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Sample records for aralast baxter healthcare

  1. 77 FR 6057 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 22, Baxter Healthcare Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 22, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, (Pharmaceutical and Biological Intravenous Product Manufacturing), Chicago, IL Pursuant to its... District, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 22, has requested manufacturing authority on behalf of...

  2. 76 FR 9743 - Foreign-Trade Zone Subzone 22- Chicago, IL, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Baxter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone Subzone 22-- Chicago, IL, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Baxter Healthcare Corporation (Pharmaceutical and Biological Product Manufacturing), Notice of.../ interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority, on behalf of Baxter Healthcare Corporation (Baxter) to...

  3. Baxter Algebras and Umbral Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li

    2004-01-01

    We apply recent constructions of free Baxter algebras to the study of the umbral calculus. We give a characterization of the umbral calculus in terms of Baxter algebra. This characterization leads to a natural generalization of the umbral calculus that include the classical umbral calculus in a family of $\\lambda$-umbral calculi parameterized by $\\lambda$ in the base ring.

  4. Baxter Aurora dialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas D

    2004-01-01

    With the recent focus on the benefits of more frequent dialysis, the Baxter Aurora dialysis system provides maximum flexibility for therapy prescription, including short daily treatments, long nocturnal treatments, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and online hemodiafiltration, all in a compact, reliable, easy to use system. A self-prompting touch screen user interface mounted on a movable arm provides for comfortable operation, whether sitting and standing. An automatic treatment setup mode facilitates easy treatment setup. Complex menus are eliminated by the use of a hardware key that automatically selects only the prescribed options during power up, eliminating all menus associated with nonprescribed functions and modalities. This prevents the user from becoming confused or accidentally altering the dialysis treatment. Prior to dialysis the instrument goes through an automatic self-test that confirms the operation of internal systems. The screen will dim when there is no action that the patient needs to attend to on the instrument. After dialysis, press the disinfect button and the instrument disinfects itself and shuts off. For patient safety, the "disinfect" menus are not available during dialysis. The instrument can also be programmed to automatically start and rinse at a set time. For remote treatment monitoring, the instrument connects to the Internet. The Aurora records information about the machine's technical status, providing a record of instrument history for easy servicing. The Aurora is a flexible platform that provides the desired renal therapy with ease of use and proper support for the hemodialysis patient when combined with Baxter's 24-hour infrastructure and support. PMID:15043620

  5. Asymmetric Baxter-King filter

    OpenAIRE

    Buss, Ginters

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes an extension of the symmetric Baxter-King band pass filter to an asymmetric Baxter-King filter. The optimal correction scheme of the ideal filter weights is the same as in the symmetric version, i.e, cut the ideal filter at the appropriate length and add a constant to all filter weights to ensure zero weight on zero frequency. Since the symmetric Baxter-King filter is unable to extract the desired signal at the very ends of the series, the extension to an asymmetric filter...

  6. Aztec Diamonds and Baxter Permutations

    OpenAIRE

    Canary, Hal

    2003-01-01

    We present a proof of a conjecture about the relationship between Baxter permutations and pairs of alternating sign matrices that are produced from domino tilings of Aztec diamonds. It is shown that if and only if a tiling corresponds to a pair of ASMs that are both permutation matrices, the larger permutation matrix corresponds to a Baxter permutation. There has been a thriving literature on both pattern-avoiding permutations of various kinds and tilings of regions using dominos or rhombuses...

  7. Fledgling IBM-Baxter joint venture confronts start-up struggles, formidable competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, E

    1990-09-01

    Spectrum Healthcare Solutions, the potentially powerful marriage of software operations at International Business Machines and Baxter Healthcare Corp., has held its own but hasn't jelled as quickly as observers had hoped. While the venture gears up, it faces stiff challenges from competitors. PMID:10106174

  8. Baxter Algebras, Stirling Numbers and Partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments of Baxter algebras have lead to applications to combinatorics, number theory and mathematical physics. We relate Baxter algebras to Stirling numbers of the first kind and the second kind, partitions and multinomial coefficients. This allows us to apply congruences from number theory to obtain congruences in Baxter algebras.

  9. Localization of Rota-Baxter algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chenghao; Guo, Li

    2012-01-01

    A commutative Rota-Baxter algebra can be regarded as a commutative algebra that carries an abstraction of the integral operator. With the motivation of generalizing the study of algebraic geometry to Rota-Baxter algebra, we extend the central concept of localization for commutative algebras to commutative Rota-Baxter algebras. The existence of such a localization is proved and, under mild conditions, its explicit constructions are obtained. The existence of tensor products of commutative Rota...

  10. Baxter Q-operator and functional relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Ovchinnikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We obtain the Baxter Q-operators in the Uq(slˆ2 invariant integrable models as a special limits of the quantum transfer matrices corresponding to different spins in the auxiliary space. We derive the Baxter equation from the well-known fusion relations for the transfer matrices. Our method is valid for an arbitrary integrable model corresponding to the quantum group Uq(slˆ2, for example for the XXZ-spin chain.

  11. Yang-Baxter deformations of Minkowski spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Reffert, Susanne; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-01-01

    We study Yang-Baxter deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime. The Yang-Baxter sigma model description was originally developed for principal chiral models based on a modified classical Yang-Baxter equation. It has been extended to coset curved spaces and models based on the usual classical Yang-Baxter equation. On the other hand, for flat space, there is the obvious problem that the standard bilinear form degenerates if we employ the familiar coset Poincar\\'e group/Lorentz group. Instead we consider a slice of AdS$_5$ by embedding the 4D Poincar\\'e group into the 4D conformal group $SO(2,4)$. With this procedure we obtain metrics and $B$-fields as Yang-Baxter deformations which correspond to well-known configurations such as T-duals of Melvin backgrounds, Hashimoto-Sethi and Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich backgrounds, the T-dual of Grant space, pp-waves, and T-duals of dS$_4$ and AdS$_4$. Finally we consider a deformation with a classical $r$-matrix of Drinfeld-Jimbo type and explicitly derive the associated met...

  12. Yang-Baxter deformations of Minkowski spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Orlando, Domenico; Reffert, Susanne; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-10-01

    We study Yang-Baxter deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime. The Yang-Baxter sigma model description was originally developed for principal chiral models based on a modified classical Yang-Baxter equation. It has been extended to coset curved spaces and models based on the usual classical Yang-Baxter equation. On the other hand, for flat space, there is the obvious problem that the standard bilinear form degenerates if we employ the familiar coset Poincaré group/Lorentz group. Instead we consider a slice of AdS5 by embedding the 4D Poincaré group into the 4D conformal group SO(2, 4) . With this procedure we obtain metrics and B-fields as Yang-Baxter deformations which correspond to well-known configurations such as T-duals of Melvin backgrounds, Hashimoto-Sethi and Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich backgrounds, the T-dual of Grant space, pp-waves, and T-duals of dS4 and AdS4. Finally we consider a deformation with a classical r-matrix of Drinfeld-Jimbo type and explicitly derive the associated metric and B-field which we conjecture to correspond to a new integrable system.

  13. Yang-Baxter deformations of Minkowski spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun-ichi, Sakamoto

    2016-01-01

    We discuss Yang-Baxter sigma deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime proposed recently. To avoid the degeneracy of the standard bilinear form associated with the familiar coset ISO(1,3)/SO(1,3), we consider a slice of AdS5 in Poincaré coordinates by embedding the 4D Poincaré group into the 4D conformal group SO(2,4). With this procedure we present the metrics and B-fields as Yang-Baxter deformations which correspond to well-known backgrounds such as T-duals of Melvin backgrounds, Hashimoto-Sethi and Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich backgrounds, pp-waves, and T-duals of dS4 and AdS4. Finally we consider a deformation with a classical r-matrix of Drinfeld-Jimbo type and explicitly derive the associated metric and B-field.

  14. Inhomogeneous linear equation in Rota-Baxter algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrzkowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    We consider a complete filtered Rota-Baxter algebra of weight $\\lambda$ over a commutative ring. Finding the unique solution of a non-homogeneous linear algebraic equation in this algebra, we generalize Spitzer's identity in both commutative and non-commutative cases. As an application, considering the Rota-Baxter algebra of power series in one variable with q-integral as the Rota-Baxter operator, we show certain Eulerian identities.

  15. Baxter'i Balti riike halvustavad plakatid / Uno Schultz ; foto: Emil Schultz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Schultz, Uno, 1956-

    2007-01-01

    rahvusvahelise meditsiinifirma Baxter Rootsi osakonna, Stockholmi äärelinnas Kistas asuva Baxter Medical AB tegevusest puugihammustuste kaudu levivate haiguste vastase kaitsepookimise propageerimisel

  16. Grassmann extensions of Yang–Baxter maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we show that there are explicit Yang–Baxter (YB) maps with Darboux–Lax representation between Grassman extensions of algebraic varieties. Motivated by some recent results on noncommutative extensions of Darboux transformations, we first derive a Darboux matrix associated with the Grassmann-extended derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation, and then we deduce novel endomorphisms of Grassmann varieties, which possess the YB property. In particular, we present ten-dimensional maps which can be restricted to eight-dimensional YB maps on invariant leaves, related to the Grassmann-extended NLS and DNLS equations. We consider their vector generalisations. (paper)

  17. A Note on the Baxter-King Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Woitek

    1998-01-01

    Recently, Baxter and King (1995) developed a bandpass filter which overcomes to some extent the well known drawbacks of the Hodrick-Prescott filter. In this paper, the circumstances under which the Baxter-King filter is preferable are identified, and a modification is presented which takes into account spurious side lobes generated by this method.

  18. New Elliptic Solutions of the Yang-Baxter Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicherin, D.; Derkachov, S. E.; Spiridonov, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    We consider finite-dimensional reductions of an integral operator with the elliptic hypergeometric kernel describing the most general known solution of the Yang-Baxter equation with a rank 1 symmetry algebra. The reduced R-operators reproduce at their bottom the standard Baxter's R-matrix for the 8-vertex model and Sklyanin's L-operator. The general formula has a remarkably compact form and yields new elliptic solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation based on the finite-dimensional representations of the elliptic modular double. The same result is also derived using the fusion formalism.

  19. New elliptic solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    CERN Document Server

    Chicherin, D; Spiridonov, V P

    2014-01-01

    We consider finite-dimensional reductions of the most general known solution of the Yang-Baxter equation with a rank 1 symmetry algebra, which is described by an integral operator with an elliptic hypergeometric kernel. The reduced R-operators reproduce at their bottom the standard Baxter's R-matrix for the 8-vertex model and Sklyanin's L-operator. The general formula has a remarkably compact form and yields new elliptic solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation based on the finite-dimensional representations of the elliptic modular double. The same result is reproduced using the fusion formalism.

  20. The Yang-Baxter relation and gauge invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashaev, Rinat

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a quantum dilogarithm over a Pontryagin self-dual LCA group A, we construct an operator solution of the Yang-Baxter equation generalizing the solution of the Faddeev-Volkov model. Based on a specific choice of a subgroup B\\subset A and by using the Weil transformation, we also give a new non-operator interpretation of the Yang-Baxter relation. That allows us to construct a lattice QFT-model of IRF-type with gauge invariance under independent B-translations of local ‘spin’ variables. Dedicated to Professor Rodney Baxter on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

  1. Yang–Baxter sigma models based on the CYBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that Yang–Baxter sigma models provide a systematic way to study integrable deformations of both principal chiral models and symmetric coset sigma models. In the original proposal and its subsequent development, the deformations have been characterized by classical r-matrices satisfying the modified classical Yang–Baxter equation (mCYBE). In this article, we propose the Yang–Baxter sigma models based on the classical Yang–Baxter equations (CYBE) rather than the mCYBE. This generalization enables us to utilize various kinds of solutions of the CYBE to classify integrable deformations. In particular, it is straightforward to realize partial deformations of the target space without loss of the integrability of the parent theory

  2. Yang–Baxter sigma models based on the CYBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Takuya, E-mail: takuya.matsumoto@math.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Research and Department of Mathematics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yoshida, Kentaroh, E-mail: kyoshida@gauge.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    It is known that Yang–Baxter sigma models provide a systematic way to study integrable deformations of both principal chiral models and symmetric coset sigma models. In the original proposal and its subsequent development, the deformations have been characterized by classical r-matrices satisfying the modified classical Yang–Baxter equation (mCYBE). In this article, we propose the Yang–Baxter sigma models based on the classical Yang–Baxter equations (CYBE) rather than the mCYBE. This generalization enables us to utilize various kinds of solutions of the CYBE to classify integrable deformations. In particular, it is straightforward to realize partial deformations of the target space without loss of the integrability of the parent theory.

  3. Marsh v Baxter, Kojonup to Canberra: Foresight, Hindsight and Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2016-01-01

    Australia is a global leader in organic production and a minnow in global GMO production. Organic produce consistently sells at a premium, while genetically modified (GM) produce consistently sells at a discount. In the case of Marsh and Baxter, the facts were agreed but their interpretation was not and this proved fatal to the case. This was a dispute between two farmer neighbours at Kojonup, Western Australia. When the GMO moratorium was lifted in WA, Baxter promptly planted Monsanto GM can...

  4. A Unified Algebraic Approach to Classical Yang-Baxter Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Chengming

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the different operator forms of classical Yang-Baxter equation are given in the tensor expression through a unified algebraic method. It is closely related to left-symmetric algebras which play an important role in many fields in mathematics and mathematical physics. By studying the relations between left-symmetric algebras and classical Yang-Baxter equation, we can construct left-symmetric algebras from certain classical r-matrices and conversely, there is a natural classical ...

  5. Rota-Baxter algebras and the Hopf algebra of renormalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the theory of renormalization in perturbative quantum field theory underwent some exciting new developments. Kreimer discovered an organization of Feynman graphs into combinatorial Hopf algebras. The process of renormalization is captured by a factorization theorem for regularized Hopf algebra characters. Hereby the notion of Rota-Baxter algebras enters the scene. In this work we develop in detail several mathematical aspects of Rota-Baxter algebras as they appear also in other sectors closely related to perturbative renormalization, to wit, for instance multiple-zeta-values and matrix differential equations. The Rota-Baxter picture enables us to present the algebraic underpinning for the Connes-Kreimer Birkhoff decomposition in a concise way. This is achieved by establishing a general factorization theorem for filtered algebras. Which in turn follows from a new recursion formula based on the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. This allows us to generalize a classical result due to Spitzer to non-commutative Rota-Baxter algebras. The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff based recursion turns out to be a generalization of Magnus' expansion in numerical analysis to generalized integration operators. We will exemplify these general results by establishing a simple representation of the combinatorics of renormalization in terms of triangular matrices. We thereby recover in the presence of a Rota-Baxter operator the matrix representation of the Birkhoff decomposition of Connes and Kreimer. (orig.)

  6. Rota-Baxter algebras and the Hopf algebra of renormalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi-Fard, K.

    2006-06-15

    Recently, the theory of renormalization in perturbative quantum field theory underwent some exciting new developments. Kreimer discovered an organization of Feynman graphs into combinatorial Hopf algebras. The process of renormalization is captured by a factorization theorem for regularized Hopf algebra characters. Hereby the notion of Rota-Baxter algebras enters the scene. In this work we develop in detail several mathematical aspects of Rota-Baxter algebras as they appear also in other sectors closely related to perturbative renormalization, to wit, for instance multiple-zeta-values and matrix differential equations. The Rota-Baxter picture enables us to present the algebraic underpinning for the Connes-Kreimer Birkhoff decomposition in a concise way. This is achieved by establishing a general factorization theorem for filtered algebras. Which in turn follows from a new recursion formula based on the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. This allows us to generalize a classical result due to Spitzer to non-commutative Rota-Baxter algebras. The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff based recursion turns out to be a generalization of Magnus' expansion in numerical analysis to generalized integration operators. We will exemplify these general results by establishing a simple representation of the combinatorics of renormalization in terms of triangular matrices. We thereby recover in the presence of a Rota-Baxter operator the matrix representation of the Birkhoff decomposition of Connes and Kreimer. (orig.)

  7. Introduction to the Yang-Baxter Equation with Open Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Nichita

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Yang-Baxter equation first appeared in theoretical physics, in a paper by the Nobel laureate C. N. Yang, and in statistical mechanics, in R. J. Baxter’s work. Later, it turned out that this equation plays a crucial role in: quantum groups, knot theory, braided categories, analysis of integrable systems, quantum mechanics, non-commutative descent theory, quantum computing, non-commutative geometry, etc. Many scientists have found solutions for the Yang-Baxter equation, obtaining qualitative results (using the axioms of various algebraic structures or quantitative results (usually using computer calculations. However, the full classification of its solutions remains an open problem. In this paper, we present the (set-theoretical Yang-Baxter equation, we sketch the proof of a new theorem, we state some problems, and discuss about directions for future research.

  8. Yang–Baxter invariance of the Nappi–Witten model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Kyono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We study Yang–Baxter deformations of the Nappi–Witten model with a prescription invented by Delduc, Magro and Vicedo. The deformations are specified by skew-symmetric classical r-matrices satisfying (modified classical Yang–Baxter equations. We show that the sigma-model metric is invariant under arbitrary deformations (while the coefficient of B-field is changed by utilizing the most general classical r-matrix. Furthermore, the coefficient of B-field is determined to be the original value from the requirement that the one-loop β-function should vanish. After all, the Nappi–Witten model is the unique conformal theory within the class of the Yang–Baxter deformations preserving the conformal invariance.

  9. Baxter Q-Operators and Representations of Yangians

    CERN Document Server

    Bazhanov, Vladimir V; Lukowski, Tomasz; Meneghelli, Carlo; Staudacher, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new approach to Baxter Q-operators by relating them to the theory of Yangians, which are the simplest examples for quantum groups. Here we open up a new chapter in this theory and study certain degenerate solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation connected with harmonic oscillator algebras. These infinite-state solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation serve as elementary, "partonic" building blocks for other solutions via the standard fusion procedure. As a first example of the method we consider sl(n) compact spin chains and derive the full hierarchy of operatorial functional equations for all related commuting transfer matrices and Q-operators. This leads to a systematic and transparent solution of these chains, where the nested Bethe equations are derived in an entirely algebraic fashion, without any reference to the traditional Bethe ansatz techniques.

  10. Yang-Baxter equations with two Planck constants

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, A; Zotov, A

    2015-01-01

    We consider Yang-Baxter equations arising from its associative analog and study corresponding exchange relations. They generate finite-dimensional quantum algebras which have form of coupled ${\\rm GL}(N)$ Sklyanin elliptic algebras. Then we proceed to a natural generalization of the Baxter-Belavin quantum $R$-matrix to the case ${\\rm Mat}(N,\\mathbb C)^{\\otimes 2}\\otimes {\\rm Mat}(M,\\mathbb C)^{\\otimes 2}$. It can be viewed as symmetric form of ${\\rm GL}(NM)$ $R$-matrix in the sense that the Planck constant and the spectral parameter enter (almost) symmetrically. Such type (symmetric) $R$-matrices are also shown to satisfy the Yang-Baxter like quadratic and cubic equations.

  11. Yang-Baxter equations with two Planck constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A.; Olshanetsky, M.; Zotov, A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider Yang-Baxter equations arising from its associative analog and study the corresponding exchange relations. They generate finite-dimensional quantum algebras which have the form of coupled {{GL}}(N) Sklyanin elliptic algebras. Then we proceed to a natural generalization of the Baxter-Belavin quantum R-matrix to the case {{Mat}}{(N,{{C}})}\\otimes 2\\otimes {{Mat}}{(M,{{C}})}\\otimes 2. It can be viewed as symmetric form of {{GL}}({NM}) R-matrix in the sense that the Planck constant and the spectral parameter enter (almost) symmetrically. Such type (symmetric) R-matrices are also shown to satisfy the Yang-Baxter like quadratic and cubic equations.

  12. Yang–Baxter operators need quantum entanglement to distinguish knots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any solution to the Yang–Baxter equation yields a family of representations of braid groups. Under certain conditions, identified by (Turaev 1988 Inventiones Math. 92 527–53), the appropriately normalized trace of these representations yields a link invariant. Any Yang–Baxter solution can be interpreted as a two-qudit quantum gate. Here we show that if this gate is non-entangling, then the resulting invariant of knots is trivial. We thus obtain a connection between topological entanglement and quantum entanglement. (paper)

  13. The Yang-Baxter relation and gauge invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Kashaev, Rinat

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a quantum dilogarithm over a Pontryagin self-dual LCA group $A$, we construct an operator solution of the Yang-Baxter equation generalizing the solution of the Faddeev-Volkov model. Based on a specific choice of a subgroup $B\\subset A$ and by using the Weil transformation, we also give a new non-operator interpretation of the Yang-Baxter relation. That allows us to construct a lattice QFT-model of IRF-type with gauge invariance under independent $B$-translations of local `spin' ...

  14. Rota-Baxter multiplicative 3-ary Hom-Nambu-Lie algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Chen, Liangyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concepts of Rota-Baxter operators and differential operators with weights on a multiplicative n-ary Hom-algebra. We then focus on Rota-Baxter multiplicative 3-ary Hom-Nambu-Lie algebras and show that they can be derived from Rota-Baxter Hom-Lie algebras, Hom-preLie algebras and Rota-Baxter commutative Hom-associative algebras. We also explore the connections between these Rota-Baxter multiplicative 3-ary Hom-Nambu-Lie algebras.

  15. ℤ3 parafermionic chain emerging from Yang-Baxter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Wei; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-02-01

    We construct the 1D parafermionic model based on the solution of Yang-Baxter equation and express the model by three types of fermions. It is shown that the parafermionic chain possesses both triple degenerate ground states and non-trivial topological winding number. Hence, the parafermionic model is a direct generalization of 1D Kitaev model. Both the and model can be obtained from Yang-Baxter equation. On the other hand, to show the algebra of parafermionic tripling intuitively, we define a new 3-body Hamiltonian based on Yang-Baxter equation. Different from the Majorana doubling, the holds triple degeneracy at each of energy levels. The triple degeneracy is protected by two symmetry operators of the system, ω-parity P and emergent parafermionic operator Γ, which are the generalizations of parity PM and emergent Majorana operator in Lee-Wilczek model, respectively. Both the parafermionic model and can be viewed as SU(3) models in color space. In comparison with the Majorana models for SU(2), it turns out that the SU(3) models are truly the generalization of Majorana models resultant from Yang-Baxter equation.

  16. Quantum supergroups and solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is developed for systematically constructing trigonometric and rational solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation using the representation theory of quantum supergroups. New quantum R-matrices are obtained by applying the method to the vector representations of quantum osp(1/2) and gl(m/n)

  17. Four-state solution of the Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new four-state solution of the Yang-Baxter equation is constructed with the help of the lowest dimensional cyclic L-operator related to a 3-state R-matrix. Some special choice of parameters which this solution depends on, leads to the exactly solvable spin model on the chain with Hermitian Hamiltonian. 8 refs

  18. Clifford algebras and the classical dynamical Yang-Baxter equation

    OpenAIRE

    Alekseev, Anton; Meinrenken, E.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a relationship of the classical dynamical Yang-Baxter equation with the following elementary problem for Clifford algebras: Given a vector space $V$ with quadratic form $Q_V$, how is the exponential of an element in $\\wedge^2(V)$ under exterior algebra multiplication related to its exponential under Clifford multiplication?

  19. ℤ3 parafermionic chain emerging from Yang-Baxter equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Wei; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We construct the 1D ℤ3 parafermionic model based on the solution of Yang-Baxter equation and express the model by three types of fermions. It is shown that the ℤ3 parafermionic chain possesses both triple degenerate ground states and non-trivial topological winding number. Hence, the ℤ3 parafermionic model is a direct generalization of 1D ℤ2 Kitaev model. Both the ℤ2 and ℤ3 model can be obtained from Yang-Baxter equation. On the other hand, to show the algebra of parafermionic tripling intuitively, we define a new 3-body Hamiltonian H123 based on Yang-Baxter equation. Different from the Majorana doubling, the H123 holds triple degeneracy at each of energy levels. The triple degeneracy is protected by two symmetry operators of the system, ω-parity P [formula in text] and emergent parafermionic operator Γ, which are the generalizations of parity PM and emergent Majorana operator in Lee-Wilczek model, respectively. Both the ℤ3 parafermionic model and H123 can be viewed as SU(3) models in color space. In comparison with the Majorana models for SU(2), it turns out that the SU(3) models are truly the generalization of Majorana models resultant from Yang-Baxter equation. PMID:26902999

  20. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions: electrostatics versus adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the repulsive electrostatics against part of the bare adhesion. A theory similar in spirit is developed at nonzero concentrations by assuming an appropriate Baxter model as the reference state. The first-...

  1. Gauging quantum groups: Yang-Baxter joining Yang-Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-02-01

    This review is an expansion of my talk at the conference on Sixty Years of Yang-Mills Theory. I review and explain the line of thoughts that lead to a recent joint work with Hu and Geer [Hu et al., arXiv:1502.03433] on the construction, exact solutions and ubiquitous properties of a class of quantum group gauge models on a honey-comb lattice. Conceptually the construction achieves a synthesis of the ideas of Yang-Baxter equations with those of Yang-Mills theory. Physically the models describe topological anyonic states in 2D systems.

  2. Yang-Baxter R-operators and parameter permutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an uniform construction of the solution to the Yang-Baxter equation with the symmetry algebra sl(2) and its deformations: the q-deformation and the elliptic deformation or Sklyanin algebra. The R-operator acting in the tensor product of two representations of the symmetry algebra with arbitrary spins l1 and l2 is built in terms of products of three basic operators S1, S2, S3 which are constructed explicitly. They have the simple meaning of representing elementary permutations of the symmetric group S4, the permutation group of the four parameters entering the RLL-relation

  3. Parameter-dependent associative Yang-Baxter equations and Poisson brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odesskii, Alexander; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    We discuss associative analogues of classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE) meromorphically dependent on parameters. We discover that such equations enter in a description of a general class of parameter-dependent Poisson structures and double Lie and Poisson structures in sense of Van den Bergh. We propose a classification of all solutions for one-dimensional associative Yang-Baxter equations (AYBE).

  4. Spatial symmetry, local integrability and tetrahedron equations in the Baxter-Bazhanov model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the Baxter-Bazhanov model is invariant under the action of the cube symmetry group. The three-dimensional star-star relations, proposed by Baxter and Bazhanov as local integrability conditions, correspond to a particular transformation from this group. Invariant Boltzmann weights, parameterized in terms of the Zamolodchikov's angle variables, apparently satisfy the tetrahedron equations. 12 refs

  5. Constructions of Rota-Baxter algebras from idempotent-like elements

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Run-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In this short note, we construct Rota-Baxter algebras by idempotent-like elements and show that every finite dimensional Hopf algebra admits nontrivial Rota-Baxter algebra structures and tridendriform algebra structures. Several concrete examples are provided, including finite quantum groups.

  6. Yang-Baxter algebras, integrable theories and Bethe Ansatz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the Yang-Baxter algebras (YBA) in a general framework stressing their power to exactly solve the lattice models associated to them. The algebraic Behe Ansatz is developed as an eigenvector construction based on the YBA. The six-vertex model solution is given explicitly. The generalization of YB algebras to face language is considered. The algebraic BA for the SOS model of Andrews, Baxter and Forrester is described using these face YB algebras. It is explained how these lattice models yield both solvable massive QFT and conformal models in appropriated scaling (continuous) limits within the lattice light-cone approach. This approach permit to define and solve rigorously massive QFT as an appropriate continuum limit of gapless vertex models. The deep links between the YBA and Lie algebras are analyzed including the quantum groups that underlay the trigonometric/hyperbolic YBA. Braid and quantum groups are derived from trigonometric/hyperbolic YBA in the limit of infinite spectral parameter. To conclude, some recent developments in the domain of integrable theories are summarized

  7. Asymptotic representations and q-oscillator solutions of the graded Yang–Baxter equation related to Baxter Q-operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, Zengo, E-mail: ztsuboi@yahoo.co.jp

    2014-09-15

    We consider a class of asymptotic representations of the Borel subalgebra of the quantum affine superalgebra U{sub q}(gl{sup ^}(M|N)). This is characterized by Drinfeld rational fractions. In particular, we consider contractions of U{sub q}(gl(M|N)) in the FRT formulation and obtain explicit solutions of the graded Yang–Baxter equation in terms of q-oscillator superalgebras. These solutions correspond to L-operators for Baxter Q-operators. We also discuss an extension of these representations to the ones for contracted algebras of U{sub q}(gl{sup ^}(M|N)) by considering the action of renormalized generators of the other side of the Borel subalgebra. We define model independent universal Q-operators as the supertrace of the universal R-matrix and write universal T-operators in terms of these Q-operators based on shift operators on the supercharacters. These include our previous work on U{sub q}(sl{sup ^}(2|1)) case [1] in part, and also give a cue for the operator realization of our Wronskian-like formulas on T- and Q-functions in [2,3].

  8. From Baxter Q-operators to local charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frassek, Rouven [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Mathematik und Institut fuer Physik; Albert-Einstein-Institut, Potsdam (Germany). MPI fuer Gravitationsphysik; Meneghelli, Carlo [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik

    2012-10-15

    We discuss how the shift operator and the Hamiltonian enter the hierarchy of Baxter Q-operators in the example of gl(n) homogeneous spin-chains. Building on the construction that was recently carried out by the authors and their collaborators, we find that a reduced set of Q-operators can be used to obtain local charges. The mechanism relies on projection properties of the corresponding R-operators on a highest/lowest weight state of the quantum space. It is intimately related to the ordering of the oscillators in the auxiliary space. Furthermore, we introduce a diagrammatic language that makes these properties manifest and the results transparent. Our approach circumvents the paradigm of constructing the transfer matrix with equal representations in quantum and auxiliary space and underlines the strength of the Q-operator construction.

  9. Experimental realization of the Yang-Baxter Equation via NMR interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vind, F Anvari; Foerster, A; Oliveira, I S; Sarthour, R S; Soares-Pinto, D O; Souza, A M; Roditi, I

    2016-01-01

    The Yang-Baxter equation is an important tool in theoretical physics, with many applications in different domains that span from condensed matter to string theory. Recently, the interest on the equation has increased due to its connection to quantum information processing. It has been shown that the Yang-Baxter equation is closely related to quantum entanglement and quantum computation. Therefore, owing to the broad relevance of this equation, besides theoretical studies, it also became significant to pursue its experimental implementation. Here, we show an experimental realization of the Yang-Baxter equation and verify its validity through a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) interferometric setup. Our experiment was performed on a liquid state Iodotrifluoroethylene sample which contains molecules with three qubits. We use Controlled-transfer gates that allow us to build a pseudo-pure state from which we are able to apply a quantum information protocol that implements the Yang-Baxter equation. PMID:26861686

  10. Teleportation-based quantum computation, extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach and Yang-Baxter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Kun; Pang, Jinglong

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of topological features in teleportation-based quantum computation and aims at presenting a detailed review on teleportation-based quantum computation (Gottesman and Chuang in Nature 402: 390, 1999). In the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach, we clearly show that such topological features bring about the fault-tolerant construction of both universal quantum gates and four-partite entangled states more intuitive and simpler. Furthermore, we describe the Yang-Baxter gate by its extended Temperley-Lieb configuration and then study teleportation-based quantum circuit models using the Yang-Baxter gate. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach and the Yang-Baxter gate approach. With these research results, we propose a worthwhile subject, the extended Temperley-Lieb diagrammatical approach, for physicists in quantum information and quantum computation.

  11. A q-difference Baxter operator for the Ablowitz–Ladik chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct the Baxter operator and the corresponding Baxter equation for a quantum version of the Ablowitz–Ladik model. The result is achieved in two different ways: by using the well-known Bethe ansatz technique and by looking at the quantum analogue of the classical Bäcklund transformations. General results about integrable models governed by the same r-matrix algebra will be given. Baxter’s equation comes out to be a q-difference equation involving both the trace and the quantum determinant of the monodromy matrix. The spectrality property of the classical Bäcklund transformations gives a trace formula representing the classical analogue of Baxter’s equation. A q-integral representation of the Baxter operator is discussed. (paper)

  12. Using computer algebra for Yang-Baxterization applied to quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2006-05-01

    Using Computer Algebra Software (Mathematica and Maple), the recently introduced topic of Yang- Baxterization applied to quantum computing, is explored from the mathematical and computational views. Some algorithms of computer algebra were elaborated with the aim to make the calculations to obtain some of results that were originally presented in the paper by Shang-Kauffman-Ge. Also certain new results about computational Yang-baxterization are presented. We obtain some Hamiltonians for hypothetical physical systems which can be realized within the domain of spin chains and certain diffusion process. We conclude that it is possible to have real physical systems on which implement, via Yang-baxterization, the standard quantum gates with topological protection. Finally some lines for future research are deligned.

  13. Baxter's Q-operator for the W-algebra W{sub N}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Takeo [Department of Mathematics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan)

    2008-09-05

    The q-oscillator representation for the Borel subalgebra of the affine symmetry U'{sub q}(sl{sub N}-hat) is presented. By means of this q-oscillator representation, we give the free field realizations of Baxter's Q-operator Q{sub j}({lambda}), Q-bar{sub j}({lambda}), (j=1,2,...,N) for the W-algebra W{sub N}. We give functional relations of the T-Q operators, including the higher-rank generalization of Baxter's T-Q relation.

  14. The Hintermann-Merlini-Baxter-Wu and the infinite-coupling-limit Ashkin-Teller models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yuan, E-mail: huangy22@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Deng Youjin, E-mail: yjdeng@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke, E-mail: jacobsen@lpt.ens.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Salas, Jesus, E-mail: jsalas@math.uc3m.es [Grupo de Modelizacion, Simulacion Numerica y Matematica Industrial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Grupo de Teorias de Campos y Fisica Estadistica, Instituto Gregorio Millan, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Unidad asociada al IEM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-11

    We show how the Hintermann-Merlini-Baxter-Wu model (which is a generalization of the well-known Baxter-Wu model to a general Eulerian triangulation) can be mapped onto a particular infinite-coupling-limit of the Ashkin-Teller model. We work out some mappings among these models, also including the standard and mixed Ashkin-Teller models. Finally, we compute the phase diagram of the infinite-coupling-limit Ashkin-Teller model on the square, triangular, hexagonal, and kagome lattices.

  15. Non-associative algebras, Yang-Baxter equations, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-associative algebras is a research direction gaining much attention these days. New developments show that associative algebras and some not-associative structures can be unified at the level of Yang-Baxter structures. In this paper, we present a unification for associative algebras, Jordan algebras and Lie algebras. The (quantum) Yang-Baxter equation and related structures are interesting topics, because they have applications in many areas of physics, mathematics, and computer science. Several new interpretations and results are presented in this paper

  16. Classical Yang- Baxter Equation and Low Dimensional Triangular Lie Bialgebras Over Arbitrary Field

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shouchuan

    2006-01-01

    Let $ L $ be a Lie algebra over arbitrary field $ k $ with dim $ L $ =3 and dim $ L' $ =2. All solutions of constant classical Yang- Baxter equation (CYBE) in Lie algebra $ L $ are obtained and the necessary conditions which $ (L,[\\ ],\\Delta_{r}, r) $ is a coboundary (or triangular) Lie bialgebra are given.

