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Sample records for arabidopsis protein kinase

  1. Characterization of a calmodulin binding protein kinase from Arabidopsis thalian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A full-length calmodulin binding protein kinase cDNA, AtCBK1, from Arabidopsis has been isolated by screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library and by 5′-RACE. Northern blot and in situ hybridization indicated that the expression of AtCBK1 was more abundant in the vascular bundles and the meristems than in other tissues. The phylogenetic analyses reveal that AtCBK1 is different from animal CaMKs and it falls into CRK subgroup, indicating that they may come from different ancestors. The result suggests that AtCBK1 encodes a CaM-binding serine/threonine protein kinase.

  2. The protein kinase TOUSLED facilitates RNAi in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Nazim; Dunoyer, Patrice; Schott, Gregory; Akhter, Salina; Shi, Chunlin; Lucas, William J; Voinnet, Olivier; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-07-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA that is processed into 21- to 24-nt small interfering (si)RNA or micro (mi)RNA by RNaseIII-like enzymes called Dicers. Gene regulations by RNA silencing have fundamental implications in a large number of biological processes that include antiviral defense, maintenance of genome integrity and the orchestration of cell fates. Although most generic or core components of the various plant small RNA pathways have been likely identified over the past 15 years, factors involved in RNAi regulation through post-translational modifications are just starting to emerge, mostly through forward genetic studies. A genetic screen designed to identify factors required for RNAi in Arabidopsis identified the serine/threonine protein kinase, TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations in TSL affect exogenous and virus-derived siRNA activity in a manner dependent upon its kinase activity. By contrast, despite their pleiotropic developmental phenotype, tsl mutants show no defect in biogenesis or activity of miRNA or endogenous trans-acting siRNA. These data suggest a possible role for TSL phosphorylation in the specific regulation of exogenous and antiviral RNA silencing in Arabidopsis and identify TSL as an intrinsic regulator of RNA interference. PMID:24920830

  3. Arabidopsis Yak1 protein (AtYak1) is a dual specificity protein kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2015-10-09

    Yak1 is a member of dual-specificity Tyr phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) that are evolutionarily conserved. The downstream targets of Yak1 and their functions are largely unknown. Here, a homologous protein AtYAK1 was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and the phosphoprotein profiles of the wild type and an atyak1 mutant were compared on two-dimensional gel following Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein gel staining. Annexin1, Annexin2 and RBD were phosphorylated at serine/ threonine residues by the AtYak1 kinase. Annexin1, Annexin2 and Annexin4 were also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Our study demonstrated that AtYak1 is a dual specificity protein kinase in Arabidopsis that may regulate the phosphorylation status of the annexin family proteins.

  4. An Autophosphorylation Site of the Protein Kinase SOS2 Is Important for Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hiroaki; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase SOS2 (Salt Overly Sensitive 2) is essential for salt-stress signaling and tolerance in Arabidopsis. SOS2 is known to be activated by calcium-SOS3 and by phosphorylation at its activation loop. SOS2 is autophosphorylated in vitro, but the autophosphorylation site and its role in salt tolerance are not known. In this study, we identified an autophosphorylation site in SOS2 and analyzed its role in the responses of Arabidopsis to salt stress. Mass spectrometry analysis showed ...

  5. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-04-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 (K48M) ) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5-3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 (K48M) under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 (K48M) mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 (K48M) , mpk6, and PTP1 (S7AS8A) under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  6. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  7. SRK2C, a SNF1-related protein kinase 2, improves drought tolerance by controlling stress-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Umezawa, Taishi; Yoshida, Riichiro; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation are major signaling events induced by osmotic stress in higher plants. Here, we showed that a SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2), SRK2C, is an osmotic-stress-activated protein kinase in Arabidopsis thaliana that can significantly impact drought tolerance of Arabidopsis plants. Knockout mutants of SRK2C exhibited drought hypersensitivity in their roots, suggesting that SRK2C is a positive regulator of drought tolerance in Arabidopsis roots. Addition...

  8. Regulation of WRKY46 transcription factor function by mitogen-activated protein kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsheed Hussain Sheikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are central signalling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defence as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defence.

  9. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Arsheed H; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  10. An Autophosphorylation Site of the Protein Kinase SOS2 Is Important for Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki Fujii; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase SOS2 (Salt Overly Sensitive 2) is essential for salt-stress signaling and tolerance in Arabidopsis. SOS2 is known to be activated by calcium-SOS3 and by phosphorylation at its activation loop. SOS2 is autophosphorylated in vitro, but the autophosphorylation site and its role in salt tolerance are not known. In this study, we identified an autophosphorylation site in SOS2 and analyzed its role in the responses of Arabidopsis to salt stress. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Ser 228 of SOS2 is autophosphorylated. When this site was mutated to Ala, the autophosphorylation rate of SOS2 decreased. The substrate phosphorylation by the mutated SOS2 was also less than that by the wild-type SOS2. In contrast, changing Ser228 to Asp to mimic the autophosphorylation enhanced substrate phosphorylation by SOS2. Complementation tests in a sos2 mutant showed that the S228A but not the S228D mutation partially disrupted the function of SOS2 in salt tolerance. We also show that activation loop phosphorylation at Thr168 and autophosphorylation at Ser228 cannot substitute for each other, suggesting that both are required for salt tolerance. Our results indicate that Ser 228 of SOS2 is autophosphorylated and that this autophosphorylation is important for SOS2 function under salt stress.

  11. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    OpenAIRE

    Villamor, J. G.; Kaschani, F.; Colby, T; Oeljeklaus, J.; Zhao, D; Kaiser, M.; Patricelli, M. P.; R. A. L. van der Hoorn

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding prot...

  12. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines eLassowskat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs target a variety of protein substrates to regulate cellular signaling processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the number of identified MAPK substrates that control plant defense responses is still limited. Here, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an inducible system to simulate in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6. Metabolome analysis revealed that this artificial MPK3/6 activation (without any exposure to pathogens or other stresses is sufficient to drive the production of major defense-related metabolites, including various camalexin, indole glucosinolate and agmatine derivatives. An accompanying (phosphoproteome analysis led to detection of hundreds of potential phosphoproteins downstream of MPK3/6 activation. Besides known MAPK substrates, many candidates on this list possess typical MAPK-targeted phosphosites and in many cases, the corresponding phosphopeptides were detected by mass spectrometry. Notably, several of these putative phosphoproteins have been reported to be associated with the biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense substances (e.g. WRKY transcription factors and proteins encoded by the genes from the PEN pathway required for penetration resistance to filamentous pathogens. Thus, this work provides an inventory of candidate phosphoproteins, including putative direct MAPK substrates, for future analysis of MAPK-mediated defense control. (Proteomics data are available with the identifier PXD001252 via ProteomeXchange, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org.

  13. Activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Arabidopsis by chitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jinrong; Zhang, Shuqun; Stacey, Gary

    2004-03-01

    SUMMARY Chitin, a polysaccharide composed of beta-1-->4-linked N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, has been shown or implicated as a signal in plant defence and development. However, the key components of chitin perception and downstream signalling in non-leguminous plants are largely unknown. In recent years, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and their cascades were shown to transduce various extracellular stimuli into internal cellular responses. To investigate the possible involvement of MAPKs in chitin signalling in plants, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was treated with crab-shell chitin and also with the purified chitin oligomers (degree of polymerization, d.p. = 2-8). Both mRNA levels and kinase activity of two MAPK genes, AtMPK6 and AtMPK3, were monitored after treatment. The mRNA of AtMPK3 was strongly up-regulated by both chitin and its larger oligomers (d.p. = 6-8), but the mRNA of AtMPK6 did not appear to be regulated by these treatments. However, the kinase activity of both MAPKs was induced by chitin and the larger oligomers (d.p. = 6-8), with AtMPK6 much more strongly induced. In addition, WRKY22, WRKY29, WRKY33 and WRKY53, which encode four WRKY transcription factors that recognize TTGAC(C/T) W-box elements in promoters of numerous plant defence-related genes, were up-regulated by these treatments. WRKY33 and WRKY53 expression was induced by the transgenic expression of the tobacco MAPKK NtMEK2 active mutant NtMEK2(DD), suggesting a potential role for these WRKY transcription factors in relaying the signal generated from the MAPK cascade to downstream genes. These data suggest that AtMPK6/AtMPK3 and WRKY transcription factors (such as WRKY33 and WRKY53) may be important components of a pathway involved in chitin signalling in Arabidopsis plants.

  14. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  15. Biochemical and functional analysis of CTR1, a protein kinase that negatively regulates ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yafan; Li, Hui; Hutchison, Claire E.; Laskey, James; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2003-01-01

    CTR1 encodes a negative regulator of the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. The C-terminal domain of CTR1 is similar to the Raf family of protein kinases, but its first two-thirds encodes a novel protein domain. We used a variety of approaches to investigate the function of these two CTR1 domains. Recombinant CTR1 protein was purified from a baculoviral expression system, and shown to possess intrinsic Ser/Thr protein kinase activity with enzymatic properties similar to Raf-1. Deletion of the N-terminal domain did not elevate the kinase activity of CTR1, indicating that, at least in vitro, this domain does not autoinhibit kinase function. Molecular analysis of loss-of-function ctr1 alleles indicated that several mutations disrupt the kinase catalytic domain, and in vitro studies confirmed that at least one of these eliminates kinase activity, which indicates that kinase activity is required for CTR1 function. One missense mutation, ctr1-8, was found to result from an amino acid substitution within a new conserved motif within the N-terminal domain. Ctr1-8 has no detectable effect on the kinase activity of CTR1 in vitro, but rather disrupts the interaction with the ethylene receptor ETR1. This mutation also disrupts the dominant negative effect that results from overexpression of the CTR1 amino-terminal domain in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that CTR1 interacts with ETR1 in vivo, and that this association is required to turn off the ethylene-signaling pathway.

  16. A maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, ZmMKK1, positively regulated the salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohua; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Li; Liu, Yang; Pan, Jiaowen; Li, Dequan

    2014-07-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signal transduction modules in animals, plants and yeast. MAPK cascades are complicated networks and play vital roles in signal transduction pathways involved in biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a maize MAPKK gene, ZmMKK1, was characterized. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that ZmMKK1 transcripts were induced by diverse stresses and ABA signal molecule in maize root. Further study showed that the ZmMKK1-overexpressing Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance to salt and drought stresses. However, seed germination, post-germination growth and stomatal aperture analysis demonstrated that ZmMKK1 overexpression was sensitive to ABA in transgenic Arabidopsis. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that the overexpression of ZmMKK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced the expression of ROS scavenging enzyme- and ABA-related genes, such as POD, CAT, RAB18 and RD29A under salt and drought conditions. In addition, heterologous overexpression of ZmMKK1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) improved the tolerance to salt and drought stresses. These results suggested that ZmMKK1 might act as an ABA- and ROS-dependent protein kinase in positive modulation of salt and drought tolerance. Most importantly, ZmMKK1 interacted with ZmMEKK1 as evidenced by yeast two-hybrid assay, redeeming a deficiency of MAPK interaction partners in maize. PMID:24974327

  17. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses.

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    Nasar Virk

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

  18. The MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 Kinase Cascade Negatively Regulates Immunity Mediated by a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qing; Qu, Na; Gao, Minghui; Zhang, Zhibin; Ding, Xiaojun; Yang, Fan; Li, Yingzhong; Dong, Oliver X.; Chen, She; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade represses cell death and immune responses. In mekk1, mkk1 mkk2, and mpk4 mutants, programmed cell death and defense responses are constitutively activated, but the mechanism by which MEKK1, MKK1/MKK2, and MPK4 negatively regulate cell death and immunity was unknown. From a screen for suppressors of mkk1 mkk2, we found that mutations in suppressor of mkk1 mkk2 1 (summ1) suppress the cell death and defense responses not only in mkk1 mkk2 but also in mekk1 and mpk4. SUMM1 encodes the MAP kinase kinase kinase MEKK2. It interacts with MPK4 and is phosphorylated by MPK4 in vitro. Overexpression of SUMM1 activates cell death and defense responses that are dependent on the nucleotide binding–leucine-rich repeat protein SUMM2. Taken together, our data suggest that the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 kinase cascade negatively regulates MEKK2 and activation of MEKK2 triggers SUMM2-mediated immune responses. PMID:22643122

  19. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  20. Regulation of salt and ABA responses by CIPK14, a calcium sensor interacting protein kinase in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Calcium and protein kinase serve as the common mediators to regulate plant responses to multiple stresses including salt and ABA stimulus. Here we reported a novel protein kinase (CIPK14) that regulated the responses to ABA treatment and salt stress in Arabidopsis. CIPK14 transcripts, capable been checked in roots, stems, leaves and flowers, were highly expressed in flowers and roots. CIPK14 was induced by ABA and salt treatments. The disruption of CIPK14 altered the transcriptional pattern of a gene marker line related to ABA and salt responses, and the results suggested that CIPK14 probably was responsible to the control of the salt and ABA responses. Comparing with wild types, the lines inserted with the T-DNA in which CIPK14 gene expression was knocked out were also more sensitive to ABA and salt stimulus, showing low germination rate and the less root elongation. While, when these conditioned seeds were treated with norflurazon, their germination percentages could recover to a certain extent. We also found that exogenous calcium could have an effect on the transcription of CIPK14 under ABA and salt treatments, and it seemed that calcium ion might work upstream CIPK14 to regulate the plant response to ABA and salt response.

  1. Regulation of salt and ABA responses by CIPK14, a calcium sensor interacting protein kinase in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN YuZhi; LI Xu; GUO Ming; DENG KeQin; LIN dianZhong; TANG DongYing; GUO XinHong; LIU XuanMing

    2008-01-01

    Calcium and protein kinsse serve as the common mediators to regulate plant responses to multiple stresses including salt and ABA stimulus. Here we reported a novel protein kinase (CIPK14) that regulated the responses to ABA treatment and salt stress in Arabidopsis. CIPK14 transcripts, capable been checked in roots, stems, leaves and flowers, were highly expressed in flowers and roots. CIPK14 was induced by ABA and salt treatments. The disruption of CIPK14 altered the transcriptional pattern of a gene marker line related to ABA and salt responses, and the results suggested that CIPK14 probably was responsible to the control of the salt and ABA responses. Comparing with wild types, the lines inserted with the T-DNA in which CIPK14 gene expression was knocked out were also more sensitive to ABA and salt stimulus, showing low germination rate and the less root elongation. While, when these conditioned seeds were treated with norflurazon, their germination percentages could recover to a certain extent. We also found that exogenous calcium could have an effect on the transcription of CIPK14 under ABA end salt treatments, and it seemed that calcium ion might work upstream ClPK14 to regulate the plant response to ABA and salt response.

  2. Genome-wide cloning and sequence analysis of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Yuan Tong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane receptor kinases play critical roles in both animal and plant signaling pathways regulating growth, development, differentiation, cell death, and pathogenic defense responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are at least 223 Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs, representing one of the largest protein families. Although functional roles for a handful of LRR-RLKs have been revealed, the functions of the majority of members in this protein family have not been elucidated. Results As a resource for the in-depth analysis of this important protein family, the complementary DNA sequences (cDNAs of 194 LRR-RLKs were cloned into the GatewayR donor vector pDONR/ZeoR and analyzed by DNA sequencing. Among them, 157 clones showed sequences identical to the predictions in the Arabidopsis sequence resource, TAIR8. The other 37 cDNAs showed gene structures distinct from the predictions of TAIR8, which was mainly caused by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Most of the genes have been further cloned into GatewayR destination vectors with GFP or FLAG epitope tags and have been transformed into Arabidopsis for in planta functional analysis. All clones from this study have been submitted to the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC at Ohio State University for full accessibility by the Arabidopsis research community. Conclusions Most of the Arabidopsis LRR-RLK genes have been isolated and the sequence analysis showed a number of alternatively spliced variants. The generated resources, including cDNA entry clones, expression constructs and transgenic plants, will facilitate further functional analysis of the members of this important gene family.

  3. MicroRNA biogenesis factor DRB1 is a phosphorylation target of mitogen activated protein kinase MPK3 in both rice and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuram, Badmi; Sheikh, Arsheed H; Rustagi, Yashika; Sinha, Alok K

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis requires AtDRB1 (double-stranded RNA binding protein)/HYL1 (Hyponastic Leaves1) protein for processing and maturation of miRNA precursors. The AtDRB1/HYL1 protein associates with AtDCL1 (Dicer-Like1) and accurately processes primary-miRNAs (pri-mRNAs) first to precursor-miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) and finally to mature miRNAs. The dephosphorylation of AtDRB1/HYL1 protein is very important for the precise processing of miRNA precursors. The monocot model crop plant Oryza sativa encodes four orthologues of AtDRB1/HYL1 protein, the only one encoded by Arabidopsis thaliana. The present study focuses on the functionality of the O. sativa DRBs as the orthologues of AtDRB1/HYL1 by using RNA binding assays and in planta protein-protein interaction analysis. Further, mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3 is established as the kinase phosphorylating DRB1 protein in both the model plants, O. sativa and Arabidopsis. MicroRNA microarray analysis in atmpk3 and atmpk6 mutants indicate the importance of AtMPK3 in maintaining the level of miRNAs in the plant.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase I protein is present in sporophytic and gametophytic cells and undergoes endocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwaaitaal, M.A.C.J.; Vries, de S.C.; Russinova, E.T.

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing AtSERK1 fused to yellow-fluorescent protein were generated. Fluorescence was detected predominantly at the cell periphery, most likely the plasma membrane, of cells in ovules, embryo sacs, anthers, and embryos and in seedlings. The AtSERK1 protein was detected

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15227263 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 93 putative protein kinase Arabidopsis thaliana MKLVLEGVDSFETLRVVGTFNCIDPDYVGSKRVTKKADVYAFEVILMELITGRKANYETLSVDEQNLVMWLRPKIKISTFLNLVDGTIATDKETIKRIKKIAKLAEYCTSQEVESRPLRASRTKSGNEVTSED ...

  6. A maize calcium-dependent protein kinase gene, ZmCPK4, positively regulated abscisic acid signaling and enhanced drought stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Li; Pan, Jiaowen; Liu, Yang; Kong, Xiangpei; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dequan

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play essential roles in calcium-mediated signal transductions in plant response to abiotic stress. Several members have been identified to be regulators for plants response to abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. Here, we isolated a subgroup I CDPK gene, ZmCPK4, from maize. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the ZmCPK4 transcripts were induced by various stresses and signal molecules. Transient and stable expression of the ZmCPK4-GFP fusion proteins revealed ZmCPK4 localized to the membrane. Moreover, overexpression of ZmCPK4 in the transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced ABA sensitivity in seed germination, seedling growth and stomatal movement. The transgenic plants also enhanced drought stress tolerance. Taken together, the results suggest that ZmCPK4 might be involved in ABA-mediated regulation of stomatal closure in response to drought stress. PMID:23911729

  7. The functional interplay between protein kinase CK2 and CCA1 transcriptional activity is essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Portolés

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are daily biological oscillations driven by an endogenous mechanism known as circadian clock. The protein kinase CK2 is one of the few clock components that is evolutionary conserved among different taxonomic groups. CK2 regulates the stability and nuclear localization of essential clock proteins in mammals, fungi, and insects. Two CK2 regulatory subunits, CKB3 and CKB4, have been also linked with the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian system. However, the biological relevance and the precise mechanisms of CK2 function within the plant clockwork are not known. By using ChIP and Double-ChIP experiments together with in vivo luminescence assays at different temperatures, we were able to identify a temperature-dependent function for CK2 modulating circadian period length. Our study uncovers a previously unpredicted mechanism for CK2 antagonizing the key clock regulator CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1. CK2 activity does not alter protein accumulation or subcellular localization but interferes with CCA1 binding affinity to the promoters of the oscillator genes. High temperatures enhance the CCA1 binding activity, which is precisely counterbalanced by the CK2 opposing function. Altering this balance by over-expression, mutation, or pharmacological inhibition affects the temperature compensation profile, providing a mechanism by which plants regulate circadian period at changing temperatures. Therefore, our study establishes a new model demonstrating that two opposing and temperature-dependent activities (CCA1-CK2 are essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

  8. Overexpression of a maize SNF-related protein kinase gene, ZmSnRK2.11, reduces salt and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fan; CHEN Xun-ji; WANG Jian-hua; ZHENG Jun

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) is a unique family of protein kinases associated with abiotic stress signal transduction in plants. In this study, a maize SnRK2 gene ZmSnRK2.11 was cloned and characterized. The results showed that ZmSnRK2.11 is up-regulated by high-salinity and dehydration treatment, and it is expressed mainly in maize mature leaf. A transient expression assay using onion epidermal cel s revealed that ZmSnRK2.11-GFP fusion proteins are localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Overexpressing-ZmSnRK2.11 in Arabidopsis resulted in salt and drought sensitivity phenotypes that exhibited an increased rate of water loss, reduced relative water content, delayed stoma closure, accumulated less free proline content and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content relative to the phenotypes observed in wild-type (WT) control. Furthermore, overexpression of ZmSnRK2.11 up-regulated the expression of the genes ABI1 and ABI2 and decreased the expression of DREB2A and P5CS1. Taken together, our results suggest that ZmSnRK2.11 is a possible negative regulator involved in the salt and drought stress signal transduction pathways in plants.

