorecard" approaches will allow IHS and their accountable work groups to track performance on several dimensions and establish integrated goals or targets. Those with consistently good scores will be labeled "champions." Champions will support the multidimensional measures with improved decision processes. About eight major processes will be central--governance/strategic management, clinical quality, clinical organization, financial planning, planning and marketing, information services, human resources, and plant services. It is possible to map these processes to the criteria of the Joint Commission, NCQA, and Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. The processes themselves can be measured and common weaknesses identified and corrected. Champions share some common characteristics that seem to arise from the combination of processes and measures. Among these characteristics are service line orientation, extensive partnering with other organizations, and the possibility of outsourcing organizational components. PMID:11066948

  14. The US healthcare workforce and the labor market effect on healthcare spending and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Qian, Jing

    2014-06-01

    The healthcare sector was one of the few sectors of the US economy that created new positions in spite of the recent economic downturn. Economic contractions are associated with worsening morbidity and mortality, declining private health insurance coverage, and budgetary pressure on public health programs. This study examines the causes of healthcare employment growth and workforce composition in the US and evaluates the labor market's impact on healthcare spending and health outcomes. Data are collected for 50 states and the District of Columbia from 1999-2009. Labor market and healthcare workforce data are obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Mortality and health status data are collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vital Statistics program and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Healthcare spending data are derived from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dynamic panel data regression models, with instrumental variables, are used to examine the effect of the labor market on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality. Regression analysis is also performed to model the effects of healthcare spending on the healthcare workforce composition. All statistical tests are based on a two-sided [Formula: see text] significance of [Formula: see text] .05. Analyses are performed with STATA and SAS. The labor force participation rate shows a more robust effect on healthcare spending, morbidity, and mortality than the unemployment rate. Study results also show that declining labor force participation negatively impacts overall health status ([Formula: see text] .01), and mortality for males ([Formula: see text] .05) and females ([Formula: see text] .001), aged 16-64. Further, the Medicaid and Medicare spending share increases as labor force participation declines ([Formula: see text] .001); whereas, the private healthcare spending share decreases ([Formula: see text] .001). Public and private healthcare spending also

  15. The healthcare system and provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 4: Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaskinos, P; Koletsi-Kounari, H; Economou, C; Eaton, K A; Widström, E

    2016-03-11

    This paper presents a description of the healthcare system and how oral healthcare is organised and provided in Greece, a country in a deep economic and social crisis. The national health system is underfunded, with severe gaps in staffing levels and the country has a large private healthcare sector. Oral healthcare has been largely provided in the private sector. Most people are struggling to survive and have no money to spend on general and oral healthcare. Unemployment is rising and access to healthcare services is more difficult than ever. Additionally, there has been an overproduction of dentists and no development of team dentistry. This has led to under or unemployment of dentists in Greece and their migration to other European Union member states, such as the United Kingdom, where over 600 Greek dentists are currently working. PMID:26964601

  16. The road to recovery: Egypt's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Donald Robert; Bég, Sama A

    2012-01-01

    As many industrial and third-world countries recover from the severe economic crisis of a global recession, they continue to struggle with its negative effect on their healthcare systems. Healthcare reform has become a leading policy agenda item for most countries. This is especially true for countries in the developing world who are struggling to allocate very limited resources to meet the growing health needs of their residents and the expectations of global health. In the late 1990s, the Egyptian government, in conjunction with the United States Agency for International Development, initiated a Health Sector Reform Program (HSRP) to completely reform the way healthcare was financed, organized and delivered with the intent to extend healthcare coverage to all of its citizens. Although some successes have resulted from the HSRP, Egypt's new government leaders will need to be informed on policies that may more effectively improve the health of the Egyptian population. PMID:21638310

  17. Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us at: https://info.ahrq.gov . Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your ... Go to Online Store Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women Selected Findings From the ...

  18. The Rise of a European Healthcare Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare has only slowly appeared on the European Union’s (EU) policy agenda. EU involvement in policies concerning the organization, financing and the provision of diagnosis, care and cures to ill people developed along three fragmented tracks: (a) EU public health policies concerning the well...... are whether this fragmented EU involvement has now developed into a distinct European healthcare union, and if so what its driving forces have been. Thus, it explores how European integration in healthcare has moved forward despite widespread reluctance. It also examines the underexplored political dynamics...... and implementation of CJEU case law. The conclusion is that a fragile European healthcare union is emerging. A distinct area of EU health law has come into existence, whereas an institutional structure has given a voice to health expertise. A certain commonality in patients’ rights has also emerged. The EU...

  19. Environmental sustainability in European public healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate concerning the influence of leadership on environmental sustainability implementation in European public healthcare organisations. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a viewpoint. It is based on preliminary analysis of European standards dedicated to environmental sustainability and their spread across Europe in public healthcare organisations. Viewpoints concerning leadership are then discussed and asserted. Findings - This paper found a limited implementation of standards such as Green Public Procurement criteria, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme and ISO 14001 in public healthcare. Some clues indicate that the lack of implementation is related to leadership and management commitment. Originality/value - For the first time, this paper investigates relationships between leadership and environmental sustainability in European public healthcare opening further avenues of research on the subject. PMID:26764957

  20. Education for healthcare clinical support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin; Kelly, Shona

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the current situation regarding the provision of education and training for healthcare clinical support workers (HCSWs). In the UK, there has been an increasing reliance on unqualified clinical support staff to provide a significant proportion of the direct patient care in all healthcare settings. HCSWs routinely undertake several nursing activities that were traditionally the responsibility of nursing students or junior staff nurses. There is a need for an urgent review of the training of healthcare support staff. A 'tick box' approach to training, with an emphasis on classroom-based or on-the-job learning, makes it difficult for HCSWs to integrate theory into practice, and supports a transactional approach to caring rather than a relational approach to caregiving. Lessons from the educational experiences of other healthcare groups should be applied to the training of HCSWs. An immersive, participatory teaching and learning strategy is one approach that could be used. PMID:26647705

  1. Leading ladies: women in healthcare leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Women represent an overwhelming majority of the healthcare workforce, yet they are significantly underrepresented in leadership positions, particularly at the executive and board levels. However, women are uniquely positioned to leverage traits such as compassion, transparency, and the ability to foster teamwork to lead organizations into the next phase of contemporary healthcare delivery. In the future, the pace with which women gain access to the C-suite will accelerate as organizations embrace diversity and select the best qualified leaders in terms of both experience and leadership style that supports organizational culture. While the future for women in healthcare leadership looks bright, many women are currently struggling to reach the executive office, facing glass ceilings, competing priorities, and lack of access to support and guidance. In this article I discuss the role of women in healthcare leadership and offer practical suggestions on how women can reach the top echelon and achieve their goals and aspirations. PMID:22787907

  2. Co-constructing IT and Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tariq; Bansler, Jørgen; Bjørn, Pernille;

    The CITH project (Co-constructing IT and Healthcare) is an ongoing 4-year interdisciplinary research project, which investigates while intervenes in the collaborative practices involved in disease management of chronic heart patients with an ICD (Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator)....

  3. Evaluating CRM Implementation in Healthcare Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Anshari, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, many healthcare organizations are adopting CRM as a strategy, which involves using technology to organize, automate, and coordinate business processes, in managing interactions with their patients. CRM with the Web technology provides healthcare providers the ability to broaden their services beyond usual practices, and thus offers suitable environment using latest technology to achieve superb patient care. This paper discusses and demonstrates how a new approach in CRM based on Web 2.0 will help the healthcare providers improving their customer support, avoiding conflict, and promoting better health to patient. With this new approach patients will benefit from the customized personal service with full information access to perform self managed their own health. It also helps healthcare providers retaining the right customer. A conceptual framework of the new approach will be discussed.

  4. Open Business Model Innovation in Healthcare Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Rasmussen, Ole Horn; Poulsen, Helle;

    2012-01-01

    from the European and US healthcare sectors. The paper focuses on the following research questions: • How can OBMI be defined? • How is OBMI used in the healthcare sector? The paper concludes by proposing a definition of open and close business models, and open and close business model innovations.......The Open Innovation and Open Business Model Innovation (OBMI) approach (Chesbrough 2005, 2008) has been one of the most discussed innovation frameworks in the 2000s, and probably one of the most important contributions to business model innovations (BMIs) since 2005. Managers in the healthcare...... sector responsible for innovations have also tried to adapt the OBMI approach as a tool among the numerous other innovation tools. The aim of the paper is to present an initial study of the implementation of the framework of OBMI in the European healthcare sector. The study is naturally inspired...

  5. Social Responsibility and Healthcare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    This article examines current trends and prospects in Finnish healthcare literature and discussion. The Finnish healthcare system was long considered to manifest an equal, universal, and solidaristic welfare scheme. However, recent data reveals structural inequalities in access to healthcare that result in health differences among socioeconomic groups. The political will aims at tackling these inequalities, but the ideological trend toward responsibilization of the individual taking place across political spheres elsewhere in Europe creates potential challenges to this goal. The applications of this trend have a theoretical background in the responsibility-sensitive egalitarian-or luck egalitarian-tradition. The theory, which is unfit for real-life policy applications, has explicit appeal in considerations aiming at the responsibilization of the individual within the healthcare sector. It remains to be seen in which direction the Finnish welfare schemes will continue to develop.

  6. Social Responsibility and Healthcare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    This article examines current trends and prospects in Finnish healthcare literature and discussion. The Finnish healthcare system was long considered to manifest an equal, universal, and solidaristic welfare scheme. However, recent data reveals structural inequalities in access to healthcare that result in health differences among socioeconomic groups. The political will aims at tackling these inequalities, but the ideological trend toward responsibilization of the individual taking place across political spheres elsewhere in Europe creates potential challenges to this goal. The applications of this trend have a theoretical background in the responsibility-sensitive egalitarian-or luck egalitarian-tradition. The theory, which is unfit for real-life policy applications, has explicit appeal in considerations aiming at the responsibilization of the individual within the healthcare sector. It remains to be seen in which direction the Finnish welfare schemes will continue to develop. PMID:27348829

  7. Environmental sustainability in European public healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate concerning the influence of leadership on environmental sustainability implementation in European public healthcare organisations. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a viewpoint. It is based on preliminary analysis of European standards dedicated to environmental sustainability and their spread across Europe in public healthcare organisations. Viewpoints concerning leadership are then discussed and asserted. Findings - This paper found a limited implementation of standards such as Green Public Procurement criteria, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme and ISO 14001 in public healthcare. Some clues indicate that the lack of implementation is related to leadership and management commitment. Originality/value - For the first time, this paper investigates relationships between leadership and environmental sustainability in European public healthcare opening further avenues of research on the subject.

  8. Screening for intimate partner violence in healthcare in Kano, Nigeria : Barriers and challenges for healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    John, Ime Akpan

    2010-01-01

    Background Though there has been increased advocacy for screening for Intimate partner violence (IPV) in healthcare over the past decades, data from developed country context suggest that only one in ten healthcare providers routinely screen for this phenomena suggesting barriers. Knowledge on the screening activity, with regard to IPV, and related barriers among healthcare providers in Sub-Saharan Africa is lacking. Aims The aim of this dissertation is to scrutinize ...

  9. Views of healthcare professionals to linkage of routinely collected healthcare data: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Hopf, Y.M.; Bond, C.; Francis, J.; Haughney, J; Helms, P J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the views of healthcare professionals to the linkage of healthcare data and to identify any potential barriers and/or facilitators to participation in a data linkage system. Methods: Published papers describing the views of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to data sharing and linkage were identified by searches of Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. The searches were limited to papers published in the English language from 2001 to 2011. ...

  10. Achieving compliance with healthcare waste management regulations : empirical evidence from small European healthcare units

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Anabela

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare units generate substantial amounts of hazardous or potentially hazardous wastes as by-products of their medical services. The inappropriate management of these wastes poses significant risks to people and the environment. In Portugal, as in other EU countries, the collection, storage, treatment and disposal of healthcare waste is regulated by law. Although legal provisions covering the safe management of healthcare waste date back to the 1990s, little is known about the compliance ...

  11. Integration of mental healthcare into primary healthcare in Lagos, Nigeria: the way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Ayodele O. Coker; Olufemi B. Olugbile; Olufemi Oluwatayo

    2015-01-01

    The Lagos State Ministry of Health recently launched its Mental Health Policy aimed at addressing the mental health needs the residents of the State. The policy also aimed at reducing the mental disorders treatment gap in the state by integrating mental healthcare into the primary healthcare in order to make mental healthcare services closer and accessible for residents of the State. This paper therefore critically reviews the rationale for the integration, magnitude of problems in Lagos Stat...

  12. Innovation for a Sustainable Healthcare: : How can patients improve their own healthcare?

    OpenAIRE

    Gabassi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    As the demographic pictures is changing across the Western world, healthcare costs are growing at unsustainable rates. In order to sustain the healthcare we’re used to in the Western world, new healthcare deliver strategies must be implemented. As the average person grows older, chronic diseases hit more people, requiring costly treatments for a growing part of the population. A successful approach could address the problem of medical adherence, together with increasing awareness among patien...

  13. Process Management Practices In Healthcare Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Şükrü Kılıç; Cumhur Aydınlı

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare institutions differ from other service businesses by their “matrix organizational structure” and “error-free output” requirement. However, the processes stay the same for all organizational activities at different levels. One of the post-modern management approach is to focus on basis of necessary processes and fundamental organizational changes. This case study aims to initially explain the characteristics of healthcare institutions and the ba...

  14. Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dishongh, Terrance J; Kuris, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This unique reference focuses on methods of application, validation and testing based on real deployments of sensor networks in the clinical and home environments. Key topics include healthcare and wireless sensors, sensor network applications, designs of experiments using sensors, data collection and decision making, clinical deployment of wireless sensor networks, contextual awareness medication prompting field trials in homes, social health monitoring, and the future of wireless sensor networks in healthcare.

  15. Distributed cognition for evaluating healthcare technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkomar, A.; Blandford, A.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed Cognition (DCog) has been proposed as being a better approach to analyzing healthcare work than traditional cognitive approaches, due to the collaborative nature of healthcare work. This study sought to explore this by applying two DCog frameworks, DiCoT and the Resources Model, to the analysis of infusion pump use in an Intensive Care Unit. Data was gathered through observations and interviews, and then analysed using DiCoT and the Resources Model to construct models representing...

  16. Determinants of maternal healthcare utilization in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Zimbabwe and other developing countries struggle to achieve millennium development goals originally set for 2015. To assist health policy making, there was an investigation of how demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors determine maternal healthcare services use in Zimbabwe. A logistic model for four different maternal healthcare services using data from the 2005/6 Zimbabwe Demographic Health Survey was estimated. Secondary education increases the odds of use of maternal health servic...

  17. Health-Care Reform for Childbirth

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2010-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the current health-care crisis and the need for health-care reform to promote, support, and protect natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  18. PRIMARY HEALTHCARE SERVICE QUALITY MEASUREMENT: SERVQUAL SCALE

    OpenAIRE

    Dijana Mečev; Ivana Kardum Goleš

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine customers’ perceptions of primary healthcare service quality in public institutions in the city of Šibenik. The research was aimed at investigating whether there is difference between customers` expectations and their satisfaction with received medical services. The findings suggest that primary healthcare public institutions need to improve all the dimensions of SERVQUAL service quality from the gap analysis carried out. Furthermore, the research analy...

  19. An analysis of healthcare providers' online ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Black; Lindsay Thompson; Heidi Saliba; Kara Dawson; Nicole Paradise Black

    2009-01-01

    Background Many websites allow consumers to evaluate their healthcare experience yet scant data exist that explore the type and content of reviews. Objective To evaluate and describe online healthcare provider reviews. Methods We analysed 16 703 ratings on 6101 providers from four US cities. Ratings spanned five categories and an overall provider score. We also performed text analyses of narrative commentary (n = 15 952). Results Providers had a high mean score for each category (3.7...

  20. Business resilience: Reframing healthcare risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Cynthia L

    2015-09-01

    The responsibility of risk management in healthcare is fractured, with multiple stakeholders. Most hospitals and healthcare systems do not have a fully integrated risk management system that spans the entire organizational and operational structure for the delivery of key services. This article provides insight toward utilizing a comprehensive Business Resilience program and associated methodology to understand and manage organizational risk leading to organizational effectiveness and operational efficiencies, with the fringe benefit of realizing sustainable operational capability during adverse conditions. PMID:26418138

  1. Patient involvement and service innovation in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Engström, Jon

    2014-01-01

    This thesis adds to a stream of research suggesting that healthcare can be more patient centered and efficient by redefining the role of the patient from a passive receiver to a more active and collaborative participant. This may relate to healthcare provision (Anderson and Funnell, 2005; Berry and Bendapudi, 2007; Bitner and Brown, 2008; McColl-Kennedy et al., 2012; Nordgren, 2008) and innovation (Bate and Robert, 2006; Groene et al., 2009; Longtin et al., 2010). Through research initiative ...

  2. Wicked problems in designing healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2009-10-01

    The design process for new healthcare facilities presents many wicked problems for nurse leaders with a number of stakeholders, a myriad of opinions, and numerous options to consider. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the concept of wicked problems is explored with application to the healthcare design situation using examples of design decisions frequently challenging nurse leaders.