  17. Gr\\"obner-Shirshov Bases for Commutative Algebras with Multiple Operators and Free Commutative Rota-Baxter Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the Composition-Diamond lemma for commutative algebras with multiple operators is established. As applications, the Gr\\"obner-Shirshov bases and linear bases of free commutative Rota-Baxter algebra, free commutative $\\lambda$-differential algebra and free commutative $\\lambda$-differential Rota-Baxter algebra are given, respectively. Consequently, these three free algebras are constructed directly by commutative $\\Omega$-words.

  18. R-Matrix and Baxter Q-Operators for the Noncompact SL(N,C Invariant Spin Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey É. Derkachov

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of constructing the SL(N,C invariant solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation is considered. The solutions (R-operators for arbitrarily principal series representations of SL(N,C are obtained in an explicit form. We construct the commutative family of the operators Q_k(u which can be identified with the Baxter operators for the noncompact SL(N,C spin magnet.

  19. The Star Square in the Baxter-Bazhanov Model and the Star-Triangle Relation in the Chiral Potts Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhan-Ning

    In this letter, the connection is found between the "star-square" relation in the Baxter-Bazhanov model and the "star-triangle" relation in the chiral Potts model, which means that the tetrahedron equation of the Baxter-Bazhanov model is a consequence of the latter. The four additional constraints in the tetrahedron equation given by Kashaev et al. hold naturally in respect to the spherical trigonometry parametrizations.

  20. The dynamical Yang-Baxter equation, representation theory, and quantum integrable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    The text is based on an established graduate course given at MIT that provides an introduction to the theory of the dynamical Yang-Baxter equation and its applications, which is an important area in representation theory and quantum groups. The book, which contains many detailed proofs and explicit calculations, will be accessible to graduate students of mathematics, who are familiar with the basics of representation theory of semisimple Lie algebras. - ;The text is based on an established graduate course given at MIT that provides an introduction to the theory of the dynamical Yang-Baxter equation and its applications, which is an important area in representation theory and quantum groups. The book, which contains many detailed proofs and explicit calculations, will be accessible to graduate students of mathematics, who are familiar with the basics of representation theory of semisimple Lie algebras. - ;The book offers a readable introduction to a very interesting, interdisciplinary field. - EMS Newsletter;T...

  1. Solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation with extra nonadditive parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a systematic technique to construct solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation which depend not only on a spectral parameter but in addition on further continuous parameters. These extra parameters enter the Yang-Baxter equation in a similar way to the spectral parameter but in a non-additive form. We exploit the fact that quantum non-compact algebras such as Uq(su(1,1)) and type-I quantum superalgebras such as Uq(gl(1 mod 1)) and Uq(gl(2 mod 1)) are known to admit non-trivial one-parameter families of infinite-dimensional and finite-dimensional irreps, respectively, even for generic q. We develop a technique for constructing the corresponding spectral-dependent R-matrices. As examples, we work out the the R-matrices for the three quantum algebras mentioned above in certain representations. (author)

  2. From representations of the braid group to solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic method is developed for constructing solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation from given braid group representations, arising from such finite dimensional irreps of quantum groups that any irrep can be affinized and the tensor product of the irrep with itself is multiplicity-free. The main tool used in the construction is a tensor product graph, whose circuits give rise to consistency conditions. A maximal tree of this graph leads to an explicit formula for the quantum R-matrix when the consistency conditions are satisfied. As examples, new solutions of the Xang-Baxter equations are found, corresponding to braid group generators associated with the symmetric and antisymmetric tensor irreps of Uq[gl(m)], a spinor irrep of Uq[so(2n)], and the minimal irreps of Uq[E6] and Uq[E7]. (orig.)

  3. Solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation with extra nonadditive parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, A.J.; Gould, M.D.; Zhang Yaozhong; Delius, G.W. [Dept. of Math., Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1994-10-07

    We present a systematic technique to construct solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation which depend not only on a spectral parameter but in addition on further continuous parameters. These extra parameters enter the Yang-Baxter equation in a similar way to the spectral parameter but in a non-additive form. We exploit the fact that quantum non-compact algebras such as U{sub q}(su(1,1)) and type-I quantum superalgebras such as U{sub q}(gl(1 mod 1)) and U{sub q}(gl(2 mod 1)) are known to admit non-trivial one-parameter families of infinite-dimensional and finite-dimensional irreps, respectively, even for generic q. We develop a technique for constructing the corresponding spectral-dependent R-matrices. As examples, we work out the the R-matrices for the three quantum algebras mentioned above in certain representations. (author)

  4. Solutions to the quantum yang-baxter equation with extra non-additive parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Bracken, A J; Gould, M D; Zhang, Y; Anthony J Bracken; Gustav W Delius; Mark D Gould; Yao-Zhong Zhang

    1994-01-01

    ABSTRACT: We present a systematic technique to construct solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation which depend not only on a spectral parameter but in addition on further continuous parameters. These extra parameters enter the Yang-Baxter equation in a similar way to the spectral parameter but in a non-additive form. We exploit the fact that quantum non-compact algebras such as U_q(su(1,1)) and type-I quantum superalgebras such as U_q(gl(1|1)) and U_q(gl(2|1)) are known to admit non-trivial one-parameter families of infinite-dimensional and finite dimensional irreps, respectively, even for generic q. We develop a technique for constructing the corresponding spectral-dependent R-matrices. As examples we work out the the R-matrices for the three quantum algebras mentioned above in certain representations.

  5. Yang–Baxter integrable models in experiments: from condensed matter to ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yang–Baxter equation has long been recognised as the masterkey to integrability, providing the basis for exactly solved models which capture the fundamental physics of a number of realistic classical and quantum systems. In this article we provide an introductory survey of the impact of Yang–Baxter integrable models on experiments in condensed matter physics and ultracold atoms. A number of prominent examples are covered, including the hard-hexagon model, the Heisenberg spin chain, the transverse quantum Ising chain, a spin ladder model, the Lieb–Liniger Bose gas, the Gaudin–Yang Fermi gas and the two-site Bose–Hubbard model. The review concludes by pointing to some other recent developments with promise for further progress. (review)

  6. Baxter operators and Hamiltonians for “nearly all” integrable closed gl(n) spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue our systematic construction of Baxter Q-operators for spin chains, which is based on certain degenerate solutions of the Yang–Baxter equation. Here we generalize our approach from the fundamental representation of gl(n) to generic finite-dimensional representations in quantum space. The results equally apply to non-compact representations of highest or lowest weight type. We furthermore fill an apparent gap in the literature, and provide the nearest-neighbor Hamiltonians of the spin chains in question for all cases where the gl(n) representations are described by rectangular Young diagrams, as well as for their infinite-dimensional generalizations. They take the form of digamma functions depending on operator-valued shifted weights

  7. Mark G. Baxter: award for distinguished scientific early career contributions to psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Presents the citation for Mark G. Baxter, who received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (animal learning and behavior, comparative) "for insightful and incisive contributions in studies of learning, memory, attentional processing, executive function, and goal-directed behavior in work that has translated across species." A brief profile and a selected bibliography accompany the citation. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115814

  8. Deformations of $T^{1,1}$ as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    CERN Document Server

    Crichigno, P Marcos; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-01-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T^{1,1} in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T^{1,1}, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T^{1,1} by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS_5 x T^{1,1}, classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  9. Deformations of T 1 ,1 as Yang-Baxter sigma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichigno, P. Marcos; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-12-01

    We consider a family of deformations of T 1,1 in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach. We first discuss a supercoset description of T 1,1, which makes manifest the full symmetry of the space and leads to the standard Sasaki-Einstein metric. Next, we consider three-parameter deformations of T 1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form agree exactly with the ones obtained via TsT transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. It is worth noting that for AdS5 × T 1,1 , classical integrability for the full sector has been argued to be lost. Hence our result indicates that the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach is applicable even for non-integrable cosets. This observation suggests that the gravity/CYBE correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cases.

  10. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel. PMID:24701749

  11. On the Yang-Baxter equation for the six-vertex model

    OpenAIRE

    Mangazeev, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the theory of the Yang–Baxter equation related to the 6-vertex model and its higher spin generalizations. We employ a 3D approach to the problem. Starting with the 3D R -matrix, we consider a two-layer projection of the corresponding 3D lattice model. As a result, we obtain a new expression for the higher spin R -matrix associated with the affine quantum algebra Uq(sl(2)ˆ) . In the simplest case of the spin s=1/2 this R -matrix naturally reduces to the R -matrix of the...

  12. Yang-Baxter sigma models and Lax pairs arising from κ-Poincaré r-matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Andrzej; Kyono, Hideki; Lukierski, Jerzy; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-04-01

    We study Yang-Baxter sigma models with deformed 4D Minkowski spacetimes arising from classical r-matrices associated with κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra. These classical κ-Poincaré r-matrices describe three kinds of deformations: 1) the standard deformation, 2) the tachyonic deformation, and 3) the light-cone deformation. For each deformation, the metric and two-form B-field are computed from the associated r-matrix. The first two deformations, related to the modified classical Yang-Baxter equation, lead to T-duals of dS4 and AdS4, respectively. The third deformation, associated with the homogeneous classical Yang-Baxter equation, leads to a time-dependent pp-wave background. Finally, we construct a Lax pair for the generalized κ-Poincaré r-matrix that unifies the three kinds of deformations mentioned above as special cases.

  13. Generalized Perk-Schultz models: solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation associated with quantized orthosymplectic superalgebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Perk-Schultz model may be expressed in terms of the solution of the Yang-Baxter equation associated with the fundamental representation of the untwisted affine extension of the general linear quantum superalgebra Uq[gl(m vertical bar n)], with a multiparametric coproduct action as given by Reshetikhin. Here, we present analogous explicit expressions for solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation associated with the fundamental representations of the twisted and untwisted affine extensions of the orthosymplectic quantum superalgebras Uq[osp(m vertical bar n)]. In this manner, we obtain generalizations of the Perk-Schultz model. (letter to the editor)

  14. Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds from the classical Yang-Baxter equation — towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-06-01

    We consider γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring as Yang-Baxter sigma models with classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). An essential point is that the classical r-matrices are composed of Cartan generators only and then generate abelian twists. We present examples of the r-matrices that lead to real γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring. Finally we discuss a possible classification of integrable deformations and the corresponding gravity solution in terms of solutions of CYBE. This classification may be called the gravity/CYBE correspondence.

  15. Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds from the classical Yang-Baxter equation -- Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    We consider \\gamma-deformations of the AdS_5xS^5 superstring as Yang-Baxter sigma models with classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). An essential point is that the classical r-matrices are composed of Cartan generators only and then generate abelian twists. We present examples of the r-matrices that lead to \\gamma-deformations of the AdS_5xS^5 superstring. Finally we discuss a possible classification of integrable deformations and the corresponding gravity solution in terms of solutions of CYBE. This classification may be called the gravity/CYBE correspondence.

  16. Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds from the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-01-01

    We consider γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring as Yang-Baxter sigma models with classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). An essential point is that the classical r-matrices are composed of Cartan generators only and then generate abelian twists. We present examples of the r-matrices that lead to real γ-deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring. Finally we discuss a possible classification of integrable deformations and the corresponding gravity solution ...

  17. Yang–Baxter deformations, AdS/CFT, and twist-noncommutative gauge theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn J. van Tongeren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We give an AdS/CFT interpretation to homogeneous Yang–Baxter deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring as noncommutative deformations of the dual gauge theory, going well beyond the canonical noncommutative case. These homogeneous Yang–Baxter deformations can be of so-called abelian or jordanian type. While abelian deformations have a clear interpretation in string theory and many already had well understood gauge theory duals, jordanian deformations appear novel on both counts. We discuss the symmetry structure of the deformed string from the uniformizing perspective of Drinfeld twists and indicate that this structure can be realized on the gauge theory side by considering theories on various noncommutative spaces. We then conjecture that these are the gauge theory duals of our strings, modulo subtleties involving singularities. We support this conjecture by a brane construction for two jordanian examples, corresponding to noncommutative spaces with [x−,⋆xi]∼xi (i=1,2. We also discuss κ-Minkowski type deformations of AdS5×S5, one of which may be the gravity dual of gauge theory on spacelike κ-Minkowski space.

  18. Canonical and noncanonical variables, Baxter's Q-operator and the XXX model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter's Q-operator for the XXX model is analysed to study the different roles played by the canonical and noncanonical variables using the formalism of Sklyanin. In this approach to the study of Baecklund transformation (BT) and Baxter's Q-operator one requires two Lax operators obeying the same Poisson algebra (i.e. having the same classical r matrix). Usually the nonlinear variables in the Lax operator are canonically conjugate quantities. In this communication we have shown that even when the variables in one Lax operator are not canonical, it is still possible to construct the BT and Q-operator by a proper representation of the corresponding nonlinear variables. The price for this is that, the BT is not easily interpretable as a canonical transformation in the conventional sense of the term. However the Q-operator for the XXX chain turns out to be similar to that obtained by Derkachov [J Phys A 32 (1999) 316] using a similar representation but in a different manner. It is important to note that although, in contrast to the results obtained by Kuznetsov et al. [J Phys A 33 (2000) 171], the Q-operator depends on two adjacent sites (xi,xi-1), its relevant properties can be explicitly established

  19. SO(d,1)-invariant Yang-Baxter operators and the dS/CFT correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Hollands, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for the dS/CFT correspondence. The model is constructed in terms of a "Yang-Baxter operator" $R$ for unitary representations of the deSitter group $SO(d,1)$. This $R$-operator is shown to satisfy the Yang-Baxter equation, unitarity, as well as certain analyticity relations, including in particular a crossing symmetry. With the aid of this operator we construct: a) A chiral (light-ray) conformal quantum field theory whose internal degrees of freedom transform under the given unitary representation of $SO(d,1)$. By analogy with the $O(N)$ non-linear sigma model, this chiral CFT can be viewed as propagating in a deSitter spacetime. b) A (non-unitary) Euclidean conformal quantum field theory on ${\\mathbb R}^{d-1}$, where $SO(d,1)$ now acts by conformal transformations in (Euclidean) spacetime. These two theories can be viewed as dual to each other if we interpret ${\\mathbb R}^{d-1}$ as conformal infinity of deSitter spacetime. Our constructions use semi-local generator fields defined in terms o...

  20. Supercoset construction of Yang-Baxter deformed AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Kyono, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We proceed to study Yang-Baxter deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring with the classical Yang-Baxter equation. We make a general argument on the supercoset construction and present the master formula to describe the dilaton in terms of classical $r$-matrices. The supercoset construction is explicitly performed for some classical $r$-matrices and the full backgrounds including the Ramond-Ramond (R-R) sector and dilaton are derived. Within the class of abelian $r$-matrices, the perfect agreement is shown for well-known examples including gravity duals of non-commutative gauge theories, $\\gamma$-deformations of S$^5$ and Schr\\"odinger spacetimes. It would be remarkable that the supercoset construction works well, even if the resulting backgrounds are not maximally supersymmetric. In particular, three-parameter $\\gamma$-deformations of S$^5$ and Schr\\"odinger spacetimes do not preserve any supersymmetries. As for non-abelian $r$-matrices, we will focus upon a specific example. The resulting backgroun...

  1. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  2. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  3. Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence beyond integrability — Yang-Baxter deformations of T1,1 —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos Crichigno, P.; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    Yang-Baxter sigma models, proposed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, have been recognized as a powerful framework for studying integrable deformations of two dimensional non-linear sigma models. In this short article, as an important generalization, we review a non-integrable sigma model in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach based on [arXiv:1406.2249]. In particular, we discuss a family of deformations of the 5D Sasaki-Einstein manifold T1,1, instead of the standard deformations of the 5-sphere S5. For this purpose, we first describe a novel construction of T1,1 as a supercoset, and provide a physical interpretation of this construction from viewpoint of the dual Klebanov-Witten field theory. Secondly, we consider a 3-parameter deformation of T1,1 by using classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form completely agree with the ones previously obtained via TsT (T-dual - shift - T-dual) transformations, and contain the Lunin-Maldacena background as a special case. Our result indicates that what we refer to as the gravity/CYBE(Classical Yang-Baxter Equation) correspondence can be extended beyond integrable cosets.

  4. Solution of the graded Yang-Baxter equation associated with the vector representation of Uq(osp(M/2n))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general method of constructing spectral parameter-dependent solutions of the graded Yang-Baxter equation using quantum supergroups is briefly reviewed. Using this method, a quantum R-matrix associated with the vector representation of Uq(osp(M/2n)) is obtained for all M and n. (orig.)

  5. Two qutrits universal quantum gates from the nine-dimensional unitary solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Mario; Ospina, Juan

    2007-04-01

    Using the Kauffman-Lomonaco method, some two-qutrits universal quantum gates are derived from the nine-dimensional unitary solutions of the Yang-Baxter equations associated with algebraic structures like the partial transpose operator and the dihedral group, which admit three dimensional representations. The Yang-Baxterization method given by Zhang-Kauffman-Ge is continuously used to obtain two-qutrits quantum gates and certain Hamiltonians for the evolution of the quantum gates are obtained, being such Hamiltonians interpreted as physical Hamiltonians of chain of particles of spin 1. Finally, the generalization for systems of two qudits is presented in the case of Yang-Baxterization of representations of braided monoidal algebra like the BH algebra and the bicolored Birman-Wenzl-Muraki algebra. For these algebras the corresponding two-qudits quantum gates are constructed jointly with the associated Hamiltonians interpreted like physical chains of particles with spin d. It is conjectured that the derived two-qdits quantum gates and the Hamiltonians may be implemented over bi-dimensional lattice systems like anyons systems or more generally over any physical systems ruled by the Yang-Baxter equations.

  6. Healthcare compunetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Andy; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Bos, Lodewijk

    2004-01-01

    Changes in life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and health seeking behaviour are having an impact on the demand for care. Such changes could occur across the whole population, or for specific groups. Changes for specific groups will be particularly affected by policy initiatives, while both these and wider changes will be affected by people's levels of engagement with their health and the health service itself. Levels of education, income and media coverage of health issues are also important. These factors could also encourage an increase in people caring for themselves and their families or community. People are now expecting a patient-centred service with safe high quality treatment, comfortable accommodation services, fast access and an integrated joined-up system. The uptake of integrated Information and Communication technologies (ICT) will be crucial. Healthcare Compunetics, the combination of computing and networking customised for medical and care, will provide the common policy and framework for combined multi-disciplinary research, development, implementation and usage. PMID:15747899

  7. Yang-Baxter equation, parameter permutations, and the elliptic beta integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a construction of an infinite-dimensional solution of the Yang-Baxter equation of rank 1 which is represented as an integral operator with an elliptic hypergeometric kernel acting in the space of functions of two complex variables. This R-operator intertwines the product of two standard L-operators associated with the Sklyanin algebra, an elliptic deformation of the algebra sl(2). The solution is constructed from three basic operators S1, S2, and S3 generating the permutation group S4 on four parameters. Validity of the key Coxeter relations (including a star-triangle relation) is based on the formula for computing an elliptic beta integral and the Bailey lemma associated with an elliptic Fourier transformation. The operators Sj are determined uniquely with the help of the elliptic modular double. Bibliography: 37 titles

  8. Matched pairs approach to set theoretic solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study set-theoretic solutions (X,r) of the Yang-Baxter equations on a set X in terms of the induced left and right actions of X on itself. We give a characterization of involutive square-free solutions in terms of cyclicity conditions. We characterise general solutions in terms of an induced matched pair of unital semigroups S(X,r) and construct (S,rS) from the matched pair. Finally, we study extensions of solutions in terms of matched pairs of their associated semigroups. We also prove several general results about matched pairs of unital semigroups of the required type, including iterated products S bowtie S bowtie S underlying the proof that rS is a solution, and extensions (S bowtie T, rSbowtieT). Examples include a general 'double' construction (S bowtie S,rSbowtieS) and some concrete extensions, their actions and graphs based on small sets. (author)

  9. The Yang-Baxter equation for PT invariant nineteen vertex models

    CERN Document Server

    Pimenta, R A

    2010-01-01

    We study the solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation associated to nineteen vertex models invariant by the parity-time symmetry from the perspective of algebraic geometry. We determine the form of the algebraic curves constraining the respective Boltzmann weights and found that they possess a universal structure. This allows us to classify the integrable manifolds in four different families reproducing three known models besides uncovering a novel nineteen vertex model in a unified way. The introduction of the spectral parameter on the weights is made via the parameterization of the fundamental algebraic curve which is a conic. The diagonalization of the transfer matrix of the new vertex model and its thermodynamic limit properties are discussed. We point out a connection between the form of the main curve and the nature of the excitations of the corresponding spin-1 chains.

  10. The Yang-Baxter equation for PT invariant 19-vertex models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, R A; Martins, M J, E-mail: martins@df.ufscar.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, CP 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2011-02-25

    We study the solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation associated with 19-vertex models invariant by the parity-time symmetry from the perspective of algebraic geometry. We determine the form of the algebraic curves constraining the respective Boltzmann weights and find that they possess a universal structure. This allows us to classify the integrable manifolds into four different families reproducing three known models, besides uncovering a novel 19-vertex model in a unified way. The introduction of the spectral parameter on the weights is made via the parameterization of the fundamental algebraic curve which is a conic. The diagonalization of the transfer matrix of the new vertex model and its thermodynamic limit properties are discussed. We point out a connection between the form of the main curve and the nature of the excitations of the corresponding spin-1 chains.

  11. Baxter's Q-operators and operatorial Backlund flow for quantum (super)-spin chains

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Vladimir; Tsuboi, Zengo

    2010-01-01

    We propose the operatorial form of Baxter's TQ-relations in a general form of the operatorial B\\"acklund flow describing the nesting process for the inhomogeneous rational gl(K|M) quantum (super)spin chains with twisted periodic boundary conditions. The full set of Q-operators and T-operators on all levels of nesting is explicitly defined. The results are based on a generalization of the identities among the group characters and their group co-derivatives with respect to the twist matrix, found by one of the authors and P.Vieira [V.Kazakov and P.Vieira, JHEP 0810 (2008) 050 [arXiv:0711.2470

  12. Open spin chains with generic integrable boundaries: Baxter equation and Bethe ansatz completeness from SOV

    CERN Document Server

    Kitanine, N; Niccoli, G

    2014-01-01

    We solve the longstanding problem to define a functional characterization of the spectrum of the transfer matrix associated to the most general spin-1/2 representations of the 6-vertex reflection algebra for general inhomogeneous chains. The corresponding homogeneous limit reproduces the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of the spin-1/2 open XXZ and XXX quantum chains with the most general integrable boundaries. The spectrum is characterized by a second order finite difference functional equation of Baxter type with an inhomogeneous term which vanishes only for some special but yet interesting non-diagonal boundary conditions. This functional equation is shown to be equivalent to the known separation of variable (SOV) representation hence proving that it defines a complete characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum. The polynomial character of the Q-function allows us then to show that a finite system of equations of generalized Bethe type can be similarly used to describe the complete transfer matrix spectru...

  13. On discrete three-dimensional equations associated with the local Yang-Baxter relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashaev, R. M.

    1996-12-01

    The local Yang-Baxter equation (YBE), introduced by Maillet and Nijhoff, is a proper generalization to three dimensions of the zero curvature relation. Recently, Korepanov has constructed an infinite set of integrable three-dimensional lattice models, and has related them to solutions to the local YBE. The simplest Korepanov model is related to the star-triangle relation in the Ising model. In this Letter the corresponding discrete equation is derived. In the continuous limit it leads to a differential three-dimensional equation, which is symmetric with respect to all permutations of the three coordinates. A similar analysis of the star-triangle transformation in electric networks leads to the discrete bilinear equation of Miwa, associated with the BKP hierarchy. Some related operator solutions to the tetrahedron equation are also constructed.

  14. II Mesa de Trabajo Baxter-SENPE: Nutrición Parenteral Periférica II Baxter-SENPE workshop: peripheral parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García de Lorenzo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available En la IIa Mesa de Trabajo BAXTER-SENPE un grupo multidisciplinario de expertos en nutrición debate sobre las indicaciones, ventajas e inconvenientes de la Nutrición Parenteral Periférica (NPP, definiéndose ésta como una NP compuesta por los tres principios inmediatos, vitaminas y minerales. Su composición implica una razón H d C: Lípidos de 60:40, un límite en el aporte diario lipídico (1,3 g/kg de peso/día y no más del 30 % de las calorías totales y una carga nitrogenada que no supere los 10 gramos de nitrógeno en un volumen máximo de 2500 ml. La NPP permite su administración por vía periférica debido a presentar una osmolaridad menor de 800 mOsml y un pH entre 6,0 y 7,4; de esta forma evita los posibles efectos deletéreos del acceso venoso central. A día de hoy la NPP puede llegar a suponer el 50 % de las NPs prescritas en un centro hospitalario. Los estudios de eficacia, seguridad y farmacoeconomía demuestran que la NPP es un recurso terapéutico muy útil en determinadas situaciones clínicas tanto médicas como quirúrgicas para evitar el deterioro metabólico-nutricional del paciente lo que repercute en una reducción significativa de las complicaciones, disminuye significativamente el número de exploraciones y acorta la estancia hospitalaria.During the II BAXTER-SENPE workshop, a multidisciplinary nutrition expert committee discusses on indications, advantages and drawbacks of Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition (PPN, being defined as PN compounded by the three essential elements, vitamins, and minerals. Its composition implies a CH: lipids ratio of 60:40, a limited lipid daily intake (1.3 g/kg of body weight/day and no more than 30% of total calories, and a nitrogen load not higher than 10 g of nitrogen in a maximum volume of 2500 mL. PPN can be administered by the peripheral route since its osmolarity is lower than 800 mOsm/L and pH is 6.0-7.4; in this way, possible adverse affects of central venous accesses are

  15. Homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations as non-abelian duals of the AdS_5 sigma-model

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the Yang-Baxter deformation of the symmetric space sigma-model parameterized by an r-matrix solving the homogeneous (classical) Yang-Baxter equation is equivalent to the non-abelian dual of the undeformed model with respect to a subgroup determined by the structure of the r-matrix. We explicitly demonstrate this on numerous examples in the case of the AdS_5 sigma-model. The same should also be true for the full AdS_5 x S^5 supercoset model, providing an explanation for and generalizing several recent observations relating homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations based on non-abelian r-matrices to the undeformed AdS_5 x S^5 model by a combination of T-dualities and non-linear coordinate redefinitions. This also includes the special case of deformations based on abelian r-matrices, which correspond to TsT transformations: they are equivalent to non-abelian duals of the original model with respect to a central extension of abelian subalgebras.

  16. Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence beyond integrability -- Yang-Baxter deformations of $T^{1,1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Crichigno, P Marcos; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-01-01

    Yang-Baxter sigma models, proposed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, have been recognized as a powerful framework for studying integrable deformations of two-dimensional non-linear sigma models. In this short article, as an important generalization, we review a non-integrable sigma model in the Yang-Baxter sigma model approach based on [arXiv:1406.2249]. In particular, we discuss a family of deformations of the 5D Sasaki-Einstein manifold $T^{1,1}$, instead of the standard deformations of the $5$-sphere S$^5$. For this purpose, we first describe a novel construction of $T^{1,1}$ as a supercoset, and provide a physical interpretation of this construction from viewpoint of the dual Klebanov-Witten field theory. Secondly, we consider a $3$-parameter deformation of $T^{1,1}$ by using classical $r$-matrices satisfying the classical Yang--Baxter equation (CYBE). The resulting metric and NS-NS two-form completely agree with the ones previously obtained via TsT (T-dual -- shift -- T-dual) transformations, and conta...

  17. Experimental evaluation of effect on Cassie-Baxter equation of surface roughness with application to soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Gowenlock, Cathren; Hallin, Ingrid; Mabbett, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Manifestation of soil water repellency depends both on the surface chemistry and the physical structure of the particles making up the soil. In materials science the effect of physical structure on water repellency is often explained by the Cassie-Baxter equation. Recently, a few attempts have been made to explain water repellency of soil using the Cassie-Baxter equation for hexagonally-arrayed spheres on a flat plane. Experimental verification of this conceptual model using glass beads as model soil particles has been left somewhat incomplete, as the experimentally measured contact angles do not match well those expected from theory. This might be caused by a failure to generate a perfect arrangement of particles. Therefore, we have aimed to obtain highly precise arrangements of glass beads as model soil particles using 3D printing technology. Our aim is to generate particle frames of precise hexagonal arrangement with particles at differing separations, and to measure the water contact angles upon the particle arrays optically using a goniometer. In this contribution, we report our preliminary results in which we explore the applicability of the Cassie-Baxter equation to such regular arrays as both separation distance and surface roughness is varied. This research has been funded by Bridging the Gap in Swansea University, UK.

  18. Communicating with Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Change See More of Resources Communicating with Healthcare Professionals Updated:Nov 16,2015 Adapted from the National ... gained by improving communication between family caregivers and healthcare professionals. Positive outcomes include: Better care for the patient ...

  19. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  20. On the Hamiltonian integrability of the bi-Yang-Baxter sigma-model

    CERN Document Server

    Delduc, Francois; Magro, Marc; Vicedo, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The bi-Yang-Baxter sigma-model is a certain two-parameter deformation of the principal chiral model on a real Lie group G for which the left and right G-symmetries of the latter are both replaced by Poisson-Lie symmetries. It was introduced by C. Klimcik who also recently showed it admits a Lax pair, thereby proving it is integrable at the Lagrangian level. By working in the Hamiltonian formalism and starting from an equivalent description of the model as a two-parameter deformation of the coset sigma-model on G x G / G_diag, we show that it also admits a Lax matrix whose Poisson bracket is of the standard r/s-form characterised by a twist function which we determine. A number of results immediately follow from this, including the identification of certain complex Poisson commuting Kac-Moody currents as well as an explicit description of the q-deformed symmetries of the model. Moreover, the model is also shown to fit naturally in the general scheme recently developed for constructing integrable deformations o...

  1. Beyond Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter: second-order effects on the wetting of rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid; Moghadam, Afsaneh Dorri; Rohatgi, Pradeep; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2014-08-12

    The Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models are almost exclusively used to explain the contact angle dependence of the structure of rough and patterned solid surfaces. However, these two classical models do not always accurately predict the wetting properties of surfaces since they fail to capture the effect of many interactions occurring during wetting, including, for example, the effect of the disjoining pressure and of crystal microstructure, grains, and defects. We call such effects the second-order effects and present here a model showing how the disjoining pressure isotherm can affect wettability due to the formation of thin liquid films. We measure water contact angles on pairs of metallic surfaces with nominally the same Wenzel roughness obtained by abrasion and by chemical etching. These two methods of surface roughening result in different rough surface structure, thus leading to different values of the contact angle, which cannot be captured by the Wenzel- and Cassie-type models. The chemical and physical changes that occur on the stainless steel and aluminum alloy surfaces as a result of intergranular corrosion, along with selective intermetallic dissolution, lead to a surface roughness generated on the nano- and microscales. PMID:25051526

  2. [Results of primary healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponchel, J L

    2004-01-01

    The concept of primary healthcare was formulated at the international conference held in Alma-Ata (USSR) on September 6 to 12, 1978. Over the past quarter-century, the term "primary healthcare" has been widely used as a basis for implementing healthcare policies in various nations, especially those considered as developing countries. However many programs initiated in the name of the primary healthcare concept have only partially complied with the spirit of the final declaration of Alma-Ata. Analysis of the healthcare in Mali shows that the system followed that evolution. Although considerable time and energy were regrettably wasted in implementing the village health agent strategy, this phase may have been a necessary step in the political development of the state at that time. Recent changes in the country's healthcare system in compliance with the original principles of primary healthcare show that the 1978 declaration is sound and remains pertinent as democracy makes further gains in the world. PMID:15816127

  3. Taiwan's healthcare report 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Chan, Willie Sai

    2010-12-01

    Times are changing. Taiwan is one of the richest countries in the Asia Pacific region. It enacted its single-payer national health insurance program in 1995: in all estimates, it has been very successful. It has a strong healthcare system and the universal health insurance ensures that all citizens have grown to expect a high level of care. Healthcare systems are designed to meet the healthcare needs of target populations. There are a wide variety of healthcare systems around the world. In some countries, healthcare system planning is distributed among market participants, whereas in others planning is made more centrally among governments, trade unions, charities, religions, or other co-ordinated bodies to deliver planned healthcare services targeted to the populations they serve. However, healthcare planning has often been evolutionary rather than revolutionary. In healthcare all work carried out must be at the highest quality, and a much higher proportion of resources must be invested in quality in healthcare. The aim of this report is to give an overview of the healthcare service provision in Taiwan. PMID:23199110

  4. Social marketing in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Radha Aras

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundSocial marketing is an important tool in the delivery ofhealthcare services. For any healthcare programme orproject to be successful, community/consumer participationis required. The four principles of social marketing can guidepolicymakers and healthcare providers to successfully planand implement health programmes.AimTo review the existing literature in order to project thebenefits of social marketing in healthcare.MethodA search of periodical literature by the author involvingsoc...

  5. Why healthcare providers merge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities. PMID:26055501

  6. A non-symmetric Yang–Baxter algebra for the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study certain non-symmetric wavefunctions associated with the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger model, introduced by Komori and Hikami using Gutkin’s propagation operator, which involves representations of the degenerate affine Hecke algebra. We highlight how these functions can be generated using a vertex-type operator formalism similar to the recursion defining the symmetric (Bethe) wavefunction in the quantum inverse scattering method. Furthermore, some of the commutation relations encoded in the Yang–Baxter equation for the relevant monodromy matrix are generalized to the non-symmetric case. (paper)

  7. Stability of the renormalization group in the 2D random Ising and Baxter models with respect to replica symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the critical properties of the weakly disordered two-dimensional sing and Baxter models in terms of the renormalization group (RG) theory generalized to take into account replica symmetry breaking (RSB) effects. Recently it has been shown that the traditional replica-symmetric RG flows in the dimension D=4-ε are unstable with respect to the RSB potentials and a new spin-glass type critical phenomena has been discovered (Dotsenko Vik S, Harris B, Sherrington D and Stinchbombe R 1995 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 8 3093; Dotsenko Vik S and Feldman D E 1995 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 28 5183). In contrast, here it is demonstrated that in the considered two-dimensional systems the renormalization-group flows are stable with respect to the RSB modes. It is shown that the solution of the renormalization group equations with arbitrary starting RSB coupling matrix exhibits asymptotic approach to the traditional replica-symmetric ones. Thus, to leading order the on-perturbative RSB degrees of freedom do not affect the critical phenomena in the two-dimensional weakly disordered Ising and Baxter models studied earlier. (author)

  8. Factors Influencing Healthcare Service Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-01-01

    Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production o...