  9. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Weiyan; Li, Baohua; Li, Shujia; Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Ma, Mei; Wang, Jiyao; Gao, Jin; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development. PMID:27618482

  10. Protein Kinase D family kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lo...

  11. A protein–protein interaction network linking the energy-sensor kinase SnRK1 to multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlen Nietzsche

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1 represents a central integrator of low energy signaling and acclimation towards many environmental stress responses. Although SnRK1 acts as a convergent point for many different environmental and metabolic signals to control growth and development, it is currently unknown how these many different signals could be translated into a cell-type or stimulus specific response since many components of SnRK1-regulated signaling pathways remain unidentified. Recently, we have demonstrated that proteins containing a domain of unknown function (DUF 581 interact with the catalytic α subunits of SnRK1 (AKIN10/11 from Arabidopsis thaliana and could potentially act as mediators conferring tissue- and stimulus-type specific differences in SnRK1 regulation. To further extend the SnRK1 signaling network in plants, we systematically screened for novel DUF581 interaction partners using the yeast two-hybrid system. A deep and exhaustive screening identified 17 interacting partners for 10 of the DUF581 proteins tested. Many of these novel interaction partners are implicated in cellular processes previously associated with SnRK1 signaling. Furthermore, we mined publicly available interaction data to identify additional DUF581 interacting proteins. A protein–protein interaction network resulting from our studies suggests connections between SnRK1 signaling and other central signaling pathways involved in growth regulation and environmental responses. These include TOR and MAP-kinase signaling as well as hormonal pathways. The resulting protein–protein interaction network promises to be effective in generating hypotheses to study the precise mechanisms SnRK1 signaling on a functional level.

  12. The Arabidopsis Homolog of the Mammalian OS-9 Protein Plays a Key Role in the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Misfolded Receptor-Like Kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Su; Yidan Liu; Yang Xia; Zhi Hong; Jianming Li

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation(ERAD)is a highly conserved mechanism to remove misfolded membrane/secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum(ER).While many of the individual components of the ERAD machinery are well characterized in yeast and mammals,our knowledge of a plant ERAD process is rather limited.Here,we report a functional study of an Arabidopsis homolog(AtOS9)of an ER luminal lectin Yos9(OS-9 in mammals)that recognizes a unique asparagine-linked glycan on misfolded proteins.We discovered that AtOS9 is an ER-localized glycoprotein that is co-expressed with many known/predicted ER chaperones.AT-DNA insertional atos9-t mutation blocks the degradation of a structurally imperfect yet biochemically competent brassinosteroid(BR)receptor bri1-9,causing its increased accumulation in the ER and its consequent leakage to the cell surface responsible for restoring the BR sensitivity and suppressing the dwarfism of the bri1-9 mutant.In addition,we identified a missense mutation in AtOS9 in a recently discovered ERAD mutant ems-mutagenized bri1 suppressor 6(ebs6-1).Moreover,we showed that atos9-t also inhibits the ERAD of bri1-5,another ER-retained BR receptor,and a misfolded EFR,a BRI1-like receptor for the bacterial translation elongation factor EF-Tu.Furthermore,we found that AtOS9 interacted biochemically and genetically with EBS5,an Arabidopsis homolog of the yeast Hrd3/mammalian Sel1L known to collaborate with Yos9/OS-9 to select ERAD clients.Taken together,our results demonstrated a functional role of AtOS9 in a plant ERAD process that degrades misfolded receptor-like kinases.

  13. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohscheider, Jens N; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2016-06-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid-protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  14. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Jia, Wen-Jing; Chu, Yu-Jia; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring, and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses. We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2, which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation, and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin. The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation, which could be recovered with exogenous auxin, and interestingly, delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin. Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2. In addition, analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P(2) reduction, which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins (PIN2 and 3), and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pip5k2 roots. On the contrary, PtdIns(4,5)P(2) significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins. These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response, and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in root development through regulation of PIN proteins, providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response, and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport. PMID:21894193

  15. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Mei; Wen-Jing Jia; Yu-Jia Chu; Hong-Wei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase(PIP5K)catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate(PtdIns(4,5)P2)by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring,and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses.We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2,which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation,and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin.The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation,which could be recovered with exogenous auxin,and interestingly,delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin.Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2.In addition,analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P2 reduction,which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins(PIN2 and 3),and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pipSk2 roots.On the contrary,PtdIns(4,5)P2 significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins.These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response,and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/Ptdlns(4,5)P2 in root development through regulation of PIN proteins,providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response,and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport.

  16. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  17. Genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis protein kinases MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 indicates roles in cell expansion and embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwongsar, Suraphon; Strohm, Allison K; Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode protein kinases related to cdc7p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that the map3kε1;map3kε2 double-mutant combination causes pollen lethality. In this study, we have used an ethanol-inducible promoter construct to rescue this lethal phenotype and create map3kε1(-/-);map3kε2(-/-) double-mutant plants in order to examine the function of these genes in the sporophyte. These rescued double-mutant plants carry a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-MAP3Kε1 transgene under the control of the alcohol-inducible AlcA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. The double-mutant plants were significantly smaller and had shorter roots than wild-type when grown in the absence of ethanol treatment. Microscopic analysis indicated that cell elongation was reduced in the roots of the double-mutant plants and cell expansion was reduced in rosette leaves. Treatment with ethanol to induce expression of YFP-MAP3Kε1 largely rescued the leaf phenotypes. The double-mutant combination also caused embryos to arrest in the early stages of development. Through the use of YFP reporter constructs we determined that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are expressed during embryo development, and also in root tissue. Our results indicate that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 have roles outside of pollen development and that these genes affect several aspects of sporophyte development.

  18. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Yu; Jia, Wen-Jing; Chu, Yu-Jia; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring, and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses. We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2, which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation, and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin. The knockout mutant pip5k...

  19. Synergistic interaction of CLAVATA1, CLAVATA2, and RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE 2 in cyst nematode parasitism of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (ESR) (CLE)-like effector proteins. These proteins act as ligand mimics of plant CLE peptides and are required for successful nematode infection. Previously, we showed that CLV2 and CORYNE (CRN), a heterodimer recept...

  20. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID

    KAUST Repository

    Zourelidou, Melina

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the-in many cells-asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  1. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieterse Corné MJ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian systems, but since substrates from many organisms are present we decided to test these arrays for the determination of kinase activities in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Kinome profiling using Arabidopsis cell extracts resulted in the labelling of many consensus peptides by kinases from the plant, indicating the usefulness of this kinome profiling tool for plants. Method development showed that fresh and frozen plant material could be used to make cell lysates containing active kinases. Dilution of the plant extract increased the signal to noise ratio and non-radioactive ATP enhances full development of spot intensities. Upon infection of Arabidopsis with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, we could detect differential kinase activities by measuring phosphorylation of consensus peptides. Conclusion We show that kinome profiling on arrays with consensus substrates can be used to monitor kinase activities in plants. In a case study we show that upon infection with avirulent P. syringae differential kinase activities can be found. The PepChip can for example be used to purify (unknown kinases that play a role in P. syringae infection. This paper shows that kinome profiling using arrays of consensus peptides is a valuable new tool to study signal-transduction in plants. It complements the available methods for genomics and proteomics research.

  2. Plant protein kinase genes induced by drought, high salt and cold stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Drought, high salt and cold are three different kinds of environment stresses that severely influence the growth, development and productivity of crops. They all decrease the water state of plant cells, and consequently result in the harm of plant from water deficit. Several genes encoding protein kinases and induced by drought, high salt and low temperature have been isolated from Arabidopsis. These protein kinases include receptor protein kinase (RPK), MAP kinases, ribosomal-protein kinases and transcription-regulation protein kinase. The expression features of these genes and the regulatory roles of these protein kinases in stress response and signal transduction are discussed.

  3. Arabidopsis CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE8 and CATALASE3 Function in Abscisic Acid-Mediated Signaling and H2O2 Homeostasis in Stomatal Guard Cells under Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun-Jie; Li, Xi-Dong; Ratnasekera, Disna; Wang, Cun; Liu, Wen-Xin; Song, Lian-Fen; Zhang, Wen-Zheng; Wu, Wei-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Drought is a major threat to plant growth and crop productivity. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, CPKs) are believed to play important roles in plant responses to drought stress. Here, we report that Arabidopsis thaliana CPK8 functions in abscisic acid (ABA)- and Ca(2+)-mediated plant responses to drought stress. The cpk8 mutant was more sensitive to drought stress than wild-type plants, while the transgenic plants overexpressing CPK8 showed enhanced tolerance to drought stress compared with wild-type plants. ABA-, H2O2-, and Ca(2+)-induced stomatal closing were impaired in cpk8 mutants. Arabidopsis CATALASE3 (CAT3) was identified as a CPK8-interacting protein, confirmed by yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. CPK8 can phosphorylate CAT3 at Ser-261 and regulate its activity. Both cpk8 and cat3 plants showed lower catalase activity and higher accumulation of H2O2 compared with wild-type plants. The cat3 mutant displayed a similar drought stress-sensitive phenotype as cpk8 mutant. Moreover, ABA and Ca(2+) inhibition of inward K(+) currents were diminished in guard cells of cpk8 and cat3 mutants. Together, these results demonstrated that CPK8 functions in ABA-mediated stomatal regulation in responses to drought stress through regulation of CAT3 activity. PMID:25966761

  4. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten;

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  5. The Calcineurin B-Like Calcium Sensors CBL1 and CBL9 Together with Their Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK26 Regulate the Arabidopsis NADPH Oxidase RBOHF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Magdalena Drerup; Kathrin Schlücking; Kenji Hashimoto; Prabha Manishankar; Leonie Steinhorst; Kazuyuki Kuchitsu; J(o)rg Kudla

    2013-01-01

    Stimulus-specific accumulation of second messengers like reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ are central to many signaling and regulation processes in plants.However,mechanisms that govern the reciprocal interrelation of Ca2+ and ROS signaling are only beginning to emerge.NADPH oxidases of the respiratory burst oxidase homolog (RBOH) family are critical components contributing to the generation of ROS while Calcineurin B-like (CBL) Ca2+ sensor proteins together with their interacting kinases (CIPKs) have been shown to function in many Ca2+-signaling processes.In this study,we identify direct functional interactions between both signaling systems.We report that the CBL-interacting protein kinase ClPK26 specifically interacts with the N-terminal domain of RBOHF in yeast two-hybrid analyses and with the full-length RBOHF protein in plant cells.In addition,CIPK26 phosphorylates RBOHF in vitro and co-expression of either CBL1 or CBL9 with CIPK26 strongly enhances ROS production by RBOHF in HEK293T cells.Together,these findings identify a direct interconnection between CBL-ClPK-mediated Ca2+ signaling and ROS signaling in plants and provide evidence for a synergistic activation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHF by direct Ca2+-binding to its EF-hands and Ca2+-induced phosphorylation by CBL1/9-ClPK26 complexes.

  6. Arabidopsis map kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, P; Johansen, Bo; Petersen, M;

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) levels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  7. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.;

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  8. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  9. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  10. Involvement of OST1 Protein Kinase and PYR/PYL/RCAR Receptors in Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ye; Adachi, Yuji; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Munemasa, Shintaro; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) induces stomatal closure. It has been shown that stomata of many ABA-insensitive mutants are also insensitive to MeJA, and a low amount of ABA is a prerequisite for the MeJA response. However, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between ABA and MeJA signaling remain to be elucidated. Here we studied the interplay of signaling of the two hormones in guard cells using the quadruple ABA receptor mutant pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 and ABA-activated protein kinase mutants ost1-2 and srk2e. In the quadruple mutant, MeJA-induced stomatal closure, H2O2 production, nitric oxide (NO) production, cytosolic alkalization and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable current (ICa) activation were not impaired. At the same time, the inactivation of the inward-rectifying K(+) current was impaired. In contrast to the quadruple mutant, MeJA-induced stomatal closure, H2O2 production, NO production and cytosolic alkalization were impaired in ost1-2 and srk2e as well as in aba2-2, the ABA-deficient mutant. The activation of ICa was also impaired in srk2e. Collectively, these results indicated that OST1 was essential for MeJA-induced stomatal closure, while PYR1, PYL1, PYL2 and PYL4 ABA receptors were not sufficient factors. MeJA did not appear to activate OST1 kinase activity. This implies that OST1 mediates MeJA signaling through an undetectable level of activity or a non-enzymatic action. MeJA induced the expression of an ABA synthesis gene, NCED3, and increased ABA contents only modestly. Taken together with previous reports, this study suggests that MeJA signaling in guard cells is primed by ABA and is not brought about through the pathway mediated by PYR1, PYL1 PYL2 and PYL4. PMID:27354421

  11. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karin, Michael (San Diego, CA); Hibi, Masahiko (San Diego, CA); Lin, Anning (La Jolla, CA); Davis, Roger (Princeton, MA); Derijard, Benoit (Shrewsbury, MA)

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  12. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  13. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4-7 and 8-12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  14. Inhibitors of protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shiying; JIANG Yuyang; CAO Jian; LIU Feng; MA Li; ZHAO Yufen

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the hydroxyl groups of protein side chains, which plays critical roles in signal transduction pathways by transmitting extracellular signals across the plasma membrane and nuclear membrane to the destination sites in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a superfamily of phospholipid-dependent Ser/Thr kinase. There are at least 12 isozymes in PKC family. They are distributed in different tissues and play different roles in physiological processes. On account of their concern with a variety of pathophysiologic states, such as cancer, inflammatory conditions, autoimmune disorder, and cardiac diseases, the inhibitors, which can inhibit the activity of PKC and the interaction of cytokine with receptor, and interfere signal transduction pathway, may be candidates of therapeutic drugs. Therefore, intense efforts have been made to develop specific protein kinase inhibitors as biological tools and therapeutic agents. This article reviews the recent development of some of PKC inhibitors based on their interaction with different conserved domains and different inhibition mechanisms.

  15. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases.

  16. Positional signaling mediated by a receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Shen, Ronglai; Schiefelbein, John

    2005-02-18

    The position-dependent specification of root epidermal cells in Arabidopsis provides an elegant paradigm for cell patterning during development. Here, we describe a new gene, SCRAMBLED (SCM), required for cells to appropriately interpret their location within the developing root epidermis. SCM encodes a receptor-like kinase protein with a predicted extracellular domain of six leucine-rich repeats and an intracellular serine-threonine kinase domain. SCM regulates the expression of the GLABRA2, CAPRICE, WEREWOLF, and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 transcription factor genes that define the cell fates. Further, the SCM gene is expressed throughout the developing root. Therefore, SCM likely enables developing epidermal cells to detect positional cues and establish an appropriate cell-type pattern.

  17. Genome-wide identification and analysis of expression profiles of maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangpei; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Shizhong; Li, Dequan

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signal transduction model in animals, yeast and plants. Plant MAPK cascades have been implicated in development and stress responses. Although MAPKKKs have been investigated in several plant species including Arabidopsis and rice, no systematic analysis has been conducted in maize. In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire maize genome and identified 74 MAPKKK genes. Phylogenetic analyses of MAPKKKs from maize, rice and Arabidopsis have classified them into three subgroups, which included Raf, ZIK and MEKK. Evolutionary relationships within subfamilies were also supported by exon-intron organizations and the conserved protein motifs. Further expression analysis of the MAPKKKs in microarray databases revealed that MAPKKKs were involved in important signaling pathways in maize different organs and developmental stages. Our genomics analysis of maize MAPKKK genes provides important information for evolutionary and functional characterization of this family in maize.

  18. Genome-wide identification and analysis of expression profiles of maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangpei Kong

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are highly conserved signal transduction model in animals, yeast and plants. Plant MAPK cascades have been implicated in development and stress responses. Although MAPKKKs have been investigated in several plant species including Arabidopsis and rice, no systematic analysis has been conducted in maize. In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire maize genome and identified 74 MAPKKK genes. Phylogenetic analyses of MAPKKKs from maize, rice and Arabidopsis have classified them into three subgroups, which included Raf, ZIK and MEKK. Evolutionary relationships within subfamilies were also supported by exon-intron organizations and the conserved protein motifs. Further expression analysis of the MAPKKKs in microarray databases revealed that MAPKKKs were involved in important signaling pathways in maize different organs and developmental stages. Our genomics analysis of maize MAPKKK genes provides important information for evolutionary and functional characterization of this family in maize.

  19. The OXI1 kinase pathway mediates Piriformospora indica-induced growth promotion in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Camehl

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Piriformospora indica is an endophytic fungus that colonizes roots of many plant species and promotes growth and resistance to certain plant pathogens. Despite its potential use in agriculture, little is known on the molecular basis of this beneficial plant-fungal interaction. In a genetic screen for plants, which do not show a P. indica- induced growth response, we isolated an Arabidopsis mutant in the OXI1 (Oxidative Signal Inducible1 gene. OXI1 has been characterized as a protein kinase which plays a role in pathogen response and is regulated by H₂O₂ and PDK1 (3-PHOSPHOINOSITIDE-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE1. A genetic analysis showed that double mutants of the two closely related PDK1.1 and PDK1.2 genes are defective in the growth response to P. indica. While OXI1 and PDK1 gene expression is upregulated in P. indica-colonized roots, defense genes are downregulated, indicating that the fungus suppresses plant defense reactions. PDK1 is activated by phosphatidic acid (PA and P. indica triggers PA synthesis in Arabidopsis plants. Under beneficial co-cultivation conditions, H₂O₂ formation is even reduced by the fungus. Importantly, phospholipase D (PLDα1 or PLDδ mutants, which are impaired in PA synthesis do not show growth promotion in response to fungal infection. These data establish that the P. indica-stimulated growth response is mediated by a pathway consisting of the PLD-PDK1-OXI1 cascade.

  20. A membrane protein / signaling protein interaction network for Arabidopsis version AMPv2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Lalonde

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between membrane proteins and the soluble fraction are essential for signal transduction and for regulating nutrient transport. To gain insights into the membrane-based interactome, 3,852 open reading frames (ORFs out of a target list of 8,383 representing membrane and signaling proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into a Gateway compatible vector. The mating-based split-ubiquitin system was used to screen for potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs among 490 Arabidopsis ORFs. A binary robotic screen between 142 receptor-like kinases, 72 transporters, 57 soluble protein kinases and phosphatases, 40 glycosyltransferases, 95 proteins of various functions and 89 proteins with unknown function detected 387 out of 90,370 possible PPIs. A secondary screen confirmed 343 (of 387 pPPIs between 179 proteins, yielding a scale-free network (r2=0.863. Eighty of 142 transmembrane receptor-like kinases (RLK tested positive, identifying three homomers, 63 heteromers and 80 pPPIs with other proteins. Thirty-one out of 142 RLK interactors (including RLKs had previously been found to be phosphorylated; thus interactors may be substrates for respective RLKs. None of the pPPIs described here had been reported in the major interactome databases, including potential interactors of G protein-coupled receptors, phospholipase C, and AMT ammonium transporters. Two RLKs found as putative interactors of AMT1;1 were independently confirmed using a split luciferase assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts. These RLKs may be involved in ammonium-dependent phosphorylation of the C-terminus and regulation of ammonium uptake activity. The robotic screening method established here will enable a systematic analysis of membrane protein interactions in fungi, plants and metazoa.

  1. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly referred to as casein kinase II) is an evolutionary conserved, ubiquitous protein kinase. There are two paralog catalytic subunits, i.e. alpha (A1) and alpha' (A2). The alpha and alpha' subunits are linked to two beta subunits to produce a heterotetrameric structure....... The catalytic alpha subunits are distantly related to the CMGC subfamily of kinases, such as the Cdk kinases. There are some peculiarities associated with protein kinase CK2, which are not found with most other protein kinases: (i) the enzyme is constitutively active, (ii) it can use ATP and GTP and...... specifically target this protein kinase [10]. Since not all the aspects of what has been published on CK2 can be covered in this review, we would like to recommend the following reviews; (i) for general information on CK2 [11-18] and (ii) with a focus on aberrant CK2 [19-22]....

