WorldWideScience

Sample records for arabidopsis ycf20-like genes

  1. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  2. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  3. Histone Deacetylase Genes in Arabidopsis Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtney Hollender; Zhongchi Liu

    2008-01-01

    Histone acetylatlon and deacetylation are directly connected with transcriptional activation and silencing in eukaryotas.Gene families for enzymes that accomplish these histone modifications show surprising complexity in domain organization,tissue-specific expression, and function. This review is focused on the family of histone deacetylases (HDACs) that remove the acetyl group from core histone tails, resulting in a "closed" chromatin and transcriptional repression. In Arabidopsis,18 HDAC genes are divided in to three different types - RPD3-1ike, HD-tuin and sirtuin - with two or more members ineach type. The structural feature of each HDAC class, the expression profile of each HDAC gene during development and functional insights of important family members are summarized here. It is clear that HDACs are an important class of global transcriptional regulators that play crucial roles in plant development, defense, and adaptation.

  4. Transposed genes in Arabidopsis are often associated with flanking repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Woodhouse

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Much of the eukaryotic genome is known to be mobile, largely due to the movement of transposons and other parasitic elements. Recent work in plants and Drosophila suggests that mobility is also a feature of many nontransposon genes and gene families. Indeed, analysis of the Arabidopsis genome suggested that as many as half of all genes had moved to unlinked positions since Arabidopsis diverged from papaya roughly 72 million years ago, and that these mobile genes tend to fall into distinct gene families. However, the mechanism by which single gene transposition occurred was not deduced. By comparing two closely related species, Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, we sought to determine the nature of gene transposition in Arabidopsis. We found that certain categories of genes are much more likely to have transposed than others, and that many of these transposed genes are flanked by direct repeat sequence that was homologous to sequence within the orthologous target site in A. lyrata and which was predominantly genic in identity. We suggest that intrachromosomal recombination between tandemly duplicated sequences, and subsequent insertion of the circular product, is the predominant mechanism of gene transposition.

  5. pATsi: Paralogs and Singleton Genes from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, Luca; Bostan, Hamed; di Salle, Pasquale; Sangiovanni, Mara; Vigilante, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is widely accepted as a model species in plant biology. Its genome, due to its small size and diploidy, was the first to be sequenced among plants, making this species also a reference for plant comparative genomics. Nevertheless, the evolutionary mechanisms that shaped the Arabidopsis genome are still controversial. Indeed, duplications, translocations, inversions, and gene loss events that contributed to the current organization are difficult to be traced. A reliable identification of paralogs and single-copy genes is essential to understand these mechanisms. Therefore, we implemented a dedicated pipeline to identify paralog genes and classify single-copy genes into opportune categories. PATsi, a web-accessible database, was organized to allow the straightforward access to the paralogs organized into networks and to the classification of single-copy genes. This permits to efficiently explore the gene collection of Arabidopsis for evolutionary investigations and comparative genomics. PMID:26792975

  6. Comparative analysis of drought resistance genes in Arabidopsis and rice

    OpenAIRE

    Trijatmiko, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords: rice, Arabidopsis, drought, genetic mapping,microarray, transcription factor, AP2/ERF, SHINE, wax, stomata, comparative genetics, activation tagging, Ac/Ds, En/IThis thesis describes the use of genomics information and tools from Arabidopsis and rice to understand the mechanisms controlling drought resistance. Genetic mapping in a rice population revealed that around 30% of variation for grain yield under drought was controlled by a locus close to the dwarfing gene responsible for t...

  7. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavaiah Channa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes and mitochondrial (28 genes genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes. Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely

  8. Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana Em genes : role of AB15

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carles, C.; Bies-Etheve, N.; Aspart, L.; Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.; Koornneef, M.; Echeverria, M.; Delseny, M.

    2002-01-01

    In order to identify new factors involved in Em (a class I Late Embryogenesis Abundant protein) gene expression, Arabidopsis mutants with an altered expression of an Em promoter GUS fusion construct and a modified accumulation of Em transcripts and proteins were isolated. Germination tests on ABA sh

  9. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-Ping Feng; John Mundy

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions,TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also discussed.

  10. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also...

  11. Prediction of anther-expressed gene resulation in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG JiFeng; YANG JingJin; WANG Guan; YU QingBo; YANG ZhongNan

    2008-01-01

    Anther development in Arabidopsis, a popular model plant for plant biology and genetics, is controlled by a complex gene network. Despite the extensive use of this genus for genetic research, little is known about its regulatory network. In this paper, the direct transcriptional regulatory relationships between genes expressed in Arabidopsis anther development were predicted with an integrated bioinformatic method that combines mining of microarray data with promoter analysis. A total of 7710 transcription factor-gene pairs were obtained. The 80 direct regulatory relationships demonstrating the highest con-fidence were screened from the initial 7710 pairs; three of the 80 were validated by previous experi-ments. The results indicate that our predicted results were reliable. The regulatory relationships re-vealed by this research and described in this paper may facilitate further investigation of the molecular mechanisms of anther development. The bioinformatic method used in this work can also be applied to the prediction of gene regulatory relationships in other organisms.

  12. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  13. Inheritance beyond plain heritability : variance controlling genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Shen; Mats Pettersson; Lars Rönnegård; Örjan Carlborg

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary The most well-studied effects of genes are those leading to different phenotypic means for alternative genotypes. A less well-explored type of genetic control is that resulting in a heterogeneity in variance between genotypes. Here, we reanalyze a publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana GWAS dataset to detect genetic effects on the variance heterogeneity, and our results indicate that the environmental variance is under extensive genetic control by a large number of variance-co...

  14. Expression pattern of GASA, downstream genes of DELLA, in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ShengChun; WANG XiaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Separation and functional research of related components involved in gibberellins (GAs) signaling are important to clarify the mechanism of GA functioning. Research on the downstream components of DELLA, the key factor of the GA signaling pathway, is limited at present. GASA (GA-Stimulated in Arabidopsis) family contains 15 genes usually regulated by GA in Arabidopsis thaliana. All GASA proteins have a cleavable signal peptide in N terminus and a conserved GASA domain including 12 cysteines in C terminus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of GASA4 and GASA6 were down-regulated, but GASA1 and GASA9were up-regulated in the DELLA mutants, gai-t6 and rga-24, as well as the double mutant, consisting with the results that GASA4 and GASA6 were induced, but GASA1 and GASA9 were inhibited by exogenous GA3. In addition, the expression patterns of other GASA genes were regulated by GA and ABA, separately or cooperatively. Most of GASA genes were expressed in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and developing siliques. GUS gene driven by the promoters of GASA6, GASA7, GASAS, GASA9, GASA10, GASA11 and GASA12were used as reporters and it was found that all GASA genes expressed in the growing and differentiating organs and abscission zones,suggesting the role of these genes in cell growth and differentiation. This study provided an important basis for functional study of the GASA gene family in the GA and ABA signaling pathway.

  15. Arabidopsis gene co-expression network and its functional modules

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    Dash Sudhansu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological networks characterize the interactions of biomolecules at a systems-level. One important property of biological networks is the modular structure, in which nodes are densely connected with each other, but between which there are only sparse connections. In this report, we attempted to find the relationship between the network topology and formation of modular structure by comparing gene co-expression networks with random networks. The organization of gene functional modules was also investigated. Results We constructed a genome-wide Arabidopsis gene co-expression network (AGCN by using 1094 microarrays. We then analyzed the topological properties of AGCN and partitioned the network into modules by using an efficient graph clustering algorithm. In the AGCN, 382 hub genes formed a clique, and they were densely connected only to a small subset of the network. At the module level, the network clustering results provide a systems-level understanding of the gene modules that coordinate multiple biological processes to carry out specific biological functions. For instance, the photosynthesis module in AGCN involves a very large number (> 1000 of genes which participate in various biological processes including photosynthesis, electron transport, pigment metabolism, chloroplast organization and biogenesis, cofactor metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and vitamin metabolism. The cell cycle module orchestrated the coordinated expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell cycle, DNA metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis. We also compared the AGCN constructed in this study with a graphical Gaussian model (GGM based Arabidopsis gene network. The photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis, and cell cycle modules identified from the GGM network had much smaller module sizes compared with the modules found in the AGCN, respectively. Conclusion This study reveals new insight into the topological properties of

  16. Gene silencing and homology-dependent gene silencing in Arabidopsis: genetic modifiers and DNA methylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Furner, I J; Sheikh, M. A.; Collett, C E

    1998-01-01

    Transgenes inserted into the plant genome can become inactive (gene silencing) or result in silencing of homologous cellular genes [homology-dependent gene silencing (HDG silencing)]. In an earlier study we reported HDG silencing of chalcone synthase (CHS) in Arabidopsis. This study concerns genetic revertants of one of the CHS HDG-silencing transgenic homozygotes. Two monogenic recessive trans-acting mutations (hog1 and ddm1) that impair gene silencing and HDG silencing were identified. Thes...

  17. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  18. GORDITA, a young paralog of Arabidopsis thaliana Bsister MADS-box gene ABS, has undergone neofunctionalization

    OpenAIRE

    Erdmann, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Bsister genes, a clade with close relationships to the class B floral homeotic genes, have been conserved for more than 300 million years. Bsister genes in Arabidopsis thaliana underwent gene duplication probably before the diversification of Brassicaceae leading to the paralogue genes ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS) and GORDITA (GOA). The phenotype of the abs mutant, however, is rather mild as it shows only reduced seed coloration and defects in endothelium development. This thesis focuses on the ...

  19. Analysis of Arabidopsis JAZ gene expression during Pseudomonas syringae pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianski, Agnes J; Chung, Kwi Mi; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2012-01-01

    The jasmonates (JAs) comprise a family of plant hormones that regulate several developmental processes and mediate responses to various abiotic and biotic stresses, including pathogens. JA signalling is manipulated by several strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, including P. syringae strain DC3000, using the virulence factor coronatine (COR) as a mimic of jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). To better understand the JA-Ile-mediated processes contributing to P. syringae disease susceptibility, it is important to investigate the regulation of JA signalling during infection. In Arabidopsis thaliana, JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are negative regulators of JA signalling. The transcription factor JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1 (JIN1/ATMYC2) has been implicated in the regulation of JAZ gene expression. To investigate the regulation of JAZ genes during P. syringae pathogenesis, we examined JAZ gene expression during infection of Arabidopsis by DC3000. We found that eight of the 12 JAZ genes are induced during infection in a COR-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the induction of the majority of JAZ genes during infection was not dependent on JIN1, indicating that JIN1 is not the only transcription factor regulating JAZ genes. A T-DNA insertion mutant and an RNA interference line disrupted for the expression of JAZ10, one of the few JAZ genes regulated by JIN1 during infection, exhibited enhanced JA sensitivity and increased susceptibility to DC3000, with the primary effect being increased disease symptom severity. Thus, JAZ10 is a negative regulator of both JA signalling and disease symptom development. PMID:21726394

  20. Interspecific and interploidal gene flow in Central European Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Marte H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of polyploidisation on gene flow between natural populations are little known. Central European diploid and tetraploid populations of Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata are here used to study interspecific and interploidal gene flow, using a combination of nuclear and plastid markers. Results Ploidal levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. Network analyses clearly separated diploids according to species. Tetraploids and diploids were highly intermingled within species, and some tetraploids intermingled with the other species, as well. Isolation with migration analyses suggested interspecific introgression from tetraploid A. arenosa to tetraploid A. lyrata and vice versa, and some interploidal gene flow, which was unidirectional from diploid to tetraploid in A. arenosa and bidirectional in A. lyrata. Conclusions Interspecific genetic isolation at diploid level combined with introgression at tetraploid level indicates that polyploidy may buffer against negative consequences of interspecific hybridisation. The role of introgression in polyploid systems may, however, differ between plant species, and even within the small genus Arabidopsis, we find very different evolutionary fates when it comes to introgression.

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Manmathan, Harish; Shaner, Dale; Snelling, Jacob; Tisserat, Ned; Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways i...

  2. Unique nucleotide polymorphism of ankyrin gene cluster in Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianchang Du; Xingna Wang; Mingsheng Zhang; Dacheng Tian; Yong-Hua Yang

    2007-01-01

    The ankyrin (ANK) gene cluster is a part of a multigene family encoding ANK transmembrane proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, and plays an important role in protein–protein interactions and in signal pathways. In contrast to other regions of a genome, the ANK gene cluster exhibits an extremely high level of DNA polymorphism in an ∼5-kb region, without apparent decay. Phylogenetic analysis detects two clear, deeply differentiated haplotypes (dimorphism). The divergence between haplotypes of accession Col-0 and Ler-0 (Hap-C and Hap-L) is estimated to be 10.7%, approximately equal to the 10.5% average divergence between A. thaliana and A. lyrata. Sequence comparisons for the ANK gene cluster homologues in Col-0 indicate that the members evolve independently, and that the similarity among paralogues is lower than between alleles. Very little intralocus recombination or gene conversion is detected in ANK regions. All these characteristics of the ANK gene cluster are consistent with a tandem gene duplication and birth-and-death process. The possible mechanisms for and implications of this elevated nucleotide variation are also discussed, including the suggestion of balancing selection.

  3. Internet Resources for Gene Expression Analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2008-09-01

    The number of online databases and web-tools for gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana has increased tremendously during the last years. These resources permit the database-assisted identification of putative cis-regulatory DNA sequences, their binding proteins, and the determination of common cis-regulatory motifs in coregulated genes. DNA binding proteins may be predicted by the type of cis-regulatory motif. Further questions of combinatorial control based on the interaction of DNA binding proteins and the colocalization of cis-regulatory motifs can be addressed. The database-assisted spatial and temporal expression analysis of DNA binding proteins and their target genes may help to further refine experimental approaches. Signal transduction pathways upstream of regulated genes are not yet fully accessible in databases mainly because they need to be manually annotated. This review focuses on the use of the AthaMap and PathoPlant((R)) databases for gene expression regulation analysis and discusses similar and complementary online databases and web-tools. Online databases are helpful for the development of working hypothesis and for designing subsequent experiments. PMID:19506727

  4. Gene expression in plant lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shan Hsiao

    Full Text Available Events in plant lipid metabolism are important during seedling establishment. As it has not been experimentally verified whether lipid metabolism in 2- and 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is diurnally-controlled, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to investigate the expression of target genes in acyl-lipid transfer, β-oxidation and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis and hydrolysis in wild-type Arabidopsis WS and Col-0. In both WS and Col-0, ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN3 (ACBP3, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1 and DGAT3 showed diurnal control in 2- and 5-day-old seedlings. Also, COMATOSE (CTS was diurnally regulated in 2-day-old seedlings and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE6 (LACS6 in 5-day-old seedlings in both WS and Col-0. Subsequently, the effect of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY from the core clock system was examined using the cca1lhy mutant and CCA1-overexpressing (CCA1-OX lines versus wild-type WS and Col-0, respectively. Results revealed differential gene expression in lipid metabolism between 2- and 5-day-old mutant and wild-type WS seedlings, as well as between CCA1-OX and wild-type Col-0. Of the ACBPs, ACBP3 displayed the most significant changes between cca1lhy and WS and between CCA1-OX and Col-0, consistent with previous reports that ACBP3 is greatly affected by light/dark cycling. Evidence of oil body retention in 4- and 5-day-old seedlings of the cca1lhy mutant in comparison to WS indicated the effect of cca1lhy on storage lipid reserve mobilization. Lipid profiling revealed differences in primary lipid metabolism, namely in TAG, fatty acid methyl ester and acyl-CoA contents amongst cca1lhy, CCA1-OX, and wild-type seedlings. Taken together, this study demonstrates that lipid metabolism is subject to diurnal regulation in the early stages of seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  5. Induced expression of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis upon infection with Phytophthora capsici

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Bouwmeester, K.; Mortel, van de J.E.; Shan, W.; Govers, F.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of pathogens by plants initiates defense responses including activation of defense-related genes and production of antimicrobial compounds. Recently, we reported that Phytophthora capsici can successfully infect Arabidopsis and revealed interaction specificity among various accession-iso

  6. Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana 5S rRNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Isabelle; Tutois, Sylvie; Cuvillier, Claudine; Schubert, Ingo; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2007-05-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome comprises around 1,000 copies of 5S rRNA genes encoding both major and minor 5S rRNAs. In mature wild-type leaves, the minor 5S rRNA genes are silent. Using different mutants of DNA methyltransferases (met1, cmt3 and met1 cmt3), components of the RNAi pathway (ago4) or post-translational histone modifier (hda6/sil1), we show that the corresponding proteins are needed to maintain proper methylation patterns at heterochromatic 5S rDNA repeats. Using reverse transcription-PCR and cytological analyses, we report that a decrease of 5S rDNA methylation at CG or CNG sites in these mutants leads to the release of 5S rRNA gene silencing which occurred without detectable changes of the 5S rDNA chromatin structure. In spite of severely reduced DNA methylation, the met1 cmt3 double mutant revealed no increase in minor 5S rRNA transcripts. Furthermore, the release of silencing of minor 5S rDNAs can be achieved without increased formation of euchromatic loops by 5S rDNA, and is independent from the global heterochromatin content. Additionally, fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric 180 bp repeats confirmed that these highly repetitive sequences, in spite of their elevated transcriptional activity in the DNA methyltransferase mutants (met1, cmt3 and met1 cmt3), remain within chromocenters of the mutant nuclei. PMID:17412735

  7. The Essential Gene EMB1611 Maintains Shoot Apical Meristem Function During Arabidopsis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains hundreds of genes essential for seed development. Because null mutations in these genes cause embryo lethality, their specific molecular and developmental functions are largely unknown. Here, we identify a role for EMB1611/MEE22, an essential gene in Arabidop...

  8. Comparative analysis of drought resistance genes in Arabidopsis and rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijatmiko, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords: rice, Arabidopsis, drought, genetic mapping,microarray, transcription factor, AP2/ERF, SHINE, wax, stomata, comparative genetics, activation tagging, Ac/Ds, En/IThis thesis describes the use of genomics information and tools from Arabidopsis and

  9. Gene duplication and hypermutation of the pathogen Resistance gene SNC1 in the Arabidopsis bal variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hankuil; Richards, Eric J

    2009-12-01

    The bal defect in the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia strain was spontaneously generated in an inbred ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation 1) mutant background in which various genetic and epigenetic alterations accumulate. The bal variant displays short stature and curled leaves due to the constitutive activation of defense signaling. These bal phenotypes are metastable and phenotypic suppression is evident in more than one-third of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated bal M(1) plants. The semidominant bal allele maps to the RPP5 (recognition of Peronospora parasitica 5) locus, which includes a cluster of disease Resistance (R) genes, many of which show an increase in steady-state expression levels in the bal variant. Here, we report that activation of RPP5 locus R genes and dwarfing in the bal variant are caused by a 55-kb duplication within the RPP5 locus. Although many RPP5 locus R genes are duplicated in the bal variant, the duplication of SNC1 alone is necessary and sufficient for the phenotypic changes in the bal variant. Missense mutations in the SNC1 gene were identified in all three phenotypically suppressed EMS-treated bal lines investigated, indicating that the high-frequency phenotypic instability induced by EMS treatment is caused by a genetic mechanism. We propose that the high degree of variation in SNC1-related sequences among Arabidopsis natural accessions follows the two-step mechanism observed in the bal variant: gene duplication followed by hypermutation. PMID:19797048

  10. The FRIABLE1 gene product affects cell adhesion in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Neumetzler

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1, was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246. Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion.

  11. Mobile gene silencing in Arabidopsis is regulated by hydrogen peroxide

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    Dacheng Liang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants and nematodes, RNAi can spread from cells from which it is initiated to other cells in the organism. The underlying mechanism controlling the mobility of RNAi signals is not known, especially in the case of plants. A genetic screen designed to recover plants impaired in the movement but not the production or effectiveness of the RNAi signal identified RCI3, which encodes a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-producing type III peroxidase, as a key regulator of silencing mobility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Silencing initiated in the roots of rci3 plants failed to spread into leaf tissue or floral tissue. Application of exogenous H2O2 reinstated the spread in rci3 plants and accelerated it in wild-type plants. The addition of catalase or MnO2, which breaks down H2O2, slowed the spread of silencing in wild-type plants. We propose that endogenous H2O2, under the control of peroxidases, regulates the spread of gene silencing by altering plasmodesmata permeability through remodelling of local cell wall structure, and may play a role in regulating systemic viral defence.

  12. SPL8, an SBP-box gene that affects pollen sac development in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Unte, Ulrike S.; Sorensen, Anna-Marie; Pesaresi, Paolo; Gandikota, Madhuri; Leister, Dario; Saedler, Heinz; Huijser, Peter

    2003-01-01

    SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box genes (SBP-box genes) encode plant-specific proteins that share a highly conserved DNA binding domain, the SBP domain. Although likely to represent transcription factors, little is known about their role in development. In Arabidopsis, SBP-box genes constitute a structurally heterogeneous family of 16 members known as SPL genes. For one of these genes, SPL8, we isolated three independent transposon-tagged mutants, all of which exhibited a strong reduction...

  13. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-09-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  14. The roles of segmental and tandem gene duplication in the evolution of large gene families in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgarten Andrew

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most genes in Arabidopsis thaliana are members of gene families. How do the members of gene families arise, and how are gene family copy numbers maintained? Some gene families may evolve primarily through tandem duplication and high rates of birth and death in clusters, and others through infrequent polyploidy or large-scale segmental duplications and subsequent losses. Results Our approach to understanding the mechanisms of gene family evolution was to construct phylogenies for 50 large gene families in Arabidopsis thaliana, identify large internal segmental duplications in Arabidopsis, map gene duplications onto the segmental duplications, and use this information to identify which nodes in each phylogeny arose due to segmental or tandem duplication. Examples of six gene families exemplifying characteristic modes are described. Distributions of gene family sizes and patterns of duplication by genomic distance are also described in order to characterize patterns of local duplication and copy number for large gene families. Both gene family size and duplication by distance closely follow power-law distributions. Conclusions Combining information about genomic segmental duplications, gene family phylogenies, and gene positions provides a method to evaluate contributions of tandem duplication and segmental genome duplication in the generation and maintenance of gene families. These differences appear to correspond meaningfully to differences in functional roles of the members of the gene families.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of WOX gene family in rice, sorghum, maize, Arabidopsis and poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zong, Jie; Liu, Jianhua; Yin, Jinyuan; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-11-01

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) genes form a large gene family specifically expressed in plants. They are known to play important roles in regulating the development of plant tissues and organs by determining cell fate. Recent available whole genome sequences allow us to do more comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the WOX genes in plants. In the present study, we identified 11 and 21 WOXs from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays), respectively. The 72 WOX genes from rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum, maize, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) were grouped into three well supported clades with nine subgroups according to the amino acid sequences of their homodomains. Their phylogenetic relationship was also supported by the observation of the motifs outside the homodomain. We observed the variation of duplication events among the nine sub-groups between monocots and eudicots, for instance, more gene duplication events of WOXs within subgroup A for monocots, while, less for dicots in this subgroup. Furthermore, we observed the conserved intron/exon structural patterns of WOX genes in rice, sorghum and Arabidopsis. In addition, WUS (Wuschel)-box and EAR (the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression)-like motif were observed to be conserved among several WOX subgroups in these five plants. Comparative analysis of expression patterns of WOX genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggest that the WOX genes play conserved and various roles in plants. This work provides insights into the evolution of the WOX gene family and is useful for future research. PMID:20977659

  16. Identification of prior candidate genes for Sclerotinia local resistance in Brassica napus using Arabidopsis cDNA microarray and Brassica-Arabidopsis comparative mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Renhu; ZHAO; Jianwei; XIAO; Yong; MENG; Jinling

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis cDNA arrays were used to screen the local-defense-associated genes in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) at the challenge of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. 61 genes with two-fold expression changes were screened out from the local tissue around the necrosis. Among them, 36 unique genes were up-regulated and 25 unique genes were down-regulated. RT-PCR and Northern blot results were consistent with the array results, suggesting Arabidopsis arrays were useful for transcriptional profiling of B. napus genes. Some of these genes were located in the interval of some QTLs for Sclerotinia resistance in B. napus by Brassica- Arabidopsis comparative mapping. These genes may have priority to be pursued for more intensive research.

  17. Differentially expressed genes associated with dormancy or germination of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorop, P.E.; Barroco, R.M.; Engler, G.; Groot, S.P.C.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Differential display analysis using dormant and non-dormant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh seeds resulted in a set of genes that were associated with either dormancy or germination. Expression of the germination-associated genes AtRPL36B and AtRPL27B, encoding two ribosomal proteins, was undetectab

  18. A class V chitinase from Arabidopsis thaliana: gene responses, enzymatic properties, and crystallographic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Numata, Tomoyuki; Osawa, Takuo;

    2011-01-01

    Expression of a class V chitinase gene (At4g19810, AtChiC) in Arabidopsis thaliana was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and by analyzing microarray data available at Genevestigator. The gene expression was induced by the plant stress-related hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA...... common to class V chitinases from higher plants....

  19. Increased Drought Tolerance through the Suppression of ESKMO1 Gene and Overexpression of CBF-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhui Xu; Zhixue Liu; Hongyan Xie; Jian Zhu; Juren Zhang; Josef Kraus; Tasja Blaschnig; Reinhard Nehls; Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Improved drought tolerance is always a highly desired trait for agricultural plants. Significantly increased drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0) has been achieved in our work through the suppression of ESKMO1 (ESK1) gene expression with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and overexpression of CBF genes with constitutive gene expression. ESK1 has been identified as a gene linked to normal development of the plant vascular system, which is assumed directly related to plant drought...

  20. RNAi-mediated gene silencing reveals involvement of Arabidopsis chromatin-related genes in Agrobacterium-mediated root transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Yan Ma; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of RNAi-mediated gene silencing of 109 Arabidopsis thaliana chromatin-related genes (termed “chromatin genes” hereafter) on Agrobacterium-mediated root transformation. Each of the RNAi lines contains a single- or low-copy-number insertion of a hairpin construction that silences the endogenous copy of the target gene. We used three standard transient and stable transformation assays to screen 340 independent RNAi lines, representing 109 target genes, for the rat (res...

  1. An auxin responsive CLE gene regulates shoot apical meristem development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant hormone auxin regulates most, if not all aspects of plant growth and development, including lateral root formation, organ pattering, apical dominance and tropisms. Peptide hormones are peptides with hormone activities. Some of the functions of peptide hormones in regulating plant growth and development are similar to that of auxin, however, the relationship between auxin and peptide hormones remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of OsCLE48, a rice (Oryza sativa CLE (CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION gene, as an auxin response gene, and the functional characterization of OsCLE48 in Arabidopsis and rice. OsCLE48 encodes a CLE peptide hormone that is similar to Arabidopsis CLEs. RT-PCR analysis showed that OsCLE48 was induced by exogenously application of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid, a naturally occurred auxin. Expression of integrated OsCLE48p:GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants was also induced by exogenously IAA treatment. These results indicate that OsCLE48 is an auxin responsive gene. Histochemical staining showed that GUS activity was detected in all the tissue and organs of the OsCLE48p:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis inhibited shoot apical meristem development. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the CLV3 native regulatory elements almost completely complemented clv3-2 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that OsCLE48 is functionally similar to CLV3. On the other hand, expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis has little, if any effects on root apical meristem development, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCLE48 are morphologically indistinguishable from wild type plants, suggesting that the functions of some CLE peptides may not be fully conserved in Arabidopsis and rice.

  2. Post-transcriptional gene silencing signal could move rapidly and bidirectionally in grafted Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming; JIANG Shiling; WANG Youqun; LIU Guoqin

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), one of the newly found ways for post-transcriptional gene silencing, has been widely used to investigate gene functions through transgenic methods for introducing an RNA silencing signal into plants. In the present study, we constructed a dexamethazone (DEX)-inducible RNAi binary vector harboring a specific sequence fragment (168-bp) homologous to KatB and KatC, two kinesin isoform genes of Arabidopsis, which were proved to result in the post-transcriptional gene silencing of KatB and KatC in DEX-induced transgenic plants. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis on transgenic homozygous Arabidopsis (termed as RNAi-type plants) showed that DEX inducement causes KatB and KatC mRNA degradation. With a simplified method, Arabidopsis grafting was effectively performed between RNAi-type and wild-type lines. The target gene mRNA levels were tested based on semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Our results demonstrateed that DEX-induced gene silencing signals could result in a reduction in KatB and KatC mRNA in the wild-type rootstocks or scions, indicating that silencing signals of RNAi could be transmitted bidirectionally across the graft junction whether RNAi-plants were scions or stocks. In contrast to the previously reported results on grafted tobacco, the transmission of post- transcriptional gene silencing signals caused by RNAi in grafted Arabidopsis is more effective than that in tobacco.

  3. Integrating genes and phenotype: a wheat-Arabidopsis-rice glycosyltransferase database for candidate gene analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sado, Pierre-Etienne; Tessier, Dominique; Vasseur, Marc; Elmorjani, Khalil; Guillon, Fabienne; Saulnier, Luc

    2009-02-01

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) constitute a very large multi-gene superfamily, containing several thousand members identified in sequenced organisms especially in plants. GTs are key enzymes involved in various biological processes such as cell wall formation, storage polysaccharides biosynthesis, and glycosylation of various metabolites. GTs have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis thaliana, but their precise function has been demonstrated biochemically for only a few. In this work we have established a repertoire of virtually all the wheat (Triticum aestivum) GT sequences, using the large publicly available banks of expressed sequences. Based on sequence similarity with Arabidopsis and rice GTs compiled in the carbohydrate active enzyme database (CAZY), we have identified and classified these wheat sequences. The results were used to feed a searchable database available on the web ( http://wwwappli.nantes.inra.fr:8180/GTIDB ) that can be used for initiating an exhaustive candidate gene survey in wheat applied to a particular biological process. This is illustrated through the identification of GT families which are expressed during cell wall formation in wheat grain maturation. PMID:19005709

  4. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Wenchuan; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Yang; Rao, Jianan; Luo, Da; He, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-prote...

  5. Functional Analysis of the Arabidopsis TETRASPANIN Gene Family in Plant Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Muto, Antonella; Van de Velde, Jan; Neyt, Pia; Himanen, Kristiina; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2015-11-01

    TETRASPANIN (TET) genes encode conserved integral membrane proteins that are known in animals to function in cellular communication during gamete fusion, immunity reaction, and pathogen recognition. In plants, functional information is limited to one of the 17 members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TET gene family and to expression data in reproductive stages. Here, the promoter activity of all 17 Arabidopsis TET genes was investigated by pAtTET::NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION SIGNAL-GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN/β-GLUCURONIDASE reporter lines throughout the life cycle, which predicted functional divergence in the paralogous genes per clade. However, partial overlap was observed for many TET genes across the clades, correlating with few phenotypes in single mutants and, therefore, requiring double mutant combinations for functional investigation. Mutational analysis showed a role for TET13 in primary root growth and lateral root development and redundant roles for TET5 and TET6 in leaf and root growth through negative regulation of cell proliferation. Strikingly, a number of TET genes were expressed in embryonic and seedling progenitor cells and remained expressed until the differentiation state in the mature plant, suggesting a dynamic function over developmental stages. The cis-regulatory elements together with transcription factor-binding data provided molecular insight into the sites, conditions, and perturbations that affect TET gene expression and positioned the TET genes in different molecular pathways; the data represent a hypothesis-generating resource for further functional analyses. PMID:26417009

  6. An auxin responsive CLE gene regulates shoot apical meristem development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyan; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Dai, Xuemei; Liu, Shanda; Hu, Qingnan; Wang, Xianling; Liu, Bao; Wang, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormone auxin regulates most, if not all aspects of plant growth and development, including lateral root formation, organ pattering, apical dominance, and tropisms. Peptide hormones are peptides with hormone activities. Some of the functions of peptide hormones in regulating plant growth and development are similar to that of auxin, however, the relationship between auxin and peptide hormones remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of OsCLE48, a rice (Oryza sativa) CLE (CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION) gene, as an auxin response gene, and the functional characterization of OsCLE48 in Arabidopsis and rice. OsCLE48 encodes a CLE peptide hormone that is similar to Arabidopsis CLEs. RT-PCR analysis showed that OsCLE48 was induced by exogenously application of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid), a naturally occurred auxin. Expression of integrated OsCLE48p:GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants was also induced by exogenously IAA treatment. These results indicate that OsCLE48 is an auxin responsive gene. Histochemical staining showed that GUS activity was detected in all the tissue and organs of the OsCLE48p:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis inhibited shoot apical meristem development. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the CLV3 native regulatory elements almost completely complemented clv3-2 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that OsCLE48 is functionally similar to CLV3. On the other hand, expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis has little, if any effects on root apical meristem development, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCLE48 are morphologically indistinguishable from wild type plants, suggesting that the functions of some CLE peptides may not be fully conserved in Arabidopsis and rice. Taken together, our results showed that OsCLE48 is an auxin responsive peptide hormone gene, and it regulates shoot apical

  7. Identification of genes affecting the response of tomato and Arabidopsis upon powdery mildew infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, D.

    2014-01-01

      Many plant species are hosts of powdery mildew fungi, including Arabidopsis and economically important crops such as wheat, barley and tomato. Resistance has been explored using induced mutagenesis and natural variation in the plant species. The isolated genes encompass loss-of-function susc

  8. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeown, Peter C

    2011-08-12

    Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs) displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination). We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag) which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i) their size and (ii) which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 seeds was

  9. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennblom Trevor J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination. We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i their size and (ii which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1

  10. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Tesfaye

    Full Text Available Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species.

  11. DNA mismatch repair related gene expression as potential biomarkers to assess cadmium exposure in Arabidopsis seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current study, Arabidopsis seedlings were hydroponically grown on MS media containing cadmium (Cd) of 0-2.0 mg L-1 for 60 h of treatment. Gene expression profiles were used to relate exposure to Cd with some altered biological responses and/or specific growth effects. RT-PCR analysis was used to quantitate mRNA expression for seven genes known to be involved in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system and cell division. Results indicated that Cd concentrations of 0.25-2.0 mg L-1 cause increased total soluble protein levels in shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings in an inverted U-shaped dose-response manner. Exposure to 0.25 and 0.5 mg L-1 of Cd dramatically induced expression of four genes (i.e. proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (atPCNA 2), MutL1 homolog (atMLH1), MutS 2 homolog (atMSH2) and atMSH3) and five genes (i.e. atPCNA1,2, atMLH1 and atMSH2,7), respectively, in shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings; Exposure to 1.0 mg L-1 of Cd significantly elevated expression of only two genes (atMSH6,7), but caused prominent inhibition in expression of three genes (atPCNA2, atMLH1 and atMSH3) in shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings. The expression alterations of the above genes were independent of any biological effects such as survival, fresh weight and chlorophyll level of shoots. However, shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to 2.0 mg L-1 of Cd exhibited statistically prominent repression in expression of these seven genes, and showed incipient reduction of fresh weight and chlorophyll level. This research provides data concerning sensitivity of expression profiles of atMLH1, atMSH2,3,6,7 and atPCNA1,2 genes in Arabidopsis seedlings to Cd exposure, as well as the potential use of these gene expression patterns as representative molecular biomarkers indicative of Cd exposure and related biological effects.

  12. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening)

    OpenAIRE

    Dutt, Manjul; Barthe, Gary; Irey, Michael; Grosser, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB), a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars ‘Hamlin’ and ‘Valencia’ expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that e...

  13. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  14. Functional analysis of the theobroma cacao NPR1 gene in arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene encodes a transcription coactivator (NPR1 that plays a major role in the mechanisms regulating plant defense response. After pathogen infection and in response to salicylic acid (SA accumulation, NPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus where it interacts with other transcription factors resulting in increased expression of over 2000 plant defense genes contributing to a pathogen resistance response. Results A putative Theobroma cacao NPR1 cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using degenerate primers based on homologous sequences from Brassica, Arabidopsis and Carica papaya. The cDNA was used to isolate a genomic clone from Theobroma cacao containing a putative TcNPR1 gene. DNA sequencing revealed the presence of a 4.5 kb coding region containing three introns and encoding a polypeptide of 591 amino acids. The predicted TcNPR1 protein shares 55% identity and 78% similarity to Arabidopsis NPR1, and contains each of the highly conserved functional domains indicative of this class of transcription factors (BTB/POZ and ankyrin repeat protein-protein interaction domains and a nuclear localization sequence (NLS. To functionally define the TcNPR1 gene, we transferred TcNPR1 into an Arabidopsis npr1 mutant that is highly susceptible to infection by the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Driven by the constitutive CaMV35S promoter, the cacao TcNPR1 gene partially complemented the npr1 mutation in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, resulting in 100 fold less bacterial growth in a leaf infection assay. Upon induction with SA, TcNPR1 was shown to translocate into the nucleus of leaf and root cells in a manner identical to Arabidopsis NPR1. Cacao NPR1 was also capable of participating in SA-JA signaling crosstalk, as evidenced by the suppression of JA responsive gene expression in TcNPR1 overexpressing transgenic plants. Conclusion Our data indicate that the TcNPR1 is a functional

  15. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes between Brassica species and Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jingyin; Tehrim, Sadia; Zhang, Fengqi; Tong, Chaobo; Huang, Junyan; Cheng, Xiaohui; Dong, Caihua; Zhou, Yanqiu; Qin, Rui; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant disease resistance (R) genes with the nucleotide binding site (NBS) play an important role in offering resistance to pathogens. The availability of complete genome sequences of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa provides an important opportunity for researchers to identify and characterize NBS-encoding R genes in Brassica species and to compare with analogues in Arabidopsis thaliana based on a comparative genomics approach. However, little is known about the evolutionary fat...

  16. Functional analysis of the theobroma cacao NPR1 gene in arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Verica Joseph; Liu Yi; Maximova Siela N; Shi Zi; Guiltinan Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene encodes a transcription coactivator (NPR1) that plays a major role in the mechanisms regulating plant defense response. After pathogen infection and in response to salicylic acid (SA) accumulation, NPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus where it interacts with other transcription factors resulting in increased expression of over 2000 plant defense genes contributing to a pathogen resistance response. Results A putative Theo...

  17. Gynoecium patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana : control of transmitting tract development by the HECATE genes

    OpenAIRE

    Gremski, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis gynoecium promotes the fertilization of ovules and subsequent seed development and dispersal. During fertilization, pollen adheres to the stigma and forms pollen tubes that grow through the stigma cells and the extracellular matrix of the transmitting tract toward the ovules. We have identified three genes, HECATE1 (HEC1), HECATE2 (HEC2), HECATE3 (HEC3, which have redundant roles in controlling transmitting tract and stigma development. The HEC genes encode closely related bas...

  18. The role of sugars and sugar metabolism genes (sucrose synthase) in arabidopsis thaliana seed development

    OpenAIRE

    Odunlami, Benjamin Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    Seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana, has been studied at several levels. However, little has been done to study the role of sugar metabolism genes in seed pod development in this species. As the fertilized egg progresses to a mature seed, the sugars composition during different stages of the developing changes. These changes are related to metabolic processes in the developing seeds, but also to the activity of sucrose- converting and transporting genes, active at the interphase between ...

  19. Redox state of plastoquinone pool regulates expression of Arabidopsis thaliana genes in response to elevated irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiec, Małgorzata; Drath, Maria; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    DNA microarray technology was applied to gain insight into the role of the redox state of PQ pool as a retrograde factor mediating differential expression of Arabidopsis nuclear genes during the acclimation to changing irradiance. DNA microarray chips containing probes corresponding to 24,000 Arabidopsis nuclear genes were screened with cRNA samples prepared from leaves of plants exposed for 5 h to low irradiance (control) vs. medium, high and excessive irradiances (MI, HI and EI, respectively). Six hundred and sixty three genes were differentially expressed as a result of an exposure to at least one elevated irradiance. Among 663 differentially expressed genes a total of 50 were reverted by DCMU--24 ones modulated at medium irradiance, 32 ones modulated at high irradiance and a single one modulated at excessive irradiance. We postulate that their expression is regulated by redox state of plastoquinone (PQ) pool. Thus the PQ-mediated redox regulation of expression of Arabidopsis nuclear genes is probably limited to the irradiance window representing non-stressing conditions. We found that the promoter regions of the PQ-regulated genes contained conserved elements, suggesting transcriptional control by a shared set of trans-acting factors which participate in signal transduction from the redox state of the PQ pool. PMID:18231654

  20. The Arabidopsis Root Transcriptome by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression. Gene Identification Using the Genome Sequence1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizames, Cécile; Muños, Stéphane; Cazettes, Céline; Nacry, Philippe; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Piquemal, David; Delorme, Valérie; Commes, Thérèse; Doumas, Patrick; Cooke, Richard; Marti, Jacques; Sentenac, Hervé; Gojon, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale identification of genes expressed in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis was performed by serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), on a total of 144,083 sequenced tags, representing at least 15,964 different mRNAs. For tag to gene assignment, we developed a computational approach based on 26,620 genes annotated from the complete sequence of the genome. The procedure selected warrants the identification of the genes corresponding to the majority of the tags found experimentally, with a high level of reliability, and provides a reference database for SAGE studies in Arabidopsis. This new resource allowed us to characterize the expression of more than 3,000 genes, for which there is no expressed sequence tag (EST) or cDNA in the databases. Moreover, 85% of the tags were specific for one gene. To illustrate this advantage of SAGE for functional genomics, we show that our data allow an unambiguous analysis of most of the individual genes belonging to 12 different ion transporter multigene families. These results indicate that, compared with EST-based tag to gene assignment, the use of the annotated genome sequence greatly improves gene identification in SAGE studies. However, more than 6,000 different tags remained with no gene match, suggesting that a significant proportion of transcripts present in the roots originate from yet unknown or wrongly annotated genes. The root transcriptome characterized in this study markedly differs from those obtained in other organs, and provides a unique resource for investigating the functional specificities of the root system. As an example of the use of SAGE for transcript profiling in Arabidopsis, we report here the identification of 270 genes differentially expressed between roots of plants grown either with NO3- or NH4NO3 as N source. PMID:14730065

  1. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress. PMID:27191596

  2. Characterization of the Ubiquitin E2 Enzyme Variant Gene Family in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Pei Wen; On-Sun Lau; Xing-Wang Deng

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitin E2 enzyme variant (UEV) proteins are similar to ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) in both sequence and structure, but the lack of a catalytic cysteine residue renders them incapable of forming a thiolester linkage with ubiquitin. While the functional roles of several UEVs have been defined in yeast and animal systems, Arabidopsis COP10, a photomorphogenesis repressor, is the only UEV characterized in plants. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the eight Arabidopsis UEV genes belong to three subfamilies.The expression of those genes is supported by either the presence of ESTs or RT-PCR analysis. We also characterized the other members of the COP10 subfamily, UEV2. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the UEV2 transcripts can be detected in most organs of Arabidopsis. Analysis of UEV2::GUS transgenic lines also showed its ubiquitous expression in nearly all the developmental stages of Arabidopsis.Transient expression analysis indicated that the sGFP-UEV2 fusion protein can localize to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. A T-DNA insertion mutant, uev2-1, which abolished the transcription of UEV2, displays no visible phenotype. Further, the cop10-4 uev2-1 double mutant exhibits the same phenotype as the cop10-4mutant in darkness. UEV2 is therefore not functionally redundant with COP10.

  3. Discovery of core biotic stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrine, Katherine C H; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Cantu, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Intricate signal networks and transcriptional regulators translate the recognition of pathogens into defense responses. In this study, we carried out a gene co-expression analysis of all currently publicly available microarray data, which were generated in experiments that studied the interaction of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with microbial pathogens. This work was conducted to identify (i) modules of functionally related co-expressed genes that are differentially expressed in response to multiple biotic stresses, and (ii) hub genes that may function as core regulators of disease responses. Using Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) we constructed an undirected network leveraging a rich curated expression dataset comprising 272 microarrays that involved microbial infections of Arabidopsis plants with a wide array of fungal and bacterial pathogens with biotrophic, hemibiotrophic, and necrotrophic lifestyles. WGCNA produced a network with scale-free and small-world properties composed of 205 distinct clusters of co-expressed genes. Modules of functionally related co-expressed genes that are differentially regulated in response to multiple pathogens were identified by integrating differential gene expression testing with functional enrichment analyses of gene ontology terms, known disease associated genes, transcriptional regulators, and cis-regulatory elements. The significance of functional enrichments was validated by comparisons with randomly generated networks. Network topology was then analyzed to identify intra- and inter-modular gene hubs. Based on high connectivity, and centrality in meta-modules that are clearly enriched in defense responses, we propose a list of 66 target genes for reverse genetic experiments to further dissect the Arabidopsis immune system. Our results show that statistical-based data trimming prior to network analysis allows the integration of expression datasets generated by different groups, under different

  4. Discovery of core biotic stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C H Amrine

    Full Text Available Intricate signal networks and transcriptional regulators translate the recognition of pathogens into defense responses. In this study, we carried out a gene co-expression analysis of all currently publicly available microarray data, which were generated in experiments that studied the interaction of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with microbial pathogens. This work was conducted to identify (i modules of functionally related co-expressed genes that are differentially expressed in response to multiple biotic stresses, and (ii hub genes that may function as core regulators of disease responses. Using Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA we constructed an undirected network leveraging a rich curated expression dataset comprising 272 microarrays that involved microbial infections of Arabidopsis plants with a wide array of fungal and bacterial pathogens with biotrophic, hemibiotrophic, and necrotrophic lifestyles. WGCNA produced a network with scale-free and small-world properties composed of 205 distinct clusters of co-expressed genes. Modules of functionally related co-expressed genes that are differentially regulated in response to multiple pathogens were identified by integrating differential gene expression testing with functional enrichment analyses of gene ontology terms, known disease associated genes, transcriptional regulators, and cis-regulatory elements. The significance of functional enrichments was validated by comparisons with randomly generated networks. Network topology was then analyzed to identify intra- and inter-modular gene hubs. Based on high connectivity, and centrality in meta-modules that are clearly enriched in defense responses, we propose a list of 66 target genes for reverse genetic experiments to further dissect the Arabidopsis immune system. Our results show that statistical-based data trimming prior to network analysis allows the integration of expression datasets generated by different groups

  5. Identification and Expression Profiling of Radiation-sensitive Genes Using Plant Model System, Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to characterize genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing energy (gamma-rays) of acute irradiation and elucidate signalling mechanisms via functional analysis of isolated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent improvements in DNA microarray technologies and bioinformatics have made it possible to look for common features of ionizing radiation-responsive genes and their regulatory regions. It has produced massive quantities of gene expression and other functional genomics data, and its application will increase in plant genomics. In this study, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to detect the Arabidopsis genes expressed differentially by a gamma-irradiation during the vegetative (VT, 21 DAG) and reproductive (RT, 28 DAG) stages. Wild-type (Ler) Arabidopsis was irradiated with gamma-rays with 100 and 800 Gy doses. Among the 21,500 genes represented in the Agilent chip, approximately 13,500 (∼61.4 %) responsive genes to ν -irradiation were expressed with signal intensity greater than 192 when compared to the combined control (non-irradiated vegetative and reproductive pool). Expression patterns of several radiation inducible genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and Northern blotting. Our microarray results may contribute to an overall understanding of the type and quantities of genes that are expressed by an acute gamma-irradiation. In addition, to investigate the oxidative damage caused by irradiation, RT-PCR analysis for the expression of antioxidant isoenzyme genes, and a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation for visualizing the H2O2 scavenging activity in leaves were applied

  6. Identification and Expression Profiling of Radiation-sensitive Genes Using Plant Model System, Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sub; Kang, Si-Yong; Lee, Geung-Joo; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to characterize genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing energy (gamma-rays) of acute irradiation and elucidate signalling mechanisms via functional analysis of isolated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent improvements in DNA microarray technologies and bioinformatics have made it possible to look for common features of ionizing radiation-responsive genes and their regulatory regions. It has produced massive quantities of gene expression and other functional genomics data, and its application will increase in plant genomics. In this study, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to detect the Arabidopsis genes expressed differentially by a gamma-irradiation during the vegetative (VT, 21 DAG) and reproductive (RT, 28 DAG) stages. Wild-type (Ler) Arabidopsis was irradiated with gamma-rays with 100 and 800 Gy doses. Among the 21,500 genes represented in the Agilent chip, approximately 13,500 ({sup {approx}}61.4 %) responsive genes to {nu} -irradiation were expressed with signal intensity greater than 192 when compared to the combined control (non-irradiated vegetative and reproductive pool). Expression patterns of several radiation inducible genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and Northern blotting. Our microarray results may contribute to an overall understanding of the type and quantities of genes that are expressed by an acute gamma-irradiation. In addition, to investigate the oxidative damage caused by irradiation, RT-PCR analysis for the expression of antioxidant isoenzyme genes, and a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation for visualizing the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenging activity in leaves were applied.

  7. Putative sugarcane FT/TFL1 genes delay flowering time and alter reproductive architecture in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla P. Coelho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agriculturally important grasses such as rice, maize and sugarcane are evolutionarily distant from Arabidopsis, yet some components of the floral induction process are highly conserved. Flowering in sugarcane is an important factor that negatively affects cane yield and reduces sugar/ethanol production from this important perennial bioenergy crop. Comparative studies have facilitated the identification and characterization of putative orthologs of key flowering time genes in sugarcane, a complex polyploid plant whose genome has yet to be sequenced completely. Using this approach we identified phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP gene family members in sugarcane that are similar to the archetypical FT and TFL1 genes of Arabidopsis that play an essential role in controlling the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Expression analysis of ScTFL1, which falls into the TFL1-clade of floral repressors, showed transcripts in developing leaves surrounding the shoot apex but not at the apex itself. ScFT1 was detected in immature leaves and apical regions of vegetatively growing plants and, after the floral transition, expression also occurred in mature leaves. Ectopic over-expression of ScTFL1 in Arabidopsis caused delayed flowering in Arabidopsis, as might be expected for a gene related to TFL1. In addition, lines with the latest flowering phenotype exhibited aerial rosette formation. Unexpectedly, over-expression of ScFT1, which has greatest similarity to the florigen-encoding FT, also caused a delay in flowering. This preliminary analysis of divergent sugarcane FT and TFL1 gene family members from Saccharum spp. suggests that their expression patterns and roles in the floral transition has diverged from the predicted role of similar PEBP family members.

  8. Epidermal control of floral organ identity by class B homeotic genes in Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, N; Perbal, M C; Yephremov, A; Hofmann, W A; Saedler, H; Schwarz-Sommer, Z

    2001-07-01

    To assess the contribution of the epidermis to the control of petal and stamen organ identity, we have used transgenic Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis plants that expressed the Antirrhinum class B homeotic transcription factors DEFICIENS (DEF) and GLOBOSA (GLO) in the epidermis. Transgene expression was controlled by the ANTIRRHINUM FIDDLEHEAD (AFI) promoter, which directs gene expression to the L1 meristematic layer and, later, to the epidermis of differentiating organs. Transgenic epidermal DEF and GLO chimeras display similar phenotypes, suggesting similar epidermal contributions by the two class B genes in ANTIRRHINUM: Epidermal B function autonomously controls the differentiation of Antirrhinum petal epidermal cell types, but cannot fully control the pattern of cell divisions and the specification of sub-epidermal petal cell-identity by epidermal signalling. This non-autonomous control is enhanced if the endogenous class B genes can be activated from the epidermis. The developmental influence of epidermal B function in Antirrhinum stamen development is very limited. In contrast, epidermal B function in Arabidopsis can control most if not all epidermal and sub-epidermal differentiation events in petals and stamens, without any contribution from the endogenous class B genes. Possible reasons for differences in the efficacy of B-function-mediated cell communication between the two species are discussed. Interestingly, our experiments uncovered partial incompatibility between class B functional homologues. Although the DEFICIENS/PISTILLATA heterodimer is functional in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, the APETALA3/GLOBOSA heterodimer is not. PMID:11526073

  9. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hincha Dirk K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE and/or low temperature response (LTRE elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for

  10. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  11. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase. PMID:27457990

  12. Identification of brassinosteroid responsive genes in Arabidopsis by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡玉欣; 汪政科; 王永红; 包方; 李凝; 彭镇华; 李家洋

    2001-01-01

    We have systematically monitored brassinosteroid (BR) responsive genes in a BR-deficient mutant det2 suspension culture of Arabidopsis by using a cDNA array approach. Among 13000 cDNA clones arrayed on filters, 53 BR responsive clones were identified and designated BRR1-BRR53. Sequence analysis of 43 clones showed that 19 clones are novel genes, 3 clones are genes involved in the control of cell division, 4 clones are genes related to plant stress responses, 4 clones are transcriptional factor or signal transduction component genes, and 3 clones are genes involved in RNA splicing or structure forming. In addition, we also found that BR regulated the transcription of genes related to many physiological processes, such as photoreaction, ion transportation and some metabolic processes. These findings present molecular evidence that BR plays an essential role in plant growth and development.

  13. Abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis overexpressing the multiprotein bridging factor 1a (MBF1a) transcriptional coactivator gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jung; Lim, Gah-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Seon; Ko, Chang-Beom; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Jeong, Jin-An; Lee, Myung-Chul; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2007-03-01

    We conducted a genetic yeast screen to identify salt tolerance (SAT) genes in a maize kernel cDNA library. During the screening, we identified a maize clone (SAT41) that seemed to confer elevated salt tolerance in comparison to control cells. SAT41 cDNA encodes a 16-kDa protein which is 82.4% identical to the Arabidopsis Multiprotein bridging factor 1a (MBF1a) transcriptional coactivator gene. To further examine salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis, we functionally characterized the MBF1a gene and found that dehydration as well as heightened glucose (Glc) induced MBF1a expression. Constitutive expression of MBF1a in Arabidopsis led to elevated salt tolerance in transgenic lines. Interestingly, plants overexpressing MBF1a exhibited insensitivity to Glc and resistance to fungal disease. Our results suggest that MBF1a is involved in stress tolerance as well as in ethylene and Glc signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:17234157

  14. Cloning of the Arabidopsis WIGGUM gene identifies a role for farnesylation in meristem development

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegelhoffer, Eva C.; Medrano, Leonard J.; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2000-01-01

    Control of cellular proliferation in plant meristems is important for maintaining the correct number and position of developing organs. One of the genes identified in the control of floral and apical meristem size and floral organ number in Arabidopsis thaliana is WIGGUM. In wiggum mutants, one of the most striking phenotypes is an increase in floral organ number, particularly in the sepals and petals, correlating with an increase in the width of young floral meristems. Additional phenotypes ...

  15. The Arabidopsis Athb-2 and -4 genes are strongly induced by far-red-rich light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, M; Sessa, G; Baima, S; Morelli, G; Ruberti, I

    1993-09-01

    The isolation and characterization of the Athb-2 gene, which codes for a HD-Zip protein in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported. Interestingly, Southern analysis has established that the Arabidopsis genome contains sequences which are highly related to the Athb-2 HD-Zip coding region. One of these genes, designated Athb-4, has been cloned and partially sequenced. Amino acid sequence comparison revealed that Athb-2 and -4 are members of a small family of HD-Zip related proteins. Athb-2 mRNA analysis showed that this gene is expressed during the vegetative and reproductive phases of plant growth. A significant increment in the amount of Athb-2 transcripts was observed in flowering plants. A higher steady-state level of the Athb-2 mRNA was also found in dark-adapted plants. Remarkably, far-red-rich light treatment of Arabidopsis plants results in a rapid and strong induction of the Athb-2 expression. This light treatment also induces the accumulation of Athb-4 transcripts, suggesting a similar role for the two members of this HD-Zip family. PMID:8106086

  16. Expression pattern of the AHP gene family from Arabidopsis thaliana and organ specific alternative splicing in the AHP5 gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradilová, Jana; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2007), s. 257-267. ISSN 0006-3134 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A081; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600040612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : Arabidopsis two component systems * gene expression analysis * real time RT-PCR Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  17. Conserved non-coding regulatory signatures in Arabidopsis co-expressed gene modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob B Spangler

    Full Text Available Complex traits and other polygenic processes require coordinated gene expression. Co-expression networks model mRNA co-expression: the product of gene regulatory networks. To identify regulatory mechanisms underlying coordinated gene expression in a tissue-enriched context, ten Arabidopsis thaliana co-expression networks were constructed after manually sorting 4,566 RNA profiling datasets into aerial, flower, leaf, root, rosette, seedling, seed, shoot, whole plant, and global (all samples combined groups. Collectively, the ten networks contained 30% of the measurable genes of Arabidopsis and were circumscribed into 5,491 modules. Modules were scrutinized for cis regulatory mechanisms putatively encoded in conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs previously identified as remnants of a whole genome duplication event. We determined the non-random association of 1,361 unique CNSs to 1,904 co-expression network gene modules. Furthermore, the CNS elements were placed in the context of known gene regulatory networks (GRNs by connecting 250 CNS motifs with known GRN cis elements. Our results provide support for a regulatory role of some CNS elements and suggest the functional consequences of CNS activation of co-expression in specific gene sets dispersed throughout the genome.

  18. Two GATA transcription factors are downstream effectors of floral homeotic gene action in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Chloe D; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-06-01

    Floral organogenesis is dependent on the combinatorial action of MADS-box transcription factors, which in turn control the expression of suites of genes required for growth, patterning, and differentiation. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the specification of petal and stamen identity depends on the action of two MADS-box gene products, APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). In a screen for genes whose expression was altered in response to the induction of AP3 activity, we identified GNC (GATA, nitrate-inducible, carbon-metabolism-involved) as being negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. The GNC gene encodes a member of the Arabidopsis GATA transcription factor family and has been implicated in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis as well as carbon and nitrogen metabolism. In addition, we found that the GNC paralog, GNL (GNC-like), is also negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that promoter sequences of both GNC and GNL are bound by PI protein, suggesting a direct regulatory interaction. Analyses of single and double gnc and gnl mutants indicated that the two genes share redundant roles in promoting chlorophyll biosynthesis, suggesting that in repressing GNC and GNL, AP3/PI have roles in negatively regulating this biosynthetic pathway in flowers. In addition, coexpression analyses of genes regulated by AP3, PI, GNC, and GNL indicate a complex regulatory interplay between these transcription factors in regulating a variety of light and nutrient responsive genes. Together, these results provide new insights into the transcriptional cascades controlling the specification of floral organ identities. PMID:18417639

  19. SPL8, an SBP-box gene that affects pollen sac development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unte, Ulrike S; Sorensen, Anna-Marie; Pesaresi, Paolo; Gandikota, Madhuri; Leister, Dario; Saedler, Heinz; Huijser, Peter

    2003-04-01

    SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box genes (SBP-box genes) encode plant-specific proteins that share a highly conserved DNA binding domain, the SBP domain. Although likely to represent transcription factors, little is known about their role in development. In Arabidopsis, SBP-box genes constitute a structurally heterogeneous family of 16 members known as SPL genes. For one of these genes, SPL8, we isolated three independent transposon-tagged mutants, all of which exhibited a strong reduction in fertility. Microscopic analysis revealed that this reduced fertility is attributable primarily to abnormally developed microsporangia, which exhibit premeiotic abortion of the sporocytes. In addition to its role in microsporogenesis, the SPL8 knockout also seems to affect megasporogenesis, trichome formation on sepals, and stamen filament elongation. The SPL8 mutants described help to uncover the roles of SBP-box genes in plant development. PMID:12671094

  20. Identification and structural analysis of a novel snoRNA gene cluster from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周惠; 孟清; 屈良鹄

    2000-01-01

    A 22 snoRNA gene cluster, consisting of four antisense snoRNA genes, was identified from Arabidopsis thaliana. The sequence and structural analysis showed that the 22 snoRNA gene cluster might be transcribed as a polycistronic precursor from an upstream promoter, and the in-tergenic spacers of the gene cluster encode the ’hairpin’ structures similar to the processing recognition signals of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae polycistronic snoRNA precursor. The results also revealed that plant snoRNA gene with multiple copies is a characteristic in common, and provides a good system for further revealing the transcription and expression mechanism of plant snoRNA gene cluster.