  9. Improving healthcare practice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fleet, David D; Peterson, Tim O

    2016-03-14

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present the results of exploratory research designed to develop an awareness of healthcare behaviors, with a view toward improving the customer satisfaction with healthcare services. It examines the relationship between healthcare providers and their consumers/patients/clients. Design/methodology/approach - The study uses a critical incident methodology, with both effective and ineffective behavioral specimens examined across different provider groups. Findings - The effects of these different behaviors on what Berry (1999) identified as the common core values of service organizations are examined, as those values are required to build a lasting service relationship. Also examined are categories of healthcare practice based on the National Quality Strategy priorities. Research limitations/implications - The most obvious is the retrospective nature of the method used. How accurate are patient or consumer memories? Are they capable of making valid judgments of healthcare experiences (Berry and Bendapudi, 2003)? While an obvious limitation, such recollections are clearly important as they may be paramount in following the healthcare practitioners' instructions, loyalty for repeat business, making recommendations to others and the like. Further, studies have shown retrospective reports to be accurate and useful (Miller et al., 1997). Practical implications - With this information, healthcare educators should be in a better position to improve the training offered in their programs and practitioners to better serve their customers. Social implications - The findings would indicate that the human values of excellence, innovation, joy, respect and integrity play a significant role in building a strong service relationship between consumer and healthcare provider. Originality/value - Berry (1999) has argued that the overriding importance in building a lasting service business is human values. This exploratory study has shown how

  10. Possibilities for Healthcare Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Szolovits

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computing technology promise to aid in achieving the goals of healthcare.We review how such changes can support each of the goá1s of healthcare as identified by the U.S.Institute of Medicine:safety,effectiveness,patient-centricity,timeliness,efficiency,and equitability.We also describe current foci of computing technology research aimed at realizing the ambitious goals for health information technology that have been set by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Health Reform Act of 2010.Finally,we mention efforts to build health information technologies to support improved healthcare delivery in developing countries.

  11. Healthcare Facility Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MAP:http://tinyurl.com/HealthcareFacilityLocationsMap The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Center for Health Care Quality, Licensing and Certification...

  12. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  13. Healthcare Under Fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Tension between patients and hospital staff, insufficient health insurance coverage, and a limited supply of quality medical services are pressurizing China’s healthcare system reform Doctors and nurses, normally seen as protecting their patients, are in

  14. Healthcare Associated Infections - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - national data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  15. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  16. Coproduction of healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names-patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always 'coproduced'. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  17. Healthcare Software Assurance

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Jason G.; Pauley, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Dru...

  18. Empathy in healthcare settings

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Empathy is an important concept associated with positive outcomes for healthcare practitioners and their patients. In order to identify the best methods to develop and sustain empathy in healthcare professionals there is a need for greater understanding of the antecedents and behaviours involved in empathic responding towards patients. This thesis used a multidimensional model of empathy as a guide for research aimed at understanding the antecedents and behaviours involved in empathic int...

  19. The Cuban National Healthcare System: Characterization of primary healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Regina DAL PRÁ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a report on the experience of healthcare professionals in Florianópolis, who took the course La Atención Primaria de Salud y la Medicina Familiar en Cuba [Primary Healthcare and Family Medicine in Cuba], in 2014. The purpose of the study is to characterize the healthcare units and services provided by the Cuban National Healthcare System (SNS and to reflect on this experience/immersion, particularly on Cuba’s Primary Healthcare Service. The results found that in comparison with Brazil’s Single Healthcare System (SUS Cuba’s SNS Family Healthcare (SF service is the central organizing element of the Primary Healthcare Service. The number of SF teams per inhabitant is different than in Brazil; the programs given priority in the APS are similar to those in Brazil and the intersectorial nature and scope of the services prove to be effective in the resolution of healthcare problems.

  20. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper. PMID:16777784

  1. Queueing for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palvannan, R Kannapiran; Teow, Kiok Liang

    2012-04-01

    Patient queues are prevalent in healthcare and wait time is one measure of access to care. We illustrate Queueing Theory-an analytical tool that has provided many insights to service providers when designing new service systems and managing existing ones. This established theory helps us to quantify the appropriate service capacity to meet the patient demand, balancing system utilization and the patient's wait time. It considers four key factors that affect the patient's wait time: average patient demand, average service rate and the variation in both. We illustrate four basic insights that will be useful for managers and doctors who manage healthcare delivery systems, at hospital or department level. Two examples from local hospitals are shown where we have used queueing models to estimate the service capacity and analyze the impact of capacity configurations, while considering the inherent variation in healthcare. PMID:20703697

  2. Characteristics of healthcare wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, L F; Eggerth, L L; Enkhtsetseg, Sh; Savage, G M

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the quantities and characteristics of the material that needs to be managed is one of the most basic steps in the development of a plan for solid waste management. In this case, the material under consideration is the solid waste generated in healthcare facilities, also known as healthcare waste. Unfortunately, limited reliable information is available in the open literature on the quantities and characteristics of the various types of wastes that are generated in healthcare facilities. Thus, sound management of these wastes, particularly in developing countries, often is problematic. This article provides information on the quantities and properties of healthcare wastes in various types of facilities located in developing countries, as well as in some industrialized countries. Most of the information has been obtained from the open literature, although some information has been collected by the authors and from reports available to the authors. Only data collected within approximately the last 15 years and using prescribed methodologies are presented. The range of hospital waste generation (both infectious and mixed solid waste fractions) varies from 0.016 to 3.23kg/bed-day. The relatively wide variation is due to the fact that some of the facilities surveyed in Ulaanbaatar include out-patient services and district health clinics; these facilities essentially provide very basic services and thus the quantities of waste generated are relatively small. On the other hand, the reported amount of infectious (clinical, yellow bag) waste varied from 0.01 to 0.65kg/bed-day. The characteristics of the components of healthcare wastes, such as the bulk density and the calorific value, have substantial variability. This literature review and the associated attempt at a comparative analysis point to the need for worldwide consensus on the terms and characteristics that describe wastes from healthcare facilities. Such a consensus would greatly

  3. Costing Practices in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Christopher; Kern, Anja; Laguecir, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    The rising cost of healthcare is a globally pressing concern. This makes detailed attention to the way in which costing is carried out of central importance. This article offers a framework for considering the interdependencies between a dominant element of the contemporary healthcare context, i.......e., Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) systems, and costing practices. DRG-based payment systems strongly influence costing practices in multiple ways. In particular, setting DRG tariffs requires highly standardized costing practices linked with specific skill sets from management accountants and brings other...... jurisdictions (e.g., clinical coding) to bear on costing practice. These factors contribute to the fragmentation of the jurisdiction of management accounting....

  4. Advanced healthcare materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Advanced materials are attracting strong interest in the fundamental as well as applied sciences and are being extensively explored for their potential usage in a range of healthcare technological and biological applications. Advanced Healthcare Nanomaterials summarises the current status of knowledge in the fields of advanced materials for functional therapeutics, point-of-care diagnostics, translational materials, up and coming bio-engineering devices. The book highlights the key features which enable engineers to design stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles, novel biomaterials, nan

  5. Factors Influencing Healthcare Service Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Mosadeghrad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality.

  6. Access to effective healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Access to effective healthcare is in particular challenging for vulnerable and socially disadvantaged patients. Patients with chronic conditions are over-represented in these lower socioeconomic (LSES) groups. No generic review integrating the evidence on Self-Management support interventions in...

  7. Social marketing in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Aras

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSocial marketing is an important tool in the delivery ofhealthcare services. For any healthcare programme orproject to be successful, community/consumer participationis required. The four principles of social marketing can guidepolicymakers and healthcare providers to successfully planand implement health programmes.AimTo review the existing literature in order to project thebenefits of social marketing in healthcare.MethodA search of periodical literature by the author involvingsocial marketing and marketing concepts in health wascarried out. Items were identified initially through healthorientedindexing services such as Medline, Health STARand Cinahl, using the identifiers “social marketing“ and“marketing in health”. An extensive search was also carriedout on educational database ERIC.ResultsA literature review of various studies on social marketingindicated that the selection of the right product (accordingto the community need at the right place, with the rightstrategy for promotion and at the right price yields goodresults. However, along with technical sustainability(product, price, promotion and place, financialsustainability, institutional sustainability and marketsustainability are conducive factors for the success of socialmarketing.ConclusionThe purpose of this literature review was to ascertain thelikely effectiveness of social marketing principles andapproaches and behaviour change communication towardshealth promotion.It is important for all healthcare workers to understand andrespond to the public’s desires and needs and routinely useconsumer research to determine how best to help thepublic to solve problems and realise aspirations. Socialmarketing can optimise public health by facilitatingrelationship-building with consumers and making their liveshealthier.

  8. Will healthcare reform work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvany, Chad

    2010-11-01

    Providers should support efforts to reorganize the healthcare delivery system by undertaking four key market-centric activities: Improve customer service. Develop a deeper understanding of utilization patterns and the health statuses of the populations they serve. Build patient engagement. Help patients understand value in health care. PMID:21061818

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) Share Compartir Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings On this Page What ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  10. Integrable deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S5 can be charactered by classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as the gravity/CYBE correspondence. We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for β-deformations of the N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS5 × T1,1 as a generalization

  11. Integrable deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-11-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S5 can be charactered by classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as the gravity/CYBE correspondence. We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for β-deformations of the N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS5 × T1,1 as a generalization.

  12. Integrable deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation -- Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence --

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ can be characterized by classical $r$-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as `the gravity/CYBE correspondence.' We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for $\\beta$-deformations of the ${\\cal N} = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS$_5\\times T^{1,1}$ as a generalization.

  13. HEALTHCARE MARKETING - A RELATIONAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    CAZACU Lavinia; OPRESCU, Alina Elena

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the unique characteristics of healthcare services, the challenges faced in the implementation of marketing principles into the healthcare services sector and also the behavior tendencies of the healthcare consumer. Taking into account the differences between healthcare services and other services and the importance of the doctor-patient relationship, a new marketing approach seems to be a solution for all problems and a response for all unanswered questions. A revi...

  14. STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Odigie, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are exposed to several job stressors that can adversely affect both their mental and physical health, decrease their efficiency at work, for a successful intervention, the causes and management of stress in any healthcare unit or among healthcare professionals must be diligently documented. The aim of this study is to explore issues on specific occupational stress related to job performance, the role of healthcare in stress management and the effects of job resourc...

  15. Migrants' access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-10-01

    There are strong pragmatic and moral reasons for receiving societies to address access to healthcare for migrants. Receiving societies have a pragmatic interest in sustaining migrants' health to facilitate integration; they also have a moral obligation to ensure migrants' access to healthcare according to international human rights principles. The intention of this thesis is to increase the understanding of migrants' access to healthcare by exploring two study aims: 1) Are there differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy I and II); and 2) Why are there possible differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants? (substudy III and IV). The thesis builds on different methodological approaches using both register-based retrospective cohort design, cross-sectional design and survey methods. Two different measures of access were used to explore differences: 1) cancer stage at diagnosis as a clinical outcome and 2) emergency room (ER) contacts as a utilisation measure. Both informal and formal barriers to access were studied to explore why possible differences existed including: 1) motivation for using ER; and 2) asylum seekers' healthcare entitlements. Different definitions of migration and ethnicity were investigated including: country of birth and residence status. Substudy I showed a tendency towards more advanced stage at diagnosis or unknown stage among most subgroups of migrant women with a history of cancer compared to non-migrant women. Sub-study II found that some migrants (those born in Somalia, Turkey and Ex-Yugoslavia) use ER services more frequently than do non-migrants whereas others have the same or lower utilisation levels. As a consequence, substudy III was undertaken, which documented that more migrant within all subgroups had considered contacting a primary caregiver before visiting the ER compared to non-migrants, but that migrants experienced communication problems herein

  16. [Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo Caldeira; Malik, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and services; financial; and information. PMID:23099762

  17. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays in an...... the architect, the construction engineer, the plumbing engineer etc. which overlap professional field just like other disciplines. Secondly, the general conception is that DGNB brings in limited new things into the project, but it gives a common notion of sustainability which usually can be discussed...... Healthcare Centres, which was certified as office buildings, however more traditional office buildings might differ en experience with DGNB....

  18. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the He...

  19. Healthcare in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, Nyi Nyi; Myat Cho, Su; Htun, Nang Mie Mie; Yu Mon Saw; Myint, Myat Noe Htin Aung; Aoki, Fumiko; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Myanmar transitioned to a civilian government in March, 2011. Although the democratic process has accelerated since then, many problems in the field of healthcare still exist. Since there is a limited overview on the healthcare in Myanmar, this article briefly describes the current states surrounding health services in Myanmar. According to the Census 2014, the population in the Republic of the Union of Myanmar was 51,410,000. The crude birth rate in the previous one year was estimated to be 18.9 per 1,000, giving the annual population growth rate of 0.89% between 2003 and 2014. The Ministry of Health reorganized into six departments. National non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations support healthcare, as well as international non-governmental organizations. Since hospital statistics by the government cover only public facilities, the information on private facilities is limited. Although there were not enough medical doctors (61 per 100,000 population), the number of medical students was reduced from 2,400 to 1,200 in 2012 to ensure the quality of medical education. The information on causes of death in the general population could not be retrieved, but some data was available from hospital statistics. Although the improvement was marked, the figures did not reach the levels set by Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. A trial prepaid health insurance system started in July 2015, to be followed by evaluation one year later. There are many international donors, including the Japan International Cooperation Agency, supporting health in Myanmar. With these efforts and support, a marked progress is expected in the field of healthcare. PMID:27303099

  20. Social Networking Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Leigh; de Leastar, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    The world of “Social Networking”, a cultural phenomenon of recent years, has evolved an application paradigm, Instant Messaging (IM), into a feature rich, highly interactive and context sensitive service delivery environment. Terms such as buddy lists, presence and IM-bots have emerged as building blocks for services that significantly enhance the user experience. Mapping this paradigm to healthcare can deliver a highly innovative communication platform for information sharing, monitoring and...

  1. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Edwards, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...... of the well-known and universal lean management principles in the context of the healthcare this paper will attempt to formulate and test four hypotheses about possible barriers to the successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The first hypothesis states that lean management in...... healthcare still is in its infancy and it is just a matter of letting sufficient time pass in order have a successful implementation of lean in all areas of healthcare. The second hypothesis states that a major barrier to lean management in healthcare simply is lacking understanding of the lean concepts...

  2. On q-deformed symmetries as Poisson-Lie symmetries and application to Yang-Baxter type models

    CERN Document Server

    Delduc, Francois; Magro, Marc; Vicedo, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Yang-Baxter type models are integrable deformations of integrable field theories, such as the principal chiral model on a Lie group $G$ or $\\sigma$-models on (semi-)symmetric spaces $G/F$. The deformation has the effect of breaking the global $G$-symmetry of the original model, replacing the associated set of conserved charges by ones whose Poisson brackets are those of the $q$-deformed Poisson-Hopf algebra $\\mathscr U_q(\\mathfrak g)$. Working at the Hamiltonian level, we show how this $q$-deformed Poisson algebra originates from a Poisson-Lie $G$-symmetry. The theory of Poisson-Lie groups and their actions on Poisson manifolds, in particular the formalism of the non-abelian moment map, is reviewed. For a coboundary Poisson-Lie group $G$, this non-abelian moment map must obey the Semenov-Tian-Shansky bracket on the dual group $G^*$, up to terms involving central quantities. When the latter vanish, we develop a general procedure linking this Poisson bracket to the defining relations of the Poisson-Hopf algebra...

  3. Factorized three-body S-matrix restrained by the Yang–Baxter equation and quantum entanglements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the physical effects of the Yang–Baxter equation (YBE) to quantum entanglements through the 3-body S-matrix in entangling parameter space. The explicit form of 3-body S-matrix Ř123(θ,φ) based on the 2-body S-matrices is given due to the factorization condition of YBE. The corresponding chain Hamiltonian has been obtained and diagonalized, also the Berry phase for 3-body system is given. It turns out that by choosing different spectral parameters the Ř(θ,φ)-matrix gives GHZ and W states respectively. The extended 1-D Kitaev toy model has been derived. Examples of the role of the model in entanglement transfer are discussed. - Highlights: • We give the relation between 3-body S-matrix and 3-qubit entanglement. • The relation between 3-qubit and 2-qubit entanglements is investigated via YBE. • 1D Kitaev toy model is derived by the Type-II solution of YBE. • The condition of YBE kills the “Zero boundary mode” in our chain model

  4. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  5. Data mining applications in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hian Chye; Tan, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Data mining has been used intensively and extensively by many organizations. In healthcare, data mining is becoming increasingly popular, if not increasingly essential. Data mining applications can greatly benefit all parties involved in the healthcare industry. For example, data mining can help healthcare insurers detect fraud and abuse, healthcare organizations make customer relationship management decisions, physicians identify effective treatments and best practices, and patients receive better and more affordable healthcare services. The huge amounts of data generated by healthcare transactions are too complex and voluminous to be processed and analyzed by traditional methods. Data mining provides the methodology and technology to transform these mounds of data into useful information for decision making. This article explores data mining applications in healthcare. In particular, it discusses data mining and its applications within healthcare in major areas such as the evaluation of treatment effectiveness, management of healthcare, customer relationship management, and the detection of fraud and abuse. It also gives an illustrative example of a healthcare data mining application involving the identification of risk factors associated with the onset of diabetes. Finally, the article highlights the limitations of data mining and discusses some future directions. PMID:15869215

  6. Constructing Healthcare Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Holm Jacobsen, Peter; Tryggestad, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to inquire into the role of project visualisations in shaping healthcare spaces and practices. The study draws upon an ethnographic field study from a large on-going hospital construction project in Denmark, and focuses on the early phases of on-boarding the design team...... into the project organisation. The theoretical contribution concerns the ways in which project visualisations plays an active role in developing novel conceptions of space and how these are mobilized in the process of on-boarding, in terms of 1. Design space (especially the engagement of users in the design...

  7. Script of Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Many new product designs are currently being implemented in the healthcare sector, and this presents designers with challenges involved in socially innovative design. In this paper, we argue that designing assistive technologies requires focus on multiple users and use practices. We see the design...... of assistive technologies as design of socio-material assemblies , which include an analysis of the products already used in relation to multiple users, their practices and wishes. In the article we focus on the challenges in the implementation of two types of robotic beds used for disability care...

  8. Healthcare technology in the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2011-01-01

    is relevant to examine the changes induced by this development: How is healthcare technology appropriated and domesticated by users, how does the development affect the role of the patient, and how is the relationship between home patients, family caregivers and healthcare professionals transformed......The dissertation explores through ethnographic field studies ways in which negotiations and transformations take place when healthcare technology is introduced to the home. With the increased focus on tele-medical solutions and on supporting patient self-care through new healthcare technologies it......? The role of healthcare technology extends beyond making treatment available outside the hospital. Healthcare technology is not neutral, but transforms practice and entails both challenges and possibilities....

  9. SOA governance in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilakopoulos, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is increasingly adopted by many sectors, including healthcare. Due to the nature of healthcare systems there is a need to increase SOA adoption success rates as the non integrated nature of healthcare systems is responsible for medical errors that cause the loss of tens of thousands patients per year. Following our previous research [1] we propose that SOA governance is a critical success factor for SOA success in healthcare. Literature reports multiple SOA governance models that have limitations and they are confusing. In addition to this, there is a lack of healthcare specific SOA governance models. This highlights a literature void and thus the purpose of this paper is to proposed a healthcare specific SOA governance framework. PMID:23823423

  10. Healthcare technology and technology assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, James H.; Hwang, Raymond; Bozic, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    New technology is one of the primary drivers for increased healthcare costs in the United States. Both physician and industry play important roles in the development, adoption, utilization and choice of new technologies. The Federal Drug Administration regulates new drugs and new medical devices, but healthcare technology assessment remains limited. Healthcare technology assessment originated in federal agencies; today it is decentralized with increasing private sector efforts. Innovation is ...

  11. Quality assessment of healthcare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Koubeková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Quality assessment of healthcare systems is considered to be the basic tool of developing strategic concepts in healthcare quality improvement and has a great impact on quality of life. The thesis' main focus is on possibilities of quality assessment on international quality model level and its transformation into national structures. It includes teoretical points of quality and economic evaluation of quality in healthcare. The objective is to assess the participation of czech hospitals in he...

  12. Occupational Outlook Handbook: Healthcare Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurses ( APRNs ), coordinate patient care and may provide primary and specialty healthcare. The scope of ... Health and Safety Specialists Occupational health and safety specialists analyze many ...

  13. Migrants' access to healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-01-01

    access were used to explore differences: 1) cancer stage at diagnosis as a clinical outcome and 2) emergency room (ER) contacts as a utilisation measure. Both informal and formal barriers to access were studied to explore why possible differences existed including: 1) motivation for using ER; and 2......) asylum seekers' healthcare entitlements. Different definitions of migration and ethnicity were investigated including: country of birth and residence status. Substudy I showed a tendency towards more advanced stage at diagnosis or unknown stage among most subgroups of migrant women with a history of...... informal barriers to access and screening. According to the law asylum seekers are entitled to emergency care only in 10 out of 24 countries. Medical screening was carried out in all but one of the 24 EU countries; however, the content and extent of screening programmes vary. The thesis aimed to explore if...

  14. Healthcare Fraud Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Victor Vevera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tax healthcare fraud and tax evasion affects us all. It occurs within a country and across countries both within the EU,USA and globally. That is why a single country cannot solve the problem on its own. The EU and Member States need to work more together and internationally to combat the problem at home and abroad. Open dialogue involving the European Commission, stakeholders and interested parties helps ensure that existing rules and proposals for new rules are designed to keep pace with the reality of rapid change. This dialogue helps to achieve the regulatory efficiency we need to foster best administrative and legislative practice tailored to meet the needs of business in the European Union in the third millennium

  15. [The primary healthcare centres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  16. Technology and healthcare costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine in the 21 st century is increasingly dependent on technology. Unlike in many other areas, the cost of medical technology is not declining and its increasing use contributes to the spiraling healthcare costs. Many medical professionals equate progress in medicine to increasing use of sophisticated technology that is often expensive and beyond the reach of the average citizen. Pediatric heart care is very technology-intensive and therefore very expensive and beyond the reach of the vast majority of children in the developing world. There is an urgent need to address this situation through development and use of appropriate technology in accordance with the needs and priorities of the society. A number of simple and inexpensive quality measures that have the potential of improving outcomes substantially without the need for expensive equipment should be instituted before embracing high-end technology. Innovations to reduce costs that are commonly used in limited resource environments should be tested systematically.

  17. Governance mechanisms for healthcare apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Konstantinos; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kyng, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the `app store' concept has challenged the way software is distributed and marketed: developers have easier access to customers, while customers have easy access to innovative applications. Apps today are increasingly focusing on more "mission-critical" areas like healthcare...... with the Apple AppStore counting more than 40,000 apps under the category "health & fitness". This rapid development of healthcare apps increases the necessity of governance as, currently, healthcare apps are not thoroughly governed. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission...... only have policies for apps that are medical devices.In this paper, we approach the problem of how to govern healthcare and medical apps by addressing the risks the use of these apps pose, while at the same time inviting for development of new apps. To do so we (i) analyze four cases of healthcare app...

  18. A Framework for Healthcare Planning and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Erwin W.; Houdenhoven, van Mark; Hulshof, Peter J.H.; Hall, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Rising expenditures spur healthcare organizations to organize their processes more efficiently and effectively. Unfortunately, healthcare planning and control lags behind manufacturing planning and control. We analyze existing planning and control concepts or frameworks for healthcare operations man

  19. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Austin, Tony; Calisir, Fethi; Chanjaplammootil, Samuel; Davis, Mark J.; Favela, Jesus; Gan, Heng; Gefen, Amit; Haddas, Ram; Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Hornero, Roberto; Huang , Yu-Li; Jensen, Øystein; Jiang, Zhongwei; J.S. Katsanis

    2015-01-01

    Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engin...

  20. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines how marketing managers face increasingly difficult management and it emphasizes one more time the importance of marketing in the internal organizational structure. Also it shows the direct connection between the marketing strategy, the Quality of Healthcare and marketing planning in the internal organization of Private Healthcare Practice in Romania. Also it concludes that marketing planning in healthcare has to be very precised in order to achieve some major objectives: customer care, financial stability, equilibrium between stakeholders and shareholders and future improvement in communication to customers. The marketing strategies and programs discussed in this paper follow the analysis of the 4Ps of Healthcare Marketing Services and propose call to action plans and possibilities that might result in a more particular case study analysis of the Romanian Healthcare Market.

  1. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in non-clinical settings such as the private home can challenge, among others, older adults. To support such unsupervised care activities, an increasingly number of reminders and monitoring systems are being designed. However, most of these...... systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account...... for the home setting and people’s everyday activities....

  2. Improving healthcare using Lean processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G Ross

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, healthcare organizations across Canada have been using Lean management tools to improve care processes, reduce preventable adverse events, increase patient satisfaction and create better work environments. The largest system-wide effort in Canada, and perhaps anywhere, is currently under way in Saskatchewan. The jury is still out on whether Lean efforts in that province, or elsewhere in Canada, are robust enough to transform current delivery systems and sustain new levels of performance. This issue of Healthcare Quarterly features several articles that provide a perspective on Lean methods in healthcare. PMID:25191802

  3. PUBLIC FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in Poland is mainly financed by public sector entities, among them the National Health Fund (NFZ, state budget and local government budgets. The task of the National Health Fund, as the main payer in the system, is chiefly currently financing the services. The state budget plays a complementary role in the system, and finances selected groups of services, health insurance premiums and investments in healthcare infrastructure. The basic role of the local governments is to ensure access to the services, mostly by performing ownership functions towards healthcare institutions.

  4. [Healthcare patient loyalty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    If the "old economy" preached standardization of products/services in order to reduce costs, the "new economy" is based on the recognition of the needs and the management of information. It is aimed at providing better and more usable services. One scenario is a national health service with regional management but based on competition between hospitals/companies.This led to a different handling of the user/patient, which has become the center of the health system: marketing seeks to retain the patient, trying to push a client-patient to not change their healthcare service provider. In costs terms, it is more economical to retain a customer rather than acquire a new one: a satisfied customer is also the best sounding board for each company. Customer equity is the management of relations with patients which can result in a greater customer value: it is possible to recognize an equity of the value, of the brand and of the report. Loyalty uses various marketing activities (basic, responsive, responsible, proactive and collaborative): each hospital/company chooses different actions depending on how many resources it plans to invest in loyalty. PMID:27374397

  5. Healthcare costs for new technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyen, Mathias; Debatin, Joerg F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Continuous ageing of the population coupled with growing health consciousness and continuous technological advances have fueled the rapid rise in healthcare costs in the United States and Europe for the past several decades. The exact impact of new medical technology on long-term spending growth remains the subject of controversy. By all measures it is apparent that new medical technology is the dominant driver of increases in health-care costs and hence insurance premiums. This paper addresses the impact of medical technology on healthcare delivery systems with regard to medical practice and costs. We first explore factors affecting the growth of medical technology and then attempt to provide a means for assessing the effectiveness of medical technology. Avoidable healthcare cost drivers are identified and related policy issues are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with heart failure ... good relationships with all the members of this team. Learn to talk to them openly and honestly ...

  7. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof...

  8. Leveraging Digital Innovation in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Carol V.; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margun;

    2014-01-01

    investments in digital infrastructures. New technologies are leveraged to achieve widespread 24x7 disease management, patients’ wellbeing, home-based healthcare and other patient-centric service innovations. Yet, digital innovations in healthcare face barriers in terms of standardization, data privacy and...... security concerns, fragmented markets, and misaligned incentives across stakeholders. The panel will focus on this apparent paradox and highlight the potential of big data, cloud and mobile computing for achieving better health. The panel co-chairs will introduce differences in healthcare delivery...... landscapes in selected countries. Then panelists with expertise in digital data streams, cloud, and mobile computing will present concrete examples of healthcare service innovations that have the potential to address one or more of the global goals. ECIS attendees are invited to join a debate about the...

  9. Healthcare IT and Patient Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter; Bødker, Keld; Hertzum, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    This short paper outlines a recently initiated research project that concerns healthcare information systems and patient empowerment. Drawing on various theoretical backgrounds, Participatory Design (PD), Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), and Science...

  10. Healthcare costs for new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous ageing of the population coupled with growing health consciousness and continuous technological advances have fueled the rapid rise in healthcare costs in the United States and Europe for the past several decades. The exact impact of new medical technology on long-term spending growth remains the subject of controversy. By all measures it is apparent that new medical technology is the dominant driver of increases in health-care costs and hence insurance premiums. This paper addresses the impact of medical technology on healthcare delivery systems with regard to medical practice and costs. We first explore factors affecting the growth of medical technology and then attempt to provide a means for assessing the effectiveness of medical technology. Avoidable healthcare cost drivers are identified and related policy issues are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Belle; Raghuram Thiagarajan; S. M. Reza Soroushmehr; Fatemeh Navidi; Daniel A Beard; Kayvan Najarian

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is sti...

  12. MARKETING PLANNING IN HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Bobeica Ana Amaria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a perspective on what is important or critical to the discipline of healthcare marketing by analyzing the marketing plan from the institutional (or organizational) perspective. This “salience issue” is complicated by the structural problems in healthcare such as new advertising programs, advances in medical technology, and the escalating costs of care in the recent economic situation of world economic crisis. Reviewing a case study, the paper examines h...

  13. Customer relationship management in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    GHAZİ ASGAR, Mahsa; SHAHRİ, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Background and purpose: Customer relationship management research is utilized to explain the need for a more patient-oriented support. This paper argues about customer relationship managemet in healthcare Method: the present article has utilized the valid resources in the subject under study. Conclusion: CRM tools and strategies will be implemented in the marketing and service layer. The healthcare organization should perform re-engineering process to adapt their CRM strategy and to...

  14. Machine learning in healthcare informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, U; Dua, Prerna

    2014-01-01

    The book is a unique effort to represent a variety of techniques designed to represent, enhance, and empower multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional machine learning research in healthcare informatics. The book provides a unique compendium of current and emerging machine learning paradigms for healthcare informatics and reflects the diversity, complexity and the depth and breath of this multi-disciplinary area. The integrated, panoramic view of data and machine learning techniques can provide an opportunity for novel clinical insights and discoveries.

  15. LEAN thinking in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorma, Tapani; Tiirinki, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Turkki, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes have been achieved or expected by using it. The main focus is in managing and developing patient and treatment processes. Design/methodology/approach - A mixed-method approach incorporating the Webropol survey was used. Findings - LEAN is quite a new concept in Finnish public healthcare. It is mainly used as a development tool to seek financial savings and to improve the efficiency of patient processes, but has not yet been deeply implemented. However, the experiences from LEAN initiatives have been positive, and the methodology is already quite well-known. It can be concluded that, because of positive experiences from LEAN, the environment in Finnish healthcare is ready for the deeper implementation of LEAN. Originality/value - This paper evaluates the usage of LEAN thinking for the first time in the public healthcare system of Finland as a development tool and a management system. It highlights the implementation and achieved results of LEAN thinking when used in the healthcare environment. It also highlights the expectations for LEAN thinking in Finnish public healthcare. PMID:26764958

  16. HEALTHCARE: A COMPLEX SERVICE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James M. TIEN; Pascal J. GOLDSCHMIDT-CLERMONT

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare is indeed a complex service system, one requiring the technobiology approach of systems engineering to underpin its development as an integrated and adaptive system. In general, healthcare services are carried out with knowledge-intensive agents or components which work together as providers and consumers to create or co-produce value. Indeed, the engineering design of a healthcare system must recognize the fact that it is actually a complex integration of human-centered activities that is increasingly dependent on information technology and knowledge. Like any service system, healthcare can be considered to be a combination or recombination of three essential components-people (characterized by behaviors, values, knowledge, etc.), processes (characterized by collaboration, customization, etc.) and products (characterized by software, hardware, infrastructures, etc.). Thus, a healthcare system is an integrated and adaptive set of people, processes and products. It is, in essence, a system of systems which objectives are to enhance its efficiency (leading to greater interdependency) and effectiveness (leading to improved health). Integration occurs over the physical, temporal, organizational and functional dimensions, while adaptation occurs over the monitoring, feedback, cybernetic and learning dimensions. In sum, such service systems as healthcare are indeed complex, especially due to the uncertainties associated with the human-centered aspects of these systems. Moreover, the system complexities can only be dealt with methods that enhance system integration and adaptation.

  17. Healthcare waste management in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks associated with healthcare waste and its management has gained attention across the world in various events, local and international forums and summits. However, the need for proper healthcare waste management has been gaining recognition slowly due to the substantial disease burdens associated with poor practices, including exposure to infectious agents and toxic substances. Despite the magnitude of the problem, practices, capacities and policies in many countries in dealing with healthcare waste disposal, especially developing nations, is inadequate and requires intensification. This paper looks upon aspects to drive improvements to the existing healthcare waste management situation. The paper places recommendation based on a 12 country study reflecting the current status. The paper does not advocate for any complex technology but calls for changes in mindset of all concerned stakeholders and identifies five important aspects for serious consideration. Understanding the role of governments and healthcare facilities, the paper also outlines three key areas for prioritized action for both parties - budget support, developing policies and legislation and technology and knowledge management.

  18. The Microbiome and Sustainable Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney R. Dietert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing prevalences, morbidity, premature mortality and medical needs associated with non-communicable diseases and conditions (NCDs have reached epidemic proportions and placed a major drain on healthcare systems and global economies. Added to this are the challenges presented by overuse of antibiotics and increased antibiotic resistance. Solutions are needed that can address the challenges of NCDs and increasing antibiotic resistance, maximize preventative measures, and balance healthcare needs with available services and economic realities. Microbiome management including microbiota seeding, feeding, and rebiosis appears likely to be a core component of a path toward sustainable healthcare. Recent findings indicate that: (1 humans are mostly microbial (in terms of numbers of cells and genes; (2 immune dysfunction and misregulated inflammation are pivotal in the majority of NCDs; (3 microbiome status affects early immune education and risk of NCDs, and (4 microbiome status affects the risk of certain infections. Management of the microbiome to reduce later-life health risk and/or to treat emerging NCDs, to spare antibiotic use and to reduce the risk of recurrent infections may provide a more effective healthcare strategy across the life course particularly when a personalized medicine approach is considered. This review will examine the potential for microbiome management to contribute to sustainable healthcare.

  19. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company (Portland), Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009020603. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-13

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting site is located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ATSDR considers the site to have been a public health hazard for former plant workers because of past ingestion exposure to arsenic, creosote, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans at levels of public health concern. The site also poses an ongoing and future public health hazard because people might encounter hazardous chemicals along the shoreline on or near the site at levels that can damage the skin, as was reported to have happened to two boys. Finally, dioxin levels would pose a public health hazard if people subsist on crayfish and suckers contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  20. Baxterization of GL{sub q}(2) and its application to the Liouville model and some other model on a lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytsko, A.G. [Steklov Mathematics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    We develop the Baxterization approach to (an extension of) the quantum group GL{sub q}(2). We introduce two matrices which play the role of spectral parameter dependent L-matrices and observe that they are naturally related to two different comultiplications. Using these comultiplication structures, we find the related fundamental R-operators in terms of powers of coproducts and also give their equivalent forms in terms of quantum dilogarithms. The corresponding quantum local Hamiltonians are given in terms of logarithms of positive operators. An analogous construction is developed for the q-oscillator and Weyl algebras using that their algebraic and coalgebraic structures can be obtained as reductions of those for the quantum group. As an application, the lattice Liouville model, the q-DST model, the Volterra model, a lattice regularization of the free field, and the relativistic Toda model are considered. (orig.)