  2. The wheat MAP kinase phosphatase 1 alleviates salt stress and increases antioxidant activities in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Ikram; Ebel, Chantal; Belgaroui, Nibras; Ghorbel, Mouna; Amara, Imène; Hanin, Moez

    2016-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are important negative regulators in the MAPK signaling pathways, which play crucial roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. We have previously shown that the heterologous expression of a durum wheat MKP, TMKP1, results in increased tolerance to salt stress in yeast but its particular contribution in salt stress tolerance in plants was not investigated. Here, TMKP1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana and physiological changes were assessed in transgenic plants exposed to stress conditions. Under salt stress and especially LiCl, the TMKP1 overexpressors displayed higher germination rates in comparison to wild type plants. The enhancement of salt stress tolerance was accompanied by increased antioxidant enzyme activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxydases. Such increases in antioxidant activities were concomitant with lower malondialdehyde, superoxide anion O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide levels in the TMKP1 transgenic seedlings. Moreover, we provide evidence that, in contrast to the Arabidopsis ortholog AtMKP1, TMKP1 acts as a positive regulator of salt stress tolerance via its ectopic expression in the Arabidopsis mkp1 mutant. PMID:26927025

  3. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates gene expression through transcription factor release in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Botanga, Christopher J; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Palma, Kristoffer; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina; Sandbech-Clausen, Signe; Lichota, Jacek; Brodersen, Peter; Grasser, Klaus D; Mattsson, Ole; Glazebrook, Jane; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-08-20

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation.

  4. The structure of arabidopsis thaliana OST1 provides insights into the kinase regulation mechanism in response to osmotic stress

    KAUST Repository

    Yunta, Cristina

    2011-11-01

    SnRK [SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1)-related protein kinase] 2.6 [open stomata 1 (OST1)] is well characterized at molecular and physiological levels to control stomata closure in response to water-deficit stress. OST1 is a member of a family of 10 protein kinases from Arabidopsis thaliana (SnRK2) that integrates abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent and ABA-independent signals to coordinate the cell response to osmotic stress. A subgroup of protein phosphatases type 2C binds OST1 and keeps the kinase dephosphorylated and inactive. Activation of OST1 relies on the ABA-dependent inhibition of the protein phosphatases type 2C and the subsequent self-phosphorylation of the kinase. The OST1 ABA-independent activation depends on a short sequence motif that is conserved among all the members of the SnRK2 family. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. The crystallographic structure of OST1 shows that ABA-independent regulation motif stabilizes the conformation of the kinase catalytically essential α C helix, and it provides the basis of the ABA-independent regulation mechanism for the SnRK2 family of protein kinases. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunochemical characterization of rat brain protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyclonal antibodies against rat brain protein kinase C (the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) were raised in goat. These antibodies can neutralize completely the kinase activity in purified enzyme preparation as well as that in the crude homogenate. Immunoblot analysis of the purified and the crude protein kinase C preparations revealed a major immunoreactive band of 80 kDa. The antibodies also recognize the same enzyme from other rat tissues. Neuronal tissues (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, and retina) and lymphoid organs (thymus and spleen) were found to be enriched in protein kinase C, whereas lung, kidney, liver, heart, and skeletal muscle contained relatively low amounts of this kinase. Limited proteolysis of the purified rat brain protein kinase C with trypsin results in an initial degradation of the kinase into two major fragments of 48 and 38 kDa. Both fragments are recognized by the antibodies. However, further digestion of the 48-kDa fragment to 45 kDa and the 38-kDa fragment to 33 kDa causes a loss of the immunoreactivity. Upon incubation of the cerebellar extract with Ca2+, the 48-kDa fragment was also identified as a major proteolytic product of protein kinase C. Proteolytic degradation of protein kinase C converts the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent kinase to an independent form without causing a large impairment of the binding of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. The two major proteolytic fragments were separated by ion exchange chromatography and one of them (45-48 kDa) was identified as a protein kinase and the other (33-38 kDa) as a phorbol ester-binding protein. These results demonstrate that rat brain protein kinase C is composed of two functionally distinct units, namely, a protein kinase and a Ca2+-independent/phospholipid-dependent phorbol ester-binding protein

  6. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, E. van der; Sauter, M.; Kende, H. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). DOE Plant Research Lab.); Song, W.Y.; Ruan, D.L.; Ronald, P.C. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-06-01

    The authors identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively.

  7. Constitutive activation of AtMEK5, a MAPK kinase, induces salicylic acid-independent cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongxia; WANG Ying; ZHOU Tianhong; SUN Yujing; LIU Guoqin; REN Dongtao

    2004-01-01

    AtMEK5DD is an active mutant of AtMEK5, a MAP kinase kinase in Arabidopsis. Induction of AtMEK5DD expression in transgenic plants leads to activation of 44 and 48 kD MAPKs and causes a rapid cell death. To compare the cell death induced by the expression of AtMEK5DD with the HR-cell death induced by avirulence pathogen infection, we analyzed the activation of downstream MAP Kinase and induction of PR genes expression in permanent transgenic Arabidopsis plants. In-gel kinase activity assay revealed that the infection of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 harboring Avr Rpt2 gene also lead to activation of 44 and 48 kD MAPKs. PAL, PR1 and PR5 were strongly induced in plants undergoing HR-cell death caused by the infection of P. Syringae DC3000, while only the expression of PR5 was strongly induced in transgenic plants expressing AtMEK5DD protein. NahG protein in AtMEK5DD×NahG plants cannot suppress the cell death induced by AtMEK5DD. And AtMEK5DD protein expressed AtMEK5DD×NahG plants showed no significant change in salicylic acid (SA)level.All these suggest that the cell death induced by the activation of AtMEK5 is salicylic acid-independent.

  8. In silico analysis reveals 75 members of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase gene family in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kudupudi Prabhakara; Richa, Tambi; Kumar, Kundan; Raghuram, Badmi; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2010-06-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases (MAPKKKs) are important components of MAPK cascades, which are universal signal transduction modules and play important role in plant growth and development. In the sequenced Arabidopsis genome 80 MAPKKKs were identified and currently being analysed for its role in different stress. In rice, economically important monocot cereal crop only five MAPKKKs were identified so far. In this study using computational analysis of sequenced rice genome we have identified 75 MAPKKKs. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from KOME or Genbank database) of 75 MAPKKKs supported their existence. Phylogenetic analyses of MAPKKKs from rice and Arabidopsis have classified them into three subgroups, which include Raf, ZIK and MEKK. Conserved motifs in the deduced amino acid sequences of rice MAPKKKs strongly supported their identity as members of Raf, ZIK and MEKK subfamilies. Further expression analysis of the MAPKKKs in MPSS database revealed that their transcripts were differentially regulated in various stress and tissue-specific libraries.

  9. LIK1, a CERK1-interacting kinase, regulates plant immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Ha Le

    Full Text Available Chitin, an integral component of the fungal cell wall, is one of the best-studied microbe-associated molecular patterns. Previous work identified a LysM receptor-like kinase (LysM-RLK1/CERK1 as the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. In order to identify proteins that interact with CERK1, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen using the intracellular kinase domain of CERK1 as the bait. This screen identified 54 putative CERK1-interactors. Screening mutants defective in 43 of these interacting proteins identified only two, a calmodulin like protein (At3g10190 and a leucine-rich repeat receptor like kinase (At3g14840, which differed in their response to pathogen challenge. In the present work, we focused on characterizing the LRR-RLK gene where mutations altered responses to chitin elicitation. This LRR-RLK was named LysM RLK1-interacting kinase 1 (LIK1. The interaction between CERK1 and LIK1 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation using protoplasts and transgenic plants. In vitro experiments showed that LIK1 was directly phosphorylated by CERK1. In vivo phosphorylation assays showed that Col-0 wild-type plants have more phosphorylated LIK1 than cerk1 mutant plants, suggesting that LIK1 may be directly phosphorylated by CERK1. Lik1 mutant plants showed an enhanced response to both chitin and flagellin elicitors. In comparison to the wild-type plants, lik1 mutant plants were more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, but more susceptible to the necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Consistent with the enhanced susceptibility to necrotrophs, lik1 mutants showed reduced expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathways. These data suggest that LIK1 directly interacts with CERK1 and regulates MAMP-triggered innate immunity.

  10. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  11. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, T.; Joore, J.; Workum, W. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian s

  12. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru (Meiji Institute of Health Science, Odawara (Japan))

    1988-12-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP for 10 min at 37{degree}C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation.

  13. The mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julhash U. KAZI

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family ofserine/threonine protein kinases that plays a central role in transducing extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses ranging from cell proliferation to apoptosis.Nine PKC genes have been identified in the human genome,which encode 10 proteins.Each member of this protein kinase family displays distinct biochemical characteristics and is enriched in different cellular and subcellular locations.Activation of PKC has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation.This review summarizes works of the past years in the field of PKC biochemistry that covers regulation and activation mechanism of different PKC isoforms.

  14. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    OpenAIRE

    K Aurelia Ball; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K; John Guatelli; Erik Verschueren; Krogan, Nevan J.; Matthew P Jacobson

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichm...

  15. A Brassinosteroid-Signaling Kinase Interacts withMultiple Receptor-Like Kinases in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Dear Editor, Higher plants have evolved hundreds of genes encodingreceptor-like kinases (RLKs), which function as cell surfacereceptors perceiving developmental and environmental sig-nals (Shiu et al., 2004). Many RLKs have been shown to playspecific roles in hormone responses, developmental regula-tion, defense against pathogen infection, and adaptationto abiotic stresses (Chae et al., 2009; Antolin-Llovera et al.,2012). The mechanisms that ensure specific signal transduc-tion from each RLK to target cellular responses remain poorlyunderstood. Recent studies revealed that many RLKs trans-duce signals by phosphorylating receptor-like cytoplasmickinases (RLCKs), which lack the transmembrane domainsbut are anchored at the plasma membrane through lipidmodification (Tang et al., 2008; Zhang et al., 2010; Shi et al.,2013). There are over 400 RLKs and only about 150 RLCKs inArabidopsis (Shiu et al., 2004). One outstanding question iswhether each RLCK mediates signaling downstream of a spe-cific RLK, participates in multiple RLK pathways, or mediatescrosstalk between RLK pathways.

  16. 拟南芥蛋白激酶 SnRK2.6的原核表达、纯化及活性分析%Prokaryotic Expression,Purification and Activity Analysis of Protein Kinase SnRK2·6 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凤博; 王鲜萍; 李坤

    2014-01-01

    从哥伦比亚生态型拟南芥(Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 0)中克隆 SnRK2·6[SNF1(su-crose non-fermenting-1)-related protein kinase 2·6]的完整编码序列(coding sequence,CDS),构建该基因的原核表达载体,将其转化 BL21(DE3),经表达纯化得到 SnRK2·6蛋白。激酶活性分析发现,原核表达纯化的 SnRK2·6有自磷酸化和磷酸化 MBP(myelin basin protein)的活性,为后续试验分析 SnRK2·6的功能奠定基础。%The whole coding sequence of SnRK2·6 [SNF1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1 )-related protein kinase 2·6]was cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia 0.The prokaryotic expression vector of the gene was constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3)to obtain SnRK2·6 protein by induction and purification.By activity analysis,the purified SnRK2·6 had both autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylation activity of the myelin basic protein(MBP)substrate.This study lays the foundation for further study of the function of SnRK2·6.

  17. Physiological roles of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-activated p38-regulated/activated protein kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergiy; Kostenko; Gianina; Dumitriu; Kari; Jenssen; Lgreid; Ugo; Moens

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases(MAPKs)are a family of proteins that constitute signaling pathways involved in processes that control gene expression,cell division, cell survival,apoptosis,metabolism,differentiation and motility.The MAPK pathways can be divided into conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.The first group converts a signal into a cellular response through a relay of three consecutive phosphorylation events exerted by MAPK kinase kinases,MAPK kinase,and MAPK.Atypical MAPK pathways are not organized into this three-tiered cascade.MAPK that belongs to both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways can phosphorylate both non-protein kinase substrates and other protein kinases.The latter are referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases.This review focuses on one such MAPK-activated protein kinase,MAPK-activated protein kinase 5(MK5)or p38-regulated/activated protein kinase(PRAK).This protein is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom and seems to be the target of both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.Recent findings on the regulation of the activity and subcellular localization,bona fide interaction partners and physiological roles of MK5/PRAK are discussed.

  18. The receptor kinase IMPAIRED OOMYCETE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 attenuates abscisic acid responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hok, Sophie; Allasia, Valérie; Andrio, Emilie; Naessens, Elodie; Ribes, Elsa; Panabières, Franck; Attard, Agnès; Ris, Nicolas; Clément, Mathilde; Barlet, Xavier; Marco, Yves; Grill, Erwin; Eichmann, Ruth; Weis, Corina; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Ammon, Alexandra; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Voll, Lars M; Keller, Harald

    2014-11-01

    In plants, membrane-bound receptor kinases are essential for developmental processes, immune responses to pathogens and the establishment of symbiosis. We previously identified the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) receptor kinase IMPAIRED OOMYCETE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (IOS1) as required for successful infection with the downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. We report here that IOS1 is also required for full susceptibility of Arabidopsis to unrelated (hemi)biotrophic filamentous oomycete and fungal pathogens. Impaired susceptibility in the absence of IOS1 appeared to be independent of plant defense mechanism. Instead, we found that ios1-1 plants were hypersensitive to the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), displaying enhanced ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination, root elongation, and stomatal opening. These findings suggest that IOS1 negatively regulates ABA signaling in Arabidopsis. The expression of ABA-sensitive COLD REGULATED and RESISTANCE TO DESICCATION genes was diminished in Arabidopsis during infection. This effect on ABA signaling was alleviated in the ios1-1 mutant background. Accordingly, ABA-insensitive and ABA-hypersensitive mutants were more susceptible and resistant to oomycete infection, respectively, showing that the intensity of ABA signaling affects the outcome of downy mildew disease. Taken together, our findings suggest that filamentous (hemi)biotrophs attenuate ABA signaling in Arabidopsis during the infection process and that IOS1 participates in this pathogen-mediated reprogramming of the host. PMID:25274985

  19. Protein kinase profiling assays: a technology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching

    2015-11-01

    Protein kinases have become one of the most intensively pursued classes of drug targets for many diseases such as cancers and inflammatory diseases. Kinase profiling work seeks to understand general selectivity trends of lead compounds across the kinome, which help with target selection, compound prioritization, and potential implications in toxicity. Under the current drug discovery process, screening of compounds against comprehensive panels of kinases and their mutants has become the standard approach. Many screening assays and technologies which are compatible for high-throughput screening (HTS) against kinases have been extensively pursued and developed.

  20. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction.

  1. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  2. Regulation of the S-locus receptor kinase and self-incompatibility in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Susan R; Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, June B

    2013-02-01

    Intraspecific mate selectivity often is enforced by self-incompatibility (SI), a barrier to self-pollination that inhibits productive pollen-pistil interactions. In the Brassicaceae, SI specificity is determined by two highly-polymorphic proteins: the stigmatic S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) and its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein (SCR). Arabidopsis thaliana is self fertile, but several of its accessions can be made to express SI, albeit to various degrees, by transformation with functional SRK-SCR gene pairs isolated from its close self-incompatible relative, Arabidopsis lyrata. Here, we use a newly identified induced mutation that suppresses the SI phenotype in stigmas of SRK-SCR transformants of the Col-0 accession to investigate the regulation of SI and the SRK transgene. This mutation disrupts NRPD1a, a gene that encodes a plant-specific nuclear RNA polymerase required for genomic methylation and production of some types of silencing RNAs. We show that NRPD1a, along with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is required for SI in some A. thaliana accessions. We also show that Col-0 nrpd1a mutants exhibit decreased accumulation of SRK transcripts in stigmas, which is not, however, responsible for loss of SI in these plants. Together, our analysis of the nrpd1a mutation and of SRK promoter activity in various accessions reveals that the SRK transgene is subject to several levels of regulation, which vary substantially by tissue type and by accession. This study thus helps explain the well-documented differences in expression of SI exhibited by SRK-SCR transformants of different A. thaliana accessions.

  3. Momilactone sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kitajima, Shinya

    2015-05-01

    The labdane-related diterpenoid, momilactone B has potent growth inhibitory activity and was demonstrated to play a particularly critical role in the allelopathy of rice (Oryza sativa L.). However, there is limited information available about the mode of action of momilactone B on the growth inhibition. The present research describes the effects of momilactone B on protein expression in the early development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling, which was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOFMS. Momilactone B inhibited the accumulation of subtilisin-like serine protease, amyrin synthase LUP2, β-glucosidase and malate synthase at 1 h after the momilactone application. Those proteins are involved in the metabolic turnover and the production of intermediates needed for cell structures resulting in plant growth and development. Momilactone B also inhibited the breakdown of cruciferin 2, which is essential for seed germination and seedling growth to construct cell structures. Momilactone B induced the accumulation of translationally controlled tumor protein, glutathione S-transferase and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin 1. These proteins are involved in stress responses and increased stress tolerance. In addition, glutathione S-transferase has the activity of herbicide detoxification and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin 1 has inhibitory activity for seed germination under unfavorable conditions. The present research suggests that momilactone B may inhibit the seedling growth by the inhibition of the metabolic turnover and the production of intermediates for cell structures. In addition, momilactone induced proteins associated with plant defense responses. PMID:26058145

  4. Cloning and Characterization of Two NAD Kinases from Arabidopsis. Identification of a Calmodulin Binding Isoform1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, William L.; Waller, Jeffrey C.; Vanderbeld, Barb; Snedden, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    NAD kinase (NADK; ATP:NAD 2′-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.23), an enzyme found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, generates the important pyridine nucleotide NADP from substrates ATP and NAD. The role of NADKs in plants is poorly understood, and cDNAs encoding plant NADKs have not previously been described to our knowledge. We have cloned two cDNAs from Arabidopsis predicted to encode NADK isoforms, designated NADK1 and NADK2, respectively. Expressed as recombinant proteins in bacteria, both NADK1 and NADK2 were catalytically active, thereby confirming their identity as NADKs. Transcripts for both isoforms were detected in all tissues examined and throughout development. Although the predicted catalytic regions for NADK1 and NADK2 show sequence similarity to NADKs from other organisms, NADK2 possesses a large N-terminal extension that appears to be unique to plants. Using recombinant glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins and calmodulin (CaM)-affinity chromatography, we delineated a Ca2+-dependent CaM-binding domain to a 45-residue region within the N-terminal extension of NADK2. Although recombinant NADK2 was not responsive to CaM in vitro, immunoblot analysis suggests that native NADK2 is a CaM-binding protein. In Arabidopsis crude extracts, CaM-dependent NADK activity was much greater than CaM-independent activity throughout development, particularly in young seedlings. A native CaM-dependent NADK was partially purified from Arabidopsis seedlings (KmNAD = 0.20 mM, KmMg2+−ATP = 0.17 mM). The enzyme was fully activated by conserved CaM (S0.5 = 2.2 nm) in the presence of calcium but displayed differential responsiveness to eight CaM-like Arabidopsis proteins. Possible roles for NADKs in plants are discussed in light of our observations. PMID:15247403

  5. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  6. Regulation of the interaction between protein kinase C-related protein kinase 2 (PRK2) and its upstream kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettori, Rosalia; Sonzogni, Silvina; Meyer, Lucas;

    2009-01-01

    The members of the AGC kinase family frequently exhibit three conserved phosphorylation sites: the activation loop, the hydrophobic motif (HM), and the zipper (Z)/turn-motif (TM) phosphorylation site. 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) phosphorylates the activation loop of...... numerous AGC kinases, including the protein kinase C-related protein kinases (PRKs). Here we studied the docking interaction between PDK1 and PRK2 and analyzed the mechanisms that regulate this interaction. In vivo labeling of recombinant PRK2 by (32)P(i) revealed phosphorylation at two sites, the...... the mechanism that negatively regulates the docking interaction of PRK2 to the upstream kinase PDK1 is directly linked to the activation mechanism of PRK2 itself. Finally, our results indicate that the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the interaction between PRK2 and PDK1 are specific for PRK2...

  7. A cytosolic Arabidopsis D-xylulose kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose into a precursor of the plastidial isoprenoid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Tritsch, Denis; Hartmann, Michael; Pacaud, Karine; Hoeffler, Jean-François; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2006-10-01

    Plants are able to integrate exogenous 1-deoxy-D-xylulose (DX) into the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, implicated in the biosynthesis of plastidial isoprenoids. Thus, the carbohydrate needs to be phosphorylated into 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate and translocated into plastids, or vice versa. An enzyme capable of phosphorylating DX was partially purified from a cell-free Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein extract. It was identified by mass spectrometry as a cytosolic protein bearing D-xylulose kinase (XK) signatures, already suggesting that DX is phosphorylated within the cytosol prior to translocation into the plastids. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and enzymatic properties of a recombinant protein were determined. In Arabidopsis, xylulose kinases are encoded by a small gene family, in which only two genes are putatively annotated. The additional gene is coding for a protein targeted to plastids, as was proved by colocalization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs. Functional complementation assays in an Escherichia coli strain deleted in xk revealed that the cytosolic enzyme could exclusively phosphorylate xylulose in vivo, not the enzyme that is targeted to plastids. xk activities could not be detected in chloroplast protein extracts or in proteins isolated from its ancestral relative Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The gene encoding the plastidic protein annotated as "xylulose kinase" might in fact yield an enzyme having different phosphorylation specificities. The biochemical characterization and complementation experiments with DX of specific Arabidopsis knockout mutants seedlings treated with oxo-clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, further confirmed that the cytosolic protein is responsible for the phosphorylation of DX in planta.