  1. The Arabidopsis NPR1 gene confers broad-spectrum disease resistance in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Katchen Julliany P; Brunings, Asha; Peres, Natalia A; Mou, Zhonglin; Folta, Kevin M

    2015-08-01

    Although strawberry is an economically important fruit crop worldwide, production of strawberry is limited by its susceptibility to a wide range of pathogens and the lack of major commercial cultivars with high levels of resistance to multiple pathogens. The objective of this study is to ectopically express the Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene (AtNPR1) in the diploid strawberry Fragaria vesca L. and to test transgenic plants for disease resistance. AtNPR1 is a key positive regulator of the long-lasting broad-spectrum resistance known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and has been shown to confer resistance to a number of pathogens when overexpressed in Arabidopsis or ectopically expressed in several crop species. We show that ectopic expression of AtNPR1 in strawberry increases resistance to anthracnose, powdery mildew, and angular leaf spot, which are caused by different fungal or bacterial pathogens. The increased resistance is related to the relative expression levels of AtNPR1 in the transgenic plants. In contrast to Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtNPR1, which grow normally and do not constitutively express defense genes, the strawberry transgenic plants are shorter than non-transformed controls, and most of them fail to produce runners and fruits. Consistently, most of the transgenic lines constitutively express the defense gene FvPR5, suggesting that the SAR activation mechanisms in strawberry and Arabidopsis are different. Nevertheless, our results indicate that overexpression of AtNPR1 holds the potential for generation of broad-spectrum disease resistance in strawberry. PMID:25812515

  2. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV. Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were

  3. Isolation of Promoters and Fragments of Genes Controlling Endosperm Development Without Fertilization in Arabidopsis and Engineering of the Antisense Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory A. Gerashchenkov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apomixis is asexual seed reproduction without both meiosis and fertilization based on the complex developmental processes such as apomeiosis, parthenogenesis and specific endosperm development. This investigation is aimed at engineering of apomixis in Arabidopsis thaliana with sexual seed reproduction. The fragments of known genes of endosperm formation MEA, FIE, FIS2 and gene of apomeiosis DYAD (as control were isolated using Q5 high fidelity DNA polymerase. These gene fragments of interest at the antisense orientation were fused with isolated constitutive and meiosis specific promoters of Arabidopsis at NcoI sites. The fused promoter-gene fragment modules were cloned in pCambia1301 at SalI cites. The engineered constructions will be used for the floral dip transformation of Arabidopsis and down regulation of these genes at engineering of apomixis.

  4. Gene coexpression analysis reveals complex metabolism of the monoterpene alcohol linalool in Arabidopsis flowers.

    OpenAIRE

    Ginglinger, J.-F.; Boachon, B.; Hofer, R.; Paetz, C.; Kollner, T. G.; Miesch, L.; Lugan, R.; Baltenweck, R.; Mutterer, J.; Ullmann, P.; Beran, F.; Claudel, P.; Verstappen, F.; Fischer, M. J. C.; Karst, F

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simu...

  5. ATAF1 transcription factor directly regulates abscisic acid biosynthetic gene NCED3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Lindemose, Søren; De Masi, Federico;

    2013-01-01

    ATAF1, an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor, plays important roles in plant adaptation to environmental stress and development. To search for ATAF1 target genes, we used protein binding microarrays and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). This identified T[A,C,G]CGT[A,G] and TT...... key abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone biosynthetic gene NCED3. ChIP-qPCR and expression analysis showed that ATAF1 binding to the NCED3 promoter correlated with increased NCED3 expression and ABA hormone levels. These results indicate that ATAF1 regulates ABA biosynthesis....

  6. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  7. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    St Clair Dina A; Morgante Michele; West Marilyn AL; Kozik Alexander; Meyers Blake C; Tan Xiaoping; Bent Andrew F; Michelmore Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of...

  8. Analysis of gene expression in resynthesized Brassica napus Allopolyploids using arabidopsis 70mer oligo microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Gaeta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in resynthesized Brassica napus allopolyploids indicate that homoeologous chromosome exchanges in advanced generations (S(5ratio6 alter gene expression through the loss and doubling of homoeologous genes within the rearrangements. Rearrangements may also indirectly affect global gene expression if homoeologous copies of gene regulators within rearrangements have differential affects on the transcription of genes in networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We utilized Arabidopsis 70mer oligonucleotide microarrays for exploring gene expression in three resynthesized B. napus lineages at the S(0ratio1 and S(5ratio6 generations as well as their diploid progenitors B. rapa and B. oleracea. Differential gene expression between the progenitors and additive (midparent expression in the allopolyploids were tested. The S(5ratio6 lines differed in the number of genetic rearrangements, allowing us to test if the number of genes displaying nonadditive expression was related to the number of rearrangements. Estimates using per-gene and common variance ANOVA models indicated that 6-15% of 26,107 genes were differentially expressed between the progenitors. Individual allopolyploids showed nonadditive expression for 1.6-32% of all genes. Less than 0.3% of genes displayed nonadditive expression in all S(0ratio1 lines and 0.1-0.2% were nonadditive among all S(5ratio6 lines. Differentially expressed genes in the polyploids were over-represented by genes differential between the progenitors. The total number of differentially expressed genes was correlated with the number of genetic changes in S(5ratio6 lines under the common variance model; however, there was no relationship using a per-gene variance model, and many genes showed nonadditive expression in S(0ratio1 lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Few genes reproducibly demonstrated nonadditive expression among lineages, suggesting few changes resulted from a general response to polyploidization

  9. Identification of auxin responsive genes in Arabidopsis by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin influences a variety of developmental and physiological processes. But the mechanism of its action is quite unclear. In order to identify and analyze the expression of auxin responsive genes, a cDNA array approach was used to screen for genes with altered expression from Arabidopsis suspension culture after IAA treatment and was identified 50 differentially expressed genes from 13824 cDNA clones. These genes were related to signal transduction, stress responses, senescence, photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis and transportation. The results provide the molecular evidence that auxin influences a variety of physiological processes and pave a way for further investigation of the mechanism of auxin action. Furthermore,we found that the expression of a ClpC (regulation subunit of Clp protease) was repressed by exogenous auxin, but increased in dark-induced senescing leaves. This suggests that ClpC may be a senescence-associated gene and can be regulated by auxin.

  10. Analysis of T-DNA alleles of flavonoid biosynthesis genes in Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Bowerman Peter A; Ramirez Melissa V; Price Michelle B; Helm Richard F; Winkel Brenda SJ

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The flavonoid pathway is a long-standing and important tool for plant genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology. Numerous flavonoid mutants have been identified in Arabidopsis over the past several decades in a variety of ecotypes. Here we present an analysis of Arabidopsis lines of ecotype Columbia carrying T-DNA insertions in genes encoding enzymes of the central flavonoid pathway. We also provide a comprehensive summary of various mutant alleles for these structural...

  11. Two rubisco activase genes from ipomoea batatas have different roles in photosynthesis of arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) that functions as a molecular chaperone regulates the activity of the Calvin-Benson cycle via regulation of the Rubisco activity. In plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana, Spinacia oleracea, and Oryza sativa, there are two RCA isoforms from two mRNAs that are produced from alternative splicing of the transcribed pre-mRNA of a single RCA gene. However, this research reported that the transcripts of the two IbRCA isoforms in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) were transcribed from two different genes. To study the roles of these two IbRCA isoforms in photosynthesis, we inserted these two IbRCA genes into the genome of Arabidopsis with deletion of RCA gene (RCA), resulting in IbRCAs- and IbRCAl-expressing plants, respectively. Analysis of these transgenic Arabidopsis indicated that the IbRCAs-expressing plants were similar to wild-type plants under ambient CO/sub 2/ concentration and 22 degree C conditions, suggesting that expression of IbRCAs gene was sufficient for functional complementation of RCA plants under normal conditions. However, IbRCAs-expressing plants were more susceptible to moderate heat stress (26 degree C) compared to wild-type plants. In contrast, although the IbRCAl-expressing plants had to grow normally in high CO/sub 2/ concentration conditions, there were almost no differences in growth and photosynthesis between normally grown and heat-treated plants, implying that IbRCAl-expressing plants had a better heat-resistance than IbRCAs-expressing plants. (author)

  12. Differential Selective Constraints Shaping Codon Usage Pattern of Housekeeping and Tissue-specific Homologous Genes of Rice and Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Pamela; Basak, Surajit; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2008-01-01

    Intra-genomic variation between housekeeping and tissue-specific genes has always been a study of interest in higher eukaryotes. To-date, however, no such investigation has been done in plants. Availability of whole genome expression data for both rice and Arabidopsis has made it possible to examine the evolutionary forces in shaping codon usage pattern in both housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in plants. In the present work, we have taken 4065 rice–Arabidopsis homologous gene pairs to s...

  13. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  14. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjul Dutt

    Full Text Available Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB, a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2 promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree.

  15. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Manjul; Barthe, Gary; Irey, Michael; Grosser, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB), a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree. PMID:26398891

  16. Characterization of Putative cis-Regulatory Elements in Genes Preferentially Expressed in Arabidopsis Male Meiocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is essential for plant reproduction because it is the process during which homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and meiotic recombination occur. The meiotic transcriptome is difficult to investigate because of the size of meiocytes and the confines of anther lobes. The recent development of isolation techniques has enabled the characterization of transcriptional profiles in male meiocytes of Arabidopsis. Gene expression in male meiocytes shows unique features. The direct interaction of transcription factors (TFs with DNA regulatory sequences forms the basis for the specificity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we identified putative cis-regulatory elements (CREs associated with male meiocyte-expressed genes using in silico tools. The upstream regions (1 kb of the top 50 genes preferentially expressed in Arabidopsis meiocytes possessed conserved motifs. These motifs are putative binding sites of TFs, some of which share common functions, such as roles in cell division. In combination with cell-type-specific analysis, our findings could be a substantial aid for the identification and experimental verification of the protein-DNA interactions for the specific TFs that drive gene expression in meiocytes.

  17. Transcriptomic profiling of Arabidopsis gene expression in response to varying micronutrient zinc supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlânder Azevedo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the micronutrient zinc is a widespread condition in agricultural soils, causing a negative impact on crop quality and yield. Nevertheless, there is an insufficient knowledge on the regulatory and molecular mechanisms underlying the plant response to inadequate zinc nutrition [1]. This information should contribute to the development of plant-based solutions with improved nutrient-use-efficiency traits in crops. Previously, the transcription factors bZIP19 and bZIP23 were identified as essential regulators of the response to zinc deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana [2]. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression between roots of wild-type and the mutant bzip19 bzip23, exposed to zinc deficiency, led to the identification of differentially expressed genes related with zinc homeostasis, namely its transport and plant internal translocation [2]. Here, we provide the detailed methodology, bioinformatics analysis and quality controls related to the microarray gene expression profiling published by Assunção and co-workers [2]. Most significantly, the present dataset comprises new experimental variables, including analysis of shoot tissue, and zinc sufficiency and excess supply. Thus, it expands from 8 to 42 microarrays hybridizations, which have been deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under the accession number GSE77286. Overall, it provides a resource for research on the molecular basis and regulatory events of the plant response to zinc supply, emphasizing the importance of Arabidopsis bZIP19 and bZIP23 transcription factors.

  18. Growth Media Induces Variation in Cell Wall Associated Gene Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana Pollen Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Luís da Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of three different pollen germination media on the transcript profile of Arabidopsis pollen tubes has been assessed by real-time PCR on a selection of cell wall related genes, and by a statistical analysis of microarray Arabidopsis pollen tube data sets. The qPCR assays have shown remarkable differences on the transcript levels of specific genes depending upon the formulation of the germination medium used. With the aid of principal component analysis performed on existing microarray data, a subset of genes has been identified that is more prone to produce diverging transcript levels. A functional classification of those genes showed that the clusters with higher number of members were those for hydrolase activity (based in molecular function and for cell wall (based in cellular component. Taken together, these results may indicate that the nutrient composition of the pollen germination media influences pollen tube metabolism and that caution must be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data of pollen tubes.

  19. In silico identification of known osmotic stress responsive genes from Arabidopsis in soybean and Medicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Soares-Cavalcanti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants experience various environmental stresses, but tolerance to these adverse conditions is a very complex phenomenon. The present research aimed to evaluate a set of genes involved in osmotic response, comparing soybean and medicago with the well-described Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. Based on 103 Arabidopsis proteins from 27 categories of osmotic stress response, comparative analyses against Genosoja and Medicago truncatula databases allowed the identification of 1,088 soybean and 1,210 Medicago sequences. The analysis showed a high number of sequences and high diversity, comprising genes from all categories in both organisms. Genes with unknown function were among the most representative, followed by transcription factors, ion transport proteins, water channel, plant defense, protein degradation, cellular structure, organization & biogenesis and senescence. An analysis of sequences with unknown function allowed the annotation of 174 soybean and 217 Medicago sequences, most of them concerning transcription factors. However, for about 30% of the sequences no function could be attributed using in silico procedures. The establishment of a gene set involved in osmotic stress responses in soybean and barrel medic will help to better understand the survival mechanisms for this type of stress condition in legumes.

  20. Retinoblastoma-like RRB gene of arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Tim; Feiler, Heidi; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Jenkins, Susan; Roe, Judith; Zambryski, Patricia

    2004-02-24

    This invention provides methods and compositions for altering the growth, organization, and differentiation of plant tissues. The invention is based on the discovery that, in plants, genetically altering the levels of Retinoblastoma-related gene (RRB) activity produces dramatic effects on the growth, proliferation, organization, and differentiation of plant meristem.

  1. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Dolferus, R; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved fr...

  2. Transcriptional profiling of pea ABR17 mediated changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyholos Michael K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenesis-related proteins belonging to group 10 (PR10 are elevated in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Previously, we have shown a drastic salinity-induced increase in the levels of ABR17, a member of the PR10 family, in pea. Furthermore, we have also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus enhances their germination and early seedling growth under stress. Although it has been reported that several members of the PR10 family including ABR17 possess RNase activity, the exact mechanism by which the aforementioned characteristics are conferred by ABR17 is unknown at this time. We hypothesized that a study of differences in transcriptome between wild type (WT and ABR17 transgenic A. thaliana may shed light on this process. Results The molecular changes brought about by the expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in A. thaliana in the presence or absence of salt stress were investigated using microarrays consisting of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes. Statistical analysis identified number of genes which were over represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts in the transgenic line. Our results highlight the important roles of many abscisic acid (ABA and cytokinin (CK responsive genes in ABR17 transgenic lines. Although the transcriptional changes followed a general salt response theme in both WT and transgenic seedlings under salt stress, many genes exhibited differential expression patterns when the transgenic and WT lines were compared. These genes include plant defensins, heat shock proteins, other defense related genes, and several transcriptional factors. Our microarray results for selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion Transcriptional analysis in ABR17 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, both under normal and saline conditions, revealed significant changes in abundance of

  3. Oscillating Gene Expression Determines Competence for Periodic Arabidopsis Root Branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A.; Van Norman, Jaimie M.; Moreno, Antonio; Zhang, Jingyuan; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2010-01-01

    Plants and animals produce modular developmental units in a periodic fashion. In plants, lateral roots form as repeating units along the root primary axis; however, the developmental mechanism regulating this process is unknown. We found that cyclic expression pulses of a reporter gene mark the position of future lateral roots by establishing prebranch sites and that prebranch site production and root bending are periodic. Microarray and promoter-luciferase studies revealed two sets of genes oscillating in opposite phases at the root tip. Genetic studies show that some oscillating transcriptional regulators are required for periodicity in one or both developmental processes. This molecular mechanism has characteristics that resemble molecular clock–driven activities in animal species. PMID:20829477

  4. CuO Nanoparticle Interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana: Toxicity, Parent-Progeny Transfer, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Lina; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Xiangke; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-06-01

    CuO nanoparticles (NPs) (20, 50 mg L(-1)) inhibited seedling growth of different Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes (Col-0, Bay-0, and Ws-2), as well as the germination of their pollens and harvested seeds. For most of growth parameters (e.g., biomass, relative growth rate, root morphology change), Col-0 was the more sensitive ecotype to CuO NPs compared to Bay-0 and Ws-2. Equivalent Cu(2+) ions and CuO bulk particles had no effect on Arabidopsis growth. After CuO NPs (50 mg L(-1)) exposure, Cu was detected in the roots, leaves, flowers and harvested seeds of Arabidopsis, and its contents were significantly higher than that in CuO bulk particles (50 mg L(-1)) and Cu(2+) ions (0.15 mg L(-1)) treatments. Based on X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis (XANES), Cu in the harvested seeds was confirmed as being mainly in the form of CuO (88.8%), which is the first observation on the presence of CuO NPs in the plant progeny. Moreover, after CuO NPs exposure, two differentially expressed genes (C-1 and C-3) that regulated root growth and reactive oxygen species generation were identified, which correlated well with the physiological root inhibition and oxidative stress data. This current study provides direct evidence for the negative effects of CuO NPs on Arabidopsis, including accumulation and parent-progeny transfer of the particles, which may have significant implications with regard to the risk of NPs to food safety and security. PMID:27226046

  5. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns during Seed Coat Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gillian Dean; George Haughn; YoncgGuo Cao; DaoQuan Xiang; Nicholas J. Provart; Larissa Ramsay; Abdul Ahada; Rick White; Gopalan Selvaraj; Raju Datla

    2011-01-01

    The seed coat is important for embryo protection,seed hydration,and dispersal.Seed coat composition is also of interest to the agricultural sector,since it impacts the nutritional value for humans and livestock alike.Although some seed coat genes have been identified,the developmental pathways controlling seed coat development are not completely elucidated,and a global genetic program associated with seed coat development has not been reported.This study uses a combination of genetic and genomic approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana to begin to address these knowledge gaps.Seed coat development is a complex process whereby the integuments of the ovule differentiate into specialized cell types.In Arabidopsis,the outermost layer of cells secretes mucilage into the apoplast and develops a secondary cell wall known as a columella.The layer beneath the epidermis,the palisade,synthesizes a secondary cell wall on its inner tangential side.The innermost layer (the pigmented layer or endothelium) produces proanthocyanidins that condense into tannins and oxidize,giving a brown color to mature seeds.Genetic separation of these cell layers was achieved using the ap2-7 and tt16-1 mutants,where the epidermis/palisade and the endothelium do not develop respectively.This genetic ablation was exploited to examine the developmental programs of these cell types by isolating and collecting seed coats at key transitions during development and performing global gene expression analysis.The data indicate that the developmental programs of the epidermis and the pigmented layer proceed relatively independently.Global expression datasets that can be used for identification of new gene candidates for seed coat development were generated.These dataset provide a comprehensive expression profile for developing seed coats in Arabidopsis,and should provide a useful resource and reference for other seed systems.

  6. Molecular and biochemical characterizations of the monoacylglycerol lipase gene family of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryeo Jin; Kim, Hae Jin; Shim, Donghwan; Suh, Mi Chung

    2016-03-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) catalyzes the last step of triacylglycerol breakdown, which is the hydrolysis of monoacylglycerol (MAG) to fatty acid and glycerol. Arabidopsis harbors over 270 genes annotated as 'lipase', the largest class of acyl lipid metabolism genes that have not been characterized experimentally. In this study, computational modeling suggested that 16 Arabidopsis putative MAGLs (AtMAGLs) have a three-dimensional structure that is similar to a human MAGL. Heterologous expression and enzyme assays indicated that 11 of the 16 encoded proteins indeed possess MAG lipase activity. Additionally, AtMAGL4 displayed hydrolase activity with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) substrates and AtMAGL1 and 2 utilized LPE as a substrate. All recombinant AtMAGLs preferred MAG substrates with unsaturated fatty acids over saturated fatty acids and AtMAGL8 exhibited the highest hydrolase activities with MAG containing 20:1 fatty acids. Except for AtMAGL4, -14 and -16, all AtMAGLs showed similar activity with both sn-1 and sn-2 MAG isomers. Spatial, temporal and stress-induced expression of the 16 AtMAGL genes was analyzed by transcriptome analyses. AtMAGL:eYFP fusion proteins provided initial evidence that AtMAGL1, -3, -6, -7, -8, -11, -13, -14 and -16 are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi network, AtMAGL10, -12 and -15 to the cytosol and AtMAGL2, -4 and -5 to the chloroplasts. Furthermore, AtMAGL8 was associated with the surface of oil bodies in germinating seeds and leaves accumulating oil bodies. This study provides the broad characterization of one of the least well-understood groups of Arabidopsis lipid-related enzymes and will be useful for better understanding their roles in planta. PMID:26932457

  7. CATMA, a comprehensive genome-scale resource for silencing and transcript profiling of Arabidopsis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Complete Arabidopsis Transcript MicroArray (CATMA initiative combines the efforts of laboratories in eight European countries 1 to deliver gene-specific sequence tags (GSTs for the Arabidopsis research community. The CATMA initiative offers the power and flexibility to regularly update the GST collection according to evolving knowledge about the gene repertoire. These GST amplicons can easily be reamplified and shared, subsets can be picked at will to print dedicated arrays, and the GSTs can be cloned and used for other functional studies. This ongoing initiative has already produced approximately 24,000 GSTs that have been made publicly available for spotted microarray printing and RNA interference. Results GSTs from the CATMA version 2 repertoire (CATMAv2, created in 2002 were mapped onto the gene models from two independent Arabidopsis nuclear genome annotation efforts, TIGR5 and PSB-EuGène, to consolidate a list of genes that were targeted by previously designed CATMA tags. A total of 9,027 gene models were not tagged by any amplified CATMAv2 GST, and 2,533 amplified GSTs were no longer predicted to tag an updated gene model. To validate the efficacy of GST mapping criteria and design rules, the predicted and experimentally observed hybridization characteristics associated to GST features were correlated in transcript profiling datasets obtained with the CATMAv2 microarray, confirming the reliability of this platform. To complete the CATMA repertoire, all 9,027 gene models for which no GST had yet been designed were processed with an adjusted version of the Specific Primer and Amplicon Design Software (SPADS. A total of 5,756 novel GSTs were designed and amplified by PCR from genomic DNA. Together with the pre-existing GST collection, this new addition constitutes the CATMAv3 repertoire. It comprises 30,343 unique amplified sequences that tag 24,202 and 23,009 protein-encoding nuclear gene models in the TAIR6 and Eu

  8. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenchuan; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Yang; Rao, Jianan; Luo, Da; He, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We still don't know much about several important aspects of flower development. So we need to discriminate even more genes involving in the flower development. In this study, we identified seven differentially modules through integrating the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) method to analyze co-expression network and PPIs using the public floral and non-floral expression profiles data of Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis was used for the functional annotation of the related genes, and some of the hub genes were identified in each module. The potential floral organ morphogenesis genes of two significant modules were integrated with PPI information in order to detail the inherent regulation mechanisms. Finally, the functions of the floral patterning genes were elucidated by combining the PPI and evolutionary information. It was indicated that the sub-networks or complexes, rather than the genes, were the regulation unit of flower development. We found that the most possible potential new genes underlining the floral pattern formation in A. thaliana were FY, CBL2, ZFN3, and AT1G77370; among them, FY, CBL2 acted as an upstream regulator of AP2; ZFN3 activated the flower primordial determining gene AP1 and AP2 by HY5/HYH gene via photo induction possibly. And AT1G77370 exhibited similar function in floral morphogenesis, same as ELF3. It possibly formed a complex between RFC3 and RPS15 in

  9. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchuan eXie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-protein interactions (PPIs. We still don't know much about several important aspects of flower development. So we need to discriminate even more genes involving in the flower development. In this study, we identified seven differentially modules through integrating the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA and Support Vector Machine (SVM method to analyze co-expression network and PPIs using the public floral and non-floral expression profiles data of Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis was used for the functional annotation of the related genes, and some of the hub genes were identified in each module. The potential floral organ morphogenesis genes of two significant modules were integrated with PPI information in order to detail the inherent regulation mechanisms. Finally, the functions of the floral patterning genes were elucidated by combining the PPI and evolutionary information. It was indicated that the sub-networks or complexes, rather than the genes, were the regulation unit of flower development. We found that the most possible potential new genes underlining the floral pattern formation in A. thaliana were FY, CBL2, ZFN3 and AT1G77370; among them, FY, CBL2 acted as an upstream regulator of AP2; ZFN3 activated the flower primordial determining gene AP1 and AP2 by HY5/HYH gene via photo induction possibly. And AT1G77370 exhibited similar function in floral morphogenesis, same as ELF3. It possibly formed a complex between RFC3

  10. Final Report [Function of the Arabidopsis TIR1 gene in auxin response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estelle, Mark

    2000-12-18

    During this grant period substantial progress was made in the characterization of the TIR1 gene in Arabidopsis. Studies showed that the TIR1 protein is part of a protein complex that includes AtCUL1, ASK1 and RBX1. This complex, called SCF-TIR1, functions in the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway. Our work is the first report of an SCF complex in a plant system. The results of our studies are described in more detail in the report together with a publication resulting from this study.

  11. Map-based cloning of a gene controlling Omega-3 fatty acid desaturation in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arondel, V.; Lemieux, B.; Hwang, I. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1992-11-20

    A gene from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes an omega-3 desaturase was cloned on the basis of the genetic map position of a mutation affecting membrane and storage lipid fatty acid composition. Yeast artificial chromosomes covering the genetic locus were identified and used to probe a seed complementary DNA library. A complementary DNA clone for the desaturase was identified and introduced into roots of both wild-type and mutant plants by Ti plasmid-mediated transformation. Transgenic tissues of both mutant and wild-type plants had significantly increased amounts of the fatty acid produced by this desaturase. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tabs.

  12. An Arabidopsis embryonic lethal mutant with reduced expression of alanyl—t RNA synthetase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNJIANGE; XIAOLIYAO; 等

    1998-01-01

    In present paper,one of the T-DNA insertional embryonic lethal mutant of Arabidopsis is identified and designated as acd mutant.The embryo developmant of this mutant is arrested in globular stage,The cell division pattern is abnormal during early embryogenesis and results in distubed cellular differentiation.Most of mutant embryos are finally degenerated and aborted in globular stage,However,a few of them still can germinate in agar palte and produce seedlings with shoter hypoctyl and distorted shoot meristem.To understand the molecular basis of the phenotype of this mutant,the joint fragment of T-DNA/plant DNA is isolated by plasmid rescue and Dig-labeled as probe for cDNA library screening.According to the sequence analysis and similarity searching,a 936 bp cDNA sequence(EMBL accession #:Y12555)from selectoed positive clone shows a 99.8%(923/925bp) sequence homolgy with Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase(AlaRS) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana.Furthermore,the data of in situ hybridization experiment indicate that the expression of Ala RS gene is weak in early embryogenesis and declines along with globular embryodevelopment in this mutant Accordingly,the reduced expression of Ala RS gene may be closely related to the morphological changes in early embryogenesis of this lethal mutant.

  13. Genomic analysis of differentiation between soil types reveals candidate genes for local adaptation in Arabidopsis lyrata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Turner

    Full Text Available Serpentine soil, which is naturally high in heavy metal content and has low calcium to magnesium ratios, comprises a difficult environment for most plants. An impressive number of species are endemic to serpentine, and a wide range of non-endemic plant taxa have been shown to be locally adapted to these soils. Locating genomic polymorphisms which are differentiated between serpentine and non-serpentine populations would provide candidate loci for serpentine adaptation. We have used the Arabidopsis thaliana tiling array, which has 2.85 million probes throughout the genome, to measure genetic differentiation between populations of Arabidopsis lyrata growing on granitic soils and those growing on serpentinic soils. The significant overrepresentation of genes involved in ion transport and other functions provides a starting point for investigating the molecular basis of adaptation to soil ion content, water retention, and other ecologically and economically important variables. One gene in particular, calcium-exchanger 7, appears to be an excellent candidate gene for adaptation to low CaratioMg ratio in A. lyrata.

  14. Exploring valid reference genes for quantitative real - time rt - pce studies of hydrogenperoxide signaling in arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ ) acts as a signaling molecule modulating the expression of various genes in plants. However, the reference gene(s) used for gene expression analysis of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ signaling is still arbitrary. A reliable result obtained by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) highly depends on accurate transcript normalization using stably expressed reference genes, whereas the inaccurate normalization could easily lead to the false conclusions. In this report, by using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, 12 candidate reference genes were evaluated and compared in root and shoot tissues of Arabidopsis upon different doses of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The results revealed that, in our experimental conditions, three novel reference genes (TIP41-like, UKN, and UBC21) were identified and validated as suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR normalization in both root and shoot tissues under oxidative stress. This conclusion was further confirmed by publicly available microarray data of methyl viologen and drought stress. In comparison with a single reference gene (EF-1a), the expression pattern of ZAT12 modulated by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, when using TIP41-like, UKN, and UBC21 as multiple reference gene(s), was similar with the previous reports by using northern blotting. Thus, we proposed that these three reference genes might be good candidates for other researchers to include in their reference gene validation in gene expression studies under H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ related oxidative stress. (author)

  15. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E; Segerson, Nicholas A; Kannan, Latha; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2013-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  16. Regulation of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 and isochorismate synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia J R Hunter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs function in anti-viral silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. Salicylic acid (SA, an important defensive signal, increases RDR1 gene expression, suggesting that RDR1 contributes to SA-induced virus resistance. In Nicotiana attenuata RDR1 also regulates plant-insect interactions and is induced by another important signal, jasmonic acid (JA. Despite its importance in defense RDR1 regulation has not been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis, SA-induced RDR1 expression was dependent on 'NON-EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1', indicating regulation involves the same mechanism controlling many other SA- defense-related genes, including pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1. Isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1 is required for SA biosynthesis. In defensive signal transduction RDR1 lies downstream of ICS1. However, supplying exogenous SA to ics1-mutant plants did not induce RDR1 or PR1 expression to the same extent as seen in wild type plants. Analysing ICS1 gene expression using transgenic plants expressing ICS1 promoter:reporter gene (β-glucuronidase constructs and by measuring steady-state ICS1 transcript levels showed that SA positively regulates ICS1. In contrast, ICS2, which is expressed at lower levels than ICS1, is unaffected by SA. The wound-response hormone JA affects expression of Arabidopsis RDR1 but jasmonate-induced expression is independent of CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE 1, which conditions expression of many other JA-responsive genes. Transiently increased RDR1 expression following tobacco mosaic virus inoculation was due to wounding and was not a direct effect of infection. RDR1 gene expression was induced by ethylene and by abscisic acid (an important regulator of drought resistance. However, rdr1-mutant plants showed normal responses to drought. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RDR1 is regulated by a much broader range of phytohormones than previously thought

  17. On the Origin of De Novo Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Wen; Chen, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Hagmann, Jörg; Han, Ting-Shen; Zou, Yu-Pan; Ge, Song; Guo, Ya-Long

    2016-01-01

    De novo genes, which originate from ancestral nongenic sequences, are one of the most important sources of protein-coding genes. This origination process is crucial for the adaptation of organisms. However, how de novo genes arise and become fixed in a population or species remains largely unknown. Here, we identified 782 de novo genes from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and divided them into three types based on the availability of translational evidence, transcriptional evidence, and neither transcriptional nor translational evidence for their origin. Importantly, by integrating multiple types of omics data, including data from genomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, and translatomes, we found that epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation and histone modification) play an important role in the origination process of de novo genes. Intriguingly, using the transcriptomes and methylomes from the same population of 84 accessions, we found that de novo genes that are transcribed in approximately half of the total accessions within the population are highly methylated, with lower levels of transcription than those transcribed at other frequencies within the population. We hypothesized that, during the origin of de novo gene alleles, those neutralized to low expression states via DNA methylation have relatively high probabilities of spreading and becoming fixed in a population. Our results highlight the process underlying the origin of de novo genes at the population level, as well as the importance of DNA methylation in this process. PMID:27401176

  18. The rules of gene expression in plants: Organ identity and gene body methylation are key factors for regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Rodrigo A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is a widely used approach for monitoring genome-wide gene expression. For Arabidopsis, there are over 1,800 microarray hybridizations representing many different experimental conditions on Affymetrix™ ATH1 gene chips alone. This huge amount of data offers a unique opportunity to infer the principles that govern the regulation of gene expression in plants. Results We used bioinformatics methods to analyze publicly available data obtained using the ATH1 chip from Affymetrix. A total of 1887 ATH1 hybridizations were normalized and filtered to eliminate low-quality hybridizations. We classified and compared control and treatment hybridizations and determined differential gene expression. The largest differences in gene expression were observed when comparing samples obtained from different organs. On average, ten-fold more genes were differentially expressed between organs as compared to any other experimental variable. We defined "gene responsiveness" as the number of comparisons in which a gene changed its expression significantly. We defined genes with the highest and lowest responsiveness levels as hypervariable and housekeeping genes, respectively. Remarkably, housekeeping genes were best distinguished from hypervariable genes by differences in methylation status in their transcribed regions. Moreover, methylation in the transcribed region was inversely correlated (R2 = 0.8 with gene responsiveness on a genome-wide scale. We provide an example of this negative relationship using genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes, by contrasting their regulatory responsiveness to nitrate and methylation status in their transcribed regions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Arabidopsis transcriptome is largely established during development and is comparatively stable when faced with external perturbations. We suggest a novel functional role for DNA methylation in the transcribed region as a key determinant

  19. The Function of the Early Trichomes Gene in Arabidopsis and Maize.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Poethig

    2011-12-05

    Lateral organ polarity in Arabidopsis is regulated by antagonistic interactions between genes that promote either adaxial or abaxial identity, but the molecular basis of this interaction is largely unknown. We show that the adaxial regulator ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2) is a direct target of the abaxial regulator KANADI1 (KAN1), and that KAN1 represses the transcription of AS2 in abaxial cells. Mutation of a single nucleotide in a KAN1 binding site in the AS2 promoter causes AS2 to be ectopically expressed in abaxial cells, resulting in a dominant, adaxialized phenotype. We also show that the abaxial expression of KAN1 is mediated directly or indirectly by AS2. These results demonstrate that KAN1 acts as a transcriptional repressor and that mutually repressive interactions between KAN1 and AS2 contribute to the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity in plants. A screen for mutations that affect the expression of a GFP reporter for KANADI2 produced mutations in two genes, CENTER CITY (CCT) and GRAND CENTRAL (GCT). Mutations in GCT and CCT delay the specification of central and peripheral identity and the globular-to-heart transition, but have little or no effect on the initial growth rate of the embryo. Mutant embryos eventually recover and undergo relatively normal patterning, albeit at an inappropriate size. GCT and CCT were identified as the Arabidopsis orthologs of MED12 and MED13--evolutionarily conserved proteins that act in association with the Mediator complex to negatively regulate transcription. The predicted function of these proteins combined with the effect of gct and cct on embryo development suggests that MED12 and MED13 regulate pattern formation during Arabidopsis embryogenesis by transiently repressing a transcriptional program that interferes with this process. Their mutant phenotype reveals the existence of a previously unknown temporal regulatory mechanism in plant embryogenesis.

  20. Gravity regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (GENARA experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Carnero-D&íaz, Eugénie; Medina, Francisco Javier; Gasset, Gilbert; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Graziana, Annick; Mazars, Christian; Le Disquet, Isabelle; Eche, Brigitte; Grat, Sabine; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2012-07-01

    In higher plants, post-embryonic development is possible through the expression of a set of genes constituting the morphogenetic program that contribute to the production of tissues and organs during the whole plant life cycle. Plant development is mainly controlled by internal factors such as phytohormones, as well as by environmental factors, among which gravity plays a key role (gravi-morphogenetic program). The GENARA space experiment has been designed with the goal of contributing to a better understanding of this gravi-morphogenetic program through the identification and characterization of some gravity regulated proteins (GR proteins) by using quantitative proteomic methods, and through the study of the impact of plant hormones on the expression of this program. Among plant hormones, auxin is the major regulator of organogenesis. In fact, it affects numerous plant developmental processes, e.g. cell division and elongation, autumnal loss of leaves, and the formation of buds, roots, flowers and fruits. Furthermore, it also plays a key role in the mechanisms of different tropisms (including gravitropism) that modulate fundamental features of plant growth. The expression of significant genes involved in auxin transport and in auxin signal perception in root cells is being studied in space-grown seedlings and compared with the corresponding ground controls. This experiment was scheduled to be performed in The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a new facility for plant cultivation and Plant Molecular Biology studies, at ISS. However only one aspect of this experiment was flown and concerns the qualitative and quantitative changes in membrane proteins supposed to be mainly associated with cell signaling and has been called GENARA A. The second part dealing with the function of auxin in the gravi-morphogenetic program and the alterations induced by microgravity will be studied through mutants affected on biosynthesis, transport or perception of auxin in a

  1. Comprehensive transcriptional profiling of NaCl-stressed Arabidopsis roots reveals novel classes of responsive genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyholos Michael K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roots are an attractive system for genomic and post-genomic studies of NaCl responses, due to their primary importance to agriculture, and because of their relative structural and biochemical simplicity. Excellent genomic resources have been established for the study of Arabidopsis roots, however, a comprehensive microarray analysis of the root transcriptome following NaCl exposure is required to further understand plant responses to abiotic stress and facilitate future, systems-based analyses of the underlying regulatory networks. Results We used microarrays of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes to identify root transcripts that changed in relative abundance following 6 h, 24 h, or 48 h of hydroponic exposure to 150 mM NaCl. Enrichment analysis identified groups of structurally or functionally related genes whose members were statistically over-represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts. Our results are consistent with generally observed stress response themes, and highlight potentially important roles for underappreciated gene families, including: several groups of transporters (e.g. MATE, LeOPT1-like; signalling molecules (e.g. PERK kinases, MLO-like receptors, carbohydrate active enzymes (e.g. XTH18, transcription factors (e.g. members of ZIM, WRKY, NAC, and other proteins (e.g. 4CL-like, COMT-like, LOB-Class 1. We verified the NaCl-inducible expression of selected transcription factors and other genes by qRT-PCR. Conclusion Micorarray profiling of NaCl-treated Arabidopsis roots revealed dynamic changes in transcript abundance for at least 20% of the genome, including hundreds of transcription factors, kinases/phosphatases, hormone-related genes, and effectors of homeostasis, all of which highlight the complexity of this stress response. Our identification of these transcriptional responses, and groups of evolutionarily related genes with either similar or divergent

  2. Cadmium tolerance and phytochelatin content of Arabidopsis seedlings over-expressing the phytochelatin synthase gene AtPCS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; Proia, Alessandra; De Paolis, Angelo; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that expression of the Arabidopsis phytochelatin (PC) biosynthetic gene AtPCS1 in Nicotiana tabacum plants increases the Cd tolerance in the presence of exogenous glutathione (GSH). In this paper, the Cd tolerance of Arabidopsis plants over-expressing AtPCS1 (AtPCSox lines) has been analysed and the differences between Arabidopsis and tobacco are shown. Based on the analysis of seedling fresh weight, primary root length, and alterations in root anatomy, evidence is provided that, at relatively low Cd concentrations, the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines is lower than the wild type, while AtPCS1 over-expressing tobacco is more tolerant to Cd than the wild type. At higher Cd concentrations, Arabidopsis AtPCSox seedlings are more tolerant to Cd than the wild type, while tobacco AtPCS1 seedlings are as sensitive as the wild type. Exogenous GSH, in contrast to what was observed in tobacco, did not increase the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines. The PC content in wild-type Arabidopsis at low Cd concentrations is more than three times higher than in tobacco and substantial differences were also found in the PC chain lengths. These data indicate that the differences in Cd tolerance and in its dependence on exogenous GSH between Arabidopsis and tobacco are due to species-specific differences in the endogenous content of PCs and GSH and may be in the relative abundance of PCs of different length. PMID:21841172

  3. Cadmium tolerance and phytochelatin content of Arabidopsis seedlings over-expressing the phytochelatin synthase gene AtPCS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; Proia, Alessandra; De Paolis, Angelo; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that expression of the Arabidopsis phytochelatin (PC) biosynthetic gene AtPCS1 in Nicotiana tabacum plants increases the Cd tolerance in the presence of exogenous glutathione (GSH). In this paper, the Cd tolerance of Arabidopsis plants over-expressing AtPCS1 (AtPCSox lines) has been analysed and the differences between Arabidopsis and tobacco are shown. Based on the analysis of seedling fresh weight, primary root length, and alterations in root anatomy, evidence is provided that, at relatively low Cd concentrations, the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines is lower than the wild type, while AtPCS1 over-expressing tobacco is more tolerant to Cd than the wild type. At higher Cd concentrations, Arabidopsis AtPCSox seedlings are more tolerant to Cd than the wild type, while tobacco AtPCS1 seedlings are as sensitive as the wild type. Exogenous GSH, in contrast to what was observed in tobacco, did not increase the Cd tolerance of AtPCSox lines. The PC content in wild-type Arabidopsis at low Cd concentrations is more than three times higher than in tobacco and substantial differences were also found in the PC chain lengths. These data indicate that the differences in Cd tolerance and in its dependence on exogenous GSH between Arabidopsis and tobacco are due to species-specific differences in the endogenous content of PCs and GSH and may be in the relative abundance of PCs of different length. PMID:21841172

  4. Changes in Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression in response to silver nanoparticles and silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveh, Rashid; Li, Yue-Sheng; Ranjbar, Sibia; Tehrani, Rouzbeh; Brueck, Christopher L; Van Aken, Benoit

    2013-09-17

    The release of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the environment has raised concerns about their effects on living organisms, including plants. In this study, changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs and silver ions (Ag(+)) were analyzed using Affymetrix expression microarrays. Exposure to 5 mg/L AgNPs (20 nm) for 10 days resulted in upregulation of 286 genes and downregulation of 81 genes by reference to nonexposed plants. Exposure to 5 mg/L Ag(+) for 10 days resulted in upregulation of 84 genes and downregulation of 53 genes by reference to nonexposed plants. Many genes differentially expressed by AgNPs and Ag(+) were found to be involved in the response of plants to various stresses: upregulated genes were primarily associated with the response to metals and oxidative stress (e.g., vacuolar cation/proton exchanger, superoxide dismutase, cytochrome P450-dependent oxidase, and peroxidase), while downregulated genes were more associated with response to pathogens and hormonal stimuli [e.g., auxin-regulated gene involved in organ size (ARGOS), ethylene signaling pathway, and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) against fungi and bacteria]. A significant overlap was observed between genes differentially expressed in response to AgNPs and Ag(+) (13 and 21% of total up- and downregulated genes, respectively), suggesting that AgNP-induced stress originates partly from silver toxicity and partly from nanoparticle-specific effects. Three highly upregulated genes in the presence of AgNPs, but not Ag(+), belong to the thalianol biosynthetic pathway, which is thought to be involved in the plant defense system. Results from this study provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the response of plants to AgNPs and Ag(+). PMID:23962165

  5. Expression of MADS-box genes during the embryonic phase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Adamczyk, Benjamin J; Fernandez, Donna E

    2005-05-01

    MADS domain factors play important roles as developmental regulators in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, MADS domain proteins have been shown to regulate various processes during the vegetative and reproductive phases. Relatively little is known, however, about family members expressed during the embryonic phase and their function. To determine which MADS-box genes are expressed during the embryonic phase in Arabidopsis, a family-wide survey involving gene-specific primers and RT-PCR was conducted. Transcripts corresponding to 64 (out of 109 total) family members could be detected in RNA samples isolated from embryonic culture tissue. Eight MADS-box genes that appear to be expressed at higher levels during the embryonic phase than in seedlings or in inflorescence apices were identified. The spatial pattern of expression in developing seeds was characterized for four MADS-box genes (FLOWERING LOCUS C, FLOWERING LOCUS M, AGAMOUS-LIKE 15, and AGAMOUS-LIKE 18) using reporter constructs encoding translational fusions to GUS. All four are expressed in cells throughout the endosperm and embryo. Finally, to test the hypothesis that AGAMOUS-LIKE15 (AGL15) and AGAMOUS-LIKE18 (AGL18) play essential roles during the embryonic phase, plants carrying T-DNA insertions that disrupt these genes were isolated. No embryo defects were observed in agl15 or agl18 single mutants or in agl15agl18 double mutants. These results indicate that multiple regulatory pathways that involve MADS domain factors are likely to operate in embryonic tissues, and that genetic and/or functional redundancy are likely to be as prevalent as in other phases of the life cycle. PMID:16028119

  6. Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, Frédéric; D'Aloia, Maria; Tocquin, Pierre; Lobet, Guillaume; Detry, Nathalie; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot. PMID:27352932

  7. Involvement of Multiple Gene-Silencing Pathways in a Paramutation-like Phenomenon in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Zheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paramutation is an epigenetic phenomenon that has been observed in a number of multicellular organisms. The epigenetically silenced state of paramutated alleles is not only meiotically stable but also “infectious” to active homologous alleles. The molecular mechanism of paramutation remains unclear, but components involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM are required. Here, we report a multi-copy pRD29A-LUC transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana that behaves like a paramutation locus. The silent state of LUC is induced by mutations in the DNA glycosylase gene ROS1. The silent alleles of LUC are not only meiotically stable but also able to transform active LUC alleles into silent ones, in the absence of ros1 mutations. Maintaining silencing at the LUC gene requires action of multiple pathways besides RdDM. Our study identified specific factors that are involved in the paramutation-like phenomenon and established a model system for the study of paramutation in Arabidopsis.

  8. Overexpression of SOS (Salt Overly Sensitive)Genes Increases Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Yang; Zhi-Zhong Chen; Xiao-Feng Zhoua; Hai-Bo Yin; Xia Li; Xiu-Fang Xin; Xu-Hui Hong; Jian-Kang Zhu; Zhizhong Gong

    2009-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress that decreases plant growth and productivity. Recently, it was reported that plants overexpressing AtNHX1 or SOS1 have significantly increased salt tolerance. To test whether overexpression of multiple genes can improve plant salt tolerance even more, we produced six different transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress AtNHX1, SOS3, AtNHXl + SOS3, SOS1, SOS2 + SOS3, or SOS1 + SOS2 + SOS3. Northern blot analyses confirmed the presence of high levels of the relevant gene transcripts in transgenic plants. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtNHX1 alone did not present any significant increase in salt tolerance, contrary to earlier reports. We found that transgenic plants overexpressing SOS3 exhibit increased salt tolerance similar to plants overexpressing SOS1. Moreover, salt tolerance of transgenic plants overexpressing AtNHXl + SOS3, 50S2 + SOS3, or SOS1 + SOS2 +SOS3, respectively, appeared similar to the tolerance of transgenic plants overexpressing either SOS1 or SOS3 alone.

  9. Ectopic Expression of the Chinese Cabbage Malate Dehydrogenase Gene Promotes Growth and Aluminum Resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Fei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Dai, Zi-Hui; Zhang, Lu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases (MDHs) are key metabolic enzymes that play important roles in plant growth and development. In the present study, we isolated the full-length and coding sequences of BraMDH from Chinese cabbage [Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour) Olsson]. We conducted bioinformatics analysis and a subcellular localization assay, which revealed that the BraMDH gene sequence contained no introns and that BraMDH is localized to the chloroplast. In addition, the expression pattern of BraMDH in Chinese cabbage was investigated, which revealed that BraMDH was heavily expressed in inflorescence apical meristems, as well as the effect of BraMDH overexpression in two homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis lines, which resulted in early bolting and taller inflorescence stems. Furthermore, the fresh and dry weights of aerial tissue from the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher than those from the corresponding wild-type plants, as were plant height, the number of rosette leaves, and the number of siliques produced, and the transgenic plants also exhibited stronger aluminum resistance when treated with AlCl3. Therefore, our results suggest that BraMDH has a dramatic effect on plant growth and that the gene is involved in both plant growth and aluminum resistance. PMID:27536317

  10. Overexpression of OsWRKY72 gene interferes in the abscisic acid signal and auxin transport pathway of Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Song Yu; Chen Ligang; Zhang Liping; Yu Diqiu

    2010-09-01

    Through activating specific transcriptional programmes, plants can launch resistance mechanisms to stressful environments and acquire a new equilibrium between development and defence. To screen the rice WRKY transcription factor which functions in abiotic stress tolerance and modulates the abscisic acid (ABA) response, we generated a whole array of 35S-OsWRKY transgenic Arabidopsis. In this study, we report that 35S-OsWRKY72 transgenic Arabidopsis, whose seed germination was retarded under normal conditions, emerged more sensitive to mannitol, NaCl, ABA stresses and sugar starvation than vector plants. Meanwhile, 35S-OsWRKY72 transgenic Arabidopsis displayed early flowering, reduced apical dominance, lost high temperature-induced hypocotyl elongation response, and enhanced gravitropism response, which were similar to the auxin-related gene mutants aux1, axr1 and bud1. Further, semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that the expression patterns of three auxin-related genes AUX1, AXR1 and BUD1 were significantly altered in rosette leaves and inflorescences of 35S-OsWRKY72 plants compared with control Arabidopsis, and two ABA-related genes ABA2 and ABI4 were induced in 35S-OsWRKY72 seedlings. In addition, northern blot analysis indicated that, in rice, OsWRKY72 was inducible by polyethylene glycol (PEG), NaCl, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), ABA and 42°C, similar to its orthologue AtWRKY75 in Arabidopsis, implying that these two WRKY genes might be required for multiple physiological processes in their plants. Together, these results suggest that OsWRKY72 interferes in the signal cross-talk between the ABA signal and auxin transport pathway in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  11. Linkage disequilibrium between incompatibility locus region genes in the plant Arabidopsis lyrata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenblad, Jenny; Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    We have studied diversity in Arabidopsis lyrata of sequences orthologous to the ARK3 gene of A. thaliana. Our main goal was to test for recombination in the S-locus region. In A. thaliana, the single-copy ARK3 gene is closely linked to the non-functional copies of the self-incompatibility loci, and...... the ortholog in A. lyrata (a self-incompatible species) is in the homologous genome region and is known as Aly8. It is thus of interest to test whether Aly8 sequence diversity is elevated due to close linkage to the highly polymorphic incompatibility locus, as is theoretically predicted. However, Aly8...... linked to the incompatibility locus, one being a pseudogene. We determined the phase of multiple haplotypes in families of plants from Icelandic and other populations. Different Aly8 sequence types are associated with different SRK alleles, while haplotypes with the same SRK sequences tend to have the...

  12. Gene regulatory variation mediates flowering responses to vernalization along an altitudinal gradient in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Léonie; Rüegg, Marlene; Zemp, Niklaus; Hennig, Lars; Widmer, Alex

    2014-12-01

    Steep environmental gradients provide ideal settings for studies of potentially adaptive phenotypic and genetic variation in plants. The accurate timing of flowering is crucial for reproductive success and is regulated by several pathways, including the vernalization pathway. Among the numerous genes known to enable flowering in response to vernalization, the most prominent is FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). FLC and other genes of the vernalization pathway vary extensively among natural populations and are thus candidates for the adaptation of flowering time to environmental gradients such as altitude. We used 15 natural Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genotypes originating from an altitudinal gradient (800-2,700 m above sea level) in the Swiss Alps to test whether flowering time correlated with altitude under different vernalization scenarios. Additionally, we measured the expression of 12 genes of the vernalization pathway and its downstream targets. Flowering time correlated with altitude in a nonlinear manner for vernalized plants. Flowering time could be explained by the expression and regulation of the vernalization pathway, most notably by AGAMOUS LIKE19 (AGL19), FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), and FLC. The expression of AGL19, FT, and VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE3 was associated with altitude, and the regulation of MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING2 (MAF2) and MAF3 differed between low- and high-altitude genotypes. In conclusion, we found clinal variation across an altitudinal gradient both in flowering time and the expression and regulation of genes in the flowering time control network, often independent of FLC, suggesting that the timing of flowering may contribute to altitudinal adaptation. PMID:25339407

  13. Overexpression of AtBMI1C, a polycomb group protein gene, accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Polycomb group protein (PcG-mediated gene silencing is emerging as an essential developmental regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic organisms. PcGs inactivate or maintain the silenced state of their target chromatin by forming complexes, including Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1 and 2 (PRC2. Three PRC2 complexes have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis; of these, the EMF and VRN complexes suppress flowering by catalyzing the trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 of FLOWER LOCUS T (FT and FLOWER LOCUS C (FLC. However, little is known about the role of PRC1 in regulating the floral transition, although AtRING1A, AtRING1B, AtBMI1A, and AtBMI1B are believed to regulate shoot apical meristem and embryonic development as components of PRC1. Moreover, among the five RING finger PcGs in the Arabidopsis genome, four have been characterized. Here, we report that the fifth, AtBMI1C, is a novel, ubiquitously expressed nuclear PcG protein and part of PRC1, which is evolutionarily conserved with Psc and BMI1. Overexpression of AtBMI1C caused increased H2A monoubiquitination and flowering defects in Arabidopsis. Both the suppression of FLC and activation of FT were observed in AtBMI1C-overexpressing lines, resulting in early flowering. No change in the H3K27me3 level in FLC chromatin was detected in an AtBMI1C-overexpressing line. Our results suggest that AtBMI1C participates in flowering time control by regulating the expression of FLC; moreover, the repression of FLC by AtBMI1C is not due to the activity of PRC2. Instead, it is likely the result of PRC1 activity, into which AtBMI1C is integrated.

  14. Dynamics of membrane potential variation and gene expression induced by Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Bricchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biotic stress induced by various herbivores and pathogens invokes plant responses involving different defense mechanisms. However, we do not know whether different biotic stresses share a common response or which signaling pathways are involved in responses to different biotic stresses. We investigated the common and specific responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to three biotic stress agents: Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used electrophysiology to determine the plasma membrane potential (V(m and we performed a gene microarray transcriptome analysis on Arabidopsis upon either herbivory or bacterial infection. V(m depolarization was induced by insect attack; however, the response was much more rapid to S. littoralis (30 min -2 h than to M. persicae (4-6 h. M. persicae differentially regulated almost 10-fold more genes than by S. littoralis with an opposite regulation. M. persicae modulated genes involved in flavonoid, fatty acid, hormone, drug transport and chitin metabolism. S. littoralis regulated responses to heat, transcription and ion transport. The latest Vm depolarization (16 h was found for P. syringae. The pathogen regulated responses to salicylate, jasmonate and to microorganisms. Despite this late response, the number of genes differentially regulated by P. syringae was closer to those regulated by S. littoralis than by M. persicae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Arabidopsis plasma membranes respond with a V(m depolarization at times depending on the nature of biotic attack which allow setting a time point for comparative genome-wide analysis. A clear relationship between V(m depolarization and gene expression was found. At V(m depolarization timing, M. persicae regulates a wider array of Arabidopsis genes with a clear and distinct regulation than S. littoralis. An almost completely opposite regulation was observed between the aphid and the pathogen

  15. Nuevos genes reguladores de la tolerancia a estrés abiótico en Arabidopsis.

    OpenAIRE

    MARTÍNEZ MACÍAS, FÉLIX

    2015-01-01

    Martínez Macías, F. (2015). Nuevos genes reguladores de la tolerancia a estrés abiótico en Arabidopsis [Tesis doctoral no publicada]. Universitat Politècnica de València. doi:10.4995/Thesis/10251/48560.

  16. Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Anderson, Lisa; Sturre, Marcel J. G.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence Hai-Chun Jing1,2, Lisa Anderson3, Marcel J.G. Sturre1, Jacques Hille1 and Paul P. Dijkwel1,* 1Molecular Biology of Plants, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnolo

  17. Identification of brassinosteroid responsive genes in Arabidopsis by cDNA array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Yuxin; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Grove, M. D., Spencer, G. F., Rohwedder, W. K. et al., Brassinolide, a plant growth-promoting steroid isolated from Brassica napus pollen, Nature, 1979, 281: 216-217.[2]Mandava, N. B., Plant growth-promoting brassinosteroids, Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. Plant Mol. Biol., 1988, 39: 23-52.[3]Clouse, S. D., Sasse, J. M., Brassinosteroids: essential regulators of plant growth and development, Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. Plant Mol. Biol., 1998, 49: 427-451.[4]Altmann, T., Recent advances in brassinosteroid molecular genetics, Curr. Opin. Plant Biol., 1998, 1: 378-383.[5]Aharoni, A., Keizer, L. C. P., Bouwmeester, H. J. et al., Identification of the SAAT gene involved in strawberry flavor biogenesis by use of DNA microarray, Plant Cell, 2000, 12: 647-661.[6]Reymond, P., Weber, H., Damond, M. et al., Differential gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and insect feeding in Arabidopsis, Plant Cell, 2000, 12: 707-719.[7]Hu, Y., Han, C., Mou, Z. et al., Monitoring gene expression by cDNA array, Chin. Sci. Bull., 1999, 44: 441-444.[8]Fujioka, S., Li, J., Choi, Y. H. et al., The Arabidopsis deetiolated2 mutant is blocked early in brassinosteroid biosynthesis, Plant Cell, 1997, 9: 1951-1962.[9]Wadsworth, G. J., Redinbaugh, M. G., Scandalios, J. G., A procedure for small-scale isolation of plant RNA suitable for RNA blot analysis, Anal. Biochem., 1988, 172: 279-283.[10]Church, G. M., Gilbert, W., Genomic sequencing, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1984, 81: 1991-1995.[11]Huntley, R. P., Murray, J. A. H., The plant cell cycle, Curr. Opin. Plant Biol., 1999, 2: 440-446.[12]Riou-Khamlichi, C., Huntley, R., Jacqmard, A. et al., Cytokinin activation of Arabidopsis cell division through a D-type cyclin, Science, 1999, 283: 1541-1544.[13]Hu, Y., Bao, F., Li, J., Promotive effect of brassinosteroids on cell division involves a distinct CycD3-induction pathway, Plant J., 2000, 24: 693-701.[14]Hirayama, T., Shinozaki, K., A

  18. The Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper II gene family: diversity and redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarbelli, Angela Raffaella; Ciolfi, Andrea; Salvucci, Samanta; Ruzza, Valentino; Possenti, Marco; Carabelli, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Sessa, Giovanna; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-11-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains 10 genes belonging to the HD-Zip II family including ATHB2 and HAT2. Previous work has shown that ATHB2 is rapidly and strongly induced by light quality changes that provoke the shade avoidance response whereas HAT2 expression responds to auxin. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the HD-Zip II family. Phylogeny reconstruction revealed that almost all of the HD-Zip II genes can be subdivided into 4 clades (alpha-delta), each clade comprising 2-3 paralogs. Gene expression studies demonstrated that all the gamma and delta genes are regulated by light quality changes. Kinetics of induction, low R/FR/high R/FR reversibility and auxin response analyses strongly suggested that HAT1, HAT3 and ATHB4, as ATHB2, are under the control of the phytochrome system whereas HAT2 is up-regulated by low R/FR as a consequence of the induction of the auxin signaling pathway provoked by FR-rich light. Root and shoot digital in situ revealed that gamma and delta genes are also tightly regulated during plant development with both distinct and overlapping patterns. Phenotypes of gain of function and dominant negative lines demonstrated that one or more of the HD-Zip II gamma genes negatively regulate cell proliferation during leaf development in a high R/FR light environment. Finally, target gene analysis using a chimeric transcription factor (HD-Zip2-V-G), known to activate ATHB2 target genes in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, revealed that all the 10 HD-Zip II genes can be recognized by the HD-Zip 2 domain in vivo, implying an intricate negative feedback network. PMID:18758690

  19. A gene regulatory network for root epidermis cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Bruex

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The root epidermis of Arabidopsis provides an exceptional model for studying the molecular basis of cell fate and differentiation. To obtain a systems-level view of root epidermal cell differentiation, we used a genome-wide transcriptome approach to define and organize a large set of genes into a transcriptional regulatory network. Using cell fate mutants that produce only one of the two epidermal cell types, together with fluorescence-activated cell-sorting to preferentially analyze the root epidermis transcriptome, we identified 1,582 genes differentially expressed in the root-hair or non-hair cell types, including a set of 208 "core" root epidermal genes. The organization of the core genes into a network was accomplished by using 17 distinct root epidermis mutants and 2 hormone treatments to perturb the system and assess the effects on each gene's transcript accumulation. In addition, temporal gene expression information from a developmental time series dataset and predicted gene associations derived from a Bayesian modeling approach were used to aid the positioning of genes within the network. Further, a detailed functional analysis of likely bHLH regulatory genes within the network, including MYC1, bHLH54, bHLH66, and bHLH82, showed that three distinct subfamilies of bHLH proteins participate in root epidermis development in a stage-specific manner. The integration of genetic, genomic, and computational analyses provides a new view of the composition, architecture, and logic of the root epidermal transcriptional network, and it demonstrates the utility of a comprehensive systems approach for dissecting a complex regulatory network.