  1. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Belle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  2. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  3. Systems design for remote healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a multidisciplinary overview of the design and implementation of systems for remote patient monitoring and healthcare. Readers are guided step-by-step through the components of such a system and shown how they could be integrated in a coherent framework for deployment in practice. The authors explain planning from subsystem design to complete integration and deployment, given particular application constraints. Readers will benefit from descriptions of the clinical requirements underpinning the entire application scenario, physiological parameter sensing techniques, information processing approaches and overall, application dependent system integration. Each chapter ends with a discussion of practical design challenges and two case studies are included to provide practical examples and design methods for two remote healthcare systems with different needs. ·         Provides a multi-disciplinary overview of next-generation mobile healthcare system design; ·         Includes...

  4. Healthcare in overview of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Munis; Uzak, Aslı Subasioglu; Karabulut, Yesim

    2010-12-01

    Turkey is one of the leading countries with its developing economy, high young population, and with its geopolitical location being an intersection between Asia and Europe. It is aimed at setting a good example for developed and developing countries with its health policy targets. We reported and discussed here the demographic data of Turkish population, the main aims of Ministry of Health, social security system and its scope and structure, health services, healthcare institutions and their infrastructures, human resources in health, health staff training and also outline of Turkish foreign policy. We mentioned predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine according to Turkey's healthcare approach. PMID:23199111

  5. Caring for healthcare professionals: improving prevention in occupational healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Ketelaar

    2014-01-01

    How can healthcare professionals be supported to stay healthy and well-functioning at work? Working in nursing involves dealing with specific job demands which can have an impact on nurses’ health. In turn, health problems can affect their work functioning, with possible negative consequences for nu

  6. Social media disruptive change in healthcare : responses of healthcare providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    2016-01-01

    Social media represent specific types of technologies that are end-user driven and end-users are able to drive disruptive change giving little time to organizations to react. With rapid and powerful emergence of social media communities in healthcare, this sector is faced with new and alternative av

  7. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term “Healthcare Engineering” has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of “Healthcare Engineering” remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  8. [Patients' increasing role in healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Cinzia

    2016-03-01

    Since the late '90s citizens have been increasingly involved in healthcare, thanks to a shift in access to healthcare information, greater patients' and citizens' awareness about their rights and needs, and a change in physicians' attitudes and behavior. At the same time, to ensure the sustainability of the national health services, patients' needs are increasingly being examined in relation to the services and interventions needed, and to foster informed demand by patients and citizens, and appropriate prescriptions by physicians. Nowadays, patients already have a section in an authoritative medical journal. Working with clinicians, they set research priorities and the outcomes to be studied. Especially in UK and USA, they are invited to participate in the design and development of trials and in deciding which trials should be funded. The situation varies widely in different countries, though involving citizens in healthcare decisions is a common mantra. Even when they consult a clinician, the patients' role has evolved. People ask for information more often and want an active part in decisions about their health. Physicians start to pay more attention to the person and the social context, feelings and emotions, and person-centered care has become a reference in the doctor-patient relationship. This article offers an overview of the changing roles of patients and citizens in healthcare. PMID:27030220

  9. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  10. Control of corruption in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article on corruption in Indian healthcare in the BMJ has triggered a hot debate and numerous responses (1, 2, 3, 4). We do agree that corruption in Indian healthcare is a colossal issue and needs to be tackled urgently (5). However, we want to highlight that corruption in healthcare is not a local phenomenon confined to the Indian subcontinent, though India does serve as a good case study and intervention area due to the magnitude of the problem and the country's large population (6). Good governance, strict rules, transparency and zero tolerance are some of the strategies prescribed everywhere to tackle corruption. However, those entrusted with implementing good governance and strict rules in India need to go through a process of introspection to carry out their duties in a responsible fashion. At present, it looks like a no-win situation. In this article, we recommend education in medical ethics as the major intervention for dealing with corruption in healthcare. PMID:26592785

  11. Body Area Networks for Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, V.M.; Bults, R.G.A.; Konstantas, D.; Vierhout, P.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this research proposal is the design and development of novel applications and services targeting 4G wireless technologies. In previous papers [1, 2] we presented a vision of two future healthcare applications which we call Virtual Trauma Team and Virtual Homecare Team. These are two

  12. Performance indicators: healthcare professionals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to capture factors behind professional views of indicator usefulness as a common structure for assessing healthcare performance and their important characteristics to design limited key performance indicators (PIs) for holistic hospital management. Design/methodology/approach - Two surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires, in which hospital manager/staff respondents were asked to rate the 52 PIs' usefulness. In total, 228 manager and 894 staff responses were collected. Findings - Eight factors were elicited from manager and staff responses as performance measures with 72 percent cumulative variance accounted for. Hospital managers and staff showed similar performance measure perceptions: high-utility acknowledgment on safety, operational efficiency and patient/employee satisfaction but relatively low-employee development concerns. Manager indicator usefulness perceptions were rather homogeneous and significantly higher than staff for almost all performance measures. Practical implications - Homogeneous manager views mean that a single key PI set for hospital management may be established regardless of hospital attributes. The following aspects may be measures that should be managed in a healthcare organization based on their key PIs: patient/employee safety, operational efficiency, financial effectiveness and patient/employee satisfaction. Originality/value - This is a pilot study on hospital management PIs in Japan. The eight-dimensional factor structure and findings about healthcare provider perceptions may be useful for healthcare management. PMID:27477935

  13. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Ton A.M.; Stegwee, Robert A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information an

  14. Managing healthcare information: analyzing trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Eva; Eriksson, Nomie; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative research approach is applied using two case studies. The data analysis of these studies generated a problem list, which was mapped to a trust matrix. Findings - Results demonstrate flaws in current practices and point to achieving balance between organizational, person and technology trust perspectives. The analysis revealed three challenge areas, to: achieve higher trust in patient-focussed healthcare; improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals; and establish clear terminology. By taking trust into account, a more holistic perspective on healthcare can be achieved, where trust can be obtained and optimized. Research limitations/implications - A trust matrix is tested and shown to identify trust problems on different levels and relating to trusting beliefs. Future research should elaborate and more fully address issues within three identified challenge areas. Practical implications - The trust matrix's usefulness as a tool for organizations to analyze trust problems and issues is demonstrated. Originality/value - Healthcare trust issues are captured to a greater extent and from previously unchartered perspectives. PMID:27477934

  15. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider. PMID:20155554

  16. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, van de Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity is

  17. [Fostering LGBT-friendly healthcare services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Han-Ting; Chen, Mu-Hong; Ku, Wen-Wei

    2015-02-01

    LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) patients suffer from stigma and discrimination when seeking healthcare. A large LGBT healthcare survey revealed that 56% of gay patients and 70% of transgender patients suffered some type of discrimination while seeking healthcare in 2014. The fostering of LGBT-friendly healthcare services is not just an advanced step of gender mainstreaming but also a fulfillment of health equality and equity. Additionally, LGBT-friendly healthcare services are expected to provide new opportunities for healthcare workers. Therefore, proactive government policies, education, research, and clinical practice should all encourage the development of these healthcare services. We look forward to a well-developed LGBT-friendly healthcare system in Taiwan. PMID:25631181

  18. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  19. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  20. Innovation in medicine and healthcare 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Torro, Carlos; Tanaka, Satoshi; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2016-01-01

    Innovation in medicine and healthcare is an interdisciplinary research area, which combines the advanced technologies and problem solving skills with medical and biological science. A central theme of this proceedings is Smart Medical and Healthcare Systems (modern intelligent systems for medicine and healthcare), which can provide efficient and accurate solution to problems faced by healthcare and medical practitioners today by using advanced information communication techniques, computational intelligence, mathematics, robotics and other advanced technologies. The techniques developed in this area will have a significant effect on future medicine and healthcare.    The volume includes 53 papers, which present the recent trend and innovations in medicine and healthcare including Medical Informatics; Biomedical Engineering; Management for Healthcare; Advanced ICT for Medical and Healthcare; Simulation and Visualization/VR for Medicine; Statistical Signal Processing and Artificial Intelligence; Smart Medic...

  1. General Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button General Information About MRSA in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Problem? Who is at Risk, and How is MRSA Spread in Healthcare Settings? MRSA is usually spread ...

  2. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    OpenAIRE

    A. Garefalakis; G. Mantalis; E. Vourgourakis; K. Spinthiropoulos; Ch. Lemonakis

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcar...

  3. Healthcare Industry Improvement with Business Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Laura IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper highlights the advantages of big data analytics and business intelligence in the healthcare industry. In the paper are reviewed the Real-Time Healthcare Analytics Solutions for Preventative Medicine provided by SAP and the different ideas realized by possible customers for new applications in Healthcare industry in order to demonstrate that the healthcare system can and should benefit from the new opportunities provided by ITC in general and big data analytics in particular.

  4. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    OpenAIRE

    Christiana Balan; Petronela-Simona Mantaluta

    2013-01-01

    The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focu...

  5. Redefining the Core Competencies of Future Healthcare Executives under Healthcare Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Dianne B.; Ayadi, M. Femi

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare industry has evolved over the years, so too has the administration of healthcare organizations. The signing into law of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has brought additional changes to the healthcare industry that will require changes to the healthcare administration curriculum. The movement toward a…

  6. Healthcare financing: how does Turkey compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedjonov, Alisher; Güç, Yunus; Akinci, Fevzi

    2011-01-01

    The authors provide an overview of Turkey's healthcare financing. After comparing financing data on Turkey and other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries, they examine Turkey's performance on a wide range of healthcare input and outcome indicators using descriptive data drawn from the World Health Organization, World Bank, OECD, and Turkish Statistical Institute. The data analysis shows that Turkey ranks low by a number of key healthcare indicators across the OECD countries. Empirical analysis suggests that although many factors are associated with improvements in healthcare outcomes, a significant part of changes in life expectancy at birth are associated with higher spending on healthcare. PMID:21864057

  7. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research. PMID:27441404

  8. Healthcare Energy Metering Guidance (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    This brochure is intended to help facility and energy managers plan and prioritize investments in energy metering. It offers healthcare-specific examples of metering applications, benefits, and steps that other health systems can reproduce. It reflects collaborative input from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and the health system members of the DOE Hospital Energy Alliance's Benchmarking and Measurement Project Team.

  9. Legitimate Allocation of Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper; Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    Citizens' consent to political decisions is often regarded as a necessary condition of political legitimacy. Consequently, legitimate allocation of healthcare has seemed almost unattainable in contemporary pluralistic societies. The problem is that citizens do not agree on any single principle...... governing priorities among groups of patients. The Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) framework suggests an ingenious solution to this problem of moral disagreement. Rather than advocating any substantive distributive principle, its advocates propose a feasible set of conditions, which, if met by...

  10. Multicultural healthcare: a transatlantic project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Jokinen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is increasingly multicultural, posing a challenge for nurse educators in both Europe and the United States. Nursing education faculties are responding to the challenge of internationalization, for instance, by participating in international student exchange projects to foster students' intercultural competence. The authors describe an educational model constructed during a transatlantic project between European and American universities. The benefits of the project from the Finnish partner's perspective are also reported. PMID:17496825

  11. Business intelligence in healthcare organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Spil, Ton A.M.; Stegwee, Robert A.; Teitink, Christian J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The management of healthcare organizations is starting to recognize the relevance of the definition of care products in relation to management information. In the turmoil between costs, care results and patient satisfaction, the right balance is needed, and it can be found in upcoming information and communication technologies (ICT). The ICT developments are a challenge in two directions: internally towards massive data warehouses, and externally towards Internet dissemination. These new tech...

  12. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  13. Nonverbal Accommodation in Healthcare Communication

    OpenAIRE

    D’Agostino, Thomas A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examined patterns of nonverbal accommodation within healthcare interactions and investigated the impact of communication skills training and gender concordance on nonverbal accommodation behavior. The Nonverbal Accommodation Analysis System (NAAS) was used to code the nonverbal behavior of physicians and patients within 45 oncology consultations. Cases were then placed in one of seven categories based on patterns of accommodation observed across the interaction. Results...

  14. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakdaman, Masoud; Zeinahvazi, Milad; Zohoori, Bahareh; Nasiri, Fardokht; Yew Wong, Kuan

    2013-02-01

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  15. Bluetooth: Opening a Blue Sky for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been a blossoming of developing mobile healthcare programs. Bluetooth technology, which has the advantages of being low-power and inexpensive, whilst being able to transfer moderate amounts of data over a versatile, robust and secure radio link, has been widely applied in mobile healthcare as a replacement for cables. This paper discussed the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare. It started with the brief description of the history of Bluetooth technology, its technical characteristics, and the latest developments. Then the applications of Bluetooth technology in healthcare sector were reviewed. The applications are based on two basic types of links of Bluetooth technology: point-to-point link and point-to-multipoint link. The special requirements from healthcare and the challenges of successful application of Bluetooth in healthcare will be discussed. At last the future development of Bluetooth technology and its impacts on healthcare were envisioned.

  16. Contact Allergy in Danish Healthcare Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Sommerlund, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitis in healthcare workers is a pan-European problem. We conducted a retrospective observational study of the patch-test results of 1402 healthcare workers and 1402 matched controls with contact dermatitis who were treated at 3 hospitals departments in Denmark between 2007 and 2014....... focus on the use of rubber accelerators in, for example, protective gloves, which are widely used by healthcare professionals.......Contact dermatitis in healthcare workers is a pan-European problem. We conducted a retrospective observational study of the patch-test results of 1402 healthcare workers and 1402 matched controls with contact dermatitis who were treated at 3 hospitals departments in Denmark between 2007 and 2014....... The primary objective was to determine whether healthcare work was associated with contact allergy to thiuram mix. Unadjusted univariate analyses revealed that healthcare work was significantly associated with occupational contact dermatitis and hand dermatitis. Contact allergy to thiuram mix was more...

  17. Assessing quality across healthcare subsystems in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Andrea; Pagán, José A; Wong, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Recent healthcare reform efforts in Mexico have focused on the need to improve the efficiency and equity of a fragmented healthcare system. In light of these reform initiatives, there is a need to assess whether healthcare subsystems are effective at providing high-quality healthcare to all Mexicans. Nationally representative household survey data from the 2006 Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (National Health and Nutrition Survey) were used to assess perceived healthcare quality across different subsystems. Using a sample of 7234 survey respondents, we found evidence of substantial heterogeneity in healthcare quality assessments across healthcare subsystems favoring private providers over social security institutions. These differences across subsystems remained even after adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic, and health factors. Our analysis suggests that improvements in efficiency and equity can be achieved by assessing the factors that contribute to heterogeneity in quality across subsystems. PMID:19305224

  18. Patient Safety and Healthcare Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Toska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to a variety of circumstances and world-wide research findings, patient safety andquality care during hospitalization have emerged as major issues. Patient safety deficits may burdenhealth systems as well as allocated resources. The international community has examined severalproposals covering general and systemic aspects in order to improve patient safety; several long-termprograms and strategies have also been implemented promoting the participation of health-relatedagents, and also government agencies and non-governmental organizations.Aim: Those factors that have negative correlations with patient safety and quality healthcare weredetermined; WHO and EU programs as well as the Greek health policy were also reviewed.Method: Local and international literature was reviewed, including EU and WHO official publications,by using the appropriate keywords.Conclusions: International cooperation on patient safety is necessary in order to improvehospitalization and healthcare quality standards. Such incentives depend heavily on establishing worldwideviable and effective health programs and planning. These improvements also require further stepson safe work procedures, environment safety, hazard management, infection control, safe use ofequipment and medication, and sufficient healthcare staff.

  19. Healthcare Workers and Workplace Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Pinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is a threatening worldwide public health problem. Healthcare workers have under particular risk of workplace violence, and they are being exposed to violence 4-16 times more than other service workers. The frequency of violence in the health sector in the world has indicated in different range of results since there is no consistent definition of workplace violence and differences in research methodology (any type of violence: 22,0% - 60,0%; physical violence: 2,6% - 57,0%; verbal violence: 24,3% - 82,0%; sexual harassment: %1,9 - 10,5%. All healthcare workers have right to work in a safe working place. The safety of healthcare workers should deserve the same priority as patient safety. Various risk factors including social, cultural, environmental, organizational and personal elements play a role in the formation of workplace violence that is very important for our country. Considering all those factors, the workplace violence in health sector should be seriously handled and the strategies and policies must be developed for prevention. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 315-326

  20. Conflict resolution in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipcamon, James D; Mainwaring, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Conflict causes decided tension in the workplace and often produces poor professional outcomes. A manager dealing with conflict can experience a crisis of confidence and often ends up second-guessing himself or herself, regardless of how a situation has been handled. In some organizations, conflict is not viewed positively or as an opportunity for improvement. In these organizations, most individuals will see conflict as being unproductive, unpleasant, and a waste of time and energy. Yet, conflict provides employees with critical feedback on how things are going. When viewed in a positive context, even personality conflicts may provide information to the healthcare manager about what is not working in the organization. If conflict is not directed and controlled, it can have damaging effects in the workplace, stifling the growth of departments and deflating employee morale. Our job as healthcare managers is to deal with conflict so that it does not decrease productivity or detract from the provision of patient-centered care. There are 4 general sources for interpersonal conflict: personal differences, informational deficiency, role incompatibility, and environmental stress. There are 5 common responses used in dealing with conflict: forcing, accommodating, avoiding, compromising, and collaborating. Healthcare managers should become comfortable with using all of these approaches. PMID:15259690

  1. Workplace Bullying among Healthcare Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Montero-Simó

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to assess consistent predictors through the use of a sample that includes different actors from the healthcare work force to identify certain key elements in a set of job-related organizational contexts. The utilized data were obtained from the 5th European Working Conditions Survey, conducted in 2010 by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. In light of these objectives, we collected a subsample of 284 health professionals, some of them from the International Standard Classification of Occupations—subgroup 22—(ISCO-08. The results indicated that the chance of a healthcare worker referring to him/herself as bullied increases among those who work on a shift schedule, perform monotonous and rotating tasks, suffer from work stress, enjoy little satisfaction from their working conditions, and do not perceive opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes within the usual course of events that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist human resource managers in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among healthcare workers.

  2. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Balan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focuses on the relationship between the inputs and outputs of the system. Approach In order to assess the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system we use Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Both input and output healthcare indicators are observed for the period 1999-2010 and the years when healthcare inputs have been used efficiently are identified. Results The results show that human, financial, and technological resources have been used at maximum capacity in 1999, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010. Implications Though efficiency is defined differently by diverse stakeholders, healthcare policies should focus on rising the responsibility of communities and individuals for better treatments and services and better access to information on healthcare providers. Value The paper is an empirically based study of the healthcare resources allocation in Romania.

  3. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800-321-6742 (OSHA) TTY www.OSHA.gov FEDERAL GOVERNMENT White House Affordable Care Act Disaster Recovery ...

  4. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS. PMID:26656389

  5. Requirements for Interoperability in Healthcare Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Noumeir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability is a requirement for the successful deployment of Electronic Health Records (EHR. EHR improves the quality of healthcare by enabling access to all relevant information at the diagnostic decision moment, regardless of location. It is a system that results from the cooperation of several heterogeneous distributed subsystems that need to successfully exchange information relative to a specific healthcare process. This paper analyzes interoperability impediments in healthcare by first defining them and providing concrete healthcare examples, followed by discussion of how specifications can be defined and how verification can be conducted to eliminate those impediments and ensure interoperability in healthcare. This paper also analyzes how Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE has been successful in enabling interoperability, and identifies some neglected aspects that need attention.

  6. Occupational Hazards in the Thai Healthcare Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Mawn, Barbara; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Healthcare personnel work in vulnerable conditions that can adversely impact physical and/or mental health. This paper aims to synthesize the state of knowledge on work-related illnesses, injuries, and risks experienced by Thai healthcare workers. We found that Thai healthcare personnel, like others worldwide, are at risk for injury related to needle sticks and sharp instruments; infectious diseases due to biological hazards exposure such as airborne pathogens and patient secretions; muscle pain due to workload and long duration of work; and psychological disorders related to stressful working conditions. Because detailed surveillance data are limited for the Thai healthcare workforce, we recommend that additional surveillance data on Thai healthcare workers' health outcomes be collected. Future research efforts should also focus on evidence-based interventions in order to develop methods to prevent and treat occupational health injuries and illnesses acquired in the workplace for Thai healthcare sector workers. PMID:26956017

  7. Integration of healthcare rehabilitation in chronic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Quality of care provided to people with chronic conditions does not often fulfil standards of care in Denmark and in other countries. Inadequate organisation of healthcare systems has been identified as one of the most important causes for observed performance inadequacies, and providing integrated healthcare has been identified as an important organisational challenge for healthcare systems. Three entities—Bispebjerg University Hospital, the City of Copenhagen, and the GPs in C...

  8. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    OpenAIRE

    Vrugt, van de, Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity issues and improving efficiency in the delivery of healthcare, but appears to be lacking implementation in practice. This thesis displays OR research that focuses both on theoretical results and prac...

  9. Process improvement in healthcare: Overall resource efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mast, de, J.; Kemper, B; Does, R.J.M.M.; Mandjes, M.; Bijl, van der, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a unifying and quantitative conceptual framework for healthcare processes from the viewpoint of process improvement. The work adapts standard models from operation management to the specifics of healthcare processes. We propose concepts for organizational modeling of healthcare processes, breaking down work into micro processes, tasks, and resources. In addition, we propose an axiological model which breaks down general performance goals into process metrics. The co...

  10. Health-Care Technology Assessment in Radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Deljou

    2010-01-01

    Health-care service provision and procurement is increasingly subject to policy decisions, managed more than ever before. Becoming more international, collaboration is increasing as the health professions, research and industry all work across borders. Differing health-care systems across the countries result from national and regional policy developments and priorities."nIn health-care, all interventions and procedures are basically technologies-including radiology and sur-gery, and tec...

  11. Complexity science and leadership in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    2001-10-01

    The emerging field of complexity science offers an alternative leadership strategy for the chaotic, complex healthcare environment. A survey revealed that healthcare leaders intuitively support principles of complexity science. Leadership that uses complexity principles offers opportunities in the chaotic healthcare environment to focus less on prediction and control and more on fostering relationships and creating conditions in which complex adaptive systems can evolve to produce creative outcomes. PMID:11676217

  12. Enterprise Resource Planning systems in healthcare sector

    OpenAIRE

    Mucheleka, M. (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis work was to find out how Enterprise Resource Planning systems (ERP) have been used in the healthcare sector and how ERP systems could be used to improve the healthcare services. Some findings were discussed and recommendations were made about how ERP systems could be used in the healthcare sector. The thesis was written using literature review research method. Literature is the study that involves gathering and studying earlier knowledge about a specific topic ...

  13. A proposed rural healthcare ethics agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W.; Pomerantz, A; Howard, K; Bushy, A

    2007-01-01

    The unique context of the rural setting provides special challenges to furnishing ethical healthcare to its approximately 62 million inhabitants. Although rural communities are widely diverse, most have the following common features: limited economic resources, shared values, reduced health status, limited availability of and accessibility to healthcare services, overlapping professional–patient relationships and care giver stress. These rural features shape common healthcare ethical issues, ...

  14. Sustainable Healthcare - A National Swedish Innovation Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Pereno, Amina

    2015-01-01

    For the past year a constellation of different stakeholders have been working with a National Swedish Innovation Agenda on Sustainable Healthcare. Numerous meetings, workshops and interviews have been conducted to sort out what actions need to be implemented so that Sustainable Healthcare can grow and become a bigger part of the Swedish innovation, economy and export. This short English version of the Innovation Agenda summarizes the definition of sustainable healthcare, key stakeholders of s...

  15. Healthcare mergers and acquisitions: strategies for consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The passage of federal healthcare reform legislation, in combination with other factors, makes it likely that the next few years will be a major period of consolidation for healthcare organizations. This article examines the seven key forces reshaping healthcare delivery--from insurance industry consolidation to cost inflation to the increasing gap between financially strong and struggling providers--and provides advice for organizations on both sides of an acquisition. PMID:21793480

  16. The financing of healthcare in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Durkan, Joe

    1994-01-01

    It is an interesting aspect of the current debate with regard to healthcare in developed countries that the discussion starts with the finance of healthcare. What makes it interesting is that, with the exception of the US, healthcare is predominantly financed by government through a combination of a social welfare contribution and general taxation. There is some private financing through private insurance, but tax benefits for insurance and the universality attaching to most public systems ef...

  17. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P.; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2013-01-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the ...

  18. Value-based procurement: Canada's healthcare imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Value-based healthcare models are being adopted globally to maximize value for patients. Given that procurement is at the heart of purchasing value, value-based procurement goes hand in hand with value-based healthcare. Shifting procurement's traditional focus on short-term cost savings to a more holistic objective that includes health system performance and patient outcomes, giving preference to longer-term cost efficiencies, and working with suppliers to identify opportunities to develop more innovative products and services, is proving successful in leading jurisdictions. This article presents an overview of value within healthcare systems and how healthcare value-based procurement is being implemented across various jurisdictions. PMID:27278137

  19. Healthcare operations management through use of simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafee, Navonil; Williams, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades healthcare organisations have grown in size and complexity and healthcare costs have outpaced economic growth. In countries where healthcare is publicly-funded, increasing costs have traditionally meant a rise in the healthcare budgets in real terms; however, the ongoing global financial and economic crisis (2007-present) has had spending implications on governmental budgets for public resources in several countries. This apparent contradiction - "provide better service at a lesser cost" - which may last for years to come therefore necessitates the careful use of the allo

  20. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool. PMID:21841396

  1. Patient-centredness in integrated healthcare delivery systems - needs, expectations and priorities for organised healthcare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Juhnke, Christin; Mühlbacher, Axel C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patient-centred healthcare is becoming a more significant success factor in the design of integrated healthcare systems. The objective of this study is to structure a patient-relevant hierarchy of needs and expectations for the design of organised healthcare delivery systems. Methods A questionnaire with 84 items was conducted with N = 254 healthcare experts and N = 670 patients. Factor analyses were performed using SPSS©18. The number of factors retained was controlled by Kaiser...

  2. Developing Ethical Competence in Healthcare Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenström, Erica; Ohlsson, Jon; Höglund, Anna T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight essential learning processes to develop healthcare managers' ethical competence. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews…

  3. Individualized Healthcare Plans (IHP). Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that students whose healthcare needs affect or have the potential to affect safe and optimal school attendance and academic performance require the professional school nurse to write an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP), in collaboration with the student, family, educators,…

  4. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  5. Discourse Analysis of Encouragement in Healthcare Manga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Smith, Ian; Uchimura, Mari

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how healthcare professionals use encouragement. Focusing on GAMBARU ["to try hard"], forty-one scenes were collected from healthcare manga. Each scene of encouragement was analyzed from three perspectives; the contextual background of the communication, the relationship with the patients and the patients' response to the…

  6. Challenges and trends in global healthcare missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazelaar, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Changes in travel, communications, and technology are impacting how the ministry of healthcare missions is being implemented around the globe. This article discusses five emerging trends in healthcare missions, offering rationale for each and a vision for bringing health and healing among all peoples of the world. PMID:21853716

  7. The Roadside Healthcare Facility Location Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. de Vries (Harwin); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Providing African truck drivers with adequate access to healthcare is an effective way to reduce the burden and the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases. Therefore, NGO North Star Alliance builds a network of healthcare facilities along major African trucking rou

  8. Integration of mental healthcare into primary healthcare in Lagos, Nigeria: the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele O. Coker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Lagos State Ministry of Health recently launched its Mental Health Policy aimed at addressing the mental health needs the residents of the State. The policy also aimed at reducing the mental disorders treatment gap in the state by integrating mental healthcare into the primary healthcare in order to make mental healthcare services closer and accessible for residents of the State. This paper therefore critically reviews the rationale for the integration, magnitude of problems in Lagos State with regards to mental healthcare services, available resources, challenges in providing mental healthcare services, recommendations for successful integration, the necessary advocacy needed to implement the integration and benefits of the integration.

  9. Understanding bullying in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Belinda

    2015-12-01

    Bullying is a pervasive problem in healthcare organisations. Inquiries and reports on patient care and poor practice in the NHS have emphasised the substantial negative effects this behaviour may have on patient care. If bullying is to be addressed, it is crucial we develop clarity about what behaviours constitute bullying and how these behaviours differ from other negative behaviours in the workplace. It is important that we recognise the extent of the problem; statistics on the prevalence of bullying are likely to be an underestimate because of under-reporting of bullying. Effective interventions may only be designed and implemented if there is knowledge about what precipitates bullying and the magnitude of the changes required in organisations to tackle bullying. Individuals should also be aware of the options that are available to them should they be the target of bullying behaviour and what they should do if they witness bullying in their workplace. PMID:26639294

  10. Imagined Potentialities of Healthcare Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    This paper will focus on health care technologies and initiatives, particularly, Electronic Health Records (EHRs). These technologies are ascribed various potentialities, attributing them the capacity to do a wide range of things, from improving efficiency to saving medical costs and even saving...... lives. These complex and often conflicting imagined potentialities lead to inflicted burden on designers, policy makers and healthcare practitioners who are faced with different realities on the ground. The conflicting notions have real life effects as these impact our present understanding of, and...... actions taken toward, these technologies. To better understand the material and discursive processes that are at play in shaping our present and future understanding of EHR technologies, the paper offers the analytical notion of imagined potentialities, whereby a technology is imagined to possess an...

  11. Study on healthcare magnetic concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yushan; DONG Faqin; FENG Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic concrete was prepared by adding SrFe12O9 magnetic functional elementary material into concrete, and its magnetism was charged by magnetizing machine. The effect of SrFe12O9 content on magnetic field intensity and the attenuation of magnetic field intensity were investigated in different medium. The blood viscosity of rats kept in magnetic concrete was carried out. The results show that magnetic concrete can be prepared by adding SrFe12O9, and magnetic fields intensity increases with the augment of ferrite content. The attenuation of magnetic fields is mainly related with the density of medium, but it is secondary to the properties of medium. The blood viscosity of rats decreases under magnetic condition, but the blood cells remain the same as before. Experimental results support that magnetic concrete has great healthcare function.

  12. Register-based studies of healthcare costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Christiansen, Terkel

    2011-01-01

    comprehensive data material, often in the form of time series, which is very useful in health economic analyses. The disadvantage of register-based data is the use of tariffs, charges, or market prices as proxies for costs in the computation of healthcare costs.......Introduction: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and a few examples of how national registers are used in analyses of healthcare costs in Denmark. Research topics: The paper focuses on health economic analyses based on register data. For the sake of simplicity, the studies are divided...... into three main categories: economic evaluations of healthcare interventions, cost-of-illness analyses, and other analyses such as assessments of healthcare productivity. Conclusion: We examined a number of studies using register-based data on healthcare costs. Use of register-based data renders a...

  13. Telehealth: the backbone of healthcare financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Abu Bakar

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia, like many other countries faces major challenges in meeting increasing demands with limited resources. Changes in demography, life-style diseases, increasing consumer expectations, new medical technologies and rapid economic growth all fuel demand for more healthcare services. There are problems related to the distribution and delivery of healthcare services, and there is inadequate integration of healthcare delivery and continuity of care is a major concern. Resources tend to be concentrated in the very expensive hospital sector, although services would be cost-effectively and conveniently delivered at primary care level. There is no ideal healthcare system, and how healthcare is supported and organized for service delivery influences the country's social, economic and political well-being. Like many other countries, Malaysia is undergoing health reform in meeting these challenges, and is becoming more reliant on telemedicine and telehealth. PMID:15747978

  14. Healthcare Data Analytics on the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Bhattacharya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meaningful analysis of voluminous health information has always been a challenge in most healthcare organizations. Accurate and timely information required by the management to lead a healthcare organization through the challenges found in the industry can be obtained using business intelligence (BI or business analytics tools. However, these require large capital investments to implement and support the large volumes of data that needs to be analyzed to identify trends. They also require enormous processing power which places pressure on the business resources in addition to the dynamic changes in the digital technology. This paper evaluates the various nuances of business analytics of healthcare hosted on the cloud computing environment. The paper explores BI being offered as Software as a Service (SaaS solution towards offering meaningful use of information for improving functions in healthcare enterprise. It also attempts to identify the challenges that healthcare enterprises face when making use of a BI SaaS solution.

  15. Guest editorial. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Valerdi, Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    The use of integrated information systems for healthcare has been started more than a decade ago. In recent years, rapid advances in information integration methods have spurred tremendous growth in the use of integrated information systems in healthcare delivery. Various techniques have been used for probing such integrated systems. These techniques include service-oriented architecture (SOA), EAI, workflow management, grid computing, and others. Many applications require a combination of these techniques, which gives rise to the emergence of enterprise systems in healthcare. Development of the techniques originated from different disciplines has the potential to significantly improve the performance of enterprise systems in healthcare. This editorial paper briefly introduces the enterprise systems in the perspective of healthcare informatics. PMID:22760931

  16. Architecture Capabilities to Improve Healthcare Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ebrahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physical environment of healthcare buildings has great importance in issues such as patient safety, functional efficiency, user satisfaction, healthcare outcomes, and energy and resources consumption.Objectives: The present study assesses physical environments of Iranian healthcare buildings.Materials and Methods: This study was performed using a descriptive-analytical method. Data collection was carried out via a written questionnaire.Results: Based on the findings of this study, "functional efficiency", "user satisfaction", "environmental issues", "patient safety”, “accountability in incidents and disasters", and "flexibility" are regarded as the most issues in the country's hospitals. Also, none of the parameters is "without any problem" and has a "desirable status".Conclusions: According to the responses, all of the healthcare buildings in this research had flaws in their physical environment, which require attention. Thus, it is necessary to review and pay more attention to the architecture of the country's healthcare buildings.

  17. Healthcare Data Gateways: Found Healthcare Intelligence on Blockchain with Novel Privacy Risk Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiao; Wang, Huiju; Jin, Dawei; Li, Mingqiang; Jiang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Healthcare data are a valuable source of healthcare intelligence. Sharing of healthcare data is one essential step to make healthcare system smarter and improve the quality of healthcare service. Healthcare data, one personal asset of patient, should be owned and controlled by patient, instead of being scattered in different healthcare systems, which prevents data sharing and puts patient privacy at risks. Blockchain is demonstrated in the financial field that trusted, auditable computing is possible using a decentralized network of peers accompanied by a public ledger. In this paper, we proposed an App (called Healthcare Data Gateway (HGD)) architecture based on blockchain to enable patient to own, control and share their own data easily and securely without violating privacy, which provides a new potential way to improve the intelligence of healthcare systems while keeping patient data private. Our proposed purpose-centric access model ensures patient own and control their healthcare data; simple unified Indicator-Centric Schema (ICS) makes it possible to organize all kinds of personal healthcare data practically and easily. We also point out that MPC (Secure Multi-Party Computing) is one promising solution to enable untrusted third-party to conduct computation over patient data without violating privacy. PMID:27565509

  18. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management: Experiences from the Danish healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    leading to lacking absorptive capacity (Cohen & Levinthal, 1990) by the professionals within healthcare. The third hypothesis states that the nature of work and work processes in some areas of healthcare represents a significant barrier to successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The...... fourth and final hypothesis states that different mind sets and different rationalities between different types of healthcare professionals act as a major barrier for lean management in healthcare. The hypotheses are tested and discussed through four case studies. Using empirical research from four case......The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...