  3. Performance management in healthcare: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewko, Sarah J; Cummings, Greta G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying theoretical assumptions and implications of current micro-level performance management and evaluation (PME) practices, specifically within health-care organizations. PME encompasses all activities that are designed and conducted to align employee outputs with organizational goals. Design/methodology/approach - PME, in the context of healthcare, is analyzed through the lens of critical theory. Specifically, Habermas' theory of communicative action is used to highlight some of the questions that arise in looking critically at PME. To provide a richer definition of key theoretical concepts, the authors conducted a preliminary, exploratory hermeneutic semantic analysis of the key words "performance" and "management" and of the term "performance management". Findings - Analysis reveals that existing micro-level PME systems in health-care organizations have the potential to create a workforce that is compliant, dependent, technically oriented and passive, and to support health-care systems in which inequalities and power imbalances are perpetually reinforced. Practical implications - At a time when the health-care system is under increasing pressure to provide high-quality, affordable services with fewer resources, it may be wise to investigate new sector-specific ways of evaluating and managing performance. Originality/value - In this paper, written for health-care leaders and health human resource specialists, the theoretical assumptions and implications of current PME practices within health-care organizations are explored. It is hoped that readers will be inspired to support innovative PME practices within their organizations that encourage peak performance among health-care professionals. PMID:26764960

  4. Customer privacy on UK healthcare websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Darren P

    2006-09-01

    Privacy has been and continues to be one of the key challenges of an age devoted to the accumulation, processing, and mining of electronic information. In particular, privacy of healthcare-related information is seen as a key issue as health organizations move towards the electronic provision of services. The aim of the research detailed in this paper has been to analyse privacy policies on popular UK healthcare-related websites to determine the extent to which consumer privacy is protected. The author has combined approaches (such as approaches focused on usability, policy content, and policy quality) used in studies by other researchers on e-commerce and US healthcare websites to provide a comprehensive analysis of UK healthcare privacy policies. The author identifies a wide range of issues related to the protection of consumer privacy through his research analysis using quantitative results. The main outcomes from the author's research are that only 61% of healthcare-related websites in their sample group posted privacy policies. In addition, most of the posted privacy policies had poor readability standards and included a variety of privacy vulnerability statements. Overall, the author's findings represent significant current issues in relation to healthcare information protection on the Internet. The hope is that raising awareness of these results will drive forward changes in the industry, similar to those experienced with information quality. PMID:16954055

  5. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare.

  6. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare. PMID:27119398

  7. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Naenna, Thanakorn; Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand...

  8. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. D...

  9. Engineering healthcare as a service system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, James M; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J

    2010-01-01

    Engineering has and will continue to have a critical impact on healthcare; the application of technology-based techniques to biological problems can be defined to be technobiology applications. This paper is primarily focused on applying the technobiology approach of systems engineering to the development of a healthcare service system that is both integrated and adaptive. In general, healthcare services are carried out with knowledge-intensive agents or components which work together as providers and consumers to create or co-produce value. Indeed, the engineering design of a healthcare system must recognize the fact that it is actually a complex integration of human-centered activities that is increasingly dependent on information technology and knowledge. Like any service system, healthcare can be considered to be a combination or recombination of three essential components - people (characterized by behaviors, values, knowledge, etc.), processes (characterized by collaboration, customization, etc.) and products (characterized by software, hardware, infrastructures, etc.). Thus, a healthcare system is an integrated and adaptive set of people, processes and products. It is, in essence, a system of systems which objectives are to enhance its efficiency (leading to greater interdependency) and effectiveness (leading to improved health). Integration occurs over the physical, temporal, organizational and functional dimensions, while adaptation occurs over the monitoring, feedback, cybernetic and learning dimensions. In sum, such service systems as healthcare are indeed complex, especially due to the uncertainties associated with the human-centered aspects of these systems. Moreover, the system complexities can only be dealt with methods that enhance system integration and adaptation. PMID:20543250

  10. Healthcare practitioners' personal and professional values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-05-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC databases for articles on personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners and students. We extracted values from included papers and synthesized them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We summarised the framework within the context of healthcare practice. We identified 128 values from 50 included articles from doctors, nurses and allied health professionals. A new framework for the identified values established the following broad healthcare practitioner values, corresponding to Schwartz values (in parentheses): authority (power); capability (achievement); pleasure (hedonism); intellectual stimulation (stimulation); critical-thinking (self-direction); equality (universalism); altruism (benevolence); morality (tradition); professionalism (conformity); safety (security) and spirituality (spirituality). The most prominent values identified were altruism, equality and capability. This review identified a comprehensive set of personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners. We integrated these into a single framework derived from Schwartz's values model. This framework can be used to assess personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners across professional groups, and can help improve practitioners' awareness of their values so they can negotiate more patient-centred decisions. A common values framework across professional groups can support shared education strategies on values and help improve interprofessional teamwork and decision-making. PMID:26215664

  11. Healthcare @ the speed of thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, J D

    1999-05-01

    opportunity to play a leadership role. A number of the sites reviewed for this article, for example, offer the patient the ability to develop his or her own health record and maintain it on the web. It is not conceivable that a healthcare system, along with its affiliated physician, might develop a secure web site that included a combined inpatient and outpatient rcord, accessible electronically by patients and authorized providers from any telephone in the world. It is clear that armed with Internet data, consumers will play an increasingly important role in their own care. Employers are acquiescing to their demands for increasing choice. Copayments are also going up and employees are likely to vote with their feet in selecting providers. Companies like WebMd, Physicians Online, Planetrx.com, drugstore.com, Yahoo and the other mentioned above are filling a need. It should be a wakeup call for healthcare systems and physicians. According to the latest data from Medimetrix, (see medimetrix.com), the most frequently visited health sites on the web today are Intelihealth.com (Johns Hopkins), Mayohealth.org, and OnHealth.com. These sites provide a highly interactive experience for consumers and tons of news and information. They are compelling and traffic-building, have fresh news that is frequently updated and many are transaction. That's what people want. There are so many potential uses of the Internet for physicians and hospitals that it is difficult to properly cover them in this article. Why shouldn't a patient be able to check the status of their account? Has the insurance paid? Is there a patient balance? Consumers can check their bank balances on the Internet. Why not their hospital or medical office accounts? Why not let them pay their balances online? As noted above, some the the HMOs are providing account status information to patients already. Why not the hospitals and physicians? Web sites are multiplying like rabbits. It's going to take a lot of effort to

  12. [Big data in medicine and healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüping, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare is one of the business fields with the highest Big Data potential. According to the prevailing definition, Big Data refers to the fact that data today is often too large and heterogeneous and changes too quickly to be stored, processed, and transformed into value by previous technologies. The technological trends drive Big Data: business processes are more and more executed electronically, consumers produce more and more data themselves - e.g. in social networks - and finally ever increasing digitalization. Currently, several new trends towards new data sources and innovative data analysis appear in medicine and healthcare. From the research perspective, omics-research is one clear Big Data topic. In practice, the electronic health records, free open data and the "quantified self" offer new perspectives for data analytics. Regarding analytics, significant advances have been made in the information extraction from text data, which unlocks a lot of data from clinical documentation for analytics purposes. At the same time, medicine and healthcare is lagging behind in the adoption of Big Data approaches. This can be traced to particular problems regarding data complexity and organizational, legal, and ethical challenges. The growing uptake of Big Data in general and first best-practice examples in medicine and healthcare in particular, indicate that innovative solutions will be coming. This paper gives an overview of the potentials of Big Data in medicine and healthcare.

  13. PRIMARY HEALTHCARE SERVICE QUALITY MEASUREMENT: SERVQUAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Mečev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine customers’ perceptions of primary healthcare service quality in public institutions in the city of Šibenik. The research was aimed at investigating whether there is difference between customers` expectations and their satisfaction with received medical services. The findings suggest that primary healthcare public institutions need to improve all the dimensions of SERVQUAL service quality from the gap analysis carried out. Furthermore, the research analyzed whether there is difference in the perception of given healthcare service between examinees considering their gender, age, employment status and frequency of using the mentioned services. It was established that demographic variables of age and gender do not generate significant differences in the perception of healthcare service quality while there is significant difference in satisfaction regarding employment status and frequency of services usage. The given results partially differ from the data acquired in other relevant and similar studies. The factor analysis which was conducted did not confirm “a priori” accepted theoretical model of Parasuraman et al. (1988 which claims that the concept of quality has five dimensions. On the contrary, it reached the conclusion that three highly reliable factors were identified regarding the perceived quality of primary healthcare services.

  14. The peacebuilding potential of healthcare training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Kyle G; Katona, Lindsay B

    2016-01-01

    Global health professionals regularly conduct healthcare trainings, such as first aid courses, in disadvantaged communities across the world. Many of these communities lack healthcare infrastructure because of war and political conflict. The authors draw on their experience conducting a first aid course in South Sudan to provide a perspective on how healthcare trainings for people with no medical background can be used to bridge ethnic, political, and religious differences. They argue that a necessary step for turning a healthcare training into a vehicle for peacebuilding is to bring people from different communities to the same physical space to learn the course material together. Importantly, simply encouraging contact between communities is unlikely to improve intergroup relations and could be detrimental if the following features are not incorporated. Buy-in from respected community leaders is essential to ensure that training participants trust that their safety during the training sessions is not at risk. Trainers should also create a supportive environment by conferring equal status and respect on all trainees. Finally, hands-on training exercises allow for positive interactions between trainees from different groups, which in turn can challenge stereotypes and facilitate cross-group friendships. These features map onto social psychological principles that have been shown to improve intergroup relations and are consistent with lessons learned from peace through health initiatives in public health and medicine. By adopting peacebuilding features, healthcare trainings can serve their primary goal of medical education and provide the added benefit of strengthening social relations. PMID:27651828

  15. Healthcare performance turned into decision support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    has not yet been attempted. Hospital management is provided with valuable information when given insight into the factors that control employee absence behaviour. Having this insight will enable the managers to promote a healthy working environment, thus lowering employee absence rates to a minimum.......Purpose – The purpose of this study is to first create an overview of relevant factors directly influencing employee absence in the healthcare sector. The overview is used to further investigate the factors identified using employee satisfaction survey scores exclusively. The result of the overall...... from the healthcare sector, the results obtained could be restricted to this sector. Inclusion of data from Arbejdsmarkedets Tillægspension (ATP) showed no deviation from the results in the healthcare sector. Practical implications – The product of the study is a decision support tool for leaders...

  16. Integrating anatomical pathology to the healthcare enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel-Le Bozec, Christel; Henin, Dominique; Fabiani, Bettina; Bourquard, Karima; Ouagne, David; Degoulet, Patrice; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    For medical decisions, healthcare professionals need that all required information is both correct and easily available. We address the issue of integrating anatomical pathology department to the healthcare enterprise. The pathology workflow from order to report, including specimen process and image acquisition was modeled. Corresponding integration profiles were addressed by expansion of the IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) initiative. Implementation using respectively DICOM Structured Report (SR) and DICOM Slide-Coordinate Microscopy (SM) was tested. The two main integration profiles--pathology general workflow and pathology image workflow--rely on 13 transactions based on HL7 or DICOM standard. We propose a model of the case in anatomical pathology and of other information entities (orders, image folders and reports) and real-world objects (specimen, tissue samples, slides, etc). Cases representation in XML schemas, based on DICOM specification, allows producing DICOM image files and reports to be stored into a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System. PMID:17108550

  17. Private health insurance and access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    The health insurance business in India has seen a growth of over 25% per annum in the last few years with the expansion of the private health insurance sector. The premium incomes of health insurance have crossed the Rs 8,000 crore mark with the share of private companies increasing to over 41%. This is despite the fact that from the perspective of patients, health insurance is not a good deal, especially when they need it most. This raises a number of ethical issues regarding how the health insurance business runs and how medical practice adjusts to it for profiteering. This article uses the personal experience of the author to argue that health insurance in an unregulated environment can only lead to unethical practices, further victimising the patient. Further, publicly financed healthcare which operates in an environment regulating both public and private healthcare provisioning is the only way to assure access to ethical and equitable healthcare to people. PMID:22106595

  18. Process Management Practices In Healthcare Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kılıç

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare institutions differ from other service businesses by their “matrix organizational structure” and “error-free output” requirement. However, the processes stay the same for all organizational activities at different levels. One of the post-modern management approach is to focus on basis of necessary processes and fundamental organizational changes. This case study aims to initially explain the characteristics of healthcare institutions and the basic conceptual properties of process and process management. Then the effect of the “management throughprocesses approach” over organization will be discussed. Finally; process management at healthcare institutions, scope of health care and examples of the other post-modern approaches will be examined with their outputs

  19. Human trafficking and the healthcare professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Jeffrey; Finger, Reginald

    2008-05-01

    Despite the legislation passed in the 19th century outlawing human slavery, it is more widespread today than at the conclusion of the civil war. Modern human slavery, termed human trafficking, comes in several forms. The most common type of human trafficking is sex trafficking, the sale of women and children into prostitution. Labor trafficking is the sale of men, women, and children into hard labor for which they receive little or no compensation. Other forms of trafficking include child soldiering, war brides, and organ removal. Healthcare professionals play a critical role in both finding victims of human trafficking while they are still in captivity, as well as caring for their mental and physical needs upon release. Those working in the healthcare profession need to be educated regarding how a trafficking victim may present, as well as their unique healthcare needs.

  20. Handbook of medical and healthcare technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2013-01-01

    This book equips readers to understand a complex range of healthcare products that are used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases or medical conditions affecting humans. The first part of the book presents medical technologies such as medical information retrieval, tissue engineering techniques, 3D medical imaging, nanotechnology innovations in medicine, medical wireless sensor networks, and knowledge mining techniques in medicine. The second half of the book focuses on healthcare technologies including prediction hospital readmission risk, modeling e-health framework, personal Web in healt

  1. Structuring a sound securitization of healthcare receivables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradling, Mark

    2003-02-01

    Securitization of receivables allows healthcare providers to obtain an additional funding source by selling their accounts receivables to investors. A double-lock-box structure allows providers to securitize Medicare and Medicaid receivables without violating federal laws. A 2001 revision to the Uniform Commercial Code facilitates providers' securitization of private healthcare insurance receivables by underscoring rights of a purchaser of those receivables. HIPAA privacy standards appear to permit the use and disclosure of protected health information in crafting a securitization program. The securitization should be structured to shield the value of the receivables to be transferred from the potential backruptcies of the originator and the purchaser. PMID:12602313

  2. Does Quality of Healthcare Service Determine Patient Adherence? Evidence from the Primary Healthcare Sector in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoth, Nandakumar; Dalvi, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Patient adherence is extremely important to achieve positive outcome. While quality of healthcare service has been studied as a determinant of patient satisfaction and loyalty, its impact on patient adherence has not been examined. The authors attempt to determine dimensions of quality and their impact on patient adherence in primary healthcare in India. Exploratory factor analysis resulted into seven factors. Factor scores were used for regression to identify the influence of dimensions of service quality on patient adherence. Quality of healthcare emerged as a determinant of patient adherence. PMID:26652042

  3. Statistical Models, Yang-Baxter Equation and Related Topics - Proceedings of the Satellite MEeting of STATPHYS-19; Symmetry, Statistical, Mechanical Models and Applications - Proceedings of the Seventh Nankai Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, M. L.; et al.

    1996-09-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Part I: Satellite Meeting of STATPHYS-19 * Boundary Yang-Baxter in the RSOS/SOS Representation * Quantum Domains in Ferromagnetic Anisotropic Heisenberg Chains * The Generalized Chiral Clock Model and its Phase Diagram * Algebraic Solution of the Coincidence Problem for Crystals and Quasicrystals * Reflection Equations and Surface Critical Phenomena * Fully Packed Loop Models * Quantum Field Theories in terms of Group-Valued Local Fields: An Overview * C-Statiscal Transition Transforms of the Heisenberg Spin Chain and Braided Symmetry * U(1)-Invariant Local and Integrable Lattice Formulation of the Massive Thirring Model * Corner Transfer Matrices and Novel Polynomials * Rigorous and Numerical Results on Two-Dimensional Oriented Self-Avoiding Walks * The Price for Quantum Group Symmetry: Chiral Versus 2D WZNW Model * Integrable Zn-Chiral Potts Model : The Missing Rapidity-Momentum Relation * Dilute Algebras and Solvable Lattice Models * Falicov-Kimball Model: Ground States and Flux Phase Problem * Mutual Exclusion Statistics in the Exactly Solvable Model of the Mott Metal-Insulator Transition * Quantum Group and the Hofstadter Problem * Domain Walls in the Spin-S Quantum Ising Chain * Quantization of Nonultralocal Models - Generalization of the Theorem for the Multiple Coproduct * Multipoint Functions(Form-factors) of Quantum sine-Gordon Field with Boundary * Three-Dimensional Vertex Model * Probability of Phase Separation and Two Point Temperature Correlation Functions for the Bose Gas with Delta Interaction * On the Fundamental Invariant of the Hecke Algebra Hn(q) * Ternary Z3-Graded Algebras and New Gauge Theories * Thermodynamics of Integrable Quantum Chains : Free Energy and Correlation Lengths * Quantum Integrable Systems and Classical Discrete Nonlinear Dynamics * Quantum Jacobi-Trudi Formula and Analytic Bethe Ansatz * On Boundary Condition of Single Particle and the Spectrum of Many

  4. Does Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Really Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Keith C.

    2002-01-01

    Outdoor behavioral healthcare (OBH), using wilderness therapy and related outdoor programming, is an emerging treatment for adolescents with behavioral, psychological, and substance abuse disorders. A literature review examining OBH outcomes related to self-concept, interpersonal skills, substance abuse, criminal recidivism, and behavioral and…

  5. Virtue Ethics and Rural Professional Healthcare Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowden, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Because rural populations are at risk not only for clinically disparate care but also ethically disparate care, there is a need to enhance scholarship, research, and teaching about rural health care ethics. In this paper an argument for the applicability of a virtue ethics framework for professionals in rural healthcare is outlined. The argument…

  6. Prevention of Healthcare Associated Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ S. aureus colonizes the skin and mucosae of a proportion of the human population. Carriers of S. aureus are at increased risk of developing infections with this pathogen. The aim of this thesis was to add to the prevention of healthcare associated S. aureus infections.