  20. AthaMap-assisted transcription factor target gene identification in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Brill, Yuri; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and small RNA target sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The database contains sites for 115 different transcription factors (TFs). TFBS were identified with positional weight matrices (PWMs) or with single binding sites. With the new web tool 'Gene Identification', it is possible to identify potential target genes for selected TFs. For these analyses, the user can define a region of interest of up to 6000 bp in all annotated genes. For TFBS determined with PWMs, the search can be restricted to high-quality TFBS. The results are displayed in tables that identify the gene, position of the TFBS and, if applicable, individual score of the TFBS. In addition, data files can be downloaded that harbour positional information of TFBS of all TFs in a region between -2000 and +2000 bp relative to the transcription or translation start site. Also, data content of AthaMap was increased and the database was updated to the TAIR8 genome release. Database URL: http://www.athamap.de/gene_ident.php. PMID:21177332

  1. Cis-Regulatory Elements Determine Germline Specificity and Expression Level of an Isopentenyltransferase Gene in Sperm Cells of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinghua; Yuan, Tong; Duan, Xiaomeng; Wei, Xiaoping; Shi, Tao; Li, Jia; Russell, Scott D; Gou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Flowering plant sperm cells transcribe a divergent and complex complement of genes. To examine promoter function, we chose an isopentenyltransferase gene known as PzIPT1. This gene is highly selectively transcribed in one sperm cell morphotype of Plumbago zeylanica, which preferentially fuses with the central cell during fertilization and is thus a founding cell of the primary endosperm. In transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PzIPT1 promoter displays activity in both sperm cells and upon progressive promoter truncation from the 5'-end results in a progressive decrease in reporter production, consistent with occurrence of multiple enhancer sites. Cytokinin-dependent protein binding motifs are identified in the promoter sequence, which respond with stimulation by cytokinin. Expression of PzIPT1 promoter in sperm cells confers specificity independently of previously reported Germline Restrictive Silencer Factor binding sequence. Instead, a cis-acting regulatory region consisting of two duplicated 6-bp Male Gamete Selective Activation (MGSA) motifs occurs near the site of transcription initiation. Disruption of this sequence-specific site inactivates expression of a GFP reporter gene in sperm cells. Multiple copies of the MGSA motif fused with the minimal CaMV35S promoter elements confer reporter gene expression in sperm cells. Similar duplicated MGSA motifs are also identified from promoter sequences of sperm cell-expressed genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting selective activation is possibly a common mechanism for regulation of gene expression in sperm cells of flowering plants. PMID:26739233

  2. Direct regulation of the floral homeotic APETALA1 gene by APETALA3 and PISTILLATA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Jens F; Nakayama, Naomi; Glimelius, Kristina; Irish, Vivian F

    2006-05-01

    The floral homeotic gene APETALA1 (AP1) specifies floral meristem identity and sepal and petal identity in Arabidopsis. Consistent with its multiple roles during floral development, AP1 is initially expressed throughout the floral meristem, and later its expression becomes restricted to sepal and petal primordia. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that the floral homeotic PISTILLATA (PI) protein, required for petal and stamen development, has the ability to bind directly to the promoter region of AP1. In support of the hypothesis that PI, and its interacting partner APETALA3 (AP3), regulates the transcription of AP1, we show that AP1 transcript levels are elevated in strong ap3-3 mutant plants. Kinetic studies, using transgenic Arabidopsis plants in which both AP3 and PI are under post-translational control, show that AP1 transcript levels are down regulated within 2 h of AP3/PI activation. This implies that the reduction in AP1 transcripts is an early event in the cascade following AP3/PI induction and provides independent support for the hypothesis that AP1 is a direct target of the AP3/PI heterodimer. Together these results suggest a model whereby AP3/PI directly acts, in combination with other factors, to restrict the expression of AP1 during early stages of floral development. PMID:16640596

  3. Comprehensive Functional Analysis of the Catalase Gene Family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Yan Du; Peng-Cheng Wang; Jia Chen; Chun-Peng Song

    2008-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, catalase (CAT) genes encode a small family of proteins including CAT1, CAT2 and CAT3, which catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and play an important role in controlling homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we analyze the expression profiles and activities of three catalases under different treatments including drought, cold, oxidative stresses, abscisic acid and salicylic acid in Arabidopsis. Our results reveal that CAT1 is an important player in the removal of H2O2 generated under various environmental stresses. CAT2 and CAT3 are major H2O2 scavengers that contribute to ROS homeostasis in light or darkness, respectively. In addition, CAT2 is activated by cold and drought stresses and CAT3 is mainly enhanced by abscisic acid and oxidative treatments as well as at the senescence stage. These results, together with previous data, suggest that the network of transcriptional control explains how CATs and other scavenger enzymes such as peroxidase and superoxide dismutase may be coordinately regulated during development, but differentially expressed in response to different stresses for controlling ROS homeostasis.

  4. AtTHIC, a gene involved in thiamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danyu Kong; Yuxing Zhu; Huilan Wu; Xudong Cheng; Hui Liang; Hong-Qing Ling

    2008-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential compound for organisms.It contains a pyrimidine ring structure and a thiazole ring structure.These two moieties of thiamine are synthesized independently and then coupled together.Here we report the molecular characterization of AtTHIC,which is involved in thiamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.AtTHIC is similar to Escherichia coil ThiC,which is involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis in prokaryotes.Heterologous expression of AtTHIC could functionally complement the thiC knock-out mutant of E.coll.Downregulation of AtTHIC expression by T-DNA insertion at its promoter region resulted in a drastic reduction of thiamine content in plants and the knock-down mutant thicl showed albino (white leaves) and lethal phenotypes under the normal culture conditions.The thicl mutant could be rescued by supplementation of thiamine and its defect functions could be complemented by expression ofAtTHIC cDNA.Transient expression analysis revealed that the AtTHIC protein targets plastids and chloroplasts.AtTHIC was strongly expressed in leaves,flowers and siliques and the transcription of AtTHIC was downregulated by extrinsic thiamine.In conclusion,AtTHIC is a gene involved in pyrimidine synthesis in the thiamine biosynthesis pathway of Arabidopsis,and our results provide some new clues for elucidating the pathway of thiamine biosynthesis in plants.

  5. A small intergenic region drives exclusive tissue-specific expression of the adjacent genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Estela M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II is unidirectional from most genes. In plants, divergent genes, defined as non-overlapping genes organized head-to-head, are highly represented in the Arabidopsis genome. Nevertheless, there is scarce evidence on functional analyses of these intergenic regions. The At5g06290 and At5g06280 loci are head-to-head oriented and encode a chloroplast-located 2-Cys peroxiredoxin B (2CPB and a protein of unknown function (PUF, respectively. The 2-Cys peroxiredoxins are proteins involved in redox processes, they are part of the plant antioxidant defence and also act as chaperons. In this study, the transcriptional activity of a small intergenic region (351 bp shared by At5g06290 and At5g06280 in Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized. Results Activity of the intergenic region in both orientations was analyzed by driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene during the development and growth of Arabidopsis plants under physiological and stressful conditions. Results have shown that this region drives expression either of 2cpb or puf in photosynthetic or vascular tissues, respectively. GUS expression driven by the promoter in 2cpb orientation was enhanced by heat stress. On the other hand, the promoter in both orientations has shown similar down-regulation of GUS expression under low temperatures and other stress conditions such as mannitol, oxidative stress, or fungal elicitor. Conclusion The results from this study account for the first evidence of an intergenic region that, in opposite orientation, directs GUS expression in different spatially-localized Arabidopsis tissues in a mutually exclusive manner. Additionally, this is the first demonstration of a small intergenic region that drives expression of a gene whose product is involved in the chloroplast antioxidant defence such as 2cpb. Furthermore, these results contribute to show that 2cpb is related to the heat stress defensive system

  6. A bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase gene as a negative selectable marker in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Fennema, M.; Hao, L.;

    1999-01-01

    , including Arabidopsis, tobacco, oil seed rape and rice, do not express detectable haloalkane dehalogenase activities, and that wild-type Arabidopsis grows in the presence of DCE. In contrast, DCE applied as a volatile can be used to select on plates or in soil transgenic Arabidopsis which express dhl...

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the rice and arabidopsis non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLtp) gene families and identification of wheat nsLtp genes by EST data mining

    OpenAIRE

    Boutrot, Freddy; Chantret, Nathalie; Gautier, Marie Francoise

    2008-01-01

    Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are encoded by multigene families and possess physiological functions that remain unclear. Our objective was to characterize the complete nsLtp gene family in rice and arabidopsis and to perform wheat EST database mining for nsLtp gene discovery.b ResultsIn this study, we carried out a genome-wide analysis of nsLtp gene families in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana and identified 52 rice nsLtp genes and 49 arabidopsis nsLtp genes. Here w...

  8. Over-Expression of ScMnSOD, a SOD Gene Derived from Jojoba, Improve Drought Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-fei; ZHANG Gen-fa; SUN Wei-min; LI Ze-qin; BAI Rui-xue; LI Jing-xiao; SHI Zi-han; GENG Hong-wei; ZHENG Ying; ZHANG Jun

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is mainly distributed in desert, and the molecular mechanisms of jojoba in response to abiotic stress still remain elusive. In this paper, we cloned and characterized a SOD gene from jojoba named as ScMnSOD, and introduced into Arabidopsis to investigate its functions of responding to drought stress. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed an improvement in drought tolerance. Moreover, under a water deifcit condition, the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was remarkably decreased in the transgenic lines compared to the WT. Furthermore, the ScMnSOD promoter was cloned to the 5´-upstream of GUS coding region in a binary vector, and introduced into Arabidopsis. And results showed that ScMnSOD expression can be induced by drought, salt, ABA, and low temperature. In conclusion, ScMnSOD plays an important role in drought tolerance which is, at least partially, attributed to its role in ROS detoxiifcation.

  9. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  10. Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS D influences systemic-acquiredresistance-induced expression and histone modifications of WRKY genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijayata Singh; Shweta Roy; Deepjyoti Singh; Ashis Kumar Nandi

    2014-03-01

    A plant that is in part infected by a pathogen is more resistant throughout its whole body to subsequent infections – a phenomenon known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Mobile signals are synthesized at the site of infection and distributed throughout the plant through vascular tissues. Mechanism of SAR development subsequent to reaching the mobile signal in the distal tissue is largely unknown. Recently we showed that FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is required in the distal tissue to activate SAR. FLD codes for a homologue of human-lysine-specific histone demethylase. Here we show that FLD function is required for priming (SAR induced elevated expression during challenge inoculation) of WRKY29 and WRKY6 genes. FLD also differentially influences basal and SAR-induced expression of WRKY38, WRKY65 and WRKY53 genes. In addition, we also show that FLD partly localizes in nucleus and influences histone modifications at the promoters of WRKY29 and WRKY6 genes. The results altogether indicate to the possibility of FLD’s involvement in epigenetic regulation of SAR.

  11. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. PMID:26623515

  12. Sequence and organization of 5S ribosomal RNA-encoding genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campell, B R; Song, Y; Posch, T E; Cullis, C A; Town, C D

    1992-03-15

    We have isolated a genomic clone containing Arabidopsis thaliana 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding genes (rDNA) by screening an A. thaliana library with a 5S rDNA probe from flax. The clone isolated contains seven repeat units of 497 bp, plus 11 kb of flanking genomic sequence at one border. Sequencing of individual subcloned repeat units shows that the sequence of the 5S rRNA coding region is very similar to that reported for other flowering plants. Four A. thaliana ecotypes were found to contain approx. 1000 copies of 5S rDNA per haploid genome. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA indicates that 5S rDNA occurs in long tandem arrays, and shows the presence of numerous restriction-site polymorphisms among the six ecotypes studied. PMID:1348233

  13. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  14. Exploiting a Reference Genome in Terms of Duplications: The Network of Paralogs and Single Copy Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Sangiovanni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana became the model organism for plant studies because of its small diploid genome, rapid lifecycle and short adult size. Its genome was the first among plants to be sequenced, becoming the reference in plant genomics. However, the Arabidopsis genome is characterized by an inherently complex organization, since it has undergone ancient whole genome duplications, followed by gene reduction, diploidization events and extended rearrangements, which relocated and split up the retained portions. These events, together with probable chromosome reductions, dramatically increased the genome complexity, limiting its role as a reference. The identification of paralogs and single copy genes within a highly duplicated genome is a prerequisite to understand its organization and evolution and to improve its exploitation in comparative genomics. This is still controversial, even in the widely studied Arabidopsis genome. This is also due to the lack of a reference bioinformatics pipeline that could exhaustively identify paralogs and singleton genes. We describe here a complete computational strategy to detect both duplicated and single copy genes in a genome, discussing all the methodological issues that may strongly affect the results, their quality and their reliability. This approach was used to analyze the organization of Arabidopsis nuclear protein coding genes, and besides classifying computationally defined paralogs into networks and single copy genes into different classes, it unraveled further intriguing aspects concerning the genome annotation and the gene relationships in this reference plant species. Since our results may be useful for comparative genomics and genome functional analyses, we organized a dedicated web interface to make them accessible to the scientific community.

  15. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis and Expression Pattern of TCP Gene Families in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Yao; Hong Ma; Jian Wang; Dabing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Several TCP genes have been reported to play important roles in plant development; the TCP homologs encode a plant-specific family of putative transcription factors. To understand the evolutionary relationship of TCP genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa L. (hereafter called rice), we have identified 23 and 22 TCP genes in the Arabidopsls and rice genomes, respectively. Using phylogenetic analysis, we grouped these TCP genes into three classes. In addition, the motifs outside the TCP domain further support the evolutionary relationships among these genes. The genome distribution of the TCP genes strongly supports the hypothesis that genome-wide and tandem duplication contributed to the expansion of the TCP gene family. The expression pattern of the TCP genes was analyzed further, providing useful clues about the function of these genes.

  16. Agrobacterium-Mediated Transfer of Arabidopsis ICE1 Gene into Lemon (Citrus Limon (L.) Burm. F. cv. Eureka)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jia-quan; SUN Zhong-hai

    2005-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1) gene was cloned through RT-PCR of Arabidopsis cDNAs and introduced into the lemon (Citrus Limon (L.) Burm. F. cv. Eureka) genome using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. Epicotyl segments from in vitro grown lemon seedlings were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens strain EHA 105 carrying the binary plasmid pMVICE1, whose T-DNA region contain ICE1 gene driven by 35S CaMV promoter. Among 320 epicotyl segments inoculated, 71 explants responded and regenerated 51 elongated shoots. These shoots were subjected to an extra month of kanamycin exposure. In this way, the number of escapes reduced. Thirteen of 31 survived shoots formed roots and 7 were tested positive using PCR technique. Southern blot analyses confirmed PCR results and demonstrated that more than two copies of the ICE1 gene were integrated into the lemon genome.

  17. Characterization of Arabidopsis FPS isozymes and FPS gene expression analysis provide insight into the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors in seeds.

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    Verónica Keim

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes encoding farnesyl diphosphate (FPP synthase (FPS, the prenyl diphoshate synthase that catalyzes the synthesis of FPP from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP. In this study, we provide evidence that the two Arabidopsis short FPS isozymes FPS1S and FPS2 localize to the cytosol. Both enzymes were expressed in E. coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Despite FPS1S and FPS2 share more than 90% amino acid sequence identity, FPS2 was found to be more efficient as a catalyst, more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of NaCl, and more resistant to thermal inactivation than FPS1S. Homology modelling for FPS1S and FPS2 and analysis of the amino acid differences between the two enzymes revealed an increase in surface polarity and a greater capacity to form surface salt bridges of FPS2 compared to FPS1S. These factors most likely account for the enhanced thermostability of FPS2. Expression analysis of FPS::GUS genes in seeds showed that FPS1 and FPS2 display complementary patterns of expression particularly at late stages of seed development, which suggests that Arabidopsis seeds have two spatially segregated sources of FPP. Functional complementation studies of the Arabidopsis fps2 knockout mutant seed phenotypes demonstrated that under normal conditions FPS1S and FPS2 are functionally interchangeable. A putative role for FPS2 in maintaining seed germination capacity under adverse environmental conditions is discussed.

  18. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd2+ uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance

  19. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the rice and arabidopsis non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLtp) gene families and identification of wheat nsLtp genes by EST data mining

    OpenAIRE

    Chantret Nathalie; Boutrot Freddy; Gautier Marie-Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are encoded by multigene families and possess physiological functions that remain unclear. Our objective was to characterize the complete nsLtp gene family in rice and arabidopsis and to perform wheat EST database mining for nsLtp gene discovery. Results In this study, we carried out a genome-wide analysis of nsLtp gene families in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana and identified 52 rice nsLtp genes and 49 arabidopsis...

  1. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

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    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH, a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for

  2. The WOX13 homeobox gene promotes replum formation in the Arabidopsis thaliana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Branchat, Maida; Ripoll, Juan José; Yanofsky, Martin F; Pelaz, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis fruit forms a seedpod that develops from the fertilized gynoecium. It is mainly comprised of an ovary in which three distinct tissues can be differentiated: the valves, the valve margins and the replum. Separation of cells at the valve margin allows for the valves to detach from the replum and thus dispersal of the seeds. Valves and valve margins are located in lateral positions whereas the replum is positioned medially and retains meristematic properties resembling the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Members of the WUSCHEL-related homeobox family have been involved in stem cell maintenance in the SAM, and within this family, we found that WOX13 is expressed mainly in meristematic tissues including the replum. We also show that wox13 loss-of-function mutations reduce replum size and enhance the phenotypes of mutants affected in the replum identity gene RPL. Conversely, misexpression of WOX13 produces, independently from BP and RPL, an oversized replum and valve defects that closely resemble those of mutants in JAG/FIL activity genes. Our results suggest that WOX13 promotes replum development by likely preventing the activity of the JAG/FIL genes in medial tissues. This regulation seems to play a role in establishing the gradient of JAG/FIL activity along the medio-lateral axis of the fruit critical for proper patterning. Our data have allowed us to incorporate the role of WOX13 into the regulatory network that orchestrates fruit patterning. PMID:22946675

  3. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  4. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  5. Sample Preparation of Arabidopsis thaliana Shoot Apices for Expression Studies of Photoperiod-Induced Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Fernando; Torti, Stefano; Vincent, Coral; Coupland, George

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce new organs from a population of pluripotent cells which are located in specific tissues called meristems. One of these meristems, the shoot apical meristem (SAM), gives rise to leaves during the vegetative phase and flowers during the reproductive phase. The transition from vegetative SAM to an inflorescence meristem (IM) is a dramatic developmental switch, which has been particularly well studied in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. This developmental switch is controlled by multiple environmental signals such as day length (or photoperiod), and it is accompanied by changes in expression of hundreds of genes. A major interest in plant biology is to identify and characterize those genes which are regulated in the stem cells of the SAM in response to the photoperiodic signals. In this sense, techniques such as RNA in situ hybridization (RNA ISH) have been very successfully employed to detect the temporal and spatial expression patterns of genes in the SAM. This method can be specifically optimized for photoperiodic-flowering studies. In this chapter, we describe improved methods to generate plant material and histological samples to be combined with RNA ISH in flowering-related studies. PMID:26867617

  6. Hormonally controlled expression of the Arabidopsis MAX4 shoot branching regulatory gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Katherine; Sorefan, Karim; Ward, Sally; Leyser, Ottoline

    2005-11-01

    The Arabidopsis MORE AXILLARY BRANCHING 4 (MAX4) gene is required for the production of a long-range, graft-transmissible signal that inhibits shoot branching. Buds of max4 mutant plants are resistant to the inhibitory effects of apically applied auxin, indicating that MAX4 is required for auxin-mediated bud inhibition. The RAMOSUS 1 (RMS1) and DECREASED APICAL DOMINANCE 1 (DAD1) genes of pea and petunia, respectively, are orthologous to MAX4 and function in a similar way. Here we show that, despite the similarities between these three genes, there are significant differences in the regulation of their expression. RMS1 is known to be upregulated by auxin in the shoot, suggesting a straightforward link between the RMS1-dependent branch-inhibiting signal and auxin, whereas we find that MAX4 is only upregulated by auxin in the root and hypocotyl, and this is not required for the inhibition of shoot branching. Furthermore, both RMS1 and DAD1 are subject to feedback regulation, for which there is no evidence for MAX4. Instead, overexpression studies and reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrate that the most functionally significant point of interaction between auxin and MAX4 is post-transcriptional and indeed post-synthesis of the MAX4-dependent graft-transmissible signal. PMID:16262707

  7. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Hervé

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most

  8. Characterization, sub-cellular localization and expression profiling of the isoprenylcysteine methylesterase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wujun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoprenylcysteine methylesterases (ICME demethylate prenylated protein in eukaryotic cell. Until now, knowledge about their molecular information, localization and expression pattern is largely unavailable in plant species. One ICME in Arabidopsis, encoded by At5g15860, has been identified recently. Over-expression of At5g15860 caused an ABA hypersensitive phenotype in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, indicating that it functions as a positive regulator of ABA signaling. Moreover, ABA induced the expression of this gene in Arabidopsis seedlings. The current study extends these findings by examining the sub-cellular localization, expression profiling, and physiological functions of ICME and two other ICME-like proteins, ICME-LIKE1 and ICME-LIKE2, which were encoded by two related genes At1g26120 and At3g02410, respectively. Results Bioinformatics investigations showed that the ICME and other two ICME-like homologs comprise a small subfamily of carboxylesterase (EC 3.1.1.1 in Arabidopsis. Sub-cellular localization of GFP tagged ICME and its homologs showed that the ICME and ICME-like proteins are intramembrane proteins predominantly localizing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi apparatus. Semi-quantitative and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the ICME and ICME-like genes are expressed in all examined tissues, including roots, rosette leaves, cauline leaves, stems, flowers, and siliques, with differential expression levels. Within the gene family, the base transcript abundance of ICME-LIKE2 gene is very low with higher expression in reproductive organs (flowers and siliques. Time-course analysis uncovered that both ICME and ICME-like genes are up-regulated by mannitol, NaCl and ABA treatment, with ICME showing the highest level of up-regulation by these treatments. Heat stress resulted in up-regulation of the ICME gene significantly but down-regulation of the ICME-LIKE1 and ICME-LIKE2 genes. Cold and dehydration

  9. The ASK1 gene regulates B function gene expression in cooperation with UFO and LEAFY in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yu, Q; Chen, M; Ma, H

    2001-07-01

    The Arabidopsis floral regulatory genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) are required for the B function according to the ABC model for floral organ identity. AP3 and PI expression are positively regulated by the LEAFY (LFY) and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) genes. UFO encodes an F-box protein, and we have shown previously that UFO genetically interacts with the ASK1 gene encoding a SKP1 homologue; both the F-box containing protein and SKP1 are subunits of ubiquitin ligases. We show here that the ask1-1 mutation can enhance the floral phenotypes of weak lfy and ap3 mutants; therefore, like UFO, ASK1 also interacts with LFY and AP3 genetically. Furthermore, our results from RNA in situ hybridizations indicate that ASK1 regulates early AP3 and PI expression. These results support the idea that UFO and ASK1 together positively regulate AP3 and PI expression. We propose that the UFO and ASK1 proteins are components of a ubiquitin ligase that mediates the proteolysis of a repressor of AP3 and PI expression. Our genetic studies also indicate that ASK1 and UFO play a role in regulating the number of floral organ primordia, and we discuss possible mechanisms for such a regulation. PMID:11526079

  10. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1. Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis.

  11. A subgroup of MATE transporter genes regulates hypocotyl cell elongation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Ge, Qing; Li, Yuanfeng; Shao, Jingxia; Qi, Yafei; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2015-10-01

    The growth of higher plants is under complex regulation to ensure the elaboration of developmental programmes under a changing environment. To dissect these regulatory circuits, we carried out genetic screens for Arabidopsis abnormal shoot (abs) mutants with altered shoot development. Here, we report the isolation of two dominant mutants, abs3-1D and abs4-1D, through activation tagging. Both mutants showed a 'bushy' loss of apical dominance phenotype. ABS3 and ABS4 code for two closely related putative Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) family of efflux transporters, respectively. ABS3 and ABS4, as well as two related MATE genes, ABS3-Like1 (ABS3L1) and ABS3L2, showed diverse tissue expression profiles but their gene products all localized to the late endosome/prevacuole (LE/PVC) compartment. The over-expression of these four genes individually led to the inhibition of hypocotyl cell elongation in the light. On the other hand, the quadruple knockout mutant (mateq) showed the opposite phenotype of an enhanced hypocotyl cell elongation in the light. Hypocotyl cell elongation and de-etiolation processes in the dark were also affected by the mutations of these genes. Exogenously applied sucrose attenuated the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation caused by abs3-1D and abs4-1D in the dark, and enhanced the hypocotyl elongation of mateq under prolonged dark treatment. We determined that ABS3 genetically interacts with the photoreceptor gene PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB). Our results demonstrate that ABS3 and related MATE family transporters are potential negative regulators of hypocotyl cell elongation and support a functional link between the endomembrane system, particularly the LE/PVC, and the regulation of plant cell elongation. PMID:26160579

  12. A Clade-Specific Arabidopsis Gene Connects Primary Metabolism and Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dallas C.; Zheng, Wenguang; Huang, Sheng; Du, Chuanlong; Zhao, Xuefeng; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Sen, Taner Z.; Nettleton, Dan; Wurtele, Eve S.; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Nearly immobile, plants have evolved new components to be able to respond to changing environments. One example is Qua Quine Starch (QQS, AT3G30720), an Arabidopsis thaliana-specific orphan gene that integrates primary metabolism with adaptation to environment changes. SAQR (Senescence-Associated and QQS-Related, AT1G64360), is unique to a clade within the family Brassicaceae; as such, the gene may have arisen about 20 million years ago. SAQR is up-regulated in QQS RNAi mutant and in the apx1 mutant under light-induced oxidative stress. SAQR plays a role in carbon allocation: overexpression lines of SAQR have significantly decreased starch content; conversely, in a saqr T-DNA knockout (KO) line, starch accumulation is increased. Meta-analysis of public microarray data indicates that SAQR expression is correlated with expression of a subset of genes involved in senescence, defense, and stress responses. SAQR promoter::GUS expression analysis reveals that SAQR expression increases after leaf expansion and photosynthetic capacity have peaked, just prior to visible natural senescence. SAQR is expressed predominantly within leaf and cotyledon vasculature, increasing in intensity as natural senescence continues, and then decreasing prior to death. In contrast, under experimentally induced senescence, SAQR expression increases in vasculature of cotyledons but not in true leaves. In SAQR KO line, the transcript level of the dirigent-like disease resistance gene (AT1G22900) is increased, while that of the Early Light Induced Protein 1 gene (ELIP1, AT3G22840) is decreased. Taken together, these data indicate that SAQR may function in the QQS network, playing a role in integration of primary metabolism with adaptation to internal and environmental changes, specifically those that affect the process of senescence. PMID:27462324

  13. Expression and functional analyses of the Arabidopsis QUA1 gene in light signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaojin, Chen; Chuanyu, Ding; Yuan, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Plants not only use light as an energy source for photosynthesis, but also have to monitor the light quality and quantity input to execute appropriate physiological and developmental responses, such as cell differentiation, structural and functional changes, as well as the formation of tissues and organs. The process is referred to as photomorphogenesis. Arabidopsis QUA1 (QUASIMODO1), which functions in pectin synthesis, is identified as a member of glycosyltransferases. Previously, the hypocotyl elongation of the qua1-1 mutant was shown to be inhibited under dark conditions. In this study, we used the qua1-1/cry1 and qua1-1/phyB double mutants as the materials to study the function of the QUA1 gene in light signal transduction. The results showed that QUA1 not only participated in hypocotyl elongation under dark conditions, but also in blue light, red light and far red light conditions. In qua1-1 mutant seedlings, both the cell length of hypocotyl and the light-regulated gene expression were affected. Compared with cry1 and phyB mutants, qua1-1/cry1 and qua1-1/phyB double mutants had the shorter hypocotyl. Light-regulated gene expression was also affected in the double mutants. These data indicated that QUA1 might participate in the light signal transduction regulated by CRY1 and PHYB. Hence, the QUA1 gene may play multiple roles in light signal transduction by regulating the cell elongation and light-regulated gene expression. PMID:27232492

  14. A Sulfonylurea Herbicide Resistance Gene from Arabidopsis thaliana as a New Selectable Marker for Production of Fertile Transgenic Rice Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Hayashimoto, A; Murai, N

    1992-10-01

    A mutant acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene, csr1-1, isolated from sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana, was placed under control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S). Rice protoplasts were transformed with the 35S/ALS chimeric gene and regenerated into fertile transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The 35S/ALS gene was expressed effectively as demonstrated by northern blot hybridization analysis, and conferred to transformed calli at least 200-fold greater chlorsulfuron resistance than nontransformed control calli. Effective selection of 35S/ALS-transformed protoplasts was achieved at extremely low chlorsulfuron concentrations of 10 nm. The results demonstrated that the 35S/ALS gene is an alternative selectable marker for rice protoplast transformation and fertile transgenic rice production. The results also suggest that the mutant form of Arabidopsis ALS enzyme operates normally in rice cells. Thus, the mechanism of protein transport to chloroplast and ALS inhibition by chlorsulfuron is apparently conserved among plant species as diverse as Arabidopsis (dicotyledon) and rice (monocotyledon). PMID:16653044

  15. DELAYED FLOWERING, an Arabidopsis Gene That Acts in the Autonomous Flowering Promotion Pathway and Is Required for Normal Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jie Chen; Zheng Yuan; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    The control of flowering time in higher plants is one of the most important physiological processes and is critical for their reproductive success. To investigate the mechanisms controlling flowering time, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with late-flowering phenotypes. One mutant, designated delayed flowering (dfr) in the Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, was identified with delayed flowering time. Genetic analysis revealed that dfr is a single gene recessive nuclear mutant and the mutation was mapped to a locus tightly linked to UFO on chromosome 1. To our knowledge, no gene regulating flowering time has been reported yet in this region. The dfr mutant plant showed a delayed flowering time under the different growth conditions examined,including long- and short-day photoperiods and gibberellic acid GA3 treatments, suggesting that DFR is a gene involved in the autonomous flowering promotion pathway. The Arabidopsis gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) plays a central role in repressing flowering and its transcripts are undetectable in wild-type Ler.However, FLCexpression was upregulated in the dfrmutant, suggesting that DFR is a negative regulator of FLC. In addition, the dfr mutant plant displayed altered valve shapes of the silique and the number of trichomes and branches of each trichome were both reduced, indicating that the DRFgene is also required for normal plant development. Moreover, dfr leafy-5 (Ify-5) double mutant plants showed a much later flowering time than either dfr or Ify-5 single mutants, indicating that DFR and LFYact synergistically to promote flowering in Arabidopsis.

  16. AtCLH2, a Typical but Possibly Distinctive Chiorophyllase Gene in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Liao; Kun An; Xiao Zhou; Wen-Jun Chen; Ben-Ke Kuai

    2007-01-01

    Chlorophyllase (EC 3.1.1.14) is involved in the first step of chlorophyll degradation. Isolation of chlorophyllase genes greatly facilitates characterization of chlorophyllase properties and elucidation of molecular regulation of their in vivo activities. There are two chlorophyllase genes, AtCLH1 and AtCLH2, in Arabidopsis thallana. The in vivo roles of AtCLH1 have been reported previously. However, few studies have been carried out on AtCLH2. Here,we show that purified recombinant Chlase2, encoded by AtCLH2, exhibits in vitro chlorophyllase activity. Interestingly,"activation" of in vitro activity of the recombinant Chlase2 required higher concentrations of a detergent or a polar solvent. To determine its activity in vivo, the expression of AtCLH2 was inhibited by RNA interference. RNAi plants showed decreased contents of chlorophyllide without a substantial change in the total amount of the extractable chlorophyll and consequently presented lower chlorophyllide to chlorophyll ratios in their leaves. In addition, the two AtCLHs exhibited differential expression patterns. Our results suggest that AtCLH2 might play a distinctive role in chlorophyll catabolism in vivo.

  17. Arsenic Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana Expressing an Algal Arsenite Methyltransferase Gene Increases Arsenic Phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Lv, Yanling; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Wenwen; Rosen, Barry P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in soil can lead to elevated transfer of As to the food chain. One potential mitigation strategy is to genetically engineer plants to enable them to transform inorganic As to methylated and volatile As species. In this study, we genetically engineered two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with the arsenite (As(III)) S-adenosylmethyltransferase (arsM) gene from the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The transgenic A. thaliana plants gained a strong ability to methylate As, converting most of the inorganic As into dimethylarsenate [DMA(V)] in the shoots. Small amounts of volatile As were detected from the transgenic plants. However, the transgenic plants became more sensitive to As(III) in the medium, suggesting that DMA(V) is more phytotoxic than inorganic As. The study demonstrates a negative consequence of engineered As methylation in plants and points to a need for arsM genes with a strong ability to methylate As to volatile species. PMID:26998776

  18. Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Arabidopsis Identifies Previously Known Flowering Time and Pathogen Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There is currently tremendous interest in the possibility of using genome-wide association mapping to identify genes responsible for natural variation, particularly for human disease susceptibility. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is in many ways an ideal candidate for such studies, because it is a highly selfing hermaphrodite. As a result, the species largely exists as a collection of naturally occurring inbred lines, or accessions, which can be genotyped once and phenotyped repeatedly. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium in such a species will be much more extensive than in a comparable outcrossing species. We tested the feasibility of genome-wide association mapping in A. thaliana by searching for associations with flowering time and pathogen resistance in a sample of 95 accessions for which genome-wide polymorphism data were available. In spite of an extremely high rate of false positives due to population structure, we were able to identify known major genes for all phenotypes tested, thus demonstrating the potential of genome-wide association mapping in A. thaliana and other species with similar patterns of variation. The rate of false positives differed strongly between traits, with more clinal traits showing the highest rate. However, the false positive rates were always substantial regardless of the trait, highlighting the necessity of an appropriate genomic control in association studies.

  19. Genome-wide association mapping in Arabidopsis identifies previously known flowering time and pathogen resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Aranzana

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There is currently tremendous interest in the possibility of using genome-wide association mapping to identify genes responsible for natural variation, particularly for human disease susceptibility. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is in many ways an ideal candidate for such studies, because it is a highly selfing hermaphrodite. As a result, the species largely exists as a collection of naturally occurring inbred lines, or accessions, which can be genotyped once and phenotyped repeatedly. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium in such a species will be much more extensive than in a comparable outcrossing species. We tested the feasibility of genome-wide association mapping in A. thaliana by searching for associations with flowering time and pathogen resistance in a sample of 95 accessions for which genome-wide polymorphism data were available. In spite of an extremely high rate of false positives due to population structure, we were able to identify known major genes for all phenotypes tested, thus demonstrating the potential of genome-wide association mapping in A. thaliana and other species with similar patterns of variation. The rate of false positives differed strongly between traits, with more clinal traits showing the highest rate. However, the false positive rates were always substantial regardless of the trait, highlighting the necessity of an appropriate genomic control in association studies.

  20. The BLADE-ON-PETIOLE genes are essential for abscission zone formation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Sarah M; Stenvik, Grethe-Elisabeth; Butenko, Melinka A; Kristiansen, Wenche; Cho, Sung Ki; Hepworth, Shelley R; Aalen, Reidunn B; Haughn, George W

    2008-04-01

    The Arabidopsis BLADE-ON-PETIOLE 1 (BOP1) and BOP2 genes encode redundant transcription factors that promote morphological asymmetry during leaf and floral development. Loss-of-function bop1 bop2 mutants display a range of developmental defects, including a loss of floral organ abscission. Abscission occurs along specialised cell files, called abscission zones (AZs) that develop at the junction between the leaving organ and main plant body. We have characterized the bop1 bop2 abscission phenotype to determine how BOP1 and BOP2 contribute to the known abscission developmental framework. Histological analysis and petal breakstrength measurements of bop1 bop2 flowers show no differentiation of floral AZs. Furthermore, vestigial cauline leaf AZs are also undifferentiated in bop1 bop2 mutants, suggesting that BOP proteins are essential to establish AZ cells in different tissues. In support of this hypothesis, BOP1/BOP2 activity is required for both premature floral organ abscission and the ectopic abscission of cauline leaves promoted by the INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) gene under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. Expression of several abscission-related marker genes, including IDA, is relatively unperturbed in bop1 bop2 mutants, indicating that these AZ genes respond to positional cues that are independent of BOP1/BOP2 activity. We also show that BOP1 and BOP2 promote growth of nectary glands, which normally develop at the receptacle adjacent to developing AZs. Taken together, these data suggest that BOP1/BOP2 activity is required for multiple cell differentiation events in the proximal regions of inflorescence lateral organs. PMID:18339677

  1. Finding missing interactions of the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche gene regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio eAzpeitia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOver the last few decades, the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche has become a model system for the study of plant development and the stem cell niche. Currently, many of the molecular mechanisms involved in root stem cell niche maintenance and development have been described. A few years ago, we published a gene regulatory network model integrating this information. This model suggested that there were missing components or interactions. Upon updating the model, the observed stable gene configurations of the root stem cell niche could not be recovered, indicating that there are additional missing components or interactions in the model. In fact, due to the lack of experimental data, gene regulatory networks inferred from published data are usually incomplete. However, predicting the location and nature of the missing data is a not trivial task. Here, we propose a set of procedures for detecting and predicting missing interactions in Boolean networks. We used these procedures to predict putative missing interactions in the A. thaliana root stem cell niche network model. Using our approach, we identified three necessary interactions to recover the reported gene activation configurations that have been experimentally uncovered for the different cell types within the root stem cell niche: 1 a regulation of PHABULOSA to restrict its expression domain to the vascular cells, 2 a self-regulation of WOX5, possibly by an indirect mechanism through the auxin signalling pathway and 3 a positive regulation of JACKDAW by MAGPIE. The procedures proposed here greatly reduce the number of possible Boolean functions that are biologically meaningful and experimentally testable and that do not contradict previous data. We believe that these procedures can be used on any Boolean network. However, because the procedures were designed for the specific case of the root stem cell niche, formal demonstrations of the procedures should be shown in future

  2. The TORNADO1 and TORNADO2 genes function in several patterning processes during early leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Cnops, Gerda; Neyt, Pia; Raes, Jeroen; Petrarulo, Marica; Nelissen, Hilde; Malenica, Nenad; Luschnig, Christian; Tietz, Olaf; Ditengou, Franck; Palme, Klaus; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Prinsen, Els; Van Lijsebettens, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, patterning is a process that generates axes in the primary body plan, creates domains upon organ formation, and finally leads to differentiation into tissues and cell types. We identified the Arabidopsis thaliana TORNADO1 (TRN1) and TRN2 genes and their role in leaf patterning processes such as lamina venation, symmetry, and lateral growth. In trn mutants, the leaf venation network had a severely reduced complexity: incomplete loops, no tertiary or quaternary veins...

  3. Improvement of water use efficiency in rice by expression of HARDY, an Arabidopsis drought and salt tolerance gene

    OpenAIRE

    Karaba, A.; Dixit, S.A.; Greco, Raffaella; Aharoni, A.; Trijatmiko, K.R.; Marsch-Martinez, N.; Krishnan, A; Nataraja, K.N.; Udayakumar, M.; A.B. Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater is a limited and dwindling global resource; therefore, efficient water use is required for food crops that have high water demands, such as rice, or for the production of sustainable energy biomass. We show here that expression of the Arabidopsis HARDY (HRD) gene in rice improves water use efficiency, the ratio of biomass produced to the water used, by enhancing photosynthetic assimilation and reducing transpiration. These drought-tolerant, low-water-consuming rice plants exhibit i...

  4. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Jülke; Jutta Ludwig-Müller

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana cl...

  5. Plant hemoglobin gene expression adjusts Arabidopsis susceptibility to Pseudomonas synringae and Botrytis cinerea though scavenging of nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivakumaran, Anushen; Hebelstrup, Kim; Cristescu, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    NO has earlier been shown to influence ethylene production during Pseudomonas syringae elicited hypersensitive response in tobacco. In this work Arabidopsis plants with silencing or null mutation of hemoglobin genes (glb1 and glb2) and transgenic lines over-expressing Glb1 and Glb2 demonstrated a...... causal link between NO generation, hemoglobin-dependent NO scavenging, the production of ethylene and resistance to Botrytis or Pseudomonas....

  6. Molecular analysis of the LATERAL SUPPRESSOR gene in Arabidopsis reveals a conserved control mechanism for axillary meristem formation

    OpenAIRE

    Greb, Thomas; Clarenz, Oliver; Schäfer, Elisabeth; Müller, Dörte; Herrero, Rubén; Schmitz, Gregor; Theres, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In seed plants, shoot branching is initiated by the formation of new meristems in the axils of leaves, which subsequently develop into new axes of growth. This study describes the genetic control of axillary meristem formation by the LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (LAS) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. las mutants show a novel phenotype that is characterized by the inability to form lateral shoots during vegetative development. The analysis shows that axillary meristem formation is differently regulated dur...

  7. Arabidopsis Vacuolar Pyrophosphatase gene (AVP1) induces drought and salt tolerance in Nicotiana tabacum plants (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drought and salinity are global problems. In Pakistan these problems are increasing to an alarming situation due to low rain-fall and bad agricultural practices. Salt and drought stress shows a high degree of similarity with respect to physiological, biochemical, molecular and genetic effects. This is due to the fact that sub-lethal salt-stress condition is ultimately an osmotic effect which is apparently similar to that brought in by water deficit. Genetic engineering allows the re-introduction of plant genes into their genomes by increasing their expression level. Plant vacuoles play a central role in cellular mechanisms of adaptation to salinity and drought stresses. In principle, increased vacuolar solute accumulation should have a positive impact in the adaptation of plants to salinity and drought. The active transport of the solutes depends on the proton gradients established by proton pumps. We have over expressed Arabidopsis gene AVP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar pyro phosphatase H/sup +/ pump) to increase drought/salt tolerance in tobacco. The AVP1 ORF with a tandem repeat of 358 promoter was cloned in pPZP212 vector and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was performed. Transgenic plants were selected on plant nutrient agar medium supplemented with 50 mg/liter kanamycin. Transgenic plants were confirmed for transfer of genes by AVP1 and nptll gene specific PCR and Southern hybridization. AVP1 transgenic plants were screened for salt tolerance by providing NaCl solution in addition to nutrient solution. AVP1 transgenic plants showed tolerance up to 300 mM NaCl as compared to control which died ten days after 200 mM NaCl. Sodium and potassium were measured in salt treated and control plants. Results showed that sodium ion uptake in the salt treated transgenic plants was four times more as compared to wild type. This remarkable increase in Na/sup +/ ion uptake indicates that AVP1 vacuole proton pumps are actively involved in the transport of Na

  8. Comparative analysis of GT14/GT14-like family genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Li, Ting [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase family14 (GT14) belongs to the glycosyltransferase (GT) superfamily that plays important roles in the biosynthesis of cell walls, the most abundant source of cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production. It has been hypothesized that DUF266 proteins are a new class of GTs related to GT14. In this study, we identified 62 GT14 and 106 DUF266 genes (named GT14-like herein) in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis. Our phylogenetic analysis separated GT14 and GT14-like genes into two distinct clades, which were further divided into eight and five groups, respectively. Similarities in protein domain, 3D structure and gene expression were uncovered between the two phylogenetic clades, supporting the hypothesis that GT14 and GT14-like genes belong to one family. Therefore, we proposed a new family name, GT14/GT14-like family that combines both subfamilies. Variation in gene expression and protein subcellular localization within the GT14-like subfamily were greater than those within the GT14 subfamily. One-half of the Arabidopsis and Populus GT14/GT14-like genes were found to be preferentially expressed in stem/xylem, indicating that they are likely involved in cell wall biosynthesis. This study provided new insights into the evolution and functional diversification of the GT14/GT14-like family genes.

  9. The SKP1-like gene family of Arabidopsis exhibits a high degree of differential gene expression and gene product interaction during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Dezfulian

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes several families of polypeptides that are known or predicted to participate in the formation of the SCF-class of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes. One such gene family encodes the Skp1-like class of polypeptide subunits, where 21 genes have been identified and are known to be expressed in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis based on deduced polypeptide sequence organizes the family of ASK proteins into 7 clades. The complexity of the ASK gene family, together with the close structural similarity among its members raises the prospect of significant functional redundancy among select paralogs. We have assessed the potential for functional redundancy within the ASK gene family by analyzing an expanded set of criteria that define redundancy with higher resolution. The criteria used include quantitative expression of locus-specific transcripts using qRT-PCR, assessment of the sub-cellular localization of individual ASK:YFP auto-fluorescent fusion proteins expressed in vivo as well as the in planta assessment of individual ASK-F-Box protein interactions using bimolecular fluorescent complementation techniques in combination with confocal imagery in live cells. The results indicate significant functional divergence of steady state transcript abundance and protein-protein interaction specificity involving ASK proteins in a pattern that is poorly predicted by sequence-based phylogeny. The information emerging from this and related studies will prove important for defining the functional intersection of expression, localization and gene product interaction that better predicts the formation of discrete SCF complexes, as a prelude to investigating their molecular mode of action.

  10. The homeotic gene APETALA3 of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a MADS box and is expressed in petals and stamens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, T; Brockman, L L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1992-02-21

    Mutations in the APETALA3 (AP3) gene of A. thaliana result in homeotic transformations of petals to sepals and stamens to carpels. We have cloned the AP3 gene from Arabidopsis based on its homology to the homeotic flower gene deficiens (DEFA) from the distantly related plant Antirrhinum majus. The sequence of four ap3 mutant alleles and genetic mapping analysis prove that the DEFA homolog is AP3. Like several other plant homeotic genes, the AP3 gene contains a MADS box and likely acts as a transcription factor. The region-specific spatial expression pattern of AP3 rules out certain types of sequential models of flower development and argues in favor of a spatial model based on positional information. Since DEFA and AP3 have very similar protein products, mutant phenotypes, and spatial expression patterns, it is likely that these genes are cognate homologs. PMID:1346756

  11. Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ederli, Luisa; Dawe, Adam; Pasqualini, Stefania; Quaglia, Mara; Xiong, Liming; Gehring, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the Arabidopsis flower evolved protective measures to increase reproductive success. Firstly, analyses of available transcriptome data show that the most highly expressed transcripts in the closed sepal (stage 12) are enriched in genes with roles in responses to chemical stimuli and cellular metabolic processes. At stage 15, there is enrichment in transcripts with a role in responses to biotic stimuli. Comparative analyses between the sepal and petal in the open flower mark an over-representation of transcripts with a role in responses to stress and catalytic activity. Secondly, the content of the biotic defense-associated phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) in sepals and petals is significantly higher than in leaves. To understand whether the high levels of stress responsive transcripts and the higher SA content affect defense, wild-type plants (Col-0) and transgenic plants defective in SA accumulation (nahG) were challenged with the biotrophic fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum, the causal agent of powdery mildew, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. NahG leaves were more sensitive than those of Col-0, suggesting that in leaves SA has a role in the defense against biotrophs. In contrast, sepals and petals of both genotypes were resistant to G. cichoracearum, indicating that in the flower, resistance to the biotrophic pathogen is not critically dependent on SA, but likely dependent on the up-regulation of stress-responsive genes. Since sepals and petals of both genotypes are equally susceptible to B. cinerea, we conclude that neither stress-response genes nor increased SA accumulation offers protection against the necrotrophic pathogen. These results are interpreted in the light of the distinctive role of the flower and we propose that in the early stages, the sepal may act as a chemical defense barrier of the developing reproductive structures against biotrophic pathogens. PMID:25750645

  12. Molecular and functional characterization of a human ATM gene analogue at Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human ATM gene, whose inactivation is responsible for the human disease ataxia telangiectasia is conserved throughout the Eukaryotes and plays an important role in the cellular responses to DNA damage, in particular to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here we describe the identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of ATM (AtATM), and the molecular and cytological characterization of plants, hereafter called atm, carrying a disrupting T-DNA insertion in this gene. AtATM covers a 32 kb region on chromosome 3. The AtATM transcript has a complex structure, is 12 kb long and formed by 79 exons. The transcriptional level of AtATM is very low in all the tissues tested, and does not vary after exposure to ionizing radiations (IR). In atm plants, the protein is not detected suggesting the mutants are null. The atm mutants are partially sterile. Aberrant segregation of chromosomes during meiosis I on both male and female sides account for this sterility. However, meiotic recombination frequency is normal. Mutant plants are also hypersensitive to gamma rays and methyl methane sulfonate, but not to UV-B, pointing to a specific defect of atm mutants in the response to DNA DSBs. In plants, ionizing radiations induce a strong, rapid and transient transcriptional activation of genes involved in the cellular response to or the repair of DSBs. This transcriptional regulation of AtRAD51, AtPARP1, atGR1 and AtL1G4 is lost in the atm mutants . The absence of AtRAD51 induction associated with ionizing radiation sensitivity suggest that AtAtm play an important function in DSB repair by homologous recombination. In addition we show that homologous intra-chromosomal recombination frequency is elevated in the mutant comparing to wild-type, with or without gamma irradiation. These results show the implication of AtAtm in the genomic stability. (author)

  13. Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens

    KAUST Repository

    Ederli, Luisa

    2015-02-20

    We investigated whether the Arabidopsis flower evolved protective measures to increase reproductive success. Firstly, analyses of available transcriptome data show that the most highly expressed transcripts in the closed sepal (stage 12) are enriched in genes with roles in responses to chemical stimuli and cellular metabolic processes. At stage 15, there is enrichment in transcripts with a role in responses to biotic stimuli. Comparative analyses between the sepal and petal in the open flower mark an over-representation of transcripts with a role in responses to stress and catalytic activity. Secondly, the content of the biotic defense-associated phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) in sepals and petals is significantly higher than in leaves. To understand whether the high levels of stress responsive transcripts and the higher SA content affect defense, wild-type plants (Col-0) and transgenic plants defective in SA accumulation (nahG) were challenged with the biotrophic fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum, the causal agent of powdery mildew, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. NahG leaves were more sensitive than those of Col-0, suggesting that in leaves SA has a role in the defense against biotrophs. In contrast, sepals and petals of both genotypes were resistant to G. cichoracearum, indicating that in the flower, resistance to the biotrophic pathogen is not critically dependent on SA, but likely dependent on the up-regulation of stress-responsive genes. Since sepals and petals of both genotypes are equally susceptible to B. cinerea, we conclude that neither stress-response genes nor increased SA accumulation offers protection against the necrotrophic pathogen. These results are interpreted in the light of the distinctive role of the flower and we propose that in the early stages, the sepal may act as a chemical defense barrier of the developing reproductive structures against biotrophic pathogens.

  14. A Microarray Based Genomic Hybridization Method for Identification of New Genes in Plants: Case Analyses of Arabidopsis and Oryza

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanzhu Fan; Maria D. Vibranovski; Ying Chen; Manyuan Long

    2007-01-01

    To systematically estimate the gene duplication events in closely related species, we have to use comparative genomic approaches, either through genomic sequence comparison or comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Given the scarcity of complete genomic sequences of plant species, in the present study we adopted an array based CGH to investigate gene duplications in the genus Arabidopsis. Fragment genomic DNA from four species, namely Arabidopsis thaliana, A. lyrata subsp. lyrata, A. lyrata subsp. petraea, and A. halleri, was hybridized to Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA, USA) tiling arrays that are designed from the genomic sequences of A. thaliana. Pairwise comparisons of signal intensity were made to infer the potential duplicated candidates along each phylo-genetic branch. Ninety-four potential candidates of gene duplication along the genus were identified. Among them, the majority (69 of 94) were A. thaliana lineage specific. This result indicates that the array based CGH approach may be used to identify candidates of duplication in other plant genera containing closely related species, such as Oryza, particularly for the AA genome species. We compared the degree of gene duplication through retrotransposon between O. sativa and A. thaliana and found a strikingly higher number of chimera retroposed genes in rice. The higher rate of gene duplication through retroposition and other mechanisms may indicate that the grass species is able to adapt to more diverse environments.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a gene (UVR3) required for photorepair of 6-4 photoproducts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV radiation induces two major classes of pyrimidine dimers: the pyrimidine [6-4] pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4 product) and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Many organisms produce enzymes, termed photolyases, that specifically bind to these damage products and split them via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism, thereby reversing the damage. These photolyases are specific for either CPDs or 6-4 products. A gene that expresses a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity in vitro was recently cloned from Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis. We report here the isolation of a homolog of this gene, cloned on the basis of sequence similarity, from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This cloned gene produces a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity when expressed in Escherichia coli. We also find that a previously described mutant of Arabidopsis (uvr3) that is defective in photoreactivation of 6-4 products carries a nonsense mutation in this 6-4 photolyase homolog. We have therefore termed this gene UVR3. Although homologs of this gene have previously been shown to produce a functional 6-4 photolyase when expressed in heterologous systems, this is the first demonstration of a requirement for this gene for photoreactivation of 6-4 products in vivo

  16. Monoubiquitination of histone 2B at the disease resistance gene locus regulates its expression and impacts immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Baohong; Yang, Dong-Lei; Shi, Zhenying; Dong, Hansong; Hua, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Disease resistance (R) genes are key components in plant immunity. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) E3 ubiquitin ligase genes HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 (HUB1) and HUB2 regulate the expression of R genes SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1) and RESISTANCE TO PERONOSPORA PARASITICA4. An increase of SNC1 expression induces constitutive immune responses in the bonzai1 (bon1) mutant, and the loss of HUB1 or HUB2 function reduces SNC1 up-regulation and suppresses the bon1 autoimmune phenotypes. HUB1 and HUB2 mediate histone 2B (H2B) monoubiquitination directly at the SNC1 R gene locus to regulate its expression. In addition, SNC1 and HUB1 transcripts are moderately up-regulated by pathogen infection, and H2B monoubiquitination at SNC1 is enhanced by pathogen infection. Together, this study indicates that H2B monoubiquitination at the R gene locus regulates its expression and that this histone modification at the R gene locus has an impact on immune responses in plants. PMID:24664204

  17. The Arabidopsis co-expression tool (act): a WWW-based tool and database for microarray-based gene expression analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, C. H.; Manfield, I. W.; Michalopoulos, D. W.;

    2006-01-01

    We present a new WWW-based tool for plant gene analysis, the Arabidopsis Co-Expression Tool (act) , based on a large Arabidopsis thaliana microarray data set obtained from the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre. The co-expression analysis tool allows users to identify genes whose expression...... patterns are correlated across selected experiments or the complete data set. Results are accompanied by estimates of the statistical significance of the correlation relationships, expressed as probability (P) and expectation (E) values. Additionally, highly ranked genes on a correlation list can...... be examined using the novel clique finder tool to determine the sets of genes most likely to be regulated in a similar manner. In combination, these tools offer three levels of analysis: creation of correlation lists of co-expressed genes, refinement of these lists using two-dimensional scatter plots...

  18. Cadmium and iron transport by members of a plant metal transporter family in Arabidopsis with homology to Nramp genes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomine, Sébastien; Wang, Rongchen; Ward, John M.; Crawford, Nigel M.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2000-01-01

    Metal cation homeostasis is essential for plant nutrition and resistance to toxic heavy metals. Many plant metal transporters remain to be identified at the molecular level. In the present study, we have isolated AtNramp cDNAs from Arabidopsis and show that these genes complement the phenotype of a metal uptake deficient yeast strain, smf1. AtNramps show homology to the Nramp gene family in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals. Expression of AtNramp cDNAs increases Cd2+ sensitivity and Cd2+ a...

  19. Overexpression of a soybean ariadne-like ubiquitin ligase gene GmARI1 enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolian Zhang

    Full Text Available Ariadne (ARI subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L. Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2-4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase gene family in Arabidopsis, a key enzyme for matrix polysaccharides in cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Klinghammer, Michaela; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis cell walls contain large amounts of pectins and hemicelluloses, which are predominantly synthesized via the common precursor UDP-glucuronic acid. The major enzyme for the formation of this nucleotide-sugar is UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, catalysing the irreversible oxidation of UDP-glucose into UDP-glucuronic acid. Four functional gene family members and one pseudogene are present in the Arabidopsis genome, and they show distinct tissue-specific expression patterns during plant deve...

  1. Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana via Agrobacterium tumefacience with an endochitinase gene from Trichoderma, and enhanced resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Fu-ming; XU Tong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen to many crops and is especially damaging to rape in China. As a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (ColO) was transformed by spraying Agrobacterium tumefacience with Trichoderma endochitinase gene ThEn-42 at initial bud stage. Eleven seedlings (corresponding to about 0.22 percent transformation) exhibited resistance to hygromycin. The DNA fragment unique to endochitinase ( ThEn-42 ) was amplified by Arabidopsis leaf-PCR or genomic DNA PCR. Unfertile, dwarf and normal phenotypes appeared in the T1 generation. In addition, an enhanced resistance to S. sclerotiorum was observed. The mortality percentage (7.7% to 33.3%) in transgenic plants was significantly lower than in non-transgenic plants (86. 7%) 10 days after inoculation with the pathogen.

  2. MicroRNA (miR396) negatively regulates expression of ceramidase-like genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Liu; Diqiu Yu

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 21-23 nucleotide (nt), endogenous RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting mRNAs for direct cleavage or translational repression in plants. In Arabidopsis, miR396 is encoded by two different loci (MIR396a and M1R396b) and sequence analysis suggests it may target three ceramidase-like genes (Atceramidase-like 1, Atceramidase-like 2 and Atceramidase-like 3). To demonstrate the biological function of miR396, we inserted the synthetic precursors, MIR396a or MIR396b, under the control of the enhanced cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, into a plant transformation vector (pOCA30) and transformed the con-structs into Arabidopsis. The promoter increased miR396 levels by more than 2-fold, indicating appropriate maturation of the synthetic precursor MIR396a or MIR396b transcript in transgenic plants. Microarray analysis showed that the transcript levels of two ceramidase-like genes (Atceramidase-like 1, Atceramidase-like 2) were decreased by more than 2-fold and lactosylceramide 4-α-galactosyltransferase increased by more than 2-fold in transgenic plants compared with the empty vector-transformed plants. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA levels of the two ceramidase-like genes were significantly reduced in transgenic plants. These results indicated that miR396 probably plays a crucial role in the ceramide metabolism pathway by negatively regulating the expression of ceramidase-like genes in Arabidopsis.

  3. Analysis of Global Expression Profiles of Arabidopsis Genes Under Abscisic Acid and H2O2 Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Cheng Wang; Yan-Yan Du; Guo-Yong An; Yun Zhou; Chen Miao; Chun-Peng Song

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the coordination of gene expression profiles under abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 applications,global changes in gene expression in response to ABA and H2O2 in Arabidopsis seedlings were investigated using GeneChip (Santa Clara, CA, USA) arrays. Among over 24 000 genes present in the arrays, 459 transcripts were found to be significantly increased, whereas another 221 decreased following H2O2 treatment compared with control. Similar to treatment with H2O2, ABA treatment elevated the transcription of 391 genes and repressed that of 322 genes. One hundred and forty-three upregulated genes and 75 downregulated genes were shared between the two treatments and these genes were mainly involved in metabolism, signal transduction, transcription, defense, and resistance. Only two genes, which encode an APETALA2/dehydration-responsive element binding protein (AP2/DREBP) family transcriptional factor and a late embryogenesisabundant protein, were downregulated by H2O2, but upregulated by ABA. These results suggest that, similar to ABA, H2O2 plays a global role in gene transcription of Arabidopsisseedlings. The transcriptional responses induced by the application of exogenous ABA and H2O2 overlapped substantially. These two treatments regulated most of the downstream genes in a coordinated manner.

  4. Integrating the genetic and physical maps of Arabidopsis thaliana: identification of mapped alleles of cloned essential (EMB genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Meinke

    Full Text Available The classical genetic map of Arabidopsis includes more than 130 genes with an embryo-defective (emb mutant phenotype. Many of these essential genes remain to be cloned. Hundreds of additional EMB genes have been cloned and catalogued (www.seedgenes.org but not mapped. To facilitate EMB gene identification and assess the current level of saturation, we updated the classical map, compared the physical and genetic locations of mapped loci, and performed allelism tests between mapped (but not cloned and cloned (but not mapped emb mutants with similar chromosome locations. Two hundred pairwise combinations of genes located on chromosomes 1 and 5 were tested and more than 1100 total crosses were screened. Sixteen of 51 mapped emb mutants examined were found to be disrupted in a known EMB gene. Alleles of a wide range of published EMB genes (YDA, GLA1, TIL1, AtASP38, AtDEK1, EMB506, DG1, OEP80 were discovered. Two EMS mutants isolated 30 years ago, T-DNA mutants with complex insertion sites, and a mutant with an atypical, embryo-specific phenotype were resolved. The frequency of allelism encountered was consistent with past estimates of 500 to 1000 EMB loci. New EMB genes identified among mapped T-DNA insertion mutants included CHC1, which is required for chromatin remodeling, and SHS1/AtBT1, which encodes a plastidial nucleotide transporter similar to the maize Brittle1 protein required for normal endosperm development. Two classical genetic markers (PY, ALB1 were identified based on similar map locations of known genes required for thiamine (THIC and chlorophyll (PDE166 biosynthesis. The alignment of genetic and physical maps presented here should facilitate the continued analysis of essential genes in Arabidopsis and further characterization of a broad spectrum of mutant phenotypes in a model plant.