  19. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial...

  20. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in...

  1. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial...

  2. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  3. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2013-09-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  4. Monitoring: the eyes and ears of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donabedian, A

    1988-11-01

    Society and the healthcare profession are bound by a contract, sealed with the healthcare practitioner's obligation to competence, integrity, and humaneness. Society confers privileges on the practitioner, who, in turn, accepts the obligations that society also imposes. Nevertheless, repeated assessments under all sorts of conditions have revealed unexpected, often serious defects in the quality of healthcare. The quality of healthcare depends on the performance of practitioners in a healthcare system--how much and how they improve health. The means used should be socially legitimate, acceptable to patients, and economically efficient. Some key elements and considerations in the performance of a healthcare system include patient care, population care, patient access to the system, outcomes, patient satisfaction, and the nature of the patient-practitioner encounter. Not knowing how to assess technical care, patients judge quality mainly by the attributes of the interpersonal relationship with practitioners--personal interest, empathy, responsiveness, and trust--and by whether the outcomes of care meet their expectations. Some requirements for maintaining and enhancing quality include values, human and material resources, knowledge, system design, and performance monitoring. Without a commitment to quality, healthcare practitioners betray not only those who trust them, but also themselves. PMID:10290847

  5. Board Governance: Transformational Approaches Under Healthcare Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastocki, Deborah K

    2015-01-01

    Previous successes of healthcare organizations and effective governance practices in the pre-reform environment are not predictive of future success. Healthcare has been through numerous phases of growth and development using tried-and-true strategies. The challenge is that our toolbox does not contain what is needed to build the future healthcare delivery systems required in the post-reform world. Healthcare has had a parochial focus at the local level, with some broadening of horizons at the state and national levels. But healthcare delivery is now a global issue that requires a totally different perspective, and many countries are confronting similar issues. US healthcare reform initiatives have far-reaching implications. Compounding the reform dynamics are the simultaneously occurring, gamechanging accelerants such as enabling information technologies and mobile health, new providers of healthcare, increased consumer demands, and limited healthcare dollars, to name a few. Operating in this turbulent environment requires transformational board, executive, and physician leadership because traditional ways of planning for incremental change and attempting to time those adjustments can prove disastrous. Creating the legacy healthcare system for tomorrow requires governing boards and executive leadership to act today as they would in the desired future system. Boards need to create a culture that fosters.innovation with a tolerance for risk and some failure. To provide effective governance, boards must essentially develop new skills, expertise, and ways of thinking. The rapid rate of change requires board members to possess certain capabilities, including the ability to deal with ambiguity and uncertainty while demonstrating flexibility and adaptability, all with a driving commitment to metrics and results. This requires development plans for both individual members and the overall board. In short, the board needs to function differently, particularly regarding the

  6. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareli M Claassens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. METHODS: One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. RESULTS: The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02 as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08. In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08. CONCLUSION: The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB.

  7. Pervasive Healthcare as a Scientific Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2008-01-01

    . Methods: The paper presents the research questions, approach, technologies, and methods of pervasive healthcare and discusses these in comparison to those of other related scientific disciplines. Results: A set of central research themes are presented; monitoring and body sensor networks; pervasive......-aware technologies for hospitals. Both projects approach the healthcare challenges in a new way, apply a new type of research method, and come up with new kinds of technological solutions. ‘Clinical proof-of-concept’ is recommended as a new method for pervasive healthcare research; the method helps design and test......, designs new types of technologies, and applies a new kind of research method. Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  8. Healthcare economics for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Douglas A; Krubert, Christopher; Sasson, Andres

    2003-01-01

    Although the principles of healthcare economics are not usually part of the fundamental education of emergency physicians, an understanding of these elements will enhance our ability to contribute to improved health-care value. This article introduces the practical aspects of microeconomics, insurance, the supply-and-demand relationship, competition, and costs as they affect the practice of medicine on a daily basis. Being cognizant of how these elements create a dynamic interplay in the health-care industry will allow physicians to better understand the expanded role they need to assume in the ongoing cost and quality debate. PMID:12563583

  9. Innovation in healthcare: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberg, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Innovation is a frequently used buzzword in healthcare. This article will clarify innovation as a process requiring leadership, among other factors, in order to occur. The concept of innovation will be defined, as well as the precedents and consequences. This exploration will serve as the definition of healthcare innovation and provide a clearer definition for future literature and research in healthcare, especially related to leadership and change. It is the purpose for this article to allow the reader to think about innovation in a critical manner and begin to add substantive meaning related to it. PMID:19546742

  10. Wearable device implications in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmier, Casey; Hatcher, Jason; Lee, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This manuscript analyses the impact of wearable device technology in the healthcare industry. The authors provide an exploration of the different types of wearable technology that are becoming popular or are emerging into the consumer market and the personal health information and other user data these devices collect. The applications of wearable technology to healthcare and wellness are discussed, along with the impact of these devices on the industry. Finally, an analysis is provided, describing the current regulations in the US and UK that govern wearable devices and the impact of these device regulations on users and healthcare professionals. PMID:27010250

  11. Technology and the future of healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Thimbleby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare changes dramatically because of technological developments, from anesthetics and antibiotics to magnetic resonance imaging scanners and radiotherapy. Future technological innovation is going to keep transforming healthcare, yet while technologies (new drugs and treatments, new devices, new social media support for healthcare, etc will drive innovation, human factors will remain one of the stable limitations of breakthroughs. No predictions can satisfy everybody; instead, this article explores fragments of the future to see how to think more clearly about how to get where we want to go.

  12. Data warehousing as a healthcare business solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheese, R

    1998-02-01

    Because of the trend toward consolidation in the healthcare field, many organizations have massive amounts of data stored in various information systems organizationwide, but access to the data by end users may be difficult. Healthcare organizations are being pressured to provide managers easy access to the data needed for critical decision making. One solution many organizations are turning to is implementing decision-support data warehouses. A data warehouse instantly delivers information directly to end users, freeing healthcare information systems staff for strategic operations. If designed appropriately, data warehouses can be a cost-effective tool for business analysis and decision support. PMID:10176450

  13. E-Healthcare Supported by Big Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqi Liu; Jiafu Wan; Shenghua He; Yanlin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The era of open information in healthcare has arrived. E-healthcare supported by big data supports the move toward greater trans-parency in healthcare by making decades of stored health data searchable and usable. This paper gives an overview the e-health-care architecture. We discuss the four layers of the architecture-data collection, data transport, data storage, and data analysis-as well as the challenges of data security, data privacy, real-time delivery, and open standard interface. We discuss the necessity of establishing an impeccably secure access mechanism and of enacting strong laws to protect patient privacy.

  14. Championship management for healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    2000-01-01

    Stakeholders will put increasing pressure on integrated health systems (IHS) for measured performance, demanding data on quality and patient satisfaction, while simultaneously pressing for lower cost. The changes to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission) and the growing importance of the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) are simply forerunners of an intensifying trend. Quality of care in particular will face increasing scrutiny. Achieving competitive targets in these areas will also require measures addressing demand and worker satisfaction. "Balanced scorecard" approaches will allow IHS and their accountable work groups to track performance on several dimensions and establish integrated goals or targets. Those with consistently good scores will be labeled "champions." Champions will support the multidimensional measures with improved decision processes. About eight major processes will be central--governance/strategic management, clinical quality, clinical organization, financial planning, planning and marketing, information services, human resources, and plant services. It is possible to map these processes to the criteria of the Joint Commission, NCQA, and Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. The processes themselves can be measured and common weaknesses identified and corrected. Champions share some common characteristics that seem to arise from the combination of processes and measures. Among these characteristics are service line orientation, extensive partnering with other organizations, and the possibility of outsourcing organizational components. PMID:11066948

  15. The healthcare system and provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 4: Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaskinos, P; Koletsi-Kounari, H; Economou, C; Eaton, K A; Widström, E

    2016-03-11

    This paper presents a description of the healthcare system and how oral healthcare is organised and provided in Greece, a country in a deep economic and social crisis. The national health system is underfunded, with severe gaps in staffing levels and the country has a large private healthcare sector. Oral healthcare has been largely provided in the private sector. Most people are struggling to survive and have no money to spend on general and oral healthcare. Unemployment is rising and access to healthcare services is more difficult than ever. Additionally, there has been an overproduction of dentists and no development of team dentistry. This has led to under or unemployment of dentists in Greece and their migration to other European Union member states, such as the United Kingdom, where over 600 Greek dentists are currently working. PMID:26964601

  16. The road to recovery: Egypt's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Donald Robert; Bég, Sama A

    2012-01-01

    As many industrial and third-world countries recover from the severe economic crisis of a global recession, they continue to struggle with its negative effect on their healthcare systems. Healthcare reform has become a leading policy agenda item for most countries. This is especially true for countries in the developing world who are struggling to allocate very limited resources to meet the growing health needs of their residents and the expectations of global health. In the late 1990s, the Egyptian government, in conjunction with the United States Agency for International Development, initiated a Health Sector Reform Program (HSRP) to completely reform the way healthcare was financed, organized and delivered with the intent to extend healthcare coverage to all of its citizens. Although some successes have resulted from the HSRP, Egypt's new government leaders will need to be informed on policies that may more effectively improve the health of the Egyptian population. PMID:21638310

  17. Evaluating CRM Implementation in Healthcare Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Anshari, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, many healthcare organizations are adopting CRM as a strategy, which involves using technology to organize, automate, and coordinate business processes, in managing interactions with their patients. CRM with the Web technology provides healthcare providers the ability to broaden their services beyond usual practices, and thus offers suitable environment using latest technology to achieve superb patient care. This paper discusses and demonstrates how a new approach in CRM based on Web 2.0 will help the healthcare providers improving their customer support, avoiding conflict, and promoting better health to patient. With this new approach patients will benefit from the customized personal service with full information access to perform self managed their own health. It also helps healthcare providers retaining the right customer. A conceptual framework of the new approach will be discussed.

  18. Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us at: https://info.ahrq.gov . Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your ... Go to Online Store Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women Selected Findings From the ...

  19. How can healthcare standards be standardised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    International travel, medical tourism and trade have created a demand for reliable assessment of healthcare provision across borders, and for information which is accessible to patients, insurers and referring institutions. External assessment schemes for healthcare providers may be clustered into three types: statutory regulation and institutional licensing, International Standardization Organisation certification, and voluntary systems such as peer review and healthcare accreditation. Increasing complexity of healthcare provision, pressures for public accountability and expectations of professional self-governance place a burden on the inspectors and the inspected. If only to contain costs of external assessment and to increase access to reliable information for patients and insurers, the three approaches must work together rather than compete. This paper summarises the origins, aims, authority and methods of the three general models, describing current pressures and opportunities for convergence (between systems and across borders) in the UK and in Europe. PMID:26130813

  20. Collaborative technology use by healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa Said; Lau, Francis Y

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the use of collaborative technologies by healthcare teams between 1980 and 2003. Multiple databases were searched with explicit inclusion criteria that yielded 17 conceptual and empirical papers. The discussions of these literatures centered on the individual, team, and technological dimensions of collaborative technology use within healthcare teams. Results show that collaborative healthcare technologies can have positive effects on team work processes at both the individual and group level. The limited number of research studies accentuates the need for additional research in this area. Future research should focus on defining team tasks; determining which type of groupware works for a particular health setting; and exploring the effects of groupware on patient care delivery and the organization. Without research in these areas, it will be difficult to harness the full advantages of using groupware technologies by collaborative healthcare teams. PMID:16180481

  1. Environmental sustainability in European public healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate concerning the influence of leadership on environmental sustainability implementation in European public healthcare organisations. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a viewpoint. It is based on preliminary analysis of European standards dedicated to environmental sustainability and their spread across Europe in public healthcare organisations. Viewpoints concerning leadership are then discussed and asserted. Findings - This paper found a limited implementation of standards such as Green Public Procurement criteria, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme and ISO 14001 in public healthcare. Some clues indicate that the lack of implementation is related to leadership and management commitment. Originality/value - For the first time, this paper investigates relationships between leadership and environmental sustainability in European public healthcare opening further avenues of research on the subject. PMID:26764957

  2. Social Responsibility and Healthcare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    This article examines current trends and prospects in Finnish healthcare literature and discussion. The Finnish healthcare system was long considered to manifest an equal, universal, and solidaristic welfare scheme. However, recent data reveals structural inequalities in access to healthcare that result in health differences among socioeconomic groups. The political will aims at tackling these inequalities, but the ideological trend toward responsibilization of the individual taking place across political spheres elsewhere in Europe creates potential challenges to this goal. The applications of this trend have a theoretical background in the responsibility-sensitive egalitarian-or luck egalitarian-tradition. The theory, which is unfit for real-life policy applications, has explicit appeal in considerations aiming at the responsibilization of the individual within the healthcare sector. It remains to be seen in which direction the Finnish welfare schemes will continue to develop. PMID:27348829

  3. Co-constructing IT and Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tariq; Bansler, Jørgen; Bjørn, Pernille;

    The CITH project (Co-constructing IT and Healthcare) is an ongoing 4-year interdisciplinary research project, which investigates while intervenes in the collaborative practices involved in disease management of chronic heart patients with an ICD (Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator)....

  4. Education for healthcare clinical support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin; Kelly, Shona

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the current situation regarding the provision of education and training for healthcare clinical support workers (HCSWs). In the UK, there has been an increasing reliance on unqualified clinical support staff to provide a significant proportion of the direct patient care in all healthcare settings. HCSWs routinely undertake several nursing activities that were traditionally the responsibility of nursing students or junior staff nurses. There is a need for an urgent review of the training of healthcare support staff. A 'tick box' approach to training, with an emphasis on classroom-based or on-the-job learning, makes it difficult for HCSWs to integrate theory into practice, and supports a transactional approach to caring rather than a relational approach to caregiving. Lessons from the educational experiences of other healthcare groups should be applied to the training of HCSWs. An immersive, participatory teaching and learning strategy is one approach that could be used. PMID:26647705

  5. The Health of Healthcare, Part III: Dissolving (curing) the cancer in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In a previous part of this "The Health of Healthcare" series, the etiology of sickness in our healthcare system was established as cancer. This article offers a method to "cure" healthcare, taken from strategic management thinking called VOSIE. In this article, the use of VOSIE is described as well as who needs to apply this cure: the public. A unifying mantra is suggested: Think and decide. PMID:24772497

  6. Screening for intimate partner violence in healthcare in Kano, Nigeria : Barriers and challenges for healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    John, Ime Akpan

    2010-01-01

    Background Though there has been increased advocacy for screening for Intimate partner violence (IPV) in healthcare over the past decades, data from developed country context suggest that only one in ten healthcare providers routinely screen for this phenomena suggesting barriers. Knowledge on the screening activity, with regard to IPV, and related barriers among healthcare providers in Sub-Saharan Africa is lacking. Aims The aim of this dissertation is to scrutinize ...

  7. Views of healthcare professionals to linkage of routinely collected healthcare data: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Hopf, Y.M.; Bond, C.; Francis, J.; Haughney, J; Helms, P J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the views of healthcare professionals to the linkage of healthcare data and to identify any potential barriers and/or facilitators to participation in a data linkage system. Methods: Published papers describing the views of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to data sharing and linkage were identified by searches of Medline, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. The searches were limited to papers published in the English language from 2001 to 2011. ...

  8. Achieving compliance with healthcare waste management regulations : empirical evidence from small European healthcare units

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Anabela

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare units generate substantial amounts of hazardous or potentially hazardous wastes as by-products of their medical services. The inappropriate management of these wastes poses significant risks to people and the environment. In Portugal, as in other EU countries, the collection, storage, treatment and disposal of healthcare waste is regulated by law. Although legal provisions covering the safe management of healthcare waste date back to the 1990s, little is known about the compliance ...

  9. Integration of mental healthcare into primary healthcare in Lagos, Nigeria: the way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Ayodele O. Coker; Olufemi B. Olugbile; Olufemi Oluwatayo

    2015-01-01

    The Lagos State Ministry of Health recently launched its Mental Health Policy aimed at addressing the mental health needs the residents of the State. The policy also aimed at reducing the mental disorders treatment gap in the state by integrating mental healthcare into the primary healthcare in order to make mental healthcare services closer and accessible for residents of the State. This paper therefore critically reviews the rationale for the integration, magnitude of problems in Lagos Stat...

  10. Innovation for a Sustainable Healthcare: : How can patients improve their own healthcare?

    OpenAIRE

    Gabassi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    As the demographic pictures is changing across the Western world, healthcare costs are growing at unsustainable rates. In order to sustain the healthcare we’re used to in the Western world, new healthcare deliver strategies must be implemented. As the average person grows older, chronic diseases hit more people, requiring costly treatments for a growing part of the population. A successful approach could address the problem of medical adherence, together with increasing awareness among patien...

  11. Health-Care Reform for Childbirth

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2010-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the current health-care crisis and the need for health-care reform to promote, support, and protect natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  12. An analysis of healthcare providers' online ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Black; Lindsay Thompson; Heidi Saliba; Kara Dawson; Nicole Paradise Black

    2009-01-01

    Background Many websites allow consumers to evaluate their healthcare experience yet scant data exist that explore the type and content of reviews. Objective To evaluate and describe online healthcare provider reviews. Methods We analysed 16 703 ratings on 6101 providers from four US cities. Ratings spanned five categories and an overall provider score. We also performed text analyses of narrative commentary (n = 15 952). Results Providers had a high mean score for each category (3.7...

  13. Distributed cognition for evaluating healthcare technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkomar, A.; Blandford, A.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed Cognition (DCog) has been proposed as being a better approach to analyzing healthcare work than traditional cognitive approaches, due to the collaborative nature of healthcare work. This study sought to explore this by applying two DCog frameworks, DiCoT and the Resources Model, to the analysis of infusion pump use in an Intensive Care Unit. Data was gathered through observations and interviews, and then analysed using DiCoT and the Resources Model to construct models representing...

  14. Business resilience: Reframing healthcare risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Cynthia L

    2015-09-01

    The responsibility of risk management in healthcare is fractured, with multiple stakeholders. Most hospitals and healthcare systems do not have a fully integrated risk management system that spans the entire organizational and operational structure for the delivery of key services. This article provides insight toward utilizing a comprehensive Business Resilience program and associated methodology to understand and manage organizational risk leading to organizational effectiveness and operational efficiencies, with the fringe benefit of realizing sustainable operational capability during adverse conditions. PMID:26418138

  15. Improvement, trust, and the healthcare workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Berwick, D

    2003-01-01

    Although major defects in the performance of healthcare systems are well documented, progress toward remedy remains slow. Accelerating improvement will require large shifts in attitudes toward and strategies for developing the healthcare workforce. At present, prevailing strategies rely largely on outmoded theories of control and standardisation of work. More modern, and much more effective, theories of production seek to harness the imagination and participation of the workforce in reinventi...

  16. Determinants of maternal healthcare utilization in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Zimbabwe and other developing countries struggle to achieve millennium development goals originally set for 2015. To assist health policy making, there was an investigation of how demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors determine maternal healthcare services use in Zimbabwe. A logistic model for four different maternal healthcare services using data from the 2005/6 Zimbabwe Demographic Health Survey was estimated. Secondary education increases the odds of use of maternal health servic...

  17. Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dishongh, Terrance J; Kuris, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This unique reference focuses on methods of application, validation and testing based on real deployments of sensor networks in the clinical and home environments. Key topics include healthcare and wireless sensors, sensor network applications, designs of experiments using sensors, data collection and decision making, clinical deployment of wireless sensor networks, contextual awareness medication prompting field trials in homes, social health monitoring, and the future of wireless sensor networks in healthcare.

  18. Evaluating CRM Implementation in Healthcare Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2012-01-01

    Recently, many healthcare organizations are adopting CRM as a strategy, which involves using technology to organize, automate, and coordinate business processes, in managing interactions with their patients. CRM with the Web technology provides healthcare providers the ability to broaden their services beyond usual practices, and thus offers suitable environment using latest technology to achieve superb patient care. This paper discusses and demonstrates how a new approach in CRM based on Web...

  19. Approaches to Workflow Analysis in Healthcare Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehan, Barbara; Bakken, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Attention to workflow is an important component of a comprehensive approach to designing usable information systems. In healthcare, inattention to workflow is associated with poorly accepted systems and unforeseen effects of use. How best to examine workflow for the purpose of system design is in itself the subject of scientific inquiry. Several disciplines offer approaches to the study of workflow that can be tailored to meet the needs of systems designers in healthcare settings. This paper ...

  20. Obesity and Healthcare Avoidance: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Robert D McGuigan; Jenny M Wilkinson

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of health care avoidance and obesity. English language journal articles published between 1990 and 2012 that addressed the review question|“is being overweight or obese an unrecognized factor in healthcare avoidance?” were located using major databases. A modified JADAD scoring system was then used to assess papers. Ten papers were identified which directly addressed the review question. A positive relationship exists between obesity and healthcare avoidance. T...

  1. THE CLOUD- CHANGING THE INDIAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Atiya Parveen; Sobia Habib; Waseem Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is the fastest growing field in Information Technology sector. Cost reduction,flexibility, scalable and sustainable, increased efficiency, reliability, usage defined payment and enhancedmobility are some of the features of cloud computing. The robustness and security of Cloud is increasingsuch that it could now be used in healthcare sector very easily. As in healthcare sector data privacy andsecurity are of high importance. Right information at right time saves lives. But with...

  2. Performance management in healthcare: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewko, Sarah J; Cummings, Greta G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying theoretical assumptions and implications of current micro-level performance management and evaluation (PME) practices, specifically within health-care organizations. PME encompasses all activities that are designed and conducted to align employee outputs with organizational goals. Design/methodology/approach - PME, in the context of healthcare, is analyzed through the lens of critical theory. Specifically, Habermas' theory of communicative action is used to highlight some of the questions that arise in looking critically at PME. To provide a richer definition of key theoretical concepts, the authors conducted a preliminary, exploratory hermeneutic semantic analysis of the key words "performance" and "management" and of the term "performance management". Findings - Analysis reveals that existing micro-level PME systems in health-care organizations have the potential to create a workforce that is compliant, dependent, technically oriented and passive, and to support health-care systems in which inequalities and power imbalances are perpetually reinforced. Practical implications - At a time when the health-care system is under increasing pressure to provide high-quality, affordable services with fewer resources, it may be wise to investigate new sector-specific ways of evaluating and managing performance. Originality/value - In this paper, written for health-care leaders and health human resource specialists, the theoretical assumptions and implications of current PME practices within health-care organizations are explored. It is hoped that readers will be inspired to support innovative PME practices within their organizations that encourage peak performance among health-care professionals. PMID:26764960

  3. Prisoners right to healthcare, a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbing, Henriette Roscam

    2013-03-01

    The right to healthcare applies regardless of a person's legal status. Prisoners have a right to a healthcare equivalent to the one in the community at large: access to medical care and preventive measures of good quality and costs covered. States have a positive duty to provide for appropriate healthcare in prison, including harm reduction policies (for instance health screening, vaccination and needle exchange). Denial of access to appropriate health facilities to prisoners and other detainees is likely to result in bodily harm, unnecessary morbidity and avoidable death. Essential elements of the social right to care for the health of prisoners are protected through the positive obligations individual human rights impose on States (e.g., the right to life, the prohibition of torture, degrading treatment and punishment, the right to liberty and the right to private life). Health related human rights standards for prison healthcare have been formulated over worldwide and in Europe. The Council of Europe's Committee of Prevention of Torture monitors the situation of prisoners in Member States. Still, healthcare for prisoners falls short of what is required. Prison healthcare is an essential part of public health. A major involvement of the Minister of Health is indispensable. PMID:23544314

  4. Lean healthcare from a change management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Lisa; Aij, Kjeld Harald; Simons, Frederique Elisabeth; van der Eng, Niels; Ten Have, Wouter Dirk

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Lean healthcare is used in a growing number of hospitals to increase efficiency and quality of care. However, healthcare organizations encounter problems with the implementation of change initiatives due to an implementation gap: the gap between strategy and execution. From a change management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to increase scientific knowledge regarding factors that diminish the implementation gap and make the transition from the "toolbox lean" toward an actual transformation to lean healthcare. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was executed in an operating theatre of a Dutch University Medical Centre. Transformational leadership was expected to ensure the required top-down commitment, whereas team leadership creates the required active, bottom-up behavior of employees. Furthermore, professional and functional silos and a hierarchical structure were expected to impede the workforce flexibility in adapting organizational elements and optimize the entire process flow. Findings - The correlation and regression analyses showed positive relations between the transformational leadership and team leadership styles and lean healthcare implementation. The results also indicated a strong relation between workforce flexibility and the implementation of lean healthcare. Originality/value - With the use of a recently developed change management model, the Change Competence Model, the authors suggest leadership and workforce flexibility to be part of an organization's change capacity as crucial success factor for a sustainable transformation to lean healthcare. PMID:27119398

  5. Health-Care Technology Assessment in Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Deljou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Health-care service provision and procurement is increasingly subject to policy decisions, managed more than ever before. Becoming more international, collaboration is increasing as the health professions, research and industry all work across borders. Differing health-care systems across the countries result from national and regional policy developments and priorities."nIn health-care, all interventions and procedures are basically technologies-including radiology and sur-gery, and technology assessment is mandatory to meet the national and professional goals in this sec-tor. "nHealth-care technology assessment (HTA is a systematic, broad-ranging evaluation of the implications of using technologies within a particular health-care system. Structured and evidence-based input are its aim for policymaking in order to inform the formulation of safe and effective health policies that are patient-focused and seek to achieve the best value in all health-care sectors, more specifically in the radiology department. The following headlines are the topics in our study:"n•Decisions Related to Health Technologies"n•Appraisal Entities and Corresponding As-sessment Units"n•Assessment, Appraisal and Decision-Making Institutions"n•HTA Agencies and Units in Radiology"n•Model of a Policy Process in Radiology"n•Factors that Influence Radiology Policy-Making"n•HTA Process"n•Different Levels of Health-Care Technolo-gies/Intervention

  6. Customer privacy on UK healthcare websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Darren P

    2006-09-01

    Privacy has been and continues to be one of the key challenges of an age devoted to the accumulation, processing, and mining of electronic information. In particular, privacy of healthcare-related information is seen as a key issue as health organizations move towards the electronic provision of services. The aim of the research detailed in this paper has been to analyse privacy policies on popular UK healthcare-related websites to determine the extent to which consumer privacy is protected. The author has combined approaches (such as approaches focused on usability, policy content, and policy quality) used in studies by other researchers on e-commerce and US healthcare websites to provide a comprehensive analysis of UK healthcare privacy policies. The author identifies a wide range of issues related to the protection of consumer privacy through his research analysis using quantitative results. The main outcomes from the author's research are that only 61% of healthcare-related websites in their sample group posted privacy policies. In addition, most of the posted privacy policies had poor readability standards and included a variety of privacy vulnerability statements. Overall, the author's findings represent significant current issues in relation to healthcare information protection on the Internet. The hope is that raising awareness of these results will drive forward changes in the industry, similar to those experienced with information quality. PMID:16954055

  7. Progress in nanotechnology for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, V; Vittorio, O; Riggio, C; Cuschieri, A

    2010-06-01

    This review based on the Wickham lecture given by AC at the 2009 SMIT meeting in Sinaia outlines the progress made in nano-technology for healthcare. It describes in brief the nature of nano-materials and their unique properties which accounts for the significant research both in scientific institutions and industry for translation into new therapies embodied in the emerging field of nano-medicine. It stresses that the potential of nano-medicine to make significant inroads for more effective therapies both for life-threatening and life-disabling disorders will only be achieved by high-quality life science research. The first generation of passive nano-diagnostics based on nanoparticle contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging is well established in clinical practice and new such contrast agents are undergoing early clinical evaluation. Likewise active (second generation) nano-therapies, exemplified by targeted control drug release systems are undergoing early clinical evaluation. The situation concerning other nano-materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is less advanced although considerable progress has been made on their coating for aqueous dispersion and functionalisation to enable carriage of drugs, genes and fluorescent markers. The main problem related to the clinical use of these nanotubes is that there is no consent among scientists on the fate of such nano-materials following injection or implantation in humans. Provided carbon nanotubes are manufactured to certain medical criteria (length around 1 mum, purity of 97-99% and low Fe content) they exhibit no cytotoxicity on cell cultures and demonstrate full bio-compatibility on in vivo animal studies. The results of recent experimental studies have demonstrated the potential of technologies based on CNTs for low voltage wireless electro-chemotherapy of tumours and for electro-stimulation therapies for cardiac, neurodegenerative and skeletal and visceral muscle

  8. OHMF: A Query Based Optimal Healthcare Medication Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Majhi, Santosh Kumar; Bera, Padmalochan

    2014-01-01

    Today cloud computing infrastructure is largely being deployed in healthcare to access various healthcare services easily over the Internet on an as needed basis. The main advantage of healthcare cloud is that it can be used as a tool for patients, medical professionals and insurance providers, to query and coordinate among medical departments, organizations and other healthcare related hubs. Although healthcare cloud services can enable better medication process with high responsiveness, but...

  9. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Naenna, Thanakorn; Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand...

  10. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. D...

  11. Healthcare practitioners' personal and professional values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-05-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC databases for articles on personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners and students. We extracted values from included papers and synthesized them into a single framework using Schwartz's values model. We summarised the framework within the context of healthcare practice. We identified 128 values from 50 included articles from doctors, nurses and allied health professionals. A new framework for the identified values established the following broad healthcare practitioner values, corresponding to Schwartz values (in parentheses): authority (power); capability (achievement); pleasure (hedonism); intellectual stimulation (stimulation); critical-thinking (self-direction); equality (universalism); altruism (benevolence); morality (tradition); professionalism (conformity); safety (security) and spirituality (spirituality). The most prominent values identified were altruism, equality and capability. This review identified a comprehensive set of personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners. We integrated these into a single framework derived from Schwartz's values model. This framework can be used to assess personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners across professional groups, and can help improve practitioners' awareness of their values so they can negotiate more patient-centred decisions. A common values framework across professional groups can support shared education strategies on values and help improve interprofessional teamwork and decision-making. PMID:26215664

  12. ANALYZING FINANCIAL STRUCTURE OF TURKISH HEALTHCARE SYSTEM IN COMPARISON WITH U.S., GERMAN, BRITISH, FRENCH AND CUBAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Isik, Mustafa; Isik, Fikriye; KIYAK, Mithat

    2015-01-01

    Financial structure of healthcare systems and the share reserved for healthcare expenses are regarded by countries as very important indicators of economic development. Healthcare expenses are, therefore, among most important agenda items for healthcare policy makers. Finance of healthcare services is still a heated debate item in both public and private sector. Negative economic conditions, fiscal deficits and pressures imposed by international credit institutions all lead to mobilization of...

  13. Reporting of errors by healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    The realisation that an error has been committed, and the courage to discuss it openly, opens the way to a constructive process to improve one's professional practices, in interaction with healthcare organisations. Reporting errors to adverse events programmes is influenced by the impact of errors on healthcare professionals and their fears about the outcome and disclosure.The low rate of spontaneous reporting results from the obstacles encountered by healthcare professionals and reflects their attitudes towards their own errors. The way in which individuals make errors and handle adverse events reveals a lot about their personality and how they view themselves as professionals. It is not easy to report errors and it depends on the individuals concerned. Healthcare professionals' "reflexivity" (their ability to reflect on their own actions) is an integral part of their professional skills; it is an essential resource for analysing errors and improving quality of care. Reporting an error to a programme such as Prescrire's Preventing the Preventable is a conscious, professional act. It is both lucid and responsible, and part of a commitment to improving professional practice and skills, at the individual and institutional level. Learning from errors in order to prevent them from happening again supports the development of a quality and safety culture that should be encouraged among healthcare professionals. PMID:21180385

  14. An overview in healthcare information systems security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourka, A; Polemi, N; Koutsouris, D

    2001-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to present the current needs and trends in the field of healthcare systems security. The approach applied within the described review was based on three major steps. The first step was to define the point and ways of penetration and integration of security services in current healthcare related applications addressing technical, organisational and legal/regulatory issues. The second step was to specify and evaluate common security technologies applied in healthcare information systems pointing out gaps and efficient solutions, whereas the third was to draw conclusions for the present conditions and identify the future trends of healthcare information security. A number of EU RTD Projects were selected, categorised, analysed and comparatively evaluated in terms of security. The technical focus was on key security technologies, like Public Key Infrastructures (PKIs) based on Trusted Third Parties (TTPs) in conjunction with other state-of-the-art security components (programming tools, data representation formats, security standards and protocols, security policies and risk assessment techniques). The experience gained within this review will provide valuable input for future security applications in the healthcare sector, solving existing problems and addressing real user needs. PMID:11604927

  15. The challenge of changing healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F

    1996-01-01

    Healthcare systems are in flux throughout the world. Traditional structures and attitudes are changing. The balance of power between political bodies, payers, providers and patients is being destabilised. New approaches by governments and forward integration by drug companies and payers into care management are all major changes from the past. In the future, healthcare providers, particularly hospitals, will have to complement medical with business skills to survive in a more competitive environment. Experience shows that there is major potential for improvement in terms of radical rethinking of how care is provided (e.g. at least a 30% reduction in hospital days per insured life together with quality-of-care improvements). In particular, the economic value of changes in treatment (e.g. ambulatory surgery, switch to home therapy) should be understood and optimised. In a new world scenario, payers and providers will shape the healthcare environment by introducing novel approaches and integrating healthcare delivery. This process, coupled with the introduction of new approaches to competition and risk sharing by the government, could cause the emergency of high performance and more cost-effective healthcare systems. PMID:8869840

  16. A wireless trust model for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Misra, Santosh K

    2004-01-01

    In today's context of escalating costs, managed care, regulations such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and a technology savvy patient, the healthcare industry can no longer be complacent regarding embracing technologies to enable better, more effective and efficient practice management. In such an environment, many healthcare organisations are turning to m-commerce or wireless solutions. These solutions, in particular the mobile electronic patient record, have many advantages over their wired counterparts, including significant cost advantages, higher levels of physician acceptance, more functionalities as well as enabling easy accessibility to healthcare in remote geographic regions, however, they also bring with them challenges of their own. One such major challenge is security. To date, few models exist that help establish an appropriate framework, in the context of wireless in healthcare, in which to understand and evaluate all the security issues let alone facilitate the development of systematic and robust solutions. Our paper addresses this need by outlining an appropriate mobile trust model for such a scenario in healthcare organisations. PMID:18048204

  17. Integrating anatomical pathology to the healthcare enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel-Le Bozec, Christel; Henin, Dominique; Fabiani, Bettina; Bourquard, Karima; Ouagne, David; Degoulet, Patrice; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    For medical decisions, healthcare professionals need that all required information is both correct and easily available. We address the issue of integrating anatomical pathology department to the healthcare enterprise. The pathology workflow from order to report, including specimen process and image acquisition was modeled. Corresponding integration profiles were addressed by expansion of the IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) initiative. Implementation using respectively DICOM Structured Report (SR) and DICOM Slide-Coordinate Microscopy (SM) was tested. The two main integration profiles--pathology general workflow and pathology image workflow--rely on 13 transactions based on HL7 or DICOM standard. We propose a model of the case in anatomical pathology and of other information entities (orders, image folders and reports) and real-world objects (specimen, tissue samples, slides, etc). Cases representation in XML schemas, based on DICOM specification, allows producing DICOM image files and reports to be stored into a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System. PMID:17108550

  18. Needs Elicitation for Novel Pervasive Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Forchhammer, B. H.; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    inform designers about patients’ support needs and healthcare providers’ information needs.H ealthcare professionals offer a wealth of knowledge based on a clinical understanding of the condition as well as experience listening to patients' problems. Especially where patients are in denial about their......, and they are able to comment on trends, scale or proportions .We therefore explore how users' needs can be elicited by observing activities in which information is already being shared and discussed in the care process, and from the extensive knowledge of healthcare professionals. This is particularly...... include the large number of users required to represent the entire population. Failure to do so may lead to a solution that is over specialised to fit the needs of only a small subset of users. Both challenges are common in healthcare applications in which the end-user is also care recipient (or patient...