  7. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level. PMID:21414703

  8. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    In spite of a growing recognition of the importance of doctor-patient communication, the issue of language barriers to healthcare has received very little attention in India. The Indian population speaks over 22 major languages with English used as the lingua franca for biomedicine. Large-scale internal migration has meant that health workers are encountering increasing instances of language discordance within clinical settings. Research done predominantly in the West has shown language discordance to significantly affect access to care, cause problems of comprehension and adherence, and decrease the satisfaction and quality of care. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India requires a stronger political commitment to providing non-discriminatory health services, especially to vulnerable groups such as illiterate migrant workers. Research will have to address three broad areas: the ways in which language barriers affect health and healthcare, the efficacy of interventions to overcome language barriers, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. There is a need to address such barriers in health worker education and clinical practice. Proven strategies such as hiring multilingual healthcare workers, providing language training to health providers, employing in situ translators or using telephone interpretation services will have to be evaluated for their appropriateness to the Indian context. Internet-based initiatives, the proliferation of mobile phones and recent advances in machine translation promise to contribute to the solution. PMID:24758452

  9. Pervasive Healthcare as a Scientific Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2008-01-01

    . Methods: The paper presents the research questions, approach, technologies, and methods of pervasive healthcare and discusses these in comparison to those of other related scientific disciplines. Results: A set of central research themes are presented; monitoring and body sensor networks; pervasive...

  10. [Healthcare and culture, between diversity and universality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Interrelations exist between people's behaviour and the reasons for it as explained by culture. The healthcare theory put forward by the American nurse Madeleine Leininger, at the end of the 1970s, integrates anthropology Identifying and understanding the patient's culture enables nursing care to be adapted to the patient's own view of his/her disease.

  11. The myths of benchmarking healthcare IT spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, John

    2006-10-01

    Healthcare organizations should make those IT investments that they believe can be managed to achieve an acceptable return. They should make investment decisions based on the merits of the IT proposal, not because they have to catch up to another industry, such as banking. PMID:17040031

  12. TEAMWORK IN THE FAMILY HEALTHCARE STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Pinheiro Garcia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: The healthcare evaluation aims to improve the capacity to provide adequate assistance and better healthcare to the population. Through an evaluation process, one can rethink the practices that are being offered and subsidize managers for adequacy of services. The aim of this study is to evaluate teamwork, from the perspective of professionals who work in the family health strategy. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study was performed. The population comprised healthcare professionals working with the family health strategy in the municipalities of the state of Espirito Santo with more than 50,000 inhabitants. Data collection was performed through a semi-structured questionnaire between July 2012 and August 2013. Results: there was a positive evaluation of the professionals regarding teamwork, with most considering the professional relationship always or most of the time good and respectful; the relationships were rarely considered to be confrontational; the organization of the activities was performed jointly, with rare occurrence of difficulties regarding domestic work and the community; the work was always or most of the time based on pre-established routines, as well as the capacity to review routines and procedures and the encouragement for community participation. Conclusion: One can observe the challenge and responsibility of healthcare professionals in acknowledging teamwork and its relevance to changes in the practices of care and management of the Brazilian Unified Health System. KEYWORDS: Health Evaluation; Primary Health care; Family Health; Working Environment.

  13. Genetic risk estimation by healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Bonke (Benno); A. Tibben (Arend); D. Lindhout (Dick); A.J. Clarke (Angus); Th. Stijnen (Theo)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To assess whether healthcare professionals correctly incorporate the relevance of a favourable test outcome in a close relative when determining the level of risk for individuals at risk for Huntington's disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: Survey of clinical geneti

  14. Ethics of mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, E; Jansen, A; Lopalco, P L; Giesecke, J

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at increased risk of contracting infections at work and further transmitting them to colleagues and patients. Immune HCWs would be protected themselves and act as a barrier against the spread of infections and maintain healthcare delivery during outbreaks, but vaccine uptake rates in HCWs have often been low. In order to achieve adequate immunisation rates in HCWs, mandatory vaccination policies are occasionally implemented by healthcare authorities, but such policies have raised considerable controversy. Here we review the background of this debate, analyse arguments for and against mandatory vaccination policies, and consider the principles and virtues of clinical, professional, institutional and public health ethics. We conclude that there is a moral imperative for HCWs to be immune and for healthcare institutions to ensure HCW vaccination, in particular for those working in settings with high-risk groups of patients. If voluntary uptake of vaccination by HCWs is not optimal, patients’ welfare, public health and also the HCW’s own health interests should outweigh concerns about individual autonomy: fair mandatory vaccination policies for HCWs might be acceptable. Differences in diseases, patient and HCW groups at risk and available vaccines should be taken into consideration when adopting the optimal policy. PMID:24229791

  15. Intelligent Healthcare Service Using Health Lifelog Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junho; Choi, Chang; Ko, Hoon; Kim, Pankoo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there have been many studies of health services combined with smart devices, gathering a user' health lifelog and managing his or her health for the improvement of the quality of his or her life, using various sensors. However, previous works have problems in the extraction of patterns in person's complex health lifelog, the analysis of complex relations among those patterns, the extension of them to related services, and reuse of lifelog patterns. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. In this paper, we propose the intelligent healthcare service for reasoning personal health state with data extraction, pattern analysis, health life ontology modeling using health lifelog analysis based on smart devices. The proposed health information service provided more and more appropriate service with users if more reasoning rules related to more and various healthcare lifelog information gathering are included in the service. PMID:27352004

  16. Markets and Public Values in Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Zuiderent-Jerak (Teun); K.J. Grit (Kor); T.E.D. van der Grinten (Tom)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Discussions on the role of markets in healthcare easily lead to political and unfruitful polarized positions. Actors arguing in favour of markets as a solution for the quality/cost conundrum entrench themselves against others pointing out the risk of markets for the delivery a

  17. TRUSTED CLOUD COMPUTING FRAMEWORK FOR HEALTHCARE SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Adib Bamiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is rapidly evolving due to its efficient characteristics such as cost-effectiveness, availability and elasticity. Healthcare organizations and consumers lose control when they outsource their sensitive data and computing resources to a third party Cloud Service Provider (CSP, which may raise security and privacy concerns related to data loss and misuse appealing threats. Lack of consumers’ knowledge about their data storage location may lead to violating rules and regulations of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA that can cost them huge penalty. Fear of data breach by internal or external hackers may decrease consumers’ trust in adopting cloud computing and benefiting from its promising features. We designed a Healthcare Trusted Cloud Computing (HTCC framework that maintains security, privacy and considers HIPAA regulations. HTCC framework deploys Trusted Computing Group (TCG technologies such as Trusted Platform Module (TPM, Trusted Software Stack (TSS, virtual Trusted Platform Module (vTPM, Trusted Network Connect (TNC and Self Encrypting Drives (SEDs. We emphasize on using strong multi-factor authentication access control mechanisms and strict security controls, as well as encryption for data at storage, in-transit and while process. We contributed in customizing a cloud Service Level Agreement (SLA by considering healthcare requirements. HTCC was evaluated by comparing with previous researchers’ work and conducting survey from experts. Results were satisfactory and showed acceptance of the framework. We aim that our proposed framework will assist in optimizing trust on cloud computing to be adopted in healthcare sector.

  18. Turkish healthcare professionals' views on palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Gulay; Kav, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The concept of modern palliative care has been disseminating slowly in Turkey and has recently been included in the National Cancer Control Program. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' knowledge and views of palliative care. It was conducted at three hospitals with a sample of 369 healthcare professionals working in adult clinics. Data were collected via open-ended questions and 16 statements from healthcare professionals on their views of palliative care. Most respondents stated that there was a lack of in-service/continuing education in palliative care, and more than half said they had not received any education in palliative care. A majority stated that the meaning and goal of palliative care is "improving the quality of life of a patient who is in the terminal stage." Lack of awareness of palliative care and a lack of educational resources in that field are the most frequently reported barriers to the development of palliative care in Turkey. Palliative care should be included in curricula for healthcare professionals and in-service education programs should be established. PMID:23413762

  19. Global implications of China's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Tang, Shenglan; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing healthcare reform in China has a powerful spillover effect beyond the health sector and the borders of China. A successful completion of the Chinese reform will offer a new model for social justice development, shift the global economy toward sustainability and create a new hub for science and technology in medical and health science. However, reforming the healthcare system in the most populated country is a daunting task. China will not live up to its promise, and all the potentials may end with hype not hope if coherent national strategies are not constructed and state-of-the-art navigation is not achieved with staggering domestic and global challenges. The cost of failure will be immensely high, socioeconomic costs for Chinese and an opportunity cost for the world as a whole. A full appreciation of the global implications of China's healthcare reform is crucial in keeping China receptive toward good practices evidence-approved elsewhere and open minded to fulfill its international obligations. More critically, the appreciation yields constructive engagements from global community toward a joint development and global prosperity. The current report provides a multiple disciplinary assessment on the global implications of the healthcare reform in China. PMID:24890392

  20. Can healthcare go from good to great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Todd H; Wachter, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare's improvement efforts have focused on the point of care, targeting specific processes such as preventing central line infections, while paying relatively less attention to the larger issues of organizational structure and leadership. Interestingly, the business community has long recognized that poor management and structure can thwart improvement efforts. Perhaps the corporate world's best-known study of these issues is found in the book Good to Great, which identifies top-performing corporations, compares them to carefully selected organizations that failed to achieve similar levels of performance, and gleans lessons from these analyses. In this article, we analyze the feasibility of carefully applying Good to Great's methods for analyzing organizational structure and leadership to healthcare. While a few studies in healthcare have come close to emulating Good to Great's methodology, none have matched its rigor. These shortcomings highlight key information and measurement gaps that must be addressed to facilitate unbiased, rigorous studies of the organizational and leadership predictors of institutional excellence in healthcare. PMID:21997854

  1. Indicators of quality in primary healthcare.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.J. van den; Bakker, D.H. de

    2004-01-01

    Background: GPs play a pivotal role in the Dutch healthcare system. Since GPs have a so-called gatekeeper-function, the overwhelming majority of medical problems is served by GPs. The Inspectorate of Health Care (IHC) is charged with the supervision of public health, including the quality of care pr

  2. Analysis on energy efficiency in healthcare buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz-Calcedo, Justo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze and quantify the average healthcare centres' energy behavior and estimate the possibilities of savings through the use of concrete measures to reduce their energy demand in Extremadura, Spain. It provides the average energy consumption of 55 healthcare centres sized between 500 and 3,500 m². The analysis evaluated data of electricity and fossil fuel energy consumption as well as water use and other energy-consuming devices. The energy solutions proposed to improve the efficiency are quantified and listed. The average annual energy consumption of a healthcare centre is 86.01 kWh/m², with a standard deviation of 16.8 kWh/m². The results show that an annual savings of €4.77/m² is possible. The potential to reduce the energy consumption of a healthcare centre of size 1,000 m² is 10,801 kWh by making an average investment of €11,601, thus saving €2,961/year with an average payback of 3.92 years.

  3. Identity and moral responsibility of healthcare organizations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, M.A.M.; Gordijn, B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the moral responsibility of a Healthcare Organization (HCO) is conceived as an inextricable aspect of the identity of the HCO. We attempt to show that by exploring this relation a more profound insight in moral responsibility can be gained. Referring to Charles Taylor we explore the me

  4. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level.

  5. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for... Promotion, NCEZID, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop A- 07, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, E-mail:...

  6. Patients and Loved Ones: Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent MRSA Infections? To prevent MRSA infections, doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers: Clean their hands with ... of patients can help make sure that all doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers clean their hands with ...

  7. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  8. 75 FR 22816 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices...), regarding the practice of hospital infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance,...

  9. Race and healthcare disparities: overcoming vulnerablity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John

    2002-01-01

    The paper summarizes recently published data and recommendations about healthcare disparities experienced by African Americans who have Medicare or other healthcare coverage. Against this background the paper addresses the ethics of such disparities and how disadvantages of vulnerable populations like African Americans are typically maintained in decision making about how to respond to such disparities. Considering how to respond to disparities reveals much that vulnerable populations would bring to the policy-making table, if they can also be heard when they get there. The paper argues that vulnerable populations like African Americans need fair representation in bodies deciding what to do about such disparities and that fairness requires proportional representation at all levels of decisions that affect healthcare--a radical change. In this decision setting, how to provide adequate protection of minorities needs much further attention. The most attractive decision-making model is deliberative democracy. The paper shows that in deliberation, fair representation requires not only having a voice in decisions, but a fair hearing of those voices. Achieving a fair hearing requires changes in norms of communication and training of all to give importance to greetings and other measures of civility and trust building, and to be open to diverse forms of expression. Decisions about how to respond to healthcare disparities would include what programs to initiate for whom, how to evaluate the programs, and what to do in response to such evaluations. Conclusions are that achieving such goals will take a sea change in how healthcare institutions and providers do their business, and that social activism at every level will be needed to effect these changes. The discussion highlights many ethical issues that need much greater attention. PMID:12546167

  10. Crossing and creating boundaries in healthcare innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - This paper reports from a qualitative case study of a change initiative undertaken in a Danish public hospital setting during national healthcare reforms. The purpose of this paper is to challenge understandings of innovations as defined by being value-adding per se. Whether the effects of attempting to innovate are positive or negative is in this paper regarded as a matter of empirical investigation. Design/methodology/approach - Narrative accounts of activities during the change initiative are analysed in order to elucidate the effects of framing the change initiative as innovation on which boundaries are created and crossed. Findings - Framing change initiatives as innovation leads to intended as well as unanticipated boundary crossings where healthcare practitioners from different organizations recognize a shared problem and task. It also leads to unintended boundary reinforcements between "us and them" that may exclude the perspectives of patients or stakeholders when confronting complex problems in healthcare. This boundary reinforcement can lead to further fragmentation of healthcare despite the stated intention to create more integrated services. Practical implications - The paper suggests that researchers as well as practitioners should not presume that intentions to innovate will by themselves enhance creativity and innovation. When analysing the intended, unintended as well as unanticipated consequences of framing change initiatives as innovation, researchers and practitioner gain nuanced knowledge about the effects of intending to innovate in complex settings such as healthcare. Originality/value - This paper suggests the need for an analytical move from studying the effects of innovation to studying the effects of framing complex problems as a call for innovation. PMID:27296877

  11. Crossing and creating boundaries in healthcare innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - This paper reports from a qualitative case study of a change initiative undertaken in a Danish public hospital setting during national healthcare reforms. The purpose of this paper is to challenge understandings of innovations as defined by being value-adding per se. Whether the effects of attempting to innovate are positive or negative is in this paper regarded as a matter of empirical investigation. Design/methodology/approach - Narrative accounts of activities during the change initiative are analysed in order to elucidate the effects of framing the change initiative as innovation on which boundaries are created and crossed. Findings - Framing change initiatives as innovation leads to intended as well as unanticipated boundary crossings where healthcare practitioners from different organizations recognize a shared problem and task. It also leads to unintended boundary reinforcements between "us and them" that may exclude the perspectives of patients or stakeholders when confronting complex problems in healthcare. This boundary reinforcement can lead to further fragmentation of healthcare despite the stated intention to create more integrated services. Practical implications - The paper suggests that researchers as well as practitioners should not presume that intentions to innovate will by themselves enhance creativity and innovation. When analysing the intended, unintended as well as unanticipated consequences of framing change initiatives as innovation, researchers and practitioner gain nuanced knowledge about the effects of intending to innovate in complex settings such as healthcare. Originality/value - This paper suggests the need for an analytical move from studying the effects of innovation to studying the effects of framing complex problems as a call for innovation.

  12. Priority-setting in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, P; Häkkinen, U

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics which affect priority setting in the Finnish healthcare system include strong municipal (local) administration, no clear separation between producers and purchasers, a duality in funding, and the potential for physicians in public hospitals to practice in the private sector. This system has its strengths, such as the possibility to effectively co-ordinate social and healthcare services, and a strong incentive to take care of local needs, because of municipal responsibility to finance these services largely through local taxes. However, the municipalities are typically too small to take advantage of these potentials, their knowledge is scarce especially of secondary care and their negotiating power with respect to hospitals is low. Local politicians also have a dual role: they represent the needs of the local population but simultaneously they are decision-makers in hospitals. Full-time physicians are allowed to act in a dual role as well; they can run a private practice, which is paid for on a fee-for-service basis, while the hospital pays (mostly) a fixed monthly salary. The share of financing which flows from the National Sickness Insurance system to healthcare users may have adverse effects on the local use of resources. The broad national consensus statement on patient-level priorities did not reach any general rules on priorities. Strong support was given to citizens' equal right to access all healthcare services. In healthcare practice, this general rule has some exemptions. First, the reimbursement schemes for prescribed drugs vary depending on the severity and chronic nature of the disease. Secondly, the tax-financed dental services for the young are clearly prioritised over those of older citizens. In the consensus statement, emphasis was put on improving the efficiency of producing health services in order to avoid having to impose patient-level priorities. PMID:10827305

  13. Philips Healthcare: The purchasing process and decision-making choice criteria in public healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Liedes, Eevaleena; Liimatainen, Lotta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study purchasing processes and decision-making choice criteria in public healthcare, especially in central hospitals and municipal health centres. This thesis is made as an assignment from Philips Healthcare, which is a manufacturer and a supplier of the patient monitors studied in this thesis. The aim of this study is to ascertain how these patient monitors are bought and which criteria affect the purchasing decision. This thesis consists of theoretical ...

  14. Overview on patient safety in healthcare and laboratory diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare context is characterized by a high degree of complexity. Despite eager efforts of the healthcare personnel, sometimes things go wrong and produce unintentional harm to the patients. As such, patient safety must be considered as one of leading healthcare challenges. Some foremost studies have highlighted that serious medical errors might occur rather frequently, jeopardizing patient's health and costing a huge amount of money to the healthcare system. A medical error is traditio...

  15. Factors associated with healthcare avoidance among transgender women in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Socías, María Eugenia; Marshall, Brandon DL; Arístegui, Inés; Romero, Marcela; Cahn, Pedro; Kerr, Thomas; Sued, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Transgender (TG) women in many settings continue to contend with barriers to healthcare, including experiences of stigma and discrimination. Argentina has a universal health care system and laws designed to promote healthcare access among TG women. However, little is known about barriers to healthcare access among TG women in this setting. The aim of this study was to explore individual, social-structural and environmental factors associated with healthcare avoidance among TG wom...