  5. Discrete spatial and temporal cis-acting elements regulate transcription of the Arabidopsis floral homeotic gene APETALA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T A; Day, C D; Zondlo, S C; Thackeray, A G; Irish, V F

    1998-05-01

    The APETALA3 floral homeotic gene is required for petal and stamen development in Arabidopsis. APETALA3 transcripts are first detected in a meristematic region that will give rise to the petal and stamen primordia, and expression is maintained in this region during subsequent development of these organs. To dissect how the APETALA3 gene is expressed in this spatially and temporally restricted domain, various APETALA3 promoter fragments were fused to the uidA reporter gene encoding beta-glucuronidase and assayed for the resulting patterns of expression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Based on these promoter analyses, we defined cis-acting elements required for distinct phases of APETALA3 expression, as well as for petal-specific and stamen-specific expression. By crossing the petal-specific construct into different mutant backgrounds, we have shown that several floral genes, including APETALA3, PISTILLATA, UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS, and APETALA1, encode trans-acting factors required for second-whorl-specific APETALA3 expression. We have also shown that the products of the APETALA1, APETALA3, PISTILLATA and AGAMOUS genes bind to several conserved sequence motifs within the APETALA3 promoter. We present a model whereby spatially and temporally restricted APETALA3 transcription is controlled via interactions between proteins binding to different domains of the APETALA3 promoter. PMID:9521909

  6. The expression of Arabidopsis glutamate dehydrogenase gene gdh2 is induced under the influence of tetrapyrrole synthesis inhibitor norflurazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Garnik

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The gdh2 gene encoding beta-subunit of glutamate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis belongs to diurnal-regulated genes. Its expression is highly increased in the dark and reduced to minimal rates at the day light. Some sugar-responsive regulatory pathways are known to be involved in the gdh2 light repression, but the specific mechanisms of this regulation are unknown. In our experiments expression of gdh2 gene increased 6-11 fold in Arabidopsis seedlings grown in presence of the tetrapyrrole synthesis inhibitor norflurazon. The increasing rate depended on the light intensity and did not correlate with the induction of ROS marker genes. This observation can be explained by both a low glucose level in the cells treated with norflurazon and absence of repression by the chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde pathways because of chloroplast dysfunction. We assume that the diurnal regulation of gdh2 gene expression involves not only sugar-dependent, but also chloroplast-to-nucleus regulatory signals.

  7. Identification and characterization of a salt tolerance-responsive gene( AtGRP9) of Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the important limiting factors for plant growth and development. A cDNA clone encoding a glycine-rich protein (designated AtGRP9) was identified from Arabidopsis by functional expression of the plant cDNA library in the fission yeast S. pombe. Yeast cells overexpressing AtGRP9 displayed significantly enhanced salt tolerance. Northern analysis showed that expression of AtGRP9 in Arabidopsis was induced by NaCl and plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). These results suggest that AtGRP9 may be involved in the salt stress response in Arabidopsis.

  8. Effect of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Carbon Metabolism and Gene Expression in Flower Tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria V.Busi; Maria E.Gomez-Lobato; Sebastian P.Rius; Valeria R.Turowski; Paula Casati; Eduardo J.Zabaleta; Diego F.Gomez-Casati; Alejandro Araya

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the transcriptomic response of transgenic plants carrying a mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the expression of the unedited form of the ATP synthase subunit 9.The u-ATP9 transgene driven by A9 and APETALA3 promoters induce mitochondrial dysfunction revealed by a decrease jn both oxygen uptake and adenine nucleotides(ATP,ADP)levels without changes in the ATP/ADP ratio.Furthermore,we measured an increase in ROS accumulation and a decrease in glutathione and ascorbate levels with a concomitant oxidative stress response.The transcriptome analysis of young Arabidopsis flowers,validated by Qrt-PCR and enzymatic or functional tests,showed dramatic changes in u-ATP9 plants.Both lines display a modification in the expression of various genes involved in carbon,lipid,and cell wall metabolism,suggesting that an important metabolic readjustment occurs in plants with a mitochondrial dysfunction.Interestingly,transcript levels involved in mitochondrial respiration,protein synthesis,and degradation are affected.Moreover,the Ievels of several mRNAs encoding for transcription factors and DNA binding proteins were also changed.Some of them are involved in stress and hormone responses,suggesting that several signaling pathways overlap.Indeed,the transcriptome data revealed that the mitochondrial dysfunction dramatically alters the expression of genes involved in signaling pathways,including those related to ethylene,absicic acid,and auxin signal transduction.Our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction model used in this report may be usefuI to uncover the retrograde signaling mechanism between the nucleus and mitochondria in plant cells.

  9. Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana Carrying a Peroxisomal Ascorbate Peroxidase Gene from Barley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wei-Feng; SHI Wei-Ming; A. UEDA; T. TAKABE

    2008-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases (APX), localized in the cytosol, peroxisome, mitochondria, and chloroplasts of plant cells,catalyze the reduction of H2O2 to water by using ascorbic acid as the specific electron donor. To determine the role of peroxisomal type ascorbate peroxidasc (pAPX), an antioxidant enzyme, in protection against salt-induced oxidative stress, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plant carrying a pAPX gene (HvAPX1) from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was analyzed. The transgenic line pAPX3 was found to be more tolerant to salt stress than the wild type. Irrespective of salt stress, there were no significant differences in Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ contents and the ratio of K+ to Na+ between pAPX3 and the wild type. Clearly, the salt tolerance in pAPX3 was not due to the maintenance and reestablishment of cellular ion homeostasis. However, the degree of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation (measured as the levels of malondialdehyde)accumulation under salt stress was higher in the wild type than in pAPX3. The mechanism of salt tolerance in transgenic pAPX3 can thus be explained by reduction of oxidative stress injury. Under all conditions tested, activities of superoxide,glutathionc reductase, and catalase were not significantly different between pAPX3 and the wild type. In contrast, the activity of APX was significantly higher in the transgcnic plant than in wild type under salt stress. These results suggested that in higher plants, HvAPX1 played an important role in salt tolerance and was a candidate gene for developing salt-tolerant crop plants.

  10. Cytokinin Regulation of Gene Expression in the AHP Gene Family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hradilová, Jana; Malbeck, Jiří; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2007), s. 229-244. ISSN 0721-7595 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A081; GA MŠk 1M06030; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600380507; GA AV ČR IAA600040612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : gene expression * AHP gene family * cytokinin signal transduction Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.220, year: 2007

  11. Analysis of promoter activity of members of the PECTATE LYASE-LIKE (PLL gene family in cell separation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nocker Steven

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pectate lyases depolymerize pectins by catalyzing the eliminative cleavage of α-1,4-linked galacturonic acid. Pectate lyase-like (PLL genes make up among the largest and most complex families in plants, but their cellular and organismal roles have not been well characterized, and the activity of these genes has been assessed only at the level of entire organs or plant parts, potentially obscuring important sub-organ or cell-type-specific activities. As a first step to understand the potential functional diversity of PLL genes in plants and specificity of individual genes, we utilized a reporter gene approach to document the spatial and temporal promoter activity for 23 of the 26 members of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis PLL gene family throughout development, focusing on processes involving cell separation. Results Numerous PLL promoters directed activity in localized domains programmed for cell separation, such as the abscission zones of the sepal, petal, stamen, and seed, as well as the fruit dehiscence zone. Several drove activity in cell types expected to facilitate separation, including the style and root endodermal and cortical layers during lateral root emergence. However, PLL promoters were active in domains not obviously programmed for separation, including the stipule, hydathode and root axis. Nearly all PLL promoters showed extensive overlap of activity in most of the regions analyzed. Conclusions Our results document potential for involvement of PLL genes in numerous aspects of growth and development both dependent and independent of cell separation. Although the complexity of the PLL gene family allows for enormous potential for gene specialization through spatial or temporal regulation, the high degree of overlap of activity among the PLL promoters suggests extensive redundancy. Alternatively, functional specialization might be determined at the post-transcriptional or protein level.

  12. Computational Identification of Novel Family Members of MicroRNA Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang LI; Wei LI; You-Xin JIN

    2005-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small RNAs that play important regulatory roles in both animals and plants, miRNA genes have been intensively studied in animals, but not in plants. In this study, we adopted a homology search approach to identify homologs of previously validated plant miRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. We identified 20 potential miRNA genes in Arabidopsis and 40 in O. sativa, providing a relatively complete enumeration of family members for these miRNAs in plants. In addition, a greater number ofArabidopsis miRNAs (MIR168, MIR159 and MIR172) were found to be conserved in rice. With the novel homologs, most of the miRNAs have closely related fellow miRNAs and the number of paralogs varies in the different miRNA families. Moreover, a probable functional segment highly conserved on the elongated stem of pre-miRNA fold-backs of MIR319 and MIR 159 family was identified. These results support a model of variegated miRNA regulation in plants, in which miRNAs with different functional elements on their pre-miRNA fold-backs can differ in their function or regulation, and closely related miRNAs can be diverse in their specificity or competence to downregulate target genes. It appears that the sophisticated regulation of miRNAs can achieve complex biological effects through qualitative and quantitative modulation of gene expression profiles in plants.

  13. Inducible and constitutive expression of an elicitor gene Hrip1 from Alternaria tenuissima enhances stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xue-Cong; Qiu, De-Wen; Zeng, Hong-Mei; Guo, Li-Hua; Yang, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    Hrip1 is a novel hypersensitive response-inducing protein secreted by Alternaria tenuissima that activates defense responses and systemic acquired resistance in tobacco. This study investigates the role that Hrip1 plays in responses to abiotic and biotic stress using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing the Hrip1 gene under the control of the stress-inducible rd29A promoter or constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Bioassays showed that inducible Hrip1 expression in rd29A∷Hrip1 transgenic lines had a significantly higher effect on plant height, silique length, plant dry weight, seed germination and root length under salt and drought stress compared to expression in 35S∷Hrip1 lines and wild type plants. The level of enhancement of resistance to Botrytis cinerea by the 35S∷Hrip1 lines was higher than in the rd29A∷Hrip1 lines. Moreover, stress-related gene expression in the transgenic Arabidopsis lines was significantly increased by 200 mM NaCl and 200 mM mannitol treatments, and defense genes in the jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathway were significantly up-regulated after Botrytis inoculation in the Hrip1 transgenic plants. Furthermore, the activity of some antioxidant enzymes, such as peroxidase and catalase increased after salt and drought stress and Botrytis infection. These results suggested that the Hrip1 protein contributes to abiotic and biotic resistance in transgenic Arabidopsis and may be used as a useful gene for resistance breeding in crops. Although the constitutive expression of Hrip1 is suitable for biotic resistance, inducible Hrip1 expression is more responsive for abiotic resistance. PMID:25120219

  14. Putrescine accumulation confers drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing the homologous Arginine decarboxylase 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcázar, Rubén; Planas, Joan; Saxena, Triambak; Zarza, Xavier; Bortolotti, Cristina; Cuevas, Juan; Bitrián, Marta; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Altabella, Teresa

    2010-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, a model genus missing a functional ornithine decarboxylase pathway, most of the key genes involved in polyamine biosynthesis are duplicated. This gene redundancy has been related to the involvement of certain gene isoforms in the response to specific environmental stimuli. We have previously shown that drought stress induces Arginine decarboxlase 2 expression, while transcript levels for Arginine decarboxlase 1 remain constant. Accumulation of putrescine and increased arginine decarboxlase activity (EC 4.1.1.19) levels in response to different abiotic stresses have been reported in many different plant systems, but the biological meaning of this increase remains unclear. To get a new insight into these questions, we have studied the response to drought of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines constitutively expressing the homologous Arginine decarboxlase 2 gene. These lines contain high levels of putrescine with no changes in spermidine and spermine content even under drought stress. Drought tolerance experiments indicate that the different degree of resistance to dehydration correlates with Put content. Although no significant differences were observed in the number of stomata between wild-type and transgenic plants, a reduction in transpiration rate and stomata conductance was observed in the ADC2 over-expressor lines. These results indicate that one of the mechanisms involved in the drought tolerance of transgenic plants over-producing Put is related to a reduction of water loss by transpiration. PMID:20206537

  15. Diverse Transcriptional Programs Associated with Environmental Stress and Hormones in the Arabidopsis Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Chae; Sylvia Sudat; Sandrine Dudoit; Tong Zhu; Sheng Luan

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes more than 600 receptor-like kinase (RLK) genes, by far the dominant class of receptors found in land plants. Although similar to the mammalian receptor tyrosine kinases, plant RLKs are serine/threonine kinases that represent a novel signaling innovation unique to plants and, consequently, an excellent opportunity to understand how extracellular signaling evolved and functions in plants as opposed to animals. RLKs are predicted to be major components of the signaling pathways that allow plants to respond to environmental and developmental conditions. However, breakthroughs in identifying these processes have been limited to only a handful of individual RLKs. Here, we used a Syngenta custom Arabidopsis GeneChip array to compile a detailed profile of the transcriptional activity of 604 receptor-like kinase genes after exposure to a cross-section of known signaling factors in plants,including abiotic stresses, biotic stresses, and hormones. In the 68 experiments comprising the study, we found that 582 of the 604 RLK genes displayed a two-fold or greater change in expression to at least one of 12 types of treatments, thereby providing a large body of experimental evidence for targeted functional screens of individual RLK genes. We investigated whether particular subfamilies of RLK genes are responsive to specific types of signals and found that each subfamily displayed broad ranges of expression, as opposed to being targeted towards particular signal classes. Finally, by analyzing the divergence of sequence and gene expression among the RLK subfamilies, we present evidence as to the functional basis for the expansion of the RLKs and how this expansion may have affected conservation and divergences in their function. Taken as a whole, our study represents a preliminary, working model of processes and interactions in which the members of the RLK gene family may be involved, where such information has remained elusive for so many

  16. Expression differences for genes involved in lignin, glutathione and sulphate metabolism in response to cadmium in Arabidopsis thaliana and the related Zn/Cd-hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Mortel, Judith E; Schat, Henk; Moerland, Perry D; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; van der Ent, Sjoerd; Blankestijn, Hetty; Ghandilyan, Artak; Tsiatsiani, Styliani; Aarts, Mark G M

    2008-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread, naturally occurring element present in soil, rock, water, plants and animals. Cd is a non-essential element for plants and is toxic at higher concentrations. Transcript profiles of roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and Thlaspi caerulescens plants exposed to Cd and zinc (Zn) are examined, with the main aim to determine the differences in gene expression between the Cd-tolerant Zn-hyperaccumulator T. caerulescens and the Cd-sensitive non-accumulator Arabidopsis. This comparative transcriptional analysis emphasized the role of genes involved in lignin, glutathione and sulphate metabolism. Furthermore the transcription factors MYB72 and bHLH100 were studied for their involvement in metal homeostasis, as they showed an altered expression after exposure to Cd. The Arabidopsis myb72 knockout mutant was more sensitive to excess Zn or iron (Fe) deficiency than wild type, while Arabidopsis transformants overexpressing bHLH100 showed increased tolerance to high Zn and nickel (Ni) compared to wild-type plants, confirming their role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:18088336

  17. The Arabidopsis AtRaptor genes are essential for post-embryonic plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit Bruce

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flowering plant development is wholly reliant on growth from meristems, which contain totipotent cells that give rise to all post-embryonic organs in the plant. Plants are uniquely able to alter their development throughout their lifespan through the generation of new organs in response to external signals. To identify genes that regulate meristem-based growth, we considered homologues of Raptor proteins, which regulate cell growth in response to nutrients in yeast and metazoans as part of a signaling complex with the target of rapamycin (TOR kinase. Results We identified AtRaptor1A and AtRaptor1B, two loci predicted to encode Raptor proteins in Arabidopsis. Disruption of AtRaptor1B yields plants with a wide range of developmental defects: roots are thick and grow slowly, leaf initiation and bolting are delayed and the shoot inflorescence shows reduced apical dominance. AtRaptor1A AtRaptor1B double mutants show normal embryonic development but are unable to maintain post-embryonic meristem-driven growth. AtRaptor transcripts accumulate in dividing and expanding cells and tissues. Conclusion The data implicate the TOR signaling pathway, a major regulator of cell growth in yeast and metazoans, in the maintenance of growth from the shoot apical meristem in plants. These results provide insights into the ways in which TOR/Raptor signaling has been adapted to regulate plant growth and development, and indicate that in plants, as in other eukaryotes, there is some Raptor-independent TOR activity.

  18. Overexpression of Heat Shock Factor Gene HsfA3 Increases Galactinol Levels and Oxidative Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chieun; Chung, Woo Sik; Lim, Chae Oh

    2016-06-30

    Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are central regulators of abiotic stress responses, especially heat stress responses, in plants. In the current study, we characterized the activity of the Hsf gene HsfA3 in Arabidopsis under oxidative stress conditions. HsfA3 transcription in seedlings was induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and an endogenous H2O2 propagator, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). HsfA3-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited increased oxidative stress tolerance compared to untransformed wild-type plants (WT), as revealed by changes in fresh weight, chlorophyll fluorescence, and ion leakage under light conditions. The expression of several genes encoding galactinol synthase (GolS), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs), which function as antioxidants in plant cells, was induced in HsfA3 overexpressors. In addition, galactinol levels were higher in HsfA3 overexpressors than in WT under unstressed conditions. In transient transactivation assays using Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts, HsfA3 activated the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the GolS1 or GolS2 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3 and that GolS enzymes play an important role in improving oxidative stress tolerance by increasing galactinol biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27109422

  19. Identification of late O{sub 3}-responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana by cDNA microarray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Haese, D. [Univ. of Antwerp, Dept. of Biology, Antwerp (BE) and Univ. of Newcastle, School of Biology and Psychology, Div. of Biology, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Horemans, N.; Coen, W. De; Guisez, Y. [Univ. of Antwerp, Dept. of Biology, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2006-09-15

    To better understand the response of a plant to 0{sub 3} stress, an integrated microarray analysis was performed on Arabidopsis plants exposed during 2 days to purified air or 150 nl l{sup -1} O{sub 3}, 8 h day-l. Agilent Arabidopsis 2 Oligo Microarrays were used of which the reliability was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR of nine randomly selected genes. We confirmed the O{sub 3} responsiveness of heat shock proteins (HSPs), glutathione-S-tranferases and genes involved in cell wall stiffening and microbial defence. Whereas, a previous study revealed that during an early stage of the O{sub 3} stress response, gene expression was strongly dependent on jasmonic acid and ethylene, we report that at a later stage (48 h) synthesis of jasrnonic acid and ethylene was downregulated. In addition, we observed the simultaneous induction of salicylic acid synthesis and genes involved in programmed cell death and senescence. Also typically, the later stage of the response to O{sub 3} appeared to be the induction of the complete pathway leading to the biosynthesis of anthocyanin diglucosides and the induction of thioredoxin-based redox control. Surprisingly absent in the list of induced genes were genes involved in ASC-dependent antioxidation, few of which were found to be induced after 12 h of 0{sub 3} exposure in another study. We discuss these and other particular results of the microarray analysis and provide a map depicting significantly affected genes and their pathways highlighting their interrelationships and subcellular localization. (au)

  20. Repression of Lateral Organ Boundary Genes by PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH Is Essential for Meristem Maintenance and Flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha; Ragni, Laura; Tabb, Paul; Salasini, Brenda C; Chatfield, Steven; Datla, Raju; Lock, John; Kuai, Xiahezi; Després, Charles; Proveniers, Marcel; Yongguo, Cao; Xiang, Daoquan; Morin, Halima; Rullière, Jean-Pierre; Citerne, Sylvie; Hepworth, Shelley R; Pautot, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), endogenous and environmental signals acting on the shoot apical meristem cause acquisition of inflorescence meristem fate. This results in changed patterns of aerial development seen as the transition from making leaves to the production of flowers separated by elongated internodes. Two related BEL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF), fulfill this transition. Loss of function of these genes impairs stem cell maintenance and blocks internode elongation and flowering. We show here that pny pnf apices misexpress lateral organ boundary genes BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1/2 (BOP1/2) and KNOTTED-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA6 (KNAT6) together with ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX GENE1 (ATH1). Inactivation of genes in this module fully rescues pny pnf defects. We further show that BOP1 directly activates ATH1, whereas activation of KNAT6 is indirect. The pny pnf restoration correlates with renewed accumulation of transcripts conferring floral meristem identity, including FD, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN LIKE genes, LEAFY, and APETALA1. To gain insight into how this module blocks flowering, we analyzed the transcriptome of BOP1-overexpressing plants. Our data suggest a central role for the microRNA156-SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE-microRNA172 module in integrating stress signals conferred in part by promotion of jasmonic acid biosynthesis. These data reveal a potential mechanism by which repression of lateral organ boundary genes by PNY-PNF is essential for flowering. PMID:26417006

  1. DISRUPTION OF ARABIDOPSIS RETICULON GENE RTNLB16 RESULTS IN CHLOROPLAST DYSFUNCTION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasenko V.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Reticulons (RTNs are endoplasmic reticulum (ER-localized proteins that have recently attracted much attention. RTNs are ubiquitous proteins present in all eukaryotic organisms examined so far. In animal and yeast, in which knowledge of this protein family is more advanced, RTNs are involved in numerous cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell division and intracellular trafficking. Up to now, a little attention has been paid to their plant counterparts, RTNLBs. Meanwhile, gene search across sequenced genomes revealed that the RTN gene family is more diverse and numerous in plants than in animals and yeasts, which possibly suggests existence of functions specific for plant RTNs. Recently, the localization in different ER regions was shown for two members of plant reticulon family. The location in close proximity to chloroplast membrane was revealed for one of RTNLBs, which is argument in favor of its role in interorganellar interactions. In spite of growing interest towards to plant RTNs, there are no investigations devoted to insertion mutagenesis of genes encoding these proteins. We have genotyped an Arabidopsis line containing T-DNA insertion in RTNLB16 gene encoding uncharacterized member of RTNLB family. The obtained homozygous plants have marked phenotype expressed in a decreased growth rate and a pale-green leaf color. The leaf total chlorophyll content as well as the chlorophyll a/b ratio was significantly lower in mutant plants. It is interesting to note that the extent of phenotypic expression depended on a light intensity. The growth rate of wild-type and mutant plants was the same in low light conditions. The growth rate was significantly decreased and chlorophyll content was 3-5-fold lower in mutant plants growing under moderate light conditions. The growing of plants under high light conditions led to halted growth and death of mutants on the seedling stage. The demonstrated phenotype probably points out to a chloroplast

  2. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Mediated by a Plastid Inner Envelope Phosphoenolpyruvate/Phosphate Translocator CUE1 in Arabidopsis1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Ren, Xiaozhi; Cao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Zhizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1) lead to the transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of ProRD29A:LUC (LUCIFERASE) and Pro35S:NPTII (Neomycin Phosphotransferase II) reporter genes. We performed a genetic screen to find suppressors of ros1 that identified two mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN UNDEREXPRESSED1 (CUE1) gene, which encodes a plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator. The cue1 mutations released the TGS of Pro35S:NPTII and the transcriptionally silent endogenous locus TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION in a manner that was independent of DNA methylation but dependent on chromatin modification. The cue1 mutations did not affect the TGS of ProRD29A:LUC in ros1, which was dependent on RNA-directed DNA methylation. It is possible that signals from chloroplasts help to regulate the epigenetic status of a subset of genomic loci in the nucleus. PMID:19515789

  3. Mutation of a Gene in the Fungus Leptosphaeria maculans Allows Increased Frequency of Penetration of Stomatal Apertures of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Candace E. Elliott; Harjono; Barbara J. Howlett

    2008-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans, a pathogen of Brassica napus, is unable to invade most wild-type accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana, although several mutants are susceptible. The infection pathway of L. maculans via a non-invasive inoculation method on A, thaliana Ires1 (undefined), pmr4-1 (defective in callose deposition), and pen1-1 and pen2-1 (defective in non-host responses to several pathogens) mutants is described. On wild types Col-0 and Ler-0, hyphae are generally arrested at stomatal apertures. A T-DNA insertional mutant of L. maculans (A22) that penetrates stomatal apertures of Col-0 and Ler-0 five to seven times more often than the wild-type isolate is described. The higher penetration frequency of isolate A22 is associated with an increased hypersensitive response, which includes callose deposition. Complementation analysis showed that the phenotype of this isolate is due to T-DNA insertion in an intronless gene denoted as ipa (increased penetration on Arabidopsis). This gene is predicted to encode a protein of 702 amino acids with best matches to hypothetical proteins in other filamentous ascomycetes. The ipa gene is expressed in the wild-type isolate at low levels in culture and during infection of A. thaliana and B. napus.

  4. The COI1 and DFR Genes are Essential for Regulation of Jasmonate-Induced Anthocyanin Accumulation in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin-Fang Chen; Liang-Ying Dai; Shi Xiao; Yun-Sheng Wang; Xiong-Lun Liu; Guo-Liang Wang

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are a class of plant hormones that play important roles in the regulation of plant development and plant defense. It has been shown that Arabidopsis plants produce much higher levels of anthocyanins when treated exogenously with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). However, a molecular link between the JA response and anthocyanin production has not been determined. The CORONATINE INSENTITIVE1 (COI1) gene is a key player in the regulation of many JA-related responses. In the present study, we demonstrate that the COI1 gene is also required for the JA-induced accumulation of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the MeJA-inducible expression of DIHYDROFLA VONOL REDUCTASE (DFR), an essential component in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, was completely eliminated in the coi1 mutant. Jasmonateinduced anthocyanin accumulation was found to be independent of auxin signaling. The present results indicate that the expression of both COI1 and DFR genes is required for the regulation of JA-induced anthocyanin accumulation and that DFR may be a key downstream regulator for this process.

  5. The arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Rosen, E.; Caspar, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589-1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes.

  6. Phenotypic instability of Arabidopsis alleles affecting a disease Resistance gene cluster

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    Richards Eric J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana strain Columbia – cpr1, snc1, and bal – map to the RPP5 locus, which contains a cluster of disease Resistance genes. The similar phenotypes, gene expression patterns, and genetic interactions observed in these mutants are related to constitutive activation of pathogen defense signaling. However, these mutant alleles respond differently to various conditions. Exposure to mutagens, such as ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS and γ-irradiation, induce high frequency phenotypic instability of the bal allele. In addition, a fraction of the bal and cpr1 alleles segregated from bal × cpr1 F1 hybrids also show signs of phenotypic instability. To gain more insight into the mechanism of phenotypic instability of the bal and cpr1 mutations, we systematically compared the behavior of these unusual alleles with that of the missense gain-of-function snc1 allele in response to DNA damage or passage through F1 hybrids. Results We found that the cpr1 allele is similar to the bal allele in its unstable behavior after EMS mutagenesis. For both the bal and cpr1 mutants, destabilization of phenotypes was observed in more than 10% of EMS-treated plants in the M1 generation. In addition, exceptions to simple Mendelian inheritance were identified in the M2 generation. Like cpr1 × bal F1 hybrids, cpr1 × snc1 F1 hybrids and bal × snc1 F1 hybrids exhibited dwarf morphology. While only dwarf F2 plants were produced from bal × snc1 F1 hybrids, about 10% wild-type F2 progeny were produced from cpr1 × snc1 F1 hybrids, as well as from cpr1 × bal hybrids. Segregation analysis suggested that the cpr1 allele in cpr1 × snc1 crosses was destabilized during the late F1 generation to early F2 generation. Conclusion With exposure to EMS or different F1 hybrid contexts, phenotypic instability is induced for the bal and cpr1 alleles, but not for the snc1 allele. Our results suggest that the RPP5 locus can adopt different

  7. Agrobacterium mediated transfer of a mutant Arabidopsis acetolactate synthase gene confers resistance to chlorsulfuron in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, A; Vaucheret, H; Pautot, V; Chupeau, Y

    1992-06-01

    Leaf discs of C. intybus were inoculated with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene for kanamycin resistance and a mutant acetolactate synthase gene (csr1-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana conferring resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides. A regeneration medium was optimized which permitted an efficient shoot regeneration from leaf discs. Transgenic shoots were selected on rooting medium containing 100 mg/l kanamycin sulfate. Integration of the csr1-1 gene into genomic DNA of kanamycin resistant chicory plants was confirmed by Southern blot hybridizations. Analysis of the selfed progenies (S1 and S2) of two independent transformed clones showed that kanamycin and chlorsulfuron resistances were inherited as dominant Mendelian traits. The method described here for producing transformed plants will allow new opportunities for chicory breeding. PMID:24203132

  8. Structure at 1.6 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the 18 kDa At3g22680 gene product from A. thaliana was determined at 1.6 Å resolution. At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformational space. The gene product of At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana codes for a protein of unknown function. The crystal structure of the At3g22680 gene product was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined to an R factor of 16.0% (Rfree = 18.4%) at 1.60 Å resolution. The refined structure shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit, with one molecule of the non-denaturing detergent CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate) tightly bound. Protein At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformation space

  9. Nanoparticle-specific changes in Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression after exposure to ZnO, TiO2, and fullerene soot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Exposure to different nanoparticles resulted in specific changes in gene transcription. ► Nano ZnO caused most dramatic changes in Arabidopsis gene expression. ► Nano ZnO was the most toxic and up-regulated most stress-related genes. ► Fullerene soot caused significant gene expression response – mainly stress-related. ► Nano TiO2 had weak impact on Arabidopsis gene expression indicating minimal toxicity. - Abstract: The effect of exposure to 100 mg/L zinc oxide (nZnO), fullerene soot (FS) or titanium dioxide (nTiO2) nanoparticles on gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana roots was studied using microarrays. After 7 d, nZnO, FS, or nTiO2 exposure resulted in 660 up- and 826 down-regulated genes, 232 up- and 189 down-regulated genes, and 80 up- and 74 down-regulated genes, respectively (expression difference > 2-fold; p[t test] 2 exposure, which resulted in up- and down-regulation of genes involved mainly in responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. The data clearly indicate that the mechanisms of phytotoxicity are highly nanoparticle dependent despite of a limited overlap in gene expression response.

  10. Arabidopsis mRNA polyadenylation machinery: comprehensive analysis of protein-protein interactions and gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Min

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polyadenylation of mRNA is one of the critical processing steps during expression of almost all eukaryotic genes. It is tightly integrated with transcription, particularly its termination, as well as other RNA processing events, i.e. capping and splicing. The poly(A tail protects the mRNA from unregulated degradation, and it is required for nuclear export and translation initiation. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that the polyadenylation process is also involved in the regulation of gene expression. The polyadenylation process requires two components, the cis-elements on the mRNA and a group of protein factors that recognize the cis-elements and produce the poly(A tail. Here we report a comprehensive pairwise protein-protein interaction mapping and gene expression profiling of the mRNA polyadenylation protein machinery in Arabidopsis. Results By protein sequence homology search using human and yeast polyadenylation factors, we identified 28 proteins that may be components of Arabidopsis polyadenylation machinery. To elucidate the protein network and their functions, we first tested their protein-protein interaction profiles. Out of 320 pair-wise protein-protein interaction assays done using the yeast two-hybrid system, 56 (~17% showed positive interactions. 15 of these interactions were further tested, and all were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and/or in vitro co-purification. These interactions organize into three distinct hubs involving the Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors. These hubs are centered around AtCPSF100, AtCLPS, and AtFIPS. The first two are similar to complexes seen in mammals, while the third one stands out as unique to plants. When comparing the gene expression profiles extracted from publicly available microarray datasets, some of the polyadenylation related genes showed tissue-specific expression, suggestive of potential different polyadenylation complex configurations. Conclusion An

  11. On the origin of class B floral homeotic genes: functional substitution and dominant inhibition in Arabidopsis by expression of an orthologue from the gymnosperm Gnetum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Kai-Uwe; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    2002-08-01

    Class B floral homeotic genes are involved in specifying stamen and petal identity in angiosperms (flowering plants). Here we report that gymnosperms, the closest relatives of the angiosperms, contain at least two different clades representing putative orthologues of class B genes, termed GGM2-like and DAL12-like genes. To obtain information about the functional conservation of the class B genes in seed plants, the representative of one of these clades from Gnetum, termed GGM2, was expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in Arabidopsis wild-type plants and in different class B mutants. In wild-type plants and in a conditional mutant grown at a permissive temperature, gain-of-function phenotypes were obtained in whorls 1 and 4, where class B genes are usually not expressed. In contrast, loss-of-function phenotypes were observed in whorls 2 and 3, where class B genes are expressed. In different class B gene null mutants of Arabidopsis, and in the conditional B mutant grown at the non-permissive temperature, a partial complementation of the mutant phenotype was obtained. In situ hybridization studies and class B gene promoter test fusion experiments demonstrated that the gain-of-function phenotypes are not due to an upregulation of the endogenous B genes from Arabidopsis, and hence probably involve interactions between GGM2 protein homodimers and class B protein target genes other than the Arabidopsis class B genes itself. To our knowledge, this is the first time that partial complementation of a homeotic mutant by an orthologous gene from a distantly related species has been reported. These data suggest that GGM2 has a function in the gymnosperm Gnetum which is related to that of class B floral organ identity genes of angiosperms. That function may be in the specification of male reproductive organ identity, and in distinguishing male from female reproductive organs. PMID:12182704

  12. Transforming petals into sepaloid organs in Arabidopsis and oilseed rape: implementation of the hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing technology in an organ-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzova, Marina; Verduyn, Christoph; De Brouwer, Dirk; De Block, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Oilseed rape ( Brassica napus L.) genotypes with no or small petals are thought to have advantages in photosynthetic activity. The flowers of field-grown oilseed rape form a bright-yellow canopy that reflects and absorbs nearly 60% of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), causing a severe yield penalty. Reducing the size of the petals and/or removing the reflecting colour will improve the transmission of PAR to the leaves and is expected to increase the crop productivity. In this study the 'hairpin' RNA-mediated (hpRNA) gene silencing technology was implemented in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and B. napus to silence B-type MADS-box floral organ identity genes in a second-whorl-specific manner. In Arabidopsis, silencing of B-type MADS-box genes was obtained by expressing B. napus APETALA3( BAP3) or PISTILLATA ( BPI) homologous self-complementary hpRNA constructs under control of the Arabidopsis A-type MADS-box gene APETALA1 ( AP1) promoter. In B. napus, silencing of the BPI gene family was achieved by expressing a similar hpRNA construct as used in Arabidopsis under the control of a chimeric promoter consisting of a modified petal-specific Arabidopsis AP3 promoter fragment fused to the AP1 promoter. In this way, transgenic plants were generated producing male fertile flowers in which the petals were converted into sepals ( Arabidopsis) or into sepaloid petals ( B. napus). These novel flower phenotypes were stable and heritable in both species. PMID:14534787

  13. Upland cotton gene GhFPF1 confers promotion of flowering time and shade-avoidance responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wang

    Full Text Available Extensive studies on floral transition in model species have revealed a network of regulatory interactions between proteins that transduce and integrate developmental and environmental signals to promote or inhibit the transition to flowering. Previous studies indicated FLOWERING PROMOTING FACTOR 1 (FPF1 gene was involved in the promotion of flowering, but the molecular mechanism was still unclear. Here, FPF1 homologous sequences were screened from diploid Gossypium raimondii L. (D-genome, n = 13 and Gossypium arboreum L. genome (A-genome, n = 13 databases. Orthologous genes from the two species were compared, suggesting that distinctions at nucleic acid and amino acid levels were not equivalent because of codon degeneracy. Six FPF1 homologous genes were identified from the cultivated allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L. (AD-genome, n = 26. Analysis of relative transcripts of the six genes in different tissues revealed that this gene family displayed strong tissue-specific expression. GhFPF1, encoding a 12.0-kDa protein (Accession No: KC832319 exerted more transcripts in floral apices of short-season cotton, hinting that it could be involved in floral regulation. Significantly activated APETALA 1 and suppressed FLOWERING LOCUS C expression were induced by over-expression of GhFPF1 in the Arabidopsis Columbia-0 ecotype. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis displayed a constitutive shade-avoiding phenotype that is characterized by long hypocotyls and petioles, reduced chlorophyll content, and early flowering. We propose that GhFPF1 may be involved in flowering time control and shade-avoidance responses.

  14. Divergent evolutionary and expression patterns between lineage specific new duplicate genes and their parental paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available Gene duplication is an important mechanism for the origination of functional novelties in organisms. We performed a comparative genome analysis to systematically estimate recent lineage specific gene duplication events in Arabidopsis thaliana and further investigate whether and how these new duplicate genes (NDGs play a functional role in the evolution and adaption of A. thaliana. We accomplished this using syntenic relationship among four closely related species, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, Capsella rubella and Brassica rapa. We identified 100 NDGs, showing clear origination patterns, whose parental genes are located in syntenic regions and/or have clear orthologs in at least one of three outgroup species. All 100 NDGs were transcribed and under functional constraints, while 24% of the NDGs have differential expression patterns compared to their parental genes. We explored the underlying evolutionary forces of these paralogous pairs through conducting neutrality tests with sequence divergence and polymorphism data. Evolution of about 15% of NDGs appeared to be driven by natural selection. Moreover, we found that 3 NDGs not only altered their expression patterns when compared with parental genes, but also evolved under positive selection. We investigated the underlying mechanisms driving the differential expression of NDGs and their parents, and found a number of NDGs had different cis-elements and methylation patterns from their parental genes. Overall, we demonstrated that NDGs acquired divergent cis-elements and methylation patterns and may experience sub-functionalization or neo-functionalization influencing the evolution and adaption of A. thaliana.

  15. Over-expression of histone H3K4 demethylase gene JMJ15 enhances salt tolerance in Arabidopsis

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    Yuan eShen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3 has been shown to be involved in stress-responsive gene expression and gene priming in plants. However, the role of H3K4me3 resetting in the processes is not clear. In this work we studied the expression and function of Arabidopsis H3K4 demethylase gene JMJ15. We show that the expression of JMJ15 was relatively low and was limited to a number of tissues during vegetative growth but was higher in young floral organs. Over-expression of the gene in gain-of-function mutants reduced the plant height with accumulation of lignin in stems, while the loss-of-function mutation did not produce any visible phenotype. The gain-of-function mutants showed enhanced salt tolerance, whereas the loss-of-function mutant was more sensitive to salt compared to the wild type. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that over-expression of JMJ15 down-regulated many genes which are preferentially marked by H3K4me3 and H3K4me2. Many of the down-regulated genes encode transcription regulators involved in stress responses. The data suggest that increased JMJ15 levels may regulate the gene expression program that enhances stress tolerance.

  16. A gene family derived from transposable elements during early angiosperm evolution has reproductive fitness benefits in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoé Joly-Lopez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of ever-growing numbers of sequenced eukaryotic genomes will not be fully realized until we learn to decipher vast stretches of noncoding DNA, largely composed of transposable elements. Transposable elements persist through self-replication, but some genes once encoded by transposable elements have, through a process called molecular domestication, evolved new functions that increase fitness. Although they have conferred numerous adaptations, the number of such domesticated transposable element genes remains unknown, so their evolutionary and functional impact cannot be fully assessed. Systematic searches that exploit genomic signatures of natural selection have been employed to identify potential domesticated genes, but their predictions have yet to be experimentally verified. To this end, we investigated a family of domesticated genes called MUSTANG (MUG, identified in a previous bioinformatic search of plant genomes. We show that MUG genes are functional. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana MUG genes yield phenotypes with severely reduced plant fitness through decreased plant size, delayed flowering, abnormal development of floral organs, and markedly reduced fertility. MUG genes are present in all flowering plants, but not in any non-flowering plant lineages, such as gymnosperms, suggesting that the molecular domestication of MUG may have been an integral part of early angiosperm evolution. This study shows that systematic searches can be successful at identifying functional genetic elements in noncoding regions and demonstrates how to combine systematic searches with reverse genetics in a fruitful way to decipher eukaryotic genomes.

  17. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis Flowers[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G.; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J.C.; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (−)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined. PMID:24285789

  18. Expression in Arabidopsis of a Strawberry Linalool Synthase Gene Under the Control of the Inducible Potato P12 Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-mei; Per Mercke; Joop J A van Loon; FANG Zhi-yuan; Marcel Dicke; Maarten A Jongsma

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of inducible linalool in Arabidopsis-insect interactions, the FANESl linalool synthase (LIS) cDNA from strawberry with plastid targeting and a synthetic intron (LIS') was placed under the control of the wound inducible proteinase inhibitor 2 (PI2) promoter from potato. The construct pBin-PP12-LIS' was transformed to Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia O. Kanamycin resistant T0 seedlings were confirmed for the presence and transcription of the LIS' gene by PCR analysis on genomic DNA and by RT-PCR analysis on RNA. Genomic and RT-PCR products were sequenced to confirm correct splicing of the synthetic intron. The expression of active linalool synthase by the PP12-LIS' gene construct in the transgenic lines was assessed by measuring linalool emission using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) GC-MS measurements after induction with methyl jasmonate. Among 30 tested independent T2 transgenic lines, 10 exhibited linalool production.Linalool expression could be induced by methyl jasmonate treatment, but not by diamondback moth larvae.

  19. Ectopic expression of R3 MYB transcription factor gene OsTCL1 in Arabidopsis, but not rice, affects trichome and root hair formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kaijie; Tian, Hainan; Hu, Qingnan; Guo, Hongyan; Yang, Li; Cai, Ling; Wang, Xutong; Liu, Bao; Wang, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex activates the homeodomain protein gene GLABRA2 (GL2), leading to the promotion of trichome formation and inhibition of root hair formation. The same MBW complex also activates single-repeat R3 MYB genes. R3 MYBs in turn, play a negative feedback role by competing with R2R3 MYB proteins for binding bHLH proteins, thus blocking the formation of the MBW complex. By BLASTing the rice (Oryza sativa) protein database using the entire amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis R3 MYB transcription factor TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1), we found that there are two genes in rice genome encoding R3 MYB transcription factors, namely Oryza sativa TRICHOMELESS1 (OsTCL1) and OsTCL2. Expressing OsTCL1 in Arabidopsis inhibited trichome formation and promoted root hair formation, and OsTCL1 interacted with GL3 when tested in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Consistent with these observations, expression levels of GL2, R2R3 MYB transcription factor gene GLABRA1 (GL1) and several R3 MYB genes were greatly reduced, indicating that OsTCL1 is functional R3 MYB. However, trichome and root hair formation in transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsTCL1 remained largely unchanged, and elevated expression of OsGL2 was observed in the transgenic rice plants, indicating that rice may use different mechanisms to regulate trichome formation. PMID:26758286

  20. An En/Spm based transposable element system for gene isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, M.G.M.

    1996-01-01

    At the start of the research described in this thesis, the main aim was to develop, study and apply an efficient En/Spm-I/dSpm based transposon tagging system in Arabidopsis thaliana to generate tagged mutants and to provide insights in the possibilities for future applications of such a transposon

  1. Genome-wide cloning and sequence analysis of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane receptor kinases play critical roles in both animal and plant signaling pathways regulating growth, development, differentiation, cell death, and pathogenic defense responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are at least 223 Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs, representing one of the largest protein families. Although functional roles for a handful of LRR-RLKs have been revealed, the functions of the majority of members in this protein family have not been elucidated. Results As a resource for the in-depth analysis of this important protein family, the complementary DNA sequences (cDNAs of 194 LRR-RLKs were cloned into the GatewayR donor vector pDONR/ZeoR and analyzed by DNA sequencing. Among them, 157 clones showed sequences identical to the predictions in the Arabidopsis sequence resource, TAIR8. The other 37 cDNAs showed gene structures distinct from the predictions of TAIR8, which was mainly caused by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Most of the genes have been further cloned into GatewayR destination vectors with GFP or FLAG epitope tags and have been transformed into Arabidopsis for in planta functional analysis. All clones from this study have been submitted to the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC at Ohio State University for full accessibility by the Arabidopsis research community. Conclusions Most of the Arabidopsis LRR-RLK genes have been isolated and the sequence analysis showed a number of alternatively spliced variants. The generated resources, including cDNA entry clones, expression constructs and transgenic plants, will facilitate further functional analysis of the members of this important gene family.

  2. Genome structures and halophyte-specific gene expression of the extremophile thellungiella parvula in comparison with Thellungiella salsuginea (Thellungiella halophila) and arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Dongha

    2010-09-10

    The genome of Thellungiella parvula, a halophytic relative of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is being assembled using Roche-454 sequencing. Analyses of a 10-Mb scaffold revealed synteny with Arabidopsis, with recombination and inversion and an uneven distribution of repeat sequences. T. parvula genome structure and DNA sequences were compared with orthologous regions from Arabidopsis and publicly available bacterial artificial chromosome sequences from Thellungiella salsuginea (previously Thellungiella halophila). The three-way comparison of sequences, from one abiotic stress-sensitive species and two tolerant species, revealed extensive sequence conservation and microcolinearity, but grouping Thellungiella species separately from Arabidopsis. However, the T. parvula segments are distinguished from their T. salsuginea counterparts by a pronounced paucity of repeat sequences, resulting in a 30% shorter DNA segment with essentially the same gene content in T. parvula. Among the genes is SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), a sodium/proton antiporter, which represents an essential component of plant salinity stress tolerance. Although the SOS1 coding region is highly conserved among all three species, the promoter regions show conservation only between the two Thellungiella species. Comparative transcript analyses revealed higher levels of basal as well as salt-induced SOS1 expression in both Thellungiella species as compared with Arabidopsis. The Thellungiella species and other halophytes share conserved pyrimidine-rich 5\\' untranslated region proximal regions of SOS1 that are missing in Arabidopsis. Completion of the genome structure of T. parvula is expected to highlight distinctive genetic elements underlying the extremophile lifestyle of this species. © American Society of Plant Biologists.

  3. Identification of Synchronized Role of Transcription Factors, Genes, and Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana under Four Abiotic Stress Responsive Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsad Razzaque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray datasets are widely used resources to predict and characterize functional entities of the whole genomics. The study initiated here aims to identify overexpressed stress responsive genes using microarray datasets applying in silico approaches. The target also extended to build a protein-protein interaction model of regulatory genes with their upstream and downstream connection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Four microarray datasets generated treating abiotic stresses like salinity, cold, drought, and abscisic acid (ABA were chosen. Retrieved datasets were firstly filtered based on their expression comparing to control. Filtered datasets were then used to create an expression hub. Extensive literature mining helped to identify the regulatory molecules from the expression hub. The study brought out 42 genes/TF/enzymes as the role player during abiotic stress response. Further bioinformatics study and also literature mining revealed that thirty genes from those forty-two were highly correlated in all four datasets and only eight from those thirty genes were determined as highly responsive to the above abiotic stresses. Later their protein-protein interaction (PPI, conserved sequences, protein domains, and GO biasness were studied. Some web based tools and software like String database, Gene Ontology, InterProScan, NCBI BLASTn suite, etc. helped to extend the study arena.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Gene Regulatory Networks of the FVE-HDA6-FLD Complex in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chun-Wei; Chang, Kao-Yuan; Wu, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    FVE/MSI4 is a homolog of the mammalian RbAp48 protein. We found that FVE regulates flowering time by repressing FLC through decreasing histone H3K4 trimethylation and H3 acetylation. Furthermore, FVE interacts with the histone deacetylase HDA6 and the histone demethylase FLD, suggesting that these proteins may form a protein complex to regulate flowering time. To further investigate the function of the FVE-FLD-HDA6 complex, we compared the gene expression profiles of fve, fld, and hda6 mutant plants by using RNA-seq analysis. Among the mis-regulated genes found in fve plants, 51.8 and 36.5% of them were also mis-regulated in fld and hda6 plants, respectively, suggesting that FVE, HDA6, and FLD may regulate the gene expression in the same developmental processes in Arabidopsis. Gene ontology analysis revealed that among 383 genes co-regulated by FVE, HDA6, and FLD, 15.6% of them are involved in transcription, 8.2% in RNA metabolic process, 7.7% in response to abiotic stress, and 6.3% in hormone stimulus. Taken together, these results indicate that HDA6, FVE, and FLD co-regulate the gene expression in multiple development processes and pathways. PMID:27200029

  5. Unique and redundant functional domains of APETALA1 and CAULIFLOWER, two recently duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana floral MADS-box genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; García-Ponce, Berenice; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    APETALA1 (AP1) and CAULIFLOWER (CAL) are closely related MADS box genes that are partially redundant during Arabidopsis thaliana floral meristem determination. AP1 is able to fully substitute for CAL functions, but not vice versa, and AP1 has unique sepal and petal identity specification functions. In this study, the unique and redundant functions of these two genes has been mapped to the four protein domains that characterize type-II MADS-domain proteins by expressing all 15 chimeric combinations of AP1 and CAL cDNA regions under control of the AP1 promoter in ap1-1 loss-of-function plants. The "in vivo" function of these chimeric genes was analysed in Arabidopsis plants by expressing the chimeras. Rescue of flower meristem and sepal/petal identities was scored in single and multiple insert homozygous transgenic lines. Using these chimeric lines, it was found that distinct residues of the AP1 K domain not shared by the same CAL domain are necessary and sufficient for complete recovery of floral meristem identity, in the context of the CAL protein sequence, while both AP1 COOH and K domains are indispensable for complete rescue of sepal identity. By contrast, either one of these two AP1 domains is necessary and sufficient for complete petal identity recovery. It was also found that there were positive and negative synergies among protein domains and their combinations, and that multiple-insert lines showed relatively better rescue than equivalent single-insert lines. Finally, several lines had flowers with extra sepals and petals suggesting that chimeric proteins yield abnormal transcriptional complexes that may alter the expression or regulation of genes that control floral organ number under normal conditions. PMID:16893974

  6. Gene Expression, Protein Function and Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana Responding to Silver Nanoparticles in Comparison to Silver Ions, Cold, Salt, Drought, and Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisa Kohan-Baghkheirati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in industry due to their unique physical and chemical properties. However, AgNPs have caused environmental concerns. To understand the risks of AgNPs, Arabidopsis microarray data for AgNP, Ag+, cold, salt, heat and drought stresses were analyzed. Up- and down-regulated genes of more than two-fold expression change were compared, while the encoded proteins of shared and unique genes between stresses were subjected to differential enrichment analyses. AgNPs affected the fewest genes (575 in the Arabidopsis genome, followed by Ag+ (1010, heat (1374, drought (1435, salt (4133 and cold (6536. More genes were up-regulated than down-regulated in AgNPs and Ag+ (438 and 780, respectively while cold down-regulated the most genes (4022. Responses to AgNPs were more similar to those of Ag+ (464 shared genes, cold (202, and salt (163 than to drought (50 or heat (30; the genes in the first four stresses were enriched with 32 PFAM domains and 44 InterPro protein classes. Moreover, 111 genes were unique in AgNPs and they were enriched in three biological functions: response to fungal infection, anion transport, and cell wall/plasma membrane related. Despite shared similarity to Ag+, cold and salt stresses, AgNPs are a new stressor to Arabidopsis.

  7. Altered life cycle in Arabidopsis plants expressing PsUGT1, a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-encoding gene from pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Faull, Kym F; Hirsch, Ann M; Hawes, Martha C

    2003-10-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and Arabidopsis were used as model systems to examine molecular mechanisms underlying developmental effects of a microsomal UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-encoding gene from pea (Pisum sativum; PsUGT1). Alfalfa expressing PsUGT1 antisense mRNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter exhibited delayed root emergence, reduced root growth, and increased lateral root development. The timing of root emergence in wild-type and antisense plants was correlated with the transient accumulation of auxin at the site of root emergence. Cell suspension cultures derived from the antisense alfalfa plants exhibited a delay in cell cycle from 24-h in the wild-type plants to 48-h in the antisense plants. PsUGT1::uidA was introduced into Arabidopsis to demonstrate that, as in alfalfa and pea, PsUGT1 expression occurs in regions of active cell division. This includes the root cap and root apical meristems, leaf primordia, tips of older leaves, and the transition zone between the hypocotyl and the root. Expression of PsUGT1::uidA colocalized with the expression of the auxin-responding reporter DR5::uidA. Co-expression of DR5::uidA in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing CaMV35S::PsUGT1 revealed that ectopic expression of CaMV35S::PsUGT1 is correlated with a change in endogenous auxin gradients in roots. Roots of ecotype Columbia expressing CaMV35S::PsUGT1 exhibited distinctive responses to exogenous naphthalene acetic acid. Completion of the life cycle occurred in 4 to 6 weeks compared with 6 to 7 weeks for wild-type Columbia. Inhibition of endogenous ethylene did not correct this early senescence phenotype. PMID:12972656

  8. Deciphering the Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning the Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression by Master Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Sébastien; Kelemen, Zsolt; Thévenin, Johanne; Boulard, Céline; Blanchet, Sandrine; To, Alexandra; Payre, Manon; Berger, Nathalie; Effroy-Cuzzi, Delphine; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Godoy, Marta; Solano, Roberto; Thevenon, Emmanuel; Parcy, François; Lepiniec, Loïc; Dubreucq, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transcriptional control of seed maturation involves three related regulators with a B3 domain, namely LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2), ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), and FUSCA3 (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2 [AFLs]). Although genetic analyses have demonstrated partially overlapping functions of these regulators, the underlying molecular mechanisms remained elusive. The results presented here confirmed that the three proteins bind RY DNA elements (with a 5'-CATG-3' core sequence) but with different specificities for flanking nucleotides. In planta as in the moss Physcomitrella patens protoplasts, the presence of RY-like (RYL) elements is necessary but not sufficient for the regulation of the OLEOSIN1 (OLE1) promoter by the B3 AFLs. G box-like domains, located in the vicinity of the RYL elements, also are required for proper activation of the promoter, suggesting that several proteins are involved. Consistent with this idea, LEC2 and ABI3 showed synergistic effects on the activation of the OLE1 promoter. What is more, LEC1 (a homolog of the NF-YB subunit of the CCAAT-binding complex) further enhanced the activation of this target promoter in the presence of LEC2 and ABI3. Finally, recombinant LEC1 and LEC2 proteins produced in Arabidopsis protoplasts could form a ternary complex with NF-YC2 in vitro, providing a molecular explanation for their functional interactions. Taken together, these results allow us to propose a molecular model for the transcriptional regulation of seed genes by the L-AFL proteins, based on the formation of regulatory multiprotein complexes between NF-YBs, which carry a specific aspartate-55 residue, and B3 transcription factors. PMID:27208266

  9. Two P5CS genes from common bean exhibiting different tolerance to salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ji Bao Chen; Jian Wei Yang; Zhao Yuan Zhang; Xiao Fan Feng; Shu Min Wang

    2013-12-01

    Many plants accumulate proline in response to salt stress. -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) is the rate-limiting enzyme in proline biosynthesis in plants. Plasmid DNA (pCHF3-PvP5CS1 and pCHF3-PvP5CS2) containing the selectable neomycin phosphotransferase gene for kanamycin resistance and Phaseolus vulgaris P5CS (PvP5CS1 and PvP5CS2) cDNA was introduced into Arabidopsis plants using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Southern blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the foreign genes were integrated into Arabidopsis chromosomal DNA and expressed. Single-gene transformants were analysed in this study. Transgenic plants expressed higher levels of PvP5CS1 and PvP5CS2 transcripts under salt stress conditions than under normal conditions. When treated with 0, 100 and 200 mM NaCl, the average proline content in leaves of transgenic plants was significantly higher $(P \\lt 0.01)$ than control plants. The average relative electrical conductivity (REC) of transgenic lines was significantly lower $(P \\lt 0.01)$ than control plants under salt stress condition. Biomass production of transgenic lines was significantly higher $(P \\lt 0.05)$ than control plants under 200 mM NaCl stress treatment. These results indicated that introducing PvP5CS1 and PvP5CS2 cDNA into transgenic Arabidopsis caused proline overproduction, increasing salt tolerance. Although the expression of PvP5CS1 in L4 lines and PvP5CS2 in S4 lines was the same under salt stress condition, the S4 lines accumulated 1.6 and 1.9 times more proline than the L4 lines under 100 and 200 mM NaCl treatments, respectively. The REC of S4 plants was 0.5 (100 mM NaCl) and 0.6 times (200 mM NaCl) that of L4 plants. The biomass production of S4 plants was 1.6 times (200 mM NaCl) more than in L4 plants. Total P5CS enzyme activity of S4 was significantly higher than that of L4. These results implied that the PvP5CS2 protein had stronger capacity to catalyze proline synthesis than PvP5CS1 under salt

  10. The alleles at the E1 locus impact the expression pattern of two soybean FT-like genes shown to induce flowering in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A small gene family of phosphatidyl ethanolamine-binding proteins (PEBP) has been shown to function as key regulators in flowering; inArabidopsis thaliana the FT protein promotes flowering whilst theclosely related TFL1 protein represses flowering. Control of flowering time in soybean [Glycine max ...

  11. Nanoparticle-specific changes in Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression after exposure to ZnO, TiO{sub 2}, and fullerene soot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landa, Premysl [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i., 165 02 Prague 6 - Lysolaje (Czech Republic); Vankova, Radomira [Laboratory of Hormonal Regulations in Plants, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i., 165 02 Prague 6 - Lysolaje (Czech Republic); Andrlova, Jana [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i., 165 02 Prague 6 - Lysolaje (Czech Republic); Department of Crop Sciences and Agroforestry, Institute of Tropics and Subtropics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, 165 21 Prague 6 - Suchdol (Czech Republic); Hodek, Jan [Department of Molecular Biology, Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., 161 06 Praha 6 - Ruzyne (Czech Republic); Marsik, Petr [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i., 165 02 Prague 6 - Lysolaje (Czech Republic); Storchova, Helena [Plant Reproduction Laboratory, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i., 165 02 Prague 6 - Lysolaje (Czech Republic); White, Jason C. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New Haven, CT 06512 (United States); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i., 165 02 Prague 6 - Lysolaje (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to different nanoparticles resulted in specific changes in gene transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano ZnO caused most dramatic changes in Arabidopsis gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano ZnO was the most toxic and up-regulated most stress-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fullerene soot caused significant gene expression response - mainly stress-related. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano TiO{sub 2} had weak impact on Arabidopsis gene expression indicating minimal toxicity. - Abstract: The effect of exposure to 100 mg/L zinc oxide (nZnO), fullerene soot (FS) or titanium dioxide (nTiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana roots was studied using microarrays. After 7 d, nZnO, FS, or nTiO{sub 2} exposure resulted in 660 up- and 826 down-regulated genes, 232 up- and 189 down-regulated genes, and 80 up- and 74 down-regulated genes, respectively (expression difference > 2-fold; p[t test] < 0.05). The genes induced by nZnO and FS include mainly ontology groups annotated as stress responsive, including both abiotic (oxidative, salt, water deprivation) and biotic (wounding and defense to pathogens) stimuli. The down-regulated genes upon nZnO exposure were involved in cell organization and biogenesis, including translation, nucleosome assembly and microtubule based process. FS largely repressed the transcription of genes involved in electron transport and energy pathways. Only mild changes in gene expression were observed upon nTiO{sub 2} exposure, which resulted in up- and down-regulation of genes involved mainly in responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. The data clearly indicate that the mechanisms of phytotoxicity are highly nanoparticle dependent despite of a limited overlap in gene expression response.

  12. Overexpression of Two PsnAP1 Genes from Populus simonii × P. nigra Causes Early Flowering in Transgenic Tobacco and Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Tangchun; Li, Shuang; Zang, Lina; Dai, Lijuan; Yang, Chuanping; Qu, Guan-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, AP1 is a floral meristem identity gene and plays an important role in floral organ development. In this study, PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 were isolated from the male reproductive buds of poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra), which are the orthologs of AP1 in Arabidopsis, by sequence analysis. Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis showed that PsnAP1-1 and PsnAP1-2 exhibited high expression level in early inflorescence development of poplar. Subcellular localization showed the PsnAP1-1 a...