  19. Monitoring mental healthcare on a system level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramesfeld, Anke; Amaddeo, Francesco; Caldas-de-Almeida, José; Cardoso, Graça; Depaigne-Loth, Anne; Derenne, Rose; Donisi, Valeria; Jørgensen, Mette; Lindelius, Birgitta; Lora, Antonio; Mainz, Jan; Mulder, Cornelis Lambert; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Killaspy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Routinely collected data can be used to monitor the performance and improve the quality of mental healthcare systems. Data-based and system-level Quality Monitoring Programmes in Mental Health Care (QMP-MHC) are increasingly being implemented in EU countries. They are believed to be...... indispensable for the sustainable improvement of the quality of mental healthcare. However, there is a paucity of comparative research on national strategies in quality monitoring. This study explores the status of system-level Quality Monitoring Programmes in Mental Health Care (QMP-MHC) in EU countries. It...... were all members of a Europe-wide network of researchers and members of public institutions involved in quality assessment and performance monitoring of mental healthcare. RESULTS: Country profiles were gathered from England, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Sweden. All...

  20. Stretchable inorganic nanomembrane electronics for healthcare devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Son, Donghee; Kim, Jaemin

    2015-05-01

    Flexible or stretchable electronic devices for healthcare technologies have attracted much attention in terms of usefulness to assist doctors in their operating rooms and to monitor patients' physical conditions for a long period of time. Each device to monitor the patients' physiological signals real-time, such as strain, pressure, temperature, and humidity, etc. has been reported recently. However, their limitations are found in acquisition of various physiological signals simultaneously because all the functions are not assembled in one skin-like electronic system. Here, we describe a skin-like, multi-functional healthcare system, which includes single crystalline silicon nanomembrane based sensors, nanoparticle-integrated non-volatile memory modules, electro-resistive thermal actuators, and drug delivery. Smart prosthetics coupled with therapeutic electronic system would provide new approaches to personalized healthcare.

  1. Improving preparation for senior management in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, John R

    2007-01-01

    Noting the historical and practical relationship of management education in healthcare to business generally, this paper reviews and analyzes four recent criticisms of management education by Pfeffer and Fong, Ghoshal, Mintzberg, and Bennis. It concludes from that analysis that increased effort on assessing and improving healthcare education efforts is essential, and proposes a model for a national program of continuous improvement of educational practice. It reviews existing competency assessment tools in the light of needs, and suggests next steps for educators and practitioners. PMID:17847864

  2. Structuring a sound securitization of healthcare receivables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradling, Mark

    2003-02-01

    Securitization of receivables allows healthcare providers to obtain an additional funding source by selling their accounts receivables to investors. A double-lock-box structure allows providers to securitize Medicare and Medicaid receivables without violating federal laws. A 2001 revision to the Uniform Commercial Code facilitates providers' securitization of private healthcare insurance receivables by underscoring rights of a purchaser of those receivables. HIPAA privacy standards appear to permit the use and disclosure of protected health information in crafting a securitization program. The securitization should be structured to shield the value of the receivables to be transferred from the potential backruptcies of the originator and the purchaser. PMID:12602313

  3. The Rise of a European Healthcare Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare has only slowly appeared on the European Union’s (EU) policy agenda. EU involvement in policies concerning the organization, financing and the provision of diagnosis, care and cures to ill people developed along three fragmented tracks: (a) EU public health policies concerning the well......-being of all people; (b) the application of the free movement principle to national healthcare systems in particular by the EU’s Court of Justice (CJEU); and (c) the austerity packages and the stricter EU surveillance of national budgets since the debt crises. The key questions of this special issue are...

  4. Handbook of medical and healthcare technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2013-01-01

    This book equips readers to understand a complex range of healthcare products that are used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases or medical conditions affecting humans. The first part of the book presents medical technologies such as medical information retrieval, tissue engineering techniques, 3D medical imaging, nanotechnology innovations in medicine, medical wireless sensor networks, and knowledge mining techniques in medicine. The second half of the book focuses on healthcare technologies including prediction hospital readmission risk, modeling e-health framework, personal Web in healt

  5. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    In spite of a growing recognition of the importance of doctor-patient communication, the issue of language barriers to healthcare has received very little attention in India. The Indian population speaks over 22 major languages with English used as the lingua franca for biomedicine. Large-scale internal migration has meant that health workers are encountering increasing instances of language discordance within clinical settings. Research done predominantly in the West has shown language discordance to significantly affect access to care, cause problems of comprehension and adherence, and decrease the satisfaction and quality of care. Addressing language barriers to healthcare in India requires a stronger political commitment to providing non-discriminatory health services, especially to vulnerable groups such as illiterate migrant workers. Research will have to address three broad areas: the ways in which language barriers affect health and healthcare, the efficacy of interventions to overcome language barriers, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. There is a need to address such barriers in health worker education and clinical practice. Proven strategies such as hiring multilingual healthcare workers, providing language training to health providers, employing in situ translators or using telephone interpretation services will have to be evaluated for their appropriateness to the Indian context. Internet-based initiatives, the proliferation of mobile phones and recent advances in machine translation promise to contribute to the solution. PMID:24758452

  6. Open Business Model Innovation in Healthcare Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Rasmussen, Ole Horn; Poulsen, Helle;

    2012-01-01

    Chesbrough’s work on OBMI but also Michael Porters work on healthcare sector (Porter 2010) and shared values (Porter 2011). The study includes four European Hospitals (University Hospital Oslo, HSDJ Barcelona, University Hospital Aarhus and University Hospital Aalborg). Data is supplemented with experience...

  7. Turkish healthcare professionals' views on palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Gulay; Kav, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The concept of modern palliative care has been disseminating slowly in Turkey and has recently been included in the National Cancer Control Program. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' knowledge and views of palliative care. It was conducted at three hospitals with a sample of 369 healthcare professionals working in adult clinics. Data were collected via open-ended questions and 16 statements from healthcare professionals on their views of palliative care. Most respondents stated that there was a lack of in-service/continuing education in palliative care, and more than half said they had not received any education in palliative care. A majority stated that the meaning and goal of palliative care is "improving the quality of life of a patient who is in the terminal stage." Lack of awareness of palliative care and a lack of educational resources in that field are the most frequently reported barriers to the development of palliative care in Turkey. Palliative care should be included in curricula for healthcare professionals and in-service education programs should be established. PMID:23413762

  8. Markets and Public Values in Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Zuiderent-Jerak (Teun); K.J. Grit (Kor); T.E.D. van der Grinten (Tom)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Discussions on the role of markets in healthcare easily lead to political and unfruitful polarized positions. Actors arguing in favour of markets as a solution for the quality/cost conundrum entrench themselves against others pointing out the risk of markets for the delivery a

  9. Intelligent Healthcare Service Using Health Lifelog Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junho; Choi, Chang; Ko, Hoon; Kim, Pankoo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there have been many studies of health services combined with smart devices, gathering a user' health lifelog and managing his or her health for the improvement of the quality of his or her life, using various sensors. However, previous works have problems in the extraction of patterns in person's complex health lifelog, the analysis of complex relations among those patterns, the extension of them to related services, and reuse of lifelog patterns. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. The healthcare lifelogs should search efficiently data necessary for users from big data because those gather real-time data of various types of data. In this paper, we propose the intelligent healthcare service for reasoning personal health state with data extraction, pattern analysis, health life ontology modeling using health lifelog analysis based on smart devices. The proposed health information service provided more and more appropriate service with users if more reasoning rules related to more and various healthcare lifelog information gathering are included in the service. PMID:27352004

  10. The myths of benchmarking healthcare IT spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, John

    2006-10-01

    Healthcare organizations should make those IT investments that they believe can be managed to achieve an acceptable return. They should make investment decisions based on the merits of the IT proposal, not because they have to catch up to another industry, such as banking. PMID:17040031

  11. Ethics of mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, E; Jansen, A; Lopalco, P L; Giesecke, J

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at increased risk of contracting infections at work and further transmitting them to colleagues and patients. Immune HCWs would be protected themselves and act as a barrier against the spread of infections and maintain healthcare delivery during outbreaks, but vaccine uptake rates in HCWs have often been low. In order to achieve adequate immunisation rates in HCWs, mandatory vaccination policies are occasionally implemented by healthcare authorities, but such policies have raised considerable controversy. Here we review the background of this debate, analyse arguments for and against mandatory vaccination policies, and consider the principles and virtues of clinical, professional, institutional and public health ethics. We conclude that there is a moral imperative for HCWs to be immune and for healthcare institutions to ensure HCW vaccination, in particular for those working in settings with high-risk groups of patients. If voluntary uptake of vaccination by HCWs is not optimal, patients’ welfare, public health and also the HCW’s own health interests should outweigh concerns about individual autonomy: fair mandatory vaccination policies for HCWs might be acceptable. Differences in diseases, patient and HCW groups at risk and available vaccines should be taken into consideration when adopting the optimal policy. PMID:24229791

  12. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level. PMID:21414703

  13. Global implications of China's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Tang, Shenglan; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing healthcare reform in China has a powerful spillover effect beyond the health sector and the borders of China. A successful completion of the Chinese reform will offer a new model for social justice development, shift the global economy toward sustainability and create a new hub for science and technology in medical and health science. However, reforming the healthcare system in the most populated country is a daunting task. China will not live up to its promise, and all the potentials may end with hype not hope if coherent national strategies are not constructed and state-of-the-art navigation is not achieved with staggering domestic and global challenges. The cost of failure will be immensely high, socioeconomic costs for Chinese and an opportunity cost for the world as a whole. A full appreciation of the global implications of China's healthcare reform is crucial in keeping China receptive toward good practices evidence-approved elsewhere and open minded to fulfill its international obligations. More critically, the appreciation yields constructive engagements from global community toward a joint development and global prosperity. The current report provides a multiple disciplinary assessment on the global implications of the healthcare reform in China. PMID:24890392

  14. Middleware for Pervasive Healthcare - A White Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2001-01-01

    This white paper describes work-in-progress at the Center for Pervasive Computing (CfPC) at University of Aarhus. We describe our pervasive healthcare project, which is a collaboration between hospitals in the county of Aarhus, a Danish software company developing an electronic patient record...

  15. Identity and moral responsibility of healthcare organizations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, M.A.M.; Gordijn, B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the moral responsibility of a Healthcare Organization (HCO) is conceived as an inextricable aspect of the identity of the HCO. We attempt to show that by exploring this relation a more profound insight in moral responsibility can be gained. Referring to Charles Taylor we explore the me

  16. Virtue Ethics and Rural Professional Healthcare Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowden, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Because rural populations are at risk not only for clinically disparate care but also ethically disparate care, there is a need to enhance scholarship, research, and teaching about rural health care ethics. In this paper an argument for the applicability of a virtue ethics framework for professionals in rural healthcare is outlined. The argument…

  17. TRUSTED CLOUD COMPUTING FRAMEWORK FOR HEALTHCARE SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Adib Bamiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is rapidly evolving due to its efficient characteristics such as cost-effectiveness, availability and elasticity. Healthcare organizations and consumers lose control when they outsource their sensitive data and computing resources to a third party Cloud Service Provider (CSP, which may raise security and privacy concerns related to data loss and misuse appealing threats. Lack of consumers’ knowledge about their data storage location may lead to violating rules and regulations of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA that can cost them huge penalty. Fear of data breach by internal or external hackers may decrease consumers’ trust in adopting cloud computing and benefiting from its promising features. We designed a Healthcare Trusted Cloud Computing (HTCC framework that maintains security, privacy and considers HIPAA regulations. HTCC framework deploys Trusted Computing Group (TCG technologies such as Trusted Platform Module (TPM, Trusted Software Stack (TSS, virtual Trusted Platform Module (vTPM, Trusted Network Connect (TNC and Self Encrypting Drives (SEDs. We emphasize on using strong multi-factor authentication access control mechanisms and strict security controls, as well as encryption for data at storage, in-transit and while process. We contributed in customizing a cloud Service Level Agreement (SLA by considering healthcare requirements. HTCC was evaluated by comparing with previous researchers’ work and conducting survey from experts. Results were satisfactory and showed acceptance of the framework. We aim that our proposed framework will assist in optimizing trust on cloud computing to be adopted in healthcare sector.

  18. Can healthcare go from good to great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Todd H; Wachter, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare's improvement efforts have focused on the point of care, targeting specific processes such as preventing central line infections, while paying relatively less attention to the larger issues of organizational structure and leadership. Interestingly, the business community has long recognized that poor management and structure can thwart improvement efforts. Perhaps the corporate world's best-known study of these issues is found in the book Good to Great, which identifies top-performing corporations, compares them to carefully selected organizations that failed to achieve similar levels of performance, and gleans lessons from these analyses. In this article, we analyze the feasibility of carefully applying Good to Great's methods for analyzing organizational structure and leadership to healthcare. While a few studies in healthcare have come close to emulating Good to Great's methodology, none have matched its rigor. These shortcomings highlight key information and measurement gaps that must be addressed to facilitate unbiased, rigorous studies of the organizational and leadership predictors of institutional excellence in healthcare. PMID:21997854

  19. Patients and Loved Ones: Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Prevent MRSA Infections? To prevent MRSA infections, doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers: Clean their hands with ... of patients can help make sure that all doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers clean their hands with ...

  20. A global review of the expansion of multinational healthcare companies

    OpenAIRE

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2007-01-01

    There are some common patterns of expansion among healthcare multinational companies throughout the world. Many are diversifying away from just delivering healthcare to providing health insurance and other financial infrastructure.

  1. Classification of Healthcare-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Søgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether different definitions of healthcare-associated infection influenced the prevalence, characteristics, and mortality of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. With different definitions, the proportion of patients classified as having healthcare-associated S. aureus...

  2. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial...

  3. 75 FR 22816 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices...), regarding the practice of hospital infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance,...

  4. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending a ...

  5. Race and healthcare disparities: overcoming vulnerablity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John

    2002-01-01

    The paper summarizes recently published data and recommendations about healthcare disparities experienced by African Americans who have Medicare or other healthcare coverage. Against this background the paper addresses the ethics of such disparities and how disadvantages of vulnerable populations like African Americans are typically maintained in decision making about how to respond to such disparities. Considering how to respond to disparities reveals much that vulnerable populations would bring to the policy-making table, if they can also be heard when they get there. The paper argues that vulnerable populations like African Americans need fair representation in bodies deciding what to do about such disparities and that fairness requires proportional representation at all levels of decisions that affect healthcare--a radical change. In this decision setting, how to provide adequate protection of minorities needs much further attention. The most attractive decision-making model is deliberative democracy. The paper shows that in deliberation, fair representation requires not only having a voice in decisions, but a fair hearing of those voices. Achieving a fair hearing requires changes in norms of communication and training of all to give importance to greetings and other measures of civility and trust building, and to be open to diverse forms of expression. Decisions about how to respond to healthcare disparities would include what programs to initiate for whom, how to evaluate the programs, and what to do in response to such evaluations. Conclusions are that achieving such goals will take a sea change in how healthcare institutions and providers do their business, and that social activism at every level will be needed to effect these changes. The discussion highlights many ethical issues that need much greater attention. PMID:12546167

  6. Priority-setting in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, P; Häkkinen, U

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics which affect priority setting in the Finnish healthcare system include strong municipal (local) administration, no clear separation between producers and purchasers, a duality in funding, and the potential for physicians in public hospitals to practice in the private sector. This system has its strengths, such as the possibility to effectively co-ordinate social and healthcare services, and a strong incentive to take care of local needs, because of municipal responsibility to finance these services largely through local taxes. However, the municipalities are typically too small to take advantage of these potentials, their knowledge is scarce especially of secondary care and their negotiating power with respect to hospitals is low. Local politicians also have a dual role: they represent the needs of the local population but simultaneously they are decision-makers in hospitals. Full-time physicians are allowed to act in a dual role as well; they can run a private practice, which is paid for on a fee-for-service basis, while the hospital pays (mostly) a fixed monthly salary. The share of financing which flows from the National Sickness Insurance system to healthcare users may have adverse effects on the local use of resources. The broad national consensus statement on patient-level priorities did not reach any general rules on priorities. Strong support was given to citizens' equal right to access all healthcare services. In healthcare practice, this general rule has some exemptions. First, the reimbursement schemes for prescribed drugs vary depending on the severity and chronic nature of the disease. Secondly, the tax-financed dental services for the young are clearly prioritised over those of older citizens. In the consensus statement, emphasis was put on improving the efficiency of producing health services in order to avoid having to impose patient-level priorities. PMID:10827305

  7. Philips Healthcare: The purchasing process and decision-making choice criteria in public healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Liedes, Eevaleena; Liimatainen, Lotta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study purchasing processes and decision-making choice criteria in public healthcare, especially in central hospitals and municipal health centres. This thesis is made as an assignment from Philips Healthcare, which is a manufacturer and a supplier of the patient monitors studied in this thesis. The aim of this study is to ascertain how these patient monitors are bought and which criteria affect the purchasing decision. This thesis consists of theoretical ...

  8. Health-care quality promotion through infection prevention: beyond 2000.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerberding, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Health-care value purchasing, complex health-care systems, and information technology are the three most important change drivers influencing the interrelated themes of the 4th decennial conference: accountability, quality promotion through infection prevention across the health-care delivery system, and medical informatics. Among the change drivers influencing themes of future conferences may be a societal mandate for health promotion and health-care access for all.

  9. The Bearers of Information in Healthcare and their Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ileana G. R?ducanu;

    2010-01-01

    The need of correct and in short time information to do management and marketing decisions it is a priority and a necessity in any area of human activity today. In healthcare area the information is necessary not only to strategic decision but provide healthcare service too. The information in healthcare system is generated at local level inside healthcare organizations but it is usually inaccessible to marketers. For this reason, the identification of bearers of information, increased capaci...

  10. Factors associated with healthcare avoidance among transgender women in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Socías, María Eugenia; Marshall, Brandon DL; Arístegui, Inés; Romero, Marcela; Cahn, Pedro; Kerr, Thomas; Sued, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Transgender (TG) women in many settings continue to contend with barriers to healthcare, including experiences of stigma and discrimination. Argentina has a universal health care system and laws designed to promote healthcare access among TG women. However, little is known about barriers to healthcare access among TG women in this setting. The aim of this study was to explore individual, social-structural and environmental factors associated with healthcare avoidance among TG wom...

  11. A healthcare assistant as a member of the nursing team

    OpenAIRE

    DUŠKOVÁ, Jitka

    2011-01-01

    The Bachelor thesis deals with the profession of a healthcare assistant and acceptance of a relatively new healthcare staff category to a nursing team. The field of study of healthcare assistant has substituted the previous field of General Nurse at secondary medical schools within the changes of the nurse education conception. This change has shifted the field of general nurse to the tertiary level. The profession of a healthcare assistant should not be a marginalized part of a nursing team....

  12. Big data architecture for pervasive healthcare: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Chekfoung; Sun, Lily; Liu, Kecheng

    2015-01-01

    Pervasive healthcare aims to deliver deinstitutionalised healthcare services to patients anytime and anywhere. Pervasive healthcare involves remote data collection through mobile devices and sensor network which the data is usually in large volume, varied formats and high frequency. The nature of big data such as volume, variety, velocity and veracity, together with its analytical capabilities com-plements the delivery of pervasive healthcare. However, there is limited research in intertwinin...

  13. Healthcare providers' perceptions of diversity and cultural competence

    OpenAIRE

    Olt, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Swedish society is ethnically diverse and since the early 1960s immigrants have made significant contributions to the labour market in healthcare. Today many Swedes, including first- and second-generation immigrants, work together in a healthcare setting that serves an increasingly diverse population. Cultural competence is required of nurses, healthcare providers and healthcare organisations in order for them to provide quality service to culturally and ethnically diverse...

  14. An Analysis of Knowledge Management Mechanisms in Healthcare Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare portals are becoming increasingly popular with Internet users since they play an important role in supporting interaction between individuals and healthcare organizations with a Web presence. Additionally, many of these organizations make use of knowledge management mechanisms on their healthcare portals to manage the abundance of…

  15. 78 FR 61362 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Five AHRQ Subcommittee Meetings. SUMMARY: The... remainder of the meeting) 4. Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research (HSQR) Date: October...

  16. Attitudes to reporting medication error among differing healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvadikar, Ajit; Prescott, Gordon; Williams, David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims Medication error reporting is an important measure to prevent medication error incidents in a healthcare system and can serve as an important tool for improving patient safety. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) in reporting medication errors. Methods Fifty-six healthcare professionals working at a 900-bed tertiary referral...

  17. Social Media Enabled Interactions in Healthcare : Towards a Typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David

    2015-01-01

    Social media is increasingly used by healthcare users and providers to connect and communicate with each other. Such use is changing the interactions in healthcare and it is not clear what effects this may have for healthcare provision. Although it could be beneficial to both parties, it could also

  18. Review of Semantically Interoperable Electronic Health Records for Ubiquitous Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Chung, Kyo-IL; Chung, Myung-Ae; Choi, Duckjoo

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide more effective and personalized healthcare services to patients and healthcare professionals, intelligent active knowledge management and reasoning systems with semantic interoperability are needed. Technological developments have changed ubiquitous healthcare making it more semantically interoperable and individual patient-based; however, there are also limitations to these methodologies. Based upon an extensive review of international literature, this paper describes two...

  19. Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhvaryu, Achyuta R.; Nyshadham, Anant

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children's allocation of time to school and work.…

  20. The early career progress of baccalaureate healthcare management students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; Cockley, David E; Bopp, Anthony E

    2007-01-01

    Programs in healthcare management are increasingly asked to demonstrate program outcomes by identifying graduates working in the profession of healthcare management. In particular, standards under AUPHA's certification process for undergraduate programs require that programs identify programmatic and educational outcomes. However, little is known about the career track of undergraduate healthcare management graduates. This paper describes management roles and settings for the graduates of a baccalaureate program in healthcare management, and presents salary and career progression information obtained from a recent alumni survey. Findings and implications are important to highlight the success of program graduates, and support the value of undergraduate programs in healthcare management. PMID:18578265

  1. Hacking Health: Bottom-up Innovation for Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeeshan Chowdhury

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare is not sustainable and still functions with outdated technology (e.g., pagers, paper records. Top-down approaches by governments and corporations have failed to deliver digital technologies to modernize healthcare. Disruptive innovation must come from the ground up by bridging the gap between front-line health experts and innovators in the latest web and mobile technology. Hacking Health is a hackathon that is focused on social innovation more than technical innovation. Our approach to improve healthcare is to pair technological innovators with healthcare experts to build realistic, human-centric solutions to front-line healthcare problems.

  2. Integrated Environment for Ubiquitous Healthcare and Mobile IPv6 Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagalaban, Giovanni; Kim, Seoksoo

    The development of Internet technologies based on the IPv6 protocol will allow real-time monitoring of people with health deficiencies and improve the independence of elderly people. This paper proposed a ubiquitous healthcare system for the personalized healthcare services with the support of mobile IPv6 networks. Specifically, this paper discusses the integration of ubiquitous healthcare and wireless networks and its functional requirements. This allow an integrated environment where heterogeneous devices such a mobile devices and body sensors can continuously monitor patient status and communicate remotely with healthcare servers, physicians, and family members to effectively deliver healthcare services.

  3. E-commerce for healthcare supply procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbietman, D; Lirov, E; Lirov, R; Lirov, Y

    2001-01-01

    The total investment of the more than fifty e-commerce startups that entered healthcare supply chain management in the past three years has surpassed $500 million. However, none of these early entrants has delivered on the initial promise of restructuring the entire supply chain, replacing the traditional intermediaries, or at least achieving substantial revenue. This article offers a new business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce solution classification paradigm and uses it to analyze the functional requirements for an effective and, efficient healthcare supply chain marketplace. The analysis exposes several fundamental B2B market complexities that prevent the early entrants from creating a solid customer base and reaching desired liquidity goals. It also identifies several technological solutions to the problems mentioned. These new technologies create a comprehensive and symmetric order-matching engine that is capable of aggregating buy orders, requesting quotes from multiple vendors simultaneously, and negotiating along multiple criteria. PMID:11338910

  4. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  5. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Fred [Directorate of Radiography, School of Health Care Professions, University of Salford, Allerton Building, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  6. Management-By-Objectives in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas

    practice for modern healthcare organizations. During the last decade, vast amounts of quality indicators, accreditation audits, satisfaction surveys etc. have become an integrated part of healthcare professionals' daily work. Most of these measurement structures are well documented and well executed......; collectively, however, they pose a significant drawback. The vast selection of self-contained initiatives limits the overview for decision makers and imposes an escalating administrative burden on operational staff members. Contrary to the initial objective, the expanding informational burden limits the...... maker with a reliable informational foundation. The account has merits in a hectic environment, where the administrative burden consumes important time from the clinical work. The dissertation is composed of five scientific articles, together with a synopsis describing the most vital contributions and...

  7. Healthcare worker competencies for disaster training

    OpenAIRE

    Kelen Gabor D; Whyne Dianne; Bass Eric B; Thomas Tamara L; Hsu Edbert B; Green Gary B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Although training and education have long been accepted as integral to disaster preparedness, many currently taught practices are neither evidence-based nor standardized. The need for effective evidence-based disaster training of healthcare staff at all levels, including the development of standards and guidelines for training in the multi-disciplinary health response to major events, has been designated by the disaster response community as a high priority. We describe th...

  8. Empowering the Impoverished and Reducing Healthcare Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Kimberlie J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Socioeconomic disadvantage is a major risk factor for poor health and a consistent contributor to chronic stress, both of which are disempowering to individuals and communities. Poverty has been linked to a higher prevalence of many health conditions, including increased risk of chronic disease, injury, deprived infant development, anxiety, depression, premature death, and the negative impact of allostatic load associated with chronic stress. With the rising costs of healthcare, t...

  9. E-Learning in Relation to Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmeh Ali AlHuneiti; Ziad Hunaiti; Wamadiva Balachanrdan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of research work to establish an e-learning framework for e-health education for nurses in developing countries, it will help you understand the E-Learning concept in relation to the healthcare sector with regards advantages, barriers and importance integration of E-learning into medical registration. E-learning has proven effectiveness in medical education comparable with conventional learning while wide range of solutions still to be implemented to overcome its barriers ...

  10. Anonymity: An Impediment to Performance in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsberg, Daniel W; Read G. Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching hospitals employ a care team structure composed of a broad range of healthcare providers with different skill sets. Each member of this team has a distinct role and a different level of training ranging from attending physician to resident, intern, and medical student. Often times, these different roles lead to greater complexity and confusion for both patients and nursing staff. It has been demonstrated that patients have a great degree of difficulty in identifying members of t...

  11. Social stratification and the healthcare safety net

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Social inequalities can produce disparities in healthcare access and quality. This dissertation explores relationships between two social stratification processes- community residential segregation and social capital- on the supply of U.S. urban safety net providers. The first paper, "Community residential segregation and the local supply of Federally Qualified Health Centers," used data from the Area Resource File and the U.S. Census to examine growth in FQHCs in urban counties from 2000 to...

  12. Integrating policy and practice in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hostick, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    There are national and local concerns about a policy-practice gap in healthcare services which bring into question the effectiveness of traditional mechanisms for policy implementation. Using clinical governance as a focus, this report describes the rationale, development and evaluation of an alternative approach designed to integrate health policy with practice within a Mental Health and Learning Disability NHS Trust through a programme of social opportunities. A number of methodologic...

  13. Procedural Justice in Public Healthcare Resource Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Tsuchiya; Luis Silva Miguel; Richard Edlin; Allan Wailoo; Paul Dolan

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The legal studies literature on procedural justice identifies six key characteristics of procedural justice: accuracy, consistency, impartiality, reversibility, transparency and voice. However, the relative importance of these in the context of public healthcare resource allocation is unclear, as is whether they are valuable instrumentally (because it contributes to better outcomes) or inherently (for its own sake). Methods: A survey of 80-odd members of the UK public determined...

  14. Healthcare performance data turned into decision support

    OpenAIRE

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper has focused on identifying the determinants having direct impact on levels of employee absence in a healthcare organization seen from a practical viewpoint. Exploiting the acquired knowledge, a management framework is proposed giving hospital managers an overview of the determinant’s respective levels. The data foundation consists of employee satisfaction surveys exclusively, stemming from two Danish public hospitals. The framework comprises of four major clustered factors being 1)...

  15. Factors for successful improvement of Swedish healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    The Swedish OCM, developed by an Integrative Group Process, was found to be a valid model able to distinguish successful from unsuccessful organizations in terms of improvement. A majority of healthcare organizations applied the Internal Collaborative strategy which lacks the patient centered task alignment characterizing those organizations predicted to be successful by their relatively superior Swedish OCM score. Managers tend to overestimate the prospects of organizationa...

  16. Team 9: Healthcare Applications of Data Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Cornell, Paul; Paterson, Jennifer,; Young, Nancy; Chites, Lawton; Wan, Hong; Kang, Keebom

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare in the United States is expensive and inefficient. As a whole, it is at least ten years behind other industries in the application of information technology to processes and practices. Hospital administrators, with a cadre of consultants and vendors in tow, are rushing to catch up, spending billions on IT. Unfortunately, process knowledge is often lacking, and technology interventions fail to achieve their goals. This contributes to the low rate of ...

  17. Becoming business critical: Knowledge for Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey Bryant, Sue; Stewart, David; Goswami, Louise; Grant, Maria J

    2016-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in implementing Knowledge for Healthcare. This editorial reports the central contribution of effective partnerships and the involvement of librarians and knowledge specialists in this work. There are compelling business priorities. Key elements of work-streams on demonstrating impact, workforce development and streamlining are indicated, along with areas of growing importance - knowledge management, embedded roles and health information for the public and patients. Knowledge, and the skills to help people to use it, are business critical. PMID:27503689

  18. Strategy to Support Improvement of Healthcare Quality.

    OpenAIRE

    Ing. Andrea Zejdlova

    2013-01-01

    One of the latest market-based solutions to the rising costs and quality gaps in health care is pay for performance. Pay for performance is the use of financial incentives to promote the delivery of designated standards of care. It is an emerging movement in health insurance (initially in Britain and United States). Providers under this arrangement are rewarded for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services. This is a fundamental change from fee for service payment.Al...

  19. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB

    OpenAIRE

    Arne von Delft; Angela Dramowski; Celso Khosa; Koot Kotze; Philip Lederer; Thato Mosidi; Peters, Jurgens A; Jonathan Smith; Helene-Mari van der Westhuizen; Dalene von Delft; Bart Willems; Matthew Bates; Gill Craig; Markus Maeurer; Marais, Ben J.

    2015-01-01

    Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB), despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false ...

  20. Internet developments and their significance for healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Jim; Early, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent developments in the technology of the Internet, and shows how they may affect the way in which healthcare is provided. Starting with a brief technical history of the Internet, the paper discusses some of the technical developments that have taken place or been proposed in recent years, and speculates on the realities of their adoption within the next five years. The paper also discusses trends in public accessibility to the Internet and the development of Intern...

  1. Modelling Access Control For Healthcare Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Ana; Chadwick, David W; Antunes, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The widening use of Information Systems, which allow the collection, extraction, storage, management and search of information, is increasing the need for information security. After a user is successfully identified and authenticated to a system, he needs to be authorised to access the resources he/she requested. Access control is part of this last process that checks if a user can access those resources. This is particularly important in the healthcare environment where there is the need to...

  2. ADAPTATION OF LEAN METHODOLOGIES FOR HEALTHCARE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hagg, Heather (Woodward); Suskovich, Deanna; Workman-Germann, Jamie; Scachitti, Susan; Hudson, Brian; Swartz, Joseph; Vanni, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Lean and Six Sigma quality concepts and terminology have been applied in the manufacturing arena since the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. It has only been in recent years that healthcare administrators have identified these methods as being adaptable to their organizations so that they may realize organizational improvements for continuing success and delighting customers. Unfortunately, this is not an application that is widely taught in typical Industrial Engineering curriculum and therefore...

  3. Applying Industrial Management Methodologies to Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Gacias Llobera, Amador

    2011-01-01

    The recent delicate economic situation has contributed to the fact that several of the existing industrial management techniques, initially conceived in order to improve manufacturing enterprises’ efficiency, have gained popularity not only within the industrial field, but also in the services sector. In that context, healthcare is facing a complicated situation on account of a reduction of resources and an increase of incoming patients. When applying existing industrial management techniques...

  4. Technology Meets Healthcare: Distance Learning and Telehealth

    OpenAIRE

    White, Lu Ann E.; Krousel-Wood, Marie A.; Mather, Fran

    2001-01-01

    In a time of increasing demands on physician productivity, computer and communication technologies allow health professionals to experiment with many applications that may provide opportunities to meet clinical demands while still participating in educational and research activities. “Telehealth” is a comprehensive term for the support of long distance clinical healthcare, patient and professional health-related education, public health, and health administration. Educational opportunities ar...