  8. A systematic evaluation of protein kinase A-A-kinase anchoring protein interaction motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Pepijn P; van der Heyden, MAG; Kok, Bart; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) in vertebrates is localized to specific locations in the cell via A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The regulatory subunits of the four PKA isoforms (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, and RIIβ) each form a homodimer, and their dimerization domain interacts with a small helical region present

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Bryk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular signalling cascades, in which MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases intermediate, are responsible for a biological response of a cell to an external stimulus. MAP kinases, which include ERK1/2 (extracellular signalling-regulated kinase, JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p 38 MAPK, regulate the activity of many proteins, enzymes and transcription factors and thus have a wide spectrum of biological effects. Many basic scientific studies have defined numerous details of their pathway organization and activation. There are also more and more studies suggesting that individual MAP kinases probably play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They may mediate inflammatory processes, endothelial cell activation, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and T-lymphocyte differentiation, all of which represent crucial mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The specific inhibition of an activity of the respective MAP kinases may prove a new therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic plaque formation in the future. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning MAP kinase-dependent cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis.

  10. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aurelia Ball

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  11. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, K Aurelia; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Lewinski, Mary K; Guatelli, John; Verschueren, Erik; Krogan, Nevan J; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  12. Rapid Oligo-Galacturonide Induced Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Hoon, Divya; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R; Kohorn, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs)(1)are receptor protein kinases that bind to long polymers of cross-linked pectin in the cell wall. These plasma-membrane-associated protein kinases also bind soluble pectin fragments called oligo-galacturonides (OGs) released from the wall after pathogen attack and damage. WAKs are required for cell expansion during development but bind water soluble OGs generated from walls with a higher affinity than the wall-associated polysaccharides. OGs activate a WAK-dependent, distinct stress-like response pathway to help plants resist pathogen attack. In this report, a quantitative mass-spectrometric-based phosphoproteomic analysis was used to identify Arabidopsis cellular events rapidly induced by OGsin planta Using N(14/)N(15)isotopicin vivometabolic labeling, we screened 1,000 phosphoproteins for rapid OG-induced changes and found 50 proteins with increased phosphorylation, while there were none that decreased significantly. Seven of the phosphosites within these proteins overlap with those altered by another signaling molecule plants use to indicate the presence of pathogens (the bacterial "elicitor" peptide Flg22), indicating distinct but overlapping pathways activated by these two types of chemicals. Genetic analysis of genes encoding 10 OG-specific and two Flg22/OG-induced phosphoproteins reveals that null mutations in eight proteins compromise the OG response. These phosphorylated proteins with genetic evidence supporting their role in the OG response include two cytoplasmic kinases, two membrane-associated scaffold proteins, a phospholipase C, a CDPK, an unknown cadmium response protein, and a motor protein. Null mutants in two proteins, the putative scaffold protein REM1.3, and a cytoplasmic receptor like kinase ROG2, enhance and suppress, respectively, a dominantWAKallele. Altogether, the results of these chemical and genetic experiments reveal the identity of several phosphorylated proteins involved in the kinase

  13. Structure-function analysis of STRUBBELIG, an Arabidopsis atypical receptor-like kinase involved in tissue morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Vaddepalli

    Full Text Available Tissue morphogenesis in plants requires the coordination of cellular behavior across clonally distinct histogenic layers. The underlying signaling mechanisms are presently being unraveled and are known to include the cell surface leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG in Arabidopsis. To understand better its mode of action an extensive structure-function analysis of STRUBBELIG was performed. The phenotypes of 20 EMS and T-DNA-induced strubbelig alleles were assessed and homology modeling was applied to rationalize their possible effects on STRUBBELIG protein structure. The analysis was complemented by phenotypic, cell biological, and pharmacological investigations of a strubbelig null allele carrying genomic rescue constructs encoding fusions between various mutated STRUBBELIG proteins and GFP. The results indicate that STRUBBELIG accepts quite some sequence variation, reveal the biological importance for the STRUBBELIG N-capping domain, and reinforce the notion that kinase activity is not essential for its function in vivo. Furthermore, individual protein domains of STRUBBELIG cannot be related to specific STRUBBELIG-dependent biological processes suggesting that process specificity is mediated by factors acting together with or downstream of STRUBBELIG. In addition, the evidence indicates that biogenesis of a functional STRUBBELIG receptor is subject to endoplasmic reticulum-mediated quality control, and that an MG132-sensitive process regulates its stability. Finally, STRUBBELIG and the receptor-like kinase gene ERECTA interact synergistically in the control of internode length. The data provide genetic and molecular insight into how STRUBBELIG regulates intercellular communication in tissue morphogenesis.

  14. Rational design of protein kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarmoluk S. M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern methodological approaches to rational design of low molecular weight compounds with specific activity in relation to predetermined biomolecular targets are considered by example of development of high effective protein kinase inhibitors. The application of new computational methods that allow to significantly improve the quality of computational experiments (in, particular, accuracy of low molecular weight compounds activity prediction without increase of computational and time costs are highlighted. The effectiveness of strategy of rational design is demonstrated by examples of several own investigations devoted to development of new inhibitors that are high effective and selective towards protein kinases CK2, FGFR1 and ASK1.

  15. Statistical analysis of protein kinase specificity determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreegipuu, Andres; Blom, Nikolaj; Brunak, Søren;

    1998-01-01

    The site and sequence specificity of protein kinase, as well as the role of the secondary structure and surface accessibility of the phosphorylation sites on substrate proteins, was statistically analyzed. The experimental data were collected from the literature and are available on the World Wide...... Web at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/databases/PhosphoBase/. The set of data involved 1008 phosphorylatable sites in 406 proteins, which were phosphorylated by 58 protein kinases. It was found that there exists almost absolute SER/Thr or Tyr specificity, with rare exceptions. The sequence specificity...... determinants were less strict and were located between positions -4 and +4 relative to the phosphorylation site. Secondary structure and surface accessibility predictions revealed that most of the phosphorylation sites were located on the surface of the target proteins....

  16. A Cytosolic Arabidopsis d-Xylulose Kinase Catalyzes the Phosphorylation of 1-Deoxy-d-Xylulose into a Precursor of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Tritsch, Denis; Hartmann, Michael; Pacaud, Karine; Hoeffler, Jean-François; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Plants are able to integrate exogenous 1-deoxy-d-xylulose (DX) into the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, implicated in the biosynthesis of plastidial isoprenoids. Thus, the carbohydrate needs to be phosphorylated into 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate and translocated into plastids, or vice versa. An enzyme capable of phosphorylating DX was partially purified from a cell-free Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein extract. It was identified by mass spectrometry as a cytosolic protein bearing d-xylulose kinase (XK) signatures, already suggesting that DX is phosphorylated within the cytosol prior to translocation into the plastids. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and enzymatic properties of a recombinant protein were determined. In Arabidopsis, xylulose kinases are encoded by a small gene family, in which only two genes are putatively annotated. The additional gene is coding for a protein targeted to plastids, as was proved by colocalization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs. Functional complementation assays in an Escherichia coli strain deleted in xk revealed that the cytosolic enzyme could exclusively phosphorylate xylulose in vivo, not the enzyme that is targeted to plastids. xk activities could not be detected in chloroplast protein extracts or in proteins isolated from its ancestral relative Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The gene encoding the plastidic protein annotated as “xylulose kinase” might in fact yield an enzyme having different phosphorylation specificities. The biochemical characterization and complementation experiments with DX of specific Arabidopsis knockout mutants seedlings treated with oxo-clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, further confirmed that the cytosolic protein is responsible for the phosphorylation of DX in planta. PMID:16920870

  17. Problem-Solving Test: "In Vitro" Protein Kinase A Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases is an important mechanism in the regulation of protein activity. Among hundreds of protein kinases present in human cells, PKA, the first kinase discovered, belongs to the most important and best characterized group of these enzymes. The author presents an experiment that analyzes the "in vitro"…

  18. Arabidopsis decuple mutant reveals the importance of SnRK2 kinases in osmotic stress responses in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Hiroaki

    2011-01-10

    Osmotic stress associated with drought or salinity is a major factor that limits plant productivity. Protein kinases in the SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) family are activated by osmotic stress, suggesting that the kinases are involved in osmotic stress signaling. However, due to functional redundancy, their contribution to osmotic stress responses remained unclear. In this report, we constructed an Arabidopsis line carrying mutations in all 10 members of the SnRK2 family. The decuple mutant snrk2.1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10 grew poorly under hyperosmotic stress conditions but was similar to the wild type in culture media in the absence of osmotic stress. The mutant was also defective in gene regulation and the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), proline, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate under osmotic stress. In addition, analysis of mutants defective in the ABA-activated SnRK2s (snrk2.2/3/6) and mutants defective in the rest of the SnRK2s (snrk2.1/4/5/7/8/9/10) revealed that SnRK2s are a merging point of ABA-dependent and -independent pathways for osmotic stress responses. These results demonstrate critical functions of the SnRK2s in mediating osmotic stress signaling and tolerance.

  19. A proteomic approach for comprehensively screening substrates of protein kinases such as Rho-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuki Amano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are major components of signal transduction pathways in multiple cellular processes. Kinases directly interact with and phosphorylate downstream substrates, thus modulating their functions. Despite the importance of identifying substrates in order to more fully understand the signaling network of respective kinases, efficient methods to search for substrates remain poorly explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined mass spectrometry and affinity column chromatography of the catalytic domain of protein kinases to screen potential substrates. Using the active catalytic fragment of Rho-kinase/ROCK/ROK as the model bait, we obtained about 300 interacting proteins from the rat brain cytosol fraction, which included the proteins previously reported as Rho-kinase substrates. Several novel interacting proteins, including doublecortin, were phosphorylated by Rho-kinase both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method would enable identification of novel specific substrates for kinases such as Rho-kinase with high sensitivity.

  20. Arabidopsis scaffold protein RACK1A interacts with diverse environmental stress and photosynthesis related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Nabanita; Dozier, Uvetta; Deslandes, Laurent; Somssich, Imre E; Ullah, Hemayet

    2013-05-01

    Scaffold proteins are known to regulate important cellular processes by interacting with multiple proteins to modulate molecular responses. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, expresses ubiquitously and plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. Here we present the use of Arabidopsis RACK1A, the predominant isoform of a 3-member family, as a bait to screen a split-ubiquitin based cDNA library. In total 97 proteins from dehydration, salt stress, ribosomal and photosynthesis pathways are found to potentially interact with RACK1A. False positive interactions were eliminated following extensive selection based growth potentials. Confirmation of a sub-set of selected interactions is demonstrated through the co-transformation with individual plasmid containing cDNA and the respective bait. Interaction of diverse proteins points to a regulatory role of RACK1A in the cross-talk between signaling pathways. Promoter analysis of the stress and photosynthetic pathway genes revealed conserved transcription factor binding sites. RACK1A is known to be a multifunctional protein and the current identification of potential interacting proteins and future in vivo elucidations of the physiological basis of such interactions will shed light on the possible molecular mechanisms that RACK1A uses to regulate diverse signaling pathways.

  1. Protein kinase CK2 in health and disease: Protein kinase CK2: from structures to insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Raaf, J; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decade, 40 crystal structures corresponding to protein kinase CK2 (former name 'casein kinase 2'), to its catalytic subunit CK2alpha and to its regulatory subunit CK2beta were published. Together they provide a valuable, yet by far not complete basis to rationalize the biochemical...... critical region of CK2alpha recruitment is pre-formed in the unbound state. In CK2alpha the activation segment - a key element of protein kinase regulation - adapts invariably the typical conformation of the active enzymes. Recent structures of human CK2alpha revealed a surprising plasticity in the ATP...

  2. Identification of proteins interacting with Arabidopsis ACD11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Joensen, Jan; McKinney, Lea V;

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ACD11 gene encodes a sphingosine transfer protein and was identified by the accelerated cell death phenotype of the loss of function acd11 mutant, which exhibits heightened expression of genes involved in the disease resistance hypersensitive response (HR). We used ACD11 as bait...... in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an Arabidopsis cDNA library to identify ACD11 interacting proteins. One interactor identified is a protein of unknown function with an RNA recognition motif (RRM) designated BPA1 (binding partner of ACD11). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the ACD11-BPA1...

  3. Protein Kinase D family kinases: roads start to segregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lower. In our recent study we report that both kinases control PDAC cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific, but opposing manner. PKD1 selectively mediates anti-migratory/anti-invasive features by preferential regulation of the actin-regulatory Cofilin-phosphatase Slingshot1L (SSH1L). PKD2, on the other hand enhances invasion and angiogenesis of PDAC cells in 3D-ECM cultures and chorioallantois tumor models by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinase 7 and 9 (MMP7/9). MMP9 also enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis releasing extracellular matrix-bound VEGF-A. We thus suggest high PKD2 expression and loss of PKD1 may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In our recent study we demonstrate for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion, in-vitro and in-vivo, defining isoform-specific regulation of PKDs as a major future issue. PMID:24847910

  4. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW;

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray......, approximately 100 cellular proteins were identified as HCV core-interacting partners. Of these candidates, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPKAPK3) was selected for further characterization. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by stress and growth...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA...

  5. ARAMEMNON, a novel database for Arabidopsis integral membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwacke, Rainer; Schneider, Anja; van der Graaff, Eric;

    2003-01-01

    A specialized database (DB) for Arabidopsis membrane proteins, ARAMEMNON, was designed that facilitates the interpretation of gene and protein sequence data by integrating features that are presently only available from individual sources. Using several publicly available prediction programs, put...... is accessible at the URL http://aramemnon.botanik.uni-koeln.de....

  6. NITRIC OXIDE BINDS TO AND MODULATES THE ACTIVITY OF A POLLEN SPECIFIC ARABIDOPSIS DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  7. Involvement of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of proline catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eLeprince

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant adaptation to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity involves complex regulatory processes. Deciphering the signalling components that are involved in stress signal transduction and cellular responses is of importance to understand how plants cope with salt stress. Accumulation of osmolytes such as proline is considered to participate in the osmotic adjustment of plant cells to salinity. Proline accumulation results from a tight regulation between its biosynthesis and catabolism. Lipid signal components such as phospholipases C and D have previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of proline metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we demonstrate that proline metabolism is also regulated by class-III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, VPS34, which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P from phosphatidylinositol. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we show that the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, affects PI3P levels in vivo and that it triggers a decrease in proline accumulation in response to salt treatment of A. thaliana seedlings. The lower proline accumulation is correlated with a lower transcript level of Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase 1 biosynthetic enzyme and higher transcript and protein levels of Proline dehydrogenase 1 (ProDH1, a key-enzyme in proline catabolism. We also found that the ProDH1 expression is induced in a pi3k-hemizygous mutant, further demonstrating that PI3K is involved in the regulation of proline catabolism through transcriptional regulation of ProDH1. A broader metabolomic analysis indicates that LY294002 also reduced other metabolites, such as hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids and sugars like raffinose.

  8. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  9. CK2: a protein kinase in need of control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Sarno, S;

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a heterotetrameric alpha2beta2 Ser/Thr protein kinase with some features unusual among the eukaryotic protein kinases: (1) CK2 recognizes phosphoacceptor sites specified by several acidic determinants; (2) CK2 can use both ATP and GTP as phosphoryl donors; and (3...... response to nucleotide analogs. The increasing knowledge of CK2 structure-function relationships will allow the design of highly selective inhibitors of this pleiotropic kinase with oncogenic potential....

  10. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  11. Proteomic identification of S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindermayr, C.; Saalbach, G.; Durner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although nitric oxide (NO) has grown into a key signaling molecule in plants during the last few years, less is known about how NO regulates different events in plants. Analyses of NO-dependent processes in animal systems have demonstrated protein S-nitrosylation of cysteine (Cys) residues to be ...... to be one of the dominant regulation mechanisms for many animal proteins. For plants, the principle of S-nitrosylation remained to be elucidated. We generated S-nitrosothiols by treating extracts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures with the NO-donor S...

  12. Two thymidine kinases and one multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase salvage DNA precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anders Ranegaard Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Girandon, Lenart; Ali, Ashfaq;

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleotides are the building blocks of DNA and can be synthesized via de novo and salvage pathways. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (EC 2.7.1.145) salvage deoxyribonucleosides by transfer of a phosphate group to the 5' of a deoxyribonucleoside. This salvage pathway is well characterized....... Deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities were present in all tissues during all growth stages. In the A. thaliana genome, we identified two types of genes that could encode enzymes which are involved in the salvage of deoxyribonucleosides. Thymidine kinase activity was encoded by two thymidine kinase 1 (EC 2.......7.1.21)-like genes (AtTK1a and AtTK1b). Deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine and deoxycytidine kinase activities were encoded by a single AtdNK gene. T-DNA insertion lines of AtTK1a and AtTK1b mutant genes had normal growth, although AtTK1a AtTK1b double mutants died at an early stage, which indicates that AtTK1a...

  13. Two thymidine kinases and one multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase salvage DNA precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders R.; Girandon, Lenart; Ali, Ashfaq;

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleotides are the building blocks of DNA and can be synthesized via de novo and salvage pathways. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (EC 2.7.1.145) salvage deoxyribonucleosides by transfer of a phosphate group to the 5′ of a deoxyribonucleoside. This salvage pathway is well characterized....... Deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities were present in all tissues during all growth stages. In the A. thaliana genome, we identified two types of genes that could encode enzymes which are involved in the salvage of deoxyribonucleosides. Thymidine kinase activity was encoded by two thymidine kinase 1 (EC 2.......7.1.21)‐like genes (AtTK1a and AtTK1b). Deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine and deoxycytidine kinase activities were encoded by a single AtdNK gene. T‐DNA insertion lines of AtTK1a and AtTK1b mutant genes had normal growth, although AtTK1a AtTK1b double mutants died at an early stage, which indicates that AtTK1a...

  14. Genome-wide Analysis of Ovate Family Proteins in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jian-ping; Li Hong-ling; Chang Ying

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ovate family proteins (AtOFPs) is a newly found plant-specific protein family interacting with TALE (3-aa loop extension homeodomain proteins) homeodomain proteins in Arabidopsis. Here, based on bioinformatic analysis, we found that Arabidopsis genome actually encoded 17 OVATE domain-containing proteins. One of them, AtOFP19, has not been previously identified. Based on their amino acid sequence similarity, AtOFPs proteins can be divided into two groups. Most of the AtOFPs were located in nuclear, four of them were presented in chloroplast and the remaining two members appeared in cytoplasmic. A genome- wide microarray based gene expression analysis involving 47 stages of vegetative and reproductive development revealed that AtOFPs have diverse expression pattems. Investigation of proteins interaction showed that nine AtOFPs only interacted with TALE homeodomain proteins, which are fundamental regulators of plant meristem function and leaf development. Our work could provide important leads toward functional genomics studies of ovate family proteins, which may be involved in a previously unrecognized control mechanism in plant development

  15. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  16. Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase 45 functions in the responses to abscisic acid and abiotic stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiujuan

    2013-06-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed germination, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses such as drought and salt stresses. Receptor-like kinases are well known signaling components that mediate plant responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Here, we characterized the biological function of an ABA and stress-inducible cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK45, in ABA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The crk45 mutant was less sensitive to ABA than the wild type during seed germination and early seedling development, whereas CRK45 overexpression plants were more sensitive to ABA compared to the wild type. Furthermore, overexpression of CRK45 led to hypersensitivity to salt and glucose inhibition of seed germination, whereas the crk45 mutant showed the opposite phenotypes. In addition, CRK45 overexpression plants had enhanced tolerance to drought. Gene expression analyses revealed that the expression of representative stress-responsive genes was significantly enhanced in CRK45 overexpression plants in response to salt stress. ABA biosynthetic genes such as NCED3,. 22NCED3, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 3.NCED5,. 33NCED5, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 5.ABA2,. 44ABA2, Abscisic Acid Deficient 2. and AAO355AAO3, Abscisic Aldehyde Oxidase 3. were also constitutively elevated in the CRK45 overexpression plants. We concluded that CRK45 plays an important role in ABA signaling that regulates Arabidopsis seeds germination, early seedling development and abiotic stresses response, by positively regulating ABA responses in these processes. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I;

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of......, protein kinase Mzeta (PKMzeta). In this study, we used immunoblot and immunocytochemical techniques with isoform-specific antisera to examine the distribution of the complete family of PKC isozymes and PKMzeta in rat brain. Each form of PKC showed a widespread distribution in the brain with a distinct...