  13. Overexpression of MuHSP70 gene from Macrotyloma uniflorum confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Shikha; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-02-01

    A 70-KD heat shock protein (HSP70) is one of the most conserved chaperones. It is involved in de novo protein folding and prevents the aggregation of unfolded proteins under lethal environmental factors. The purpose of this study is to characterise a MuHSP70 from horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and elucidating its role in stress tolerance of plants. A MuHSP70 was cloned and characterised from a natural drought stress tolerant HPK4 variety of horsegram (M. uniflorum). For functional characterization, MuHSP70 was overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. Overexpression of MuHSP70 was found to provide tolerance to the transgenic Arabidopsis against various stresses such as heat, cold, drought, salinity and oxidative stress. MuHSP70 transgenics were observed to maintain the shoot biomass, root length, relative water content, and chlorophyll content during exposure to multi-stresses relative to non-transgenic control. Transgenic lines have further shown the reduced levels of MDA, H2O2, and proteolytic activity. Together, these findings suggest that overexpression of MuHSP70 plays an important role in improving abiotic stress tolerance and could be a crucial candidate gene for exploration in crop improvement program. PMID:26694324

  14. Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baohai

    2012-10-12

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Chromate alters root system architecture and activates expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Trujillo, Miguel; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Hernández-Madrigal, Fátima; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Long, Terri A; Cervantes, Carlos; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; López-Bucio, José

    2014-09-01

    Soil contamination by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI) or chromate] due to anthropogenic activities has become an increasingly important environmental problem. To date few studies have been performed to elucidate the signaling networks involved on adaptive responses to (CrVI) toxicity in plants. In this work, we report that depending upon its concentration, Cr(VI) alters in different ways the architecture of the root system in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Low concentrations of Cr (20-40 µM) promoted primary root growth, while concentrations higher than 60 µM Cr repressed growth and increased formation of root hairs, lateral root primordia and adventitious roots. We analyzed global gene expression changes in seedlings grown in media supplied with 20 or 140 µM Cr. The level of 731 transcripts was significantly modified in response to Cr treatment with only five genes common to both Cr concentrations. Interestingly, 23 genes related to iron (Fe) acquisition were up-regulated including IRT1, YSL2, FRO5, BHLH100, BHLH101 and BHLH039 and the master controllers of Fe deficiency responses PYE and BTS were specifically activated in pericycle cells. It was also found that increasing concentration of Cr in the plant correlated with a decrease in Fe content, but increased both acidification of the rhizosphere and activity of the ferric chelate reductase. Supply of Fe to Cr-treated Arabidopsis allowed primary root to resume growth and alleviated toxicity symptoms, indicating that Fe nutrition is a major target of Cr stress in plants. Our results show that low Cr levels are beneficial to plants and that toxic Cr concentrations activate a low-Fe rescue system. PMID:24928490

  16. BRU1, a novel link between responses to DNA damage and epigenetic gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Takeda, S.; Tadele, Z.; Hofmann, I.; Probst, A. V.; Angelis, Karel; Kaya, H.; Araki, T.; Mengiste, T.; Scheid, O. M.; Shibahara, K.; Scheel, D.; Paszkowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2004), s. 782-793. ISSN 0890-9369 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/01/1418; GA AV ČR IAA6038201; GA MŠk ME 535 Grant ostatní: Ministry of Education(JP) 14036219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * DNA repair * epigenetic inheritance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 16.385, year: 2004

  17. Dissecting a Hidden Gene Duplication: The Arabidopsis thaliana SEC10 Locus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vukašinović, Nemanja; Cvrčková, F.; Eliáš, M.; Cole, R.; Fowler, J.E.; Žárský, Viktor; Synek, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2014). E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP501/11/P853; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/1629 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk ME10033 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : WHOLE-GENOME * ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA * RECENT SEGMENTAL DUPLICATIONS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  18. Activation of nitric oxide synthase and induction of defense genes in Arabidopsis thaliana by bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, Dana

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are novel elicitors of plant innate immunity using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system. LPS are the major outer membrane components of Gram-negative bacteria and consist of three distinct structural domains: O-antigen, core region and lipid A. They represent microbe-/pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in animal patho-systems and act as extremely potent stimulators of the mammalian and insect innate immunity. As fo...

  19. Innate immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana: Lipopolysaccharides activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and induce defense genes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, Dana; Zähringer, Ulrich; Gerber, Isak; Dubery, Ian; Hartung, Thomas; Bors, Wolf; Hutzler, Peter; Durner, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell-surface components of Gram-negative bacteria and are microbe-/pathogen-associated molecular patterns in animal pathosystems. As for plants, the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction in response to LPS are not known. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana reacts to LPS with a rapid burst of NO, a hallmark of innate immunity in animals. Fifteen LPS preparations (among them Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Erwinia carotovora) as well as ...

  20. A genetic screen for modifiers of UFO meristem activity identifies three novel FUSED FLORAL ORGANS genes required for early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, J Z; Fletcher, J C; Chen, X.; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-01-01

    In a screen to identify novel genes required for early Arabidopsis flower development, we isolated four independent mutations that enhance the Ufo phenotype toward the production of filamentous structures in place of flowers. The mutants fall into three complementation groups, which we have termed FUSED FLORAL ORGANS (FFO) loci. ffo mutants have specific defects in floral organ separation and/or positioning; thus, the FFO genes identify components of a boundary formation mechanism(s) acting b...

  1. STM sustains stem cell function in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem and controls KNOX gene expression independently of the transcriptional repressor AS1

    OpenAIRE

    Scofield, Simon; Dewitte, Walter; Murray, James AH

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis KNOX gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) is required for both the development and the sustained function of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and can induce de novo meristem formation when expressed ectopically. STM acts through induction of cytokinin (CK) synthesis to inhibit cellular differentiation and additionally functions to organize undifferentiated cells into a self-sustaining meristem. STM has been shown to positively regulate the related KNOX genes KNAT1/BP and KNAT2, and it...

  2. Overexpression of AtAP1M3 regulates flowering time and floral development in Arabidopsis and effects key flowering-related genes in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Ye, Meixia; Su, Xiaoxing; Liao, Weihua; Ma, Huandi; Gao, Kai; Lei, Bingqi; An, Xinmin

    2015-08-01

    APETALA1 plays a crucial role in the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase and in floral development. In this study, to determine the effect of AP1 expression on flowering time and floral organ development, transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar overexpressing of AtAP1M3 (Arabidopsis AP1 mutant by dominant negative mutation) were generated. Transgenic Arabidopsis with e35Spro::AtAP1M3 displayed phenotypes with delayed-flowering compared to wild-type and flowers with abnormal sepals, petals and stamens. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants exhibited reduced growth vigor compared to the wild-type plants. Ectopic expression of AtAP1M3 in poplar resulted in up- or down-regulation of some endogenous key flowering-related genes, including floral meristems identity gene LFY, B-class floral organ identity genes AP3 and PI, flowering pathway integrator FT1 and flower repressors TFL1 and SVP. These results suggest that AtAP1M3 regulates flowering time and floral development in plants. PMID:25820621

  3. Overexpression of SAMDC1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana increases expression of defense-related genes as well as resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eMarco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously described that elevation of endogenous spermine levels in Arabidopsis could be achieved by transgenic overexpression of S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC or Spermine synthase (SPMS. In both cases, spermine accumulation had an impact on the plant transcriptome, with up-regulation of a set of genes enriched in functional categories involved in defense-related processes against both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, the response of SAMDC1-overexpressing plants against bacterial and oomycete pathogens has been tested. The expression of several pathogen defense-related genes was induced in these plants as well as in wild type plants exposed to an exogenous supply of spermine. SAMDC1-overexpressing plants showed an increased tolerance to infection by Pseudomonas syringae and by Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Both results add more evidence to the hypothesis that spermine plays a key role in plant resistance to biotic stress.

  4. Identification of genes involved in the ACC-mediated control of root cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markakis Marios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along the root axis of Arabidopsis thaliana, cells pass through different developmental stages. In the apical meristem repeated cycles of division increase the numbers of cells. Upon leaving the meristem, these cells pass the transition zone where they are physiologically and mechanically prepared to undergo subsequent rapid elongation. During the process of elongation epidermal cells increase their length by 300% in a couple of hours. When elongation ceases, the cells acquire their final size, shape and functions (in the differentiation zone. Ethylene administered as its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC is capable of inhibiting elongation in a concentration-dependent way. Using a microarray analysis, genes and/or processes involved in this elongation arrest are identified. Results Using a CATMA-microarray analysis performed on control and 3h ACC-treated roots, 240 differentially expressed genes were identified. Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR analysis of the 10 most up and down regulated genes combined with literature search confirmed the accurateness of the analysis. This revealed that inhibition of cell elongation is, at least partly, caused by restricting the events that under normal growth conditions initiate elongation and by increasing the processes that normally stop cellular elongation at the end of the elongation/onset of differentiation zone. Conclusions ACC interferes with cell elongation in the Arabidopsis thaliana roots by inhibiting cells from entering the elongation process and by immediately stimulating the formation of cross-links in cell wall components, diminishing the remaining elongation capacity. From the analysis of the differentially expressed genes, it becomes clear that many genes identified in this response, are also involved in several other kind of stress responses. This suggests that many responses originate from individual elicitors, but that somewhere in the downstream

  5. Roles of the middle domain-specific WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX genes in early development of leaves in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Noritaka; Tsugeki, Ryuji; Rikirsch, Enno; Laux, Thomas; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2012-02-01

    During leaf development in flowering plants, adaxial (upper) and abaxial (lower) side-specific genes are responsible for blade outgrowth, which takes places predominantly in the lateral direction, and for margin development as well as differentiation of adaxial and abaxial tissues. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that two WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) genes, PRESSED FLOWER (PRS)/WOX3 and WOX1, encoding homeobox transcription factors, act in blade outgrowth and margin development downstream of adaxial/abaxial polarity establishment. The expression of PRS and WOX1 defines a hitherto undescribed middle domain, including two middle mesophyll layers and the margin, as a center that organizes the outgrowth of leaf blades. The expression of PRS and WOX1 is repressed in the abaxial leaf domain by the abaxial-specific transcription factor KANADI. Furthermore, PRS and WOX1 coordinate adaxial/abaxial patterning together with adaxial- and abaxial-specific genes. Our data suggest a model of blade outgrowth and adaxial/abaxial patterning via the middle domain-specific WOX genes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. PMID:22374393

  6. Transformation of Brassica napus canola cultivars with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase genes and analysis of herbicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, B L; Labbé, H; Hattori, J; Ouellet, T; Gabard, J; Sunohara, G; Charest, P J; Iyer, V N

    1990-10-01

    A survey of selected crop species and weeds was conducted to evaluate the inhibition of the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) and seedling growth in vitro by the sulfonylurea herbicides chlorsulfuron, DPX A7881, DPX L5300, DPX M6316 and the imidazolinone herbicides AC243,997, AC263,499, AC252,214. Particular attention was given to the Brassica species including canola cultivars and cruciferous weeds such as B. kaber (wild mustard) and Thlaspi arvense (stinkweed). Transgenic lines of B. napus cultivars Westar and Profit, which express the Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type AHAS gene or the mutant gene csr1-1 at levels similar to the resident AHAS genes, were generated and compared. The mutant gene was essential for resistance to the sulfonylurea chlorsulfuron but not to DPX A7881, which appeared to be tolerated by certain Brassica species. Cross-resistance to the imidazolinones did not occur. The level of resistance to chlorsulfuron in transgenic canola greatly exceeded the levels that were toxic to the Brassica species or cruciferous weeds. Direct selection of transgenic lines with chlorsulfuron sprayed at field levels under greenhouse conditions was achieved. PMID:24221001

  7. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jülke, Sabine; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana. PMID:27135222

  8. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Jülke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana.

  9. Regulation of the New Arabidopsis Imprinted Gene AtBMI1C Requires the Interplay of Different Epigenetic Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabian Bratzel; ChaoYang; Alexandra Ancelova; Gema López-Torrejón; Marcus Koch; Juan Carlos del Pozo; Myriam Calonje

    2012-01-01

    Recently,it has been shown that plants contain homologs to the animal Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)components BMI1 and RING1A/B.In Arabidopsis,there are three BMI1-like genes,two of which,AtBMI1A and B,are required during post-embryonic plant growth to repress embryonic traits and allow cell differentiation.However,little is known about the third BMI1-like gene,AtBMI1C.In this work,we show that AtBMI1C is only expressed during endosperm and stamen development.AtBMI1C is an imprinted gene expressed from the maternal allele in the endosperm but biallelically expressed in stamen.We found that the characteristic expression pattern of AtBMI1C is the result of a complex epigenetic regulation that involves CG DNA methylation,RNA-directed non-CG DNA methylation (RdDM),and PcG activity.Our results show the orchestrated interplay of different epigenetic mechanisms in regulating gene expression throughout development,shedding light on the current hypotheses for the origin and mechanism of imprinting in plant endosperm.

  10. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor. PMID:10944200

  11. A gain-of-function mutation in the Arabidopsis disease resistance gene RPP4 confers sensitivity to low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaozhen; Li, Jianyong; Bao, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shuhua

    2010-10-01

    How plants adapt to low temperature is not well understood. To identify components involved in low-temperature signaling, we characterized the previously isolated chilling-sensitive2 mutant (chs2) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This mutant grew normally at 22°C but showed phenotypes similar to activation of defense responses when shifted to temperatures below 16°C. These phenotypes include yellowish and collapsed leaves, increased electrolyte leakage, up-regulation of PATHOGENESIS RELATED genes, and accumulation of excess hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid (SA). Moreover, the chs2 mutant was seedling lethal when germinated at or shifted for more than 3 d to low temperatures of 4°C to 12°C. Map-based cloning revealed that a single amino acid substitution occurred in the TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor- nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich repeat)-type resistance (R) protein RPP4 (for Recognition of Peronospora parasitica4), which causes a deregulation of the R protein in a temperature-dependent manner. The chs2 mutation led to an increase in the mutated RPP4 mRNA transcript, activation of defense responses, and an induction of cell death at low temperatures. In addition, a chs2 intragenic suppressor, in which the mutation occurs in the conserved NB domain, abolished defense responses at lower temperatures. Genetic analyses of chs2 in combination with known SA pathway and immune signaling mutants indicate that the chs2-conferred temperature sensitivity requires ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1, REQUIRED FOR Mla12 RESISTANCE, and SUPPRESSOR OF G2 ALLELE OF skp1 but does not require PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4, NONEXPRESSOR OF PR GENES1, or SA. This study reveals that an activated TIR-NB-LRR protein has a large impact on temperature sensitivity in plant growth and survival. PMID:20699401

  12. A wheat PI4K gene whose product possesses threonine autophophorylation activity confers tolerance to drought and salt in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Pan-Pan, Lu; Hu, Di; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Phosphoinositides are involved in regulation of recruitment and activity of signalling proteins in cell membranes. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4-kinases (PI4Ks) generate PI4-phosphate the precursor of regulatory phosphoinositides. No type II PI4K research on the abiotic stress response has previously been reported in plants. A stress-inducible type II PI4K gene, named TaPI4KIIγ, was obtained by de novo transcriptome sequencing of drought-treated wheat (Triticum aestivum). TaPI4KIIγ, localized on the plasma membrane, underwent threonine autophosphorylation, but had no detectable lipid kinase activity. Interaction of TaPI4KIIγ with wheat ubiquitin fusion degradation protein (TaUDF1) indicated that it might be hydrolysed by the proteinase system. Overexpression of TaPI4KIIγ revealed that it could enhance drought and salt stress tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth. A ubdkγ7 mutant, identified as an orthologue of TaPI4KIIγ in Arabidopsis, was sensitive to salt, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and abscisic acid (ABA), and overexpression of TaPI4KIIγ in the ubdkγ7 mutant compensated stress sensitivity. TaPI4KIIγ promoted root growth in Arabidopsis, suggesting that TaPI4KIIγ might enhance stress resistance by improving root growth. Overexpression of TaPI4KIIγ led to an altered expression level of stress-related genes and changes in several physiological traits that made the plants more tolerant to stress. The results provided evidence that overexpression of TaPI4KIIγ could improve drought and salt tolerance. PMID:23682116

  13. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2011-05-19

    Background: The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana.Results: A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR) but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA). Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs) and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced and uncoupled from that of

  14. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  15. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many 'unknown' yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. PMID:26657893

  16. Systematic Phenotype Analysis of Arabidopsis Ds-tagged Mutants to Unravel Gene Functions in Abiotic Stress Response as well as Growth and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the availability of various mutant resources in Arabidopsis, it is now possible to investigate mutant lines for almost every gene. Arabidopsis is then, not only a model plant for plant research, but also a model species in which it is possible to carry out 'saturation mutagenesis' for all genes, and to totally analyze each gene and mutant of one organism. One of the future goals of the 'phenome' project is to collect information about the knockout-type mutant phenotypes for each Arabidopsis gene. We have generated thousands of Dissociation (Ds) transposon-tagged lines, which have a single insertion because of an advantage of the Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) system, and deposited it to the RIKEN BioResource Center. In this resource, we selected 4,000 transposon-tagged lines with a transposon insertion in gene-coding regions, and systematically observed the visible phenotype of each line as a first step of phenome analysis. In total, about 200 clear visible phenotypes were classified into 43 categories of morphological phenotypes. Phenotypic images have been entered into a searchable database. Parallel to this, we have been selecting homozygous transposon-insertional plants, which would be useful resources to detect other phenotypes besides the visible ones. We are setting three categories of measurement to search various traits for total phenome analysis, such as physical, chemical or biological methods. Recently, we started to investigate biologically-measured phenotypes, which are stress-responsive or conditional phenotypes, using homozygous mutant resources. We are also collecting any mutant phenotype information from published reports in journal research activity to make a comprehensive phenotype database of Arabidopsis genes and mutants. (author)

  17. The Arabidopsis homeotic genes APETALA3 and PISTILLATA are sufficient to provide the B class organ identity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizek, B A; Meyerowitz, E M

    1996-01-01

    The class B organ identity genes, APETALA3 and PISTILLATA, are required to specify petal and stamen identity in the Arabidopsis flower. We show here that the activities of these two genes are sufficient to specify petals and stamens in flowers, in combination with the class A and C genes, respectively. Flowers of plants constitutively expressing both PISTILLATA and APETALA3 under the control of the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus consist of two outer whorls of petals and inner whorls of stamens. These plants also exhibit vegetative phenotypes that are not present in either of the singly (APETALA3 or PISTILLATA) overexpressing lines. These phenotypes include leaf curling and the partial conversion of later-arising cauline leaves to petals. The presence of additional floral whorls in flowers ectopically expressing APETALA3 and PISTILLATA and the rescue of missing organs in class A mutants by ectopic B function suggest that APETALA3 and PISTILLATA play an additional role in proliferation of the floral meristem. PMID:8565821

  18. The overexpression of an Amaranthus hypochondriacus NF-YC gene modifies growth and confers water deficit stress resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeros-Suárez, Paola A; Massange-Sánchez, Julio A; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma A; Montero-Vargas, Josaphat M; Gómez-Leyva, Juan F; Délano-Frier, John P

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y), is a plant heterotrimeric transcription factor constituted by NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC subunits. The function of many NF-Y subunits, mostly of the A and B type, has been studied in plants, but knowledge regarding the C subunit remains fragmentary. Here, a water stress-induced NF-YC gene from Amaranthus hypochondriacus (AhNF-YC) was further characterized by its overexpression in transgenic Arabidospis thaliana plants. A role in development was inferred from modified growth rates in root, rosettes and inflorescences recorded in AhNF-YC overexpressing Arabidopsis plants, in addition to a delayed onset of flowering. Also, the overexpression of AhNF-YC caused increased seedling sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA), and influenced the expression of several genes involved in secondary metabolism, development and ABA-related responses. An altered expression of the latter in water stressed and recovered transgenic plants, together with the observed increase in ABA sensitivity, suggested that their increased water stress resistance was partly ABA-dependent. An untargeted metabolomic analysis also revealed an altered metabolite pattern, both in normal and water stress/recovery conditions. These results suggest that AhNF-YC may play an important regulatory role in both development and stress, and represents a candidate gene for the engineering of abiotic stress resistance in commercial crops. PMID:26475185

  19. An SGS3-like protein functions in RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Zhimin

    2010-01-06

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an important epigenetic mechanism for silencing transgenes and endogenous repetitive sequences such as transposons. The RD29A promoter-driven LUCIFERASE transgene and its corresponding endogenous RD29A gene are hypermethylated and silenced in the Arabidopsis DNA demethylase mutant ros1. By screening for second-site suppressors of ros1, we identified the RDM12 locus. The rdm12 mutation releases the silencing of the RD29A-LUC transgene and the endogenous RD29A gene by reducing the promoter DNA methylation. The rdm12 mutation also reduces DNA methylation at endogenous RdDM target loci, including transposons and other repetitive sequences. In addition, the rdm12 mutation affects the levels of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from some of the RdDM target loci. RDM12 encodes a protein with XS and coiled-coil domains, and is similar to SGS3, which is a partner protein of RDR6 and can bind to double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang, and is required for several post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways. Our results show that RDM12 is a component of the RdDM pathway, and suggest that RdDM may involve double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang and the partnering between RDM12 and RDR2. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Integration and Gene Targeting in Arabidopsis thaliana Non-Homologous End-Joining Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of AtKu70 and AtKu80 in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and gene targeting, plant lines with a T-DNA insertion in AtKu80 or AtKu70 genes were functionally characterized. Such plant lines lacked both subunits, indicating that heterodimer formation between AtKu70 and AtKu80 is needed for the stability of the proteins. Homozygous mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants and were fertile. However, they were hypersensitive to the genotoxic agent bleomycin, resulting in more DSBs as quantified in comet assays. They had lower end-joining efficiency, suggesting that NHEJ is a critical pathway for DSB repair in plants. Both Atku mutants and a previously isolated Atmre11 mutant were impaired in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration via floral dip transformation, indicating that AtKu70, AtKu80, and AtMre11 play an important role in T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis. The frequency of gene targeting was not significantly increased in the Atku80 and Atku70 mutants, but it was increased at least 10-fold in the Atmre11 mutant compared with the wild type.

  1. The Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI genes regulate seed germination by modulating degradation of ABI5 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenming; Guan, Chunmei; Feng, Jian; Liang, Yan; Zhan, Ni; Zuo, Jianru; Ren, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in inhibiting seed germination and in post-germination seedling establishment. In the ABA signaling pathway, ABI5, a basic Leu zipper transcription factor, has important functions in the regulation of seed germination. ABI5 protein localizes in nuclear bodies, along with AFP, COP1, and SIZ1, and was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. However, the mechanisms of ABI5 nuclear body formation and ABI5 protein degradation remain obscure. In this study, we found that the Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) proteins, predicted nuclear matrix proteins essential for maintenance of nuclear morphology, also participate in ABA-controlled seed germination by regulating the degradation of ABI5 protein. During seed germination, the crwn mutants are hypersensitive to ABA and have higher levels of ABI5 protein compared to wild type. Genetic analysis suggested that CRWNs act upstream of ABI5. The observation that CRWN3 colocalizes with ABI5 in nuclear bodies indicates that CRWNs might participate in ABI5 protein degradation in nuclear bodies. Moreover, we revealed that the extreme C-terminal of CRWN3 protein is necessary for its function in the response to ABA in germination. Our results suggested important roles of CRWNs in ABI5 nuclear body organization and ABI5 protein degradation during seed germination. PMID:26564029

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA Mutants Implicate GAUT Genes in the Biosynthesis of Pectin and Xylan in Cell Walls and Seed Testa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerry H. Caffall; Sivakumar Pattathil; Sarah E. Phillips; Michael G. Hahn; Debra Mohnen

    2009-01-01

    Galacturonosyltransferase 1 (GAUT1) is an α1,4-D-galacturonosyltransferase that transfers galacturonic acid from uridine 5'-diphosphogalacturonic acid onto the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan (Sterling et al., 2006). The 25-member Arabidopsis thaliana GAUT1-related gene family encodes 15 GAUT and 10 GAUT-like (GATL) proteins with, respectively, 56-84 and 42-53% amino acid sequence similarity to GAUT1. Previous phylogenetic analyses of AtGAUTs indicated three clades: A through C. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis, poplar and rice GAUT families has sub-classified the GAUTs into seven clades: clade A-1 (GAUTs 1 to 3); A-2 (GAUT4); A-3 (GAUTs 5 and 6); A-4 (GAUT7); B-1(GAUTs 8 and 9); B-2 (GAUTs 10 and 11); and clade C (GAUTs 12 to 15). The Arabidopsis GAUTs have a distribution com-parable to the poplar orthologs, with the exception of GAUT2, which is absent in poplar. Rice, however, has no orthologs of GAUTs 2 and 12 and has multiple apparent orthologs of GAUTs 1, 4, and 7 compared with eitherArabidopsis or poplar. The cell wall glycosyl residue compositions of 26 homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for 13 of 15 Arabidopsis GAUTgenes reveal significantly and reproducibly different cell walls in specific tissues of gaut mutants 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 from that of wild-type Arabidopsis walls. Pectin and xylan polysaccharides are affected by the loss of GAUT function, as dem-onstrated by the altered galacturonic acid, xylose, rhamnose, galactose, and arabinose composition of distinct gaut mu-tant walls. The wall glycosyl residue compositional phenotypes observed among the gaut mutants suggest that at least six different biosynthetic linkages in pectins and/or xylans are affected by the lesions in these GAUTgenes. Evidence is also presented to support a role for GAUT11 in seed mucilage expansion and in seed wall and mucilage composition.

  3. Identification of novel miRNAs and miRNA dependent developmental shifts of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Zhan

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small, endogenous RNAs of 20 approximately 25 nucleotides, processed from stem-loop regions of longer RNA precursors. Plant miRNAs act as negative regulators of target mRNAs predominately by slicing target transcripts, and a number of miRNAs play important roles in development. We analyzed a number of published datasets from Arabidopsis thaliana to characterize novel miRNAs, novel miRNA targets, and miRNA-regulated developmental changes in gene expression. These data include microarray profiling data and small RNA (sRNA deep sequencing data derived from miRNA biogenesis/transport mutants, microarray profiling data of mRNAs in a developmental series, and computational predictions of conserved genomic stem-loop structures. Our conservative analyses identified five novel mature miRNAs and seven miRNA targets, including one novel target gene. Two complementary miRNAs that target distinct mRNAs were encoded by one gene. We found that genes targeted by known miRNAs, and genes up-regulated or down-regulated in miRNA mutant inflorescences, are highly expressed in the wild type inflorescence. In addition, transcripts upregulated within the mutant inflorescences were abundant in wild type leaves and shoot meristems and low in pollen and seed. Downregulated transcripts were abundant in wild type pollen and seed and low in shoot meristems, roots and leaves. Thus, disrupting miRNA function causes the inflorescence transcriptome to resemble the leaf and meristem and to differ from pollen and seed. Applications of our computational approach to other species and the use of more liberal criteria than reported here will further expand the number of identified miRNAs and miRNA targets. Our findings suggest that miRNAs have a global role in promoting vegetative to reproductive transitions in A. thaliana.

  4. A multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 platform for fast and efficient editing of multiple genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengjing; Mao, Yanfei; Ha, Si; Liu, Wenshan; Botella, Jose Ramon; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-07-01

    The recently developed CRISPR/Cas9 system is a promising technology for targeted genome editing in a variety of species including plants. However, the first generation systems were designed to target one or two gene loci at a time. We designed a new multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system that allows the co-expression of six sgRNA modules in one binary vector using a simple (three steps) cloning strategy in Arabidopsis. The transcription of the sgRNA modules is under the control of three different RNA Polymerase III-dependent promoters. We tested the efficiency of the new multiplex system by targeting six of the fourteen PYL families of ABA receptor genes in a single transformation experiment. One line with mutations in all six targeted PYLs was identified from 15 T1 plants. The mutagenesis frequency for the six individual PYL targets in the T1 lines ranged from 13 to 93 %. In the presence of ABA, the transgenic line identified as containing mutations in all six PYL genes produced the highest germination rate in the T2 progeny (37 %). Among these germinated seedlings, half of the analyzed plants (15/30) were homozygous mutants for at least four targeted genes and two plants (6.7 %) contained homozygous mutations in five of the targeted PYLs and the other targeted PYL had biallelic mutations. Homozygous sextuple mutants were identified in the T3 progeny and characterized together with previously described triple and sextuple PYL mutants. We anticipate that the application of this multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system will strongly facilitate functional analysis of genes pathways and families. PMID:26661595

  5. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L.; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-01-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  6. Characterization of a small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene involved in Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Nektarios Markakis

    Full Text Available The root of Arabidopsis thaliana is used as a model system to unravel the molecular nature of cell elongation and its arrest. From a micro-array performed on roots that were treated with aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, the precursor of ethylene, a Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene was found to be up regulated. As it appeared as the 76th gene in the family, it was named SAUR76. Root and leaf growth of overexpression lines ectopically expressing SAUR76 indicated the possible involvement of the gene in the division process. Using promoter::GUS and GFP lines strong expression was seen in endodermal and pericycle cells at the end of the elongation zone and during several stages of lateral root primordia development. ACC and IAA/NAA were able to induce a strong up regulation of the gene and changed the expression towards cortical and even epidermal cells at the beginning of the elongation zone. Confirmation of this up regulation of expression was delivered using qPCR, which also indicated that the expression quickly returned to normal levels when the inducing IAA-stimulus was removed, a behaviour also seen in other SAUR genes. Furthermore, confocal analysis of protein-GFP fusions localized the protein in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. SAUR76 expression was quantified in several mutants in ethylene and auxin-related pathways, which led to the conclusion that the expression of SAUR76 is mainly regulated by the increase in auxin that results from the addition of ACC, rather than by ACC itself.

  7. SPATULA and ALCATRAZ, are partially redundant, functionally diverging bHLH genes required for Arabidopsis gynoecium and fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Michael; Paicu, Teodora; Alvarez, John P; Swain, Steve M; Smyth, David R

    2011-12-01

    The Arabidopsis gynoecium is a complex organ that facilitates fertilization, later developing into a dehiscent silique that protects seeds until their dispersal. Identifying genes important for development is often hampered by functional redundancy. We report unequal redundancy between two closely related genes, SPATULA (SPT) and ALCATRAZ (ALC), revealing previously unknown developmental roles for each. SPT is known to support septum, style and stigma development in the flower, whereas ALC is involved in dehiscence zone development in the fruit. ALC diverged from a SPT-like ancestor following gene duplication coinciding with the At-β polyploidy event. Here we show that ALC is also involved in early gynoecium development, and SPT in later valve margin generation in the silique. Evidence includes the increased severity of early gynoecium disruption, and of later valve margin defects, in spt-alc double mutants. In addition, a repressive version of SPT (35S:SPT-SRDX) disrupts both structures. Consistent with redundancy, ALC and SPT expression patterns overlap in these tissues, and the ALC promoter carries two atypical E-box elements identical to one in SPT required for valve margin expression. Further, SPT can heterodimerize with ALC, and 35S:SPT can fully complement dehiscence defects in alc mutants, although 35S:ALC can only partly complement spt gynoecium disruptions, perhaps associated with its sequence simplification. Interactions with FRUITFULL and SHATTERPROOF genes differ somewhat between SPT and ALC, reflecting their different specializations. These two genes are apparently undergoing subfunctionalization, with SPT essential for earlier carpel margin tissues, and ALC specializing in later dehiscence zone development. PMID:21801252

  8. Meiosis-specific gene discovery in plants: RNA-Seq applied to isolated Arabidopsis male meiocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Gregory D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiosis is a critical process in the reproduction and life cycle of flowering plants in which homologous chromosomes pair, synapse, recombine and segregate. Understanding meiosis will not only advance our knowledge of the mechanisms of genetic recombination, but also has substantial applications in crop improvement. Despite the tremendous progress in the past decade in other model organisms (e.g., Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster, the global identification of meiotic genes in flowering plants has remained a challenge due to the lack of efficient methods to collect pure meiocytes for analyzing the temporal and spatial gene expression patterns during meiosis, and for the sensitive identification and quantitation of novel genes. Results A high-throughput approach to identify meiosis-specific genes by combining isolated meiocytes, RNA-Seq, bioinformatic and statistical analysis pipelines was developed. By analyzing the studied genes that have a meiosis function, a pipeline for identifying meiosis-specific genes has been defined. More than 1,000 genes that are specifically or preferentially expressed in meiocytes have been identified as candidate meiosis-specific genes. A group of 55 genes that have mitochondrial genome origins and a significant number of transposable element (TE genes (1,036 were also found to have up-regulated expression levels in meiocytes. Conclusion These findings advance our understanding of meiotic genes, gene expression and regulation, especially the transcript profiles of MGI genes and TE genes, and provide a framework for functional analysis of genes in meiosis.

  9. Effect of hypergravity on lignin formation and expression of lignin-related genes in inflorescence stems of an ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant ein3-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahara, Ichirou; Kobayashi, Mai; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    Our previous studies have shown that hypergravity inhibits growth and promotes lignin forma-tion in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana by up-regulation of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis (Tamaoki et al. 2006, 2009). In the present study, we have examined whether ethylene is involved in these responses using an ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant ein3-1. Our results revealed that hypergravity treatment at 300 G for 24 h significantly inhibited growth of inflorescence stems, promoted both deposition of acetyl bromide extractable lignin and gene expression involved in lignin formation in inflorescence stems of wild type plants. Growth inhibition of inflorescence stems was also observed in ein3-1. However, the effects of hypergravity on the promotion of the deposition of acetyl bromide lignin and the expression of genes involved in lignin formation were not observed in ein3-1, indicating that ethylene sig-naling is involved in the up-regulation of the expression of lignin-related genes as well as the promotion of deposition of lignin by hypergravity in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

  10. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  11. Arabidopsis Myrosinase Genes AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 Are Root-Tip Specific and Contribute to Auxin Biosynthesis and Root-Growth Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lili Fu; Meng Wang; Bingying Han; Deguan Tan; Xuepiao Sun; Jiaming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Plant myrosinases (β-thioglucoside glucohydrolases) are classified into two subclasses, Myr I and Myr II. The biological function of Myr I has been characterized as a major biochemical defense against insect pests and pathogens in cruciferous plants. However, the biological function of Myr II remains obscure. We studied the function of two Myr II member genes AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 in Arabidopsis. RT-PCR showed that both genes were specifically expressed in roots. GUS-assay revealed that both gene...

  12. Cloning the Promoter of BcNA1 from Brassica napus and Fad2 Gene from Arabidopsis thaliana and Construction of the Plant Expression Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The upstream regulatory region of a seed-specific gene was isolated from the genomic DNA of Brassica napus by PCR amplification. The cloned fragment contained 1755 nucleotides, and shared a sequence homology of 99.6% with the reported data. The coding region of oleic acid desaturase gene was then cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana. The sequencing analysis indicated that the sequence of the PCR product was just the same as reported before. In addition, the plant expression vector harboring the seed-specific promoter and trans-Fad2 gene was constructed.

  13. Proteomic Identification of Putative MicroRNA394 Target Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana Identifies Major Latex Protein Family Members Critical for Normal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litholdo, Celso G; Parker, Benjamin L; Eamens, Andrew L; Larsen, Martin R; Cordwell, Stuart J; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2016-06-01

    Expression of the F-Box protein Leaf Curling Responsiveness (LCR) is regulated by microRNA, miR394, and alterations to this interplay in Arabidopsis thaliana produce defects in leaf polarity and shoot apical meristem organization. Although the miR394-LCR node has been documented in Arabidopsis, the identification of proteins targeted by LCR F-box itself has proven problematic. Here, a proteomic analysis of shoot apices from plants with altered LCR levels identified a member of the Latex Protein (MLP) family gene as a potential LCR F-box target. Bioinformatic and molecular analyses also suggested that other MLP family members are likely to be targets for this post-translational regulation. Direct interaction between LCR F-Box and MLP423 was validated. Additional MLP members had reduction in protein accumulation, in varying degrees, mediated by LCR F-Box. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines, in which MLP28 expression was reduced through an artificial miRNA technology, displayed severe developmental defects, including changes in leaf patterning and morphology, shoot apex defects, and eventual premature death. These phenotypic characteristics resemble those of Arabidopsis plants modified to over-express LCR Taken together, the results demonstrate that MLPs are driven to degradation by LCR, and indicate that MLP gene family is target of miR394-LCR regulatory node, representing potential targets for directly post-translational regulation mediated by LCR F-Box. In addition, MLP28 family member is associated with the LCR regulation that is critical for normal Arabidopsis development. PMID:27067051

  14. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  15. SIAMESE, a gene controlling the endoreduplication cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J D; Oppenheimer, D G; Concienne, J; Larkin, J C

    2000-09-01

    Cell differentiation is generally tightly coordinated with the cell cycle, typically resulting in a nondividing cell with a unique differentiated morphology. The unicellular trichomes of Arabidopsis are a well-established model for the study of plant cell differentiation. Here, we describe a new genetic locus, SIAMESE (SIM), required for coordinating cell division and cell differentiation during the development of Arabidopsis trichomes (epidermal hairs). A recessive mutation in the sim locus on chromosome 5 results in clusters of adjacent trichomes that appeared to be morphologically identical 'twins'. Upon closer inspection, the sim mutant was found to produce multicellular trichomes in contrast to the unicellular trichomes produced by wild-type (WT) plants. Mutant trichomes consisting of up to 15 cells have been observed. Scanning electron microscopy of developing sim trichomes suggests that the cell divisions occur very early in the development of mutant trichomes. WT trichome nuclei continue to replicate their DNA after mitosis and cytokinesis have ceased, and as a consequence have a DNA content much greater than 2C. This phenomenon is known as endoreduplication. Individual nuclei of sim trichomes have a reduced level of endoreduplication relative to WT trichome nuclei. Endoreduplication is also reduced in dark-grown sim hypocotyls relative to WT, but not in light-grown hypocotyls. Double mutants of sim with either of two other mutants affecting endoreduplication, triptychon (try) and glabra3 (gl3) are consistent with a function for SIM in endoreduplication. SIM may function as a repressor of mitosis in the endoreduplication cell cycle. Additionally, the relatively normal morphology of multicellular sim trichomes indicates that trichome morphogenesis can occur relatively normally even when the trichome precursor cell continues to divide. The sim mutant phenotype also has implications for the evolution of multicellular trichomes. PMID:10952891

  16. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Anja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF essential for ornithine export from mitochondria. The yeast arg11 mutant, which is deficient in Ort1p/Arg11p grows poorly on media lacking arginine. Results High-level expression of a nuclear encoded Arabidopsis thaliana homolog (AtmBAC2 of Ort1p/Arg11p was able to suppress the growth deficiency of arg11. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated expression of AtmBAC2 in all tissues with highest levels in flowers. Promoter-GUS fusions showed preferential expression in flowers, i.e. pollen, in the vasculature of siliques and in aborted seeds. Variable expression was observed in leaf vasculature. Induction of the promoter was not observed during the first two weeks in seedlings grown on media containing NH4NO3, arginine or ornithine as sole nitrogen sources. Conclusion AtmBAC2 was isolated as a mitochondrial transporter for arginine in Arabidopsis. The absence of expression in developing seeds and in cotyledons of seedlings indicates that other transporters are responsible for storage and mobilization of arginine in seeds.

  17. Isolation of AtNUDT5 gene promoter and characterization of its activity in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Chun; Li, Mei-Ying; Ruan, Meng-Bin; Xia, Yi-Ji; Wu, Kun-Xin; Peng, Ming

    2013-03-01

    AtNUDT5 is a cytosol Nudix that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a variety of substrates. In this report, a 1,387-bp 5'-flanking region of the AtNUDT5 gene was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The tissue-specific activity of the 5'-flanking region was investigated by using the GUS gene as a reporter in transgenic A. thaliana plants. Weak GUS activity appeared in vascular tissues of young plants, strong GUS activity appeared in the axial roots, but no GUS activity was observed in the root cap, lateral roots, rosette leaf, mature silique and reproductive tissues such as stamen, pistil, and petal. Furthermore, by using these transgenic A. thaliana plants, results of the histochemical staining and fluorometric assays of GUS activity showed that the AtNUDT5 promoter can be activated by both avirulent Pst avrRpm1 and virulent Pst strains at 5 h post-infiltration and that the activity of AtNUDT5 promoter increased significantly at 24 h post-infiltration. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the AtNUDT5 promoter is pathogen-responsive. The promoter may be used to develop transgenic plants with an increased tolerance to pathogenic stresses. PMID:23322251

  18. Over-expression of an Arabidopsis δ-OAT gene enhances salt and drought tolerance in transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Liangqi; FAN Zhanmin; GUO Lei; LI Yongqing; ZHANG Wenjing; QU Li-Jia; CHEN Zhangliang

    2003-01-01

    δ-OAT, ornithine-δ-aminotransferase, is the key enzyme involved in proline biosynthesis. In this study the Arabidopsisδ-OAT gene was transferred into rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp japonica cv. Zhongzuo 321), whose successful integration was demonstrated by PCR and Southern blot analysis. The over-expression of the gene in transgenic rice was also confirmed. Biochemical analysis showed that, under salt or drought stress conditions, proline contents in the leaves and roots in transgenic rice plants were 5- to 15-fold of those in non-transgenic controls. Under stress conditions, germinating rate of transgenic lines is higher than that of controls. Although the growth of rice plants tested were more and more retarded with the increasing of NaCl concentration, the transgenic plants grow faster compared to the controls under the same stress condition. Meanwhile, the resistance to KCl and MgSO4 stresses was also found enhanced in transgenic rice. Furthermore, the over-expression ofδ-OAT also improved the yield of transgenic plants under stress conditions. The average yield per plant of transgenic lines increases about 12%-41% more than that of control lines under 0.1 mol/L NaCl stress. These data indicated that the over-expression of δ-OAT, with the accumulation of proline, resulted in the enhancement of salt and drought tolerance and an increase of rice yield, which is of significance in agriculture.

  19. Transcriptional activation of Arabidopsis axis patterning genes WOX8/9 links zygote polarity to embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Minako; Zhang, Zhongjuan; Laux, Thomas

    2011-02-15

    In most flowering plants, the apical-basal body axis is established by an asymmetric division of the polarized zygote. In Arabidopsis, early embryo patterning is regulated by WOX homeobox genes, which are coexpressed in the zygote but become restricted to apical (WOX2) and basal (WOX8/9) cells. How the asymmetry of zygote division is regulated and connected to the daughter cell fates is largely unknown. Here, we show that expression of WOX8 is independent of the axis patterning signal auxin, but, together with the redundant gene WOX9, is activated in the zygote, its basal daughter cell, and the hypophysis by the zinc-finger transcription factor WRKY2. In wrky2 mutants, egg cells polarize normally but zygotes fail to reestablish polar organelle positioning from a transient symmetric state, resulting in equal cell division and distorted embryo development. Both defects are rescued by overexpressing WOX8, indicating that WRKY2-dependent WOX8 transcription links zygote polarization with embryo patterning. PMID:21316593

  20. Induction of defence gene expression by oligogalacturonic acid requires increases in both cytosolic calcium and hydrogen peroxide in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yang HU; Steven J NEILL; Wei Ming CAI; Zhang Cheng TANG

    2004-01-01

    Responses to oligogalacturonic acid (OGA) were determined in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings expressing the calcium reporter protein aequorin. OGA stimulated a rapid, substantial and transient increase in the concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) that peaked after ca. 15 s. This increase was dose-dependent, saturating at ca. 50 μg Gal equiv/ml of OGA. OGA also stimulated a rapid generation of H2O2. A small, rapid increase in H2O2 content was followed by a much larger oxidative burst, with H2O2 content peaking after ca. 60 min and declining thereafter. Induction of the oxidative burst by OGA was also dose-dependent, with a maximum response again being achieved at ca. 50 μg Gal equiv/mL. Inhibitors of calcium fluxes inhibited both increases in [Ca2+]cyt and [H2O2], whereas inhibitors of NADPH oxidase blocked only the oxidative burst. OGA increased strongly the expression of the defence-related genes CHS,GST, PAL and PR-1. This induction was suppressed by inhibitors of calcium flux or NADPH oxidase, indicating that increases in both cytosolic calcium and H2O2 are required for OGA-induced gene expression.

  1. The Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. Gene AhLPAT2 Increases the Lipid Content of Transgenic Arabidopsis Seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Chen

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT, which converts lysophosphatidic acid (LPA to phosphatidic acid (PA, catalyzes the addition of fatty acyl moieties to the sn-2 position of the LPA glycerol backbone in triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis. We recently reported the cloning and temporal-spatial expression of a peanut (Arachis hypogaea AhLPAT2gene, showing that an increase in AhLPAT2 transcript levels was closely correlated with an increase in seed oil levels. However, the function of the enzyme encoded by the AhLPAT2 gene remains unclear. Here, we report that AhLPAT2 transcript levels were consistently higher in the seeds of a high-oil cultivar than in those of a low-oil cultivar across different seed developmental stages. Seed-specific overexpression of AhLPAT2 in Arabidopsis results in a higher percentage of oil in the seeds and greater-than-average seed weight in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants, leading to a significant increase in total oil yield per plant. The total fatty acid (FA content and the proportion of unsaturated FAs also increased. In the developing siliques of AhLPAT2-overexpressing plants, the expression levels of genes encoding crucial enzymes involved in de novo FA synthesis, acetyl-CoA subunit (AtBCCP2 and acyl carrier protein 1 (AtACP1 were elevated. AhLPAT2 overexpression also promoted the expression of several key genes related to TAG assembly, sucrose metabolism, and glycolysis. These results demonstrate that the expression of AhLPAT2 plays an important role in glycerolipid production in peanuts.

  2. Overexpression of lycopene ε-cyclase gene from lycium chinense confers tolerance to chilling stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinyu; Diao, Jinjin; Ji, Jing; Wang, Gang; Li, Zhaodi; Wu, Jiang; Josine, Tchouopou Lontchi; Wang, Yurong

    2016-01-15

    Lutein plays an important role in protecting the photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage and eliminating ROS to render normal physiological function of cells. As a rate-limiting step for lutein synthesis in plants, lycopene ε-cyclase catalyzes lycopene to δ-carotene. We cloned a lycopene ε-cyclase gene (Lcε-LYC) from Lycium chinense (L. chinense), a deciduous woody perennial halophyte growing in various environmental conditions. The Lcε-LYC gene has an ORF of 1569bp encoding a protein of 522 aa. The deduced amino acid sequence of Lcε-LYC gene has higher homology with LycEs in other plants, such as Nicotiana tabacum and Solanum tuberosum. When L. chinense was exposed to chilling stress, relative expression of Lcε-LYC increased. To study the protective role of Lcε-LYC against chilling stress, we overexpressed the Lcε-LYC gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lcε-LYC overexpression led to an increase of lutein accumulation in transgenic A. thaliana, and the content of lutein decreased when transgenics were under cold conditions. In addition, the transgenic plants under chilling stress displayed higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) and less H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) than the control. Moreover, the photosynthesis rate, photosystem II activity (Fv/fm), and Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) also increased in the transgenetic plants. On the whole, overexpression of Lcε-LYC ameliorates photoinhibition and photooxidation, and decreases the sensitivity of photosynthesis to chilling stress in transgenic plants. PMID:26526130

  3. Aluminum-induced gene expression and protein localization of a cell wall-associated receptor kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Ezaki, Bunichi; He, Zheng-Hui; Tong, Hongyun; Osawa, Hiroki; Baluska, Frantisek; Volkmann, Dieter; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2003-08-01

    Here, we report the aluminum (Al)-induced organ-specific expression of a WAK1 (cell wall-associated receptor kinase 1) gene and cell type-specific localization of WAK proteins in Arabidopsis. WAK1-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an Al-induced WAK1 gene expression in roots. Short- and long-term analysis of gene expression in root fractions showed a typical "on" and "off" pattern with a first peak at 3 h of Al exposure followed by a sharp decline at 6 h and a complete disappearance after 9 h of Al exposure, suggesting the WAK1 is a further representative of Al-induced early genes. In shoots, upon root Al exposure, an increased but stable WAK1 expression was observed. Using confocal microscopy, we visualized Al-induced closure of leaf stomata, consistent with previous suggestions that the Al stress primarily experienced in roots associated with the transfer of root-shoot signals. Elevated levels of WAK protein in root cells were observed through western blots after 6 h of Al exposure, indicating a lag time between the Al-induced WAK transcription and translation. WAK proteins are localized abundantly to peripheries of cortex cells within the elongation zone of the root apex. In these root cells, disintegration of cortical microtubules was observed after Al treatment but not after the Al analog lanthanum treatments. Tip-growing control root hairs, stem stomata, and leaf stomatal pores are characterized with high amounts of WAKs, suggesting WAKs are accumulating at plasma membrane domains, which suffer from mechanical stress and lack dense arrays of supporting cortical microtubules. Further, transgenic plants overexpressing WAK1 showed an enhanced Al tolerance in terms of root growth when compared with the wild-type plants, making the WAK1 one of the important candidates for plant defense against Al toxicity. PMID:12913180

  4. ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) gene family members of Arabidopsis thaliana: tissue- and organ-specific promoter activities and in vivo heteromerization*

    OpenAIRE

    Stenzel, Irene; Otto, Markus; Delker, Carolin; Kirmse, Nils; Schmidt, Diana; Miersch, Otto; Hause, Bettina; Wasternack, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Jasmonates are important signals in plant stress responses and plant development. An essential step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) is catalysed by ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) which establishes the naturally occurring enantiomeric structure of jasmonates. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four genes encode four functional AOC polypeptides (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3, and AOC4) raising the question of functional redundancy or diversification. Analysis of transcript accumulation revealed an organ-specifi...

  5. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. ► The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. ► The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. ► The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. ► OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  6. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hyun [National Crop Experiment Station, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 441-100 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Boung-Jun [BioControl Center, Jeonnam 516-942 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ho Won, E-mail: hwjung@dau.ac.kr [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Soo, E-mail: chungys@dau.ac.kr [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  7. Intraspecific competition reveals conditional fitness effects of single gene polymorphism at the Arabidopsis root growth regulator BRX

    OpenAIRE

    Shindo, Chikako; Bernasconi, Giorgina; Hardtke, Christian S

    2009-01-01

    • Intraspecific genetic variation for morphological traits is observed in many organisms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, alleles responsible for intraspecific morphological variation are increasingly being identified. However, the fitness consequences remain unclear in most cases. • Here, the fitness effects of alleles of the BRX gene are investigated. A brx loss-of-function allele, which was found in a natural accession, results in a highly branched but poorly elongated root system. • Comparison ...

  8. The ULTRAPETALA1 gene functions early in Arabidopsis development to restrict shoot apical meristem activity and acts through WUSCHEL to regulate floral meristem determinacy.

    OpenAIRE

    Carles, Cristel C.; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Reville, Keira; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2004-01-01

    Shoot and floral meristem activity in higher plants is controlled by complex signaling networks consisting of positive and negative regulators. The Arabidopsis ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) gene has been shown to act as a negative regulator of meristem cell accumulation in inflorescence and floral meristems, as loss-of-function ult1 mutations cause inflorescence meristem enlargement, the production of extra flowers and floral organs, and a decrease in floral meristem determinacy. To investigate whether...

  9. Expression of wild-type PtrIAA14.1, a poplar Aux/IAA gene causes morphological changes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanda eLiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aux/IAA proteins are transcriptional repressors that control auxin signaling by interacting with Auxin Response Factors (ARFs. So far all of the identified Aux/IAA mutants with auxin-related phenotypes in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa are dominant gain-of-function mutants, with mutantions in Domain II that affected stability of the corresponding Aux/IAA proteins. On the other hand, morphological changes were observed in knock-down mutants of Aux/IAA genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, suggesting that functions of Aux/IAA proteins may be specific for certain plant species. We report here the characterization of PtrIAA14.1, a poplar (Populus trichocarpa homologue of IAA7. Bioinformatics analysis showed that PtrIAA14.1 is a classic Aux/IAA protein. It contains four conserved domains with the repressor motif in Domain I, the degron in Domain II, and the conserved amino acid signatures for protein-protein interactions in Domain III and Domain IV. Protoplast transfection assays showed that PtrIAA14.1 is localized in nucleus. It is unable in the presence of auxin, and it represses auxin response reporter gene expression. Expression of wild type PtrIAA14.1 in Arabidopsis resulted in auxin-related phenotypes including down-curling leaves, semi-draft with increased number of branches, and greatly reduced fertility, but expression of the Arabidopsis Aux/IAA genes tested remain largely unchanged in the transgenic plants. Protein-protein interaction assays in yeast and protoplasts showed that PtrIAA14.1 interacted with ARF5, but not other ARFs. Consistent with this observation, vascular patterning was altered in the transgenic plants, and the expression of AtHB8 (Arabidopsis thaliana Homeobox Gene 8 was reduced in transgenic plants.

  10. Gene expression studies in kiwifruit and gene over-expression in Arabidopsis indicates that GDP-L-galactose guanyltransferase is a major control point of vitamin C biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulley, Sean M.; Rassam, Maysoon; Hoser, Dana; Otto, Wolfgang; Schünemann, Nicole; Wright, Michele; MacRae, Elspeth; Gleave, Andrew; Laing, William

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid, AsA) is an essential metabolite for plants and animals. Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.) are a rich dietary source of AsA for humans. To understand AsA biosynthesis in kiwifruit, AsA levels and the relative expression of genes putatively involved in AsA biosynthesis, regeneration, and transport were correlated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in leaves and during fruit development in four kiwifruit genotypes (three species; A. eriantha, A. chinensis, and A. deliciosa). During fruit development, fruit AsA concentration peaked between 4 and 6 weeks after anthesis with A. eriantha having 3–16-fold higher AsA than other genotypes. The rise in AsA concentration typically occurred close to the peak in expression of the L-galactose pathway biosynthetic genes, particularly the GDP-L-galactose guanyltransferase gene. The high concentration of AsA found in the fruit of A. eriantha is probably due to higher expression of the GDP-mannose-3′,5′-epimerase and GDP-L-galactose guanyltransferase genes. Over-expression of the kiwifruit GDP-L-galactose guanyltransferase gene in Arabidopsis resulted in up to a 4-fold increase in AsA, while up to a 7-fold increase in AsA was observed in transient expression studies where both GDP-L-galactose guanyltransferase and GDP-mannose-3′,5′-epimerase genes were co-expressed. These studies show the importance of GDP-L-galactose guanyltransferase as a rate-limiting step to AsA, and demonstrate how AsA can be significantly increased in plants. PMID:19129165

  11. Functional characterisation of an Arabidopsis gene strongly induced by ionising radiation: the gene coding the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (AthPARP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabidopsis thaliana, the model-system in plant genetics, has been used to study the responses to DNA damage, experimentally introduced by γ-irradiation. We have characterised a radiation-induced gene coding a 111 kDa protein, AthPARP-1, homologous to the human poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (hPARP-1). As hPARP-1 is composed by three functional domain with characteristic motifs, AthPARP-1 binds to DNA bearing single-strand breaks and shows DNA damage-dependent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. The preferential expression of AthPARP-1 in mitotically active tissues is in agreement with a potential role in the maintenance of genome integrity during DNA replication, as proposed for its human counterpart. Transcriptional gene activation by ionising radiation of AthPARP-1 and AthPARP-2 genes is to date plant specific activation. Our expression analyses after exposure to various stress indicate that 1) AthPARP-1 and AthPARP-2 play an important role in the response to DNA lesions, particularly they are activated by genotoxic agents implicating the BER DNA repair pathway 2) AthPARP-2 gene seems to play an additional role in the signal transduction induced by oxidative stress 3) the observed expression profile of AthPARP-1 is in favour of the regulation of AthPARP-1 gene expression at the level of transcription and translation. This mode of regulation of AthPARP-1 protein biosynthesis, clearly distinct from that observed in animals, needs the implication of a so far unidentified transcription factor that is activated by the presence of DNA lesions. The major outcome of this work resides in the isolation and characterisation of such new transcription factor, which will provide new insight on the regulation of plant gene expression by genotoxic stress. (author)

  12. Of the Nine Cytidine Deaminase-Like Genes in Arabidopsis, Eight Are Pseudogenes and Only One Is Required to Maintain Pyrimidine Homeostasis in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingjia; Herde, Marco; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2016-06-01

    CYTIDINE DEAMINASE (CDA) catalyzes the deamination of cytidine to uridine and ammonia in the catabolic route of C nucleotides. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CDA gene family comprises nine members, one of which (AtCDA) was shown previously in vitro to encode an active CDA. A possible role in C-to-U RNA editing or in antiviral defense has been discussed for other members. A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of plant CDA sequences, combined with biochemical functionality tests, strongly suggests that all Arabidopsis CDA family members except AtCDA are pseudogenes and that most plants only require a single CDA gene. Soybean (Glycine max) possesses three CDA genes, but only two encode functional enzymes and just one has very high catalytic efficiency. AtCDA and soybean CDAs are located in the cytosol. The functionality of AtCDA in vivo was demonstrated with loss-of-function mutants accumulating high amounts of cytidine but also CMP, cytosine, and some uridine in seeds. Cytidine hydrolysis in cda mutants is likely caused by NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) because cytosine accumulation is strongly reduced in a cda nsh1 double mutant. Altered responses of the cda mutants to fluorocytidine and fluorouridine indicate that a dual specific nucleoside kinase is involved in cytidine as well as uridine salvage. CDA mutants display a reduction in rosette size and have fewer leaves compared with the wild type, which is probably not caused by defective pyrimidine catabolism but by the accumulation of pyrimidine catabolism intermediates reaching toxic concentrations. PMID:27208239

  13. Genes associated with heavy metal tolerance and accumulation in Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri: a genomic survey with cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Huai-Chih; Lo, Jing-Chi; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2006-11-01

    To survive in variable soil conditions, plants possess homeostatic mechanisms to maintain a suitable concentration of essential heavy metal ions. Certain plants, inhabiting heavy metal-enriched or -contaminated soil, thus are named hyperaccumulators. Studying hyperaccumulators has great potential to provide information for phytoremediation. To better understand the hyperaccumulating mechanism, we used an Arabidopsis cDNA microarray to compare the gene expression of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and a nonhyperaccumulator, Arabidopsis thaliana. By analyzing the expression of metal-chelators, antioxidation-related genes, and transporters, we revealed a few novel molecular features. We found that metallothionein 2b and 3, APX and MDAR4 in the ascorbate-glutathione pathway, and certain metal transporters in P(1B)-type ATPase, ZIP, Nramp, and CDF families, are expressed at higher levels in A. halleri than in A. thaliana. We further validated that the enzymatic activity of ascorbate peroxidase and class III peroxidases are highly elevated in A. halleri. This observation positively correlates with the higher ability of A. halleri to detoxify H2O2 produced by cadmium and paraquat treatments. We thus suggest that higher peroxidase activities contribute to the heavy metal tolerance in A. halleri by alleviating the ROS damage. We have revealed genes that could be candidates for the future engineering of plants with large biomass for use in phytoremediation. PMID:17144312

  14. Factors affecting UV-B-induced changes in Arabidopsis thaliana L. gene expression: The role of development, protective pigments and the chloroplast signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression is known to change in response to UV-B radiation. In this paper, we have investigated three factors in Arabidopsis leaves that are likely to influence these changes: development, protective pigments and the 'chloroplast signal'. During late leaf development the major change in pigment composition, after exposure to UV-B radiation, is an increase in UV-absorbing pigments. Chl and Chl a/b ratio do not change substantially. Similarly Chl fluorescence is not altered. In contrast, RNA transcripts of photosynthetic proteins are reduced more in older leaves than in young leaves. To determine the role of flavonoids in UV-B protection, plants of Arabidopsis mutant tt-5, which have reduced flavonoids and sinapic esters, were exposed to UV-B and RNA transcript levels determined. The tt-mutants were more sensitive to UV-B radiation than wild-type. To examine the role of the chloroplast signal in regulating UV-B induced changes in gene expression, Arabidopsis gun mutants (genome uncoupled) have been used. The results show that UV-B-induced down-regulation still takes place in gun mutants and strongly suggests that the chloroplast signal is not required. Overall, this study clearly demonstrates that UV-B-induced changes in gene expression are influenced by both developmental and cellular factors but not chloroplastic factors

  15. The Opuntia streptacantha OpsHSP18 Gene Confers Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Jiménez-Bremont

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress limits seed germination, plant growth, flowering and fruit quality, causing economic decrease. Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs are chaperons with roles in stress tolerance. Herein, we report the functional characterization of a cytosolic class CI sHSP (OpsHSP18 from Opuntia streptacantha during seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines subjected to different stress and hormone treatments. The over-expression of the OpsHSP18 gene in A. thaliana increased the seed germination rate under salt (NaCl and osmotic (glucose and mannitol stress, and in ABA treatments, compared with WT. On the other hand, the over-expression of the OpsHSP18 gene enhanced tolerance to salt (150 mM NaCl and osmotic (274 mM mannitol stress in Arabidopsis seedlings treated during 14 and 21 days, respectively. These plants showed increased survival rates (52.00 and 73.33%, respectively with respect to the WT (18.75 and 53.75%, respectively. Thus, our results show that OpsHSP18 gene might have an important role in abiotic stress tolerance, in particular in seed germination and survival rate of Arabidopsis plants under unfavorable conditions.

  16. Thirty-seven transcription factor genes differentially respond to a harpin protein and affect resistance to the green peach aphid in Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruoxue Liu; Beibei Lü; Xiaomeng Wang; Chunling Zhang; Shuping Zhang; Jun Qian; Lei Chen; Haojie Shi; Hansong Dong

    2010-09-01

    The harpin protein HrpNEa induces Arabidopsis resistance to the green peach aphid by activating the ethylene signalling pathway and by recruiting EIN2, an essential regulator of ethylene signalling, for a defence response in the plant. We investigated 37 ethylene-inducible Arabidopsis transcription factor genes for their effects on the activation of ethylene signalling and insect defence. Twenty-eight of the 37 genes responded to both ethylene and HrpNEa, and showed either increased or inhibited transcription, while 18 genes showed increased transcription not only by ethylene but also by HrpNEa. In response to HrpNEa, transcription levels of 22 genes increased, with AtMYB44 being the most inducible, six genes had decreased transcript levels, and nine remained unchanged. When Arabidopsis mutants previously generated by mutagenicity at the 37 genes were surveyed, 24 mutants were similar to the wild type plant while four mutants were more resistant and nine mutants were more susceptible than wild type to aphid infestation. Aphid-susceptible mutants showed a greater susceptibility for atmyb15, atmyb38 and atmyb44, which were generated previously by T-DNA insertion into the exon region of AtMYB15 and the promoter regions of AtMYB38 and AtMYB44. The atmyb44 mutant was the most susceptible to aphid infestation and most compromised in induced resistance. Resistance accompanied the expression of PDF1.2, an ethylene signalling marker gene that requires EIN2 for transcription in wild type but not in atmyb15, atmyb38, and atmyb44, suggesting a disruption of ethylene signalling in the mutants. However, only atmyb44 incurred an abrogation in induced EIN2 expression, suggesting a close relationship between AtMYB44 and EIN2.