  5. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthcare for People with Mental Illness: Why Integrated Patient Centered Healthcare Is Necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Chyrell D; H Flanagan, Elizabeth; Costa, Mark; O'Connell-Bonarrigo, Maria; Tana Le, Thanh; Guy, Kimberly; Antunes, Kimberly; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-06-01

    Understanding barriers and facilitators of healthcare for people with mental illness is essential for healthcare and mental healthcare organizations moving towards patient centered care. This paper presents findings of a measure on barriers and facilitators of healthcare completed by 204 patients being served at a co-located wellness center (primary healthcare clinic) located in an urban mental health center. The top 10 results show important findings for planning healthcare services that are responsive to the needs of people with mental illness. Basic structural issues as a result of poverty are extremely important (transportation, housing, payment) as well as difficulty with public healthcare that often involves long wait-times for appointments and at the doctor's office and hours that might not be convenient. Healthcare services that want to meet the needs of people with mental illness need to address these issues. What facilitates healthcare is not just removing the barriers to receiving healthcare services but instead involves more interpersonal aspects of healthcare such as liking your provider, being able to talk with your provider, feeling your provider cares about you and listens to you. Structural supports such as also being in mental health services, having systems for remembering appointments, and/or having appointment times that are convenient also facilitate seeking healthcare. Facilitating healthcare seeking also seems to involve a sense of agency-looking forward to taking charge of your health and feeling capable of following healthcare provider instructions. Healthcare systems for people with mental illness need to support these facilitators to give care-seekers the support they need. Key points are provided on how organizations and staff can work more effectively in implementing patient centered care. PMID:27104370

  6. The making of a European healthcare union: a federalist perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; van de Bovenkamp, Hester M.; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    EU involvement in healthcare policies is growing, despite the fact that national governments prefer to keep an almost exclusive say in these policies. This article explains how this shift of authority could happen and explores whether it will lead to a European healthcare union. It argues that...... federalism offers the most fruitful way to do so because of its sensitivity to the EU’s institutional settings and to the territorial dimension of politics. The division of competences and national diversity of healthcare systems have been major obstacles for the formation of a healthcare union. However, the...... EU obtained a role in healthcare through the impact of non-healthcare legislation, voluntary co-operation, court rulings, governments’ joint-decision traps, and fiscal stress of member states. The emerging European healthcare union is a system of cooperative federalism without much cost-sharing. The...

  7. Smart Cards Applications in the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Oltean

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Current medical system based on medical records and health books is outdated and no longer meets the new requirements. Essential information security in terms of data privacy, integrity and authenticity, is not assured. Healthcare fraud with medical records is quite easy, because there is no security features to prevent this. Obtaining prescription drugs is slowly, the patient is forced in most cases, to go to the pharmacy staff to get their prescription. Another issue is data portability because each clinic can use a proprietary format of medical records, which is not always standardized. Modern and efficient healthcare system can be achieved by introducing smart cards and related software. Their introduction in addition to the portability and data security, reduce costs for both patient and medical institutions. The result will be increase confidence and patient satisfaction in medical institutions. Developed software package includes software applications which manage medical archive to smartcard, in a secure form and a software module which can be used for e-commerce transactions. All developed software application meets current standards for data security. Implementation of such solutions in practice would significantly reduce current costs in healthcare system.

  8. Process mining in healthcare: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eric; Munoz-Gama, Jorge; Sepúlveda, Marcos; Capurro, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Process Mining focuses on extracting knowledge from data generated and stored in corporate information systems in order to analyze executed processes. In the healthcare domain, process mining has been used in different case studies, with promising results. Accordingly, we have conducted a literature review of the usage of process mining in healthcare. The scope of this review covers 74 papers with associated case studies, all of which were analyzed according to eleven main aspects, including: process and data types; frequently posed questions; process mining techniques, perspectives and tools; methodologies; implementation and analysis strategies; geographical analysis; and medical fields. The most commonly used categories and emerging topics have been identified, as well as future trends, such as enhancing Hospital Information Systems to become process-aware. This review can: (i) provide a useful overview of the current work being undertaken in this field; (ii) help researchers to choose process mining algorithms, techniques, tools, methodologies and approaches for their own applications; and (iii) highlight the use of process mining to improve healthcare processes. PMID:27109932

  9. Dynamic professional boundaries in the healthcare workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Borthwick, Alan M

    2005-11-01

    The healthcare professions have never been static in terms of their own disciplinary boundaries, nor in their role or status in society. Healthcare provision has been defined by changing societal expectations and beliefs, new ways of perceiving health and illness, the introduction of a range of technologies and, more recently, the formal recognition of particular groups through the introduction of education and regulation. It has also been shaped by both inter-professional and profession-state relationships forged over time. A number of factors have converged that place new pressures on workforce boundaries, including an unmet demand for some healthcare services; neo-liberal management philosophies and a greater emphasis on consumer preferences than professional-led services. To date, however, there has been little analysis of the evolution of the workforce as a whole. The discussion of workforce change that has taken place has largely been from the perspective of individual disciplines. Yet the dynamic boundaries of each discipline mean that there is an interrelationship between the components of the workforce that cannot be ignored. The purpose of this paper is to describe four directions in which the existing workforce can change: diversification; specialisation and vertical and horizontal substitution, and to discuss the implications of these changes for the workforce. PMID:16313522

  10. [Healthcare: a growing role in international politics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, M; Rey, J L

    2004-01-01

    Since the end of the cold war the tone of international relations has clearly changed. Whereas relations were once defined strictly in terms of more or less armed confrontation, economic and social issues now play a growing role. Healthcare policies in Africa have long been influenced by the policies of countries sponsoring bilateral and even multilateral foreign aid programs. However the last ten years have witnessed an increasing interaction between international policy and healthcare policy. The two main reasons for this trend involve 1) access to drug treatment and the WTO and 2) the extension and impact of the AIDS epidemic. The problem of access to drug treatment for poor populations (fundamental right) has led to the emergence of an increasingly strong and effective civil society. Because of its social and economic effects as well as its geopolitical and security implications, AIDS has become a major factor in international relations. With regard to both these issues the place and role of the USA is demonstrative of the interaction between healthcare and international relations. PMID:15816131

  11. Obesity and Healthcare Avoidance: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D McGuigan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the issue of health care avoidance and obesity. English language journal articles published between 1990 and 2012 that addressed the review question|“is being overweight or obese an unrecognized factor in healthcare avoidance?” were located using major databases. A modified JADAD scoring system was then used to assess papers. Ten papers were identified which directly addressed the review question. A positive relationship exists between obesity and healthcare avoidance. The major contributory factors were being female, have a diagnosed mental health problem and perceived or actual bias and discrimination by health professionals. The review also highlights the importance of the relationship between healthcare professionals and their patients, and the physical environment in which interactions occur as these may contribute to avoidance behaviors. Concern about obesity is rising and while there has been much discussion about strategies to reduce obesity this review highlights the need for thinking more broadly about the way in which overweight and obese individuals interact with preventative health strategies.

  12. THE CLOUD- CHANGING THE INDIAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiya Parveen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is the fastest growing field in Information Technology sector. Cost reduction,flexibility, scalable and sustainable, increased efficiency, reliability, usage defined payment and enhancedmobility are some of the features of cloud computing. The robustness and security of Cloud is increasingsuch that it could now be used in healthcare sector very easily. As in healthcare sector data privacy andsecurity are of high importance. Right information at right time saves lives. But with the new opportunitiescome few risk too like Data security risks, the risk of loss of data and risk of system unavailability. We seethat the information system of hospitals in India not very well managed, they have somewhat rareinformation. Cloud helps its client with the latest technologies but at a very low price. Client has to pay onlyfor what he uses with minimum resource. The cloud is not about technology, it is the abstraction oftechnology for delivering pure services. This work proposes a solution based on cloud computingimplemented for hospital systems having as a result a better management, high speed for the medical process,and increased quality of the medical services. In this paper we have analyzed the implementation of cloudcomputing in Indian healthcare sector. Cloud computing technology is still new but promises a revolution inthe entire connected areas.

  13. Kumbh Mela 2013: Healthcare for the millions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariappa, M P; Singh, B P; Mahen, A; Bansal, A S

    2015-07-01

    Mass gatherings pose challenges to healthcare systems anywhere in the world. The Kumbh Mela 2013 at Allahabad, India was the largest gathering of humanity in the history of mankind, and posed an exciting challenge to the provision of healthcare services. At the finale of the Mela, it was estimated that about 120 million pilgrims had visited the site. Equitable geospatial distribution of adhoc health care facilities were created on a standardised template with integrated planning of evacuation modalities. Innovative and low cost response measures for disaster mitigation were implemented. Emergency patient management kits were prepared and stocked across the health care facilities for crisis response. Dynamic resource allocation (in terms of manpower and supplies) based on patient volumes was done on a daily basis, in response to feedback. An adhoc mega township created on the banks of a perennial river (Ganga) in the Indian subcontinent for accommodating millions of Hindu pilgrims. Conventional mindset of merely providing limited and static healthcare through adhoc facilities was done away with. Innovative concepts such as riverine ambulances and disaster kits were introduced. Managing the medical aspects of a mass gathering mega event requires allocation of adequate funds, proactive and integrated medical planning and preparedness. PMID:26288497

  14. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Delft, Arne; Dramowski, Angela; Khosa, Celso; Kotze, Koot; Lederer, Philip; Mosidi, Thato; Peters, Jurgens A; Smith, Jonathan; van der Westhuizen, Helene-Mari; von Delft, Dalene; Willems, Bart; Bates, Matthew; Craig, Gill; Maeurer, Markus; Marais, Ben J; Mwaba, Peter; Nunes, Elizabete A; Nyirenda, Thomas; Oliver, Matt; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB), despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof) and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for. PMID:25809771

  15. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne von Delft

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB, despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for.

  16. Healthcare standards based sensory data exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wajahat Ali; Hussain, Maqbool; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Lee, Sungyoung

    2012-01-01

    Interoperability is the among the key functionalities of an intelligent systems. Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems (HHMS) investigates patients activities at home, but lacks critical information exchange with Health Management Information System (HMIS). This information is vital for physicians to take necessary steps for timely and effective healthcare provisioning for patients. Physicians can only monitor and prescribe patients in time, if the data is shared with their HMIS. HMIS can be compliant to different healthcare standards. Therefore, mediation system is required to enable interoperability between HHMS and HMIS such that physicians and patients information can easily be exchanged. We propose Interoperability Mediation System (IMS) that provides interoperability services for exchange of information among HHMS and HMIS. We consider that HMIS are compliant to two heterogeneous EHR standards (HL7 CDA and openEHR). Alzheimer's patient case study is described as a proof of concept. Sensory information gathered at HHMS, is communicated with HMIS compliant to EHR based healthcare standards. Sensors information in XML form is converted by interoperability service to HL7 CDA and openEHR instances and communicated to HMIS afterwards. This allows the physicians registered with HHMS to monitor the patient using their HMIS and provide timely healthcare information. PMID:23366131

  17. IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise): A new approach for the improvement of digital communication in healthcare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel to the introduction of diagnosis related groups (DRGs) for the reimbursement of hospitals, a marked reduction of financial means within the healthcare system is taking place. Healthcare enterprise information systems will play an increasing role to accommodate the new working conditions by developing reliable and efficient workflow solutions. Interfacing the systems currently in use can meet considerable obstacles. By offering high connectivity, IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise), which was initiated by concerted actions of users and vendors, ensures improved health care delivery and, furthermore, assists in acquiring new information systems in the future. IHE is not a standard but makes extensive use of existing international standards, such as HL7 and DICOM. National IHE demonstrations confirmed the power of this approach and presented its mission to large groups of users and vendors. The concept continues to grow and for the first time provides groups of various interests cooperative solutions to the problems encountered in collecting and distributing information. (orig.)

  18. Uncovering middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birken Sarah A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Middle managers have received little attention in extant health services research, yet they may have a key role in healthcare innovation implementation. The gap between evidence of effective care and practice may be attributed in part to poor healthcare innovation implementation. Investigating middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation may reveal an opportunity for improvement. In this paper, we present a theory of middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation to fill the gap in the literature and to stimulate research that empirically examines middle managers' influence on innovation implementation in healthcare organizations. Discussion Extant healthcare innovation implementation research has primarily focused on the roles of physicians and top managers. Largely overlooked is the role of middle managers. We suggest that middle managers influence healthcare innovation implementation by diffusing information, synthesizing information, mediating between strategy and day-to-day activities, and selling innovation implementation. Summary Teamwork designs have become popular in healthcare organizations. Because middle managers oversee these team initiatives, their potential to influence innovation implementation has grown. Future research should investigate middle managers' role in healthcare innovation implementation. Findings may aid top managers in leveraging middle managers' influence to improve the effectiveness of healthcare innovation implementation.

  19. Healthcare worker competencies for disaster training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen Gabor D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although training and education have long been accepted as integral to disaster preparedness, many currently taught practices are neither evidence-based nor standardized. The need for effective evidence-based disaster training of healthcare staff at all levels, including the development of standards and guidelines for training in the multi-disciplinary health response to major events, has been designated by the disaster response community as a high priority. We describe the application of systematic evidence-based consensus building methods to derive educational competencies and objectives in criteria-based preparedness and response relevant to all hospital healthcare workers. Methods The conceptual development of cross-cutting competencies incorporated current evidence through a systematic consensus building process with the following steps: (1 review of peer-reviewed literature on relevant content areas and educational theory; (2 structured review of existing competencies, national level courses and published training objectives; (3 synthesis of new cross-cutting competencies; (4 expert panel review; (5 refinement of new competencies and; (6 development of testable terminal objectives for each competency using similar processes covering requisite knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Results Seven cross-cutting competencies were developed: (1 Recognize a potential critical event and implement initial actions; (2 Apply the principles of critical event management; (3 Demonstrate critical event safety principles; (4 Understand the institutional emergency operations plan; (5 Demonstrate effective critical event communications; (6 Understand the incident command system and your role in it; (7 Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill your role during a critical event. For each of the cross-cutting competencies, comprehensive terminal objectives are described. Conclusion Cross-cutting competencies and objectives

  20. Strategy to Support Improvement of Healthcare Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. Andrea Zejdlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the latest market-based solutions to the rising costs and quality gaps in health care is pay for performance. Pay for performance is the use of financial incentives to promote the delivery of designated standards of care. It is an emerging movement in health insurance (initially in Britain and United States. Providers under this arrangement are rewarded for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services. This is a fundamental change from fee for service payment.Also known as "P4P" or “value-based purchasing,” this payment model rewards physicians, hospitals, medical groups, and other healthcare providers for meeting certain performance measures for quality and efficiency. Disincentives, such as eliminating payments for negative consequences of care (medical errors or increased costs, have also been proposed. In the developed nations, the rapidly aging population and rising health care costs have recently brought P4P to the forefront of health policy discussions. Pilot studies underway in several large healthcare systems have shown modest improvements in specific outcomes and increased efficiency, but no cost savings due to added administrative requirements. Statements by professional medical societies generally support incentive programs to increase the quality of health care, but express concern with the validity of quality indicators, patient and physician autonomy and privacy, and increased administrative burdens. This article serves as an introduction to pay for performance. We discuss the goals and structure of pay for performance plans and their limitations and potential consequences in the health care area.

  1. Value Creation from Public Healthcare IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Svejvig, Per; Andersen, Povl Erik Rostgaard

    2014-01-01

    The obtainment of value from IT is a recurring theme that has diffused into healthcare information systems (HIS). Having completed the implementation of an integrated HIS, the Faroese Health Service (FHS) has started discussions regarding the obtainment of value from its IT investment which is the...... value. During the project, specific key performance indicators (KPIs) were identified and a baseline was established for the stroke process. The outcome is a framework for measuring IS public value as: professional, organizational, patient-perceived and employee-perceived quality as well as learning...

  2. Connecting consumer choice to the healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enthoven, Alain

    2006-01-01

    American healthcare needs to be reformed into competing, efficient, comprehensive care systems. To get there from here, we need a health insurance market in which each person or household has a wide, responsible, informed, individual multiple choice of health care financing and delivery plans. The point of this is competing delivery systems, not just competing carriers. To compete, some carriers will create or contract with selective delivery systems or doctors selected for their quality and cost-effectiveness. Others will already be teamed up with large multispecialty group practices. On the other hand, high deductible plans will not help us get to a reformed delivery system. PMID:17260543

  3. Competition in Healthcare: Good, Bad or Ugly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goddard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of competition in healthcare is much debated. Despite a wealth of international experience in relation to competition, evidence is mixed and contested and the debate about the potential role for competition is often polarised. This paper considers briefly some of the reasons for this, focusing on what is meant by “competition in healthcare” and why it is more valuable to think about the circumstances in which competition is more and less likely to be a good tool to achieve benefits, rather than whether or not it is “good” or “bad,” per se.

  4. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  5. Healthcare Policy in Romania. Frameworks and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buţiu Călina Ana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to review some of the healthcare policy issues of Romania and identify those challenges which may be addressed through social intervention. Based on statistical data, documents, reports and applicable laws one will review the health condition of Romanian population and the state of the national health system, and will examine the broad strategies and policies currently under the scrutiny of appropriate ministries. The findings of the study suggest looking at health policies also through the lens of social inclusion.

  6. Benchmarking in healthcare using aggregated indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    databases, the model is constructed as a comprehensive hierarchy of indicators. By aggregating the outcome of each indicator, the model is able to benchmark healthcare providing units. By assessing performance deeper in the hierarchy, a more detailed view of performance is obtained. The validity test of the...... model is performed at a Danish non-profit hospital, where four radiological sites are benchmarked against each other. Because of the multifaceted perspective on performance, the model proved valuable both as a benchmarking tool and as an internal decision support system....

  7. A vision for better healthcare in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Ian Hinitt, until the Summer of 2012 deputy director of Estates at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, is spearheading an ambitious joint-venture project between Apex 4D, he and his business partner, Balbir Panesar's recently established Bradford-based outsourced FM company, and Leeds-headquartered architectural practice, Bowman Riley, which the project partners hope will initiate the construction of a new generation of modular buildings to improve healthcare provision throughout India, and, in the process, generate significant reciprocal trade opportunities for both UK and Indian suppliers to the sector. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports. PMID:24341110

  8. Missing elements in the healthcare debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David W

    2006-08-01

    Financial flows in the U.S. healthcare system could be restructured in several ways to ensure that individuals and institutions pay their fair share: Eliminate subsidies for people with preventable illnesses and/or large families. Require not-for-profit hospitals to donate their tax exemptions to a state fund to help pay for care for the uninsured. Require health insurance companies to pay a percentage of their total premium revenue into a fund for graduate medical education. Eliminate copayments for pharmaceuticals, but require patients to pay the brand-generic cost difference if they wish to use brand-name drugs when generic drugs are available. PMID:16927501

  9. New materials and technologies for healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Fenn, Michael B; Jones, Julian

    2011-01-01

    This volume summarizes recent developments in the use of new materials and technologies in healthcare. The emphasis is on new approaches that incorporate bioactive materials and scaffolds with cells in the emerging technologies of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The incorporation of nanotechnology, stem cells, and gene control of cells is included in the current research discussed. Clinical applications are described throughout the volume, along with economic and bioethics issues. The chapters are organized into four sections of clinical needs and an overview that summarizes the

  10. Human factors in healthcare level one

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenorn-Lanng, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors, litigation, and complaints in the health service are due to 'human factors', yet the term is still not widely understood and is sometimes used interchangeably to refer to team training or communication skills. Although including these, the subject of 'human factors' goes far beyond this to look at systems, environmental influences, and interactions with equipment, in addition to self-awareness and human interaction. All of these aspects are captured inHuman Factors in Healthcare and are built into a new framework: the SHEEP model, which breaks down into five key areas:

  11. Healthcare performance turned into decision support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to first create an overview of relevant factors directly influencing employee absence in the healthcare sector. The overview is used to further investigate the factors identified using employee satisfaction survey scores exclusively. The result of the overall...... at the case organisations. Employee satisfaction surveys were applied to analyse the development over time of selected factors correlated with concurrent employee absence rates. Checking for causal results, comparisons with the included published literature findings were also carried out. Findings – Four...

  12. High Access Performance Strategy for Next Generation Healthcare Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, healthcare systems around the globe have undergone an increasing pressure to improve healthcare services through effective prevention, for chronicdisease patients as well as the general population. Growth of governments healthcare spending which is fuelled by an aging population and increase of chronic diseases.With advancement in information technology, healthcare organisations are now moving towards mobile healthcare which is an emerging field of technology that uses wireless network communication technologies to monitor patients mental and physical conditions. In this work, we develop an access mechanism of healthcare networks for patients by classifying the personal physiological parameters. We investigate the network performance under the proposed scheme, including access probability of patients and system utilization. The numerical results indicate that the proposed scheme with classifying physiological parameters can effectively increase QoS of networks.

  13. A Prelude Stride in Praxis and Usages of Healthcare Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murtaza Hussain Shaikh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Healthcare informatics is essential to bridge the research-practice gap that keeps widening with exploding medical knowledge; human brain power cannot keep pace with these explosions. Every developed nation is facing grim difficulties in the delivery of healthcare to its citizens. The causes are causes are universal (rising proportion of elderly requiring care, expensive medical technology, good expectations of services and quality and government`s poor ability to fund healthcare. These factors drive up cost and reduce equity of access. In this article we have tried to explore some challenges to highlight the importance of healthcare informatics as an emerging field and have given commendations for this profession to cope the coming trials and hurdles. We have has also tried to highlight some developed countries economic percentage on healthcare and medical field and proper usage of ICT as a good source of accessing information to be an updated tool in healthcare informatics.

  14. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Cheng Hii

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN. The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service.

  15. A comprehensive ubiquitous healthcare solution on an Android™ mobile device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hii, Pei-Cheng; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography) waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN). The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service. PMID:22163986

  16. Development of Personal Wellness Information Model for Pervasive Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Pervasive healthcare and citizen-centered care paradigm are moving the healthcare outside the hospital environment. Healthcare delivery is becoming more personalized and decentralized, focusing on prevention and proactive services with a complete view of health and wellbeing. The concept of wellness has been used to describe this holistic view of health, which focuses on physical, social, and mental well-being. Pervasive computing makes it possible to collect information and offer services an...

  17. Science-based healthcare organization for Great Patriotic War veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipatova Т.Е.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the results of healthcare management of Great Patriotic War veterans for the last 20 years. This period included approbation and improvement of high-technology science-based and efficient healthcare system for war veterans. Healthcare managerial, medical and diagnostical activities are based on original analytical development including population system approach, biophysical approach to human organism, ageing, and senile and stress-induced disorders.

  18. STORIES statement: Publication standards for healthcare education evidence synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Morris; Gibbs, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence synthesis techniques in healthcare education have been enhanced through the activities of experts in the field and the Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) collaborative. Despite this, significant heterogeneity in techniques and reporting of healthcare education systematic review still exist and limit the usefulness of such reports. The aim of this project was to produce the STORIES (STructured apprOach to the Reporting In healthcare education of Evidence Synthesis) stat...

  19. Markets and Healthcare Services in Malaysia: Critical Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Rajah Rasiah; Nik Rosnah Wan Abdullah; Makmor Tumin

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the critical issues facing healthcare in Malaysia. It starts by reviewing the dominant arguments on ownership and healthcare provision, viz., neoclassical, evolutionary and heterodox and the politics of interest groups. Given the imperfections and asymmetries associated with healthcare, as well as its properties as a social good that should reach everyone, the paper adopts evolutionary and heterodox arguments, and the views of political scientists on civil society. It then...

  20. Balancing influence between actors in healthcare decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Robert M.; Babad, Yair M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthcare costs in most developed countries are not clearly linked to better patient and public health outcomes, but are rather associated with service delivery orientation. In the U.S. this has resulted in large variation in healthcare availability and use, increased cost, reduced employer participation in health insurance programs, and reduced overall population health outcomes. Recent U.S. healthcare reform legislation addresses only some of these issues. Oth...

  1. Balancing influence between actors in healthcare decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Babad Yair M; Kaplan Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthcare costs in most developed countries are not clearly linked to better patient and public health outcomes, but are rather associated with service delivery orientation. In the U.S. this has resulted in large variation in healthcare availability and use, increased cost, reduced employer participation in health insurance programs, and reduced overall population health outcomes. Recent U.S. healthcare reform legislation addresses only some of these issues. Other countri...

  2. Access to Healthcare in Rural China : A Public Administration Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Access to healthcare services is a major social concern in China. China's government acknowledges that market reforms of the healthcare system have been a failure, and it has embarked on a series of ambitious health system reforms. This thesis seeks to contribute insights and propositions about how the Chinese government can improve access to healthcare services for citizens in underprivileged, rural areas. In a field dominated by quantitative studies, it takes a qualitative approach, seeking...

  3. Using Business Intelligence Tools for Predictive Analytics in Healthcare System

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela-Laura IVAN; Mircea Raducu TRIFU; Manole VELICANU; Cristian CIUREA

    2016-01-01

    The scope of this article is to highlight how healthcare analytics can be improved using Business Intelligence tools. Healthcare system has learned from the previous lessons the necessity of using healthcare analytics for improving patient care, hospital administration, population growth and many others aspects. Business Intelligence solutions applied for the current analysis demonstrate the benefits brought by the new tools, such as SAP HANA, SAP Lumira, and SAP Predictive Analytics. In deta...

  4. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    OpenAIRE

    Pei-Cheng Hii; Wan-Young Chung

    2011-01-01

    Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography) waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN). The exploitat...

  5. Healthcare Decision Support System for Administration of Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Ji-In; Yang, Jung-Gi; Lee, Young-Ho; Kang, Un-Gu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A healthcare decision-making support model and rule management system is proposed based on a personalized rule-based intelligent concept, to effectively manage chronic diseases. Methods A Web service was built using a standard message transfer protocol for interoperability of personal health records among healthcare institutions. An intelligent decision service is provided that analyzes data using a service-oriented healthcare rule inference function and machine-learning platform; ...

  6. The role of information technology in designs of healthcare trade

    OpenAIRE

    Ajeet Mathur

    2003-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) is poised to revolutionise healthcare trade through new thresholds in human connectivity. This paper focuses on the expanding role of IT in three distinct but related categories: (a) design and development of healthcare products and services, (b) delivery systems, and, (c) healthcare administration. Through information power that IT enables, capacities of decision-makers are continually transformed in how they link with each other, in the here and now. This not onl...

  7. The Appliance Pervasive of Internet of Things in Healthcare Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sajjad Hussain Talpur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In fact, information systems are the foundation of new productivity sources, medical organizational forms, and erection of a global economy. IoT based healthcare systems play a significant role in ICT and have contribution in growth of medical information systems, which are underpinning of recent medical and economic development strategies. However, to take advantages of IoT, it is essential that medical enterprises and community should trust the IoT systems in terms of performance, security, privacy, reliability and return-on-investment, which are open challenges of current IoT systems. For heightening of healthcare system; tracking, tracing and monitoring of patients and medical objects are more essential. But due to the inadequate healthcare situation, medical environment, medical technologies and the unique requirements of some healthcare applications, the obtainable tools cannot meet them accurately. The tracking, tracing and monitoring of patients and healthcare actors activities in healthcare system are challenging research directions for IoT researchers. State-of-the-art IoT based healthcare system should be developed which ensure the safety of patients and other healthcare activities. With this manuscript, we elaborate the essential role of IoT in healthcare systems; immense prospects of Internet of things in healthcare systems; extensive aspect of the use of IoT is dissimilar among different healthcare components and finally the participation of IoT between the useful research and present realistic applications. IoT and few other modern technologies are still in underpinning stage; mainly in the healthcare system.

  8. Determinants of Access to Healthcare: A Survey in Istanbul

    OpenAIRE

    Paköz, Muhammed Ziya; Yüzer, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    Access to healthcare is formed according to the characteristics of the supply and demand. While siting hospitals, ?equity' in access to healthcare should be taken as a basis for all segments of society, and necessary measures should be taken to ensure that vulnerable groups benefit from health services adequately. This necessitates evaluating spatial and non-spatial dimensions of access to healthcare together. Spatial dimension emphasizes importance of the distance whereas non-spatial dimensi...

  9. System integrational and migrational concepts and methods within healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endsleff, F; Loubjerg, P

    1997-01-01

    In this paper an overview and comparison of the basic concepts and methods behind different system integrational implementations is given, including the DHE, which is based on the coming Healthcare Information Systems Architecture pre-standard HISA, developed by CEN TC251. This standard and the DHE...... (Distributed Healthcare Environment) not only provides highly relevant standards, but also provides an efficient and well structured platform for Healthcare IT Systems....

  10. CPOE/EHR-Driven Healthcare Workflow Generation and Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Minmin; Song, Xiping; DeHaan, Jan; Cao, Hui; Kennedy, Rosemary; Gugerty, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Automated healthcare workflow generation and scheduling is an approach to ensure the use of the evidence-based protocols. Generating efficient and practical workflows is challenging due to the dynamic nature of healthcare practice and operations. We propose to use Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) and Electronic Health Record (EHR) components to generate workflows (consisting of scheduled work items) to aid healthcare (nursing) operations. Currently, we are prototyping and developing ...

  11. A multi-agent system for pervasive healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shixiong; Liu, Kecheng; Li, Weizi

    2013-01-01

    Wireless technology based pervasive healthcare has been proposed in many applications such as disease management and accident prevention for cost saving and promoting citizen’s wellbeing. However, the emphasis so far is on the artefacts with limited attentions to guiding the development of an effective and efficient solution for pervasive healthcare. Therefore, this paper aims to propose a framework of multi-agent systems design for pervasive healthcare by adopting the concept of pervasive in...

  12. SPHERE: Meaningful and Inclusive Sensor-Based Home Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, Alison; Gooberman-Hill, Rachel; Craddock, Ian; Coyle, David

    2014-01-01

    Given current demographic and health trends, and their economic implications, home healthcare technology has become a fertile area for research and development. Motivated by the need for a radical reform of healthcare provision, SPHERE is a large-scale Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration that aims to develop home sensor systems to monitor people's health and wellbeing in the home. This paper outlines the unique circumstances of designing healthcare technology for the home environment, wi...

  13. Sensor Anomaly Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Ahsanul Haque; Mustafizur Rahman; Syed Mahfuzul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are vulnerable to various sensor faults and faulty measurements. This vulnerability hinders efficient and timely response in various WSN applications, such as healthcare. For example, faulty measurements can create false alarms which may require unnecessary intervention from healthcare personnel. Therefore, an approach to differentiate between real medical conditions and false alarms will improve remote patient monitoring systems and quality of healthcare servic...

  14. Assessment of hand hygiene levels among healthcare professionals in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rameswarapu, Rohin; K, Surendranath Sai; Valsangkar, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionHand hygiene, either by hand disinfection or hand washing remains to be most pivotal in controlling infection in healthcare settings. Simple preventive measures have been proven effective to contain infections. The exiguity on studies done in healthcare settings in India has galvanized us to undertake this study on hand hygiene assessment among nurses in a healthcare setting in IndiaMaterials and methodsA cross sectional study was done in one of leading organization in preventive ...

  15. Science-based healthcare organization for Great Patriotic War veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Lipatova Т.Е.; Denisova Т.Р.; Shuldyakov V.A.; Yuanov А.А.; Dudaeva N.G.

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes the results of healthcare management of Great Patriotic War veterans for the last 20 years. This period included approbation and improvement of high-technology science-based and efficient healthcare system for war veterans. Healthcare managerial, medical and diagnostical activities are based on original analytical development including population system approach, biophysical approach to human organism, ageing, and senile and stress-induced disorders.

  16. Do Drugs Reduce Utilisation of Other Healthcare Resources?

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Yves Cremieux; Pierre Ouellette; Patrick Petit

    2007-01-01

    Background: Drug expenditures per capita have drastically increased over the last quarter century in Canada, with a share of overall healthcare costs rising from 8.8% in 1980 to 16.8% in 2002. Pressure to curb expenditure on drugs has increased accordingly, but containing drug expenditure might increase costs elsewhere in the healthcare sector. Objective: To measure substitution patterns between drugs and other healthcare resources over the last 25 years and thus assess whether containing dru...

  17. Exposing the true risks of capitation financed healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Many healthcare finance mechanisms involve transferring uncertain costs to healthcare providers in lieu of fixed payments or global capitation. Global capitation violates basic principles of risk management through insurance. Risk-theoretic analysis of capitation shows that risk disaggregation forces efficient providers to become inefficient insurers. Risk-assuming providers face lower profitability and increased exposure to operating losses, and must reduce patient benefits. Global capitation causes inefficiency, increases healthcare costs, and threatens patient-provider relationships. PMID:21506200

  18. A Review of Cloud Computing Technology Solution for Healthcare System

    OpenAIRE

    Maslin Masrom; Ailar Rahimli

    2014-01-01

    Previously the traditional healthcare information system that used in the healthcare sector was the paper-based and then later it was replaced by the Healthcare Information System (HIS). However the HIS was found not perform effectively because of several issues such as storage capacity, system integration, high operating cost and system maintenance. Cloud computing is a new technology that deliver the software, infrastructure and computational platform as a service over the Internet in any p...

  19. An Exploration of Healthcare Inventory and Lean Management in Minimizing Medical Supply Waste in Healthcare Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how lean thinking and inventory management technology minimize expired medical supply waste in healthcare organizations. This study was guided by Toyota's theory of lean and Mintzberg's theory of management development to explain why the problem of medical supply waste exists. Government…

  20. [Simulation in healthcare for the announcement of harm resulting from healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluzel, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Simulation is an effective means of transferring competencies in a complex situation such as the announcement of harm resulting from healthcare. The aim is to reinforce patient safety, to improve communication between nurses and patients and between health professionals. PMID:27085931

  1. E-commerce in healthcare: changing the traditional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A K; Travers, S

    2001-01-01

    The healthcare industry, with more than one trillion dollars in revenue, accounts for about one-seventh of the U.S. economy. A significant portion of this revenue is lost to escalating healthcare system costs. This article examines the shortcomings of the traditional healthcare delivery system in terms of information flow, communication standards, case collections, and IT spending. It makes the case that e-commerce has the ability to transact some healthcare business more efficiently and cost-effectively. With the Internet as a delivery platform, several models offer improvement over the status quo. PMID:11338906

  2. A design thinking framework for healthcare management and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jess P; Fisher, Thomas R; Trowbridge, Matthew J; Bent, Christine

    2016-03-01

    The business community has learned the value of design thinking as a way to innovate in addressing people's needs - and health systems could benefit enormously from doing the same. This paper lays out how design thinking applies to healthcare challenges and how systems might utilize this proven and accessible problem-solving process. We show how design thinking can foster new approaches to complex and persistent healthcare problems through human-centered research, collective and diverse teamwork and rapid prototyping. We introduce the core elements of design thinking for a healthcare audience and show how it can supplement current healthcare management, innovation and practice. PMID:27001093

  3. Safety and Accountability in Healthcare From Past to Present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healthcare is transitioning into a new era-an era of accountability. This era demands heightened awareness of the quality, cost, and safety of healthcare, with value (quality/cost) and safety being the watchwords of accountability. Many factors are driving this transition, and it is affecting all healthcare disciplines, including radiation oncology. The transition is accompanied by the transformation of healthcare from a craft-based culture to an information-age culture in which patient needs and information are given top priority. These changes call for new measures to quantify and document the value and safety of procedures in radiation oncology

  4. Education on human rights and healthcare: evidence from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranes, Aleksandra Jovic; Mikanovic, Vesna Bjegovic; Vukovic, Dejana; Djikanovic, Bosiljka; Babic, Momcilo

    2015-03-01

    Ensuring and enforcing human rights in patient care are important to promote health and to provide quality and appropriate healthcare services. Therefore, continued medical education (CME) is essential for healthcare professionals to utilize their sphere of influence to affect change in healthcare practice. A total of 123 participants attended three CME courses. Course topics covered: (i) the areas of human rights and healthcare, (ii) rights, obligations and responsibilities of healthcare professionals in relation to human rights and the rights of patients, (iii) healthcare of vulnerable groups and (iv) access to essential medical services. Evaluation of the CME courses involved two components: evaluation of participants' performance and the participants' evaluation of the teaching process. The participants were assessed at the beginning and end of each course. Each of the courses was evaluated by the participants through a questionnaire distributed at the end of each course. Descriptive statistics was used for data interpretation. Knowledge of the healthcare professionals improved at the end of all the three courses. The participants assessed several aspects of the courses, including the course topics, educational methods, the course methods, organization, duration and dynamics as well as the physical environment and the technical facilities of the course, and rated each very highly. Our results corroborate the importance and necessity of courses to heighten awareness of the state of current healthcare and human rights issues to increase the involvement of healthcare professionals both locally and globally. PMID:25344878

  5. Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children’s allocation of time to school and work. Children attend school for more days per week—but not for more hours per day—as a result of accessing better healthcare. There are no significant effects o...