  16. The Bearers of Information in Healthcare and their Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ileana G. R?ducanu;

    2010-01-01

    The need of correct and in short time information to do management and marketing decisions it is a priority and a necessity in any area of human activity today. In healthcare area the information is necessary not only to strategic decision but provide healthcare service too. The information in healthcare system is generated at local level inside healthcare organizations but it is usually inaccessible to marketers. For this reason, the identification of bearers of information, increased capaci...

  17. Healthcare providers' perceptions of diversity and cultural competence

    OpenAIRE

    Olt, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Swedish society is ethnically diverse and since the early 1960s immigrants have made significant contributions to the labour market in healthcare. Today many Swedes, including first- and second-generation immigrants, work together in a healthcare setting that serves an increasingly diverse population. Cultural competence is required of nurses, healthcare providers and healthcare organisations in order for them to provide quality service to culturally and ethnically diverse...

  18. A healthcare assistant as a member of the nursing team

    OpenAIRE

    DUŠKOVÁ, Jitka

    2011-01-01

    The Bachelor thesis deals with the profession of a healthcare assistant and acceptance of a relatively new healthcare staff category to a nursing team. The field of study of healthcare assistant has substituted the previous field of General Nurse at secondary medical schools within the changes of the nurse education conception. This change has shifted the field of general nurse to the tertiary level. The profession of a healthcare assistant should not be a marginalized part of a nursing team....

  19. Social Media Enabled Interactions in Healthcare : Towards a Typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    2015-01-01

    Social media is increasingly used by healthcare users and providers to connect and communicate with each other. Such use is changing the interactions in healthcare and it is not clear what effects this may have for healthcare provision. Although it could be beneficial to both parties, it could also

  20. Review of Semantically Interoperable Electronic Health Records for Ubiquitous Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Chung, Kyo-IL; Chung, Myung-Ae; Choi, Duckjoo

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide more effective and personalized healthcare services to patients and healthcare professionals, intelligent active knowledge management and reasoning systems with semantic interoperability are needed. Technological developments have changed ubiquitous healthcare making it more semantically interoperable and individual patient-based; however, there are also limitations to these methodologies. Based upon an extensive review of international literature, this paper describes two...

  1. Attitudes to reporting medication error among differing healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvadikar, Ajit; Prescott, Gordon; Williams, David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims Medication error reporting is an important measure to prevent medication error incidents in a healthcare system and can serve as an important tool for improving patient safety. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) in reporting medication errors. Methods Fifty-six healthcare professionals working at a 900-bed tertiary referral...

  2. An Analysis of Knowledge Management Mechanisms in Healthcare Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare portals are becoming increasingly popular with Internet users since they play an important role in supporting interaction between individuals and healthcare organizations with a Web presence. Additionally, many of these organizations make use of knowledge management mechanisms on their healthcare portals to manage the abundance of…

  3. 78 FR 61362 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Five AHRQ Subcommittee Meetings. SUMMARY: The... remainder of the meeting) 4. Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research (HSQR) Date: October...

  4. Hacking Health: Bottom-up Innovation for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeeshan Chowdhury

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare is not sustainable and still functions with outdated technology (e.g., pagers, paper records. Top-down approaches by governments and corporations have failed to deliver digital technologies to modernize healthcare. Disruptive innovation must come from the ground up by bridging the gap between front-line health experts and innovators in the latest web and mobile technology. Hacking Health is a hackathon that is focused on social innovation more than technical innovation. Our approach to improve healthcare is to pair technological innovators with healthcare experts to build realistic, human-centric solutions to front-line healthcare problems.

  5. The early career progress of baccalaureate healthcare management students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; Cockley, David E; Bopp, Anthony E

    2007-01-01

    Programs in healthcare management are increasingly asked to demonstrate program outcomes by identifying graduates working in the profession of healthcare management. In particular, standards under AUPHA's certification process for undergraduate programs require that programs identify programmatic and educational outcomes. However, little is known about the career track of undergraduate healthcare management graduates. This paper describes management roles and settings for the graduates of a baccalaureate program in healthcare management, and presents salary and career progression information obtained from a recent alumni survey. Findings and implications are important to highlight the success of program graduates, and support the value of undergraduate programs in healthcare management. PMID:18578265

  6. Integrated Environment for Ubiquitous Healthcare and Mobile IPv6 Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagalaban, Giovanni; Kim, Seoksoo

    The development of Internet technologies based on the IPv6 protocol will allow real-time monitoring of people with health deficiencies and improve the independence of elderly people. This paper proposed a ubiquitous healthcare system for the personalized healthcare services with the support of mobile IPv6 networks. Specifically, this paper discusses the integration of ubiquitous healthcare and wireless networks and its functional requirements. This allow an integrated environment where heterogeneous devices such a mobile devices and body sensors can continuously monitor patient status and communicate remotely with healthcare servers, physicians, and family members to effectively deliver healthcare services.

  7. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending...... a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received either a course or written information on the Danish healthcare system and subsequently evaluated this quantitatively. Results: The evaluation revealed a positive appraisal of the course/information provided. Conclusion: In times of austerity, incorporating...... healthcare information into an already existing language programme may be pertinent for providing immigrants with knowledge on the healthcare system....

  8. [Healthcare for teenagers: are we working together?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derksen-Lubsen, G; Jambroes, M; Essink-Bot, M L

    2016-01-01

    There are about 1.8 million children between 10 and 18 years of age in the Netherlands in 2016. These teenagers account for approximately 10% of the total population. Teenagers are relatively healthy and do not make much use of curative care. However, they are an important group in terms of public health, because a basis for good health in later life is created in the teenage years. Good health in teenagers is also important for education, relationships and employment, and their health has an influence on the health of the next generation. Child and adolescent healthcare plays an important part in preventive care for teenagers. Better cooperation and exchange of information between paediatricians, specialists in child and adolescent healthcare and general practitioners are important in order to optimise care for teenagers.

  9. E-commerce for healthcare supply procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbietman, D; Lirov, E; Lirov, R; Lirov, Y

    2001-01-01

    The total investment of the more than fifty e-commerce startups that entered healthcare supply chain management in the past three years has surpassed $500 million. However, none of these early entrants has delivered on the initial promise of restructuring the entire supply chain, replacing the traditional intermediaries, or at least achieving substantial revenue. This article offers a new business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce solution classification paradigm and uses it to analyze the functional requirements for an effective and, efficient healthcare supply chain marketplace. The analysis exposes several fundamental B2B market complexities that prevent the early entrants from creating a solid customer base and reaching desired liquidity goals. It also identifies several technological solutions to the problems mentioned. These new technologies create a comprehensive and symmetric order-matching engine that is capable of aggregating buy orders, requesting quotes from multiple vendors simultaneously, and negotiating along multiple criteria. PMID:11338910

  10. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Fred [Directorate of Radiography, School of Health Care Professions, University of Salford, Allerton Building, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  11. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  12. Needs Elicitation for Novel Pervasive Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Forchhammer, B. H.; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that engaging with end-users to elicit their needs is beneficial when designing a new artefact. This can be particularly challenging, however, when end-users are limited in their ability to provide input. When there is broad variation in users' needs, a further challenge...... is to include the large number of users required to represent the entire population. Failure to do so may lead to a solution that is over specialised to fit the needs of only a small subset of users. Both challenges are common in healthcare applications in which the end-user is also care recipient (or patient......). What if instead of trying to engage vastly many users in design activities, we could hear the voice of the patient by tapping into existing channels within the health care service system? Many interactions between healthcare providers and patients involve knowledge transfer. Observing these could...

  13. Medical Tourism: Globalization of the Healthcare Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Michael D.; Rosensweig, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    The citizens of many countries have long traveled to the United States and to the developed countries of Europe to seek the expertise and advanced technology available in leading medical centers. In the recent past, a trend known as medical tourism has emerged wherein citizens of highly developed countries choose to bypass care offered in their own communities and travel to less developed areas of the world to receive a wide variety of medical services. Medical tourism is becoming increasingly popular, and it is projected that as many as 750,000 Americans will seek offshore medical care in 2007. This phenomenon is driven by marketplace forces and occurs outside of the view and control of the organized healthcare system. Medical tourism presents important concerns and challenges as well as potential opportunities. This trend will have increasing impact on the healthcare landscape in industrialized and developing countries around the world. PMID:18311383

  14. E-commerce for healthcare supply procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbietman, D; Lirov, E; Lirov, R; Lirov, Y

    2001-01-01

    The total investment of the more than fifty e-commerce startups that entered healthcare supply chain management in the past three years has surpassed $500 million. However, none of these early entrants has delivered on the initial promise of restructuring the entire supply chain, replacing the traditional intermediaries, or at least achieving substantial revenue. This article offers a new business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce solution classification paradigm and uses it to analyze the functional requirements for an effective and, efficient healthcare supply chain marketplace. The analysis exposes several fundamental B2B market complexities that prevent the early entrants from creating a solid customer base and reaching desired liquidity goals. It also identifies several technological solutions to the problems mentioned. These new technologies create a comprehensive and symmetric order-matching engine that is capable of aggregating buy orders, requesting quotes from multiple vendors simultaneously, and negotiating along multiple criteria.

  15. Workforce diversity and cultural competence in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Taylor, Y; Benesch, B

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of workforce diversity in healthcare and its attendant requisite of cultural competency. The first section of the paper argues that self-assessments and diversity training are integral to workforce diversity management. This paper maintains that diversity training should be a part of overall strategic goals, and that the development of management goals should be based on self-assessments. The second section of the review offers a framework of cultural competency in healthcare delivery based on the relationship between patient and provider, and the community and health system. For this relationship to be successful, this review argues that health systems should foster providers that can also be cultural brokers. The cultural broker role is seen as core to achieving cultural competency. PMID:10196937

  16. Medical tourism: globalization of the healthcare marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Michael D; Rosensweig, Jeffrey A; Jones, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    The citizens of many countries have long traveled to the United States and to the developed countries of Europe to seek the expertise and advanced technology available in leading medical centers. In the recent past, a trend known as medical tourism has emerged wherein citizens of highly developed countries choose to bypass care offered in their own communities and travel to less developed areas of the world to receive a wide variety of medical services. Medical tourism is becoming increasingly popular, and it is projected that as many as 750,000 Americans will seek offshore medical care in 2007. This phenomenon is driven by marketplace forces and occurs outside of the view and control of the organized healthcare system. Medical tourism presents important concerns and challenges as well as potential opportunities. This trend will have increasing impact on the healthcare landscape in industrialized and developing countries around the world. PMID:18311383

  17. Anonymity: An Impediment to Performance in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsberg, Daniel W; Read G. Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching hospitals employ a care team structure composed of a broad range of healthcare providers with different skill sets. Each member of this team has a distinct role and a different level of training ranging from attending physician to resident, intern, and medical student. Often times, these different roles lead to greater complexity and confusion for both patients and nursing staff. It has been demonstrated that patients have a great degree of difficulty in identifying members of t...

  18. Internet developments and their significance for healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Jim; Early, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent developments in the technology of the Internet, and shows how they may affect the way in which healthcare is provided. Starting with a brief technical history of the Internet, the paper discusses some of the technical developments that have taken place or been proposed in recent years, and speculates on the realities of their adoption within the next five years. The paper also discusses trends in public accessibility to the Internet and the development of Intern...

  19. Applications of 3D printing in healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a relatively new, rapidly expanding method of manufacturing that found numerous applications in healthcare, automotive, aerospace and defense industries and in many other areas. In this review, applications in medicine that are revolutionizing the way surgeries are carried out, disrupting prosthesis and implant markets as well as dentistry will be presented. The relatively new field of bioprinting, that is printing with cells, will also be briefly discussed. PMID:27785150

  20. Managing workers' compensation exposures in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, L

    1998-01-01

    Employees in healthcare are exposed to numerous and varied risks that pose the threat of injury. Management of those exposures by the organization will ultimately help create a safe environment for staff, patients and the public. Incorporating workers' compensation into the risk management program is the first step toward managing and reducing these exposures. This article presents a suggested outline for a written risk management plan for workers' compensation exposures. PMID:10182134

  1. E-Learning in Relation to Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmeh Ali AlHuneiti; Ziad Hunaiti; Wamadiva Balachanrdan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of research work to establish an e-learning framework for e-health education for nurses in developing countries, it will help you understand the E-Learning concept in relation to the healthcare sector with regards advantages, barriers and importance integration of E-learning into medical registration. E-learning has proven effectiveness in medical education comparable with conventional learning while wide range of solutions still to be implemented to overcome its barriers ...

  2. Social stratification and the healthcare safety net

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Social inequalities can produce disparities in healthcare access and quality. This dissertation explores relationships between two social stratification processes- community residential segregation and social capital- on the supply of U.S. urban safety net providers. The first paper, "Community residential segregation and the local supply of Federally Qualified Health Centers," used data from the Area Resource File and the U.S. Census to examine growth in FQHCs in urban counties from 2000 to...

  3. Modelling Access Control For Healthcare Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Ana; Chadwick, David W; Antunes, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The widening use of Information Systems, which allow the collection, extraction, storage, management and search of information, is increasing the need for information security. After a user is successfully identified and authenticated to a system, he needs to be authorised to access the resources he/she requested. Access control is part of this last process that checks if a user can access those resources. This is particularly important in the healthcare environment where there is the need to...

  4. ADAPTATION OF LEAN METHODOLOGIES FOR HEALTHCARE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hagg, Heather (Woodward); Suskovich, Deanna; Workman-Germann, Jamie; Scachitti, Susan; Hudson, Brian; Swartz, Joseph; Vanni, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Lean and Six Sigma quality concepts and terminology have been applied in the manufacturing arena since the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. It has only been in recent years that healthcare administrators have identified these methods as being adaptable to their organizations so that they may realize organizational improvements for continuing success and delighting customers. Unfortunately, this is not an application that is widely taught in typical Industrial Engineering curriculum and therefore...

  5. Applying Industrial Management Methodologies to Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Gacias Llobera, Amador

    2011-01-01

    The recent delicate economic situation has contributed to the fact that several of the existing industrial management techniques, initially conceived in order to improve manufacturing enterprises’ efficiency, have gained popularity not only within the industrial field, but also in the services sector. In that context, healthcare is facing a complicated situation on account of a reduction of resources and an increase of incoming patients. When applying existing industrial management techniques...

  6. Management by missions in the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca Pires, J; Rey, C; Más-Machuca, M; Bastons, M

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of the mission statement in the healthcare sector. It's also argued that only formal declaration of the mission it's insufficient to the appropriate professional coordination of doctors, nurses and managers. It's proposed a systematic approach to facilitate the introduction of the mission within the systems of the organization, what is called "Management by missions." It promotes horizontal and vertical integration between doctors, nurses and managers. Criteria that ensure this integration are specified. PMID:27068141

  7. Personal healthcare system using cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Mayuzumi, Yuuki; Kodama, Naoki; Sato, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    A personal healthcare system used with cloud computing has been developed. It enables a daily time-series of personal health and lifestyle data to be stored in the cloud through mobile devices. The cloud automatically extracts personally useful information, such as rules and patterns concerning lifestyle and health conditions embedded in the personal big data, by using a data mining technology. The system provides three editions (Diet, Lite, and Pro) corresponding to users' needs.

  8. Becoming business critical: Knowledge for Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey Bryant, Sue; Stewart, David; Goswami, Louise; Grant, Maria J

    2016-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in implementing Knowledge for Healthcare. This editorial reports the central contribution of effective partnerships and the involvement of librarians and knowledge specialists in this work. There are compelling business priorities. Key elements of work-streams on demonstrating impact, workforce development and streamlining are indicated, along with areas of growing importance - knowledge management, embedded roles and health information for the public and patients. Knowledge, and the skills to help people to use it, are business critical.

  9. Becoming business critical: Knowledge for Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey Bryant, Sue; Stewart, David; Goswami, Louise; Grant, Maria J

    2016-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in implementing Knowledge for Healthcare. This editorial reports the central contribution of effective partnerships and the involvement of librarians and knowledge specialists in this work. There are compelling business priorities. Key elements of work-streams on demonstrating impact, workforce development and streamlining are indicated, along with areas of growing importance - knowledge management, embedded roles and health information for the public and patients. Knowledge, and the skills to help people to use it, are business critical. PMID:27503689

  10. Procedural Justice in Public Healthcare Resource Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Tsuchiya; Luis Silva Miguel; Richard Edlin; Allan Wailoo; Paul Dolan

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The legal studies literature on procedural justice identifies six key characteristics of procedural justice: accuracy, consistency, impartiality, reversibility, transparency and voice. However, the relative importance of these in the context of public healthcare resource allocation is unclear, as is whether they are valuable instrumentally (because it contributes to better outcomes) or inherently (for its own sake). Methods: A survey of 80-odd members of the UK public determined...

  11. Team 9: Healthcare Applications of Data Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Cornell, Paul; Paterson, Jennifer,; Young, Nancy; Chites, Lawton; Wan, Hong; Kang, Keebom

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare in the United States is expensive and inefficient. As a whole, it is at least ten years behind other industries in the application of information technology to processes and practices. Hospital administrators, with a cadre of consultants and vendors in tow, are rushing to catch up, spending billions on IT. Unfortunately, process knowledge is often lacking, and technology interventions fail to achieve their goals. This contributes to the low rate of ...

  12. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions.