  18. Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinases Control Root Development Mainly via Brassinosteroid Independent Actions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junbo Du; Hongju Yin; Shasha Zhang; ZhuoyunWei; Baolin Zhao; Jinghua Zhang; Xiaoping Gou; Honghui Lin; Jia Li

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs),a group of plant steroidal hormones,play critical roles in many aspects of plant growth and development.Previous studies showed that BRI1-mediated BR signaling regulates cell division and differentiation during Arabidopsis root development via interplaying with auxin and other phytohormones.Arabidopsis somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs),as co-receptors of BRI1,were found to play a fundamental role in an early activation step of BR signaling pathway.Here we report a novel function of SERKs in regulating Arabidopsis root development.Genetic analyses indicated that SERKs control root growth mainly via a BR-independent pathway.Although BR signaling pathway is completely disrupted in the serk1 bak1 bkk1 triple mutant,the root growth of the triple mutant is much severely damaged than the BR deficiency or signaling null mutants.More detailed analyses indicated that the triple mutant exhibited drastically reduced expression of a number of genes critical to polar auxin transport,cell cycle,endodermis development and root meristem differentiation,which were not observed in null BR biosynthesis mutant cpd and null BR signaling mutant bri1-701.

  19. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Floral Proteome:Detection of over 2 000 Proteins and Evidence for Posttranslational Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baomin Feng; Lianchao Li; Xiaofan Zhou; Bruce Stanley; Hong Ma

    2009-01-01

    The proteome of the Arabidopsis flower has not been extensively studied previously. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of the wild type Arabidopsis flower. Using both two-dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (2-DGE/MS) and multi-dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approaches, we identified 2 446 proteins. Although a single experiment or analysis uncovered only a subset of the proteins we identified, a combination of multiple experiments and analyses facilitated the detection of a greater number of proteins. When proteins are grouped according to RNA expression levels revealed by microarray experiments, we found that proteins encoded by genes with relatively high levels of expression were detected with greater frequencies. On the other hand, at the level of the individual genelprotein, there was not a good correlation between protein spot intensity and microarray values. We also obtained strong evidence for post-translational modification from 2-DGE and MudPIT data. We detected proteins that are annotated to function in protein synthesis, folding, modification, and degradation, as well as the presence of regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and protein kinases. Finally, sequence and evolutionary analysis of genes for active methyl group metabolisms suggests that these genes are highly conserved. Our results allow the formulation of hypotheses regarding post-translational regulation of proteins in the flower, providing new understanding about Arabidopsis flower development and physiology.

  20. SNF1-related protein kinases type 2 are involved in plant responses to cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Anna; Anielska-Mazur, Anna; Bucholc, Maria; Koen, Emmanuel; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Zmienko, Agnieszka; Krzywinska, Ewa; Wawer, Izabela; McLoughlin, Fionn; Ruszkowski, Dariusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Testerink, Christa; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Wendehenne, David; Dobrowolska, Grazyna

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium ions are notorious environmental pollutants. To adapt to cadmium-induced deleterious effects plants have developed sophisticated defense mechanisms. However, the signaling pathways underlying the plant response to cadmium are still elusive. Our data demonstrate that SnRK2s (for SNF1-related protein kinase2) are transiently activated during cadmium exposure and are involved in the regulation of plant response to this stress. Analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Osmotic Stress-Activated Protein Kinase activity in tobacco Bright Yellow 2 cells indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide, produced mainly via an l-arginine-dependent process, contribute to the kinase activation in response to cadmium. SnRK2.4 is the closest homolog of tobacco Osmotic Stress-Activated Protein Kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Comparative analysis of seedling growth of snrk2.4 knockout mutants versus wild-type Arabidopsis suggests that SnRK2.4 is involved in the inhibition of root growth triggered by cadmium; the mutants were more tolerant to the stress. Measurements of the level of three major species of phytochelatins (PCs) in roots of plants exposed to Cd(2+) showed a similar (PC2, PC4) or lower (PC3) concentration in snrk2.4 mutants in comparison to wild-type plants. These results indicate that the enhanced tolerance of the mutants does not result from a difference in the PCs level. Additionally, we have analyzed ROS accumulation in roots subjected to Cd(2+) treatment. Our data show significantly lower Cd(2+)-induced ROS accumulation in the mutants' roots. Concluding, the obtained results indicate that SnRK2s play a role in the regulation of plant tolerance to cadmium, most probably by controlling ROS accumulation triggered by cadmium ions.

  1. Structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Scheeff

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  2. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  3. Thymidine kinases share a conserved function for nucleotide salvage and play an essential role in Arabidopsis thaliana growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Li, Qun; He, Zuhua

    2015-12-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) are important components in the nucleotide salvage pathway. However, knowledge about plant TKs is quite limited. In this study, the molecular function of TKs in Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. Two TKs were identified and named AtTK1 and AtTK2. Expression of both genes was ubiquitous, but AtTK1 was strongly expressed in high-proliferation tissues. AtTK1 was localized to the cytosol, whereas AtTK2 was localized to the mitochondria. Mutant analysis indicated that the two genes function coordinately to sustain normal plant development. Enzymatic assays showed that the two TK proteins shared similar catalytic specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. They were able to complement an Escherichia coli strain lacking TK activity. 5'-Fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU) resistance and 5-ethynyl 2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assays confirmed their activity in vivo. Furthermore, the tk mutant phenotype could be alleviated by nucleotide feeding, establishing that the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides was disrupted by the TK deficiency. Finally, both human and rice (Oryza sativa) TKs were able to rescue the tk mutants, demonstrating the functional conservation of TKs across organisms. Taken together, our findings clarify the specialized function of two TKs in A. thaliana and establish that the salvage pathway mediated by the kinases is essential for plant growth and development.

  4. AtPIN: Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Filho Marcio C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute one of the most crucial conditions to sustain life in living organisms. To study PPI in Arabidopsis thaliana we have developed AtPIN, a database and web interface for searching and building interaction networks based on publicly available protein-protein interaction datasets. Description All interactions were divided into experimentally demonstrated or predicted. The PPIs in the AtPIN database present a cellular compartment classification (C3 which divides the PPI into 4 classes according to its interaction evidence and subcellular localization. It has been shown in the literature that a pair of genuine interacting proteins are generally expected to have a common cellular role and proteins that have common interaction partners have a high chance of sharing a common function. In AtPIN, due to its integrative profile, the reliability index for a reported PPI can be postulated in terms of the proportion of interaction partners that two proteins have in common. For this, we implement the Functional Similarity Weight (FSW calculation for all first level interactions present in AtPIN database. In order to identify target proteins of cytosolic glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (Cyt-gluRS (AT5G26710 we combined two approaches, AtPIN search and yeast two-hybrid screening. Interestingly, the proteins glutamine synthetase (AT5G35630, a disease resistance protein (AT3G50950 and a zinc finger protein (AT5G24930, which has been predicted as target proteins for Cyt-gluRS by AtPIN, were also detected in the experimental screening. Conclusions AtPIN is a friendly and easy-to-use tool that aggregates information on Arabidopsis thaliana PPIs, ontology, and sub-cellular localization, and might be a useful and reliable strategy to map protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis. AtPIN can be accessed at http://bioinfo.esalq.usp.br/atpin.

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK20 modulates host responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection

    KAUST Repository

    Ederli, Luisa

    2011-10-01

    In plants, the cysteine-rich repeat kinases (CRKs) are a sub-family of receptor-like protein kinases that contain the DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains. It has been shown that in Arabidopsis thaliana, CRK20 is transcriptionally induced by pathogens, salicylic acid and ozone (O3). However, its role in responses to biotic and abiotic stress remains to be elucidated. To determine the function of CRK20 in such responses, two CRK20 loss-of-function mutants, crk20-1 and crk20-2, were isolated from public collections of Arabidopsis T-DNA tagged lines and examined for responses to O3 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. crk20-1 and crk20-2 showed similar O3 sensitivities and no differences in the expression of defense genes when compared with the wild-type. However, pathogen growth was significantly reduced, while there were no differences in the induction of salicylic acid related defense genes or salicylic acid accumulation. Furthermore, correlation analysis of CRK20 gene expression suggests that it has a role in the control of H2O and/or nutrient transport. We therefore propose that CRK20 promotes conditions that are favorable for Pst DC3000 growth in Arabidopsis, possibly through the regulation of apoplastic homeostasis, and consequently, of the environment of this biotrophic pathogen. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  7. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  8. Protein kinases are potential targets to treat inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei; Yang; Yutao; Yan

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), the two main forms of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s dis-ease. In this article, we will review the mechanisms of involvement of protein kinases in the pathogenesis of and intervention against IBD, in terms of their effects on genetics, microbiota, mucous layer and tight junc-tion, and the potential of protein kinases as therapeutic targets against IBD.

  9. The Roles of Protein Kinases in Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Karl Peter; Mizuno, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, more than 250 protein kinases are expressed, but only a few of these kinases are currently known to enable learning and memory. Based on this information it appears that learning and memory-related kinases either impact on synaptic transmission by altering ion channel properties or ion channel density, or regulate…

  10. Protein Kinase Cδ mediates the activation of Protein Kinase D2 in Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Kim, Soochong; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein Kinase D (PKD) is a subfamily of serine/threonine specific family of kinases, comprised of PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 (PKCμ, PKD2 and PKCν in humans). It is known that PKCs activate PKD, but the relative expression of isoforms of PKD or the specific PKC isoform/s responsible for its activation in platelets is not known. This study is aimed at investigating the pathway involved in activation of PKD in platelets. We show that PKD2 is the major isoform of PKD that is expressed in human as well ...

  11. Enhanced Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity by overexpression of cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hung eYeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs such as the bacterial flagellin (or the derived peptide flg22 by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs such as the FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2, plants activate the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI response. The L-type lectin receptor kinase-VI.2 (LecRK-VI.2 is a positive regulator of Arabidopsis thaliana PTI. Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs possess two copies of the C-X8-C-X2-C (DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains and are thought to be involved in plant stress resistance, but data about CRK functions are scarce. Here we show that Arabidopsis overexpressing the LecRK-VI.2-responsive CRK4, CRK6 and CRK36 demonstrated an enhanced PTI response and were resistant to virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Notably, the flg22-triggered oxidative burst was primed in CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 transgenics and up-regulation of the PTI-responsive gene FLG22-INDUCED RECEPTOR-LIKE 1 (FRK1 was potentiated upon flg22 treatment in CRK4 and CRK6 overexpression lines or constitutively increased by CRK36 overexpression. PTI-mediated callose deposition was not affected by overexpression of CRK4 and CRK6, while CRK36 overexpression lines demonstrated constitutive accumulation of callose. In addition, Pst DC3000-mediated stomatal reopening was blocked in CRK4 and CRK36 overexpression lines, while overexpression of CRK6 induced constitutive stomatal closure suggesting a strengthening of stomatal immunity. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation analyses in Arabidopsis protoplasts suggested that the plasma membrane localized CRK4, CRK6 and CRK36 associate with the PRR FLS2. Association with FLS2 and the observation that overexpression of CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 boosts specific PTI outputs and resistance to bacteria suggest a role for these CRKs in Arabidopsis innate immunity.

  12. Protein Kinase Signalling in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azevedo de Silva, Raquel

    of the pathways involved in stress signalling, phosphorylating several downstream substrates in order to produce appropriate responses. We report here that P. patens has a receptor-like kinase CERK1 responsible for chitin perception which can rescue Atcerk1 mutant. Activation of PpCERK1 triggers the activation...... of the following MAPK module: MEKK1A/MEKK1B-MKK1A/MKK1C-MPK4A/MPK4B. In Arabidopsis, some of these modules were demonstrated to be activated during PTI but also during abiotic stress. However, PpMPK4a and PpMPK4b are involved in chitin-dependent defense responses but are not activated during abiotic stresses......, such as salt or osmotic stress. Moreover, the PpMEKK1 homologs seem to be involved in ABA-dependent responses, such as, dehydration. Rescue of mekk1 knockouts phenotype when exogenous ABA is applied and downregulation of ABA biosynthesis genes suggests that these proteins function upstream or parallel...

  13. GmSARK启动子驱动IPT基因在拟南芥中的表达研究%Heterologous Expression of Isopentenyl Transferase(Ipt) Gene Directed by Senescence Associated Receptor Protein Kinase(SARK) Promoter in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍巍巍; 闫璇玲; 孙晓文; 李海燕

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to investigate the expression of IPT gene directed by GmSARK promoter in Arabidopsis. [ Method] IPT gene and GmSARK promoter were respectively cloned to construct plant expression vector and transform Arabidopsis. T, transgenic plant lines were detected by PPT(phosphinothricin) herbicide selection and treated under drought and dark conditions for semi-quantitive RT-PCR analysis. [ Result] GmSARK and IPT fusion gene was successfully cloned and the plant expression vector p3301 -GmSAHK-IPT was constructed. RT-PCR analysis showed that the target gene was expressed in T1 transgenic plant lines at the mRNA level. [ Conclusion] This study laid the foundation for further investigating the roles of IPT gene directed by GmSARK promoter in plant stress resistance.%[目的]对GmSARK启动子驱动IPT基因在拟南芥中的表达进行研究.[方法]分别克隆IPT基因及GmSARK基因启动子,构建它们的植物表达栽体并进行拟南芥的转化,利用PPT(phosphinothricin)除草剂筛选,检测T1代转基因植株;对T1代转基因植株进行黑暗避光和干旱处理后进行半定量RT-PCR分析.[结果]成功克隆得到了IPT基因及GmSARK基因,并构建了它们的p3301 -GmSARK-IPT植物表达载体;对T代转基因植株的RT-PCR表明,目的基因mRNA水平上有所表达.[结论]为进一步研究GmSARK启动子驱动的IPT基因在抗逆中的作用奠定了基础.

  14. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  15. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  16. The role of the SCRAMBLED receptor-like kinase in patterning the Arabidopsis root epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Schiefelbein, John

    2007-02-01

    Cell-type patterning in the Arabidopsis root epidermis is achieved by a network of transcription factors and influenced by a position-dependent mechanism. The SCRAMBLED receptor-like kinase is required for the normal pattern to arise, but its precise role is not understood. Here we describe genetic and molecular studies to define the spatial and temporal role of SCM in epidermal patterning and its relationship to the transcriptional network. Our results suggest that SCM helps unspecified epidermal cells interpret their position in relation to the underlying cortical cells and establish distinct cell identities. Furthermore, SCM loss-of-function and overexpression analyses suggest that SCM influences cell fate through its negative transcriptional regulation of the WEREWOLF MYB gene in epidermal cells at the H position. We also find that SCM function is specifically required for patterning the post-embryonic root epidermis and not for the analogous epidermal cell-type patterning during embryogenesis or hypocotyl development. In addition, we show that two closely related SCM-like genes in Arabidopsis (SRF1 and SRF3) are not required alone or together with SCM for proper epidermal patterning. These findings help define the developmental and mechanistic role of SCM and suggest a new model for its action in root epidermal cell patterning.

  17. Letting Go is Never Easy:Abscission and Receptor-Like Protein Kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chad E.Niederhuth; Sung Ki Cho; Kati Seitz; John C.Walker

    2013-01-01

    Abscission is the process by which plants discard organs in response to environmental cues/stressors, or as part of their normal development. Abscission has been studied throughout the history of the plant sciences and in numerous species. Although long studied at the anatomical and physiological levels, abscission has only been elucidated at the molecular and genetic levels within the last two decades, primarily with the use of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This has led to the discovery of numerous genes involved at all steps of abscission, including key pathways involving receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). This review covers the current knowledge of abscission research, highlighting the role of RLKs.

  18. Oral protein kinase c β inhibition using ruboxistaurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Vignati, Louis; Sheetz, Matthew J;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy, safety, and causes of vision loss among 813 patients (1,392 eyes) with moderately severe to very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy from the Protein Kinase C β Inhibitor-Diabetic Retinopathy Study and Protein Kinase C β Inhibitor-Diabetic Retinopathy Study 2 ruboxi...

  19. PINCH proteins regulate cardiac contractility by modulating integrin-linked kinase-protein kinase B signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meder, Benjamin; Huttner, Inken G; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Just, Steffen; Dahme, Tillman; Frese, Karen S; Vogel, Britta; Köhler, Doreen; Kloos, Wanda; Rudloff, Jessica; Marquart, Sabine; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an essential component of the cardiac mechanical stretch sensor and is bound in a protein complex with parvin and PINCH proteins, the so-called ILK-PINCH-parvin (IPP) complex. We have recently shown that inactivation of ILK or β-parvin activity leads to heart failure in zebrafish via reduced protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. Here, we show that PINCH proteins localize at sarcomeric Z disks and costameres in the zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the in vivo role of PINCH proteins for IPP complex stability and PKB signaling within the vertebrate heart, we inactivated PINCH1 and PINCH2 in zebrafish. Inactivation of either PINCH isoform independently leads to instability of ILK, loss of stretch-responsive anf and vegf expression, and progressive heart failure. The predominant cause of heart failure in PINCH morphants seems to be loss of PKB activity, since PKB phosphorylation at serine 473 is significantly reduced in PINCH-deficient hearts and overexpression of constitutively active PKB reconstitutes cardiac function in PINCH morphants. These findings highlight the essential function of PINCH proteins in controlling cardiac contractility by granting IPP/PKB-mediated signaling.

  20. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  1. A Dominant Allele of Arabidopsis Pectin-Binding Wall-Associated Kinase Induces a Stress Response Suppressed by MPK6 but Not MPK3 Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruce D.Kohorn; Susan L.Kohorn; Tanya Todorova; Gillian Baptiste; Kevin Stansky; Meghan McCullough

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of a matrix of cellulose fibers,flexible pectin polymers,and an array of assorted carbohydrates and proteins.The receptor-like Wall-Associated Kinases(WAKs)of Arabidopsis bind pectin in the wall,and are necessary both for cell expansion during development and for a response to pathogens and wounding.Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases(MPKs)form a major signaling link between cell surface receptors and both transcriptional and enzyme regulation in eukaryotes,and Arabidopsis MPK6 and MPK3 indeed have important roles in development and the response to stress and pathogens.A dominant allele of WAK2 requires kinase activity and activates a stress response that includes an increased ROS accumulation and the up-regulation of numerous genes involved in pathogen resistance,wounding,and cell wall biogenesis.This dominant allele requires a functional pectin binding and kinase domain,indicating that it is engaged in a WAK signaling pathway.A null mutant of the major plasma membrane ROS-producing enzyme complex,rbohd/f does not suppress the WAK2cTAP-induced phenotype.A mpk6,but not a mpk3,null allele is able to suppress the effects of this dominant WAK2 mutation,thus distinguishing MPK3 and MPK6,whose activity previously was thought to be redundant.Pectin activation of gene expression is abated in a wak2-null,but is tempered by the WAK-dominant allele that induces elevated basal stress-related transcript levels.The results suggest a mechanism in which changes to the cell wall can lead to a large change in cellular responses and help to explain how pathogens and wounding can have general effects on growth.

  2. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-10-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  3. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, S.; Fargnoli, J.; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk a...

  4. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  5. Opposite stereoselectivities of dirigent proteins in Arabidopsis and schizandra species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Atwell, Kathleen M; Costa, Michael A; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    How stereoselective monolignol-derived phenoxy radical-radical coupling reactions are differentially biochemically orchestrated in planta, whereby for example they afford (+)- and (-)-pinoresinols, respectively, is both a fascinating mechanistic and evolutionary question. In earlier work, biochemical control of (+)-pinoresinol formation had been established to be engendered by a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein in Forsythia intermedia, whereas the presence of a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein was indirectly deduced based on the enantiospecificity of downstream pinoresinol reductases (AtPrRs) in Arabidopsis thaliana root tissue. In this study of 16 putative dirigent protein homologs in Arabidopsis, AtDIR6, AtDIR10, and AtDIR13 were established to be root-specific using a β-glucuronidase reporter gene strategy. Of these three, in vitro analyses established that only recombinant AtDIR6 was a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein, whose physiological role was further confirmed using overexpression and RNAi strategies in vivo. Interestingly, its closest homolog, AtDIR5, was also established to be a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein based on in vitro biochemical analyses. Both of these were compared in terms of properties with a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein from Schizandra chinensis. In this context, sequence analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and region swapping resulted in identification of putative substrate binding sites/regions and candidate residues controlling distinct stereoselectivities of coupling modes.

  6. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  7. Regulation of tomato Prf by Pto-like protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucyn, Tatiana S; Wu, Ai-Jiuan; Balmuth, Alexi L; Arasteh, Julia Maryam; Rathjen, John P

    2009-04-01

    Tomato Prf encodes a nucleotide-binding domain shared by Apaf-1, certain R proteins, and CED-4 fused to C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (NBARC-LRR) protein that is required for bacterial immunity to Pseudomonas syringae and sensitivity to the organophosphate fenthion. The signaling pathways involve two highly related protein kinases. Pto kinase mediates direct recognition of the bacterial effector proteins AvrPto or AvrPtoB. Fen kinase is required for fenthion sensitivity and recognition of bacterial effectors related to AvrPtoB. The role of Pto and its association with Prf has been characterized but Fen is poorly described. We show that, similar to Pto, Fen requires N-myristoylation and kinase activity for signaling and interacts with the N-terminal domain of Prf. Thus, the mechanisms of activation of Prf by the respective protein kinases are similar. Prf-Fen interaction is underlined by coregulatory mechanisms in which Prf negatively regulates Fen, most likely by controlling kinase activity. We further characterized negative regulation of Prf by Pto, and show that regulation is mediated by the previously described negative regulatory patch. Remarkably, the effectors released negative regulation of Prf in a manner dependent on Pto kinase activity. The data suggest a model in which Prf associates generally with Pto-like kinases in tightly regulated complexes, which are activated by effector-mediated disruption of negative regulation. Release of negative regulation may be a general feature of activation of NBARC-LRR proteins by cognate effectors.