  17. Information flow during gene activation by signaling molecules: ethylene transduction in Arabidopsis cells as a study system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz José

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study root cells from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the communication channel conformed by the ethylene signal transduction pathway. A basic equation taken from our previous work relates the probability of expression of the gene ERF1 to the concentration of ethylene. Results The above equation is used to compute the Shannon entropy (H or degree of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has during the decoding of the message encoded by the ethylene specific receptors embedded in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and transmitted into the nucleus by the ethylene signaling pathway. We show that the amount of information associated with the expression of the master gene ERF1 (Ethylene Response Factor 1 can be computed. Then we examine the system response to sinusoidal input signals with varying frequencies to determine if the cell can distinguish between different regimes of information flow from the environment. Our results demonstrate that the amount of information managed by the root cell can be correlated with the frequency of the input signal. Conclusion The ethylene signaling pathway cuts off very low and very high frequencies, allowing a window of frequency response in which the nucleus reads the incoming message as a sinusoidal input. Out of this window the nucleus reads the input message as an approximately non-varying one. From this frequency response analysis we estimate: a the gain of the system during the synthesis of the protein ERF1 (~-5.6 dB; b the rate of information transfer (0.003 bits during the transport of each new ERF1 molecule into the nucleus and c the time of synthesis of each new ERF1 molecule (~21.3 s. Finally, we demonstrate that in the case of the system of a single master gene (ERF1 and a single slave gene (HLS1, the total Shannon entropy is completely determined by the uncertainty associated with the expression of the master gene. A second proposition shows that the Shannon entropy

  18. AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE genes have partly overlapping functions with AINTEGUMENTA but make distinct contributions to Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizek, Beth A

    2015-08-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) is an important regulator of Arabidopsis flower development that has overlapping functions with the related AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) gene in floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. Two other AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE (AIL) genes, AIL5 and AIL7, are expressed in developing flowers in spatial domains that partly overlap with those of ANT. Here, it is shown that AIL5 and AIL7 also act in a partially redundant manner with ANT. The results demonstrate that AIL genes exhibit unequal genetic redundancy with roles for AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 only revealed in the absence of ANT function. ant ail5 and ant ail7 double mutant flowers show alterations in floral organ positioning and growth, sepal fusion, and reductions in petal number. In ant ail5, petals are often replaced by filaments or dramatically reduced in size. ant ail7 double mutants produce increased numbers of carpels, which have defects in valve fusion and a loss of apical tissues. The distinct phenotypes of ant ail5, ant ail7 and the previously characterized ant ail6 indicate that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 make unique contributions to flower development. These distinct roles are also supported by genetic analyses of ant ail triple mutants. While ant ail5 ail6 triple mutants closely resemble ant ail6 double mutants, ant ail5 ail7 triple mutants exhibit more severe deviations from the wild type than either ant ail5 or ant ail7 double mutants. Furthermore, it is shown that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 act in a dose dependent manners in ant and other mutant backgrounds. PMID:25956884

  19. A three-component gene expression system and its application for inducible flavonoid overproduction in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Feng

    Full Text Available Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool to study and engineer genes whose overexpression could be detrimental for the host organisms. However, only limited systems have been adopted in plant biotechnology. We have developed an osmotically inducible system using three components of plant origin, RD29a (Responsive to Dehydration 29A promoter, CBF3 (C-repeat Binding Factor 3 transcription factor and cpl1-2 (CTD phosphatase-like 1 mutation. The osmotic stress responsible RD29a promoter contains the CBF3 binding sites and thus RD29A-CBF3 feedforward cassette enhances induction of RD29a promoter under stress. The cpl1-2 mutation in a host repressor CPL1 promotes stress responsible RD29a promoter expression. The efficacy of this system was tested using PAP1 (Production of Anthocyanin Pigment 1 transgene, a model transcription factor that regulates the anthocyanin pathway in Arabidopsis. While transgenic plants with only one or two of three components did not reproducibly accumulate anthocyanin pigments above the control level, transgenic cpl1 plants containing homozygous RD29a-PAP1 and RD29a-CBF3 transgenes produced 30-fold higher level of total anthocyanins than control plants upon cold treatment. Growth retardation and phytochemical production of transgenic plants were minimum under normal conditions. The flavonoid profile in cold-induced transgenic plants was determined by LC/MS/MS, which resembled that of previously reported pap1-D plants but enriched for kaempferol derivatives. These results establish the functionality of the inducible three-component gene expression system in plant metabolic engineering. Furthermore, we show that PAP1 and environmental signals synergistically regulate the flavonoid pathway to produce a unique flavonoid blend that has not been produced by PAP1 overexpression or cold treatment alone.

  20. Cloning and expression of AtPLC6, a gene encoding a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaojing; CAO Zhixiang; LIU Guoqin; Madan K. Bhattacharrya; REN Dongtao

    2004-01-01

    A full-length eDNA clone corresponding to a putative phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana by screening a cDNA library and using RT-PCR strategy. The cDNA, designated AtPLC6, encodes a putative polypeptide of 578 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 66251.84 D and a pI of 7.24. The sequence analysis indicates that the polypeptide contains X, Y, EF-hand and C2 domains. The overall structure of putative AtPLC6 protein, like other plant PI-PLCs, is most similar to that of mammalian PLC& The recombinant AtPLC6 protein expressed in E. coli was able to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biophosphate (PIP2) to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphate (IP3) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG). The protein hydrolyzes PIP2 in a Ca2+-dependent manner and the optimum concentration of Ca2+ is 10 μmol/L.These results suggested that AtPLC6 gene encodes a genuine PI-PLC. Northern blot analysis showed that the AtPLC6 gene is expressed at low level in all examined tissues, such as roots,stems, leaves, flowers, siliques and seedlings under normal growth conditions. The gene is strongly induced under low temperature and weakly induced under various stresses,such as ABA, high-salt stress and heat. These results suggested that AtPLC6 might be involved in the signal-transduction pathways of cold responses of the plants.

  1. Sugars and light/dark exposure trigger differential regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, L N; Déjardin, A; Kleczkowski, L A

    1998-12-15

    Expression of four Arabidopsis (thale cress) genes corresponding to the small (ApS) and large subunits (ApL1, ApL2, ApL3) of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a key enzyme of starch biosynthesis, was found to be profoundly and differentially regulated by sugar and light/dark exposures. Transcript levels of both ApL2 and ApL3, and to a lesser extent ApS, increased severalfold upon feeding sucrose or glucose to the detached leaves in the dark, whereas the mRNA content for ApL1 decreased under the same conditions. Glucose was, in general, less effective than sucrose in inducing regulation of AGPase genes, possibly due to observed limitations in its uptake when compared with sucrose uptake by detached leaves. Osmotic agents [sorbitol, poly(ethylene glycol)] had no effect on ApS, ApL2 and ApL3 transcript level, but they did mimic the effect of sucrose on ApL1 gene, suggesting that the latter is regulated by osmotic pressure rather than any particular sugar. For all the genes the sugar effect was closely mimicked by an exposure of the dark-pre-adapted leaves to the light. Under both dark and light conditions, sucrose fed to the detached leaves was found to be rapidly metabolized to hexoses and, to some extent, starch. Starch production reflected most probably an increase in substrate availability for AGPase reaction rather than being due to changes in AGPase protein content, since both the sugar feeding and light exposure had little or no effect on the activity of AGPase or on the levels of its small and large subunit proteins in leaf extracts. The data suggest tight translational or post-translational control, but they may also reflect spatial control of AGPase gene expression within a leaf. The sugar/light-dependent regulation of AGPase gene expression may represent a part of a general cellular response to the availability/allocation of carbohydrates during photosynthesis. PMID:9841881

  2. TNL-mediated immunity in Arabidopsis requires complex regulation of the redundant ADR1 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Oliver Xiaoou; Tong, Meixuezi; Bonardi, Vera; El Kasmi, Farid; Woloshen, Virginia; Wünsch, Lisa K; Dangl, Jeffery L; Li, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) serve as intracellular immune receptors in animals and plants. Sensor NLRs perceive pathogen-derived effector molecules and trigger robust host defense. Recent studies revealed the role of three coiled-coil-type NLRs (CNLs) of the ADR1 family - ADR1, ADR1-L1 and ADR1-L2 - as redundant helper NLRs, whose function is required for defense mediated by multiple sensor NLRs. From a mutant snc1-enhancing (MUSE) forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis targeted to identify negative regulators of snc1 that encodes a TIR-type NLR (TNL), we isolated two alleles of muse15, both carrying mutations in ADR1-L1. Interestingly, loss of ADR1-L1 also enhances immunity-related phenotypes in other autoimmune mutants including cpr1, bal and lsd1. This immunity-enhancing effect is not mediated by increased SNC1 protein stability, nor is it fully dependent on the accumulation of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA). Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulation of ADR1 and ADR1-L2 in the adr1-L1 background, which may overcompensate the loss of ADR1-L1, resulting in enhanced immunity. Interestingly, autoimmunity of snc1 and chs2, which encode typical TNLs, is fully suppressed by the adr1 triple mutant, suggesting that the ADRs are required for TNL downstream signaling. This study extends our knowledge on the interplay among ADRs and reveals their complexity in defense regulation. PMID:27074399

  3. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...

  4. Constitutive expression of the barley dehydrin gene aba2 enhances Arabidopsis germination in response to salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Calestani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dehydrins (DHNs are a sub-family of the late embryogenesis abundant proteins generally induced during development of desiccation tolerance in seeds and water deficit or salinity stress in plants. Nevertheless, a detailed understanding of the DHNs function is still lacking. In this work we investigated the possible protective role during salt stress of a Dhn from Hordeum vulgare (L., aba2. The coding sequence of the aba2 gene was constitutively expressed in transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.. During salt stress conditions germination rate, cotyledon expansion and greening were greatly improved in the transgenic lines as compared to the wild type. Between 98 and 100% of the transgenic seeds germinated after two weeks in media containing up to 250 mM NaCl, and 90% after 22 days at 300 mM NaCl. In conditions of 200 mM NaCl 93% of the transgenic cotyledons had greened after two weeks, outperforming the wild type by 45%. Our study provides further evidence that DHNs have an important role in salt stress tolerance. The production of plants constitutively expressing DHNs could be an effective strategy to improve plant breeding programs.

  5. A Sweetpotato Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate Synthase Gene, IbGGPS, Increases Carotenoid Content and Enhances Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Sweetpotato highly produces carotenoids in storage roots. In this study, a cDNA encoding geranylgeranyl phyrophosphate synthase (GGPS, named IbGGPS, was isolated from sweetpotato storage roots. Green fluorescent protein (GFP was fused to the C-terminus of IbGGPS to obtain an IbGGPS-GFP fusion protein that was transiently expressed in both epidermal cells of onion and leaves of tobacco. Confocal microscopic analysis determined that the IbGGPS-GFP protein was localized to specific areas of the plasma membrane of onion and chloroplasts in tobacco leaves. The coding region of IbGGPS was cloned into a binary vector under the control of 35S promoter and then transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana to obtain transgenic plants. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis showed a significant increase of total carotenoids in transgenic plants. The seeds of transgenic and wild-type plants were germinated on an agar medium supplemented with polyethylene glycol (PEG. Transgenic seedlings grew significantly longer roots than wild-type ones did. Further enzymatic analysis showed an increased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD in transgenic seedlings. In addition, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA was reduced in transgenics. qRT-PCR analysis showed altered expressions of several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis in transgenic plants. These data results indicate that IbGGPS is involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in sweetpotato storage roots and likely associated with tolerance to osmotic stress.

  6. A Rice Immunophilin Gene, OsFKBP16-3, Confers Tolerance to Environmental Stress in Arabidopsis and Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cheul Ahn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The putative thylakoid lumen immunophilin, FKBP16-3, has not yet been characterized, although this protein is known to be regulated by thioredoxin and possesses a well-conserved CxxxC motif in photosynthetic organisms. Here, we characterized rice OsFKBP16-3 and examined the role of this gene in the regulation of abiotic stress in plants. FKBP16-3s are well conserved in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms, including the presence of a unique disulfide-forming CxxxC motif in their N-terminal regions. OsFKBP16-3 was mainly expressed in rice leaf tissues and was upregulated by various abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, high light, hydrogen peroxide, heat and methyl viologen. The chloroplast localization of OsFKBP16-3-GFP was confirmed through the transient expression of OsFKBP16-3 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Transgenic Arabidopsis and transgenic rice plants that constitutively expressed OsFKBP16-3 exhibited increased tolerance to salinity, drought and oxidative stresses, but showed no change in growth or phenotype, compared with vector control plants, when grown under non-stressed conditions. This is the first report to demonstrate the potential role of FKBP16-3 in the environmental stress response, which may be regulated by a redox relay process in the thylakoid lumen, suggesting that artificial regulation of FKBP16-3 expression is a candidate for stress-tolerant crop breeding.

  7. A Rice Immunophilin Gene, OsFKBP16-3, Confers Tolerance to Environmental Stress in Arabidopsis and Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Ji; Lee, Sang Sook; You, Young Nim; Yoon, Dae Hwa; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2013-01-01

    The putative thylakoid lumen immunophilin, FKBP16-3, has not yet been characterized, although this protein is known to be regulated by thioredoxin and possesses a well-conserved CxxxC motif in photosynthetic organisms. Here, we characterized rice OsFKBP16-3 and examined the role of this gene in the regulation of abiotic stress in plants. FKBP16-3s are well conserved in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms, including the presence of a unique disulfide-forming CxxxC motif in their N-terminal regions. OsFKBP16-3 was mainly expressed in rice leaf tissues and was upregulated by various abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, high light, hydrogen peroxide, heat and methyl viologen. The chloroplast localization of OsFKBP16-3-GFP was confirmed through the transient expression of OsFKBP16-3 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Transgenic Arabidopsis and transgenic rice plants that constitutively expressed OsFKBP16-3 exhibited increased tolerance to salinity, drought and oxidative stresses, but showed no change in growth or phenotype, compared with vector control plants, when grown under non-stressed conditions. This is the first report to demonstrate the potential role of FKBP16-3 in the environmental stress response, which may be regulated by a redox relay process in the thylakoid lumen, suggesting that artificial regulation of FKBP16-3 expression is a candidate for stress-tolerant crop breeding. PMID:23485991

  8. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  9. Neutralization of Bacterial YoeBSpn Toxicity and Enhanced Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana via Co-Expression of the Toxin-Antitoxin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have various cellular functions, including as part of the general stress response. The genome of the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors several putative TA systems, including yefM-yoeBSpn, which is one of four systems that had been demonstrated to be biologically functional. Overexpression of the yoeBSpn toxin gene resulted in cell stasis and eventually cell death in its native host, as well as in Escherichia coli. Our previous work showed that induced expression of a yoeBSpn toxin-Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusion gene apparently triggered apoptosis and was lethal in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-expression of the yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic A. thaliana. When co-expressed in Arabidopsis, the YefMSpn antitoxin was found to neutralize the toxicity of YoeBSpn-GFP. Interestingly, the inducible expression of both yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic hybrid Arabidopsis resulted in larger rosette leaves and taller plants with a higher number of inflorescence stems and increased silique production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a prokaryotic antitoxin neutralizing its cognate toxin in plant cells. PMID:27104531

  10. The arabidopsis wall associated kinase-like 10 gene encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase and is co-expressed with pathogen defense related genes

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2010-01-26

    Background: Second messengers have a key role in linking environmental stimuli to physiological responses. One such messenger, guanosine 3?,5?-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), has long been known to be an essential signaling molecule in many different physiological processes in higher plants, including biotic stress responses. To date, however, the guanylyl cyclase (GC) enzymes that catalyze the formation of cGMP from GTP have largely remained elusive in higher plants. Principal Findings: We have identified an Arabidopsis receptor type wall associated kinase-like molecule (AtWAKL10) as a candidate GC and provide experimental evidence to show that the intracellular domain of AtWAKL10431-700 can generate cGMP in vitro. Further, we also demonstrate that the molecule has kinase activity indicating that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain catalytic protein. A co-expression and stimulus-specific expression analysis revealed that AtWAKL10 is consistently coexpressed with well characterized pathogen defense related genes and along with these genes is induced early and sharply in response to a range of pathogens and their elicitors. Conclusions: We demonstrate that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain, kinase-GC signaling molecule that may function in biotic stress responses that are critically dependent on the second messenger cGMP. © 2010 Meier et al.

  11. NAC genes: Time-specific regulators of hormonal signaling in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Kjærsgaard, Trine; Petersen, Klaus;

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stresses on both animals and plants impose massive transcriptional perturbations. Successful adaptations to such stresses are being orchestrated by both activating and repressing effects of transcription factors on specific target genes. We have recently published a systematic chara...... genes upon stimuli with seven phytohormones. Our analysis could be a first indication of NAC-centered transcriptional networks, which coordinate timely hormonal signaling in plants.......Environmental stresses on both animals and plants impose massive transcriptional perturbations. Successful adaptations to such stresses are being orchestrated by both activating and repressing effects of transcription factors on specific target genes. We have recently published a systematic...

  12. The genomic landscape of meiotic crossovers and gene conversions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wijnker, E.; likkakam James, G. Ve; Ding, J.; Becker, F; Klasen, J.R.; V. Rawat; Rowan, B.A.; Jong, D.F. de; Snoo, C.B. de; Zapata, L.; Huettel, B.; de Jong, H; Ossowski, S.; Weigel, D; Koornneef, M

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest Most living organisms package their DNA into bundles called chromosomes. These chromosomes generally form pairs, with each chromosome in the pair containing the same number of genes. The genes also come in the same order, but the exact sequence of DNA bases within the genes can be different. When sex cells—such as egg, sperm or pollen cells—are made, each pair of chromosomes is separated so that the each sex cell contains only half the normal number of chromosomes. However, befor...

  13. Two Poplar Glycosyltransferase Genes, PdGATL1.1 and PdGATL1.2, Are Functional Orthologs to PARVUS/AtGATL 1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingzhen Kong; Gongke Zhou; Utku Avci; Xiaogang Gu; Chelsea Jones; Yanbin Yin; Ying Xu; Michael G. Hahn

    2009-01-01

    Several genes in Arabidopsis, including PARVUS/AtGATL1, have been implicated in xylan synthesis. However, the biosynthesis of xylan in woody plants, where this polysaccharide is a major component of wood, is poorly understood. Here, we characterize two Populus genes, PdGATL1.1 and PdGATL1.2, the closest orthologs to the Arabidopsis PARVUS/GATL 1 gene, with respect to their gene expression in poplar, their sub-cellular localization, and their ability to complement the parvus mutation in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of the two poplar genes in the parvus mutant rescued most of the defects caused by the parvus mutation, including morphological changes, collapsed xylem, and altered cell wall mono-saccharide composition. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PdGATL1.1 is expressed most strongly in developing xylem of poplar. In contrast, PdGATL1.2 is expressed much more uniformly in leaf, shoot tip, cortex, phloem, and xylem, and the transcript level of PdGATL1.2 is much lower than that of PdGATL1.1 in all tissues examined. Sub-cellular localization experi-ments showed that these two proteins are localized to both ER and Golgi in comparison with marker proteins resident to these sub-cellular compartments. Our data indicate that PdGATLI.1 and PdGATL1.2 are functional orthologs of PARVUS/ GATL1 and can play a role in xylan synthesis, but may also have role(s) in the synthesis of other wall polymers.

  14. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H;

    2001-01-01

    resembling the expression pattern of late embryogenic abundant ABA-responsive genes. Differential expression of the two genes during plant development was confirmed in plants expressing transcriptional fusions between the two promoters and the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. This showed...... that, whereas high expression of AtCRL1 in mature seeds declines during subsequent vegetative growth, transcriptional activity from the AtCRL2 promoter increases during vegetative growth. Expression of both genes is restricted to vascular tissue. Based upon their homology to proteins involved in lignin...... synthesis, we propose that AtCRL2 is involved in generating conducting tissue late in development, while AtCRL1 is involved in vascular tissue differentiation and/or synthesis in the germinating embryos....

  15. A KH Domain-Containing Putative RNA-Binding Protein Is Critical for Heat Stress-Responsive Gene Regulation and Thermotolerance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingmei Guan; Changlong Wen; Haitao Zeng; Jianhua Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Heat stress is a severe environmental factor that significantly reduces plant growth and delays development.Heat stress factors (HSFs) are a class of transcription factors that are synthesized rapidly in response to elevations in temperature and are responsible for the transcription of many heat stress-responsive genes including those encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs).There are 21 HSFs in Arabidopsis,and recent studies have established that the HSFA1 family members are master regulators for the remaining HSFs.However,very little is known about upstream molecular factors that control the expression of HSFA1 genes and other HSF genes under heat stress.Through a forward genetic analysis,we identified RCF3,a K homology (KH) domain-containing nuclear-localized putative RNA-binding protein.RCF3 is a negative regulator of most HSFs,including HSFAla,HSFAlb,and HSFAld.In contrast,RCF3 positively controls the expression of HSFAle,HSFA3,HSFA9,HSFB3,and DREB2C.Consistently with the overall increased accumulation of heat-responsive genes,the rcf3 mutant plants are more tolerant than the wild-type to heat stress.Together,our results suggest that a KH domain-containing putative RNA-binding protein RCF3 is an important upstream regulator for heat stress-responsive gene expression and thermotolerance in Arabidopsis.

  16. Comparison of Flowering Time Genes in Brassica Rapa, B. Napus and Arabidopsis Thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, T C; Kole, C; Parkin, IAP.; Sharpe, A. G.; Kuiper, M.; Lydiate, D J; Trick, M.

    1997-01-01

    The major difference between annual and biennial cultivars of oilseed Brassica napus and B. rapa is conferred by genes controlling vernalization-responsive flowering time. These genes were compared between the species by aligning the map positions of flowering time quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected in a segregating population of each species. The results suggest that two major QTLs identified in B. rapa correspond to two major QTLs identified in B. napus. Since B. rapa is one of the hyp...

  17. Functional Dissection of Sugar Signals Affecting Gene Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Kunz; Edouard Pesquet; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sugars modulate expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Previous studies on sugar signaling, using intact plants or plant tissues, were hampered by tissue heterogeneity, uneven sugar transport and/or inter-conversions of the applied sugars. This, in turn, could obscure the identity of a specific sugar that acts as a signal affecting expression of given gene in a given tissue or cell-type. Methodology/Principal Findings: To bypass those biases, we have developed a novel biologic...

  18. Involvement of hormones and KNOXI genes in early Arabidopsis seedling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucek, Premysl; Klíma, Petr; Reková, Alena; Brzobohatý, Bretislav

    2007-01-01

    Plant hormones control plant development by modulating the expression of regulatory genes, including homeobox-containing KNOXI genes. However, much remains to be elucidated about the interactions involved. Therefore, hormonal regulation of KNOXI gene expression was investigated using hormone applications and an inducible transgenic ipt expression system to increase endogenous cytokinin (CK) levels. Treatments with auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, ethylene, and gibberellin (GA) did not result in ectopic expression of the BP (BREVIPEDICELLUS) gene. However, BP expression was strongly reduced by ABA, increased by auxin treatment (correlating with the initiation of lateral root meristems, which strongly express BP), and did not significantly respond to short-term treatments with the other hormones in whole seedlings. Following short-term ipt activation, organ-specific differential regulation of KNOXI gene expression was observed. While several KNOXI genes were transiently up-regulated to low levels, STM was selectively repressed (especially at low light) in hypocotyls. In cotyledons, activation of CK-responsive genes preceded ipt induction, suggesting that CKs are transported more rapidly than the inducing agent (dexamethasone). Long-term increases in CK levels induced raised levels of several KNOXI transcripts in hypocotyls, correlating with the radial expansion of vascular tissues, the main domains of KNOXI gene expression, suggesting that CKs had little effect on KNOXI promoter activity. No alterations in hormone sensitivity were observed in a bp null mutant. Constitutive BP overexpression caused reductions in the length and number of lateral roots, while the primary root remained unaffected. The transgenic seedlings displayed weak, but significant, alterations in sensitivity to ABA, CK, and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. PMID:17951601

  19. The WIGGUM gene is required for proper regulation of floral meristem size in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Running, Mark P; Fletcher, Jennifer C; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    1998-01-01

    The study of cell division control within developing tissues is central to understanding the processes of pattern formation. The floral meristem of angiosperms gives rise to floral organs in a particular number and pattern. Despite its critical role, little is known about how cell division is controlled in the floral meristem, and few genes involved have been identified. We describe the phenotypic effects of mutations in WIGGUM, a gene required for control of cell proliferation in the floral ...

  20. Specific changes in the Arabidopsis proteome in response to bacterial challenge: differentiating basal and R-gene mediated resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexandra M E; Thomas, Vincent; Truman, Bill; Lilley, Kathryn; Mansfield, John; Grant, Murray

    2004-06-01

    Alterations in the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves during early responses to challenge by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000) were analysed using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Protein changes characteristic of the establishment of basal resistance and R-gene mediated resistance were examined by comparing responses to DC3000, a hrp mutant and DC3000 expressing avrRpm1 respectively. The abundance of selected transcripts was also analysed in GeneChip experiments. Here we present data from the soluble fraction of leaf protein, highlighting changes in two antioxidant enzyme groups; the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs F2, F6, F7 and F8) and peroxiredoxins (PrxA, B and IIE). Members of both enzyme groups showed signs of specific post-translational modifications, represented by multiple spots on gels. We suggest that oxidation of specific residues is responsible for some of the spot shifts. All forms of the GST proteins identified here increased following inoculation with bacteria. GSTF8 showed particularly dynamic responses to pathogen challenge, the corresponding transcript was significantly up-regulated by 2 h after inoculation, and the protein showed post-translational modifications specific to an incompatible interaction. Differential changes were observed with the peroxiredoxin proteins; PrxIIE and to a lesser extent PrxB, no change was observed with PrxA, but a truncated form PrxA-L was greatly reduced in abundance following bacterial challenges. Our data suggest that bacterial challenge generally induces Prxs and the antioxidants GSTs, however individual members of these families may be specifically modified dependent upon the virulence of the DC3000 strain and outcome of the interaction. Finally, proteomic and transcriptomic data derived from the same inoculation system are compared and the advantages offered by 2D gel analysis discussed in light of our results. PMID:15276439

  1. An ABA down-regulated bHLH transcription repressor gene, bHLH129 regulates root elongation and ABA response when overexpressed in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hainan; Guo, Hongyan; Dai, Xuemei; Cheng, Yuxin; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a crucial role in modulating plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are one of the largest transcription factor families that regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, as well as of plant metabolism in Arabidopsis. Several bHLH transcription factors have been shown to be involved in the regulation of ABA signaling. We report here the characterization of bHLH129, a bHLH transcription factor in Arabidopsis. We found that the expression level of bHLH129 was reduced in response to exogenously applied ABA, and elevated in the ABA biosynthesis mutant aba1-5. Florescence observation of transgenic plants expressing bHLH129-GFP showed that bHLH129 was localized in the nucleus, and transient expression of bHLH129 in protoplasts inhibited reporter gene expression. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of the 35S promoter, bHLH129 promoted root elongation, and the transgenic plants were less sensitivity to ABA in root elongation assays. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that ABA response of several genes involved in ABA signaling, including ABI1, SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3 and SnRK2.6 were altered in the transgenic plants overexpressing bHLH129. Taken together, our study suggests that bHLH129 is a transcription repressor that negatively regulates ABA response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26625868

  2. PpCBF3 from Cold-Tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass Involved in Freezing Tolerance Associated with Up-Regulation of Cold-Related Genes in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhuang

    Full Text Available Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding proteins (DREB/C-repeat (CRT Binding Factors (CBF have been identified as transcriptional activators during plant responses to cold stress. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological roles of a CBF gene isolated from a cold-tolerant perennial grass species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., which designated as PpCBF3, in regulating plant tolerance to freezing stress. Transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplast with PpCBF3-eGFP fused protein showed that PpCBF3 was localized to the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpCBF3 was specifically induced by cold stress (4°C but not by drought stress [induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 solution (PEG-6000] or salt stress (150 mM NaCl. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing PpCBF3 showed significant improvement in freezing (-20°C tolerance demonstrated by a lower percentage of chlorotic leaves, lower cellular electrolyte leakage (EL and H2O2 and O2.- content, and higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency compared to the wild type. Relative mRNA expression level analysis by qRT-PCR indicated that the improved freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PpCBF3 was conferred by sustained activation of downstream cold responsive (COR genes. Other interesting phenotypic changes in the PpCBF3-transgenic Arabidopsis plants included late flowering and slow growth or 'dwarfism', both of which are desirable phenotypic traits for perennial turfgrasses. Therefore, PpCBF3 has potential to be used in genetic engineering for improvement of turfgrass freezing tolerance and other desirable traits.

  3. Temporal relationship between the transcription of two Arabidopsis MADS box genes and the floral organ identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidge, B; Rounsley, S D; Yanofsky, M F

    1995-06-01

    MADS box genes play important roles in specifying floral meristem and floral organ identity. We characterized the temporal and spatial expression patterns of two members of this gene family, AGL4 and AGL5 (for AGAMOUS [AG]-like). AGL4 RNA initially accumulates after the onset of expression of the floral meristem identity genes but before the onset of expression of the floral organ identity genes. AGL4 is, therefore, a putative target of the floral meristem identity genes and/or a potential regulator of the floral organ identity genes. AGL5 is initially expressed early in carpel development, shortly after the onset of AG expression. The loss of AGL5 expression in flowers of ag mutants, the activation of AGL5 by ectopic expression of AG, and the specific binding of AG to an element in the AGL5 promoter identify AGL5 as a putative direct target of AG. Our study provides possible links between the establishment of floral meristem and floral organ identity as well as subsequent steps in flower development. PMID:7647563

  4. Expression of a subset of the Arabidopsis Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger protein gene family under water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, H; Araki, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-05-01

    The genes encoding Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger proteins constitute a large family in higher plants. To elucidate the functional roles of these types of protein, four different members of the gene family were cloned from Arabidopsis by PCR-aided methods. One was identical to the already reported gene STZ/ZAT10 and three were as yet unidentified genes, then designated AZF1 (Arabidopsis zinc-finger protein 1), AZF2 and AZF3. The AZF- and STZ-encoded proteins contain two canonical Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger motifs, separated by a long spacer. Three conserved regions, named B-box, L-box, and DNL-box, were also recognized outside the zinc-finger motifs, as in other members of the two-fingered Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger protein family. These four genes were positioned on the same branch of a phylogenetic tree constructed based on the zinc-finger motif sequences, suggesting their structural and functional relationship. RNA blot analysis showed that all four genes were mainly expressed in roots and at different levels in other organs. Expression of the four genes responded to water stress. High-salt treatment resulted in elevated levels of expression of all of these genes. Low-temperature treatment increased the expression levels of AZF1, AZF3, and STZ, but not AZF2. Only AZF2 expression was strongly induced by ABA treatment, where the time course of the induction was similar to that caused by high salinity. In situ localization showed that AZF2 mRNA accumulated in the elongation zone of the roots under the salt-stress condition. These results suggest that AZF1, AZF2, AZF3, and STZ are all involved in the water-stress response in an ABA-dependent or -independent pathway to regulate downstream genes. PMID:10806347

  5. THE ROLE OF THE SLEEPY1 (SLY1) F-BOX GENE IN GA REGULATION OF SEED GERMINATION IN ARABIDOPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, June 28-July 2, 2006, Madison, WI. Abstract #378. Seed germination is a complex developmental process regulated by phytohormones. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits seed germination, whereas gibberellin (GA) stimulates seed germinat...

  6. Ectopic Expression of Arabidopsis Phospholipase A Genes Elucidates Role of Phospholipase Bs in S. cerevisiae Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Yan; Giblin, E Michael; Taylor, David C.

    2009-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae neither disruption of the phospholipase B triple knockout mutant (plb1plb2plb3; plb123) nor over-expression of phospholipase Bs (PLBs) result in a phenotype different from wild type. In performing experiments to characterize candidate plant phospholipase (PLA) genes, we found, surprisingly, that ectopic expression of either of two different A. thaliana PLA2 or PLA1 genes in the yeast plb123 mutant completely inhibited cell growth. We proposed that while PLBs might not be esse...

  7. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment. miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted. PMID:26526683

  8. Nucleotide sequence of psbQ gene for 16-kDa protein of oxygen-evolving complex from Arabidopsis thaliana and regulation of its expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, M; Gaur, T; Kochhar, A; Maheshwari, S C; Tyagi, A K

    1999-06-30

    The psbQ gene encoding a 16-kDa polypeptide of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana and characterized. The gene consists of a 28 nucleotide long leader sequence, two introns and three exons encoding a 223-amino-acid precursor polypeptide. The first 75 amino acids act as a transit peptide for the translocation of the polypeptide into the thylakoid lumen. Expression studies show that the gene is light-inducible and expresses only in green tissues with high steady-state mRNA levels in leaves. Using this gene as a probe, restriction fragment length polymorphism between two ecotypes, Columbia and Estland, has also been detected. PMID:10470848

  9. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) peroxidase gene in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana enhances resistance to NaCl and H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, K; Xiao, G Z; Guo, W E; Yuan, J B; Li, J; Chao, Y H; Han, L B

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases (PODs) are enzymes that play important roles in catalyzing the reduction of H2O2 and the oxidation of various substrates. They function in many different and important biological processes, such as defense mechanisms, immune responses, and pathogeny. The POD genes have been cloned and identified in many plants, but their function in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is not known, to date. Based on the POD gene sequence (GenBank accession No. L36157.1), we cloned the POD gene in alfalfa, which was named MsPOD. MsPOD expression increased with increasing H2O2. The gene was expressed in all of the tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, particularly in stems and leaves under light/dark conditions. A subcellular analysis showed that MsPOD was localized outside the cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis with MsPOD exhibited increased resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. Moreover, POD activity in the transgenic plants was significantly higher than that in wild-type Arabidopsis. These results show that MsPOD plays an important role in resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. PMID:27323080

  10. Gene Networks and Chromatin and Transcriptional Regulation of the Phaseolin Promoter in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sundaram, S.; Kertbundit, Sunee; Shakirov, E.; Iyer, L.M.; Juříček, Miloslav; Hall, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 7 (2013), s. 2601-2617. ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : SEED MATURATION GENES * ABSCISIC-ACID * RNA-SEQ Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.575, year: 2013

  11. Epigenetic repression of male gametophyte-specific genes in the Arabidopsis sporophyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Robert D; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2013-01-01

    -regulated in the sporophyte has yet to be established. In this study, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of publicly available genome-wide epigenetics data of several sporophytic tissues. By combining this analysis with DNase I footprinting data, we assessed means by which the repression of pollen-specific genes...

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Arabidopsis Wild-Type and g13-sst sim Trichomes Identifies Four Additional Genes Required for Trichome Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.David Marks; Jonathan R Wenger; Edward Gilding; Ross Jilk; Richard A.Dixon

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses have been performed on mature trichomes isolated from wild-type Arabidopsis leaves and on leaf trichomes isolated from the g13-sst sire double mutant,which exhibit many attributes of immature trichomes.The mature trichome profile contained many highly expressed genes involved in cell wall synthesis,protein turnover,and abiotic stress response.The most highly expressed genes in the g13-sst sim profile encoded ribosomal proteins and other proteins involved in translation.Comparative analyses showed that all but one of the genes encoding transcription factors previously found to be important for trichome formation,and many other trichome-important genes,were preferentially expressed in g13-sstsim trichomes.The analysis of genes preferentially expressed in g13-sstsim led to the identification of four additional genes required for normal trichome development.One of these was the HDG2 gene,which is a member of the HD-ZIP IV transcription factor gene family.Mutations in this gene did not alter trichome expansion,but did alter mature trichome cell walls.Mutations in BLT resulted in a loss of trichome branch formation.The relationship between bit and the phenotypically identical mutant,sti,was explored.Mutations in PEL3,which was previously shown to be required for development of the leaf cuticle,resulted in the occasional tangling of expanding trichomes.Mutations in another gene encoding a protein with an unknown function altered trichome branch formation.

  13. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  14. RcLEA, a late embryogenesis abundant protein gene isolated from Rosa chinensis, confers tolerance to Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana and stabilizes enzyme activity under diverse stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Songchong; Jiang, Changhua; Wang, Yaofeng; Lv, Bo; Shen, Jiabin; Ming, Feng

    2014-07-01

    The late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family is a large protein family that is closely associated with resistance to abiotic stresses in many organisms, such as plants, bacteria and animals. In this study, we isolated a LEA gene, RcLEA, which was cytoplasm-localized, from Rosa chinensis. RcLEA was found to be induced by high temperature through RT-PCR. Overexpression of RcLEA in Escherichia coli improved its growth performance compared with the control under high temperature, low temperature, NaCl and oxidative stress conditions. RcLEA was also overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed better growth after high and low temperature treatment and exhibited less peroxide according to 3, 3-diaminobenzidine staining. However, RcLEA did not improve the tolerance to NaCl or osmotic stress in Arabidopsis. In vitro analysis showed that RcLEA was able to prevent the freeze-thaw-induced inactivation or heat-induced aggregation of various substrates, such as lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. It also protected the proteome of E. coli from denaturation when the proteins were heat-shocked or subjected to acidic conditions. Furthermore, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays suggested that RcLEA proteins function in a complex manner by making the form of homodimers. PMID:24760474

  15. Effects of biosurfactants on assays of PCB congeners in transgenic arabidopsis plants carrying a recombinant guinea pig AhR-mediated GUS reporter gene expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Sayuri; Ohta, Masaya; Inui, Hideyuki; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Hitoshi; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2010-11-01

    The transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying a recombinant guinea pig (g) aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene expression system were generated for assays of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. The selected transgenic Arabidopsis plant XgD2V11-6 exhibited a correlation between uptake of PCB126 and PCB126-induced GUS activity. Also, the plants showed induced GUS activity towards the supplemental indole 3-acetic acid (IAA). Thus, the GUS assay may reflect induction by both endogenous and exogenous AhR ligands. When biosurfactants, MEL-B, produced in the culture of yeast isolated from plants were used for assays of PCB congeners in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, they showed marked PCB126 dose-dependent and toxic equivalency factor (TEF) dependent GUS activities. The effects of biosurfactants were clearer when the plants were cultivated on soils containing PCB congeners for 7 days as compared with on soils for 3 days as well as in the medium for 3 days. Therefore, it was estimated that biosurfactants form micellae with PCB congeners, which are easily uptaken by the plants in a mode of passive diffusion, transport into the aerial parts and then induce GUS activity. PMID:20936563

  16. Ectopic overexpression of castor bean LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) in Arabidopsis triggers the expression of genes that encode regulators of seed maturation and oil body proteins in vegetative tissues ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun Uk Kim; Su-Jin Jung; Kyeong-Ryeol Lee; Eun Ha Kim; Sang-Min Lee; Kyung Hee Roh; Jong-Bum Kim

    2013-01-01

    The LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) gene plays critically important regulatory roles during both early and late embryonic development. Here, we report the identification of the LEC2 gene from the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis), and characterize the effects of its overexpression on gene regulation and lipid metabolism in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. LEC2 exists as a single-copy gene in castor bean, is expressed predominantly in embryos, and encodes a protein with a conserved B3 domain, but dif...

  17. An in silico assessment of gene function and organization of the phenylpropanoid pathway metabolic networks in Arabidopsis thaliana and limitations thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Michael A.; Collins, R. Eric; Anterola, Aldwin M.; Cochrane, Fiona C.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequencing in 2000 gave to science the first blueprint of a vascular plant. Its successful completion also prompted the US National Science Foundation to launch the Arabidopsis 2010 initiative, the goal of which is to identify the function of each gene by 2010. In this study, an exhaustive analysis of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) and The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) databases, together with all currently compiled EST sequence data, was carried out in order to determine to what extent the various metabolic networks from phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) to the monolignols were organized and/or could be predicted. In these databases, there are some 65 genes which have been annotated as encoding putative enzymatic steps in monolignol biosynthesis, although many of them have only very low homology to monolignol pathway genes of known function in other plant systems. Our detailed analysis revealed that presently only 13 genes (two PALs, a cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, a p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, a ferulate-5-hydroxylase, three 4-coumarate-CoA ligases, a cinnamic acid O-methyl transferase, two cinnamoyl-CoA reductases) and two cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases can be classified as having a bona fide (definitive) function; the remaining 52 genes currently have undetermined physiological roles. The EST database entries for this particular set of genes also provided little new insight into how the monolignol pathway was organized in the different tissues and organs, this being perhaps a consequence of both limitations in how tissue samples were collected and in the incomplete nature of the EST collections. This analysis thus underscores the fact that even with genomic sequencing, presumed to provide the entire suite of putative genes in the monolignol-forming pathway, a very large effort needs to be conducted to establish actual catalytic roles (including enzyme versatility), as well as the physiological function(s) for each member

  18. A new role for the SHATTERPROOF genes during Arabidopsis gynoecium development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Monica; Brambilla, Vittoria; Marcheselli, Riccardo; Caporali, Elisabetta; Kater, Martin M; Colombo, Lucia

    2010-01-15

    Gynoecium development is a complex process which is regulated by key factors that control the spatial formation of the apical, medial and basal parts. SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1) and SHP2, two closely related MADS-box genes, redundantly control the differentiation of the dehiscence zone and promote the lignification of adjacent cells. Furthermore, SHP1 and SHP2 have shown to play an important role in ovule identity determination. The present work identifies a new function for these two genes in promoting stigma, style and medial tissue development. This new role was discovered by combining the shp1 shp2 double mutant with the aintegumenta (ant) and crabs claw (crc) mutants. In quadruple mutant flowers, the inner whorl is composed of unfused carpels which lack almost completely apical and medial tissues, a phenotype similar to the previously reported fil ant and lug ant double mutants. PMID:19900437

  19. Paenibacillus yonginensis DCY84(T) induces changes in Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression against aluminum, drought, and salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukweenadhi, Johan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Eul-Su; Koh, Sung-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Yu-Jin; Yang, Deok Chun

    2015-03-01

    Current agricultural production methods, for example the improper use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, create many health and environmental problems. Use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) for agricultural benefits is increasing worldwide and also appears to be a trend for the future. There is possibility to develop microbial inoculants for use in agricultural biotechnology, based on these beneficial plant-microbe interactions. For this study, ten bacterial strains were isolated from Yongin forest soil for which in vitro plant-growth promoting trait screenings, such as indole acetic acid (IAA) production, a phosphate solubilization test, and a siderophore production test were used to select two PGPB candidates. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were inoculated with Paenibacillus yonginensis DCY84(T) and Micrococcus yunnanensis PGPB7. Salt stress, drought stress and heavy metal (aluminum) stress challenges indicated that P. yonginensis DCY84(T)-inoculated plants were more resistant than control plants. AtRSA1, AtVQ9 and AtWRKY8 were used as the salinity responsive genes. The AtERD15, AtRAB18, and AtLT178 were selected to check A. thaliana responses to drought stress. Aluminum stress response was checked using AtAIP, AtALS3 and AtALMT1. The qRT-PCR results indicated that P. yonginensis DCY84(T) can promote plant tolerance against salt, drought, and aluminum stress. P. yonginensis DCY84(T) also showed positive results during in vitro compatibility testing and virulence assay against X. oryzae pv. oryzae Philippine race 6 (PXO99). Better germination rates and growth parameters were also recorded for the P. yonginensis DCY84(T) Chuchung cultivar rice seed which was grown on coastal soil collected from Suncheon. Based on these results, P. yonginensis DCY84(T) can be used as a promising PGPB isolate for crop improvement. PMID:25721473

  20. An Arabidopsis tissue-specific RNAi method for studying genes essential to mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Rivera, Brunilís; Dawe, R Kelly

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the genes in plants can be considered essential in the sense that when absent the plant fails to develop past the first few cell divisions. The fact that angiosperms pass through a haploid gametophyte stage can make it challenging to propagate such mutants even in the heterozygous condition. Here we describe a tissue-specific RNAi method that allows us to visualize cell division phenotypes in petals, which are large dispensable organs. Portions of the APETALA (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) promoters confer early petal-specific expression. We show that when either promoter is used to drive the expression of a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) RNAi transgene in plants uniformly expressing GUS, GUS expression is knocked down specifically in petals. We further tested the system by targeting the essential kinetochore protein CENPC and two different components of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (MAD2 and BUBR1). Plant lines expressing petal-specific RNAi hairpins targeting these genes exhibited an array of petal phenotypes. Cytological analyses of the affected flower buds confirmed that CENPC knockdown causes cell cycle arrest but provided no evidence that either MAD2 or BUBR1 are required for mitosis (although both genes are required for petal growth by this assay). A key benefit of the petal-specific RNAi method is that the phenotypes are not expressed in the lineages leading to germ cells, and the phenotypes are faithfully transmitted for at least four generations despite their pronounced effects on growth. PMID:23236491

  1. Wheat Brassinosteroid-Insensitive1 (TaBRI1) Interacts with Members of TaSERK Gene Family and Cause Early Flowering and Seed Yield Enhancement in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akanksha; Breja, Priyanka; Khurana, Jitendra P; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) hormones are important for plant growth, development and immune responses. They are sensed by the transmembrane receptor kinase Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1 (BRI1) when they bind to its extracellular Leu-rich repeat (LRR) domain. We cloned and characterized the TaBRI1 from T. aestivum and raised overexpression transgenics in Arabidopsis to decipher its functional role. TaBRI1 protein consists of a putative signal peptide followed by 25 leucine rich repeats (LRR), a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The analysis determined the interaction of TaBRI1 with five members of the wheat Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase (TaSERKs) gene family (TaSERK1, TaSERK2, TaSERK3, TaSERK4 and TaSERK5), at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of TaBRI1 in Arabidopsis leads to the early flowering, increased silique size and seed yield. Root growth analysis of TaBRI1 overexpressing transgenic plants showed hypersensitivity to epi-brassinolide (epi-BL) hormone in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants show thermotolerance phenotype at the seedling stages as revealed by chlorophyll content, photosystem II activity and membrane stability. The transcriptome profiling on the basis of microarray analysis indicates up-regulation of several genes related to brassinosteroid signaling pathway, abiotic stress response, defense response and transcription factors. These studies predict the possible role of TaBRI1 gene in plant growth and development imparting tolerance to thermal stress. PMID:27322749

  2. Wheat Brassinosteroid-Insensitive1 (TaBRI1 Interacts with Members of TaSERK Gene Family and Cause Early Flowering and Seed Yield Enhancement in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Singh

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs hormones are important for plant growth, development and immune responses. They are sensed by the transmembrane receptor kinase Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1 (BRI1 when they bind to its extracellular Leu-rich repeat (LRR domain. We cloned and characterized the TaBRI1 from T. aestivum and raised overexpression transgenics in Arabidopsis to decipher its functional role. TaBRI1 protein consists of a putative signal peptide followed by 25 leucine rich repeats (LRR, a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The analysis determined the interaction of TaBRI1 with five members of the wheat Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase (TaSERKs gene family (TaSERK1, TaSERK2, TaSERK3, TaSERK4 and TaSERK5, at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of TaBRI1 in Arabidopsis leads to the early flowering, increased silique size and seed yield. Root growth analysis of TaBRI1 overexpressing transgenic plants showed hypersensitivity to epi-brassinolide (epi-BL hormone in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants show thermotolerance phenotype at the seedling stages as revealed by chlorophyll content, photosystem II activity and membrane stability. The transcriptome profiling on the basis of microarray analysis indicates up-regulation of several genes related to brassinosteroid signaling pathway, abiotic stress response, defense response and transcription factors. These studies predict the possible role of TaBRI1 gene in plant growth and development imparting tolerance to thermal stress.

  3. The FAST technique: a simplified Agrobacterium-based transformation method for transient gene expression analysis in seedlings of Arabidopsis and other plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Arnim Albrecht G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genome sequencing has resulted in the identification of a large number of uncharacterized genes. To investigate these unknown gene functions, several transient transformation systems have been developed as quick and convenient alternatives to the lengthy transgenic assay. These transient assays include biolistic bombardment, protoplast transfection and Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation, each having advantages and disadvantages depending on the research purposes. Results We present a novel transient assay based on cocultivation of young Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings with Agrobacterium tumefaciens in the presence of a surfactant which does not require any dedicated equipment and can be carried out within one week from sowing seeds to protein analysis. This Fast Agro-mediated Seedling Transformation (FAST was used successfully to express a wide variety of constructs driven by different promoters in Arabidopsis seedling cotyledons (but not roots in diverse genetic backgrounds. Localizations of three previously uncharacterized proteins were identified by cotransformation with fluorescent organelle markers. The FAST procedure requires minimal handling of seedlings and was also adaptable for use in 96-well plates. The high transformation efficiency of the FAST procedure enabled protein detection from eight transformed seedlings by immunoblotting. Protein-protein interaction, in this case HY5 homodimerization, was readily detected in FAST-treated seedlings with Förster resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence complementation techniques. Initial tests demonstrated that the FAST procedure can also be applied to other dicot and monocot species, including tobacco, tomato, rice and switchgrass. Conclusion The FAST system provides a rapid, efficient and economical assay of gene function in intact plants with minimal manual handling and without dedicated device. This method is potentially

  4. Overexpression of GmHsp90s, a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 gene family cloning from soybean, decrease damage of abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Xu

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is one of the most conserved and abundant molecular chaperones and is an essential component of the protective stress response; however, its roles in abiotic stress responses in soybean (Glycine max remain obscure. Here, 12 GmHsp90 genes from soybean were identified and found to be expressed and to function differentially under abiotic stresses. The 12 GmHsp90 genes were isolated and named GmHsp90A1-GmHsp90A6, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90B2, GmHsp90C1.1, GmHsp90C1.2, GmHsp90C2.1 and GmHsp90C2.2 based on their characteristics and high homology to other Hsp90s according to a new nomenclature system. Quantitative real-time PCR expression data revealed that all the genes exhibited higher transcript levels in leaves and could be strongly induced under heat, osmotic and salt stress but not cold stress. Overexpression of five typical genes (GmHsp90A2, GmHsp90A4, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90C1.1 and GmHsp90C2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana provided useful evidences that GmHsp90 genes can decrease damage of abiotic stresses. In addition, an abnormal accumulation of proline was detected in some transgenic Arabidopsis plants suggested overexpressing GmHsp90s may affect the synthesis and response system of proline. Our work represents a systematic determination of soybean genes encoding Hsp90s, and provides useful evidence that GmHsp90 genes function differently in response to abiotic stresses and may affect the synthesis and response system of proline.

  5. Genome-wide identification of aquaporin encoding genes in Brassica oleracea and their phylogenetic sequence comparison to Brassica crops and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Arvid Diehn

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are essential channel proteins that regulate plant water homeostasis and the uptake and distribution of uncharged solutes such as metalloids, urea, ammonia and carbon dioxide. Despite their importance as crop plants, little is known about AQP gene and protein function in cabbage (Brassica oleracea and other Brassica species. The recent releases of the genome sequences of B. oleracea and B. rapa allow comparative genomic studies in these species to investigate the evolution and features of Brassica genes and proteins.In this study, we identified all AQP genes in B. oleracea by a genome-wide survey. In total, 67 genes of four plant AQP subfamilies were identified. Their full-length gene sequences and locations on chromosomes and scaffolds were manually curated. The identification of six additional full-length AQP sequences in the B. rapa genome added to the recently published AQP protein family of this species. A phylogenetic analysis of AQPs of A. thaliana, B. oleracea, B. rapa allowed us to follow AQP evolution in closely related species and to systematically classify and (re- name these isoforms. Thirty-three groups of AQP-orthologous genes were identified between B. oleracea and Arabidopsis and their expression was analyzed in different organs. The two selectivity filters, gene structure and coding sequences were highly conserved within each AQP subfamily while sequence variations in some introns and untranslated regions were frequent. These data suggest a similar substrate selectivity and function of Brassica AQPs compared to Arabidopsis orthologs. The comparative analyses of all AQP subfamilies in three Brassicaceae species give initial insights into AQP evolution in these taxa. Based on the genome-wide AQP identification in B. oleracea and the sequence analysis and reprocessing of Brassica AQP information, our dataset provides a sequence resource for further investigations of the physiological and molecular functions of

  6. Evolution of floral meristem identity genes. Analysis of Lolium temulentum genes related to APETALA1 and LEAFY of Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gocal, G.F.W.; King, R.W.; Blundell, C.A.; Schwartz, O.M.; Andersen, C.H.; Weigel, D.

    2001-01-01

    1 (AP1)-like genes, LtMADS1 and LtMADS2, and of L. temulentum LEAFY (LtLFY). As shown by in situ hybridization, LtMADS1 and LtMADS2 are expressed in the vegetative shoot apical meristem, but expression increases strongly within 30 h of LD floral induction. Later in floral development, LtMADS1 and Lt...

  7. Overexpression of a Chloroplast-located Peroxiredoxin Q Gene, SsPrxQ, Increases the Salt and Low-temperature Tolerance of Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wen Jing; Shi-Hua Chen; Xiao-Li Guo; Hui Zhang; Yan-Xiu Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Abiotic stress, such as salt, drought and extreme temperature,can result in enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants have developed both enzymatic ROS-scavenging and non-enzymatic ROS-scavenging systems. The major ROS-scavenging enzymes of plants include superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and peroxiredoxins (Prxs). In the present work, we identified a gene encoding chloroplast-located peroxiredoxin Q, SsPrxQ, from Suaeda salsa L. Located at chloroplast. Overexpression of SsPrxQ in Arabidopsis leads to an increase in salt and low-temperature tolerance.

  8. Positive- and negative-acting regulatory elements contribute to the tissue-specific expression of INNER NO OUTER, a YABBY-type transcription factor gene in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Marissa K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The INNER NO OUTER (INO gene, which encodes a YABBY-type transcription factor, specifies and promotes the growth of the outer integument of the ovule in Arabidopsis. INO expression is limited to the abaxial cell layer of the developing outer integument of the ovule and is regulated by multiple regions of the INO promoter, including POS9, a positive element that when present in quadruplicate can produce low-level expression in the normal INO pattern. Results Significant redundancy in activity between different regions of the INO promoter is demonstrated. For specific regulatory elements, multimerization or the addition of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S general enhancer was able to activate expression of reporter gene constructs that were otherwise incapable of expression on their own. A new promoter element, POS6, is defined and is shown to include sufficient positive regulatory information to reproduce the endogenous pattern of expression in ovules, but other promoter regions are necessary to fully suppress expression outside of ovules. The full-length INO promoter, but not any of the INO promoter deletions tested, is able to act as an enhancer-blocking insulator to prevent the ectopic activation of expression by the 35S enhancer. Sequence conservation between the promoter regions of Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa aligns closely with the functional definition of the POS6 and POS9 regions, and with a defined INO minimal promoter. The B. oleracea INO promoter is sufficient to promote a similar pattern and level of reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis to that observed for the Arabidopsis promoter. Conclusions At least two independent regions of the INO promoter contain sufficient regulatory information to direct the specific pattern but not the level of INO gene expression. These regulatory regions act in a partially redundant manner to promote the expression in a specific pattern in the ovule and

  9. Expression of Rice CYP450-Like Gene (Os08g01480 in Arabidopsis Modulates Regulatory Network Leading to Heavy Metal and Other Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Rai

    Full Text Available Heavy metal (HM toxicity has become a grave problem in the world since it leads to hazardous effects on living organisms. Transcriptomic/proteomic studies in plants have identified a large number of metal-responsive gene families. Of these, cytochrome-P450 (CYPs family members are composed of enzymes carrying out detoxification of exogenous molecules. Here, we report a CYP-like protein encoded by Os08g01480 locus in rice that helps the plant to combat HM and other abiotic stresses. To functionally characterize CYP-like gene, cDNA and promoter were isolated from rice to develop Arabidopsis transgenic lines. Heterologous expression of Os08g01480 in Arabidopsis provided significant tolerance towards abiotic stresses. In silico analysis reveals that Os08g01480 might help plants to combat environmental stress via modulating auxin metabolism. Transgenic lines expressing reporter gene under control of Os08g01480 promoter demonstrated differential promoter activity in different tissues during environmental stresses. These studies indicated that differential expression of Os08g01480 might be modulating response of plants towards environmental stresses as well as in different developmental stages.

  10. GpDSR7, a Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Gene in Grimmia pilifera Is Involved in Tolerance to Drought Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Li, Yihao; Zhao, Junyi; Liu, Hai; Jia, Shenghua; Li, Jie; Zhao, Heping; Han, Shengcheng; Wang, Yingdian

    2016-01-01

    The growth and development of plants under drought stress depends mainly on the expression levels of various genes and modification of proteins. To clarify the molecular mechanism of drought-tolerance of plants, suppression subtractive hybridisation cDNA libraries were screened to identify drought-stress-responsive unigenes in Grimmia pilifera, and a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase gene, GpDSR7, was identified among the 240 responsive unigenes. GpDSR7 expression was induced by various abiotic stresses, particularly by drought. GpDSR7 displayed E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and was exclusively localised on the ER membrane in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. GpDSR7-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed a high water content and survival ratio under drought stress. Moreover, the expression levels of some marker genes involved in drought stress were higher in the transgenic plants than in wild-type plants. These results suggest that GpDSR7, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in tolerance to drought stress at the protein modification level. PMID:27228205

  11. The Clock Protein CCA1 and the bZIP Transcription Factor HY5 Physically Interact to Regulate Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos Andronis; Simon Barak; Stephen M.Knowles; Shoji Sugano; Elaine M.Tobin

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates the expression of an array of Arabidopsis genes such as those encoding the LIGHT-HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B (Lhcb) proteins. We have previously studied the promoters of two of these Arabidopsis genes-Lhcb1*1 and Lhcb1*3-and identified a sequence that binds the clock protein CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). This sequence, designated CCAl-binding site (CBS), is necessary for phytochrome and circadian responsiveness of these genes. In close proximity to this sequence, there exists a G-box core element that has been shown to bind the bZIP transcription factor HY5 in other light-regulated plant promoters. In the present study, we examined the importance of the interaction of transcription factors binding the CBS and the G-box core element in the control of normal circadian rhythmic expression of Lhcb genes. Our results show that HY5 is able to specifically bind the G-box element in the Lhcb promoters and that CCA1 can alter the binding activity of HY5. We further show that CCA1 and HY5 can physically interact and that they can act synergistically on transcription in a yeast reporter gene assay. An absence of HY5 leads to a shorter period of Lhcb1*1 circadian expression but does not affect the circadian expression of CATALASE3 (CAT3), whose promoter lacks a G-box element. Our results suggest that interaction of the HY5 and CCA1 proteins on Lhcb promoters is necessary for normal circadian expression of the Lhcb genes.

  12. FIT interacts with AtbHLH38 and AtbHLH39 in regulating iron uptake gene expression for iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youxi Yuan; Huilan Wu; Ning Wang; Jie Li; Weina Zhao; Juan Du; Daowen Wang; Hong-Qing Ling

    2008-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron homeostasis in plants is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional level. Several bHLH transcription factors involved in iron homeostasis have been identified recently. However, their regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that the transcription factor FIT interacted with AtbHLH38 and AtbHLH39 and directly conferred the expression regulation of iron uptake genes for iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that AtbH LH38 or AtbHLH39 interacted with FIT, a central transcription factor involved in iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Expression of FIT/AtbHLH38 or FIT/AtbHLH39 in yeast cells activated GUS expression driven by ferric chelate reductase (FRO2) and ferrous transporter (IRT1) promoters. Overexpression of FIT with either AtbHLH38 or AtbHLH39 in plants converted the expression of the iron uptake genes FRO2 and IRT1 from induced to constitutive. Further analysis revealed that FR02 and IRT1 were not regulated at the posttranscriptional level in these plants because IRT1 protein accumulation and high ferric chelate reductase activity were detected in the overexpression plants under both iron deficiency and iron sufficiency. The double overexpression plants accumulated more iron in their shoots than wild type or the plants overexpressing either AtbHLH38,AtbHLH39 or FIT. Our data support that ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and ferrous-transporter IRT1 are the targets of the three transcription factors and the transcription of FRO2 and IRT1 is directly regulated by a complex of FIT/AtbHLH38 or FIT/AtbHLH39.