  13. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthcare for People with Mental Illness: Why Integrated Patient Centered Healthcare Is Necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Chyrell D; H Flanagan, Elizabeth; Costa, Mark; O'Connell-Bonarrigo, Maria; Tana Le, Thanh; Guy, Kimberly; Antunes, Kimberly; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-06-01

    Understanding barriers and facilitators of healthcare for people with mental illness is essential for healthcare and mental healthcare organizations moving towards patient centered care. This paper presents findings of a measure on barriers and facilitators of healthcare completed by 204 patients being served at a co-located wellness center (primary healthcare clinic) located in an urban mental health center. The top 10 results show important findings for planning healthcare services that are responsive to the needs of people with mental illness. Basic structural issues as a result of poverty are extremely important (transportation, housing, payment) as well as difficulty with public healthcare that often involves long wait-times for appointments and at the doctor's office and hours that might not be convenient. Healthcare services that want to meet the needs of people with mental illness need to address these issues. What facilitates healthcare is not just removing the barriers to receiving healthcare services but instead involves more interpersonal aspects of healthcare such as liking your provider, being able to talk with your provider, feeling your provider cares about you and listens to you. Structural supports such as also being in mental health services, having systems for remembering appointments, and/or having appointment times that are convenient also facilitate seeking healthcare. Facilitating healthcare seeking also seems to involve a sense of agency-looking forward to taking charge of your health and feeling capable of following healthcare provider instructions. Healthcare systems for people with mental illness need to support these facilitators to give care-seekers the support they need. Key points are provided on how organizations and staff can work more effectively in implementing patient centered care. PMID:27104370

  14. The making of a European healthcare union: a federalist perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; van de Bovenkamp, Hester M.; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    EU involvement in healthcare policies is growing, despite the fact that national governments prefer to keep an almost exclusive say in these policies. This article explains how this shift of authority could happen and explores whether it will lead to a European healthcare union. It argues...... that federalism offers the most fruitful way to do so because of its sensitivity to the EU’s institutional settings and to the territorial dimension of politics. The division of competences and national diversity of healthcare systems have been major obstacles for the formation of a healthcare union. However......, the EU obtained a role in healthcare through the impact of non-healthcare legislation, voluntary co-operation, court rulings, governments’ joint-decision traps, and fiscal stress of member states. The emerging European healthcare union is a system of cooperative federalism without much cost...

  15. Analysis of Security Protocols for Mobile Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazid, Mohammad; Zeadally, Sherali; Das, Ashok Kumar; Odelu, Vanga

    2016-11-01

    Mobile Healthcare (mHealth) continues to improve because of significant improvements and the decreasing costs of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs). mHealth is a medical and public health practice, which is supported by mobile devices (for example, smartphones) and, patient monitoring devices (for example, various types of wearable sensors, etc.). An mHealth system enables healthcare experts and professionals to have ubiquitous access to a patient's health data along with providing any ongoing medical treatment at any time, any place, and from any device. It also helps the patient requiring continuous medical monitoring to stay in touch with the appropriate medical staff and healthcare experts remotely. Thus, mHealth has become a major driving force in improving the health of citizens today. First, we discuss the security requirements, issues and threats to the mHealth system. We then present a taxonomy of recently proposed security protocols for mHealth system based on features supported and possible attacks, computation cost and communication cost. Our detailed taxonomy demonstrates the strength and weaknesses of recently proposed security protocols for the mHealth system. Finally, we identify some of the challenges in the area of security protocols for mHealth systems that still need to be addressed in the future to enable cost-effective, secure and robust mHealth systems. PMID:27640159

  16. Volume and Value of Big Healthcare Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D.

    2016-01-01

    Modern scientific inquiries require significant data-driven evidence and trans-disciplinary expertise to extract valuable information and gain actionable knowledge about natural processes. Effective evidence-based decisions require collection, processing and interpretation of vast amounts of complex data. The Moore's and Kryder's laws of exponential increase of computational power and information storage, respectively, dictate the need rapid trans-disciplinary advances, technological innovation and effective mechanisms for managing and interrogating Big Healthcare Data. In this article, we review important aspects of Big Data analytics and discuss important questions like: What are the challenges and opportunities associated with this biomedical, social, and healthcare data avalanche? Are there innovative statistical computing strategies to represent, model, analyze and interpret Big heterogeneous data? We present the foundation of a new compressive big data analytics (CBDA) framework for representation, modeling and inference of large, complex and heterogeneous datasets. Finally, we consider specific directions likely to impact the process of extracting information from Big healthcare data, translating that information to knowledge, and deriving appropriate actions. PMID:26998309

  17. Process mining in healthcare: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eric; Munoz-Gama, Jorge; Sepúlveda, Marcos; Capurro, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Process Mining focuses on extracting knowledge from data generated and stored in corporate information systems in order to analyze executed processes. In the healthcare domain, process mining has been used in different case studies, with promising results. Accordingly, we have conducted a literature review of the usage of process mining in healthcare. The scope of this review covers 74 papers with associated case studies, all of which were analyzed according to eleven main aspects, including: process and data types; frequently posed questions; process mining techniques, perspectives and tools; methodologies; implementation and analysis strategies; geographical analysis; and medical fields. The most commonly used categories and emerging topics have been identified, as well as future trends, such as enhancing Hospital Information Systems to become process-aware. This review can: (i) provide a useful overview of the current work being undertaken in this field; (ii) help researchers to choose process mining algorithms, techniques, tools, methodologies and approaches for their own applications; and (iii) highlight the use of process mining to improve healthcare processes. PMID:27109932

  18. Dynamic professional boundaries in the healthcare workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Borthwick, Alan M

    2005-11-01

    The healthcare professions have never been static in terms of their own disciplinary boundaries, nor in their role or status in society. Healthcare provision has been defined by changing societal expectations and beliefs, new ways of perceiving health and illness, the introduction of a range of technologies and, more recently, the formal recognition of particular groups through the introduction of education and regulation. It has also been shaped by both inter-professional and profession-state relationships forged over time. A number of factors have converged that place new pressures on workforce boundaries, including an unmet demand for some healthcare services; neo-liberal management philosophies and a greater emphasis on consumer preferences than professional-led services. To date, however, there has been little analysis of the evolution of the workforce as a whole. The discussion of workforce change that has taken place has largely been from the perspective of individual disciplines. Yet the dynamic boundaries of each discipline mean that there is an interrelationship between the components of the workforce that cannot be ignored. The purpose of this paper is to describe four directions in which the existing workforce can change: diversification; specialisation and vertical and horizontal substitution, and to discuss the implications of these changes for the workforce. PMID:16313522

  19. Process mining in healthcare: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eric; Munoz-Gama, Jorge; Sepúlveda, Marcos; Capurro, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Process Mining focuses on extracting knowledge from data generated and stored in corporate information systems in order to analyze executed processes. In the healthcare domain, process mining has been used in different case studies, with promising results. Accordingly, we have conducted a literature review of the usage of process mining in healthcare. The scope of this review covers 74 papers with associated case studies, all of which were analyzed according to eleven main aspects, including: process and data types; frequently posed questions; process mining techniques, perspectives and tools; methodologies; implementation and analysis strategies; geographical analysis; and medical fields. The most commonly used categories and emerging topics have been identified, as well as future trends, such as enhancing Hospital Information Systems to become process-aware. This review can: (i) provide a useful overview of the current work being undertaken in this field; (ii) help researchers to choose process mining algorithms, techniques, tools, methodologies and approaches for their own applications; and (iii) highlight the use of process mining to improve healthcare processes.

  20. Smart Cards Applications in the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Oltean

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Current medical system based on medical records and health books is outdated and no longer meets the new requirements. Essential information security in terms of data privacy, integrity and authenticity, is not assured. Healthcare fraud with medical records is quite easy, because there is no security features to prevent this. Obtaining prescription drugs is slowly, the patient is forced in most cases, to go to the pharmacy staff to get their prescription. Another issue is data portability because each clinic can use a proprietary format of medical records, which is not always standardized. Modern and efficient healthcare system can be achieved by introducing smart cards and related software. Their introduction in addition to the portability and data security, reduce costs for both patient and medical institutions. The result will be increase confidence and patient satisfaction in medical institutions. Developed software package includes software applications which manage medical archive to smartcard, in a secure form and a software module which can be used for e-commerce transactions. All developed software application meets current standards for data security. Implementation of such solutions in practice would significantly reduce current costs in healthcare system.

  1. Kumbh Mela 2013: Healthcare for the millions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariappa, M.P.; Singh, B.P.; Mahen, A.; Bansal, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Mass gatherings pose challenges to healthcare systems anywhere in the world. The Kumbh Mela 2013 at Allahabad, India was the largest gathering of humanity in the history of mankind, and posed an exciting challenge to the provision of healthcare services. At the finale of the Mela, it was estimated that about 120 million pilgrims had visited the site. Equitable geospatial distribution of adhoc health care facilities were created on a standardised template with integrated planning of evacuation modalities. Innovative and low cost response measures for disaster mitigation were implemented. Emergency patient management kits were prepared and stocked across the health care facilities for crisis response. Dynamic resource allocation (in terms of manpower and supplies) based on patient volumes was done on a daily basis, in response to feedback. An adhoc mega township created on the banks of a perennial river (Ganga) in the Indian subcontinent for accommodating millions of Hindu pilgrims. Conventional mindset of merely providing limited and static healthcare through adhoc facilities was done away with. Innovative concepts such as riverine ambulances and disaster kits were introduced. Managing the medical aspects of a mass gathering mega event requires allocation of adequate funds, proactive and integrated medical planning and preparedness. PMID:26288497

  2. Obesity and Healthcare Avoidance: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D McGuigan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the issue of health care avoidance and obesity. English language journal articles published between 1990 and 2012 that addressed the review question|“is being overweight or obese an unrecognized factor in healthcare avoidance?” were located using major databases. A modified JADAD scoring system was then used to assess papers. Ten papers were identified which directly addressed the review question. A positive relationship exists between obesity and healthcare avoidance. The major contributory factors were being female, have a diagnosed mental health problem and perceived or actual bias and discrimination by health professionals. The review also highlights the importance of the relationship between healthcare professionals and their patients, and the physical environment in which interactions occur as these may contribute to avoidance behaviors. Concern about obesity is rising and while there has been much discussion about strategies to reduce obesity this review highlights the need for thinking more broadly about the way in which overweight and obese individuals interact with preventative health strategies.

  3. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne von Delft

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB, despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for.

  4. Rethinking gossip and scandal in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Kathryn

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to argue that gossip is a neglected aspect of organizational communication and knowledge, and an under-used management resource. Design/methodology/approach The paper challenges mainstream managerial assumptions that gossip is trivial or tainted talk which should be discouraged in the workplace. Instead, gossip is re-framed at an organizational level of analysis, which provides the opportunity for relational knowledge about systemic failure and poor practice in healthcare to surface. Findings Rather than simply viewing gossip as an individual behaviour and interpersonal process, it is claimed that organizational gossip is also a valuable early warning indicator of risk and failure in healthcare systems. There is potentially significant value in re-framing gossip as an aspect of organizational communication and knowledge. If attended to (rather than neglected or silenced) gossip can provide fresh insights into professional practice, decision making and relational leadership. Originality/value This paper offers a provocative challenge to mainstream health organization and management thinking about gossip in the workplace. It offers new ways of thinking to promote patient safety, and prevent the scandals that have plagued healthcare organizations in recent years. PMID:27681018

  5. Analysis of Security Protocols for Mobile Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazid, Mohammad; Zeadally, Sherali; Das, Ashok Kumar; Odelu, Vanga

    2016-11-01

    Mobile Healthcare (mHealth) continues to improve because of significant improvements and the decreasing costs of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs). mHealth is a medical and public health practice, which is supported by mobile devices (for example, smartphones) and, patient monitoring devices (for example, various types of wearable sensors, etc.). An mHealth system enables healthcare experts and professionals to have ubiquitous access to a patient's health data along with providing any ongoing medical treatment at any time, any place, and from any device. It also helps the patient requiring continuous medical monitoring to stay in touch with the appropriate medical staff and healthcare experts remotely. Thus, mHealth has become a major driving force in improving the health of citizens today. First, we discuss the security requirements, issues and threats to the mHealth system. We then present a taxonomy of recently proposed security protocols for mHealth system based on features supported and possible attacks, computation cost and communication cost. Our detailed taxonomy demonstrates the strength and weaknesses of recently proposed security protocols for the mHealth system. Finally, we identify some of the challenges in the area of security protocols for mHealth systems that still need to be addressed in the future to enable cost-effective, secure and robust mHealth systems.

  6. [Healthcare: a growing role in international politics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, M; Rey, J L

    2004-01-01

    Since the end of the cold war the tone of international relations has clearly changed. Whereas relations were once defined strictly in terms of more or less armed confrontation, economic and social issues now play a growing role. Healthcare policies in Africa have long been influenced by the policies of countries sponsoring bilateral and even multilateral foreign aid programs. However the last ten years have witnessed an increasing interaction between international policy and healthcare policy. The two main reasons for this trend involve 1) access to drug treatment and the WTO and 2) the extension and impact of the AIDS epidemic. The problem of access to drug treatment for poor populations (fundamental right) has led to the emergence of an increasingly strong and effective civil society. Because of its social and economic effects as well as its geopolitical and security implications, AIDS has become a major factor in international relations. With regard to both these issues the place and role of the USA is demonstrative of the interaction between healthcare and international relations. PMID:15816131

  7. Kumbh Mela 2013: Healthcare for the millions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariappa, M P; Singh, B P; Mahen, A; Bansal, A S

    2015-07-01

    Mass gatherings pose challenges to healthcare systems anywhere in the world. The Kumbh Mela 2013 at Allahabad, India was the largest gathering of humanity in the history of mankind, and posed an exciting challenge to the provision of healthcare services. At the finale of the Mela, it was estimated that about 120 million pilgrims had visited the site. Equitable geospatial distribution of adhoc health care facilities were created on a standardised template with integrated planning of evacuation modalities. Innovative and low cost response measures for disaster mitigation were implemented. Emergency patient management kits were prepared and stocked across the health care facilities for crisis response. Dynamic resource allocation (in terms of manpower and supplies) based on patient volumes was done on a daily basis, in response to feedback. An adhoc mega township created on the banks of a perennial river (Ganga) in the Indian subcontinent for accommodating millions of Hindu pilgrims. Conventional mindset of merely providing limited and static healthcare through adhoc facilities was done away with. Innovative concepts such as riverine ambulances and disaster kits were introduced. Managing the medical aspects of a mass gathering mega event requires allocation of adequate funds, proactive and integrated medical planning and preparedness. PMID:26288497

  8. Creating a Regional Healthcare Network: People First.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Verkerke, Margreet B

    2016-01-01

    Care organizations in the Dutch region Apeldoorn want to collaborate more in order to improve the care provision to elderly and psychiatric patients living independently. In order to support the collaboration they intend to create a regional digital healthcare network. The research was focused on the relevance of a regional healthcare network for care providers. Eleven semi-structured interviews based on the USE IT-model, were conducted with care providers and staff members. Results show that care providers need to tune their activities for this target group and create an agreement on integrated care. The relevance of a digital communication and collaboration platform is high. The regional healthcare network should support the collaboration between care providers by: 1. Offering a communication platform to replace the time consuming communication by telephone; 2. Making patient information available for patient and care provider at patients' homes; 3. Giving insight in who is giving what care to whom; and 4. Giving access to knowledge about the target group: elderly and psychiatric patients living independently. PMID:27577356

  9. Healthcare standards based sensory data exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wajahat Ali; Hussain, Maqbool; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Lee, Sungyoung

    2012-01-01

    Interoperability is the among the key functionalities of an intelligent systems. Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems (HHMS) investigates patients activities at home, but lacks critical information exchange with Health Management Information System (HMIS). This information is vital for physicians to take necessary steps for timely and effective healthcare provisioning for patients. Physicians can only monitor and prescribe patients in time, if the data is shared with their HMIS. HMIS can be compliant to different healthcare standards. Therefore, mediation system is required to enable interoperability between HHMS and HMIS such that physicians and patients information can easily be exchanged. We propose Interoperability Mediation System (IMS) that provides interoperability services for exchange of information among HHMS and HMIS. We consider that HMIS are compliant to two heterogeneous EHR standards (HL7 CDA and openEHR). Alzheimer's patient case study is described as a proof of concept. Sensory information gathered at HHMS, is communicated with HMIS compliant to EHR based healthcare standards. Sensors information in XML form is converted by interoperability service to HL7 CDA and openEHR instances and communicated to HMIS afterwards. This allows the physicians registered with HHMS to monitor the patient using their HMIS and provide timely healthcare information. PMID:23366131

  10. Healthcare Commercialization Programs: Improving the Efficiency of Translating Healthcare Innovations From Academia Into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reizes, Ofer; Dempsey, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Academic investigators are generating a plethora of insights and technologies that have the potential to significantly improve patient care. However, to address the imperative to improve the quality, cost and access to care with ever more constrained funding, the efficiency and the consistency with which they are translated into cost effective products and/or services need to improve. Healthcare commercialization programs (HCPs) are described and proposed as an option that institutions can add to their portfolio to improve translational research. In helping teams translate specific healthcare innovations into practice, HCPs expand the skillset of investigators and enhance an institution’s innovation capacity. Lessons learned are shared from configuring and delivering HCPs, which build on the fundamentals of the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps program, to address the unique challenges in supporting healthcare innovations and innovators. PMID:27766188

  11. Healthcare public key infrastructure (HPKI) and non-profit organization (NPO): essentials for healthcare data exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiko; Teratani, Tadamasa; Qiyan, Zhang; Kusuoka, Hideo; Matsuoka, Masami

    2004-01-01

    To share healthcare information and to promote cooperation among healthcare providers and customers (patients) under computerized network environment, a non-profit organization (NPO), named as OCHIS, was established at Osaka, Japan in 2003. Since security and confidentiality issues on the Internet have been major concerns in the OCHIS, the system has been based on healthcare public key infrastructure (HPKI), and found that there remained problems to be solved technically and operationally. An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the central and the local function in terms of a registration authority and a time stamp authority by contracting with the Ministry of Economics and Trading Industries in 2003. This paper describes the experimental design with NPO and the results of the study concerning message security and HPKI. The developed system has been operated practically in Osaka urban area. PMID:15361019

  12. Healthcare public key infrastructure (HPKI) and non-profit organization (NPO): essentials for healthcare data exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiko; Teratani, Tadamasa; Qiyan, Zhang; Kusuoka, Hideo; Matsuoka, Masami

    2004-01-01

    To share healthcare information and to promote cooperation among healthcare providers and customers (patients) under computerized network environment, a non-profit organization (NPO), named as OCHIS, was established at Osaka, Japan in 2003. Since security and confidentiality issues on the Internet have been major concerns in the OCHIS, the system has been based on healthcare public key infrastructure (HPKI), and found that there remained problems to be solved technically and operationally. An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the central and the local function in terms of a registration authority and a time stamp authority by contracting with the Ministry of Economics and Trading Industries in 2003. This paper describes the experimental design with NPO and the results of the study concerning message security and HPKI. The developed system has been operated practically in Osaka urban area.