  8. Protein kinase A regulates molecular chaperone transcription and protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 regulates one of the major pathways of protein quality control and is essential for deterrence of protein-folding disorders, particularly in neuronal cells. However, HSF1 activity declines with age, a change that may open the door to progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have investigated mechanisms of HSF1 regulation that may become compromised with age. HSF1 binds stably to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on at least one regulatory serine residue (S320. We show here that PKA is essential for effective transcription of HSP genes by HSF1. PKA triggers a cascade involving HSF1 binding to the histone acetylase p300 and positive translation elongation factor 1 (p-TEFb and phosphorylation of the c-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, a key mechanism in the downstream steps of HSF1-mediated transcription. This cascade appears to play a key role in protein quality control in neuronal cells expressing aggregation-prone proteins with long poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts. Such proteins formed inclusion bodies that could be resolved by HSF1 activation during heat shock. Resolution of the inclusions was inhibited by knockdown of HSF1, PKAcα, or the pTEFb component CDK9, indicating a key role for the HSF1-PKA cascade in protein quality control.

  9. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  10. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase ...

  11. Host Signal Transduction and Protein Kinases Implicated in Legionella Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of the phosphorylation status of proteins by both kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in cellular signal transduction. Challenge of host cells by Legionella pneumophila manipulates the phosphorylation state of multiple host factors. These changes play roles in bacterial uptake, vacuole modification, cellular survival, and the immune response. In addition to modification by host cell kinases in response to the bacterium, L. pneumophila translocates bacterial kinases int...

  12. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr9...

  13. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  14. The Arabidopsis NIMIN proteins affect NPR1 differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike eHermann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1 is the central regulator of the pathogen defense reaction systemic acquired resistance (SAR. NPR1 acts by sensing the SAR signal molecule salicylic acid (SA to induce expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR genes. Mechanistically, NPR1 is the core of a transcription complex interacting with TGA transcription factors and NIM1 INTERACTING (NIMIN proteins. Arabidopsis NIMIN1 has been shown to suppress NPR1 activity in transgenic plants. The Arabidopsis NIMIN family comprises four structurally related, yet distinct members. Here, we show that NIMIN1, NIMIN2 and NIMIN3 are expressed differentially, and that the encoded proteins affect expression of the SAR marker PR-1 differentially. NIMIN3 is expressed constitutively at a low level, but NIMIN2 and NIMIN1 are both responsive to SA. While NIMIN2 is an immediate early SA-induced and NPR1-independent gene, NIMIN1 is activated after NIMIN2, but clearly before PR-1. Notably, NIMIN1, like PR-1, depends on NPR1. In a transient assay system, NIMIN3 suppresses SA-induced PR-1 expression, albeit to a lesser extent than NIMIN1, whereas NIMIN2 does not negatively affect PR-1 gene activation. Furthermore, although binding to the same domain in the C-terminus, NIMIN1 and NIMIN2 interact differentially with NPR1, thus providing a molecular basis for their opposing effects on NPR1. Together, our data suggest that the Arabidopsis NIMIN proteins are regulators of the SAR response. We propose that NIMINs act in a strictly consecutive and SA-regulated manner on the SA sensor protein NPR1, enabling NPR1 to monitor progressing threat by pathogens and to promote appropriate defense gene activation at distinct stages of SAR. In this scenario, the defense gene PR-1 is repressed at the onset of SAR by SA-induced, yet instable NIMIN1.

  15. Leishmanial protein kinases phosphorylate components of the complement system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermoso, T; Fishelson, Z; Becker, S I; Hirschberg, K.; Jaffe, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Externally oriented protein kinases are present on the plasma membrane of the human parasite, Leishmania. Since activation of complement plays an important role in the survival of these parasites, we examined the ability of protein kinases from Leishmania major to phosphorylate components of the human complement system. The leishmanial protein kinase-1 (LPK-1) isolated from promastigotes of L. major was able to phosphorylate purified human C3, C5 and C9. Only the alpha-chain of C3 and C5 was ...

  16. A-Raf kinase is a new interacting partner of protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1997-01-01

    In a search for protein kinase CK2 beta subunit binding proteins using the two-hybrid system, more than 1000 positive clones were isolated. Beside clones for the alpha' and beta subunit of CK2, there were clones coding for a so far unknown protein, whose partial cDNA sequence was already deposite...

  17. Inactivation of a MAPK-like protein kinase and activation of a MBP kinase in germinating barley embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testerink, C.; Vennik, M.; Kijne, J.W.; Wang, M.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    2000-01-01

    We provide evidence for involvement of two different 45 kDa protein kinases in rehydration and germination of barley embryos. In dry embryos, a myelin basic protein (MBP) phosphorylating kinase was detected, which could be immunoprecipitated with an anti-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) antib

  18. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  19. Side-effects of protein kinase inhibitors on ion channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youn Kyoung Son; Hongzoo Park; Amy L Firth; Won Sun Park

    2013-12-01

    Protein kinases are one of the largest gene families and have regulatory roles in all aspects of eukaryotic cell function. Modulation of protein kinase activity is a desirable therapeutic approach for a number of human diseases associated with aberrant kinase activity, including cancers, arthritis and cardiovascular disorders. Several strategies have been used to develop specific and selective protein kinase modulators, primarily via inhibition of phosphorylation and down-regulation of kinase gene expression. These strategies are effective at regulating intracellular signalling pathways, but are unfortunately associated with several undesirable effects, particularly those that modulate ion channel function. In fact, the side-effects have precluded these inhibitors from being both useful experimental tools and therapeutically viable. This review focuses on the ion channel side-effects of several protein kinase inhibitors and specifically on those modulating K+, Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. It is hoped that the information provided with a detailed summary in this review will assist the future development of novel specific and selective compounds targeting protein kinases both for experimental tools and for therapeutic approaches.

  20. Recent Developments of Protein Kinase Inhibitors as Potential AD Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eHilgeroth

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Present AD therapies suffer from inefficient effects on AD symptoms like memory or cognition, especially in later states of the disease. Used acteylcholine esterase (ACE inhibitors or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine address one target structure which is involved in a complex, multifactorial disease progression. So the benefit for patients is presently poor. A more close insight in the AD progression identified more suggested target structures for drug development. Strategies of AD drug development concentrate on novel target structures combined with the established ones dedicated for combined therapy regimes, preferably by the use of one drug which may address two target structures. Protein kinases have been identified as promising target structures because they are involved in AD progression pathways like pathophysiological tau protein phosphorylations and amyloid β toxicity. The review article will shortly view early inhibitors of single protein kinases like glycogen synthase kinase (gsk3 β and cyclin dependent kinase 5. Novel inhibitors will be discussed which address novel AD relevant protein kinases like dual-specifity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A. Moreover, multitargeting inhibitors will be presented which target several protein kinases and those which are suspected in influencing other AD relevant processes. Such a multitargeting is the most promising strategy to effectively hamper the multifactorial disease progression and thus gives perspective hopes for a future better patient benefit.

  1. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  2. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  3. Requirement for pectin methyl esterase and preference for fragmented over native pectins for wall-associated kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent stress response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Kohorn, Susan L; Saba, Nicholas J; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-07-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway.

  4. Inhibition of protein kinase C intracerebroventricularly attenuates sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Mrowczynski, Oliver Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Drug relapse, mediated by drug-associated memories, is a major problem associated with addiction. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of protein kinase enzymes that has been implicated in learning and memory with regards to addiction. This study used a PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine (10nmol), to investigate the effects of blocking PKC throughout the brain on addiction related memories. Cocaine (15mg/kg) induced locomotor sensitization, used to model the transition from casual to compulsive use, ...

  5. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of a novel rice (Oryzasativa L.) MAPK kinase kinase, OsEDR1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis AtEDR1, reveal its role in defense/stress signalling pathways and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-A; Agrawal, Ganesh K; Rakwal, Randeep; Han, Keon Seon; Kim, Kyung-Nam; Yun, Choong-Hyo; Heu, Sunggi; Park, Sook-Young; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2003-01-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade(s) is important for plant defense/stress responses. Though MAPKs have been identified and characterized in rice (Oryza sativa L.), a monocot cereal crop research model, the first upstream component of the kinase cascade, namely MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) has not yet been identified. Here we report the cloning of a novel rice gene encoding a MAPKKK, OsEDR1, designated based on its homology with the Arabidopsis MAPKKK, AtEDR1. OsEDR1, a single copy gene in the genome of rice, encodes a predicted protein with molecular mass of 113046.13 and a pI of 9.03. Using our established two-week-old rice seedling in vitro model system, we show that OsEDR1 has a constitutive expression in seedling leaves and is further up-regulated within 15 min upon wounding by cut, treatment with the global signals jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ethephon, ET), abscisic acid, and hydrogen peroxide. In addition, protein phosphatase inhibitors, fungal elicitor chitosan, drought, high salt and sugar, and heavy metals also dramatically induce its expression. Moreover, OsEDR1 expression was altered by co-application of JA, SA, and ET, and required de novo synthesized protein factor(s) in its transient regulation. Furthermore, using an in vivo system we also show that OsEDR1 responds to changes in temperature and environmental pollutants-ozone and sulfur dioxide. Finally, OsEDR1 expression varied significantly in vegetative and reproductive tissues. These results suggest a role for OsEDR1 in defense/stress signalling pathways and development. PMID:12559953

  6. Cellular pattern formation by SCRAMBLED, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Schiefelbein, John

    2008-02-01

    The appropriate specification of distinct cell types is important for generating the proper tissues and bodies of multicellular organisms. In the root epidermis of Arabidopsis, cell fate determination is accomplished by a transcriptional regulatory circuit that is influenced by positional signaling. A leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, SCRAMBLED (SCM), has been shown to be responsible for the position-dependent aspect of this epidermal pattern. In a recent report, we find that SCM affects the transcriptional regulatory network by down-regulating the WEREWOLF (WER) MYB gene expression in a set of epidermal cells located in a specific position. We also find that SCM and the SCM-related SRF1 and SRF3 are not required for embryonic epidermal patterning and that SRF1 and SRF3 do not act redundantly with SCM. This suggests that distinct positional signaling mechanisms exist for embryonic and post-embryonic epidermal patterning. In this addendum, we discuss the implications of our recent findings and extend our working model for epidermal cell pattering.

  7. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK7 acts on root hydraulic conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guowei; Boudsocq, Marie; Hem, Sonia; Vialaret, Jérôme; Rossignol, Michel; Maurel, Christophe; Santoni, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of plant roots (Lp(r)) is determined in large part by the activity of aquaporins. Mechanisms occurring at the post-translational level, in particular phosphorylation of aquaporins of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2 (PIP2) subfamily, are thought to be of critical importance for regulating root water transport. However, knowledge of protein kinases and phosphatases acting on aquaporin function is still scarce. In the present work, we investigated the Lp(r) of knockout Arabidopsis plants for four Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. cpk7 plants showed a 30% increase in Lp(r) because of a higher aquaporin activity. A quantitative proteomic analysis of wild-type and cpk7 plants revealed that PIP gene expression and PIP protein quantity were not correlated and that CPK7 has no effect on PIP2 phosphorylation. In contrast, CPK7 exerts a negative control on the cellular abundance of PIP1s, which likely accounts for the higher Lp(r) of cpk7. In addition, this study revealed that the cellular amount of a few additional proteins including membrane transporters is controlled by CPK7. The overall work provides evidence for CPK7-dependent stability of specific membrane proteins. PMID:25366820

  8. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution, and Co-expression Network Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kewei; Liu, Fuyan; Zou, Jinwei; Xing, Guangwei; Deng, Pingchuan; Song, Weining; Tong, Wei; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are the conserved and universal signal transduction modules in all eukaryotes, which play the vital roles in plant growth, development, and in response to multiple stresses. In this study, we used bioinformatics methods to identify 86 MAPKKK protein encoded by 73 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKKK family from Arabidopsis, rice, and Brachypodium has classified them into three subfamilies, of which 28 belonged to MEKK, 52 to Raf, and 6 to ZIK subfamily, respectively. Conserved protein motif, exon-intron organization, and splicing intron phase in kinase domains supported the evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis. And gene duplication analysis suggested the chromosomal segment duplication happened before the divergence of the rice and Brachypodium, while all of three tandem duplicated gene pairs happened after their divergence. We further demonstrated that the MAPKKKs have evolved under strong purifying selection, implying the conservation of them. The splicing transcripts expression analysis showed that the splicesome translating longest protein tended to be adopted. Furthermore, the expression analysis of BdMAPKKKs in different organs and development stages as well as heat, virus and drought stresses revealed that the MAPKKK genes were involved in various signaling pathways. And the circadian analysis suggested there were 41 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium showing cycled expression in at least one condition, of which seven MAPKKK genes expressed in all conditions and the promoter analysis indicated these genes possessed many cis-acting regulatory elements involved in circadian and light response. Finally, the co-expression network of MAPK, MAPKK, and MAPKKK in Brachypodium was constructed using 144 microarray and RNA-seq datasets, and ten potential MAPK cascades pathway were predicted. To conclude, our study provided the important information for evolutionary and

  9. MBD 4-a potential substrate for protein kinase X

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Lin; Wei Li

    2011-01-01

    Human protein kinase X (PrKX) is an X chromosomeencoded cAMP-dependent protein kinase.PrKX has 50.2%,50.8%,and 44.83% identity with the catalytic,C-subunit of PKAα,PKAβ,and PKAγ,respectively [1].PrKX shares some biochemical characteristics with PKA.Both kinases catalyze phosphorylation of histone H1 and the PKA synthetic septapeptide substrate,referred to as Kemptide (LRRASLG),in vitro.However,the specific activities of PrKX phosphorylation of histone H1 and Kemptide are significantly lower than that of PKA [2,3].

  10. Conservation, variability and the modeling of active protein kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D R Knight

    Full Text Available The human proteome is rich with protein kinases, and this richness has made the kinase of crucial importance in initiating and maintaining cell behavior. Elucidating cell signaling networks and manipulating their components to understand and alter behavior require well designed inhibitors. These inhibitors are needed in culture to cause and study network perturbations, and the same compounds can be used as drugs to treat disease. Understanding the structural biology of protein kinases in detail, including their commonalities, differences and modes of substrate interaction, is necessary for designing high quality inhibitors that will be of true use for cell biology and disease therapy. To this end, we here report on a structural analysis of all available active-conformation protein kinases, discussing residue conservation, the novel features of such conservation, unique properties of atypical kinases and variability in the context of substrate binding. We also demonstrate how this information can be used for structure prediction. Our findings will be of use not only in understanding protein kinase function and evolution, but they highlight the flaws inherent in kinase drug design as commonly practiced and dictate an appropriate strategy for the sophisticated design of specific inhibitors for use in the laboratory and disease therapy.

  11. Inferring the Brassica rapa interactome using protein-protein interaction data from Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua eYang; Kim eOsman; Mudassar eIqbal; Stekel, Dov J; Zewei eLuo; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F. Chris H.

    2013-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases. It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa ...

  12. P-proteins in Arabidopsis are heteromeric structures involved in rapid sieve tube sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan B Jekat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural phloem proteins (P-proteins are characteristic components of the sieve elements in all dicotyledonous and many monocotyledonous angiosperms. Tobacco P-proteins were recently evidenced to be encoded by the widespread SEO gene family, and tobacco SEO proteins were shown to be directly involved in sieve tube sealing thus preventing the loss of photosynthate. Analysis of the two Arabidopsis SEO proteins (AtSEOa and AtSEOb indicated that the corresponding P-protein subunits do not act in a redundant manner. However, there are still pending questions regarding the interaction properties and specific functions of AtSEOa and AtSEOb as well as the general function of structural P-proteins in Arabidopsis. In this study, we characterized the Arabidopsis P-proteins in more detail. We used in planta bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the predicted heteromeric interactions between AtSEOa and AtSEOb. Arabidopsis mutants depleted for one or both AtSEO proteins lacked the typical P-protein structures normally found in sieve elements, underlining the identity of AtSEO proteins as P-proteins and furthermore providing the means to determine the role of Arabidopsis P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore developed an assay based on phloem exudation. Mutants with reduced AtSEO expression levels lost twice as much photosynthate following injury as comparable wild-type plants, confirming that Arabidopsis P-proteins are indeed involved in sieve tube sealing. 

  13. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G proteins regulate immunity by directly coupling to the FLS2 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiangxiu; Ding, Pingtao; Lian, Kehui; Wang, Jinlong; Ma, Miaomiao; Li, Lin; Li, Lei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Chen, She; Zhang, Yuelin; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis immune receptor FLS2 perceives bacterial flagellin epitope flg22 to activate defenses through the central cytoplasmic kinase BIK1. The heterotrimeric G proteins composed of the non-canonical Gα protein XLG2, the Gβ protein AGB1, and the Gγ proteins AGG1 and AGG2 are required for FLS2-mediated immune responses through an unknown mechanism. Here we show that in the pre-activation state, XLG2 directly interacts with FLS2 and BIK1, and it functions together with AGB1 and AGG1/2 to attenuate proteasome-mediated degradation of BIK1, allowing optimum immune activation. Following the activation by flg22, XLG2 dissociates from AGB1 and is phosphorylated by BIK1 in the N terminus. The phosphorylated XLG2 enhances the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) likely by modulating the NADPH oxidase RbohD. The study demonstrates that the G proteins are directly coupled to the FLS2 receptor complex and regulate immune signaling through both pre-activation and post-activation mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13568.001 PMID:27043937

  14. Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins: fascinating and less fascinating aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eJaspert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 14-3-3 dimers are well known to interact with diverse target proteins throughout eukaryotes. Most notably, association of 14-3-3s commonly requires phosphorylation of a serine or threonine residue within a specific sequence motif of the client protein. Studies with a focus on individual target proteins have unequivocally demonstrated 14-3-3s to be the crucial factors modifying the client’s activity state upon phosphorylation and, thus, finishing the job initiated by a kinase. In this respect, a recent in-depth analysis of the rice transcription factor FLOWERING LOCUS D1 (OsFD1 revealed 14-3-3s to be essential players in floral induction. However, such fascinating discoveries can often be ascribed to the random identification of 14-3-3 as an interaction partner of the favorite protein. In contrast, our understanding of 14-3-3 function in higher organisms is frustratingly limited, mainly due to an overwhelming spectrum of putative targets in combination with the existence of a multigene 14-3-3 family. In this review we will discuss our current understanding of the function of plant 14-3-3 proteins, taking into account surveys of the Arabidopsis 14-3-3 interactome.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  16. Protein Kinases and Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Syed Jafar; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M.; Barger, Steven W.; Sarkar, Sumit; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Imam, Syed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the lack of new drug candidates for the treatment of major neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease has intensified the search for drugs that can be repurposed or repositioned for such treatment. Typically, the search focuses on drugs that have been approved and are used clinically for other indications. Kinase inhibitors represent a family of popular molecules for the treatment and prevention of various cancers, and have emerged as strong candidates for such repurposing because numerous serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the pathobiology of Parkinson’s disease. This review focuses on various kinase-dependent pathways associated with the expression of Parkinson’s disease pathology, and evaluates how inhibitors of these pathways might play a major role as effective therapeutic molecules. PMID:27657053

  17. Stress-induced activation of protein kinase CK2 by direct interaction with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, M; Kim, S O; Salh, B S;

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of proteins that are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we demonstrate that the stress signaling agents anisomycin, arsenite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the specific enzyme activity of CK2...... to be an allosteric mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anisomycin- and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser-392, which is important for the transcriptional activity of this growth suppressor protein, requires p38 MAP kinase and CK2 activities....... in the human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by up to 8-fold, and this could be blocked by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. We show that p38alpha MAP kinase, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, can directly interact with the alpha and beta subunits of CK2 to activate the holoenzyme through what appears...

  18. Protein Methionine Sulfoxide Dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Silke; Ghesquière, Bart; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Demol, Hans; Wahni, Khadija; Willems, Patrick; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide can modify proteins via direct oxidation of their sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Methionine oxidation, studied here, is a reversible posttranslational modification that is emerging as a mechanism by which proteins perceive oxidative stress and function in redox signaling. Identification of proteins with oxidized methionines is the first prerequisite toward understanding the functional effect of methionine oxidation on proteins and the biological processes in which they are involved. Here, we describe a proteome-wide study of in vivo protein-bound methionine oxidation in plants upon oxidative stress using Arabidopsis thaliana catalase 2 knock-out plants as a model system. We identified over 500 sites of oxidation in about 400 proteins and quantified the differences in oxidation between wild-type and catalase 2 knock-out plants. We show that the activity of two plant-specific glutathione S-transferases, GSTF9 and GSTT23, is significantly reduced upon oxidation. And, by sampling over time, we mapped the dynamics of methionine oxidation and gained new insights into this complex and dynamic landscape of a part of the plant proteome that is sculpted by oxidative stress.