  13. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of SPATULA, a bHLH gene involved in carpel development, seedling germination, and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Michael; Bylstra, Yasmin; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Smyth, David R

    2010-03-01

    SPATULA is a bHLH transcription factor that promotes growth of tissues arising from the carpel margins, including the septum and transmitting tract. It is also involved in repressing germination of newly harvested seeds, and in inhibiting cotyledon, leaf, and petal expansion. Using a reporter gene construct, its expression profile was fully defined. Consistent with its known functions, SPT was expressed in developing carpel margin tissues, and in the hypocotyls and cotyledons of germinating seedlings, and in developing leaves and petals. It was also strongly expressed in tissues where no functions have been identified to date, including the dehiscence zone of fruits, developing anthers, embryos, and in the epidermal initials and new stele of root tips. The promoter region of SPT was dissected by truncation and deletion, and two main regions occupied by tissue-specific enhancers were identified. These were correlated with eight regions conserved between promoter regions of Arabidopsis, Brassica oleracea, and Brassica rapa. When transformed into Arabidopsis, the B. oleracea promoter drove expression in reproductive tissues mostly comparable to the equivalent Arabidopsis promoter. There is genetic evidence that SPT function in the gynoecium is associated with the perception of auxin. However, site-directed mutagenesis of three putative auxin-response elements had no detectable effect on SPT expression patterns. Even so, disruption of a putative E-box variant adjacent to one of these resulted in a loss of valve dehiscence zone expression. This expression was also specifically lost in mutants of another bHLH gene INDEHISCENT, indicating that IND may directly regulate SPT expression through this variant E-box. PMID:20176890

  14. PHH1, a novel gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a protein similar to plant blue-light photoreceptors and microbial photolyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P D; Batschauer, A; Hays, J B

    1996-11-27

    A cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana similar to microbial photolyase genes, and designated AT-PHH1, was isolated using a photolyase-like cDNA from Sinapsis alba (SA-PHR1) as a probe. Multiple isolations yielded only PHH1 cDNAs, and a few blue-light-receptor CRY1 (HY4) cDNAs (also similar to microbial photolyase genes), suggesting the absence of any other highly similar Arabidopsis genes. The AT-PHH1 and SA-PHR1 cDNA sequences predict 89% identity at the protein level, except for an AT-PHH1 C-terminal extension (111 amino acids), also not seen in microbial photolyases. AT-PHH1 and CRY1 show less similarity (54% p4erein identity), including respective C-terminal extensions that are themselves mostly dissimilar. Analysis of fifteen AT-PHH1 genomic isolates reveals a single gene, with three introns in the coding sequence and one in the 5'-untranslated leader. Full-length AT-PHH1, and both AT-PHH1 and AT-PHH1 delta C-513 (truncated to be approximately the size of microbial photolyase genes) cDNAs, were overexpressed, respectively, in yeast and Escherichia coli mutants hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. The absence of significant effects on resistance suggests either that any putative AT-PHH1 DNA repair activity requires cofactors/chromophores not present in yeast or E. coli, or that AT-PHH1 encodes a blue-light/ultraviolet-A receptor rather than a DNA repair protein. PMID:9003312

  15. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling gene AtCHR12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynárová, Ludmila; Nap, Jan-Peter; Bisseling, Ton

    2007-09-01

    One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental stress is establishing a temporary growth arrest that allows adaptation to adverse conditions. The response to abiotic stress requires the modulation of gene expression, which may be mediated by the alteration of chromatin structures. This alteration can be accomplished with the help of chromatin-remodeling enzymes, such as the various SWI/SNF classes of ATPases. Here, we investigate the role of the Arabidopsis SNF2/Brahma-type AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene in plant growth and development in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene plays a vital role in mediating the temporary growth arrest of Arabidopsis that is induced upon perception of stress. Exposing an AtCHR12 overexpressing mutant to stress conditions leads to growth arrest of normally active primary buds, as well as to reduced growth of the primary stem. In contrast, the AtCHR12 knockout mutant shows less growth arrest than the wild-type when exposed to moderate stress. Without stress, mutant plants are indistinguishable from the wild-type, and the growth arrest response seems to depend on the severity of the stress applied. Modulation of AtCHR12 expression correlates with changes in expression of dormancy-associated genes. This is in agreement with the concept of AtCHR12 participation in priming the plants for the growth arrest response. Our data indicate that AtCHR12-associated growth arrest differs from DELLA-mediated growth restraint. This establishes AtCHR12 as a novel gene involved in the response repertoire of plants that permits flexible modulation of growth in adverse and/or otherwise limiting environments. PMID:17605754

  16. AtHsfA2 modulates expression of stress responsive genes and enhances tolerance to heat and oxidative stress in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunguang; CHEN Qijun; GAO Xinqi; QI Bishu; CHEN Naizhi; XU Shouming; CHEN Jia; WANG Xuechen

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for considerable interlinking between the responses to heat stress and oxidative stress, and recent researches suggest heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) play an important role in linking heat shock with oxidative stress signals. In this paper, we present evidence that AtHsfA2 modulated expression of stress responsive genes and enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress in Arabidopsis. Using Northern blot and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrated that the expression of AtHsfA2 was induced by not only HS but also oxidative stress. By functional analysis of AtHsfA2 knockout mutants and AtHsfA2 overexpressing transgenic plants, we also demonstrated that the mutants displayed reduced the basal and acquired thermotolerance as well as oxidative stress tolerance but the overexpression lines displayed increased tolerance to these stress. The phenotypes correlated with the expression of some Hsps and APX1, ion leakage, H2O2 level and degree of oxidative injuries. These results showed that, by modulated expression of stress responsive genes, AtHsfA2 enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress in Arabidopsis. So we suggest that AtHsfA2 plays an important role in linking heat shock with oxidative stress signals.

  17. Natural variation in rosette size under salt stress conditions corresponds to developmental differences between Arabidopsis accessions and allelic variation in the LRR-KISS gene

    KAUST Repository

    Julkowska, Magdalena M.

    2016-02-11

    Natural variation among Arabidopsis accessions is an important genetic resource to identify mechanisms underlying plant development and stress tolerance. To evaluate the natural variation in salinity stress tolerance, two large-scale experiments were performed on two populations consisting of 160 Arabidopsis accessions each. Multiple traits, including projected rosette area, and fresh and dry weight were collected as an estimate for salinity tolerance. Our results reveal a correlation between rosette size under salt stress conditions and developmental differences between the accessions grown in control conditions, suggesting that in general larger plants were more salt tolerant. This correlation was less pronounced when plants were grown under severe salt stress conditions. Subsequent genome wide association study (GWAS) revealed associations with novel candidate genes for salinity tolerance such as LRR-KISS (At4g08850), flowering locus KH-domain containing protein and a DUF1639-containing protein. Accessions with high LRR-KISS expression developed larger rosettes under salt stress conditions. Further characterization of allelic variation in candidate genes identified in this study will provide more insight into mechanisms of salt stress tolerance due to enhanced shoot growth.

  18. Ectopic expression of FaesAP3, a Fagopyrum esculentum (Polygonaceae) AP3 orthologous gene rescues stamen development in an Arabidopsis ap3 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng-wu; Qi, Rui; Li, Xiao-fang; Liu, Zhi-xiong

    2014-10-25

    Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA3 (AP3) and Antirrhinum majus DEFICIENS (DEF) MADS box genes are required to specify petal and stamen identity. AP3 and DEF are members of the euAP3 lineage, which arose by gene duplication coincident with radiation of the core eudicots. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying organ development in early diverging clades of core eudicots, we isolated and identified an AP3 homolog, FaesAP3, from Fagopyrum esculentum (buckwheat, Polygonaceae), a multi-food-use pseudocereal with healing benefits. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses revealed that FaesAP3 grouped into the euAP3 lineage. Expression analysis showed that FaesAP3 was transcribed only in developing stamens, and differed from AP3 and DEF, which expressed in developing petals and stamens. Moreover, ectopic expression of FaesAP3 rescued stamen development without complementation of petal development in an Arabidopsis ap3 mutant. Our results suggest that FaesAP3 is involved in the development of stamens in buckwheat. These results also suggest that FaesAP3 holds some potential for biotechnical engineering to create a male sterile line of F. esculentum. PMID:25149019

  19. Probing cytokinin homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana by constitutively overexpressing two forms of the maize cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase 1 gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, D.; Tarkowski, Petr; Majira, M.; Bouchez-Mahiout, I.; Nogué, F.; Laurière, M.; Sandberg, G.; Laloue, M.; Houba-Hérin, N.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 171, č. 1 (2006), s. 114-122. ISSN 0168-9452 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase * Homeostasis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.631, year: 2006

  20. Expression of the rgMT gene, encoding for a rice metallothionein-like protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shumei Jin; Dan Sun; Ji Wang; Ying Li; Xinwang Wang; Shenkui Liu

    2014-12-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins of low molecular weight with many attributed functions, such as providing protection against metal toxicity, being involved in regulation of metal ions uptake that can impact plant physiology and providing protection against oxidative stress. However, the precise function of the metallothionein-like proteins such as the one coded for rgMT gene isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L.) is not completely understood. The whole genome analysis of rice (O. sativa) showed that the rgMT gene is homologue to the Os11g47809 on chromosome 11 of O. sativa sp. japonica genome. This study used the rgMT coding sequence to create transgenic lines to investigate the subcellular localization of the protein, as well as the impact of gene expression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Arabidopsis thaliana under heavy metal ion, salt and oxidative stresses. The results indicate that the rgMT gene was expressed in the cytoplasm of transgenic cells. Yeast cells transgenic for rgMT showed vigorous growth compared to the nontransgenic controls when exposed to 7mM CuCl2, 10 mM FeCl2, 1 M NaCl, 24 mM NaHCO3 and 3.2 mM H2O2, but there was no significant difference for other stresses tested. Similarly, Arabidopsis transgenic for rgMT displayed significantly improved seed germination rates over that of the control when the seeds were stressed with 100 M CuCl2 or 1 mM H2O2. Increased biomass was observed in the presence of 100 M CuCl2, 220 M FeCl2, 3 mM Na2CO3, 5 mM NaHCO3 or 1 mM H2O2. These results indicate that the expression of the rice rgMT gene in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis is implicated in improving their tolerance for certain salt and peroxide stressors.

  1. Transformation of Arabidopsis by Rice OsWRKY78:: GFP Fusion Gene and Subcellular Localization of OsWRKY78 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunzhi LIU; Mei ZHANG; Xin TANG; Xiaolan WANG

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study was to understand the subcellular localization of OsWRKY78 protein in plants. [Method] Primers specific for OsWRKY78 gene were designed according to the OsWRKY78 full length sequence in Genbank. The gene was cloned by RT-PCR method. The gene was then recombined into a plasmid ex- pression vector carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, pBinGFP. The re- combinant was confirmed by PCR and enzyme digestion. The recombinant plasmid pBinGFP-OsWRKY was transformed into Arabidopsis through Agrobacterium tume- faciens strain GV3101 and transgenic plants were obtained. [Result] Measured by fluorescence microscopy, the expression of OsWRKY78 and GFP fusion protein in root tip cells was localized in the nucleus. [Conclusion] This study laid the foundation for further investigating the function of OsWRKY78 gene and its role in related sig- nal transduction and provided theoretical basis for exploring the relation between OsWRKY78 gene and brown planthoppers.

  2. A GRAS-like gene of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) alters the gibberellin content and axillary meristem outgrowth in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambrini, M; Mariotti, L; Parlanti, S; Salvini, M; Pugliesi, C

    2015-11-01

    The GRAS proteins belong to a plant transcriptional regulator family that function in the regulation of plant growth and development. Despite their important roles, in sunflower only one GRAS gene (HaDella1) with the DELLA domain has been reported. Here, we provide a functional characterisation of a GRAS-like gene from Helianthus annuus (Ha-GRASL) lacking the DELLA motif. The Ha-GRASL gene contains an intronless open reading frame of 1,743 bp encoding 580 amino acids. Conserved motifs in the GRAS domain are detected, including VHIID, PFYRE, SAW and two LHR motifs. Within the VHII motif, the P-H-N-D-Q-L residues are entirely maintained. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that Ha-GRASL belongs to the SCARECROW LIKE4/7 (SCL4/7) subfamily of the GRAS consensus tree. Accumulation of Ha-GRASL mRNA at the adaxial boundaries from P6/P7 leaf primordia suggests a role of Ha-GRASL in the initiation of median and basal axillary meristems (AMs) of sunflower. When Ha-GRASL is over-expressed in Arabidopsis wild-type plants, the number of lateral bolts increases differently from untransformed plants. However, Ha-GRASL slightly affects the lateral suppressor (las-4-) mutation. Therefore, we hypothesise that Ha-GRASL and LAS are not functionally equivalent. The over-expression of Ha-GRASL reduces metabolic flow of gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis and this modification could be relevant in AM development. Phylogenetic analysis includes LAS and SCL4/7 in the same major clade, suggesting a more recent separation of these genes with respect to other GRAS members. We propose that some features of their ancestor, as well as AM initiation and outgrowth, are partially retained in both LAS and SCL4/7. PMID:26081041

  3. Ectopic overexpression of castor bean LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2 in Arabidopsis triggers the expression of genes that encode regulators of seed maturation and oil body proteins in vegetative tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Uk Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2 gene plays critically important regulatory roles during both early and late embryonic development. Here, we report the identification of the LEC2 gene from the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis, and characterize the effects of its overexpression on gene regulation and lipid metabolism in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. LEC2 exists as a single-copy gene in castor bean, is expressed predominantly in embryos, and encodes a protein with a conserved B3 domain, but different N- and C-terminal domains to those found in LEC2 from Arabidopsis. Ectopic overexpression of LEC2 from castor bean under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter in Arabidopsis plants induces the accumulation of transcripts that encodes five major transcription factors (the LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1, LEAFY COTYLEDON1-LIKE (L1L, FUSCA3 (FUS3, and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3 transcripts for seed maturation, and WRINKELED1 (WRI1 transcripts for fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as OLEOSIN transcripts for the formation of oil bodies in vegetative tissues. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants that express the LEC2 gene from castor bean show a range of dose-dependent morphological phenotypes and effects on the expression of LEC2-regulated genes during seedling establishment and vegetative growth. Expression of castor bean LEC2 in Arabidopsis increased the expression of fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1 and induced the accumulation of triacylglycerols, especially those containing the seed-specific fatty acid, eicosenoic acid (20:1Δ11, in vegetative tissues.

  4. Ectopic Expression of BraYAB1-702, a Member of YABBY Gene Family in Chinese Cabbage, Causes Leaf Curling, Inhibition of Development of Shoot Apical Meristem and Flowering Stage Delaying in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Lu-Gang Zhang; Jing Zhang; Ze-Ping Yang; Xin-Ling Zhang

    2013-01-01

    YABBY gene family plays an important role in the polarity development of lateral organs. We isolated the BraYAB1-702 gene, a member of the YABBY gene family, from young leaves of Chinese cabbage line 06J45. The full-length gene has a 937 bp CDNA sequence and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 702 bp. The subcellular localization analysis showed that the expression product of the gene was localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BraYAB1-702 in Arabidopsis thaliana caused leaf curli...

  5. Expression of some water stress-induced genes in the seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under conditions of moderate water deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrownyzky J. A.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In this study we have analyzed the expression of some water stress-inducible genes of Arabidopsis. Methods. A method of growing the A. thaliana seedlings at slowly lowering water potential on an agar-solidified medium was used. Gene expression was analyzed using a method of real-time PCR. Results. We have detected an increased expression of RD29A and AtP5CS, two ABA-dependent genes. At the same time, their expression did not reach the level observed in the experiments where the conditions of acute water stress were imposed. The levels of expression of AtP5CS correlated with the concentration of proline in the seedlings of A. thaliana. However, there was not detected a significant increase in the expression of DREB2A, RD17 and ERD1, three ABA-independent genes. Conclusions. The pattern of gene expression under conditions close to natural ones may differ from that observed under an acute water stress.

  6. OsSFR6 is a functional rice orthologue of SENSITIVE TO FREEZING-6 and can act as a regulator of COR gene expression, osmotic stress and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wathugala, D.L.; Richards, S.A.; Knight, H; Knight, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein SENSITIVE TO FREEZING-6 (AtSFR6) is required for cold- and drought-inducible expression of COLD-ON REGULATED (COR) genes and, as a consequence, AtSFR6 is essential for osmotic stress and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. Therefore, orthologues of AtSFR6 in crop species represent important candidate targets for future manipulation of stress tolerance. We identified and cloned a homologue of AtSFR6 from rice (Oryza sativa), OsSFR6, and confirmed its orthology in Arabido...

  7. Improvement of copper tolerance of Arabidopsis by transgenic expression of an allene oxide cyclase gene, GhAOC1, in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuange Wang; Huaihua Liu; Qingguo Xin

    2015-01-01

    Allene oxide cyclase (AOC, E 5.3.99.6) is an essential enzyme in the jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthetic pathway and mediates a wide range of adaptive responses. In this report, five AOC genes (GhAOC1–GhAOC5) were cloned from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), sequenced, and characterized. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the transcripts of GhAOCs were abundantly expressed in roots and less in fibers, and regulated in cotton plants under methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and CuCl2 stresses. To investigate the role of GhAOC under copper stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing cotton GhAOC1 under control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) promoter were generated. Compared to untransformed plants, GhAOC1-overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants exhibited markedly higher survival rate, shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, and photosynthetic efficiency, and reduced cell membrane damage and lipid peroxidation under copper stress. This study provides the first evidence that GhAOC1 plays an important role in copper stress tolerance.

  8. Improvement of copper tolerance of Arabidopsis by transgenic expression of an allene oxide cyclase gene, GhAOC1, in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuange Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Allene oxide cyclase (AOC, E 5.3.99.6 is an essential enzyme in the jasmonic acid (JA biosynthetic pathway and mediates a wide range of adaptive responses. In this report, five AOC genes (GhAOC1–GhAOC5 were cloned from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., sequenced, and characterized. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the transcripts of GhAOCs were abundantly expressed in roots and less in fibers, and regulated in cotton plants under methyl jasmonate (MeJA and CuCl2 stresses. To investigate the role of GhAOC under copper stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing cotton GhAOC1 under control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S promoter were generated. Compared to untransformed plants, GhAOC1-overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants exhibited markedly higher survival rate, shoot fresh weight, shoot dry weight, and photosynthetic efficiency, and reduced cell membrane damage and lipid peroxidation under copper stress. This study provides the first evidence that GhAOC1 plays an important role in copper stress tolerance.

  9. Over-expression of Arabidopsis thaliana SFD1/GLY1, the gene encoding plastid localized glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, increases plastidic lipid content in transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijayata; Singh, Praveen Kumar; Siddiqui, Adnan; Singh, Subaran; Banday, Zeeshan Zahoor; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Lipids are the major constituents of all membranous structures in plants. Plants possess two pathways for lipid biosynthesis: the prokaryotic pathway (i.e., plastidic pathway) and the eukaryotic pathway (i.e., endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) pathway). Whereas some plants synthesize galactolipids from diacylglycerol assembled in the plastid, others, including rice, derive their galactolipids from diacylglycerols assembled by the eukaryotic pathway. Arabidopsis thaliana glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pDH), coded by SUPPRESSOR OF FATTY ACID DESATURASE 1 (SFD1; alias GLY1) gene, catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate (G3p), the backbone of many membrane lipids. Here SFD1 was introduced to rice as a transgene. Arabidopsis SFD1 localizes in rice plastids and its over-expression increases plastidic membrane lipid content in transgenic rice plants without any major impact on ER lipids. The results suggest that over-expression of plastidic G3pDH enhances biosynthesis of plastid-localized lipids in rice. Lipid composition in the transgenic plants is consistent with increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis in the plastid and increased galactolipid synthesis from diacylglycerol produced via the ER pathway. The transgenic plants show a higher photosynthetic assimilation rate, suggesting a possible application of this finding in crop improvement. PMID:26747130

  10. Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 Form Nuclear Bodies and Repress a Large Number of Protein-Coding Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C Jake; Husmann, Dylan; Liu, Wanlu; Kasmi, Farid El; Wang, Haifeng; Papikian, Ashot; Pastor, William A; Moissiard, Guillaume; Vashisht, Ajay A; Dangl, Jeffery L; Wohlschlegel, James A; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-05-01

    The MORC family of GHKL ATPases are an enigmatic class of proteins with diverse chromatin related functions. In Arabidopsis, AtMORC1, AtMORC2, and AtMORC6 act together in heterodimeric complexes to mediate transcriptional silencing of methylated DNA elements. Here, we studied Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7. We found that, in contrast to AtMORC1,2,6, they act to suppress a wide set of non-methylated protein-coding genes that are enriched for those involved in pathogen response. Furthermore, atmorc4 atmorc7 double mutants show a pathogen response phenotype. We found that AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 form homomeric complexes in vivo and are concentrated in discrete nuclear bodies adjacent to chromocenters. Analysis of an atmorc1,2,4,5,6,7 hextuple mutant demonstrates that transcriptional de-repression is largely uncoupled from changes in DNA methylation in plants devoid of MORC function. However, we also uncover a requirement for MORC in both DNA methylation and silencing at a small but distinct subset of RNA-directed DNA methylation target loci. These regions are characterized by poised transcriptional potential and a low density of sites for symmetric cytosine methylation. These results provide insight into the biological function of MORC proteins in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27171361

  11. Over-expression of the PaAP1 gene from sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) causes early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yan, Guohua; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Kaichun

    2013-02-15

    A homologue of SQUAMOSA/APETALA1, designated PaAP1, was isolated from Prunus avium by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The full length of PaAP1 cDNA is 753 bp, and it codes for a polypeptide of 250 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison revealed that PaAP1 belongs to the MADS-box gene family. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PaAP1 shared the highest identity with SQUA/AP1 homologues from Prunus serrulata. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that PaAP1 was expressed at high levels in petal, sepal, style, and flower buds, which was slightly different from the expression pattern of AP1 of Arabidopsis thaliana. To characterize the functions of PaAP1, we assessed Arabidopsis transformed with 35S::PaAP1. A total of 8 transgenic T(1) lines with an early flowering phenotype were obtained, and a 3:1 segregation ratio of flowering time was observed in the T(2) generation of 4 lines. This study provides the first functional analysis of an SQUA/AP1 homolog from P. avium and suggests that PaAP1 is potentially useful for shortening the juvenile period in sweet cherry. PMID:23206932

  12. Floral Induction in Arabidopsis by FLOWERING LOCUS T Requires Direct Repression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE Genes by the Homeodomain Protein PENNYWISE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Fernando; Romera-Branchat, Maida; Martínez-Gallegos, Rafael; Patel, Vipul; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Jang, Seonghoe; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Coupland, George

    2015-11-01

    Flowers form on the flanks of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in response to environmental and endogenous cues. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the photoperiodic pathway acts through FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) to promote floral induction in response to day length. A complex between FT and the basic leucine-zipper transcription factor FD is proposed to form in the SAM, leading to activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY and thereby promoting floral meristem identity. We identified mutations that suppress FT function and recovered a new allele of the homeodomain transcription factor PENNYWISE (PNY). Genetic and molecular analyses showed that ectopic expression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2, which encode transcriptional coactivators, in the SAM during vegetative development, confers the late flowering of pny mutants. In wild-type plants, BOP1 and BOP2 are expressed in lateral organs close to boundaries of the SAM, whereas in pny mutants, their expression occurs in the SAM. This ectopic expression lowers FD mRNA levels, reducing responsiveness to FT and impairing activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY. We show that PNY binds to the promoters of BOP1 and BOP2, repressing their transcription. These results demonstrate a direct role for PNY in defining the spatial expression patterns of boundary genes and the significance of this process for floral induction by FT. PMID:26417007

  13. Arabidopsis Acetyl-Amido Synthetase GH3.5 Involvement in Camalexin Biosynthesis through Conjugation of Indole-3-Carboxylic Acid and Cysteine and Upregulation of Camalexin Biosynthesis Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu-Yang Wang; Xue-Ting Liu; Ying Chen; Xiao-Jing Xu; Biao Yu; Shu-Qun Zhang; Qun Li; Zu-Hua He

    2012-01-01

    Camalexin (3-thiazol-2'-yl-indole) is the major phytoalexin found in Arabidopsis thaliana.Several key intermediates and corresponding enzymes have been identified in camalexin biosynthesis through mutant screening and biochemical experiments.Camalexin is formed when indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN)is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP71A13.Here,we demonstrate that the Arabidopsis GH3.5 protein,a multifunctional acetyl-amido synthetase,is involved in camalexin biosynthesis via conjugating indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) and cysteine (Cys) and regulating camalexin biosynthesis genes.Camalexin levels were increased in the activation-tagged mutant gh3.5-1D in both Col-0 and cyp71A13-2 mutant backgrounds after pathogen infection.The recombinant GH3.5 protein catalyzed the conjugation of ICA and Cys to form a possible intermediate indole-3-acyl-cysteinate (ICA(Cys)) in vitro.In support of the in vitro reaction,feeding with ICA and Cys increased camalexin levels in Col-0 and gh3.5-1D.Dihydrocamalexic acid (DHCA),the precursor of camalexin and the substrate for PAD3,was accumulated in gh3.5-1Dlpad3-1,suggesting that ICA(Cys) could be an additional precursor of DHCA for camalexin biosynthesis.Furthermore,expression of the major camalexin biosynthesis genes CYP79B2,CYP71A12,CYP71A13 and PAD3 was strongly induced in gh3.5-1D.Our study suggests that GH3.5 is involved in camalexin biosynthesis through direct catalyzation of the formation of ICA(Cys),and upregulation of the major biosynthetic pathway genes.

  14. Reducing Cytoplasmic Polyamine Oxidase Activity in Arabidopsis Increases Salt and Drought Tolerance by Reducing Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Increasing Defense Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagor, G H M; Zhang, Siyuan; Kojima, Seiji; Simm, Stefan; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    The link between polyamine oxidases (PAOs), which function in polyamine catabolism, and stress responses remains elusive. Here, we address this issue using Arabidopsis pao mutants in which the expression of the five PAO genes is knocked-out or knocked-down. As the five single pao mutants and wild type (WT) showed similar response to salt stress, we tried to generate the mutants that have either the cytoplasmic PAO pathway (pao1 pao5) or the peroxisomal PAO pathway (pao2 pao3 pao4) silenced. However, the latter triple mutant was not obtained. Thus, in this study, we used two double mutants, pao1 pao5 and pao2 pao4. Of interest, pao1 pao5 mutant was NaCl- and drought-tolerant, whereas pao2 pao4 showed similar sensitivity to those stresses as WT. To reveal the underlying mechanism of salt tolerance, further analyses were performed. Na uptake of the mutant (pao1 pao5) decreased to 75% of WT. PAO activity of the mutant was reduced to 62% of WT. The content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide, a reaction product of PAO action, and superoxide anion in the mutant became 81 and 72% of the levels in WT upon salt treatment. The mutant contained 2.8-fold higher thermospermine compared to WT. Moreover, the mutant induced the genes of salt overly sensitive-, abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent- and ABA-independent- pathways more strongly than WT upon salt treatment. The results suggest that the Arabidopsis plant silencing cytoplasmic PAOs shows salinity tolerance by reducing ROS production and strongly inducing subsets of stress-responsive genes under stress conditions. PMID:26973665

  15. Characterization of a glutamine synthetase gene DvGS2 from Dunaliella viridis and biochemical identification of DvGS2-transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenguang; Fan, Qianlan; Wang, Wei; Shen, Chunlei; Meng, Xiangzong; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2014-02-25

    The salt-tolerant green alga Dunaliella has remarkable capability to survive in some extreme environments such as nitrogen starvation, which makes Dunaliella be a proper model for mining novel genes on nitrogen uptake or assimilation. In this study, a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene DvGS2 with amino acid identity of 72% to other homologous GS proteins, was isolated and characterized from Dunaliella viridis. Phylogenetic comparison with other GSs revealed that DvGS2 occupied an independent phylogenetic position. Expressional analysis in D. viridis cells under nitrogen starvation confirmed that DvGS2 increased its mRNA level in 12h. Subcellular localization study and functional analysis in a GS-deficient Escherichia coli mutant proved that DvGS2 was a chloroplastic and functional GS enzyme. In order to investigate the potential application of DvGS2 in higher plants, the transgenic studies of DvGS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana were carried out. Results showed that the transgenic lines expressed the DvGS2 gene and demonstrated obviously enhanced root length (29%), fresh weight (40%-48% at two concentrations of nitrate supplies), stem length (21%), leaf size (39%) and silique number (44%) in contrast with the wild-type Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the transgenic lines had higher total nitrogen content (35%-43%), total GS activity (39%-45%) and soluble protein concentration (23%-24%) than the wild type. These results indicated that the overexpression of DvGS2 in A. thaliana resulted in higher biomass and the improvement of the host's nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:24334123

  16. Overexpression of Poplar PtrWRKY89 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Leads to a Reduction of Disease Resistance by Regulating Defense-Related Genes in Salicylate- and Jasmonate-Dependent Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanzhong; Guo, Li; Liu, Rui; Jiao, Bo; Zhao, Xin; Ling, Zhengyi; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play key roles in plant defenses against pathogens and several WRKY transcription factors have been shown to have a role in SA/JA crosstalk. In a previous study, overexpression of the poplar WRKY gene PtrWRKY89 enhanced resistance to pathogens in transgenic poplars. In this study, the promoter of PtrWRKY89 (ProPtrWRKY89) was isolated and used to drive GUS reporter gene. High GUS activity was observed in old leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis containing ProPtrWRKY89-GUS construct and GUS expression was extremely induced by SA solution and SA+MeJA mixture but not by MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that PtrWRKY89 acted as a transcription activator in the nucleus. Constitutive expression of PtrWRKY89 in Arabidopsis resulted in more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea compared to wild-type plants. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed that marker genes of SA and JA pathways were down-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis after pathogen inoculations. Overall, our results indicated that PtrWRKY89 modulates a cross talk in resistance to P. syringe and B. cinerea by negatively regulating both SA and JA pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27019084

  17. Overexpression of Poplar PtrWRKY89 in Transgenic Arabidopsis Leads to a Reduction of Disease Resistance by Regulating Defense-Related Genes in Salicylate- and Jasmonate-Dependent Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Jiao, Bo; Zhao, Xin; Ling, Zhengyi; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play key roles in plant defenses against pathogens and several WRKY transcription factors have been shown to have a role in SA/JA crosstalk. In a previous study, overexpression of the poplar WRKY gene PtrWRKY89 enhanced resistance to pathogens in transgenic poplars. In this study, the promoter of PtrWRKY89 (ProPtrWRKY89) was isolated and used to drive GUS reporter gene. High GUS activity was observed in old leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis containing ProPtrWRKY89-GUS construct and GUS expression was extremely induced by SA solution and SA+MeJA mixture but not by MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that PtrWRKY89 acted as a transcription activator in the nucleus. Constitutive expression of PtrWRKY89 in Arabidopsis resulted in more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea compared to wild-type plants. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed that marker genes of SA and JA pathways were down-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis after pathogen inoculations. Overall, our results indicated that PtrWRKY89 modulates a cross talk in resistance to P. syringe and B. cinerea by negatively regulating both SA and JA pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27019084

  18. Overexpression of WsSGTL1 gene of Withania somnifera enhances salt tolerance, heat tolerance and cold acclimation ability in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Mishra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sterol glycosyltrnasferases (SGT are enzymes that glycosylate sterols which play important role in plant adaptation to stress and are medicinally important in plants like Withania somnifera. The present study aims to find the role of WsSGTL1 which is a sterol glycosyltransferase from W. somnifera, in plant's adaptation to abiotic stress. METHODOLOGY: The WsSGTL1 gene was transformed in Arabidopsis thaliana through Agrobacterium mediated transformation, using the binary vector pBI121, by floral dip method. The phenotypic and physiological parameters like germination, root length, shoot weight, relative electrolyte conductivity, MDA content, SOD levels, relative electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll measurements were compared between transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants under different abiotic stresses--salt, heat and cold. Biochemical analysis was done by HPLC-TLC and radiolabelled enzyme assay. The promoter of the WsSGTL1 gene was cloned by using Genome Walker kit (Clontech, USA and the 3D structures were predicted by using Discovery Studio Ver. 2.5. RESULTS: The WsSGTL1 transgenic plants were confirmed to be single copy by Southern and homozygous by segregation analysis. As compared to WT, the transgenic plants showed better germination, salt tolerance, heat and cold tolerance. The level of the transgene WsSGTL1 was elevated in heat, cold and salt stress along with other marker genes such as HSP70, HSP90, RD29, SOS3 and LEA4-5. Biochemical analysis showed the formation of sterol glycosides and increase in enzyme activity. When the promoter of WsSGTL1 gene was cloned from W. somnifera and sequenced, it contained stress responsive elements. Bioinformatics analysis of the 3D structure of the WsSGTL1 protein showed functional similarity with sterol glycosyltransferase AtSGT of A. thaliana. CONCLUSIONS: Transformation of WsSGTL1 gene in A. thaliana conferred abiotic stress tolerance. The promoter of the gene in W.somnifera was found

  19. Characterization of a new mutant allele of the Arabidopsis Flowering Locus D (FLD) gene that controls the flowering time by repressing FLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ruiqiang; ZHANG Suzhi; SUN Shulan; CHANG Jianhong; ZUO Jianru

    2005-01-01

    Flowering in higher plants is controlled by both the internal and environmental cues. In Arabidopsis, several major genetic loci have been defined as the key switches to control flowering. The Flowering Locus C (FLC) gene has been shown in the autonomous pathway to inhibit the vegetative-to-reproductive transition. FLC appears to be repressed by Flowering Locus D (FLD), which encodes a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Here we report the identification and characterization of a new mutant allele fld-5. Genetic analysis indicates that fld-5 (in the Wassilewskija background) is allelic to the previously characterized fld-3 and fld-4 (in the Colombia-0 background). Genetic and molecular analyses reveal that fld-5 carries a frame-shift mutation, resulting in a premature termination of the FLD open reading frame. The FLC expression is remarkably increased in fld-5, which presumably attributes to the extremely delayed flowering phenotype of the mutant.

  20. A maize calcium-dependent protein kinase gene, ZmCPK4, positively regulated abscisic acid signaling and enhanced drought stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Li; Pan, Jiaowen; Liu, Yang; Kong, Xiangpei; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dequan

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play essential roles in calcium-mediated signal transductions in plant response to abiotic stress. Several members have been identified to be regulators for plants response to abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. Here, we isolated a subgroup I CDPK gene, ZmCPK4, from maize. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the ZmCPK4 transcripts were induced by various stresses and signal molecules. Transient and stable expression of the ZmCPK4-GFP fusion proteins revealed ZmCPK4 localized to the membrane. Moreover, overexpression of ZmCPK4 in the transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced ABA sensitivity in seed germination, seedling growth and stomatal movement. The transgenic plants also enhanced drought stress tolerance. Taken together, the results suggest that ZmCPK4 might be involved in ABA-mediated regulation of stomatal closure in response to drought stress. PMID:23911729

  1. HYPER RECOMBINATION1 of the THO/TREX complex plays a role in controlling transcription of the REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 gene in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congyao Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1 represses ethylene hormone responses by promoting ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1 signaling, which negatively regulates ethylene responses. To investigate the regulation of RTE1, we performed a genetic screening for mutations that suppress ethylene insensitivity conferred by RTE1 overexpression in Arabidopsis. We isolated HYPER RECOMBINATION1 (HPR1, which is required for RTE1 overexpressor (RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity at the seedling but not adult stage. HPR1 is a component of the THO complex, which, with other proteins, forms the TRanscription EXport (TREX complex. In yeast, Drosophila, and humans, the THO/TREX complex is involved in transcription elongation and nucleocytoplasmic RNA export, but its role in plants is to be fully determined. We investigated how HPR1 is involved in RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity in Arabidopsis. The hpr1-5 mutation may affect nucleocytoplasmic mRNA export, as revealed by in vivo hybridization of fluorescein-labeled oligo(dT45 with unidentified mRNA in the nucleus. The hpr1-5 mutation reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 transcript levels to a similar extent, and RTE1 transcript reduction rate was not affected by hpr1-5 with cordycepin treatment, which prematurely terminates transcription. The defect in the THO-interacting TEX1 protein of TREX but not the mRNA export factor SAC3B also reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 levels. SERINE-ARGININE-RICH (SR proteins are involved mRNA splicing, and we found that SR protein SR33 co-localized with HPR1 in nuclear speckles, which agreed with the association of human TREX with the splicing machinery. We reveal a role for HPR1 in RTE1 expression during transcription elongation and less likely during export. Gene expression involved in ethylene signaling suppression was not reduced by the hpr1-5 mutation, which indicates selectivity of HPR1 for RTE1 expression affecting the consequent ethylene response. Thus

  2. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Virk

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

  3. Gain-of-function analysis of poplar CLE genes in Arabidopsis by exogenous application and over-expression assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yisen; Yang, Shaohui; Song, Yingjin; Men, Shuzhen; Wang, Jiehua

    2016-04-01

    Among 50CLEgene family members in thePopulus trichocarpagenome, three and sixPtCLEgenes encode a CLE motif sequence highly homologous toArabidopsisCLV3 and TDIF peptides, respectively, which potentially make them functional equivalents. To test and compare their biological activity, we first chemically synthesized each dodecapeptide and analysed itsin vitrobioactivity on Arabidopsis seedlings. Similarly, but to a different extent, three types of poplar CLV3-related peptides caused root meristem consumption, phyllotaxis disorder, anthocyanin accumulation and failure to enter the bolting stage. In comparison, application of two poplar TDIF-related peptides led to root length promotion in a dose-dependent manner with an even stronger effect observed for poplar TDIF-like peptide than TDIF. Next, we constructedCaMV35S:PtCLEtransgenic plants for each of the ninePtCLEgenes. Phenotypic abnormalities exemplified by arrested shoot apical meristem and abnormal flower structure were found to be more dominant and severe in35S:PtCLV3and35S:PtCLV3-like2lines than in the35S:PtCLV3-like1line. Disordered vasculature was detected in both stem and hypocotyl cross-sections in Arabidopsis plants over-expressing poplarTDIF-relatedgenes with the most defective vascular patterning observed forTDIF2and twoTDIF-likegenes. Phenotypic difference consistently observed in peptide application assay and transgenic analysis indicated the functional diversity of nine poplarPtCLEgenes under investigation. This work represents the first report on the functional analysis ofCLEgenes in a tree species and constitutes a basis for further study of the CLE peptide signalling pathway in tree development. PMID:26912800

  4. A gene encoding a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C is induced by dehydration and salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    OpenAIRE

    Hirayama, T.; Ohto, C; Mizoguchi, T; Shinozaki, K

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a putative phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) in the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana was cloned by use of the polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA, designated cAtPLC1, encodes a putative polypeptide of 561 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 64 kDa. The putative product includes so-called X and Y domains found in all PI-PLCs identified to date. In mammalian cells, there are three types of PI-PLC, PLC-beta, -gamma, and -delta. The overall structu...

  5. The BURP domain protein AtUSPL1 of Arabidopsis thaliana is destined to the protein storage vacuoles and overexpression of the cognate gene distorts seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Son, Le; Tiedemann, Jens; Rutten, Twan; Hillmer, Stefan; Hinz, Giselbert; Zank, Thorsten; Manteuffel, Renate; Bäumlein, Helmut

    2009-11-01

    BURP domain proteins comprise a broadly distributed, plant-specific family of functionally poorly understood proteins. VfUSP (Vicia faba Unknown Seed Protein) is the founding member of this family. The BURP proteins are characterized by a highly conserved C-terminal protein domain with a characteristic cysteine-histidine pattern. The Arabidopsis genome contains five BURP-domain encoding genes. Three of them are similar to the non-catalytic beta-subunit of the polygalacturonase of tomato and form a distinct subgroup. The remaining two genes are AtRD22 and AtUSPL1. The deduced product of AtUSPL1 is similar in size and sequence to VfUSP and that of the Brassica napus BNM2 gene which is expressed during microspore-derived embryogenesis. The protein products of BURP genes have not been found, especially that of VfUSP despite a great deal of interest arising from copious transcription of the gene in seeds. Here, we demonstrate that VfUSP and AtUSPL1 occur in cellular compartments essential for seed protein synthesis and storage, like the Golgi cisternae, dense vesicles, prevaculoar vesicles and the protein storage vacuoles in the parenchyma cells of cotyledons. Ectopic expression of AtUSPL1 leads to a shrunken seed phenotype; these seeds show structural alterations in their protein storage vacuoles and lipid vesicles. Furthermore, there is a reduction in the storage protein content and a perturbation in the seed fatty acid composition. However, loss of AtUSP1 gene function due to T-DNA insertions does not lead to a phenotypic change under laboratory conditions even though the seeds have less storage proteins. Thus, USP is pertinent to seed development but its role is likely shared by other proteins that function well enough under the laboratory growth conditions. PMID:19639386

  6. Studies on the role of heavy-metal transporting P-type ATPase family genes on zinc (Zn) transport and accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagavathiannan, M.V. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Plant Science; Broadley, M.R.; Donnelly, S.J.; Smith, R.J.; Mills, V. [Nottingham Univ., Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom). School of Biosciences, Plant Sciences Division

    2006-07-01

    Although zinc (Zn) is an essential plant mineral nutrient for normal crop growth, excess amounts can cause environmental contamination problems. Higher amounts of Zn are added into soils every year through effluents from tanning industries and other sources such as sewage treatment plants, metal inputs from rivers and the atmosphere. Studies have shown that specific metal tolerances exist at the cellular level in plants, indicating that specific adaptations to metal ions occur in cells as well as in the whole plant. This paper described the mechanisms that plants develop in order to tolerate heavy metals and showed that transporter genes play a key role in uptake and sequestration of heavy metals in plant systems. Since metal ion transporting genes are also involved in transport and homeostasis of heavy metals in plants, this study examined the role of the metal ion transporting gene family members in Zn transport and tolerance in plant systems. Among the metal ion transporting gene families, P-type ATPase gene family members are considered to be efficient in metal transport in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They form a diverse superfamily of transporters which carry a range of essential and potentially toxic metals across cellular membranes. Genetic-screening experiments were performed in which 3 SALK lines with known disruption in the target gene were studied physiologically and at the molecular level to determine their role in heavy-metal transportation and accumulation. The study showed that one of the family lines may have altered Zn tolerance and uptake characteristics. Ongoing research continues to examine the characteristics of this line. 27 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  7. Blue light alters miR167 expression and microRNA-targeted auxin response factor genes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkovskiy, Pavel P; Kartashov, Alexander V; Zlobin, Ilya E; Pogosyan, Sergei I; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2016-07-01

    The effect of blue LED (450 nm) on the photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants and the transcript levels of several genes, including miRNAs, photoreceptors and auxin response factors (ARF) was investigated. It was observed that blue light accelerated the generative development, reduced the rosette leaf number, significantly reduced the leaf area, dry biomass and led to the disruption of conductive tissue formation. The blue LED differentially influenced the transcript levels of several phytochromes (PHY a, b, c, d, and e), cryptochromes (CRY 1 and 2) and phototropins (PHOT 1 and 2). At the same time, the blue LED significantly increased miR167 expression compared to a fluorescent lamp or white LEDs. This increase likely resulted in the enhanced transcription of the auxin response factor genes ARF4 and ARF8, which are regulated by this miRNA. These findings support the hypothesis that the effects of blue light on A. thaliana are mediated by auxin signalling pathway involving miRNA-dependent regulation of ARF gene expression. PMID:27031426

  8. Overexpression of a New Putative Membrane Protein Gene AtMRB1 Results in Organ Size Enlargement in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Guan; Dingming Kang; Min Fan; Zhangliang Chen; LiJia Qu

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis AtMRB1 is predicted to encode a novel protein of 432 amino acid residues in length, with four putative trans-membrane domains. In the present study, characterization of AtMRB1 is conducted. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein assay showed that AtMRB1 was located in the plasma membrane. Transgenic lines overexprsssing AtMRB1 driven by a CaMV 35S promoter were generated. Statistic analysis showed that, during the seedling stage, the organ sizes of the transgenic lines including hypocotyl length, root length and root weight were significantly larger than those of the wild type plants under both light and dark conditions. In the adult plant stage, the AtMRB1 overexpressor plants were found to have larger organ sizes in terms of leaf length and width, and increased number of cauline leaves and branches when bolting. Further observation indicated that the larger leaf size phenotype was due to a larger number of mesophyll cells, the size of which was not altered. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the transcription of ANT, ROT3 and GRF5 were upregulated in the AtMRB1-overexpressor plants. These data suggest that AtMRB1 is possibly a positive regulator of organ size development in Arabidopsis, mainly through cell number control.

  9. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root. PMID:27457987

  10. nana plant2 Encodes a Maize Ortholog of the Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis Gene DWARF1, Identifying Developmental Interactions between Brassinosteroids and Gibberellins1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budka, Josh; Fujioka, Shozo; Johal, Gurmukh

    2016-01-01

    A small number of phytohormones dictate the pattern of plant form affecting fitness via reproductive architecture and the plant’s ability to forage for light, water, and nutrients. Individual phytohormone contributions to plant architecture have been studied extensively, often following a single component of plant architecture, such as plant height or branching. Both brassinosteroid (BR) and gibberellin (GA) affect plant height, branching, and sexual organ development in maize (Zea mays). We identified the molecular basis of the nana plant2 (na2) phenotype as a loss-of-function mutation in one of the two maize paralogs of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BR biosynthetic gene DWARF1 (DWF1). These mutants accumulate the DWF1 substrate 24-methylenecholesterol and exhibit decreased levels of downstream BR metabolites. We utilized this mutant and known GA biosynthetic mutants to investigate the genetic interactions between BR and GA. Double mutants exhibited additivity for some phenotypes and epistasis for others with no unifying pattern, indicating that BR and GA interact to affect development but in a context-dependent manner. Similar results were observed in double mutant analyses using additional BR and GA biosynthetic mutant loci. Thus, the BR and GA interactions were neither locus nor allele specific. Exogenous application of GA3 to na2 and d5, a GA biosynthetic mutant, also resulted in a diverse pattern of growth responses, including BR-dependent GA responses. These findings demonstrate that BR and GA do not interact via a single inclusive pathway in maize but rather suggest that differential signal transduction and downstream responses are affected dependent upon the developmental context. PMID:27288361

  11. The Reaumuria trigyna leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (RtLDOX) gene complements anthocyanidin synthesis and increases the salt tolerance potential of a transgenic Arabidopsis LDOX mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huirong; Du, Chao; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jia; Zheng, Linlin; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-09-01

    Reaumuria trigyna is a typical, native desert halophyte that grows under extreme conditions in Inner Mongolia. In a previous transcriptomic profiling analysis, flavonoid pathway-related genes in R. trigyna showed significant differences in transcript abundance under salt stress. Leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX, EC 1.14.11.19) is one of three dioxygenases in the flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of anthocyanidins from leucoanthocyanidins. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of R. trigyna LDOX (RtLDOX), and found RtLDOX recombinant protein was able to replace flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H, EC 1.14.11.9), another dioxygenase in the flavonoid pathway, to convert naringenin to dihydrokaempferol in vitro. R. trigyna LDOX can complement the Arabidopsis LDOX mutant transparent testa11 (tt11-11), which has reduced proanthocyanin (PA) and anthocyanin levels in seeds, to accumulate these two compounds. Thus, RtLDOX acts as a multifunctional dioxygenase to effect the synthesis of PA and anthocyanins and can perform F3H dioxygenase activities in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The RtLDOX promoter harbored many cis-acting elements that might be recognized and bound by transcription factors related to stress response. RtLDOX expression was strongly increased under salt stress, and RtLDOX transgenic Arabidopsis mutant under NaCl stress accumulated the content of flavonoids leading to an increased antioxidant activities and plant biomass. These results suggest that RtLDOX as a multifunctional dioxygenase in flavonoid biosynthesis involves in enhancing plant response to NaCl stress. PMID:27219053

  12. nana plant2 Encodes a Maize Ortholog of the Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis Gene DWARF1, Identifying Developmental Interactions between Brassinosteroids and Gibberellins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Norman B; Hartwig, Thomas; Budka, Josh; Fujioka, Shozo; Johal, Gurmukh; Schulz, Burkhard; Dilkes, Brian P

    2016-08-01

    A small number of phytohormones dictate the pattern of plant form affecting fitness via reproductive architecture and the plant's ability to forage for light, water, and nutrients. Individual phytohormone contributions to plant architecture have been studied extensively, often following a single component of plant architecture, such as plant height or branching. Both brassinosteroid (BR) and gibberellin (GA) affect plant height, branching, and sexual organ development in maize (Zea mays). We identified the molecular basis of the nana plant2 (na2) phenotype as a loss-of-function mutation in one of the two maize paralogs of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BR biosynthetic gene DWARF1 (DWF1). These mutants accumulate the DWF1 substrate 24-methylenecholesterol and exhibit decreased levels of downstream BR metabolites. We utilized this mutant and known GA biosynthetic mutants to investigate the genetic interactions between BR and GA. Double mutants exhibited additivity for some phenotypes and epistasis for others with no unifying pattern, indicating that BR and GA interact to affect development but in a context-dependent manner. Similar results were observed in double mutant analyses using additional BR and GA biosynthetic mutant loci. Thus, the BR and GA interactions were neither locus nor allele specific. Exogenous application of GA3 to na2 and d5, a GA biosynthetic mutant, also resulted in a diverse pattern of growth responses, including BR-dependent GA responses. These findings demonstrate that BR and GA do not interact via a single inclusive pathway in maize but rather suggest that differential signal transduction and downstream responses are affected dependent upon the developmental context. PMID:27288361

  13. Multiple Patterns of Regulation and Overexpression of a Ribonuclease-Like Pathogenesis-Related Protein Gene, OsPR10a, Conferring Disease Resistance in Rice and Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siou-Luan; Chen, Jyh-Lang; Jiang, Jian-Zhi; Chen, Bo-Hong; Hou, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Ruey-Shyang; Hong, Chwan-Yang; Ho, Shin-Lon

    2016-01-01

    An abundant 17 kDa RNase, encoded by OsPR10a (also known as PBZ1), was purified from Pi-starved rice suspension-cultured cells. Biochemical analysis showed that the range of optimal temperature for its RNase activity was 40–70°C and the optimum pH was 5.0. Disulfide bond formation and divalent metal ion Mg2+ were required for the RNase activity. The expression of OsPR10a::GUS in transgenic rice was induced upon phosphate (Pi) starvation, wounding, infection by the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), leaf senescence, anther, style, the style-ovary junction, germinating embryo and shoot. We also provide first evidence in whole-plant system, demonstrated that OsPR10a-overexpressing in rice and Arabidopsis conferred significant level of enhanced resistance to infection by the pathogen Xoo and Xanthomona campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), respectively. Transgenic rice and Arabidopsis overexpressing OsPR10a significantly increased the length of primary root under phosphate deficiency (-Pi) condition. These results showed that OsPR10a might play multiple roles in phosphate recycling in phosphate-starved cells and senescing leaves, and could improve resistance to pathogen infection and/or against chewing insect pests. It is possible that Pi acquisition or homeostasis is associated with plant disease resistance. Our findings suggest that gene regulation of OsPR10a could act as a good model system to unravel the mechanisms behind the correlation between Pi starvation and plant-pathogen interactions, and also provides a potential application in crops disease resistance. PMID:27258121

  14. Study of genes induced by ionizing radiations at Arabidopsis thaliana: identification and molecular characterization of the ATGR1 gene, a new gene encoding a protein involved in plant cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage, that can be experimentally introduced by ionizing radiation (IR), induces complex signal transduction pathways leading to cell recovery or, alternatively to programmed cell death if damages are too severe. To identify the inducible components of the response to genotoxic stress in plants, we have screened by Differential Display for mRNAs that rapidly and strongly accumulate after IR treatment in A. thaliana cells. We have characterized ATGR1, a new single copy Arabidopsis gene encoding a PEST-box protein of unknown function. In unstressed plant organs the ATGR1 mRNA is hardly detectable, whereas the protein is present in extracts prepared from roots, shoot meristems and inflorescences, that all contain large amounts of actively dividing cells. This pattern is confirmed by immuno localisation on tissue sections that shows constitutive ATGR1 protein expression covering the root elongation zone, the shoot meristem, leaf primordial and the ovules of developing flowers. Histochemical analysis of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ATGR1 promoter, demonstrate that the developmental and tissue-specific profile of ATGR1 protein expression is conferred by the gene promoter. The massive, transient and dose-dependent accumulation of ATGR1 transcripts after IR treatment observed in all plant organs does not lead to significant changes in ATGR1 protein pattern. Stable ATGR1 protein overexpression, as exemplified by transgenic A. thaliana plants that contain a 35S promoter-ATGR1 gene fusion, does not induce notable changes of the overall ATGR1 protein level, but leads to male and female sterility. The cause of sterility is a lack of correct chromosome assembly and distribution at the stage metaphase II of meiosis. Taken together our results show that i) ATGR1 gene expression is associated to cell division during plant development ii) the ATGR1 protein level is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level iii

  15. SRK2C, a SNF1-related protein kinase 2, improves drought tolerance by controlling stress-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Umezawa, Taishi; Yoshida, Riichiro; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation are major signaling events induced by osmotic stress in higher plants. Here, we showed that a SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2), SRK2C, is an osmotic-stress-activated protein kinase in Arabidopsis thaliana that can significantly impact drought tolerance of Arabidopsis plants. Knockout mutants of SRK2C exhibited drought hypersensitivity in their roots, suggesting that SRK2C is a positive regulator of drought tolerance in Arabidopsis roots. Addition...

  16. Arabidopsis SOI33/AtENT8 Gene Encodes a Putative Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter That Is Involved in Cytokinin Transport In Planta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqiang SUN; Naoya HIROSE; Xingchun WANG; Pei WEN; Li XUE; Hitoshi SAKAKIBARA; Jianru ZUO

    2005-01-01

    The plant phytohormone cytokinin plays an important role in many facets of plant growth and development by regulating cell division and differentiation. Recent studies have shed significant light into the mechanisms of cytokinin metabolism and signaling. However, little is known about how the hormone is transported in planta, although it has been proposed that the hormone is presumably transported in nucleoside-conjugated forms. Here, we report the identification and characterization of cytokinin transport ers in Arabidopsis. We previously reported that a gain-of-function mutation in the PGA22/AtIPT8 gene caused overproduction of cytokinins in planta. In an effort to screen for suppressor of pga22/atipt8 (soi) mutants, we identified a mutant soi33-1. Molecular and genetic analyses indicated that SOI33 encodes a putative equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT), previously designated as AtENT8. Members of this small gene family are presumed to be involved in the transport of nucleosides in eukaryotic cells. Under conditions of nitrogen starvation, loss-of-function mutations in SOI33/AtENT8 or in a related gene AtENT3 cause a reduced sensitivity to the nucleoside-type cytokinins isopentenyladenine riboside (iPR) and trans zeatin riboside (tZR), but display a normal response to the free base-type cytokinins isopentenyladenine (iP) and trans-zeatin (tZ). Conversely, overexpression of SOI33/AtENT8 renders transgenic plants hyper sensitive to iPR but not to iP. An in planta measurement experiment indicated that uptake efficiency of 3H labeled iPR was reduced more than 40% in soi33 and atent3 mutants. However, a mutation inAtENT1 had no substantial effect on the cytokinin response and iPR uptake efficiency. Our results suggest that SOI33/ AtENT8 and AtENT3 are involved in the transport of nucleoside-type cytokinins in Arabidopsis.

  17. Gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana: Root-specific action of the EHB gene and violation of the resultant law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dümmer, Michaela; Forreiter, Christoph; Galland, Paul

    2015-09-15

    Gravitropic bending of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana in response to centrifugal accelerations was determined in a range between 0.0025 and 4×g to revisit and validate the so-called resultant law, which claims that centrifugation causes gravitropic organs to orient parallel to the resultant stimulus vector. We show here for seedlings of A. thaliana that this empirical law holds for hypocotyls but surprisingly fails for roots. While the behavior of hypocotyls could be modeled by an arc tangent function predicted by the resultant law, roots displayed a sharp maximum at 1.8×g that substantially overshoots the predicted value and that represents a novel phenomenon, diagravitropism elicited by centrifugal acceleration. The gravitropic bending critically depended on the orientation of the seedling relative to the centrifugal acceleration. If the centrifugal vector pointed toward the cotyledons, gravitropic bending of hypocotyls and roots was substantially enhanced. The complex behavior of Arabidopsis seedlings provides strong evidence that gravitropic bending entails a cosine component (longitudinal stimulus) to which the seedlings were more sensitive than to the classical sine component. The absolute gravitropic thresholds of hypocotyls and roots were determined in a clinostat-centrifuge and found to be below 0.015×g. A tropism mutant lacking the EHB1 protein, which interacts with ARF-GAP (ARF GTPase-activating protein) and thus indirectly with a small ARF-type G protein, displayed a lower gravitropic threshold for roots and also enhanced bending, while the responses of the hypocotyls remained nearly unaffected. PMID:26496692

  18. A Rice Gene Homologous to Arabidopsis AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE1 Participates in Disease Resistance Response against Infection with Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga Young Jung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ALD1 (ABERRANT GROWTH AND DEATH2 [AGD2]-LIKE DEFENSE1 is one of the key defense regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. In these model plants, ALD1 is responsible for triggering basal defense response and systemic resistance against bacterial infection. As well ALD1 is involved in the production of pipecolic acid and an unidentified compound(s for systemic resistance and priming syndrome, respectively. These previous studies proposed that ALD1 is a potential candidate for developing genetically modified (GM plants that may be resistant to pathogen infection. Here we introduce a role of ALD1-LIKE gene of Oryza sativa, named as OsALD1, during plant immunity. OsALD1 mRNA was strongly transcribed in the infected leaves of rice plants by Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. OsALD1 proteins predominantly localized at the chloroplast in the plant cells. GM rice plants over-expressing OsALD1 were resistant to the fungal infection. The stable expression of OsALD1 also triggered strong mRNA expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN1 genes in the leaves of rice plants during infection. Taken together, we conclude that OsALD1 plays a role in disease resistance response of rice against the infection with rice blast fungus.

  19. Role of the plant-specific endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducible gene TIN1 in the formation of pollen surface structure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells triggers the transcriptional activation of ER-resident molecular chaperones and folding enzymes to maintain cellular homeostasis. This process is known as the ER stress response or the unfolded protein response. We have identified tunicamycin induced 1 (TIN1), a plant-specific ER stress-inducible Arabidopsis thaliana gene. The TIN1 protein is localized in the ER; however, its molecular function has yet to be clarified. In this study, we performed functional analysis of TIN1 in planta. RT-PCR analysis showed that TIN1 is highly expressed in pollen. Analysis using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene demonstrated that the TIN1 promoter is active throughout pollen development, peaking at the time of flowering and in an ovule of an open flower. Although a T-DNA insertion mutant of TIN1 grows normally under ambient laboratory conditions, abnormal pollen surface morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. Based on the current and previous observations, a possible physiological function of TIN1 during pollen development is discussed. © 2012 The Japanese Society for Plant Cell and Molecular Biology.

  20. Overexpression of a maize SNF-related protein kinase gene, ZmSnRK2.11, reduces salt and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fan; CHEN Xun-ji; WANG Jian-hua; ZHENG Jun

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) is a unique family of protein kinases associated with abiotic stress signal transduction in plants. In this study, a maize SnRK2 gene ZmSnRK2.11 was cloned and characterized. The results showed that ZmSnRK2.11 is up-regulated by high-salinity and dehydration treatment, and it is expressed mainly in maize mature leaf. A transient expression assay using onion epidermal cel s revealed that ZmSnRK2.11-GFP fusion proteins are localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Overexpressing-ZmSnRK2.11 in Arabidopsis resulted in salt and drought sensitivity phenotypes that exhibited an increased rate of water loss, reduced relative water content, delayed stoma closure, accumulated less free proline content and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content relative to the phenotypes observed in wild-type (WT) control. Furthermore, overexpression of ZmSnRK2.11 up-regulated the expression of the genes ABI1 and ABI2 and decreased the expression of DREB2A and P5CS1. Taken together, our results suggest that ZmSnRK2.11 is a possible negative regulator involved in the salt and drought stress signal transduction pathways in plants.

  1. Stress responsive gene CIPK14 is involved in phytochrome A-mediated far-red light inhibition of greening in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show that CIPK14,a stress responsive CBL-interacting protein kinase gene,is involved in phytochrome A-mediated far-red light inhibition of greening in Arabidopsis seedlings. The CIPK14-impairment mutant cipk14 grown in continuous far-red (FR) light did not show greening when exposed to white light illumination for 15 h. By contrast, the FR-grown phytochrome A null mutant phyA greened within 0.5 h of exposure to white light. Although greening of Col-4 (wild-type) was not completely abolished by FR, it exhibited a significantly decreased greening capacity compared with that of phyA. Further analyses demonstrated that the expression of protochlorophyllide reductase (POR) genes was correlated with the greening ability of the genotypes. In addition, CIPK14 appeared to be regulated by both the circadian clock and PhyA. Taken together, these results suggest that CIPK14 plays a role in PhyA-mediated FR inhibition of seedling greening, and that a Ca-related kinase may be involved in a previously undefined branch point in the phytochrome A signaling pathway.