  13. Healthcare coalitions: the new foundation for national healthcare preparedness and response for catastrophic health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Brooke; Toner, Eric; Waldhorn, Richard; Franco, Crystal; Rambhia, Kunal; Norwood, Ann; Inglesby, Thomas V; O'Toole, Tara

    2009-06-01

    After 9/11 and the 2001 anthrax letters, it was evident that our nation's healthcare system was largely underprepared to handle the unique needs and large volumes of people who would seek medical care following catastrophic health events. In response, in 2002 Congress established the Hospital Preparedness Program (HPP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to strengthen the ability of U.S. hospitals to prepare for and respond to bioterrorism and naturally occurring epidemics and disasters. Since 2002, the program has resulted in substantial improvements in individual hospitals' disaster readiness. In 2007, the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) contracted with the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center to conduct an assessment of U.S. hospital preparedness and to develop tools and recommendations for evaluating and improving future hospital preparedness efforts. One of the most important findings from this work is that healthcare coalitions-collaborative groups of local healthcare institutions and response agencies that work together to prepare for and respond to emergencies-have emerged throughout the U.S. since the HPP began. This article provides an overview of the HPP and the Center's hospital preparedness research for ASPR. Based on that work, the article also defines healthcare coalitions and identifies their structure and core functions, provides examples of more developed coalitions and common challenges faced by coalitions, and proposes that healthcare coalitions should become the foundation of a national strategy for healthcare preparedness and response for catastrophic health events.

  14. Uncovering middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birken Sarah A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Middle managers have received little attention in extant health services research, yet they may have a key role in healthcare innovation implementation. The gap between evidence of effective care and practice may be attributed in part to poor healthcare innovation implementation. Investigating middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation may reveal an opportunity for improvement. In this paper, we present a theory of middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation to fill the gap in the literature and to stimulate research that empirically examines middle managers' influence on innovation implementation in healthcare organizations. Discussion Extant healthcare innovation implementation research has primarily focused on the roles of physicians and top managers. Largely overlooked is the role of middle managers. We suggest that middle managers influence healthcare innovation implementation by diffusing information, synthesizing information, mediating between strategy and day-to-day activities, and selling innovation implementation. Summary Teamwork designs have become popular in healthcare organizations. Because middle managers oversee these team initiatives, their potential to influence innovation implementation has grown. Future research should investigate middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation. Findings may aid top managers in leveraging middle managers' influence to improve the effectiveness of healthcare innovation implementation.

  15. Standard treatment guidelines in primary healthcare practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, S; Udayshankar, P M; Rama, R

    2014-01-01

    In India, healthcare delivery is implemented at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Of these, primary health care is the essential health care and is the first point of care for the public across the country. The primary health care system caters to nearly 70% of the population by treating about 90% of the common and locally prevailing problems. One of the integral elements of primary health care is provision of essential medicines, which should be available at all times in adequate amounts in appropriate dosage forms and at an affordable cost. It has an important bearing on the medical, economical and social outcomes of the healthcare delivery system. This situation mandates the need for rational use of medicines by standardizing the treatment of commonly occurring illness at the primary health care level. Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) have been in vogue in India only since recent times and is gaining popularity among practitioners. STGs have many advantages for the patients, healthcare providers, drug manufacturers and marketing agencies, and above all, the policy makers and the legislative system of the country. The drawback in STGs lies in the difficulties in implementation on a large scale. With due efforts to prioritize the health needs, comprehensive coverage of national health programs involving all the stakeholders including professional organizations, undergraduate medical curriculum planners and medical practitioners, STGs can be implemented effectively and thereby we can ensure a quality health care at the primary care level at an affordable cost as part of the now redefined Universal Health Coverage. This article is intended as a guide to understand the concept of STGs, prepared with the aim of capacity building for medical professionals in rationally treating patients in their day-to-day clinical practice.

  16. Healthcare worker competencies for disaster training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Gabor D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although training and education have long been accepted as integral to disaster preparedness, many currently taught practices are neither evidence-based nor standardized. The need for effective evidence-based disaster training of healthcare staff at all levels, including the development of standards and guidelines for training in the multi-disciplinary health response to major events, has been designated by the disaster response community as a high priority. We describe the application of systematic evidence-based consensus building methods to derive educational competencies and objectives in criteria-based preparedness and response relevant to all hospital healthcare workers. Methods The conceptual development of cross-cutting competencies incorporated current evidence through a systematic consensus building process with the following steps: (1 review of peer-reviewed literature on relevant content areas and educational theory; (2 structured review of existing competencies, national level courses and published training objectives; (3 synthesis of new cross-cutting competencies; (4 expert panel review; (5 refinement of new competencies and; (6 development of testable terminal objectives for each competency using similar processes covering requisite knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Results Seven cross-cutting competencies were developed: (1 Recognize a potential critical event and implement initial actions; (2 Apply the principles of critical event management; (3 Demonstrate critical event safety principles; (4 Understand the institutional emergency operations plan; (5 Demonstrate effective critical event communications; (6 Understand the incident command system and your role in it; (7 Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill your role during a critical event. For each of the cross-cutting competencies, comprehensive terminal objectives are described. Conclusion Cross-cutting competencies and objectives

  17. Human factors in healthcare level one

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenorn-Lanng, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors, litigation, and complaints in the health service are due to 'human factors', yet the term is still not widely understood and is sometimes used interchangeably to refer to team training or communication skills. Although including these, the subject of 'human factors' goes far beyond this to look at systems, environmental influences, and interactions with equipment, in addition to self-awareness and human interaction. All of these aspects are captured inHuman Factors in Healthcare and are built into a new framework: the SHEEP model, which breaks down into five key areas:

  18. Predicting healthcare associated infections using patients' experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Michael A.; Chu, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Healthcare associated infections (HAI) are a major threat to patient safety and are costly to health systems. Our goal is to predict the HAI performance of a hospital using the patients' experience responses as input. We use four classifiers, viz. random forest, naive Bayes, artificial feedforward neural networks, and the support vector machine, to perform the prediction of six types of HAI. The six types include blood stream, urinary tract, surgical site, and intestinal infections. Experiments show that the random forest and support vector machine perform well across the six types of HAI.

  19. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  20. Connecting consumer choice to the healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enthoven, Alain

    2006-01-01

    American healthcare needs to be reformed into competing, efficient, comprehensive care systems. To get there from here, we need a health insurance market in which each person or household has a wide, responsible, informed, individual multiple choice of health care financing and delivery plans. The point of this is competing delivery systems, not just competing carriers. To compete, some carriers will create or contract with selective delivery systems or doctors selected for their quality and cost-effectiveness. Others will already be teamed up with large multispecialty group practices. On the other hand, high deductible plans will not help us get to a reformed delivery system. PMID:17260543

  1. Performance of Zirconia for Dental Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J. Kohal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The positive results of the performance of zirconia for orthopedics devices have led the dental community to explore possible esthetical and mechanical outcomes using this material. However, questions regarding long-term results have opened strong and controversial discussions regarding the utilization of zirconia as a substitute for alloys for restorations and implants. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized for dental restorations, oral implant components, and zirconia oral implants, and also addresses laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends of this material for dental healthcare.

  2. Three Wishes for Performing Arts Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2015-12-01

    As I think back over my 30-plus years as a physician and researcher in performing arts healthcare and try to imagine what might happen in the next 30 years, I sometimes fantasize about having three wishes that some supernatural force would grant. While waiting for something like that to happen is not likely to be an effective strategy for improving the health of performing artists around the world, the thought exercise might help to flesh out some ideas that could lead to further progress. While others will come up with different wishes (that I'm sure would be at least as valid), here are mine. PMID:26614982

  3. Three Wishes for Performing Arts Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2015-12-01

    As I think back over my 30-plus years as a physician and researcher in performing arts healthcare and try to imagine what might happen in the next 30 years, I sometimes fantasize about having three wishes that some supernatural force would grant. While waiting for something like that to happen is not likely to be an effective strategy for improving the health of performing artists around the world, the thought exercise might help to flesh out some ideas that could lead to further progress. While others will come up with different wishes (that I'm sure would be at least as valid), here are mine.

  4. Competition in Healthcare: Good, Bad or Ugly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goddard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of competition in healthcare is much debated. Despite a wealth of international experience in relation to competition, evidence is mixed and contested and the debate about the potential role for competition is often polarised. This paper considers briefly some of the reasons for this, focusing on what is meant by “competition in healthcare” and why it is more valuable to think about the circumstances in which competition is more and less likely to be a good tool to achieve benefits, rather than whether or not it is “good” or “bad,” per se.

  5. A Wicked Problem? Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Mannion and Davies’ article recognises whistleblowing as an important means of identifying quality and safety issues in healthcare organisations. While ‘voice’ is a useful lens through which to examine whistleblowing, it also obscures a shifting pattern of uncertain ‘truths.’ By contextualising cultures which support or impede whislteblowing at an organisational level, two issues are overlooked; the power of wider institutional interests to silence those who might raise the alarm and changing ideas about what constitutes adequate care. A broader contextualisation of whistleblowing might illuminate further facets of this multi-dimensional problem. PMID:27239870

  6. A vision for better healthcare in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Ian Hinitt, until the Summer of 2012 deputy director of Estates at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, is spearheading an ambitious joint-venture project between Apex 4D, he and his business partner, Balbir Panesar's recently established Bradford-based outsourced FM company, and Leeds-headquartered architectural practice, Bowman Riley, which the project partners hope will initiate the construction of a new generation of modular buildings to improve healthcare provision throughout India, and, in the process, generate significant reciprocal trade opportunities for both UK and Indian suppliers to the sector. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports.

  7. Healthcare Policy in Romania. Frameworks and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buţiu Călina Ana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to review some of the healthcare policy issues of Romania and identify those challenges which may be addressed through social intervention. Based on statistical data, documents, reports and applicable laws one will review the health condition of Romanian population and the state of the national health system, and will examine the broad strategies and policies currently under the scrutiny of appropriate ministries. The findings of the study suggest looking at health policies also through the lens of social inclusion.

  8. A Prelude Stride in Praxis and Usages of Healthcare Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murtaza Hussain Shaikh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Healthcare informatics is essential to bridge the research-practice gap that keeps widening with exploding medical knowledge; human brain power cannot keep pace with these explosions. Every developed nation is facing grim difficulties in the delivery of healthcare to its citizens. The causes are causes are universal (rising proportion of elderly requiring care, expensive medical technology, good expectations of services and quality and government`s poor ability to fund healthcare. These factors drive up cost and reduce equity of access. In this article we have tried to explore some challenges to highlight the importance of healthcare informatics as an emerging field and have given commendations for this profession to cope the coming trials and hurdles. We have has also tried to highlight some developed countries economic percentage on healthcare and medical field and proper usage of ICT as a good source of accessing information to be an updated tool in healthcare informatics.

  9. High Access Performance Strategy for Next Generation Healthcare Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, healthcare systems around the globe have undergone an increasing pressure to improve healthcare services through effective prevention, for chronicdisease patients as well as the general population. Growth of governments healthcare spending which is fuelled by an aging population and increase of chronic diseases.With advancement in information technology, healthcare organisations are now moving towards mobile healthcare which is an emerging field of technology that uses wireless network communication technologies to monitor patients mental and physical conditions. In this work, we develop an access mechanism of healthcare networks for patients by classifying the personal physiological parameters. We investigate the network performance under the proposed scheme, including access probability of patients and system utilization. The numerical results indicate that the proposed scheme with classifying physiological parameters can effectively increase QoS of networks.

  10. The role of criminal law within the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhafaji, Yasmin

    2012-12-01

    Health is for most of us the most precious thing one can have. However, in practice situations occur where the patient is harmed within the healthcare institution. Traditionally, there are several ways to protect individuals in society: with civil, criminal and administrative procedures. Over the years in the Netherlands complaints procedures were established in which the complaints about healthcare providers' performance can be handled. Recently, there are some developments within the criminal law that concern the healthcare sector. Examples are: the establishment of the Public Prosecution Service's Expertise Center on Medical Matters, appointments of medical prosecutors. In addition, in legal literature suggestions are made that criminal law is nowadays applied in order to provide redress to the patients (relatives) and as a 'safety tool' that is to ensure security and to counter the risks within the healthcare sector. The article discusses the role of criminal law within the healthcare sector, and in particular, whether criminal procedure is suitable for handling complaints about healthcare.

  11. Does healthcare financing converge? Evidence from eight OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Yi

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the convergence of healthcare financing across eight OECD countries during 1960-2009 for the first time. The panel stationary test incorporating both shapes of multiple structural breaks (i.e., sharp drifts and smooth transition shifts) and cross-sectional dependence was used to provide reliable evidence of convergence in healthcare financing. Our results suggested that the public share of total healthcare financing in eight OECD countries has exhibited signs of convergence towards that of the US. The convergence of healthcare financing not only reflected a decline in the share of public healthcare financing in these eight OECD countries but also exhibited an upward trend in the share of public healthcare financing in the US over the period of 1960-2009. PMID:24037490

  12. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Cheng Hii

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN. The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service.

  13. A comprehensive ubiquitous healthcare solution on an Android™ mobile device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hii, Pei-Cheng; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography) waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN). The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service. PMID:22163986

  14. LEAN THINKING IN HEALTHCARE: REVIEW OF IMPLEMENTATION RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kovacevic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For over decade, automotive industry originated lean concept has been successfully implemented in healthcare systems as a management method and philosophy with main focus on elimination of all types of wastes and looses in all tasks and processes so that time, materials, resources and medical procedures could be realized as effectively as it is possible. As main result lean concept implementation ensured to healthcare organizations to focus on their main core function and dedicate more time and efforts to patients without additional costs for them or healthcare system. However, lean implementation in healthcare could be much more difficult than in standard industrial environment and there are significant number of examples of lean in healthcare projects that failed to gain any measurable results and sustainable benefits from it. This paper presents review of some of the most successful implementations of lean tools and principles in healthcare organizations.

  15. An Exploration of Healthcare Inventory and Lean Management in Minimizing Medical Supply Waste in Healthcare Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how lean thinking and inventory management technology minimize expired medical supply waste in healthcare organizations. This study was guided by Toyota's theory of lean and Mintzberg's theory of management development to explain why the problem of medical supply waste exists. Government…

  16. Assessment of hand hygiene levels among healthcare professionals in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rameswarapu, Rohin; K, Surendranath Sai; Valsangkar, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionHand hygiene, either by hand disinfection or hand washing remains to be most pivotal in controlling infection in healthcare settings. Simple preventive measures have been proven effective to contain infections. The exiguity on studies done in healthcare settings in India has galvanized us to undertake this study on hand hygiene assessment among nurses in a healthcare setting in IndiaMaterials and methodsA cross sectional study was done in one of leading organization in preventive ...

  17. Access to Healthcare in Rural China : A Public Administration Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Access to healthcare services is a major social concern in China. China's government acknowledges that market reforms of the healthcare system have been a failure, and it has embarked on a series of ambitious health system reforms. This thesis seeks to contribute insights and propositions about how the Chinese government can improve access to healthcare services for citizens in underprivileged, rural areas. In a field dominated by quantitative studies, it takes a qualitative approach, seeking...

  18. Using Business Intelligence Tools for Predictive Analytics in Healthcare System

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela-Laura IVAN; Mircea Raducu TRIFU; Manole VELICANU; Cristian CIUREA

    2016-01-01

    The scope of this article is to highlight how healthcare analytics can be improved using Business Intelligence tools. Healthcare system has learned from the previous lessons the necessity of using healthcare analytics for improving patient care, hospital administration, population growth and many others aspects. Business Intelligence solutions applied for the current analysis demonstrate the benefits brought by the new tools, such as SAP HANA, SAP Lumira, and SAP Predictive Analytics. In deta...

  19. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    OpenAIRE

    Pei-Cheng Hii; Wan-Young Chung

    2011-01-01

    Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography) waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN). The exploitat...

  20. Healthcare Decision Support System for Administration of Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Ji-In; Yang, Jung-Gi; Lee, Young-Ho; Kang, Un-Gu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A healthcare decision-making support model and rule management system is proposed based on a personalized rule-based intelligent concept, to effectively manage chronic diseases. Methods A Web service was built using a standard message transfer protocol for interoperability of personal health records among healthcare institutions. An intelligent decision service is provided that analyzes data using a service-oriented healthcare rule inference function and machine-learning platform; ...

  1. The role of information technology in designs of healthcare trade

    OpenAIRE

    Ajeet Mathur

    2003-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) is poised to revolutionise healthcare trade through new thresholds in human connectivity. This paper focuses on the expanding role of IT in three distinct but related categories: (a) design and development of healthcare products and services, (b) delivery systems, and, (c) healthcare administration. Through information power that IT enables, capacities of decision-makers are continually transformed in how they link with each other, in the here and now. This not onl...

  2. System integrational and migrational concepts and methods within healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endsleff, F; Loubjerg, P

    1997-01-01

    In this paper an overview and comparison of the basic concepts and methods behind different system integrational implementations is given, including the DHE, which is based on the coming Healthcare Information Systems Architecture pre-standard HISA, developed by CEN TC251. This standard and the DHE...... (Distributed Healthcare Environment) not only provides highly relevant standards, but also provides an efficient and well structured platform for Healthcare IT Systems....