  6. Evaluating Burnout among Administrative and Healthcare Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khorshidian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Burnout is an occupational hazard which is known as one of the major factors affecting employees’ psychological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate occupational burnout among administrative and healthcare staffs of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods In this cross sectional study, 300 employees (150 administrative staff and 150 health care staff were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean of burnout was 2.33±0.60. The results showed no significant difference between men and women employees in terms of occupational burnout and its three dimensions. Moreover, a significant difference between administrative and medical staffs  were found only in the dimension of emotional exhaustion. The mean score of emotional exhaustion in the administrative staff was significantly lower than that of their peers in the healthcare sector (2.03±0.84vs. 2.36±1.00 (p=0.03. Conclusions: The results showed that the majority of employees reported an average level of burnout .Such finding was in agreement with the results reported in previous studies. The obtained results can pave the way for further study on the identifying determinants of burnout.

  7. Interprofessional Competencies in Integrative Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Brooks, Audrey J; Maizes, Victoria; Goldblatt, Elizabeth; Klatt, Maryanna; Koithan, Mary S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Lee, Jeannie K; Lopez, Ana Marie; McClafferty, Hilary; Rhode, Robert; Sandvold, Irene; Saper, Robert; Taren, Douglas; Wells, Eden; Lebensohn, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    In October 2014, the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare (NCIPH) was launched as a collaboration between the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the Academic Consortium for Integrative Health and Medicine and supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. A primary goal of the NCIPH is to develop a core set of integrative healthcare (IH) competencies and educational programs that will span the interprofessional primary care training and practice spectra and ultimately become a required part of primary care education. This article reports on the first phase of the NCIPH effort, which focused on the development of a shared set of competencies in IH for primary care disciplines. The process of development, refinement, and adoption of 10 "meta-competencies" through a collaborative process involving a diverse interprofessional team is described. Team members represent nursing, the primary care medicine professions, pharmacy, public health, acupuncture, naturopathy, chiropractic, nutrition, and behavioral medicine. Examples of the discipline-specific sub-competencies being developed within each of the participating professions are provided, along with initial results of an assessment of potential barriers and facilitators of adoption within each discipline. The competencies presented here will form the basis of a 45-hour online curriculum produced by the NCIPH for use in primary care training programs that will be piloted in a wide range of programs in early 2016 and then revised for wider use over the following year. PMID:26421232

  8. Fully integrated biochip platforms for advanced healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  9. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  10. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety. PMID:25078411

  11. Laboratory medicine in the new healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Simona; Braga, Federica; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The 21st century challenge is to redesign healthcare systems to be safe, efficient, effective, timely, equitable and patient-centred. Although laboratory medicine is integral to many of these objectives involving prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and managing disease of patients, it suffers from poor visibility as a medical discipline and as a profession and fewer rewards for educational efforts when compared to other medical disciplines. Laboratory scientists are often perceived as managing machinery and equipment, but conversely they need to take a position of shared clinical leadership, showing the role of laboratory tests to guarantee optimal care for patients. This is however challenging because of some reluctance by laboratory professionals to involve themselves in test structuring and requesting and in the inspection of work as it arrives because it is assumed that all requests are clinically necessary; there is a poor communication and integration between clinical wards and laboratory; and, importantly, there is the need for an excellent cultural and scientific background of laboratory professionals for implementing outcome research and to act as knowledge managers and skilled clinical consultants. By combining the unique talent of performing quality laboratory assays with knowledge of the pathophysiologic rationale behind the tests, laboratory professionals have the expertise to advise their clinical colleagues in regard to the appropriate test selection and interpretation of laboratory results, thereby creating opportunities to define the added value and the pivotal role of laboratory medicine on healthcare delivery. PMID:26466169

  12. Developing forensic mental healthcare in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Joachim Salize

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many economically struggling societies forensic psychiatry is still in its initial developmental stages and thus forensic patients pose an ongoing challenge for the healthcare and juridical systems. In this article we present the various issues and problems that arose when establishing the first forensic psychiatric institute in Kosovo- a country whose population has constantly been reported as suffering from a high psychiatric morbidity due to long-lasting traumatic experiences during the war of 1999. The implementation of a new forensic psychiatric institute in the developing mental healthcare system of Kosovo, still characterized by considerable shortages, required substantial effort on various levels. On the policy and financial level, it was made possible by a clear intent and coordinated commitment of all responsible national stakeholders and authorities, such as the Ministries of Health and Justice, and by the financial contribution of the European Commission. Most decisive in terms of the success of the project was capacity building in human resources, i.e. the recruitment and training of motivated staff. Training included essential clinical and theoretical issues as well as clearly defined standard operation procedures, guidelines and checklists to aid daily routine work and the management of challenging situations.

  13. [Digital health as a motor for change towards new healthcare models and the relationship between patients and healthcare professionals. Disruption of healthcare processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cuyàs, Francesc; de San Pedro, Marc; Martínez Roldan, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    We find ourselves at the end of an era of asymmetry in the domain of health information where the majority of this data is in the hands of the healthcare system. Increasingly, the public are calling for a more central role in the new paradigm that enables them to duly exercise their right of access to their health data while availing of more reliable and safer technologies which contribute to the management of their condition and promote healthy lifestyles. So far, the TIC Salud strategic plan has been developed independently from the Generalitat de Catalunya Health Department's Healthcare Plan, which sets out health policy strategy in Catalonia. However, from its initial design stage the new Healthcare Plan (2016- 2020) envisages incorporating a new strategic Information and communications technology (ICT) line called "Digital Health". Incorporating ICT into the Health Plan will allow these technologies to become integral part of all strategic healthcare processes, acting as a driving force for a shift towards a new healthcare models and an innovative relationship between the public and healthcare professionals. The Digital Health implies a disruption in itself, by way of the convergence of several technologies and their positive impact on health and healthcare procedures, by way of the public's access to information concerning their health, and by creating new opportunities for promoting health and the salutogenic paradigm which empowers people to develop their health, welfare and quality of life. PMID:26711061

  14. Hardship financing of healthcare among rural poor in Orissa, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Binnendijk (Erica); R. Koren (Ruth); D.M. Dror (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This study examines health-related "hardship financing" in order to get better insights on how poor households finance their out-of-pocket healthcare costs. We define hardship financing as having to borrow money with interest or to sell assets to pay out-of-pocket healthcare

  15. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  16. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  17. A Review of Cloud Computing Technology Solution for Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslin Masrom

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previously the traditional healthcare information system that used in the healthcare sector was the paper-based and then later it was replaced by the Healthcare Information System (HIS. However the HIS was found not perform effectively because of several issues such as storage capacity, system integration, high operating cost and system maintenance. Cloud computing is a new technology that deliver the software, infrastructure and computational platform as a service over the Internet in any place and any time. This technology has been said can solve many problems of the healthcare system such as increase the storage capacity and add new capability on the existing healthcare system. Cloud computing offers cost effective, increase interoperability and accessibility, optimize resources and integrate the healthcare information systems. It becomes a solution for solving the current issues, which lead to enhance functionality and features of the healthcare information systems. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore the cloud computing technology as solution for healthcare information system issues. Issues such as data transmission, data storage, cost and maintenance issues are presented and described. The implications of this study then discussed.

  18. Instilling New Habits: Addressing Implicit Bias in Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aidan; Tanesini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    There appears to be a fundamental inconsistency between research which shows that some minority groups consistently receive lower quality healthcare and the literature indicating that healthcare workers appear to hold equality as a core personal value. Recent evidence using Implicit Association Tests suggests that these disparities in outcome may…

  19. Vaccines for preventing hepatitis B in health-care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers.......Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers....

  20. Architecting for connected healthcare - a case of telehomecare and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben; Hoffmann-Petersen, Nikolai; Bejder, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The healthcare system is in many countries operated by the governments, and interaction with the healthcare system is one of the most frequent interactions between citizen and government. Demographic, medical and technological changes are likely to bring new aspects of connectedness into the ever...

  1. Converting Text to Structured Models of Healthcare Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotou, George; Matragkas, Nicholas; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a concise method for transforming textual representations of healthcare services, to a structured, semantically unambiguous modelling language. The method is designed based on literature, as well as trial and error by the authors, using text descriptions of healthcare services. Employing the method can convert textual descriptions to structured graphical models, facilitating stakeholder collaboration on requirements analysis and simulation. PMID:27350483

  2. Leadership Styles and Effectiveness among C-Level Healthcare Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhoon-Walker, Etta J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is essential to circumnavigating the numerous obstacles confronting the healthcare industry. In addition, the current health system is suffering from a proficient leadership gap. However, identifying and developing executives with the greatest potential to become strong, up-and-coming healthcare C-level executive leaders can…

  3. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  4. Healthcare justice and human rights in perinatal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an approach to ethics of perinatal medicine in which "women and children first" plays a central role, based on the concept of healthcare justice. Healthcare justice requires that all patients receive clinical management based on their clinical needs, which are defined by deliberative (evidence-based, rigorous, transparent, and accountable) clinical judgment. All patients in perinatal medicine includes pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. Healthcare justice also protects the informed consent process, which is intended to empower the exercise of patient autonomy in the decision-making process about patient care. In the context of healthcare justice, the informed consent process should not be influenced by ethically irrelevant factors. Healthcare justice should be understood as a basis for the human rights to healthcare and to participate in decisions about one's healthcare. Healthcare justice in perinatal medicine creates an essential role for the perinatologist to be an effective advocate for pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients, i.e., for "women and children first." PMID:26811097

  5. IT Support for Healthcare Processes - Premises, Challenges, Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, R.; Reichert, M.U.

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare processes require the cooperation of different organizational units and medical disciplines. In such an environment optimal process support becomes crucial. Though healthcare processes frequently change, and therefore the separation of the flow logic from the application code seems to be

  6. The Life-and-Death Factor: Focus on Healthcare Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    With economic pressures restricting campus budgets and healthcare policy issues capturing national attention, facilities managers at university-affiliated hospitals and other healthcare entities say they feel more urgency than ever to provide cost-effective services to patients, providers, medical researchers, and students. Managing facilities at…

  7. INCAS—Interactive Teleconsultation Network for Worldwide Healthcare Services

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, A.; Colombo, C.; A. Garlaschelli; G. Pepe

    2001-01-01

    The INCAS Project arises from the needs of an Italian oil company in order to support the doctors responsible for the healthcare in remote drilling sites. The INCAS telemedicine1 system implements a prototype of teleconsultation medical service allowing for the interactive on-line connection with Italian healthcare reference centres in order to:

  8. Concordance: A Critical Participatory Alternative in Healthcare IT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo; Bagalkot, Naveen L.;

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare sector is undergoing large changes in which technology is given a more active role in both in-clinic and out-of-clinic care. Authoritative healthcare models such as compliance and adherence which relies on asymmetric patient doctor relationships are being challenged as society...

  9. Medication-Nutrient Interactions and Individuals with Special Healthcare Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizee, Lori S.

    2008-01-01

    Many children and adults with special healthcare needs receive one or more medications on a regular basis. Parents and healthcare professionals who care for these individuals should be aware of each medication and potential interactions with foods/nutrients. Those who require long term or multiple medications are at highest risk for drug-nutrient…

  10. Healthcare in Brunei Darussalam: Flying Doctor Service (Part I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of an official healthcare system in Brunei in 1907, service provision continued to improve, albeit slowly. Some of the limiting factors included the lack of infrastructure in healthcare, roads and transportation and workforce (limited to dressers and a visiting doctor from Labuan in the initial part, and limited knowledge of the bygone era.

  11. Implementation of Consolidated HIS: Improving Quality and Efficiency of Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jinwook; Kim, Jin Wook; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ju Han; Kim, Jong Hyo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Wee, Won Ryang; Nam, Sang Mo; Lim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Young-Ah

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Adoption of hospital information systems offers distinctive advantages in healthcare delivery. First, implementation of consolidated hospital information system in Seoul National University Hospital led to significant improvements in quality of healthcare and efficiency of hospital management. Methods The hospital information system in Seoul National University Hospital consists of component applications: clinical information systems, clinical research support systems, administrati...

  12. The future of PACS in healthcare enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), which was originally designed as a tool for facilitating radiologists in interpreting images more efficiently, is evolving into a hospital-integrated system storing diagnostic imaging information that often reaches far beyond Radiology. The continuous evolution of PACS technology has led to a gradual broadening of its applications, ranging from teleradiology to CAD (Computer-Assisted Diagnosis) and multidimensional imaging, and is moving into the direction of providing access to image data outside the Radiology department, so to reach all the branches of the healthcare enterprise. New perspectives have been created thanks to new technologies (such as holographic media and GRID computing) that are likely due to expand PACS-based applications even further, improving patient care and enhancing overall productivity.

  13. How to build effective teams in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Maxine; McKeown, Debi

    In healthcare, good team building is where all team members understand, believe in and work towards the shared purpose of caring and working for patients. This sense of common purpose should never be assumed. Team leaders should talk about it at every opportunity and ensure all team members are working towards it in their day-to-day work. All teams move through different stages of development, but are at their most productive where there is openness and trust, with members working to their own strengths. Team leaders should develop a "teaming strategy" to plan how people will act and work together, including effective use of communication technology to help them make better use of face-to-face time. PMID:26182585

  14. People-centric sensing in assistive healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannetsos, Thanassis; Dimitriou, Tassos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    follows a more passive approach and has focused on collecting and processing data using a static-topology and an application-aware infrastructure. However, with the technological advances in sensing, computation, storage, and communications, a new era is about to emerge changing the traditional view of...... sensor-based assistive environments where people are passive data consumers, with one where people carry mobile sensing elements involving large volumes of data related to everyday human activities. This evolution will be driven by people-centric sensing and will turn mobile phones into global mobile...... sensing devices enabling thousands new personal, social, and public sensing applications. In this paper, we discuss our vision for people-centric sensing in assistive healthcare environments and study the security challenges it brings. This highly dynamic and mobile setting presents new challenges for...

  15. Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Burnout among Healthcare Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mohammad Azeem

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship among conscientiousness, neuroticism and burnout in healthcare staff of private hospitals. Moreover, the study also examines the influence of conscientiousness and neuroticism on burnout of the respondents. 120 respondents were contacted in 8 private hospitals for data collection but only 90 of them completed the survey. Maslach’s burnout inventory (MBI and Big-Five Inventory were used as measuring instruments. Results reveal that conscientiousness was negatively and significantly related to dimensions of burnout. Neuroticism was found to be positively and significantly related to dimensions of burnout. Multiple regression analysis was used to see which among the independent variable predicts burnout in the sample. Results show that conscientiousness significantly predicts all the dimensions of burnout and neuroticism significantly predicts only emotional exhaustion and reduced personal accomplishment dimensions of burnout.

  16. Critical Knowledge Monitor System Model : healthcare context

    OpenAIRE

    T. Pereira; Santos, Henrique Dinis dos

    2012-01-01

    In  order to  provide  a  better service, sharing  knowledge  with partners and communities is becoming part of the healthcare organizations culture. Data, information and clinic knowledge require specific cautious, because it involves ethical and legal issues. The constant evolution of Information and Communication Technologies brings new opportunities with multiple forms of communication (web 2.0), therefore, new ways of sharing knowledge. Further, there is a wide knowledge sources: patient...

  17. Collaborative Purchasing of Complex Technologies in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobbi, Chiara; Hsuan, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    appropriate management of the relationships, expertise and guidance in simplifying procedures and effective management of the purchasing group. Customer alignment is facilitated by buyers’ understating of the vendor’s design options, which are moderated by the vendor’s design strategies. Research limitations......Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how buyers and the vendors pursue alignment in collaborative purchasing (CP) of complex medical technologies. Design/methodology/approach: – Through a literature review in CP, the paper identify factors for shareholder alignment (i.e. aligning...... the needs of the buyers within the purchasing group) and customer alignment (i.e. aligning buyers’ needs with the vendors offering strategies) and investigate how they manifest in the case of CP of complex technology in the Danish National Healthcare System. Findings: – Shareholder alignment requires...

  18. Personalized biomedical devices & systems for healthcare applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-Ming; Phee, Soo Jay; Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian

    2011-03-01

    With the advancement in micro- and nanotechnology, electromechanical components and systems are getting smaller and smaller and gradually can be applied to the human as portable, mobile and even wearable devices. Healthcare industry have started to benefit from this technology trend by providing more and more miniature biomedical devices for personalized medical treatments in order to obtain better and more accurate outcome. This article introduces some recent development in non-intrusive and intrusive biomedical devices resulted from the advancement of niche miniature sensors and actuators, namely, wearable biomedical sensors, wearable haptic devices, and ingestible medical capsules. The development of these devices requires carful integration of knowledge and people from many different disciplines like medicine, electronics, mechanics, and design. Furthermore, designing affordable devices and systems to benefit all mankind is a great challenge ahead. The multi-disciplinary nature of the R&D effort in this area provides a new perspective for the future mechanical engineers.

  19. Healthcare resource consumption in terminal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R M; Schneiderman, L J

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in healthcare have raised important ethical challenges. One of the trends is the increasing attention to patient autonomy for medical decision making. Patients are exercising greater authority to refuse medical treatment and to seek medical treatment that may end life. Another important trend is that end of life medical care has become increasingly expensive. Further, changes in reimbursement for medical care may create incentives for providers to deny heroic treatment. This article reviews issues relevant to these developments. We consider the issue of medical futility, the role of advance directives, and the international movement toward the legalisation of euthanasia. We suggest that futile medical treatment should not be offered and that advance directives should he used. However, review of the literature suggests that advance directives may not reduce medical costs. The effect of managed care upon advance directives, denial of heroic care and euthanasia is not known at this time. PMID:10172914

  20. Constructions of the patient in healthcare communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2016-01-01

    ; target group patient; citizen with rights; patient as a competent resource; user as active partner; and consumer. As a result, the patient-centred communication programme renders the patient as a flexible figure able to fit organizational demands of both care orientation and market concerns. Originality......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how strategic, patient-centred communication plays a part in the discursive management of expectations posed to patients and healthcare organizations. Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides an analysis of four documents collected as part...... of an ethnographic case study regarding “The Perspective of the Patient” – a Danish Hospital’s patient-centred communication programme. Mapping methods inspired by Grounded Theory are used to qualify the analysis. Findings – The paper shows that strategic patient-centred communication addresses both...

  1. Virtual video prototyping of pervasive healthcare systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Bossen, Claus; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video...... concrete design issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constraints and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users' perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate to....... In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very...

  2. Virtual Video Prototyping for Healthcare Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video...... concrete design issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constraints and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users' perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate to....... In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very...

  3. Anonymity: an impediment to performance in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsberg, Daniel W; Pierce, Read G

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching hospitals employ a care team structure composed of a broad range of healthcare providers with different skill sets. Each member of this team has a distinct role and a different level of training ranging from attending physician to resident, intern, and medical student. Often times, these different roles lead to greater complexity and confusion for both patients and nursing staff. It has been demonstrated that patients have a great degree of difficulty in identifying members of their care team. This anonymity also exists between nursing staff and other care providers. In order to better understand the magnitude of anonymity within the teaching hospital, a ten-question survey was sent to nurses across three different departments. Results from this survey demonstrated that 71% of nurses are "Always" or "Often" able to identify which care team is responsible for their patients, while 79% of nurses reported that they either "Often" or "Sometimes" page a provider who is not currently caring for a given patient. Furthermore, 33% of nurses felt that they were either "Rarely" or "Never" able to recognize, by face and name, attending level providers. Residents were "Rarely" or "Never" recognized by face and name 37% of the time, and interns 42% of the time. Contacting the wrong provider repeatedly leads to de facto delays in medication, therapy, and diagnosis. Additionally, these unnecessary interruptions slow workflow for both nurses and members of the care team, making hospital care less efficient and safe overall. Technological systems should focus on reducing anonymity within the hospital in order to enhance healthcare delivery. PMID:25114570

  4. Training to prevent healthcare associated infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebahat Dikici

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Aim of this study was to investigate pre-education information level, efficiency of training, persistence of acquired information, and factors affecting information level of recently employed nurses about healthcare associated infections. Methods. One hundred and thirty-two nurses who have just started work were trained about “healthcare associated infections and infection control measures”. Tests were performed pre, post training and one year after training. Factors affecting test success were investigated. Results. Nurses who continued education after high school were more successful (p=0.002. Duration of work-hours, unit where they work and presence of previous training didn't affect test success (p=0.705, p=0.040, p=0.105; respectively. Test results were assessed over 100 points. Mean score before the training was 67.95±10.5 and it increased to 85.06±7.6 after the training (p=0.000. Mean test score at test repeated one year later was 80.04±8.77. Unit where they have worked during previous year, application of isolation in their unit and presence of training didn't affect general success in the test (p=0.344, p=0.316, p=0.259; respectively. Conclusions. Training programs using individualized, regularly repeated and approved training methods should be conducted in accordance with needs determined by these studies. Next target after knowledge increase will be reflection of this increase to daily practice and behaviour change.

  5. Biomedical digital assistant for ubiquitous healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Cho, Myeong-Chan

    2007-01-01

    The concept of ubiquitous healthcare service, which emerged as one of measures to solve healthcare problems in aged society, means that patients can receive services such as prevention, diagnosis, therapy and prognosis management at any time and in any place with the help of advanced information and communication technology. This service requires not only biomedical digital assistant that can monitor continuously the patients' health condition regardless of time and place, but also wired and wireless communication devices and telemedicine servers that provide doctors with data on patients' present health condition. In order to implement a biomedical digital assistant that is portable and wearable to patients, the present study developed a device that minimizes size, weight and power consumption, measures ECG and PPG signals, and even monitors moving patients' state. The biomedical sensor with the function of wireless communication was designed to be highly portable and wearable, to be operable 24 hours with small-size batteries, and to monitor the subject's heart rate, step count and respiratory rate in his daily life. The biomedical signal receiving device was implemented in two forms, PDA and cellular phone. The movement monitoring device embedded in the battery pack of a cellular phone does not have any problem in operating 24 hours, but the real-time biomedical signal receiving device implemented with PDA operated up to 6 hours due to the limited battery capacity of PDA. This problem is expected to be solved by reducing wireless communication load through improving the processing and storage functions of the sensor. The developed device can transmit a message on the patient's emergency to the remote server through the cellular phone network, and is expected to play crucial roles in the health management of chronic-aged patients in their daily life. PMID:18002325

  6. The Role of Patient Narratives in Healthcare Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    into patient experience for healthcare professionals, and support professionals’ enrolment and mobilisation in innovation projects. Design/methodology/approach: – Two case studies were undertaken. These drew upon qualitative interviews with staff and participant observation during innovation workshops...... meaning making as an enabler of patient-centred change processes in healthcare via: local clinic mangers defining problems and ideas; collecting and sharing patient narratives in innovation workshops; and healthcare professionals’ interpretation of patient narratives supporting new insights into patient...... experience. Practical implications: – This study demonstrates how healthcare professionals’ meaning making can be supported by articulating, constructing, listening and interpreting patient narratives. The two cases demonstrate how patient narratives serve as reflective devices for healthcare professionals...

  7. Virtual, augmented reality and serious games for healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Anderson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is a tremendous interest among researchers for the development of virtual, augmented reality and games technologies due to their widespread applications in medicine and healthcare. To date the major applications of these technologies include medical simulation, telemedicine, medical and healthcare training, pain control, visualisation aid for surgery, rehabilitation in cases such as stroke, phobia, and trauma therapies. Many recent studies have identified the benefits of using Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, or serious games in a variety of medical applications.   This research volume on Virtual, Augmented Reality and Serious Games for Healthcare 1 offers an insightful introduction to the theories, development and applications of virtual, augmented reality and digital games technologies in medical and clinical settings and healthcare in general. It is divided into six sections: section one presents a selection of applications in medical education and healthcare management; Section two relates to th...

  8. FRAMEWORK ARCHITECTURE FOR IMPROVING HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS USING AGENT TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Omar Al-Sakran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to diversity, heterogeneity and complexity of the existing healthcare structure, providing suitable healthcare services is a complicated process. This work describes the conceptual design of an e-healthcare system, which implements integration strategies and suitable technologies that will handle the interoperability problem among its essential components. The proposed solution combines intelligent agent technology and case based reasoning for highly distributed applications in healthcare environment. Intelligent agents play a critical role in providing correct information for diagnostic, treatment, etc. They work on behalf of human agents taking care of routine tasks, thus increasing speed and reliability of the information exchanges. CBR is used to generate advices to a certain e-healthcare problems by analyzing solutions given to previously solved problems and to build intelligent systems for disease diagnostics and prognosis. Preliminary experimental simulation based on Agent Development Framework (JADE demonstrated the feasibility of this model.

  9. Terminology-Based Approach: Knowledge Acquisition and Integration in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subiksha.K.P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare organizations are increasingly choosing the Knowledge Management Systems for clinical use, which have been established in technical support organizations for several years. Technical support organization can make use of its Knowledge Management System to meets its customer needs using its infrastructure and established processes. Success of Knowledge Management System in a healthcare organization mainly depends on the practice of healthcare professionals. Knowledge acquisition is very vital in healthcare than the application in technical support. The aim is to provide efficient access to heterogeneous biological textual data and databases, enabling users to integrate a wide range of textual and non-textual resources effortlessly. The main objective of the system is to make easier knowledge acquisition through query answering against XML-based documents in Healthcare specifically in the domain of molecular biology.

  10. Developing a Security Metrics Scorecard for Healthcare Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrefaey, Heba; Borycki, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In healthcare, information security is a key aspect of protecting a patient's privacy and ensuring systems availability to support patient care. Security managers need to measure the performance of security systems and this can be achieved by using evidence-based metrics. In this paper, we describe the development of an evidence-based security metrics scorecard specific to healthcare organizations. Study participants were asked to comment on the usability and usefulness of a prototype of a security metrics scorecard that was developed based on current research in the area of general security metrics. Study findings revealed that scorecards need to be customized for the healthcare setting in order for the security information to be useful and usable in healthcare organizations. The study findings resulted in the development of a security metrics scorecard that matches the healthcare security experts' information requirements. PMID:26718256

  11. APPLYING INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGIES TO HEALTHCARE : Considering opinions from healthcare organizations’ staff regarding potential problem areas

    OpenAIRE

    Gacias Llobera, Amador

    2012-01-01

    The recent delicate economic situation has contributed to the fact that several of the existing industrial management techniques, initially conceived in order to improve manufacturing enterprises’ efficiency, have gained popularity not only within the industrial field, but also in the services sector. In that context, healthcare is facing a complicated situation on account of a reduction of resources and an increase of incoming patients. When applying existing industrial management techniques...

  12. 77 FR 59985 - Healthcare Corporation of America (HCA), HCA Mountain Division Including Workers Whose Wages Were...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Healthcare Corporation of America (HCA), HCA Mountain Division... of Healthcare Corporation of America (HCA), HCA Mountain Division, Cottonwood Heights, Utah (subject... follows: All workers of Healthcare Corporation of America (HCA), HCA Mountain Division, including...

  13. Communication in Healthcare: Opportunities for information technology and concerns for patient safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Pirnejad (Habibollah)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding healthcare workflow is fundamental for design and implementation of information systems. Communication and information exchange between healthcare professionals plays a pivotal role in developing smooth workflow within and between healthcare organizations. The study in this

  14. 76 FR 61707 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the intention of the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  15. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy H. Ficzere, PharmD, BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology.Setting: Ambulatory care and community practicePractice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party payers, point-of-care testing, and all health-care providers.Main Outcome Measures: By providing integrated and customized information at the point of use, medication adherence and access to care will be increased and patients will engage in healthy behaviors more often resulting in an improved level of care for patients.Results: In the future, the authors believe if the vision is achieved, the health care system and patients will see improved health outcomes and more efficient utilization of the healthcare system.Conclusions: Our proposed use of technology provides an opportunity to empower patients to positively improve their own health which could be a vital advancement in health care, especially in the areas of medication adherence, improving access to care, and health behavior support. As pharmacists, we may also embrace technology opportunities to expand our roles as health care professionals as we continue to partner with patients and the health care team to improve outcomes.

  16. Statistical Models, Yang-Baxter Equation and Related Topics - Proceedings of the Satellite MEeting of STATPHYS-19; Symmetry, Statistical, Mechanical Models and Applications - Proceedings of the Seventh Nankai Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, M. L.; et al.

    1996-09-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Part I: Satellite Meeting of STATPHYS-19 * Boundary Yang-Baxter in the RSOS/SOS Representation * Quantum Domains in Ferromagnetic Anisotropic Heisenberg Chains * The Generalized Chiral Clock Model and its Phase Diagram * Algebraic Solution of the Coincidence Problem for Crystals and Quasicrystals * Reflection Equations and Surface Critical Phenomena * Fully Packed Loop Models * Quantum Field Theories in terms of Group-Valued Local Fields: An Overview * C-Statiscal Transition Transforms of the Heisenberg Spin Chain and Braided Symmetry * U(1)-Invariant Local and Integrable Lattice Formulation of the Massive Thirring Model * Corner Transfer Matrices and Novel Polynomials * Rigorous and Numerical Results on Two-Dimensional Oriented Self-Avoiding Walks * The Price for Quantum Group Symmetry: Chiral Versus 2D WZNW Model * Integrable Zn-Chiral Potts Model : The Missing Rapidity-Momentum Relation * Dilute Algebras and Solvable Lattice Models * Falicov-Kimball Model: Ground States and Flux Phase Problem * Mutual Exclusion Statistics in the Exactly Solvable Model of the Mott Metal-Insulator Transition * Quantum Group and the Hofstadter Problem * Domain Walls in the Spin-S Quantum Ising Chain * Quantization of Nonultralocal Models - Generalization of the Theorem for the Multiple Coproduct * Multipoint Functions(Form-factors) of Quantum sine-Gordon Field with Boundary * Three-Dimensional Vertex Model * Probability of Phase Separation and Two Point Temperature Correlation Functions for the Bose Gas with Delta Interaction * On the Fundamental Invariant of the Hecke Algebra Hn(q) * Ternary Z3-Graded Algebras and New Gauge Theories * Thermodynamics of Integrable Quantum Chains : Free Energy and Correlation Lengths * Quantum Integrable Systems and Classical Discrete Nonlinear Dynamics * Quantum Jacobi-Trudi Formula and Analytic Bethe Ansatz * On Boundary Condition of Single Particle and the Spectrum of Many

  17. Choice of health insurer and healthcare provider : An analysis of regulated competition in the Dutch healthcare system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.I.D. Duijmelinck (Daniëlle)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractConsumer choice of health insurer is an essential precondition for achieving efficiency and consumer responsiveness in healthcare. In healthcare, consumer preferences are highly heterogeneous. This implies that if groups of consumers with specific preferences feel not free to switch

  18. Teaching at primary healthcare services within the Brazilian national health system (SUS in Brazilian healthcare professionals' training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Fernanda Ceriotti Toassi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the role of teaching at primary healthcare services within the Brazilian National Health System (SUS in dentists' training, at a public university in the south of Brazil. A qualitative methodological approach (case study was used. Interviews were conducted with 12 dentistry students, six dentists who were preceptors working in public primary healthcare services and three teachers connected with this curricular training. Our findings showed that the curricular training in SUS primary healthcare services had an impact on the dentists' education through establishment of bonds, autonomy in problem-solving and multiprofessional teamwork. It was seen that they learned about how healthcare services function, about healthcare and about development of cultural competence. There is a need to maintain constant questioning regarding these practices, and to ensure the presence of infrastructure and qualified professionals for teaching at these services.

  19. 'Underclassism' and access to healthcare in urban centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sannie Y; Browne, Annette J; Mussell, Bill; Smye, Victoria L; Rodney, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we draw on findings from an ethnographic study that explored experiences of healthcare access from the perspectives of Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients seeking services at the non-urgent division of an urban emergency department (ED) in Canada. Our aim is to critically examine the notion of 'underclassism' within the context of healthcare in urban centres. Specifically, we discuss some of the processes by which patients experiencing poverty and racialisation are constructed as 'underclass' patients, and how assumptions of those patients as social and economic Other (including being seen as 'drug users' and 'welfare dependents') subject them to marginalisation, discrimination, and inequitable treatment within the healthcare system. We contend that healthcare is not only a clinical space; it is also a social space in which unequal power relations along the intersecting axes of 'race' and class are negotiated. Given the largely invisible roles that healthcare plays in controlling access to resources and power for people who are marginalised, we argue that there is an urgent need to improve healthcare inequities by challenging the taken-for-granted assumption that healthcare is equally accessible for all Canadians irrespective of differences in social and economic positioning. PMID:25720520

  20. Interoperability in Nigeria Healthcare System: The Ways Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iroju Olaronke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability of health related information is one of the agendas of many counties in the world, with no exception to Nigeria and other developing countries. This is because healthcare costs are rising exponentially. However, interoperability of health related information seem largely unattainable in Nigeria due to reluctance to change from the traditional paper based healthcare system to the use of e-health systems, inadequate ICT infrastructure, poor utilization of the available ICT resources, erratic power supply, increased burden of underdevelopment, poverty, political instability, shortage of educational capacity in Nigeria rural and urban healthcare centers, low level of ICT awareness, poor maintenance culture as well as corruption. Consequently, the healthcare system in Nigeria is saddled with high cost, high rate of disease outbreak driven by HIV/AIDs, malaria and other infectious diseases which results in a high rate of mortality. Nevertheless, the urgent need to meaningfully exchange safe and reliable health information is a key priority to the healthcare system in Nigeria as the qualities of patients’ care depend majorly on the timely acquisition, processing and retrieval of data related to the patient. Thus, this paper attempts to unravel the factors hindering interoperability in the Nigeria healthcare system and suggests ways of making total interoperability a reality in Nigeria healthcare system as well as other developing countries.