  2. Ectopic expression of a grape aspartic protease gene, AP13, in Arabidopsis thaliana improves resistance to powdery mildew but increases susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rongrong; Tu, Mingxing; Wang, Xianhang; Zhao, Jiao; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Wang, Yuejin; Wang, Xiping

    2016-07-01

    The grape aspartic protease gene, AP13 was previously reported to be responsive, in Chinese wild Vitis quinquangularis cv. 'Shang-24', to infection by Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of powdery mildew disease, as well as to treatment with salicylic acid in V. labrusca×V. vinifera cv. 'Kyoho'. In the current study, we evaluated the expression levels of AP13 in 'Shang-24' in response to salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and ethylene (ET) treatments, as well as to infection by the necrotrophic fungus, Botrytis cinerea, and the transcript levels of VqAP13 decreased after B. cinerea infection and MeJA treatment, but increased following ET and SA treatments. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines over-expressing VqAP13 under the control of a constitutive promoter showed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew and to the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and accumulated more callose than wild type plants, while the resistance of transgenic A. thaliana lines to B. cinerea inoculation was reduced. In addition, the expression profiles of various disease resistance- related genes in the transgenic A. thaliana lines following infection by different pathogens were compared to the equivalent profiles in the wild type plants. The results suggest that VqAP13 action promotes the SA dependent signal transduction pathway, but suppresses the JA signal transduction pathway. PMID:27181943

  3. Mutation of a family 8 glycosyltransferase gene alters cell wall carbohydrate composition and causes a humidity-sensitive semi-sterile dwarf phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Nga T; Long, Debbie; Kiang, Sophie; Coupland, George; Shoue, Douglas A; Carpita, Nicholas C; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2003-11-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains about 400 genes coding for glycosyltransferases, many of which are predicted to be involved in the synthesis and remodelling of cell wall components. We describe the isolation of a transposon-tagged mutant, parvus, which under low humidity conditions exhibits a severely dwarfed growth phenotype and failure of anther dehiscence resulting in semi-sterility. All aspects of the mutant phenotype were partially rescued by growth under high-humidity conditions, but not by the application of growth hormones or jasmonic acid. The mutation is caused by insertion of a maize Dissociation (Ds) element in a gene coding for a putative Golgi-localized glycosyltransferase belonging to family 8. Members of this family, originally identified on the basis of similarity to bacterial lipooligosaccharide glycosyltransferases, include enzymes known to be involved in the synthesis of bacterial and plant cell walls. Cell-wall carbohydrate analyses of the parvus mutant indicated reduced levels of rhamnogalacturonan I branching and alterations in the abundance of some xyloglucan linkages that may, however, be indirect consequences of the mutation. PMID:15010604

  4. A Rice Gene Homologous to Arabidopsis AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE1 Participates in Disease Resistance Response against Infection with Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ga Young; Park, Ju Yeon; Choi, Hyo Ju; Yoo, Sung-Je; Park, Jung-Kwon; Jung, Ho Won

    2016-08-01

    ALD1 (ABERRANT GROWTH AND DEATH2 [AGD2]-LIKE DEFENSE1) is one of the key defense regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. In these model plants, ALD1 is responsible for triggering basal defense response and systemic resistance against bacterial infection. As well ALD1 is involved in the production of pipecolic acid and an unidentified compound(s) for systemic resistance and priming syndrome, respectively. These previous studies proposed that ALD1 is a potential candidate for developing genetically modified (GM) plants that may be resistant to pathogen infection. Here we introduce a role of ALD1-LIKE gene of Oryza sativa, named as OsALD1, during plant immunity. OsALD1 mRNA was strongly transcribed in the infected leaves of rice plants by Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus. OsALD1 proteins predominantly localized at the chloroplast in the plant cells. GM rice plants over-expressing OsALD1 were resistant to the fungal infection. The stable expression of OsALD1 also triggered strong mRNA expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEIN1 genes in the leaves of rice plants during infection. Taken together, we conclude that OsALD1 plays a role in disease resistance response of rice against the infection with rice blast fungus. PMID:27493611

  5. Hahb-10, a sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene, is regulated by light quality and quantity, and promotes early flowering when expressed in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Eva C; Dezar, Carlos A; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Chan, Raquel L

    2005-12-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper proteins constitute a family of transcription factors found only in plants. Expression patterns of the sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene Hahb-10 (Helianthus annuus homeobox-10), that belongs to the HD-Zip II subfamily, were analysed. Northern blots showed that Hahb-10 is expressed primarily in mature leaves, although expression is clearly detectable in younger leaves and also in stems. Considerably higher expression levels were detected in etiolated seedlings compared with light-grown seedlings. Induction of Hahb-10 expression was observed when seedlings were subjected to treatment with gibberellins. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express Hahb-10 under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter show special phenotypic characteristics such as darker cotyledons and planar leaves. A reduction in the life cycle of about 25% allowing earlier seed collection was also observed, and this phenomenon is clearly related to a shortened flowering time. When the number of plants per pot increased, the difference in developmental rate between transgenic and non-transformed individuals became larger. After gibberellin treatment, the relative difference in life cycle duration was considerably reduced. Several light-regulated genes have been tested as possible target genes of Hahb-10. One of them, PsbS, shows a different response to illumination conditions in transgenic plants compared with the response in wild-type plants while the other genes behave similarly in both genotypes. We propose that Hahb-10 functions in a signalling cascade(s) that control(s) plant responses to light quality and quantity, and may also be involved in gibberellin transduction pathways. PMID:16215272

  6. H2O2-Activated Up-Regulation of Glutathione in Arabidopsis Involves Induction of Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Cysteine Synthesis in the Chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guillaume Queval; Dorothée Thominet; Hélène Vanacker; Myroslawa Miginiac-Maslow; Bertrand Gakière; Graham Noctor

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione is a key player in cellular redox homeostasis and, therefore, in the response to H2O2, but the factors regulating oxidation-activated glutathione synthesis are still unclear. We investigated H2O2-induced glutathione synthesis in a conditional Arabidopsis catalase-deficient mutant (cat2). Plants were grown from seed at elevated CO2 for 5 weeks, then transferred to air in either short-day or long-day conditions. Compared to cat2 at elevated CO2 or wild-type plants in any condition, transfer of cat2 to air in both photoperiods caused measurable oxidation of the leaf glutathione pool within hours. Oxidation continued on subsequent days and was accompanied by accumulation of glutathione. This effect was stronger in cat2 transferred to air in short days, and was not linked to appreciable increases in the extractable activities of or transcripts encoding enzymes involved in the committed pathway of glutathione synthesis. In contrast, it was accompanied by increases in serine, O-acetylserine, and cysteine. These changes in metabolites were accompanied by induction of genes encoding adenosine phosphosulfate reductase (APR), particularly APR3, as well as a specific serine acetyltransferase gene (SAT2.1) encoding a chloroplastic SAT. Marked induction of these genes was only observed in cat2 transferred to air in short-day conditions, where cysteine and glutathione accumulation was most dramatic. Unlike other SAT genes, which showed negligible induction in cat2, the relative abundance of APR and SAT2.1 transcripts was closely correlated with marker transcripts for H2O2 signaling. Together, the data underline the importance of cysteine synthesis in oxidant-induced up-regulation of glutathione synthesis and suggest that the chloroplast makes an important contribution to cysteine production under these circumstances.

  7. Arabidopsis Transcription Factor Genes NF-YA1,5, 6, and 9 Play Redundant Roles in Male Gametogenesis, Embryogenesis, and Seed Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinye Mu; Helin Tan; Sulei Hong; Yan Liang; Jianru Zuo

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is a highly conserved transcription factor presented in all eukaryotic organisms,and is a heterotrimer consisting of three subunits:NF-YA,NF-YB,and NF-YC.In Arabidopsis,these three subunits are encoded by multigene families.The best-studied member of the NF-Y transcription factors is LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1),a NF-YB family member,which plays a critical role in embryogenesis and seed maturation.However,the function of most NF-Y genes remains elusive.Here,we report the characterization of four genes in the NF-YA family.We found that a gainof-function mutant of NF-YA1 showed defects in male gametogenesis and embryogenesis.Consistently,overexpression of NF-YA1,5,6,and 9 affects male gametogenesis,embryogenesis,seed morphology,and seed germination,with a stronger phenotype when overexpressing NF-YA1 and NF-YA9.Moreover,overexpression of these NF-YA genes also causes hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination,retarded seedling growth,and late flowering at different degrees.Intriguingly,overexpmssion of NF-YA1,5,6,and 9 is sufficient to induce the formation of somatic embryos from the vegetative tissues.However,single or double mutants of these NF-YA genes do not have detectable phenotype.Collectively,these results provide evidence that NF-YA1,5,6,and 9 play redundant roles in male gametophyte development,embryogenesis,seed development,and post-germinative growth.

  8. Impact of AtNHX1, a vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter, upon gene expression during short- and long-term salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumwald Eduardo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AtNHX1, the most abundant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter in Arabidopsis thaliana, mediates the transport of Na+ and K+ into the vacuole, influencing plant development and contributing to salt tolerance. In this report, microarray expression profiles of wild type plants, a T-DNA insertion knockout mutant of AtNHX1 (nhx1, and a 'rescued' line (NHX1::nhx1 were exposed to both short (12 h and 48 h and long (one and two weeks durations of a non-lethal salt stress to identify key gene transcripts associated with the salt response that are influenced by AtNHX1. Results 147 transcripts showed both salt responsiveness and a significant influence of AtNHX1. Fifty-seven of these genes showed an influence of the antiporter across all salt treatments, while the remaining genes were influenced as a result of a particular duration of salt stress. Most (69% of the genes were up-regulated in the absence of AtNHX1, with the exception of transcripts encoding proteins involved with metabolic and energy processes that were mostly down-regulated. Conclusion While part of the AtNHX1-influenced transcripts were unclassified, other transcripts with known or putative roles showed the importance of AtNHX1 to key cellular processes that were not necessarily limited to the salt stress response; namely calcium signaling, sulfur metabolism, cell structure and cell growth, as well as vesicular trafficking and protein processing. Only a small number of other salt-responsive membrane transporter transcripts appeared significantly influenced by AtNHX1.

  9. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole;

    2002-01-01

    unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially......Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been...

  10. Arabidopsis CAPRICE (MYB) and GLABRA3 (bHLH) Control Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Anthocyanin Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Takuji; Kunihiro, Asuka; Tominaga-Wada, Rumi

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana the MYB transcription factor CAPRICE (CPC) and the bHLH transcription factor GLABRA3 (GL3) are central regulators of root-hair differentiation and trichome initiation. By transforming the orthologous tomato genes SlTRY (CPC) and SlGL3 (GL3) into Arabidopsis, we demonstrated that these genes influence epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis, suggesting that tomato and Arabidopsis partially use similar transcription factors for epidermal cell differentiation. CPC a...

  11. Expression differences for genes involved in lignin, glutathione and sulphate metabolism in response to cadmium in Arabidopsis thaliana and the related Zn/Cd-hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortel, van de J.E.; Schat, H.; Moerland, P.D.; Loren van Themaat, Ver E.; Ent, van der S.; Blankestijn-de Vries, M.H.C.; Ghandilyan, A.; Tsiatsiani, S.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread, naturally occurring element present in soil, rock, water, plants and animals. Cd is a non-essential element for plants and is toxic at higher concentrations. Transcript profiles of roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and Thlaspi caerulescens plants exposed to Cd

  12. Towards the Identification of New Genes Involved in ABA-Dependent Abiotic Stresses Using Arabidopsis Suppressor Mutants of abh1 Hypersensitivity to ABA during Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Szarejko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid plays a pivotal role in the abiotic stress response in plants. Although great progress has been achieved explaining the complexity of the stress and ABA signaling cascade, there are still many questions to answer. Mutants are a valuable tool in the identification of new genes or new alleles of already known genes and in elucidating their role in signaling pathways. We applied a suppressor mutation approach in order to find new components of ABA and abiotic stress signaling in Arabidopsis. Using the abh1 (ABA hypersensitive 1 insertional mutant as a parental line for EMS mutagenesis, we selected several mutants with suppressed hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination. Here, we present the response to ABA and a wide range of abiotic stresses during the seed germination and young seedling development of two suppressor mutants—soa2 (suppressor of abh1 hypersensitivity to ABA 2 and soa3 (suppressor of abh1 hypersensitivity to ABA 3. Generally, both mutants displayed a suppression of the hypersensitivity of abh1 to ABA, NaCl and mannitol during germination. Both mutants showed a higher level of tolerance than Columbia-0 (Col-0—the parental line of abh1 in high concentrations of glucose. Additionally, soa2 exhibited better root growth than Col-0 in the presence of high ABA concentrations. soa2 and soa3 were drought tolerant and both had about 50% fewer stomata per mm2 than the wild-type but the same number as their parental line—abh1. Taking into account that suppressor mutants had the same genetic background as their parental line—abh1, it was necessary to backcross abh1 with Landsberg erecta four times for the map-based cloning approach. Mapping populations, derived from the cross of abh1 in the Landsberg erecta background with each suppressor mutant, were created. Map based cloning in order to identify the suppressor genes is in progress.

  13. The CArG boxes in the promoter of the Arabidopsis floral organ identity gene APETALA3 mediate diverse regulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilly, J J; Allen, D W; Jack, T

    1998-05-01

    APETALA3 is a MADS box gene required for normal development of the petals and stamens in the Arabidopsis flower. Studies in yeast, mammals and plants demonstrate that MADS domain transcription factors bind with high affinity to a consensus sequence called the CArG box. The APETALA3 promoter contains three close matches to the consensus CArG box sequence. To gain insights into the APETALA3 regulatory circuitry, we have analyzed the APETALA3 promoter using AP3::uidA(GUS) fusions. 496 base pairs of APETALA3 promoter sequence 5' to the transcriptional start directs GUS activity in the same temporal and spatial expression pattern as the APETALA3 RNA and protein in wild-type flowers. A synthetic promoter consisting of three tandem repeats of a 143 base pair sequence directs reporter gene activity exclusively to petals and stamens in the flower. We have analyzed the role of the CArG boxes by site-specific mutagenesis and find that the three CArG boxes mediate discrete regulatory effects. Mutations in CArG1 result in a decrease in reporter expression suggesting that CArG1 is the binding site for a positively acting factor or factors. Mutations in CArG2 result in a decrease in reporter expression in petals, but the expression pattern in stamens is unchanged. By contrast, mutations in CArG3 result in an increase in the level of reporter gene activity during early floral stages suggesting that CArG3 is the binding site for a negatively acting factor. PMID:9521903

  14. Ethylene signalling is involved in regulation of phosphate starvation-induced gene expression and production of acid phosphatases and anthocyanin in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, Mingguang

    2010-11-30

    With the exception of root hair development, the role of the phytohormone ethylene is not clear in other aspects of plant responses to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. The induction of AtPT2 was used as a marker to find novel signalling components involved in plant responses to Pi starvation. Using genetic and chemical approaches, we examined the role of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation. hps2, an Arabidopsis mutant with enhanced sensitivity to Pi starvation, was identified and found to be a new allele of CTR1 that is a key negative regulator of ethylene responses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene, increases plant sensitivity to Pi starvation, whereas the ethylene perception inhibitor Ag+ suppresses this response. The Pi starvation-induced gene expression and acid phosphatase activity are also enhanced in the hps2 mutant, but suppressed in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-5. By contrast, we found that ethylene signalling plays a negative role in Pi starvation-induced anthocyanin production. These findings extend the roles of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation and will help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying these responses. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. The Arabidopsis MUM2 gene encodes a beta-galactosidase required for the production of seed coat mucilage with correct hydration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Gillian H; Zheng, Huanquan; Tewari, Jagdish; Huang, Jun; Young, Diana S; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Western, Tamara L; Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C; Mansfield, Shawn D; Haughn, George W

    2007-12-01

    Seed coat development in Arabidopsis thaliana involves a complex pathway where cells of the outer integument differentiate into a highly specialized cell type after fertilization. One aspect of this developmental process involves the secretion of a large amount of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast. When the mature seed coat is exposed to water, this mucilage expands to break the primary cell wall and encapsulate the seed. The mucilage-modified2 (mum2) mutant is characterized by a failure to extrude mucilage on hydration, although mucilage is produced as normal during development. The defect in mum2 appears to reside in the mucilage itself, as mucilage fails to expand even when the barrier of the primary cell wall is removed. We have cloned the MUM2 gene and expressed recombinant MUM2 protein, which has beta-galactosidase activity. Biochemical analysis of the mum2 mucilage reveals alterations in pectins that are consistent with a defect in beta-galactosidase activity, and we have demonstrated that MUM2 is localized to the cell wall. We propose that MUM2 is involved in modifying mucilage to allow it to expand upon hydration, establishing a link between the galactosyl side-chain structure of pectin and its physical properties. PMID:18165329

  16. Identification of novel motif patterns to decipher the promoter architecture of co-expressed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    López, Yosvany; Patil, Ashwini; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    Background The understanding of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation remains a challenge for molecular biologists in the post-genome era. It is hypothesized that the regulatory regions of genes expressed in the same tissue or cell type share a similar structure. Though several studies have analyzed the promoters of genes expressed in specific metazoan tissues or cells, little research has been done in plants. Hence finding specific patterns of motifs to explain the promoter architectu...

  17. Tissue-specific expression of a gene encoding a cell wall-localized lipid transfer protein from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, S; Hecht, U; Kippers, A; Botella, J; De Vries, S; Somerville, C

    1994-05-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) from plants are characterized by their ability to stimulate phospholipid transfer between membranes in vitro. However, because these proteins are generally located outside of the plasma membrane, it is unlikely that they have a similar role in vivo. As a step toward identifying the function of these proteins, one of several LTP genes from Arabidoposis has been cloned and the expression pattern of the gene has been examined by analysis of the tissue specificity of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants containing LTP promoter-GUS fusions and by in situ mRNA localization. The LTP1 promoter was active early in development in protoderm cells of embryos, vascular tissues, lignified tips of cotyledons, shoot meristem, and stipules. In adult plants, the gene was expressed in epidermal cells of young leaves and the stem. In flowers, expression was observed in the epidermis of all developing influorescence and flower organ primordia, the epidermis of the siliques and the outer ovule wall, the stigma, petal tips, and floral nectaries of mature flowers, and the petal/sepal abscission zone of mature siliques. The presence of GUS activity in guard cells, lateral roots, pollen grains, leaf vascular tissue, and internal cells of stipules and nectaries was not confirmed by in situ hybridizations, supporting previous observations that suggest that the reporter gene is subject to artifactual expression. These results are consistent with a role for the LTP1 gene product in some aspect of secretion or deposition of lipophilic substances in the cell walls of expanding epidermal cells and certain secretory tissues. The LTP1 promoter region contained sequences homologous to putative regulatory elements of genes in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that the expression of the LTP1 gene may be regulated by the same or similar mechanisms as genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. PMID:8029357

  18. Expression of the Arabidopsis vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase gene (AVP1) improves the shoot biomass of transgenic barley and increases grain yield in a saline field

    KAUST Repository

    Schilling, Rhiannon K.

    2013-11-22

    Cereal varieties with improved salinity tolerance are needed to achieve profitable grain yields in saline soils. The expression of AVP1, an Arabidopsis gene encoding a vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase), has been shown to improve the salinity tolerance of transgenic plants in greenhouse conditions. However, the potential for this gene to improve the grain yield of cereal crops in a saline field has yet to be evaluated. Recent advances in high-throughput nondestructive phenotyping technologies also offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the growth of transgenic plants under abiotic stress through time. In this study, the growth of transgenic barley expressing AVP1 was evaluated under saline conditions in a pot experiment using nondestructive plant imaging and in a saline field trial. Greenhouse-grown transgenic barley expressing AVP1 produced a larger shoot biomass compared to segregants, as determined by an increase in projected shoot area, when grown in soil with 150 mm NaCl. This increase in shoot biomass of transgenic AVP1 barley occurred from an early growth stage and also in nonsaline conditions. In a saline field, the transgenic barley expressing AVP1 also showed an increase in shoot biomass and, importantly, produced a greater grain yield per plant compared to wild-type plants. Interestingly, the expression of AVP1 did not alter barley leaf sodium concentrations in either greenhouse- or field-grown plants. This study validates our greenhouse-based experiments and indicates that transgenic barley expressing AVP1 is a promising option for increasing cereal crop productivity in saline fields. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cerato-platanin induces resistance in Arabidopsis leaves through stomatal perception, overexpression of salicylic acid- and ethylene-signalling genes and camalexin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Baccelli

    Full Text Available Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs lead to the activation of the first line of plant defence. Few fungal molecules are universally qualified as MAMPs, and proteins belonging to the cerato-platanin protein (CPP family seem to possess these features. Cerato-platanin (CP is the name-giving protein of the CPP family and is produced by Ceratocystis platani, the causal agent of the canker stain disease of plane trees (Platanus spp.. On plane tree leaves, the biological activity of CP has been widely studied. Once applied on the leaf surface, CP acts as an elicitor of defence responses. The molecular mechanism by which CP elicits leaves is still unknown, and the protective effect of CP against virulent pathogens has not been clearly demonstrated. In the present study, we tried to address these questions in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results suggest that stomata rapidly sense CP since they responded to the treatment with ROS signalling and stomatal closure, and that CP triggers salicylic acid (SA- and ethylene (ET-signalling pathways, but not the jasmonic acid (JA-signalling pathway, as revealed by the expression pattern of 20 marker genes. Among these, EDS1, PAD4, NPR1, GRX480, WRKY70, ACS6, ERF1a/b, COI1, MYC2, PDF1.2a and the pathogenesis-related (PR genes 1-5. CP rapidly induced MAPK phosphorylation and induced the biosynthesis of camalexin within 12 hours following treatment. The induction of localised resistance was shown by a reduced susceptibility of the leaves to the infection with Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. These results contribute to elucidate the key steps of the signalling process underlying the resistance induction in plants by CP and point out the central role played by the stomata in this process.

  20. Ectopic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of an NB-ARC Encoding Putative Disease Resistance Gene from Wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata Enhances Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng eWen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant resistance proteins mediate pathogen recognition and activate innate immune responses to restrict pathogen proliferation. One common feature of these proteins is an NB-ARC domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a protein with an NB-ARC domain from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession Baihe-35-1, which was identified in a transcriptome analysis of the leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator (Schw., a causal agent of powdery mildew. Transcript levels of this gene, designated VpCN (GenBank accession number KT265084, increased strongly after challenge of grapevine leaves with E. necator. The deduced amino acid sequence was predicted to contain an NB-ARC domain in the C-terminus and an RxCC-like domain similar to CC domain of Rx protein in the N-terminus. Ectopic expression of VpCN in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type phenotype or a dwarf phenotype. The phenotypically normal transgenic A. thaliana showed enhance resistance to A. thaliana powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to a virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Moreover, promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase analysis revealed that powdery mildew infection induced the promoter activity of VpCN in grapevine leaves. Finally, a promoter deletion analysis showed that TC rich repeat elements likely play an important role in the response to E. necator infection. Taken together, our results suggest that VpCN contribute to powdery mildew disease resistant in grapevine.

  1. Ethylene Antagonizes Salt-Induced Growth Retardation and Cell Death Process via Transcriptional Controlling of Ethylene-, BAG- and Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Ling; Lin, Ying-Chao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Li, Lei-Peng; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The existing question whether ethylene is involved in the modulation of salt-induced cell death to mediate plant salt tolerance is important for understanding the salt tolerance mechanisms. Here, we employed Arabidopsis plants to study the possible role of ethylene in salt-induced growth inhibition and programmed cell death (PCD) profiles. The root length, DNA ladder and cell death indicated by Evan's blue detection were measured by compared to the control or salt-stressed seedlings. Secondly, the protoplasts isolated from plant leaves and dyed with Annexin V-FITC were subjected to flow cytometric (FCM) assay. Our results showed that ethylene works effectively in seedling protoplasts, antagonizing salt-included root retardation and restraining cell death both in seedlings or protoplasts. Due to salinity, the entire or partial insensitivity of ethylene signaling resulted in an elevated levels of cell death in ein2-5 and ein3-1 plants and the event were amended in ctr1-1 plants after salt treatment. The subsequent experiment with exogenous ACC further corroborated that ethylene could modulate salt-induced PCD process actively. Plant Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family genes are recently identified to play an extensive role in plant PCD processes ranging from growth, development to stress responses and even cell death. Our result showed that salinity alone significantly suppressed the transcripts of BAG6, BAG7 and addition of ACC in the saline solution could obviously re-activate BAG6 and BAG7 expressions, which might play a key role to inhibit the salt-induced cell death. In summary, our research implies that ethylene and salinity antagonistically control BAG family-, ethylene-, and senescence-related genes to alleviate the salt-induced cell death.

  2. Regulation of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE genes/microRNA 156 Module by the Homeodomain Proteins PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shruti Lal; Leo Bryan Pacis; Harley M.S. Smith

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of inflorescences is regulated in part by the temporal and spatial events that regulate flower specification.In Arabidopsis,an endogenous flowering time pathway mediated by a subset of SQUAMOSA PROMOTERBINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factors,including SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5,function to specify flowers by activating floral meristem identity genes.During shoot development,SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 are post-transcriptionally regulated by microRNA156 (miR156).The photoperiod regulated florigenic signal,FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT),promotes floral induction,in part by activating SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5.In turn,these SPLs function in parallel with FT to specify flower meristems.Two related BELL1-like homeobox genes PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) expressed in the shoot apical meristem are absolutely required for the specification of floral meristems.Genetic studies show that the floral specification function of FT depends upon PNY and PNF; however,the interplay between these homeodomain proteins and SPLs is not known.In this manuscript,we show that the photoperiodic floral induction of SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 is dependent upon PNY and PNF.Further,PNY and PNF also control SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 expression by negatively regulating miR156.Lastly,ectopic expression of SPL4 partially rescues the pny pnf non-flower-producing phenotype,while overexpression of SPL3 or SPL5 in pny pnf plants was unable to restore flower specification.These results suggest that:(1) SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 function is dependent upon PNY and PNF,or (2) expression of multiple SPLs is required for floral specification in pny pnf plants.

  3. Ethylene Antagonizes Salt-Induced Growth Retardation and Cell Death Process via Transcriptional Controlling of Ethylene-, BAG- and Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Ling; Lin, Ying-Chao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Li, Lei-Peng; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The existing question whether ethylene is involved in the modulation of salt-induced cell death to mediate plant salt tolerance is important for understanding the salt tolerance mechanisms. Here, we employed Arabidopsis plants to study the possible role of ethylene in salt-induced growth inhibition and programmed cell death (PCD) profiles. The root length, DNA ladder and cell death indicated by Evan's blue detection were measured by compared to the control or salt-stressed seedlings. Secondly, the protoplasts isolated from plant leaves and dyed with Annexin V-FITC were subjected to flow cytometric (FCM) assay. Our results showed that ethylene works effectively in seedling protoplasts, antagonizing salt-included root retardation and restraining cell death both in seedlings or protoplasts. Due to salinity, the entire or partial insensitivity of ethylene signaling resulted in an elevated levels of cell death in ein2-5 and ein3-1 plants and the event were amended in ctr1-1 plants after salt treatment. The subsequent experiment with exogenous ACC further corroborated that ethylene could modulate salt-induced PCD process actively. Plant Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family genes are recently identified to play an extensive role in plant PCD processes ranging from growth, development to stress responses and even cell death. Our result showed that salinity alone significantly suppressed the transcripts of BAG6, BAG7 and addition of ACC in the saline solution could obviously re-activate BAG6 and BAG7 expressions, which might play a key role to inhibit the salt-induced cell death. In summary, our research implies that ethylene and salinity antagonistically control BAG family-, ethylene-, and senescence-related genes to alleviate the salt-induced cell death. PMID:27242886

  4. OsSFR6 is a functional rice orthologue of SENSITIVE TO FREEZING-6 and can act as a regulator of COR gene expression, osmotic stress and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathugala, Deepthi L; Richards, Shane A; Knight, Heather; Knight, Marc R

    2011-09-01

    The Arabidopsis protein SENSITIVE TO FREEZING-6 (AtSFR6) is required for cold- and drought-inducible expression of COLD-ON REGULATED (COR) genes and, as a consequence, AtSFR6 is essential for osmotic stress and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. Therefore, orthologues of AtSFR6 in crop species represent important candidate targets for future manipulation of stress tolerance. We identified and cloned a homologue of AtSFR6 from rice (Oryza sativa), OsSFR6, and confirmed its orthology in Arabidopsis. OsSFR6 was identified by homology searches, and a full-length coding region isolated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from Oryza sativa cDNA. To test for orthology, OsSFR6 was expressed in an Arabidopsis sfr6 loss-of-function mutant background, and restoration of wild-type phenotypes was assessed. Searching the rice genome revealed a single homologue of AtSFR6. Cloning and sequencing the OsSFR6 coding region showed OsSFR6 to have 61.7% identity and 71.1% similarity to AtSFR6 at the predicted protein sequence level. Expression of OsSFR6 in the atsfr6 mutant background restored the wild-type visible phenotype, as well as restoring wild-type levels of COR gene expression and tolerance of osmotic and freezing stresses. OsSFR6 is an orthologue of AtSFR6, and thus a target for future manipulation to improve tolerance to osmotic and other abiotic stresses. PMID:21585388

  5. Physiological and molecular basis of Azospirillum-Arabidopsis Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Nazeer, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at revealing the early signalling events during the interaction of the diazotrophic soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense with its host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, taking advantage of the micro array technique, a comprehensive overview of Arabidopsis genes has been undertaken which are affected upon association with A. brasilense The characterization of the early responses of Arabidopsis plants upon inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense strain Sp7 ...

  6. HOS3, an ELO-Like Gene, Inhibits Effects of ABA and Implicates a S-1-P/Ceramide Control System for Abiotic Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanya M. Quist; Irina Sokolchik; Huazhong Shi; Robert J. Joly; Ray A. Bressan; Albino Maggio; Meena Narsimhan; Xia Li

    2009-01-01

    A hyper-osmotically sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, designated hos3-1 (high expression of osmotically responsive genes), was identified based on its hyper-luminescence of RD29A:LUC promoter fusion plants upon treatment with NaCI and ABA. These responses implicate the disrupted gene as a direct or indirect negative regulator of the RD29A stress-responsive pathway. By sequencing the flanking regions of the T-DNA borders, it was determined that the disrupted gene is at locus At4g36830, annotated as encoding a putative protein with high homology to CIG30 (ELO2/FEN1).CIG30 has been implicated in synthesis of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), which are essential precursors for sphingolipids and ceramides. Altered stress responses characteristic of ABA-hypersensitivity, including reduced root growth inhibition and reduced germination with ABA treatment and reduced water loss from leaves, were exhibited by allelic hos3-1 and hos3-2 mutants. The hos3-2 mutant is partially suppressed in its transcript abundance and is inherited as a recessive trait. Further, the HOS30RF under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter restored wild-type NaCI- and ABA-root growth sensitivity as well as RD29A:LUC luminescence in mutant plants. We also show here that the HOS3 wild-type gene functionally complements the sensitivity of elo2 and elo3 yeast mutants to monensin. Furthermore, both hos3-1 and hos3-2 alleles shared increased sensitivity to the herbicide Metolachlor, which inhibits acyl chain elongation in synthesis of VLCFA, and HOS3 functionally complemented both elo2 and elo3 and restored levels of VLCFA. Together, these data establish that HOS3 inhibits ABA-mediated stress responses and implicate the VLCFA pathway and products as control points for several aspects of abiotic stress signaling and responses. The results also provide support for a role of ceramide in the control of stomatal behavior.

  7. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 and 3 genes have a post-meristematic effect on Arabidopsis thaliana phyllotaxis

    KAUST Repository

    Burian, Agata

    2015-02-12

    Background and Aims: The arrangement of flowers in inflorescence shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana represents a regular spiral Fibonacci phyllotaxis. However, in the cuc2 cuc3 double mutant, flower pedicels are fused to the inflorescence stem, and phyllotaxis is aberrant in the mature shoot regions. This study examined the causes of this altered development, and in particular whether the mutant phenotype is a consequence of defects at the shoot apex, or whether post-meristematic events are involved. Methods: The distribution of flower pedicels and vascular traces was examined in cross-sections of mature shoots; sequential replicas were used to investigate the phyllotaxis and geometry of shoot apices, and growth of the young stem surface. The expression pattern of CUC3 was analysed by examining its promoter activity. Key Results: Phyllotaxis irregularity in the cuc2 cuc3 double mutant arises during the post-meristematic phase of shoot development. In particular, growth and cell divisions in nodes of the elongating stem are not restricted in the mutant, resulting in pedicel-stem fusion. On the other hand, phyllotaxis in the mutant shoot apex is nearly as regular as that of the wild type. Vascular phyllotaxis, generated almost simultaneously with the phyllotaxis at the apex, is also much more regular than pedicel phyllotaxis. The most apparent phenotype of the mutant apices is a higher number of contact parastichies. This phenotype is associated with increased meristem size, decreased angular width of primordia and a shorter plastochron. In addition, the appearance of a sharp and deep crease, a characteristic shape of the adaxial primordium boundary, is slightly delayed and reduced in the mutant shoot apices. Conclusions: The cuc2 cuc3 double mutant displays irregular phyllotaxis in the mature shoot but not in the shoot apex, thus showing a post-meristematic effect of the mutations on phyllotaxis. The main cause of this effect is the formation of pedicel-stem fusions

  8. AthaMap web tools for the analysis of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    The AthaMap database provides a map of verified and predicted transcription factor (TF) and small RNA-binding sites for the A. thaliana genome. The database can be used for bioinformatic predictions of putative regulatory sites. Several online web tools are available that address specific questions. Starting with the identification of transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS) in any gene of interest, colocalizing TFBS can be identified as well as common TFBS in a set of user-provided genes. Furthermore, genes can be identified that are potentially targeted by specific transcription factors or small inhibitory RNAs. This chapter provides detailed information on how each AthaMap web tool can be used online. Examples on how this database is used to address questions in circadian and diurnal regulation are given. Furthermore, complementary databases and databases that go beyond questions addressed with AthaMap are discussed. PMID:24792049

  9. SPATULA, a gene that controls development of carpel margin tissues in Arabidopsis, encodes a bHLH protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, M G; Atkinson, A; Bylstra, Y H; Walsh, R; Smyth, D R

    2001-04-01

    Studies involving mutants of the gene SPATULA indicate that it promotes the growth of carpel margins and of pollen tract tissues derived from them. We show that it encodes a new member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. SPATULA is expressed in marginal and pollen tract tissues throughout their development confirming its role in regulating their growth. It is also expressed in many other tissues where it may act redundantly to control growth, including the peripheral zone of the shoot apical meristem, and specific tissues within leaves, petals, stamens and roots. Expression in the stomium, funiculus and valve dehiscence zone indicates an additional role in abscission. SPATULA expression does not require the function of the other carpel development genes CRABS CLAW and AGAMOUS, although its expression is repressed in first whorl organs by the A function gene APETALA2. Further, we have shown that disruptions to gynoecial pattern formation seen in ettin mutants can largely be attributed to ectopic SPATULA action. ETTIN's role seems to be to negatively regulate SPATULA expression in abaxial regions of the developing gynoecium. SPATULA is the first basic-helix-loop-helix gene in plants known to play a role in floral organogenesis. PMID:11245574

  10. Variation of five major glucosinolate genes in Brassica rapa in relation to Brassica oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Qiu, D.; Quiros, F.

    2010-07-01

    Glucosinolates and their derivatives isothiocyanates are important secondary metabolites in the Brassica cea that has biological activity, such as cancer protecting and bio fumigant properties. The putative ortho logs of five major genes in the glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway, Bra.GSELONG.a, Bra.GSALK.a, Bra.CYP83B1, Bra.SUR1.a and Bra.ST5.a, were cloned from both cDNA and genomic DNA from different subspecies of Brassica rapa. Inter species comparative analysis disclosed high conservation of exon number and size for GS-Elong, GS-Alk, GS-CYP83B1 and GS-ST5a among B. rapa, B. oleracea and A. thaliana. Splice site mutations caused the differences observed for exon numbers and sizes in GS-SUR1 among the three species. However, the exonic sequences were highly conserved for this gene. There were not major differences of intronic sizes among the three species for these genes, except for intron 1 for GS-Elong in two subspecies of B. rapa. The cloning of the putative ortho logs of all these major genes involved in the glucosinolate biosynthesis pathway of B. rapa and sequence analysis provide a useful base for their genetic manipulation and functional analysis. (Author) 31 refs.

  11. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters encoded by distinct Al tolerance genes function independently in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum (Al) -activated malate and citrate exudation from roots plays an important role in conferring Al tolerance to many plant species. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of AtMATE, the gene encoding an Al-activated root citrate efflux transporter that functions in Arabid...

  12. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b 6 f (Cytb 6 f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  13. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 gene is required for boundary and shoot meristem formation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vroemen, Casper W; Mordhorst, Andreas P; Albrecht, Cathy;

    2003-01-01

    revealing an even higher degree of redundancy in this class of genes than was thought previously. The CUC3 expression pattern, the cuc3 phenotypes, and CUC3 expression in a series of shoot meristem mutants and transgenes suggest a primary role for CUC3 in the establishment of boundaries that contain cells...

  14. Target Genes of the MADS Transcription Factor SEPALLATA3: Integration of Developmental and Hormonal Pathways in the Arabidopsis Flower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Kerstin; Muiño, Jose M; Jauregui, Ruy; Airoldi, Chiara A; Smaczniak, Cezary; Krajewski, Pawel; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which floral homeotic genes act as major developmental switches to specify the identity of floral organs are still largely unknown. Floral homeotic genes encode transcription factors of the MADS-box family, which are supposed to assemble in a combinatorial fashion into organ-specific multimeric protein complexes. Major mediators of protein interactions are MADS-domain proteins of the SEPALLATA subfamily, which play a crucial role in the development of all types of floral organs. In order to characterize the roles of the SEPALLATA3 transcription factor complexes at the molecular level, we analyzed genome-wide the direct targets of SEPALLATA3. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by ultrahigh-throughput sequencing or hybridization to whole-genome tiling arrays to obtain genome-wide DNA-binding patterns of SEPALLATA3. The results demonstrate that SEPALLATA3 binds to thousands of sites in the genome. Most potential target sites that were strongly bound in wild-type inflorescences are also bound in the floral homeotic agamous mutant, which displays only the perianth organs, sepals, and petals. Characterization of the target genes shows that SEPALLATA3 integrates and modulates different growth-related and hormonal pathways in a combinatorial fashion with other MADS-box proteins and possibly with non-MADS transcription factors. In particular, the results suggest multiple links between SEPALLATA3 and auxin signaling pathways. Our gene expression analyses link the genomic binding site data with the phenotype of plants expressing a dominant repressor version of SEPALLATA3, suggesting that it modulates auxin response to facilitate floral organ outgrowth and morphogenesis. Furthermore, the binding of the SEPALLATA3 protein to cis-regulatory elements of other MADS-box genes and expression analyses reveal that this protein is a key component in the regulatory transcriptional network underlying the formation of floral organs. PMID:19385720

  15. ASYMMETRIC-LEAVES2 and an ortholog of eukaryotic NudC domain proteins repress expression of AUXIN-RESPONSE-FACTOR and class 1 KNOX homeobox genes for development of flat symmetric leaves in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanako Ishibashi

    2012-01-01

    Leaf primordia form around the shoot apical meristem, which consists of indeterminate stem cells. Upon initiation of leaf development, adaxial-abaxial patterning is crucial for appropriate lateral expansion, via cellular proliferation, and the formation of flat symmetric leaves. Many genes that specify such patterning have been identified, but regulation by upstream factors of the expression of relevant effector genes remains poorly understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2 and AS1 play important roles in repressing transcription of class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX genes and leaf abaxial-determinant effector genes. We report here a mutation, designated enhancer of asymmetric leaves2 and asymmetric leaves1 (eal, that is associated with efficient generation of abaxialized filamentous leaves on the as2 or as1 background. Levels of transcripts of many abaxial-determinant genes, including ETTIN (ETT/AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3, and all four class 1 KNOX genes were markedly elevated in as2 eal shoot apices. Rudimentary patterning in as2 eal leaves was suppressed by the ett mutation. EAL encodes BOBBER1 (BOB1, an Arabidopsis ortholog of eukaryotic NudC domain proteins. BOB1 was expressed in plant tissues with division potential and bob1 mutations resulted in lowered levels of transcripts of some cell-cycle genes and decreased rates of cell division in shoot and root apices. Coordinated cellular proliferation, supported by BOB1, and repression of all class 1 KNOX genes, ETT/ARF3 by AS2 (AS1 and BOB1 might be critical for repression of the indeterminate state and of aberrant abaxialization in the presumptive adaxial domain of leaf primordia, which might ensure the formation of flat symmetric leaves.

  16. 拟南芥转or基因突变体转录组及表型分析%TRANSCRIPTOME AND PHENOTYPE ANALYSES OF or GENE TRANSGENIC ARABIDOPSIS MUTANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    门潇; 孙天虎; 杨永华

    2012-01-01

    构建了拟南芥orange(or)过表达突变体和相应的对照组,通过比较它们在色素含量、转录组、表型等方面的变化,发现or在绿色组织(拟南芥叶子、茎等)中也能起到提高类胡萝卜素含量的作用,且突变体类胡萝卜素合成途径的基因转录水平没有显著变化,但是很多防卫胁迫相关基因转录水平上调,说明突变体中存在胁迫环境.对不同生长条件下突变体幼苗下胚轴的测量等表明or突变体对光尤其是蓝光变得十分敏感.本研究分析比较了or在不同组织中的效应,为or应用于改良作物类胡萝卜素含量的基因工程和进一步揭示or的作用机制提供了参考.%It is known that orange(or) gene mutation leads to increased carotenoids content in plants.To elucidate the detailed mechanisms involved,Arabidopsis plants with over-expressed or and vector-only control were generated.Pigment content,transcriptome profile and mutant phenotypes were investigated.It was found that or was functional in green tissues,such as leaves and stems,although less functional than in non-green tissues.No major changes in transcription pattern were found for genes involved in carotenoids biosynthesis,but resistance-related genes,such as ZAT,were up-regulated,implying stressed environment in or mutants.Hypocotyl length measurements under different light conditions suggested that the or mutant became sensitive to light especially to blue light.Carotenoids enhancement of or in different plant tissues was analyzed,providing a reference for genetic engineering using or to improve nutritional status of crops,and for future work to uncover or regulatory mechanisms.

  17. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K+ uptake and Na+ transport in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The AtCCX5 protein coding a putative cation calcium exchanger was characterized. → AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. → AtCCX5 protein did not show the same transport properties as the CAXs. → AtCCX5 protein involves in mediating high-affinity K+ uptake in yeast. → AtCCX5 protein also involves in Na+ transport in yeast. -- Abstract: The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Ba2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Li+) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K+ and Na+ in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn2+. The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K+ (0.5 mM), and also suppressed its Na+ sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K+ uptake and was also involved in Na+ transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K+ uptake and Na+ transport in yeast.

  18. Dominant and recessive mutations in the Raf-like kinase HT1 gene completely disrupt stomatal responses to CO2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Monda, Keina; Higaki, Takumi; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Toshiaki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Iba, Koh

    2016-05-01

    HT1 (HIGH LEAF TEMPERATURE 1) is the first component associated with changes in stomatal aperture in response to CO2 to be isolated by forward genetic screening. The HT1 gene encodes a protein kinase expressed mainly in guard cells. The loss-of-function ht1-1 and ht1-2 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana have CO2-hypersensitive stomatal closure with concomitant reductions in their kinase activities in vitro In addition to these mutants, in this study we isolate or obtaine five new ht1 alleles (ht1-3, ht1-4, ht1-5, ht1-6, and ht1-7). Among the mutants, only ht1-3 has a dominant mutant phenotype and has widely opened stomata due to CO2 insensitivity. The ht1-3 mutant has a missense mutation affecting a non-conserved residue (R102K), whereas the other six recessive mutants have mutations in highly conserved residues in the catalytic domains required for kinase activity. We found that the dominant mutation does not affect the expression of HT1 or the ability to phosphorylate casein, a universal kinase substrate, but it does affect autophosphorylation activity in vitro A 3D structural model of HT1 also shows that the R102 residue protrudes from the surface of the kinase, implying a role for the formation of oligomers and/or interaction with its targets. We demonstrate that both the loss-of-function and gain-of-function ht1 mutants have completely disrupted CO2 responses, although they have normal responses to ABA. Furthermore, light-induced stomatal opening is smaller in ht1-3 and much smaller in ht1-2 Taken together, these results indicate that HT1 is a critical regulator for CO2 signaling and is partially involved in the light-induced stomatal opening pathway. PMID:27034327

  19. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-03-31

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT‐encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T‐DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol‐localized, mevalonate‐derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  20. A wheat PI4K gene whose product possesses threonine autophophorylation activity confers tolerance to drought and salt in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Pei; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Pan-Pan, Lu; Hu, Di; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are involved in regulation of recruitment and activity of signalling proteins in cell membranes. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4-kinases (PI4Ks) generate PI4-phosphate the precursor of regulatory phosphoinositides. No type II PI4K research on the abiotic stress response has previously been reported in plants. A stress-inducible type II PI4K gene, named TaPI4KIIγ, was obtained by de novo transcriptome sequencing of drought-treated wheat (Triticum aestivum). TaPI4KIIγ, localized o...

  1. Overexpression of the lily p70(s6k) gene in Arabidopsis affects elongation of flower organs and indicates TOR-dependent regulation of AP3, PI and SUP translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Tsai-Yu; Kong, Lih-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hung; Shaw, Chih-Chi; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2009-09-01

    The p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70(s6k)) signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating the cell cycle via translational regulation of specific 5'TOP mRNAs. However, the function of this signaling pathway is still poorly understood in plants. Ectopic expression of the lily putative p70(s6k) gene, LS6K1, resulted in up-regulation of NAP (NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI) and PISTILLATA (PI) expression, and significantly inhibited cell expansion for petals and stamens, resulting in the male sterility phenotype in transgenic Arabidopsis. Sequence analysis revealed that the genes involved in petal and stamen development, such as APETALA3 (AP3), PI and SUPERMAN (SUP), probably encode 5'TOP mRNAs. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), fused to oligopyrimidine tract sequences that were identified in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of AP3, PI and SUP, was translationally regulated in human cells in response to mitogen stimulation and inhibition by the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. Furthermore, 35S::LS6K1 significantly up-regulated beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in the flower buds of transgenic plants carrying the GUS transgene fused to the AP3 promoter and the 5' UTR. These results have identified a novel role for the p70(s6k) gene in regulating cell division and the expansion of petals and stamens by translational regulation of the 5'TOP mRNAs once ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis. PMID:19651701

  2. Harpin-induced expression and transgenic overexpression of the phloem protein gene AtPP2-A1 in Arabidopsis repress phloem feeding of the green peach aphid Myzus persicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of plants with HrpNEa, a protein of harpin group produced by Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria, induces plant resistance to insect herbivores, including the green peach aphid Myzus persicae, a generalist phloem-feeding insect. Under attacks by phloem-feeding insects, plants defend themselves using the phloem-based defense mechanism, which is supposed to involve the phloem protein 2 (PP2, one of the most abundant proteins in the phloem sap. The purpose of this study was to obtain genetic evidence for the function of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis PP2-encoding gene AtPP2-A1 in resistance to M. persicae when the plant was treated with HrpNEa and after the plant was transformed with AtPP2-A1. Results The electrical penetration graph technique was used to visualize the phloem-feeding activities of apterous agamic M. persicae females on leaves of Arabidopsis plants treated with HrpNEa and an inactive protein control, respectively. A repression of phloem feeding was induced by HrpNEa in wild-type (WT Arabidopsis but not in atpp2-a1/E/142, the plant mutant that had a defect in the AtPP2-A1 gene, the most HrpNEa-responsive of 30 AtPP2 genes. In WT rather than atpp2-a1/E/142, the deterrent effect of HrpNEa treatment on the phloem-feeding activity accompanied an enhancement of AtPP2-A1 expression. In PP2OETAt (AtPP2-A1-overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants, abundant amounts of the AtPP2-A1 gene transcript were detected in different organs, including leaves, stems, calyces, and petals. All these organs had a deterrent effect on the phloem-feeding activity compared with the same organs of the transgenic control plant. When a large-scale aphid population was monitored for 24 hours, there was a significant decrease in the number of aphids that colonized leaves of HrpNEa-treated WT and PP2OETAt plants, respectively, compared with control plants. Conclusions The repression in phloem-feeding activities of

  3. Arabidopsis Myrosinase Genes AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 Are Root-Tip Specific and Contribute to Auxin Biosynthesis and Root-Growth Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant myrosinases (β-thioglucoside glucohydrolases are classified into two subclasses, Myr I and Myr II. The biological function of Myr I has been characterized as a major biochemical defense against insect pests and pathogens in cruciferous plants. However, the biological function of Myr II remains obscure. We studied the function of two Myr II member genes AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 in Arabidopsis. RT-PCR showed that both genes were specifically expressed in roots. GUS-assay revealed that both genes were expressed in the root-tip but with difference: AtTGG4 was expressed in the elongation zone of the root-tip, while AtTGG5 was expressed in the whole root-tip. Moreover, myrosin cells that produce and store the Myr I myrosinases in aboveground organs were not observed in roots, and AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 were expressed in all cells of the specific region. A homozygous double mutant line tgg4tgg5 was obtained through cross-pollination between two T-DNA insertion lines, tgg4E8 and tgg5E12, by PCR-screening in the F2 and F3 generations. Analysis of myrosinase activity in roots of mutants revealed that AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 had additive effects and contributed 35% and 65% myrosinase activity in roots of the wild type Col-0, respectively, and myrosinase activity in tgg4tgg5 was severely repressed. When grown in Murashiege & Skoog (MS medium or in soil with sufficient water, Col-0 had the shortest roots, and tgg4tgg5 had the longest roots, while tgg4E8 and tgg5E12 had intermediate root lengths. In contrast, when grown in soil with excessive water, Col-0 had the longest roots, and tgg4tgg5 had the shortest roots. These results suggested that AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 regulated root growth and had a role in flood tolerance. The auxin-indicator gene DR5::GUS was then introduced into tgg4tgg5 by cross-pollination. DR5::GUS expression patterns in seedlings of F1, F2, and F3 generations indicated that AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 contributed to auxin biosynthesis in roots. The proposed

  4. Arabidopsis Myrosinase Genes AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 Are Root-Tip Specific and Contribute to Auxin Biosynthesis and Root-Growth Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lili; Wang, Meng; Han, Bingying; Tan, Deguan; Sun, Xuepiao; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-01-01

    Plant myrosinases (β-thioglucoside glucohydrolases) are classified into two subclasses, Myr I and Myr II. The biological function of Myr I has been characterized as a major biochemical defense against insect pests and pathogens in cruciferous plants. However, the biological function of Myr II remains obscure. We studied the function of two Myr II member genes AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 in Arabidopsis. RT-PCR showed that both genes were specifically expressed in roots. GUS-assay revealed that both genes were expressed in the root-tip but with difference: AtTGG4 was expressed in the elongation zone of the root-tip, while AtTGG5 was expressed in the whole root-tip. Moreover, myrosin cells that produce and store the Myr I myrosinases in aboveground organs were not observed in roots, and AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 were expressed in all cells of the specific region. A homozygous double mutant line tgg4tgg5 was obtained through cross-pollination between two T-DNA insertion lines, tgg4E8 and tgg5E12, by PCR-screening in the F2 and F3 generations. Analysis of myrosinase activity in roots of mutants revealed that AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 had additive effects and contributed 35% and 65% myrosinase activity in roots of the wild type Col-0, respectively, and myrosinase activity in tgg4tgg5 was severely repressed. When grown in Murashiege & Skoog (MS) medium or in soil with sufficient water, Col-0 had the shortest roots, and tgg4tgg5 had the longest roots, while tgg4E8 and tgg5E12 had intermediate root lengths. In contrast, when grown in soil with excessive water, Col-0 had the longest roots, and tgg4tgg5 had the shortest roots. These results suggested that AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 regulated root growth and had a role in flood tolerance. The auxin-indicator gene DR5::GUS was then introduced into tgg4tgg5 by cross-pollination. DR5::GUS expression patterns in seedlings of F1, F2, and F3 generations indicated that AtTGG4 and AtTGG5 contributed to auxin biosynthesis in roots. The proposed mechanism is that

  5. Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia P; Sipari, Nina; Lindfors, Anders V; Strid, Åke; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum, UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm), are key environmental signals modifying several aspects of plant physiology. Despite significant advances in the understanding of plant responses to UV-B and the identification of signalling components involved, there is limited information on the molecular mechanisms that control UV-B signalling in plants under natural sunlight. Here, we aimed to corroborate the previous suggested role for RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) in UV-B signalling under full spectrum sunlight. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the rcd1-1 mutant were used in an experimental design outdoors where UV-B and UV-A irradiances were manipulated using plastic films, and gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation and metabolite profiles were analysed in the leaves. At the level of transcription, RCD1 was not directly involved in the solar UV-B regulation of genes with functions in UV acclimation, hormone signalling and stress-related markers. Furthermore, RCD1 had no role on PDX1 accumulation but modulated the UV-B induction of flavonoid accumulation in leaves of Arabidopsis exposed to solar UV. We conclude that RCD1 does not play an active role in UV-B signalling but rather modulates UV-B responses under full spectrum sunlight. PMID:24689869

  6. Colonization of the Arabidopsis rhizosphere by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. activates a root-specific, ethylene-responsive PR-5 gene in the vascular bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.; Verhagen, B.W.M.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Pelt, J.A. van; Rep, M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Plants of which the roots are colonized by selected strains of non-pathogenic, fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. develop an enhanced defensive capacity against a broad spectrum of foliar pathogens. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance (ISR) functions independently of sa

  7. HrpNEa -induced deterrent effect on phloem feeding of the green peach aphid Myzus persicae requires AtGSL5 and AtMYB44 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beibei Lü; Weiwei Sun; Shuping Zhang; Chunling Zhang; Jun Qian; Xiaomeng Wang; Rong Gao; Hansong Dong

    2011-03-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) treated with the harpin protein HrpNEa, resistance to the green peach aphid Myzus persicae, a generalist phloem-feeding insect, develops with induced expression of the AtMYB44 gene. Special GLUCAN SYNTHESIS-LIKE (GSL) genes and -1,3-glucan callose play an important role in plant defence responses to attacks by phloem-feeding insects. Here we report that AtGLS5 and AtMYB44 are both required for HrpNEa-induced repression of M. persicae feeding from the phloem of Arabidopsis leaves. In 24 h successive surveys on large-scale aphid populations, the proportion of feeding aphids was much smaller in HrpNEa-treated plants than in control plants, and aphids preferred to feed from the 37 tested atgsl mutants rather than the wild-type plant. The atgsl mutants were generated previously by mutagenesis in 12 identified AtGSL genes (AtGSL1 through AtGSL12); in the 24 h survey, both atgsl5 and atgsl6 tolerated aphid feeding, and atgsl5 was the most tolerant. Consistently, atgsl5 was also most inhibitive to the deterrent effect of HrpNEa on the phloem-feeding activity of aphids as monitored by the electrical penetration graph technique. These results suggested an important role of the AtGSL5 gene in the effect of HrpNEa. In response to HrpNEa, AtGSL5 expression and callose deposition were induced in the wild-type plant but not in atgsl5. In response to HrpNEa, moreover, the AtMYB44 gene known to be required for repression of aphid reproduction on the plant was also required for repression of the phloem-feeding activity. Small amounts of the AtGSL5 transcript and callose deposition were detected in the atmyb44 mutant, as in atgsl5. Both mutants performed similarly in tolerating the phloem-feeding activity and impairing the deterrent effect of HrpNEa, suggesting that AtGSL5 and AtMYB44 both contributed to the effect.

  8. The embryonic leaf identity gene FUSCA3 regulates vegetative phase transitions by negatively modulating ethylene-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumba Shelley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The embryonic temporal regulator FUSCA3 (FUS3 plays major roles in the establishment of embryonic leaf identity and the regulation of developmental timing. Loss-of-function mutations of this B3 domain transcription factor result in replacement of cotyledons with leaves and precocious germination, whereas constitutive misexpression causes the conversion of leaves into cotyledon-like organs and delays vegetative and reproductive phase transitions. Results Herein we show that activation of FUS3 after germination dampens the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis and response to the plant hormone ethylene, whereas a loss-of-function fus3 mutant shows many phenotypes consistent with increased ethylene signaling. This FUS3-dependent regulation of ethylene signaling also impinges on timing functions outside embryogenesis. Loss of FUS3 function results in accelerated vegetative phase change, and this is again partially dependent on functional ethylene signaling. This alteration in vegetative phase transition is dependent on both embryonic and vegetative FUS3 function, suggesting that this important transcriptional regulator controls both embryonic and vegetative developmental timing. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the embryonic regulator FUS3 not only controls the embryonic-to-vegetative phase transition through hormonal (ABA/GA regulation but also functions postembryonically to delay vegetative phase transitions by negatively modulating ethylene-regulated gene expression.

  9. Characterization of a glutamine synthetase gene DvGS1 from Dunaliella viridis and investigation of the impact on expression of DvGS1 in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenguang; Fan, Qianlan; Wang, Wei; Shen, Chunlei; Wang, Peipei; Meng, Xiangzong; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2014-01-01

    A novel glutamine synthetase (GS) gene DvGS1 showing highest amino acid sequence identity of 78 % with the other homologous GS proteins from green algae, was isolated and characterized from Dunaliella viridis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that DvGS1 occupied an independent phylogenetic position which was different with the GSs from higher plants, animals and microbes. Functional complement in E. coli mutant confirmed that the DvGS1 encoded functional GS enzyme. Real-time PCR analysis of DvGS1 in D. viridis cells under nitrogen starvation revealed that the mRNA level of DvGS1 was positively up-regulated in 12 h. The DvGS1 levels at the points of 12 and 24 h were separately twofold and fourfold of the level before nitrogen starvation. In order to investigate the potential application of DvGS1 in higher plants, the transgenic study of DvGS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana was carried out. Phenotype identification demonstrated that all three transgenic lines of T3 generation showed obviously enhanced root length (26 %), fresh weight (22-46 % at two concentrations of nitrate supplies), stem length (26 %), leaf size (29 %) and silique number (30 %) compared with the wild-type Arabidopsis. Biochemical analysis confirmed that all three transgenic lines had higher total nitrogen content, soluble protein concentration, total amino acid content and the leaf GS activity than the wild type plants. The free NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) concentration in fresh leaves of three transgenic lines were reduced by 17-26 % and 14-15 % separately (at two concentrations of nitrate supplies) compared with those of the wild types. All the results indicated that over-expression of DvGS1 in Arabidopsis significantly results in the improvement of growth phenotype and the host's nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:24307252

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287630 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287630 J065073I15 At5g22260.1 68418.m02593 male ... sterility 1 protein, putative (MS1) identical ... to male ... sterility 1 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|1555 ... fam profile PF00628: PHD-finger; identical to cDNA male ... sterility 1 protein (ms1 gene) GI:15554514 3e-78 ...

  11. Facile high-throughput forward chemical genetic screening by in situ monitoring of glucuronidase-based reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek eHalder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biologically active small molecules to perturb biological functions holds enormous potential for investigating complex signaling networks. However, in contrast to animal systems, the search for and application of chemical tools for basic discovery in the plant sciences, generally referred to as ‘chemical genetics’, has only recently gained momentum. In addition to cultured cells, the well-characterized, small-sized model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is suitable for cultivation in microplates, which allows employing diverse cell- or phenotype-based chemical screens. In such screens, a chemical’s bioactivity is typically assessed either through scoring its impact on morphological traits or quantifying molecular attributes such as enzyme or reporter activities. Here, we describe a facile forward chemical screening methodology for intact Arabidopsis seedlings harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter by directly quantifying GUS activity in situ with 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide (4-MUG as substrate. The quantitative nature of this screening assay has an obvious advantage over the also convenient histochemical GUS staining method, as it allows application of statistical procedures and unbiased hit selection based on threshold values as well as distinction between compounds with strong or weak bioactivity. At the same time, the in situ bioassay is very convenient requiring less effort and time for sample handling in comparison to the conventional quantitative in vitro GUS assay using 4-MUG, as validated with several Arabidopsis lines harboring different GUS reporter constructs. To demonstrate that the developed assays is particularly suitable for large-scale screening projects, we performed a pilot screen for chemical activators or inhibitors of salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling using the Arabidopsis PR1p::GUS line. Importantly, the screening methodology provided here can be adopted for any inducible GUS reporter line.

  12. PUB16 gene expression under abiotic stress and their putative role as an ARM repeat protein in Arabidopsis thaliana self-pollination pathway

    OpenAIRE

    María Gabriela Acosta; Miguel Ángel Ahumada; Sergio Luis Lassaga; Víctor Hugo Casco

    2012-01-01