  3. CPOE/EHR-Driven Healthcare Workflow Generation and Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Minmin; Song, Xiping; DeHaan, Jan; Cao, Hui; Kennedy, Rosemary; Gugerty, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Automated healthcare workflow generation and scheduling is an approach to ensure the use of the evidence-based protocols. Generating efficient and practical workflows is challenging due to the dynamic nature of healthcare practice and operations. We propose to use Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) and Electronic Health Record (EHR) components to generate workflows (consisting of scheduled work items) to aid healthcare (nursing) operations. Currently, we are prototyping and developing ...

  4. Markets and Healthcare Services in Malaysia: Critical Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Rajah Rasiah; Nik Rosnah Wan Abdullah; Makmor Tumin

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the critical issues facing healthcare in Malaysia. It starts by reviewing the dominant arguments on ownership and healthcare provision, viz., neoclassical, evolutionary and heterodox and the politics of interest groups. Given the imperfections and asymmetries associated with healthcare, as well as its properties as a social good that should reach everyone, the paper adopts evolutionary and heterodox arguments, and the views of political scientists on civil society. It then...

  5. Exposing the true risks of capitation financed healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Many healthcare finance mechanisms involve transferring uncertain costs to healthcare providers in lieu of fixed payments or global capitation. Global capitation violates basic principles of risk management through insurance. Risk-theoretic analysis of capitation shows that risk disaggregation forces efficient providers to become inefficient insurers. Risk-assuming providers face lower profitability and increased exposure to operating losses, and must reduce patient benefits. Global capitation causes inefficiency, increases healthcare costs, and threatens patient-provider relationships. PMID:21506200

  6. Determinants of Access to Healthcare: A Survey in Istanbul

    OpenAIRE

    Paköz, Muhammed Ziya; Yüzer, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    Access to healthcare is formed according to the characteristics of the supply and demand. While siting hospitals, ?equity' in access to healthcare should be taken as a basis for all segments of society, and necessary measures should be taken to ensure that vulnerable groups benefit from health services adequately. This necessitates evaluating spatial and non-spatial dimensions of access to healthcare together. Spatial dimension emphasizes importance of the distance whereas non-spatial dimensi...

  7. Do Drugs Reduce Utilisation of Other Healthcare Resources?

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Yves Cremieux; Pierre Ouellette; Patrick Petit

    2007-01-01

    Background: Drug expenditures per capita have drastically increased over the last quarter century in Canada, with a share of overall healthcare costs rising from 8.8% in 1980 to 16.8% in 2002. Pressure to curb expenditure on drugs has increased accordingly, but containing drug expenditure might increase costs elsewhere in the healthcare sector. Objective: To measure substitution patterns between drugs and other healthcare resources over the last 25 years and thus assess whether containing dru...

  8. The Appliance Pervasive of Internet of Things in Healthcare Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sajjad Hussain Talpur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In fact, information systems are the foundation of new productivity sources, medical organizational forms, and erection of a global economy. IoT based healthcare systems play a significant role in ICT and have contribution in growth of medical information systems, which are underpinning of recent medical and economic development strategies. However, to take advantages of IoT, it is essential that medical enterprises and community should trust the IoT systems in terms of performance, security, privacy, reliability and return-on-investment, which are open challenges of current IoT systems. For heightening of healthcare system; tracking, tracing and monitoring of patients and medical objects are more essential. But due to the inadequate healthcare situation, medical environment, medical technologies and the unique requirements of some healthcare applications, the obtainable tools cannot meet them accurately. The tracking, tracing and monitoring of patients and healthcare actors activities in healthcare system are challenging research directions for IoT researchers. State-of-the-art IoT based healthcare system should be developed which ensure the safety of patients and other healthcare activities. With this manuscript, we elaborate the essential role of IoT in healthcare systems; immense prospects of Internet of things in healthcare systems; extensive aspect of the use of IoT is dissimilar among different healthcare components and finally the participation of IoT between the useful research and present realistic applications. IoT and few other modern technologies are still in underpinning stage; mainly in the healthcare system.

  9. Healthcare Services Expenditure: A Case Study in Isfahan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Determining and understanding of healthcare costs and its financing method is one of the most important subjects understatement of which can cause such major problems as excessive health costs for households due to the high rate of out-of-pocket expenses. Objectives The current study aimed to analyze the healthcare costs and determine the share of Isfahan province, Iran, from the total healthcare costs of the country from 2006 to 2011. Materials and Methods It was a retrospective and descriptive-analytical study. The required statistical data were gathered from statistical yearbooks of the country and the province, the website of the World Bank, the statistics provided by the Healthcare Department of Isfahan and Kashan Universities of Medical Sciences and the statistical data provided by Iran Statistics Center in 2011, all covering the period of six years from 2006 to 2011. Excel software was used for data analysis and computations of the research. Results During this period, the annual growth average of healthcare and treatment costs were 12% and 20%, respectively. The share of the healthcare sector declined from 33% in 2006 to 25.4% in 2011. In other words, healthcare cost per capita, being about one second of the treatment cost per capita, reduced to a third of treatment per capita in 2011. Conclusions Efficient allocation of financial resources in the healthcare system based on specific goals and strategies, coordination of public and private sectors in providing healthcare services, the rising share of the healthcare sector in GDP of the province and the country, and the preference of prevention over treatment measures can affect achieving the healthcare system goals and surmount challenges such as pay-out-of-pocket and rising healthcare costs, particularly the costs of integrated treatment with full performance.

  10. Telemental health: responding to mandates for reform in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kathleen M; Lieberman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Telemental health (TMH) has established a niche as a feasible, acceptable, and effective service model to improve the mental healthcare and outcomes for individuals who cannot access traditional mental health services. The Accountability Care Act has mandated reforms in the structure, functioning, and financing of primary care that provide an opportunity for TMH to move into the mainstream healthcare system. By partnering with the Integrated Behavioral Healthcare Model, TMH offers a spectrum of tools to unite primary care physicians and mental health specialist in a mind-body view of patients' healthcare needs and to activate patients in their own care. TMH tools include video-teleconferencing to telecommute mental health specialists to the primary care setting to collaborate with a team in caring for patients' mental healthcare needs and to provide direct services to patients who are not progressing optimally with this collaborative model. Asynchronous tools include online therapies that offer an efficient first step to treatment for selected disorders such as depression and anxiety. Patients activate themselves in their care through portals that provide access to their healthcare information and Web sites that offer on-demand information and communication with a healthcare team. These synchronous and asynchronous TMH tools may move the site of mental healthcare from the clinic to the home. The evolving role of social media in facilitating communication among patients or with their healthcare team deserves further consideration as a tool to activate patients and provide more personalized care.

  11. A design thinking framework for healthcare management and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jess P; Fisher, Thomas R; Trowbridge, Matthew J; Bent, Christine

    2016-03-01

    The business community has learned the value of design thinking as a way to innovate in addressing people's needs--and health systems could benefit enormously from doing the same. This paper lays out how design thinking applies to healthcare challenges and how systems might utilize this proven and accessible problem-solving process. We show how design thinking can foster new approaches to complex and persistent healthcare problems through human-centered research, collective and diverse teamwork and rapid prototyping. We introduce the core elements of design thinking for a healthcare audience and show how it can supplement current healthcare management, innovation and practice.

  12. E-commerce in healthcare: changing the traditional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A K; Travers, S

    2001-01-01

    The healthcare industry, with more than one trillion dollars in revenue, accounts for about one-seventh of the U.S. economy. A significant portion of this revenue is lost to escalating healthcare system costs. This article examines the shortcomings of the traditional healthcare delivery system in terms of information flow, communication standards, case collections, and IT spending. It makes the case that e-commerce has the ability to transact some healthcare business more efficiently and cost-effectively. With the Internet as a delivery platform, several models offer improvement over the status quo. PMID:11338906

  13. E-commerce in healthcare: changing the traditional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A K; Travers, S

    2001-01-01

    The healthcare industry, with more than one trillion dollars in revenue, accounts for about one-seventh of the U.S. economy. A significant portion of this revenue is lost to escalating healthcare system costs. This article examines the shortcomings of the traditional healthcare delivery system in terms of information flow, communication standards, case collections, and IT spending. It makes the case that e-commerce has the ability to transact some healthcare business more efficiently and cost-effectively. With the Internet as a delivery platform, several models offer improvement over the status quo.

  14. Fully integrated biochip platforms for advanced healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  15. Implementing healthcare information security: standards can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Andrej; Bernik, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Using widely spread common approaches to systems security in health dedicated controlled environments, a level of awareness, confidence and acceptance of relevant standardisation is evaluated. Patients' information is sensitive, so putting appropriate organisational techniques as well as modern technology in place to secure health information is of paramount importance. Mobile devices are becoming the top priorities in advanced information security planning with healthcare environments being no exception. There are less and less application areas in healthcare without having a need for a mobile functionality which represents an even greater information security challenge. This is also true in emergency treatments, rehabilitation and homecare just to mention a few areas outside hospital controlled environments. Unfortunately quite often traditional unsecured communications principles are still in routine use for communicating sensitive health related information. The security awareness level with users, patients and care professionals is not high enough so potential threats and risks may not be addressed and the respective information security management is therefore weak. Standards like ISO/IEC 27000 ISMS family, the ISO/IEC 27799 information security guidelines in health are often not well known, but together with legislation principles such as HIPAA, they can help.

  16. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  17. Service models for remote healthcare monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Bridget A

    2010-01-01

    These scenarios reflect where the future is heading for remote health monitoring technology and service expectations. Being able to manage a "system of systems" with timely service hand-off over seams of responsibility and system interfaces will become very important for a BMET or clinical engineer. These interfaces will include patient homes, clinician homes, commercial/civilian infrastructure, public utilities, vendor infrastructure as well as internal departmental domains. Concurrently, technology is changing rapidly resulting in newer software delivery modes and hardware appliances as well as infrastructure changes. Those who are able to de-construct the complex systems and identify infrastructure assumptions and seams of servicing responsibility will be able to better understand and communicate the expectations for service of these systems. Moreover, as identified in Case 1, prodigious use of underlying system monitoring tools (managing the "meta-data") could move servicing of these remote systems from a reactive approach to a proactive approach. A prepared healthcare organization will identify their current and proposed future service combination use cases and design service philosophies and expectations for those use cases, while understanding the infrastructure assumptions and seams of responsibility. This is the future of technical service to the healthcare clinicians and patients. PMID:22049611

  18. Evaluating Burnout among Administrative and Healthcare Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khorshidian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Burnout is an occupational hazard which is known as one of the major factors affecting employees’ psychological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate occupational burnout among administrative and healthcare staffs of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods In this cross sectional study, 300 employees (150 administrative staff and 150 health care staff were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean of burnout was 2.33±0.60. The results showed no significant difference between men and women employees in terms of occupational burnout and its three dimensions. Moreover, a significant difference between administrative and medical staffs  were found only in the dimension of emotional exhaustion. The mean score of emotional exhaustion in the administrative staff was significantly lower than that of their peers in the healthcare sector (2.03±0.84vs. 2.36±1.00 (p=0.03. Conclusions: The results showed that the majority of employees reported an average level of burnout .Such finding was in agreement with the results reported in previous studies. The obtained results can pave the way for further study on the identifying determinants of burnout.

  19. Developing forensic mental healthcare in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Joachim Salize

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many economically struggling societies forensic psychiatry is still in its initial developmental stages and thus forensic patients pose an ongoing challenge for the healthcare and juridical systems. In this article we present the various issues and problems that arose when establishing the first forensic psychiatric institute in Kosovo- a country whose population has constantly been reported as suffering from a high psychiatric morbidity due to long-lasting traumatic experiences during the war of 1999. The implementation of a new forensic psychiatric institute in the developing mental healthcare system of Kosovo, still characterized by considerable shortages, required substantial effort on various levels. On the policy and financial level, it was made possible by a clear intent and coordinated commitment of all responsible national stakeholders and authorities, such as the Ministries of Health and Justice, and by the financial contribution of the European Commission. Most decisive in terms of the success of the project was capacity building in human resources, i.e. the recruitment and training of motivated staff. Training included essential clinical and theoretical issues as well as clearly defined standard operation procedures, guidelines and checklists to aid daily routine work and the management of challenging situations.

  20. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety. PMID:25078411

  1. [Digital health as a motor for change towards new healthcare models and the relationship between patients and healthcare professionals. Disruption of healthcare processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cuyàs, Francesc; de San Pedro, Marc; Martínez Roldan, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    We find ourselves at the end of an era of asymmetry in the domain of health information where the majority of this data is in the hands of the healthcare system. Increasingly, the public are calling for a more central role in the new paradigm that enables them to duly exercise their right of access to their health data while availing of more reliable and safer technologies which contribute to the management of their condition and promote healthy lifestyles. So far, the TIC Salud strategic plan has been developed independently from the Generalitat de Catalunya Health Department's Healthcare Plan, which sets out health policy strategy in Catalonia. However, from its initial design stage the new Healthcare Plan (2016- 2020) envisages incorporating a new strategic Information and communications technology (ICT) line called "Digital Health". Incorporating ICT into the Health Plan will allow these technologies to become integral part of all strategic healthcare processes, acting as a driving force for a shift towards a new healthcare models and an innovative relationship between the public and healthcare professionals. The Digital Health implies a disruption in itself, by way of the convergence of several technologies and their positive impact on health and healthcare procedures, by way of the public's access to information concerning their health, and by creating new opportunities for promoting health and the salutogenic paradigm which empowers people to develop their health, welfare and quality of life.

  2. [Digital health as a motor for change towards new healthcare models and the relationship between patients and healthcare professionals. Disruption of healthcare processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cuyàs, Francesc; de San Pedro, Marc; Martínez Roldan, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    We find ourselves at the end of an era of asymmetry in the domain of health information where the majority of this data is in the hands of the healthcare system. Increasingly, the public are calling for a more central role in the new paradigm that enables them to duly exercise their right of access to their health data while availing of more reliable and safer technologies which contribute to the management of their condition and promote healthy lifestyles. So far, the TIC Salud strategic plan has been developed independently from the Generalitat de Catalunya Health Department's Healthcare Plan, which sets out health policy strategy in Catalonia. However, from its initial design stage the new Healthcare Plan (2016- 2020) envisages incorporating a new strategic Information and communications technology (ICT) line called "Digital Health". Incorporating ICT into the Health Plan will allow these technologies to become integral part of all strategic healthcare processes, acting as a driving force for a shift towards a new healthcare models and an innovative relationship between the public and healthcare professionals. The Digital Health implies a disruption in itself, by way of the convergence of several technologies and their positive impact on health and healthcare procedures, by way of the public's access to information concerning their health, and by creating new opportunities for promoting health and the salutogenic paradigm which empowers people to develop their health, welfare and quality of life. PMID:26711061

  3. Hardship financing of healthcare among rural poor in Orissa, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Binnendijk (Erica); R. Koren (Ruth); D.M. Dror (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This study examines health-related "hardship financing" in order to get better insights on how poor households finance their out-of-pocket healthcare costs. We define hardship financing as having to borrow money with interest or to sell assets to pay out-of-pocket healthcare

  4. A Systematic Review of Natural Language Processing in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaronke G. Iroju

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare system is a knowledge driven industry which consists of vast and growing volumes of narrative information obtained from discharge summaries/reports, physicians case notes, pathologists as well as radiologists reports. This information is usually stored in unstructured and non-standardized formats in electronic healthcare systems which make it difficult for the systems to understand the information contents of the narrative information. Thus, the access to valuable and meaningful healthcare information for decision making is a challenge. Nevertheless, Natural Language Processing (NLP techniques have been used to structure narrative information in healthcare. Thus, NLP techniques have the capability to capture unstructured healthcare information, analyze its grammatical structure, determine the meaning of the information and translate the information so that it can be easily understood by the electronic healthcare systems. Consequently, NLP techniques reduce cost as well as improve the quality of healthcare. It is therefore against this background that this paper reviews the NLP techniques used in healthcare, their applications as well as their limitations.

  5. Vaccines for preventing hepatitis B in health-care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers.......Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers....

  6. Implementation of Consolidated HIS: Improving Quality and Efficiency of Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jinwook; Kim, Jin Wook; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ju Han; Kim, Jong Hyo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Wee, Won Ryang; Nam, Sang Mo; Lim, Mi-sun; Kim, Young-Ah

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Adoption of hospital information systems offers distinctive advantages in healthcare delivery. First, implementation of consolidated hospital information system in Seoul National University Hospital led to significant improvements in quality of healthcare and efficiency of hospital management. Methods The hospital information system in Seoul National University Hospital consists of component applications: clinical information systems, clinical research support systems, administrati...

  7. Healthcare professionals’ views of feedback on patient safety culture assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Hendriks, M.; Hoogervorst-Schilp, J.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: By assessing patient safety culture, healthcare providers can identify areas for improvement in patient safety culture. To achieve this, these assessment outcomes have to be relevant and presented clearly. The aim of our study was to explore healthcare professionals’ views on the feedbac

  8. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  9. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  10. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  11. The Life-and-Death Factor: Focus on Healthcare Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    With economic pressures restricting campus budgets and healthcare policy issues capturing national attention, facilities managers at university-affiliated hospitals and other healthcare entities say they feel more urgency than ever to provide cost-effective services to patients, providers, medical researchers, and students. Managing facilities at…

  12. Preparedness of Lithuanian general practitioners to provide mental healthcare services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Sauliune, Skirmante; Jarusevicius, Gediminas;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large unmet need for mental healthcare in Lithuania is partially attributable to a lack of primary care providers with skills in this area. The aim of this study was to assess general practitioners' (GPs) experience in mental healthcare and their perceptions about how to increase th...

  13. IT Support for Healthcare Processes - Premises, Challenges, Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, R.; Reichert, M.U.

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare processes require the cooperation of different organizational units and medical disciplines. In such an environment optimal process support becomes crucial. Though healthcare processes frequently change, and therefore the separation of the flow logic from the application code seems to be

  14. Medication-Nutrient Interactions and Individuals with Special Healthcare Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizee, Lori S.