  19. Protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation blocks juvenile hormone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kethidi, Damu R; Li, Yiping; Palli, Subba R

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate a wide variety of developmental and physiological processes in insects. Although the biological actions of JH are well documented, the molecular mechanisms underlying JH action are poorly understood. We studied the molecular basis of JH action using a JH response element (JHRE) identified in the promoter region of JH esterase gene cloned from Choristoneura fumiferana, which is responsive to JH and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). In Drosophila melanogaster L57 cells, the JHRE-regulated reporter gene was induced by JH I, JH III, methoprene, and hydroprene. Nuclear proteins isolated from L57 cells bound to the JHRE and exposure of these proteins to ATP resulted in a reduction in their DNA binding. Either JH III or calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) was able to restore the binding of nuclear proteins to the DNA. In addition, protein kinase C inhibitors increased and protein kinase C activators reduced the binding of nuclear proteins to the JHRE. In transactivation assays, protein kinase C inhibitors induced the luciferase gene placed under the control of a minimal promoter and the JHRE. These data suggest that protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation prevents binding of nuclear proteins to juvenile hormone responsive promoters resulting in suppression of JH action. PMID:16448742

  20. The arabidopsis wall associated kinase-like 10 gene encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase and is co-expressed with pathogen defense related genes

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2010-01-26

    Background: Second messengers have a key role in linking environmental stimuli to physiological responses. One such messenger, guanosine 3?,5?-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), has long been known to be an essential signaling molecule in many different physiological processes in higher plants, including biotic stress responses. To date, however, the guanylyl cyclase (GC) enzymes that catalyze the formation of cGMP from GTP have largely remained elusive in higher plants. Principal Findings: We have identified an Arabidopsis receptor type wall associated kinase-like molecule (AtWAKL10) as a candidate GC and provide experimental evidence to show that the intracellular domain of AtWAKL10431-700 can generate cGMP in vitro. Further, we also demonstrate that the molecule has kinase activity indicating that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain catalytic protein. A co-expression and stimulus-specific expression analysis revealed that AtWAKL10 is consistently coexpressed with well characterized pathogen defense related genes and along with these genes is induced early and sharply in response to a range of pathogens and their elicitors. Conclusions: We demonstrate that AtWAKL10 is a twin-domain, kinase-GC signaling molecule that may function in biotic stress responses that are critically dependent on the second messenger cGMP. © 2010 Meier et al.

  1. Protein: FEA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA3 AREB pathway: Signaling proteins SRK2E OST1, SNRK2.6 Serine/threonine-protein kinase SRK2E Protein... OPEN STOMATA 1, SNF1-related kinase 2.6, Serine/threonine-protein kinase OST1 3702 Arabidopsis thaliana 829541 Q940H6 3UC4, 3ZUT, 3ZUU, 3UDB 19805022 ...

  2. DETORQUEO, QUIRKY, and ZERZAUST represent novel components involved in organ development mediated by the receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Fulton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signaling plays an important role in controlling cellular behavior in apical meristems and developing organs in plants. One prominent example in Arabidopsis is the regulation of floral organ shape, ovule integument morphogenesis, the cell division plane, and root hair patterning by the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG (SUB. Interestingly, kinase activity of SUB is not essential for its in vivo function, indicating that SUB may be an atypical or inactive receptor-like kinase. Since little is known about signaling by atypical receptor-like kinases, we used forward genetics to identify genes that potentially function in SUB-dependent processes and found recessive mutations in three genes that result in a sub-like phenotype. Plants with a defect in DETORQEO (DOQ, QUIRKY (QKY, and ZERZAUST (ZET show corresponding defects in outer integument development, floral organ shape, and stem twisting. The mutants also show sub-like cellular defects in the floral meristem and in root hair patterning. Thus, SUB, DOQ, QKY, and ZET define the STRUBBELIG-LIKE MUTANT (SLM class of genes. Molecular cloning of QKY identified a putative transmembrane protein carrying four C(2 domains, suggesting that QKY may function in membrane trafficking in a Ca(2+-dependent fashion. Morphological analysis of single and all pair-wise double-mutant combinations indicated that SLM genes have overlapping, but also distinct, functions in plant organogenesis. This notion was supported by a systematic comparison of whole-genome transcript profiles during floral development, which molecularly defined common and distinct sets of affected processes in slm mutants. Further analysis indicated that many SLM-responsive genes have functions in cell wall biology, hormone signaling, and various stress responses. Taken together, our data suggest that DOQ, QKY, and ZET contribute to SUB-dependent organogenesis and shed light on the mechanisms, which are dependent on

  3. Dominant and recessive mutations in the Raf-like kinase HT1 gene completely disrupt stomatal responses to CO2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Monda, Keina; Higaki, Takumi; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Toshiaki; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Iba, Koh

    2016-05-01

    HT1 (HIGH LEAF TEMPERATURE 1) is the first component associated with changes in stomatal aperture in response to CO2 to be isolated by forward genetic screening. The HT1 gene encodes a protein kinase expressed mainly in guard cells. The loss-of-function ht1-1 and ht1-2 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana have CO2-hypersensitive stomatal closure with concomitant reductions in their kinase activities in vitro In addition to these mutants, in this study we isolate or obtaine five new ht1 alleles (ht1-3, ht1-4, ht1-5, ht1-6, and ht1-7). Among the mutants, only ht1-3 has a dominant mutant phenotype and has widely opened stomata due to CO2 insensitivity. The ht1-3 mutant has a missense mutation affecting a non-conserved residue (R102K), whereas the other six recessive mutants have mutations in highly conserved residues in the catalytic domains required for kinase activity. We found that the dominant mutation does not affect the expression of HT1 or the ability to phosphorylate casein, a universal kinase substrate, but it does affect autophosphorylation activity in vitro A 3D structural model of HT1 also shows that the R102 residue protrudes from the surface of the kinase, implying a role for the formation of oligomers and/or interaction with its targets. We demonstrate that both the loss-of-function and gain-of-function ht1 mutants have completely disrupted CO2 responses, although they have normal responses to ABA. Furthermore, light-induced stomatal opening is smaller in ht1-3 and much smaller in ht1-2 Taken together, these results indicate that HT1 is a critical regulator for CO2 signaling and is partially involved in the light-induced stomatal opening pathway. PMID:27034327

  4. Modulation of the MAP kinase signaling cascade by Raf kinase inhibitory protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicholas TRAKUL; Marsha R. ROSNER

    2005-01-01

    Proteins like Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) that serve as modulators of signaling pathways, either by promoting or inhibiting the formation of productive signaling complexes through protein-protein interactions, have been demonstrated to play an increasingly important role in a number of cell types and organisms. These proteins have been implicated in development as well as the progression of cancer. RKIP is a particularly interesting regulator, as it is a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed protein that has been shown to play a role in growth and differentiation in a number of organisms and can regulate multiple signaling pathways. RKIP is also the first MAP kinase signaling modulator to be identified as playing a role in cancer metastasis, and identification of the mechanism by which it regulates Raf-1 activation provides new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Maria Cristina Suarez; Petersen, Morten; Mundy, John

    2010-01-01

    of substrate proteins, whose altered activities mediate a wide array of responses, including changes in gene expression. Cascades may share kinase components, but their signaling specificity is maintained by spaciotemporal constraints and dynamic protein-protein interactions and by mechanisms that include......Eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have evolved to transduce environmental and developmental signals into adaptive and programmed responses. MAPK cascades relay and amplify signals via three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases leading to the phosphorylation...... crossinhibition, feedback control, and scaffolding. Plant MAPK cascades regulate numerous processes, including stress and hormonal responses, innate immunity, and developmental programs. Genetic analyses have uncovered several predominant MAPK components shared by several of these processes including...

  7. Mitogen activated protein kinases: a role in inflammatory bowel disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broom, O J; Widjaya, B; Troelsen, J;

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery more than 15 years ago, the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been implicated in an ever-increasingly diverse array of pathways, including inflammatory signalling cascades. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease...... and their related signalling proteins in influencing the progression of IBD....

  8. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Kumar, Narender; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C; Kwon, Ashley; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  9. The ACR11 encodes a novel type of chloroplastic ACT domain repeat protein that is coordinately expressed with GLN2 in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chih-Ping

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ACT domain, named after bacterial aspartate kinase, chorismate mutase and TyrA (prephenate dehydrogenase, is a regulatory domain that serves as an amino acid-binding site in feedback-regulated amino acid metabolic enzymes. We have previously identified a novel type of ACT domain-containing protein family, the ACT domain repeat (ACR protein family, in Arabidopsis. Members of the ACR family, ACR1 to ACR8, contain four copies of the ACT domain that extend throughout the entire polypeptide. Here, we describe the identification of four novel ACT domain-containing proteins, namely ACR9 to ACR12, in Arabidopsis. The ACR9 and ACR10 proteins contain three copies of the ACT domain, whereas the ACR11 and ACR12 proteins have a putative transit peptide followed by two copies of the ACT domain. The functions of these plant ACR proteins are largely unknown. Results The ACR11 and ACR12 proteins are predicted to target to chloroplasts. We used protoplast transient expression assay to demonstrate that the Arabidopsis ACR11- and ACR12-green fluorescent fusion proteins are localized to the chloroplast. Analysis of an ACR11 promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS fusion in transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that the GUS activity was mainly detected in mature leaves and sepals. Interestingly, coexpression analysis revealed that the GLN2, which encodes a chloroplastic glutamine synthetase, has the highest mutual rank in the coexpressed gene network connected to ACR11. We used RNA gel blot analysis to confirm that the expression pattern of ACR11 is similar to that of GLN2 in various organs from 6-week-old Arabidopsis. Moreover, the expression of ACR11 and GLN2 is highly co-regulated by sucrose and light/dark treatments in 2-week-old Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusions This study reports the identification of four novel ACT domain repeat proteins, ACR9 to ACR12, in Arabidopsis. The ACR11 and ACR12 proteins are localized to the chloroplast, and the expression

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana mTERF proteins: evolution and functional classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana eKleine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organellar gene expression (OGE is crucial for plant development, photosynthesis and respiration, but our understanding of the mechanisms that control it is still relatively poor. Thus, OGE requires various nucleus-encoded proteins that promote transcription, splicing, trimming and editing of organellar RNAs, and regulate translation. In metazoans, proteins of the mitochondrial Transcription tERmination Factor (mTERF family interact with the mitochondrial chromosome and regulate transcriptional initiation and termination. Sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome led to the identification of a diversified MTERF gene family but, in contrast to mammalian mTERFs, knowledge about the function of these proteins in photosynthetic organisms is scarce. In this hypothesis article, I show that tandem duplications and one block duplication contributed to the large number of MTERF genes in A. thaliana, and propose that the expansion of the family is related to the evolution of land plants. The MTERF genes - especially the duplicated genes - display a number of distinct mRNA accumulation patterns, suggesting functional diversification of mTERF proteins to increase adaptability to environmental changes. Indeed, hypothetical functions for the different mTERF proteins can be predicted using co-expression analysis and gene ontology annotations. On this basis, mTERF proteins can be sorted into five groups. Members of the chloroplast and chloroplast-associated clusters are principally involved in chloroplast gene expression, embryogenesis and protein catabolism, while representatives of the mitochondrial cluster seem to participate in DNA and RNA metabolism in that organelle. Moreover, members of the mitochondrion-associated cluster and the low expression group may act in the nucleus and/or the cytosol. As proteins involved in OGE and presumably nuclear gene expression, mTERFs are ideal candidates for the coordination of the expression of organelle and nuclear

  11. Contractions activate hormone-sensitive lipase in rat muscle by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donsmark, Morten; Langfort, Jozef; Holm, Cecilia;

    2003-01-01

    Intramuscular triacylglycerol is an important energy store and is also related to insulin resistance. The mobilization of fatty acids from this pool is probably regulated by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which has recently been shown to exist in muscle and to be activated by both adrenaline......-induced activation of HSL was abolished by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I and calphostin C and reduced 50% by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, which also completely blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation. None...... of the inhibitors reduced adrenaline-induced HSL activation in soleus muscle. Both phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), which activates PKC and, in turn, ERK, and caffeine, which increases intracellular Ca2+ without eliciting contraction, increased HSL activity. Activated ERK increased HSL activity in supernatant...

  12. Early light-induced proteins protect Arabidopsis from photooxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutin, Claire; Nussaume, Laurent; Moise, Nicolae; Moya, Ismaël; Kloppstech, Klaus; Havaux, Michel

    2003-04-15

    The early light-induced proteins (ELIPs) belong to the multigenic family of light-harvesting complexes, which bind chlorophyll and absorb solar energy in green plants. ELIPs accumulate transiently in plants exposed to high light intensities. By using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (chaos) affected in the posttranslational targeting of light-harvesting complex-type proteins to the thylakoids, we succeeded in suppressing the rapid accumulation of ELIPs during high-light stress, resulting in leaf bleaching and extensive photooxidative damage. Constitutive expression of ELIP genes in chaos before light stress resulted in ELIP accumulation and restored the phototolerance of the plants to the wild-type level. Free chlorophyll, a generator of singlet oxygen in the light, was detected by chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime measurements in chaos leaves before the symptoms of oxidative stress appeared. Our findings indicate that ELIPs fulfill a photoprotective function that could involve either the binding of chlorophylls released during turnover of pigment-binding proteins or the stabilization of the proper assembly of those proteins during high-light stress. PMID:12676998

  13. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin;

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date...... protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine......, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  14. Purification and characterization of a thylakoid protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of state transitions in the thylakoid by reversible phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is modulated by a kinase. The kinase catalyzing this phosphorylation is associated with the thylakoid membrane, and is regulated by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool. The isolation and partial purification from spinach thylakoids of two protein kinases (CPK1, CPK2) of apparent molecular masses 25 kDa and 38 kDa has been reported. Neither enzyme utilizes isolated LHC-II as a substrate. The partial purification of a third protein kinase (LHCK) which can utilize both lysine-rich histones (IIIs and Vs) and isolated LHC-II as substrate has now been purified to homogeneity and characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a 64 kDa peptide. From a comparison of the two isolation procedures we have concluded that CPK1 is indeed a protein kinase, but has a lower specific activity than that of LHCK. 8 refs., 4 figs

  15. Nuclear Targeting of Methyl-Recycling Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana Is Mediated by Specific Protein Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanghyun Lee; Andrew C. Doxey; Brendan J. McConkey; Barbara A. Moffatt

    2012-01-01

    Numerous transmethylation reactions are required for normal plant growth and development.S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) and adenosine kinase (ADK) act coordinately to recycle the by-product of these reactions,S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) that would otherwise competitively inhibit methyltransferase (MT) activities.Here,we report on investigations to understand how the SAH produced in the nucleus is metabolized by SAHH and ADK.Localization analyses using green fluorescent fusion proteins demonstrated that both enzymes are capable of localizing to the cytoplasm and the nucleus,although no obvious nuclear localization signal was found in their sequences.Deletion analysis revealed that a 41-amino-acid segment of SAHH (Gly1 50-Lys190) is required for nuclear targeting of this enzyme.This segment is surface exposed,shows unique sequence conservation patterns in plant SAHHs,and possesses additional features of protein-protein interaction motifs.ADK and SAHH interact in Arabidopsis via this segment and also interact with an mRNA cap MT.We propose that the targeting of this complex is directed by the nuclear localization signal of the MT; other MTs may similarly target SAHH/ADK to other subcellular compartments to ensure uninterrupted transmethylation.

  16. Synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate for 60S ribosomal protein kinase from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Gasior, E; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic studies on the 60S protein kinase were conducted with synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate. Peptide RRREEESDDD proved to be the best synthetic substrate for this enzyme. The peptide has a sequence of amino acids which most closely resembles the structure of potential...... phosphorylation sites in natural substrates, i.e., acidic ribosomal proteins. The superiority of certain kinetic parameters for 60S kinase obtained with the native whole 80S ribosomes over those of the isolated fraction of acidic ribosomal proteins indicates that the affinity of 60S kinase to the specific protein...

  17. Construction of a chloroplast protein interaction network and functional mining of photosynthetic proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Bo Yu; Yong-Lan Cui; Kang Chong; Yi-Xue Li; Yu-Hua Li; Zhongming Zhao; Tie-Liu Shi; Zhong-Nan Yang; Guang Li; Guan Wang; Jing-Chun Sun; Peng-Cheng Wang; Chen Wang; Hua-Ling Mi; Wei-Min Ma; Jian Cui

    2008-01-01

    Chloroplast is a typical plant cell organeUe where photosynthesis takes place.In this study,a total of 1 808 chloroplast core proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana were reliably identified by combining the results of previously published studies and our own predictions.We then constructed a chloroplast protein interaction network primarily based on these core protein interactions.The network had 22 925 protein interaction pairs which involved 2 214 proteins.A total of 160 previously uncharacterized proteins were annotated in this network.The subunits of the photosynthetic complexes were modularized,and the functional relationships among photosystem Ⅰ (PSI),photosystem Ⅱ (PSII),light harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅰ (LHC Ⅰ) and light harvesting complex of photosystem Ⅰ (LHC Ⅱ) could be deduced from the predicted protein interactions in this network.We further confirmed an interaction between an unknown protein AT1G52220 and a photosynthetic subunit PSI-D2 by yeast two-hybrid analysis.Our chloroplast protein interaction network should be useful for functional mining of photosynthetic proteins and investigation of chloroplast-related functions at the systems biology level in Arabidopsis.

  18. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  19. Kip-related protein 3 is required for control of endoreduplication in the shoot apical meristem and leaves of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sang Eun; Okushima, Yoko; Nam, Jaesung; Umeda, Masaaki; Kim, Gyung-Tae

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle plays an important role in the development and adaptation of multicellular organisms; specifically, it allows them to optimally adjust their architecture in response to environmental changes. Kip-related proteins (KRPs) are important negative regulators of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which positively control the cell cycle during plant development. The Arabidopsis genome possesses seven KRP genes with low sequence similarity and distinct expression patterns; however, why Arabidopsis needs seven KRP genes and how these genes function in cell cycle regulation are unknown. Here, we focused on the characterization of KRP3, which was found to have unique functions in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and leaves. KRP3 protein was localized to the SAM, including the ground meristem and vascular tissues in the ground part of the SAM and cotyledons. In addition, KRP3 protein was stabilized when treated with MG132, an inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, indicating that the protein may be regulated by 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation. KRP3-overexpressing (KRP3 OE) transgenic plants showed reduced organ size, serrated leaves, and reduced fertility. Interestingly, the KRP3 OE transgenic plants showed a significant reduction in the size of the SAM with alterations in cell arrangement. In addition, compared to the wild type, the KRP3 OE transgenic plants had a higher DNA ploidy level in the SAM and leaves. Taken together, our data suggest that KRP3 plays important regulatory roles in the cell cycle and endoreduplication in the SAM and leaves. PMID:23314608

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase-activating kinases CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 are essential for preserving mitotic activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Hirotomo; Umeda-Hara, Chikage; Umeda, Masaaki

    2015-06-01

    For the full activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), not only cyclin binding but also CDK phosphorylation is required. This activating phosphorylation is mediated by CDK-activating kinases (CAKs). Arabidopsis has four genes showing similarity to vertebrate-type CAKs, three CDKDs (CDKD;1-CDKD;3) and one CDKF (CDKF;1). We previously found that the cdkf;1 mutant is defective in post-embryonic development, even though the kinase activities of core CDKs remain unchanged relative to the wild type. This raised a question about the involvement of CDKDs in CDK activation in planta. Here we report that the cdkd;1 cdkd;3 double mutant showed gametophytic lethality. Most cdkd;1-1 cdkd;3-1 pollen grains were defective in pollen mitosis I and II, producing one-cell or two-cell pollen grains that lacked fertilization ability. We also found that the double knock-out of CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 caused arrest and/or delay in the progression of female gametogenesis at multiple steps. Our genetic analyses revealed that the functions of CDKF;1 and CDKD;1 or CDKD;3 do not overlap, either during gametophyte and embryo development or in post-embryonic development. Consistent with these analyses, CDKF;1 expression in the cdkd;1-1 cdkd;3-1 mutant could not rescue the gametophytic lethality. These results suggest that, in Arabidopsis, CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 function as CAKs controlling mitosis, whereas CDKF;1 plays a distinct role, mainly in post-embryonic development. We propose that CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 phosphorylate and activate all core CDKs, CDKA, CDKB1 and CDKB2, thereby governing cell cycle progression throughout plant development.