    2008-01-01

    Many children and adults with special healthcare needs receive one or more medications on a regular basis. Parents and healthcare professionals who care for these individuals should be aware of each medication and potential interactions with foods/nutrients. Those who require long term or multiple medications are at highest risk for drug-nutrient…

  15. [Coordination among healthcare levels: systematization of tools and measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraza Núñez, Rebeca; Vargas Lorenzo, Ingrid; Vázquez Navarrete, María Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Improving healthcare coordination is a priority in many healthcare systems, particularly in chronic health problems in which a number of professionals and services intervene. There is an abundance of coordination strategies and mechanisms that should be systematized so that they can be used in the most appropriate context. The present article aims to analyse healthcare coordination and its instruments using the organisational theory. Coordination mechanisms can be classified according to two basic processes used to coordinate activities: programming and feedback. The optimal combination of mechanisms will depend on three factors: the degree to which healthcare activities are differentiated, the volume and type of interdependencies, and the level of uncertainty. Historically, healthcare services have based coordination on skills standardization and, most recently, on processes standardization, through clinical guidelines, maps, and plans. Their utilisation is unsatisfactory in chronic diseases involving intervention by several professionals with reciprocal interdependencies, variability in patients' response to medical interventions, and a large volume of information to be processed. In this case, mechanisms based on feedback, such as working groups, linking professionals and vertical information systems, are more effective. To date, evaluation of healthcare coordination has not been conducted systematically, using structure, process and results indicators. The different strategies and instruments have been applied mainly to long-term care and mental health and one of the challenges to healthcare coordination is to extend and evaluate their use throughout the healthcare continuum.

  16. Instilling New Habits: Addressing Implicit Bias in Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aidan; Tanesini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    There appears to be a fundamental inconsistency between research which shows that some minority groups consistently receive lower quality healthcare and the literature indicating that healthcare workers appear to hold equality as a core personal value. Recent evidence using Implicit Association Tests suggests that these disparities in outcome may…

  17. Converting Text to Structured Models of Healthcare Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotou, George; Matragkas, Nicholas; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a concise method for transforming textual representations of healthcare services, to a structured, semantically unambiguous modelling language. The method is designed based on literature, as well as trial and error by the authors, using text descriptions of healthcare services. Employing the method can convert textual descriptions to structured graphical models, facilitating stakeholder collaboration on requirements analysis and simulation. PMID:27350483

  18. System Interoperability Study for Healthcare Information System with Web Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a new distributed middleware technology ‘Web Services’ in the proposed Healthcare Information System (HIS to address the issue of system interoperability raised from existing Healthcare Information systems. With the development of HISs, hospitals and healthcare institutes have been building their own HISs for processing massive healthcare data, such as, systems built up for hospitals under the NHS (National Health Service to manage patients’ records. Nowadays many healthcare providers are willing to integrate their systems’ functions and data for information sharing. This has raised concerns in data transmission, data security and network limitation. Among these issues, system and language interoperability are one of most obvious issues since data and application integration is not an easy task due to differences in programming languages, system platforms, Database Management Systems (DBMS used within different systems. As a new distributed middleware technology, Web service brings an ideal solution to the issue of system and language interoperability. Web service has been approved to be very successful in many commercial applications (e.g. Amazon.com, Dell computer, etc., however it is different to healthcare information system. As the result, Web Service-based Integrated Healthcare Information System (WSIHIS is proposed to address the interoperability issue of existing HISs but also to introduce this new technology into the healthcare environment.

  19. Leadership Styles and Effectiveness among C-Level Healthcare Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhoon-Walker, Etta J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is essential to circumnavigating the numerous obstacles confronting the healthcare industry. In addition, the current health system is suffering from a proficient leadership gap. However, identifying and developing executives with the greatest potential to become strong, up-and-coming healthcare C-level executive leaders can…

  20. How well are healthcare institutions prepared for disasters?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzermans, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The better healthcare providers are educated and trained and the more they practice their skills, the more they are prepared when disaster strikes. However, little is known about the current state of preparedness for managing disasters among healthcare providers. Methods: Representativ

  1. Healthcare in Brunei Darussalam: Flying Doctor Service (Part I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of an official healthcare system in Brunei in 1907, service provision continued to improve, albeit slowly. Some of the limiting factors included the lack of infrastructure in healthcare, roads and transportation and workforce (limited to dressers and a visiting doctor from Labuan in the initial part, and limited knowledge of the bygone era.

  2. Healthcare resource consumption in terminal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R M; Schneiderman, L J

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in healthcare have raised important ethical challenges. One of the trends is the increasing attention to patient autonomy for medical decision making. Patients are exercising greater authority to refuse medical treatment and to seek medical treatment that may end life. Another important trend is that end of life medical care has become increasingly expensive. Further, changes in reimbursement for medical care may create incentives for providers to deny heroic treatment. This article reviews issues relevant to these developments. We consider the issue of medical futility, the role of advance directives, and the international movement toward the legalisation of euthanasia. We suggest that futile medical treatment should not be offered and that advance directives should he used. However, review of the literature suggests that advance directives may not reduce medical costs. The effect of managed care upon advance directives, denial of heroic care and euthanasia is not known at this time. PMID:10172914

  3. People-centric sensing in assistive healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannetsos, Thanassis; Dimitriou, Tassos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    sensing devices enabling thousands new personal, social, and public sensing applications. In this paper, we discuss our vision for people-centric sensing in assistive healthcare environments and study the security challenges it brings. This highly dynamic and mobile setting presents new challenges...... for information security, data privacy and ethics, caused by the ubiquitous nature of data traces originating from sensors carried by people. We aim to instigate discussion on these critical issues because people-centric sensing will never succeed without adequate provisions on security and privacy. To that end...... follows a more passive approach and has focused on collecting and processing data using a static-topology and an application-aware infrastructure. However, with the technological advances in sensing, computation, storage, and communications, a new era is about to emerge changing the traditional view...

  4. Critical Knowledge Monitor System Model : healthcare context

    OpenAIRE

    T. Pereira; Santos, Henrique Dinis dos

    2012-01-01

    In  order to  provide  a  better service, sharing  knowledge  with partners and communities is becoming part of the healthcare organizations culture. Data, information and clinic knowledge require specific cautious, because it involves ethical and legal issues. The constant evolution of Information and Communication Technologies brings new opportunities with multiple forms of communication (web 2.0), therefore, new ways of sharing knowledge. Further, there is a wide knowledge sources: patient...

  5. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  6. Virtual video prototyping of pervasive healthcare systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Bossen, Claus; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constraints and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users' perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate......Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video....... In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very concrete design...

  7. Exploring Overtime Utilization Patterns in Healthcare Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almorsy, Lamia; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    To control healthcare costs it is essential to analyze and improve staffing, the largest organizational expense, by improving utilization of human resources. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center explored overtime utilization patterns. There was no significant correlation between overtime utilization and workload (P=0.91, r=0.04) or number of staff (P=0.71, r=0.12). Some departments showed a positive correlation between overtime utilization and workloads, others showed no correlation or even a negative correlation between overtime utilization and workloads. Consideration of other factors is recommended, including staff turnover rates, productivity and efficiency, staff competency and training. Further analysis of overtime utilization should be conducted per employees' grade and profession, to compare the utilization of the technical, non-technical and administrative staff members. The hospital information system should not only be used to login overtime utilization and workload, but should also be enhanced to monitor, control and analyze these performance indicators. PMID:27350503

  8. Value Creation from Public Healthcare IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Svejvig, Per; Andersen, Povl Erik Rostgaard

    2014-01-01

    The obtainment of value from IT is a recurring theme that has diffused into healthcare information systems (HIS). Having completed the implementation of an integrated HIS, the Faroese Health Service (FHS) has started discussions regarding the obtainment of value from its IT investment which...... is the subject of this paper. Based on an action research project focusing on the improvement of the stroke process, this paper reveals that it is not possible to distinguish between working processes and HIS and that the realization of value in this context has a much broader significance than mere financial...... value. During the project, specific key performance indicators (KPIs) were identified and a baseline was established for the stroke process. The outcome is a framework for measuring IS public value as: professional, organizational, patient-perceived and employee-perceived quality as well as learning...

  9. Telepathology for effective healthcare in Developing Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Sankaye

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Telepathology has grown immensely due to rapid advances in information and technology. It has a wide variety of applications especially in the developing world, namely for remote primary diagnosis, specialist referrals, secondary opinions, remote teachings and in research. Basic infrastructure and skilled and experienced staff are the prerequisites for its successful implementation.Socio-economic differences in developing nations result in a chaotic scenario so that, the advanced areas have expertise, while rural and remote areas remain deprived. Telepathology has the potential to bridge this gap.This article discusses how successful use of the internet for telepathology is bridging this gap in developing nations and thereby contributing positively to effective healthcare. Possible constraints to telepathology and some solutions to overcome them are also discussed.

  10. Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Burnout among Healthcare Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mohammad Azeem

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship among conscientiousness, neuroticism and burnout in healthcare staff of private hospitals. Moreover, the study also examines the influence of conscientiousness and neuroticism on burnout of the respondents. 120 respondents were contacted in 8 private hospitals for data collection but only 90 of them completed the survey. Maslach’s burnout inventory (MBI and Big-Five Inventory were used as measuring instruments. Results reveal that conscientiousness was negatively and significantly related to dimensions of burnout. Neuroticism was found to be positively and significantly related to dimensions of burnout. Multiple regression analysis was used to see which among the independent variable predicts burnout in the sample. Results show that conscientiousness significantly predicts all the dimensions of burnout and neuroticism significantly predicts only emotional exhaustion and reduced personal accomplishment dimensions of burnout.

  11. Management-By-Objectives in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas

    the overview and transparency for healthcare decision makers; as a result, well-documented initiatives fail to become integrated support in operational decision-making processes. This research work has thus striven to design a holistic Management-By-Objectives framework that can enable managers and operational...... that managers are able to incorporate those indicators they find useful in their department, and thus secure sufficient informational support for the department's decision-making processes. The Performance Account thereby eases the identification of areas suited for corrective actions, and provides the decision......; collectively, however, they pose a significant drawback. The vast selection of self-contained initiatives limits the overview for decision makers and imposes an escalating administrative burden on operational staff members. Contrary to the initial objective, the expanding informational burden limits...

  12. Virtual Video Prototyping for Healthcare Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video...... concrete design issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constraints and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users' perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate to....... In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very...

  13. The promise and peril of healthcare forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, J Frank; Weiner, Jonathan P

    2012-03-01

    Health plans and physician groups increasingly use sophisticated tools to predict individual patient outcomes. Such analytics will accelerate as US medicine enters the digital age. Promising applications of forecasting include better targeting of disease management as well as innovative patient care approaches such as personalized health insurance and clinical decision support systems. In addition, stakeholders will use predictions to advance their organizational agendas, and unintended consequences could arise. Forecasting-based interventions might have uncertain effectiveness, focus on cost savings rather than long-term health, or specifically exclude disadvantaged populations. Policy makers, health plans, and method developers should adopt strategies that address these concerns in order to maximize the benefit of healthcare forecasting on the long-term health of patients.

  14. Benchmarking in healthcare using aggregated indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking has become a fundamental part of modern health care systems, but unfortunately, no benchmarking framework is unanimously accepted for assessing both quality and performance. The aim of this paper is to present a benchmarking model that is able to take different stakeholder perspectives...... into account. By presenting performance as a function of a patient perspective, an operations management perspective, and an employee perspective a more holistic approach to benchmarking is proposed. By collecting statistical information from several national and regional agencies and internal databases......, the model is constructed as a comprehensive hierarchy of indicators. By aggregating the outcome of each indicator, the model is able to benchmark healthcare providing units. By assessing performance deeper in the hierarchy, a more detailed view of performance is obtained. The validity test of the model...

  15. The Italian health-care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, George; Taroni, Francesco; Donatini, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Italy's national health service is statutorily required to guarantee the uniform provision of comprehensive care throughout the country. However, this is complicated by the fact that, constitutionally, responsibility for health care is shared between the central government and the 20 regions. There are large and growing differences in regional health service organisation and provision. Public health-care expenditure has absorbed a relatively low share of gross domestic product, although in the last 25 years it has consistently exceeded central government forecasts. Changes in payment systems, particularly for hospital care, have helped to encourage organisational appropriateness and may have contributed to containing expenditure. Tax sources used to finance the Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) have become somewhat more regressive. The limited evidence on vertical equity suggests that the SSN ensures equal access to primary care but lower income groups face barriers to specialist care. The health status of Italians has improved and compares favourably with that in other countries, although regional disparities persist.

  16. Anonymity: an impediment to performance in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsberg, Daniel W; Pierce, Read G

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching hospitals employ a care team structure composed of a broad range of healthcare providers with different skill sets. Each member of this team has a distinct role and a different level of training ranging from attending physician to resident, intern, and medical student. Often times, these different roles lead to greater complexity and confusion for both patients and nursing staff. It has been demonstrated that patients have a great degree of difficulty in identifying members of their care team. This anonymity also exists between nursing staff and other care providers. In order to better understand the magnitude of anonymity within the teaching hospital, a ten-question survey was sent to nurses across three different departments. Results from this survey demonstrated that 71% of nurses are "Always" or "Often" able to identify which care team is responsible for their patients, while 79% of nurses reported that they either "Often" or "Sometimes" page a provider who is not currently caring for a given patient. Furthermore, 33% of nurses felt that they were either "Rarely" or "Never" able to recognize, by face and name, attending level providers. Residents were "Rarely" or "Never" recognized by face and name 37% of the time, and interns 42% of the time. Contacting the wrong provider repeatedly leads to de facto delays in medication, therapy, and diagnosis. Additionally, these unnecessary interruptions slow workflow for both nurses and members of the care team, making hospital care less efficient and safe overall. Technological systems should focus on reducing anonymity within the hospital in order to enhance healthcare delivery. PMID:25114570

  17. Do randomized controlled trials discuss healthcare costs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Michael Allan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Healthcare costs, particularly pharmaceutical costs, are a dominant issue for most healthcare organizations, but it is unclear if randomized controlled trials (RCTs routinely discuss costs. Our objective was to assess the frequency and factors associated with the inclusion of costs in RCTs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We randomly sampled 188 RCTs spanning three years (2003-2005 from six high impact journals. The sample size for RCTs was based on a calculation to estimate the inclusion of actual drug costs with a precision of +/-3%. Two reviewers independently extracted cost data and study characteristics. Frequencies were calculated and potential characteristics associated with the inclusion of costs were explored. Actual drug costs were included in 4.7% (9/188 of RCTs; any actual costs were included in 7.4% (14/188 of RCTs; and any mention of costs was included in 27.7% (52/188 of RCTs. As the amount of industry funding increased across RCTs, from non-profit to mixed to fully industry funded RCTs, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of RCTs with any actual costs (Cochran-Armitage test, p = 0.005 and any mention of costs (Cochran-Armitage test, p = 0.02. Logistic regression analysis also indicated funding was associated with the inclusion of any actual cost (OR = 0.34, p = 0.009 or any mention of costs (OR = 0.63, p = 0.02. Journal, study conclusions, study location, primary author's country and product age were not associated with inclusion of cost information. CONCLUSION: While physicians are encouraged to consider costs when prescribing drugs for their patients, actual drug costs were provided in only 5% of RCTs and were not mentioned at all in 72% of RCTs. Industry funded trials were less likely to include cost information. No other factors were associated with the inclusion of cost information.

  18. Virtual, augmented reality and serious games for healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Anderson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is a tremendous interest among researchers for the development of virtual, augmented reality and games technologies due to their widespread applications in medicine and healthcare. To date the major applications of these technologies include medical simulation, telemedicine, medical and healthcare training, pain control, visualisation aid for surgery, rehabilitation in cases such as stroke, phobia, and trauma therapies. Many recent studies have identified the benefits of using Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, or serious games in a variety of medical applications.   This research volume on Virtual, Augmented Reality and Serious Games for Healthcare 1 offers an insightful introduction to the theories, development and applications of virtual, augmented reality and digital games technologies in medical and clinical settings and healthcare in general. It is divided into six sections: section one presents a selection of applications in medical education and healthcare management; Section two relates to th...

  19. FRAMEWORK ARCHITECTURE FOR IMPROVING HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS USING AGENT TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Omar Al-Sakran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to diversity, heterogeneity and complexity of the existing healthcare structure, providing suitable healthcare services is a complicated process. This work describes the conceptual design of an e-healthcare system, which implements integration strategies and suitable technologies that will handle the interoperability problem among its essential components. The proposed solution combines intelligent agent technology and case based reasoning for highly distributed applications in healthcare environment. Intelligent agents play a critical role in providing correct information for diagnostic, treatment, etc. They work on behalf of human agents taking care of routine tasks, thus increasing speed and reliability of the information exchanges. CBR is used to generate advices to a certain e-healthcare problems by analyzing solutions given to previously solved problems and to build intelligent systems for disease diagnostics and prognosis. Preliminary experimental simulation based on Agent Development Framework (JADE demonstrated the feasibility of this model.

  20. Privatization and management development in the healthcare sector of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel J; Costello, Michael; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare reforms in Georgia parallel some of the major changes made by other Central and Eastern European countries. This is especially true of efforts to privatize the health sector and secure capital investments from Western Europe. Privatization of Georgian healthcare requires an understanding of the Soviet-era healthcare system and ideological orientation. Many of the issues and problems of privatization in Georgia require new knowledge to enhance equity outcomes, improve financial performance, increase access to care and encourage healthcare competition. Training existing and future healthcare leaders in modern management theory and practice is paramount. A university based health-management education partnership model was developed and implemented between several universities in the United States and Europe, along with two Georgian universities, to address workforce demands, changing market conditions, management knowledge and leadership competencies. Health-management education concentrations were developed and implemented along with several short courses to meet market demand for trained leaders and managers.