  1. Protein kinase C gamma mutations in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 increase kinase activity and alter membrane targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D. S.; Knight, M. A.; Harmison, G. G.; Fischbeck, K. H.; Howell, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase C gamma (PKCgamma) gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, we investigated the effects of two SCA14 missense mutations, G118D and C150F, on PKCgamma function. We found that these mutations increase the intrinsic activity of PKCgamma. Direct visual

  2. Diacylglycerol kinase counteracts protein kinase C-mediated inactivation of the EGF receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, van J.; Widt, de J.; Divecha, N.; Blitterswijk, van W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is negatively regulated by protein kinase C (PKC)signaling. Stimulation of A431 cells with EGF, bradykinin or UTP increased EGFR phosphorylation at Thr654 in a PKC-dependent manner. Inhibition of PKC signaling enhanced EGFR activation, as assessed b

  3. Diverse Transcriptional Programs Associated with Environmental Stress and Hormones in the Arabidopsis Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Chae; Sylvia Sudat; Sandrine Dudoit; Tong Zhu; Sheng Luan

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes more than 600 receptor-like kinase (RLK) genes, by far the dominant class of receptors found in land plants. Although similar to the mammalian receptor tyrosine kinases, plant RLKs are serine/threonine kinases that represent a novel signaling innovation unique to plants and, consequently, an excellent opportunity to understand how extracellular signaling evolved and functions in plants as opposed to animals. RLKs are predicted to be major components of the signaling pathways that allow plants to respond to environmental and developmental conditions. However, breakthroughs in identifying these processes have been limited to only a handful of individual RLKs. Here, we used a Syngenta custom Arabidopsis GeneChip array to compile a detailed profile of the transcriptional activity of 604 receptor-like kinase genes after exposure to a cross-section of known signaling factors in plants,including abiotic stresses, biotic stresses, and hormones. In the 68 experiments comprising the study, we found that 582 of the 604 RLK genes displayed a two-fold or greater change in expression to at least one of 12 types of treatments, thereby providing a large body of experimental evidence for targeted functional screens of individual RLK genes. We investigated whether particular subfamilies of RLK genes are responsive to specific types of signals and found that each subfamily displayed broad ranges of expression, as opposed to being targeted towards particular signal classes. Finally, by analyzing the divergence of sequence and gene expression among the RLK subfamilies, we present evidence as to the functional basis for the expansion of the RLKs and how this expansion may have affected conservation and divergences in their function. Taken as a whole, our study represents a preliminary, working model of processes and interactions in which the members of the RLK gene family may be involved, where such information has remained elusive for so many

  4. Protein kinase C controls activation of the DNA integrity checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Carot, María; Quilis, Inma; Bañó, M. Carmen; Igual, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily plays key regulatory roles in numerous cellular processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a single PKC, Pkc1, whose main function is cell wall integrity maintenance. In this work, we connect the Pkc1 protein to the maintenance of genome integrity in response to genotoxic stresses. Pkc1 and its kinase activity are necessary for the phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase Rad53, histone H2A and Xrs2 protein after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, indicating that Pkc1 is required for activation of checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Tel1. Furthermore, Pkc1 electrophoretic mobility is delayed after inducing DNA damage, which reflects that Pkc1 is post-translationally modified. This modification is a phosphorylation event mediated by Tel1. The expression of different mammalian PKC isoforms at the endogenous level in yeast pkc1 mutant cells revealed that PKCδ is able to activate the DNA integrity checkpoint. Finally, downregulation of PKCδ activity in HeLa cells caused a defective activation of checkpoint kinase Chk2 when DNA damage was induced. Our results indicate that the control of the DNA integrity checkpoint by PKC is a mechanism conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:24792164

  5. Regulation of protein kinase B/Akt activity and Ser473 phosphorylation by protein kinase Calpha in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovian, Chohreh; Simons, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Protein kinase Balpha (PKBalpha/Akt-1) is a key mediator of multiple signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis among others. The unphosphorylated form of Akt-1 is virtually inactive and its full activation requires two phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent phosphorylation events, Thr308 by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and Ser473 by an undefined kinase that has been termed PDK2. Recent studies have suggested that the Ser473 kinase is a plasma membrane raft-associated kinase. In this study we show that protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) translocates to the membrane rafts in response to insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulation. Overexpression of PKCalpha increases Ser473 phosphorylation and Akt-1 activity, while inhibition of its activity or expression decreases IGF-1-dependent activation of Akt-1. Furthermore, in vitro, in the presence of phospholipids and calcium, PKCalpha directly phosphorylates Akt-1 at the Ser473 site. We conclude, therefore, that PKCalpha regulates Akt-1 activity via Ser473 phosphorylation and may function as PDK2 in endothelial cells. PMID:15157674

  6. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  7. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Jiang, Zhongliang; Ahmad, Nisar; Rosati, Rita; Liu, Yusen; Beuret, Laurent; Monks, Robert; Charron, Jean; Birnbaum, Morris J; Samavati, Lobelia

    2013-11-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), also known as dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP-1), plays a crucial role in the deactivation of MAPKs. Several drugs with immune-suppressive properties modulate MKP-1 expression as part of their mechanism of action. We investigated the effect of mTOR inhibition through rapamycin and a dual mTOR inhibitor (AZD2014) on MKP-1 expression. Low dose rapamycin led to a rapid activation of both AKT and ERK pathways with a subsequent increase in MKP-1 expression. Rapamycin treatment led to phosphorylation of CREB, transcription factor 1 (ATF1), and ATF2, three transcription factors that bind to the cyclic AMP-responsive elements on the Mkp-1 promoter. Inhibition of either the MEK/ERK or the AKT pathway attenuated rapamycin-mediated MKP-1 induction. AZD2014 did not activate AKT but activated the ERK pathway, leading to a moderate MKP-1 induction. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) derived from wild-type (WT) mice or mice deficient in AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms or BMDM from targeted deficiency in MEK1 and MEK2, we show that rapamycin treatment led to an increased MKP1 expression in BMDM from WT but failed to do so in BMDMs lacking the AKT1 isoform or MEK1 and MEK2. Importantly, rapamycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-mediated p38 activation and decreased nitric oxide and IL-6 production. Our work provides a conceptual framework for the observed immune modulatory effect of mTOR inhibition.

  8. Functional analysis of the Hikeshi-like protein and its interaction with HSP70 in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Shinya; Ohama, Naohiko; Mizoi, Junya [Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Shinozaki, Kazuo [RIKEN Plant Science Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko, E-mail: akys@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • HKL, a Hikeshi homologous gene is identified in Arabidopsis. • HKL interacts with two HSP70 isoforms and regulates the subcellular localization of HSC70-1. • The two HSP70 translocate into nucleus in response to heat stress. • Overexpression of HKL confers thermotolerance in transgenic plants. - Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) refold damaged proteins and are an essential component of the heat shock response. Previously, the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) has been reported to translocate into the nucleus in a heat-dependent manner in many organisms. In humans, the heat-induced translocation of HSP70 requires the nuclear carrier protein Hikeshi. In the Arabidopsis genome, only one gene encodes a protein with high homology to Hikeshi, and we named this homolog Hikeshi-like (HKL) protein. In this study, we show that two Arabidopsis HSP70 isoforms accumulate in the nucleus in response to heat shock and that HKL interacts with these HSP70s. Our histochemical analysis revealed that HKL is predominantly expressed in meristematic tissues, suggesting the potential importance of HKL during cell division in Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that HKL regulates HSP70 localization, and HKL overexpression conferred thermotolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Our results suggest that HKL plays a positive role in the thermotolerance of Arabidopsis plants and cooperatively interacts with HSP70.

  9. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  10. Presenilin dependence of phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehvari, Nodi; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Isacsson, Ola;

    2007-01-01

    -stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activity which was gamma-secretase dependent. To further evaluate the dependence of PLC on PSs we measured PLC activity and the activation of variant protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking either PS1, PS2, or both. PLC activity and PKCalpha...

  11. Leishmania amazonensis: PKC-like protein kinase modulates the (Na++K+)ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo de; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Lara, Lucienne Silva; Pinheiro, Carla Mônica; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the presence of protein kinase C-like (PKC-like) in Leishmania amazonensis and to elucidate its possible role in the modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity. Immunoblotting experiments using antibody against a consensus sequence (Ac 543-549) of rabbit protein kinase C (PKC) revealed the presence of a protein kinase of 80 kDa in L. amazonensis. Measurements of protein kinase activity showed the presence of both (Ca(2+)-dependent) and (Ca(2+)-independent) protein kinase activity in plasma membrane and cytosol. Phorbol ester (PMA) activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase stimulated the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity, while activation of the Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase was inhibitory. Both effects of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase of the plasma membrane were lower than that observed in intact cells. PMA induced the translocation of protein kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane, indicating that the maximal effect of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity depends on the synergistic action of protein kinases from both plasma membrane and cytosol. This is the first demonstration of a protein kinase activated by PMA in L. amazonensis and the first evidence for a possible role in the regulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity in this trypanosomatid. Modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase by protein kinase in a trypanosomatid opens up new possibilities to understand the regulation of ion homeostasis in this parasite. PMID:17475255

  12. Selective Phosphorylation Inhibitor of Delta Protein Kinase C-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Protein-Protein Interactions: Application for Myocardial Injury in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvit, Nir; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Sho, Eiketsu; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-22

    Protein kinases regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, metabolism, and cell death. Because the primary sequence and the three-dimensional structure of many kinases are highly similar, the development of selective inhibitors for only one kinase is challenging. Furthermore, many protein kinases are pleiotropic, mediating diverse and sometimes even opposing functions by phosphorylating multiple protein substrates. Here, we set out to develop an inhibitor of a selective protein kinase phosphorylation of only one of its substrates. Focusing on the pleiotropic delta protein kinase C (δPKC), we used a rational approach to identify a distal docking site on δPKC for its substrate, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). We reasoned that an inhibitor of PDK's docking should selectively inhibit the phosphorylation of only PDK without affecting phosphorylation of the other δPKC substrates. Our approach identified a selective inhibitor of PDK docking to δPKC with an in vitro Kd of ∼50 nM and reducing cardiac injury IC50 of ∼5 nM. This inhibitor, which did not affect the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates even at 1 μM, demonstrated that PDK phosphorylation alone is critical for δPKC-mediated injury by heart attack. The approach we describe is likely applicable for the identification of other substrate-specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:27218445

  13. The S-Domain Receptor Kinase Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase2 and the U Box/Armadillo Repeat-Containing E3 Ubiquitin Ligase9 Module Mediates Lateral Root Development under Phosphate Starvation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Srijani; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Wewala, Gayathri; Widdup, Ellen; Samuel, Marcus A

    2014-06-25

    When plants encounter nutrient-limiting conditions in the soil, the root architecture is redesigned to generate numerous lateral roots (LRs) that increase the surface area of roots, promoting efficient uptake of these deficient nutrients. Of the many essential nutrients, reduced availability of inorganic phosphate has a major impact on plant growth because of the requirement of inorganic phosphate for synthesis of organic molecules, such as nucleic acids, ATP, and phospholipids, that function in various crucial metabolic activities. In our screens to identify a potential role for the S-domain receptor kinase1-6 and its interacting downstream signaling partner, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plant U box/armadillo repeat-containing E3 ligase9 (AtPUB9), we identified a role for this module in regulating LR development under phosphate-starved conditions. Our results show that Arabidopsis double mutant plants lacking AtPUB9 and Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase2 (AtARK2; ark2-1/pub9-1) display severely reduced LRs when grown under phosphate-starved conditions. Under these starvation conditions, these plants accumulated very low to no auxin in their primary root and LR tips as observed through expression of the auxin reporter DR5::uidA transgene. Exogenous auxin was sufficient to rescue the LR developmental defects in the ark2-1/pub9-1 lines, indicating a requirement of auxin accumulation for this process. Our subcellular localization studies with tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension-cultured cells indicate that interaction between ARK2 and AtPUB9 results in accumulation of AtPUB9 in the autophagosomes. Inhibition of autophagy in wild-type plants resulted in reduction of LR development and auxin accumulation under phosphate-starved conditions, suggesting a role for autophagy in regulating LR development. Thus, our study has uncovered a previously unknown signaling module (ARK2-PUB9) that is required for auxin-mediated LR development under phosphate-starved conditions

  14. Contribution of casein kinase 2 and spleen tyrosine kinase to CFTR trafficking and protein kinase A-induced activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Simão; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Mendes, Ana Isabel; Romeiras, Francisco; Sousa, Marisa; Schreiber, Rainer; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter; Mehta, Anil; Amaral, Margarida D; Kunzelmann, Karl; Farinha, Carlos M

    2011-11-01

    Previously, the pleiotropic "master kinase" casein kinase 2 (CK2) was shown to interact with CFTR, the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Moreover, CK2 inhibition abolished CFTR conductance in cell-attached membrane patches, native epithelial ducts, and Xenopus oocytes. CFTR possesses two CK2 phosphorylation sites (S422 and T1471), with unclear impact on its processing and trafficking. Here, we investigated the effects of mutating these CK2 sites on CFTR abundance, maturation, and degradation coupled to effects on ion channel activity and surface expression. We report that CK2 inhibition significantly decreased processing of wild-type (wt) CFTR, with no effect on F508del CFTR. Eliminating phosphorylation at S422 and T1471 revealed antagonistic roles in CFTR trafficking: S422 activation versus T1471 inhibition, as evidenced by a severe trafficking defect for the T1471D mutant. Notably, mutation of Y512, a consensus sequence for the spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) possibly acting in a CK2 context adjacent to the common CF-causing defect F508del, had a strong effect on both maturation and CFTR currents, allowing the identification of this kinase as a novel regulator of CFTR. These results reinforce the importance of CK2 and the S422 and T1471 residues for regulation of CFTR and uncover a novel regulation of CFTR by SYK, a recognized controller of inflammation.

  15. Protein kinase A signaling during bidirectional axenic differentiation in Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmaier, Sabine; Witztum, Ronit; Tsigankov, Polina; Koren, Roni; Boshart, Michael; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cycle between the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages, where they proliferate as intracellular amastigotes, and the midgut of female sand flies, where they proliferate as extracellular promastigotes. Shifting between the two environments induces signaling pathway-mediated developmental processes that enable adaptation to both host and vector. Developmentally regulated expression and phosphorylation of protein kinase A subunits in Leishmania and in Trypanosoma brucei point to an involvement of protein kinase A in parasite development. To assess this hypothesis in Leishmania donovani, we determined proteome-wide changes in phosphorylation of the conserved protein kinase A phosphorylation motifs RXXS and RXXT, using a phospho-specific antibody. Rapid dephosphorylation of these motifs was observed upon initiation of promastigote to amastigote differentiation in culture. No phosphorylated sites were detected in axenic amastigotes. To analyse the kinetics of (re)phosphorylation during axenic reverse differentiation from L. donovani amastigotes to promastigotes, we first established a map of this process with morphological and molecular markers. Upon initiation, the parasites rested for 6-12 h before proliferation of an asynchronous population resumed. After early changes in cell shape, the major changes in molecular marker expression and flagella biogenesis occurred between 24 and 33 h after initiation. RXXS/T re-phosphorylation and expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1 correlated with promastigote maturation, indicating a promastigote-specific function of protein kinase A signaling. This is supported by the localization of PKAR1 to the flagellum, an organelle reduced to a remnant in amastigote forms. We conclude that a significant increase in protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation is part of the ordered changes that characterise the amastigote to promastigote

  16. Synapsis of DNA ends by DNA-dependent protein kinase

    OpenAIRE

    DeFazio, Lisa G.; Stansel, Rachel M.; Griffith, Jack D.; Chu, Gilbert

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKCS) is required for a non-homologous end-joining pathway that repairs DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation or V(D)J recombination; however, its role in this pathway has remained obscure. Using a neutravidin pull-down assay, we found that DNA-PKCS mediates formation of a synaptic complex containing two DNA molecules. Furthermore, kinase activity was cooperative with respect to DNA concentration, suggesting that act...

  17. Overinhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inducing Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-lian; CHEN Juan; LIU Shi-jie; ZHANG Jia-yu; WANG Qun; WANG Jian-zhi

    2005-01-01

    To reveal the relationship between mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and tau phosphorylation, we used different concentration of PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK (MAPK kinase), to treat mice neuroblastma (N2a) cell line for 6 h. It showed that the activity of MAPK decreased in a dose-dependent manner. But Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that just when the cells were treated with 16 μmol/L PD98059, tau was hyperphosphorylated at Ser396/404 and Ser199/202 sites. We obtained the conclusion that overinhibited MAPK induced tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser396/404 and Ser199/202 sites.

  18. Arabidopsis lectin receptor kinases LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 are functional analogs in regulating phytophthora resistance and plant cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yan; Cordewener, Jan H G; America, Antoine H P; Shan, Weixing; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Govers, Francine

    2015-01-01

    L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRK) are potential immune receptors. Here, we characterized two closely-related Arabidopsis LecRK, LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2, of which T-DNA insertion mutants showed compromised resistance to Phytophthora brassicae and Phytophthora capsici, with double mutants showi

  19. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained 32P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a ∼ 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not

  20. 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase is phosphorylated and activated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Antonio Juel; Buch, M B; Krag, T O;

    1999-01-01

    90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation of th...... of Ser(227), Ser(369), and Ser(386). Our study extend recent findings which implicate PDK1 in the activation of protein kinases B and C and p70(S6K), suggesting that PDK1 controls several major growth factor-activated signal transduction pathways.......90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation...... of the linker region at Ser(369), catalyzed by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and at Ser(386), catalyzed by the C-terminal kinase, after its activation by ERK. In addition, the N-terminal kinase must be phosphorylated at Ser(227) in the activation loop by an as yet unidentified kinase. Here, we...

  1. Protein kinase C mechanisms that contribute to cardiac remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Alexandra C.; Antal, Corina E.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a highly-regulated and reversible process that is precisely controlled by the actions of protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Factors that tip the balance of protein phosphorylation lead to changes in a wide range of cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases sits at nodal points in many signal transduction pathways; PKC enzymes have been the focus of considerable attention since they contribute to both normal physiological responses as well as maladaptive pathological responses that drive a wide range of clinical disorders. This review provides a background on the mechanisms that regulate individual PKC isoenzymes followed by a discussion of recent insights into their role in the pathogenesis of diseases such as cancer. We then provide an overview on the role of individual PKC isoenzymes in the regulation of cardiac contractility and pathophysiological growth responses, with a focus on the PKC-dependent mechanisms that regulate pump function and/or contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. PMID:27433023

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natarajan Palaniappan; S Anbalagan; Sujatha Narayanan

    2012-03-01

    CD44, an adhesion molecule, has been reported to be a binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) in macrophages and it also mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis in vivo. However, the signalling pathways that are involved in M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytic cells are currently unknown. Exposure of THP-1 human monocytes to M. tuberculosis H37Rv and H37Ra induced distinct, time-dependent, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3/6, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinases. The strains also differed in their usage of CD14 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain induced lower CD44 surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, whereas H37Ra the reverse. Using highly specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinase, we report that inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinases increases, but that inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase decreases M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in THP-1 human monocytes.

  3. Evolution of NIN-like proteins in Arabidopsis, rice, and Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauser, Leif; Wieloch, Wioletta; Stougaard, Jens

    2005-02-01

    Genetic studies in Lotus japonicus and pea have identified Nin as a core symbiotic gene required for establishing symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria collectively called Rhizobium. Sequencing of additional Lotus cDNAs combined with analysis of genome sequences from Arabidopsis and rice reveals that Nin homologues in all three species constitute small gene families. In total, the Arabidopsis and rice genomes encode nine and three NIN-like proteins (NLPs), respectively. We present here a bioinformatics analysis and prediction of NLP evolution. On a genome scale we show that in Arabidopsis, this family has evolved through segmental duplication rather than through tandem amplification. Alignment of all predicted NLP protein sequences shows a composition with six conserved modules. In addition, Lotus and pea NLPs contain segments that might characterize NIN proteins of legumes and be of importance for their function in symbiosis. The most conserved region in NLPs, the RWP-RK domain, has secondary structure predictions consistent with DNA binding properties. This motif is shared by several other small proteins in both Arabidopsis and rice. In rice, the RWP-RK domain sequences have diversified significantly more than in Arabidopsis. Database searches reveal that, apart from its presence in Arabidopsis and rice, the motif is also found in the algae Chlamydomonas and in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Thus, the origin of this putative DNA binding region seems to predate the fungus-plant divide. PMID:15785851

  4. The plastid-localized pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE 1 and 2 are essential for growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilkerson Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription of plastid-encoded genes requires two different DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, a nuclear-encoded polymerase (NEP and plastid-encoded polymerase (PEP. Recent studies identified two related pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases, named FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE PROTEIN (FLN1 and FLN2, as components of the thylakoid bound PEP complex in both Arabidopsis thaliana and Sinapis alba (mustard. Additional work demonstrated that RNAi-mediated reduction in FLN expression specifically diminished transcription of PEP-dependent genes. Results Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis FLN knockout alleles to examine the contribution of each gene in plant growth, chloroplast development, and in mediating PEP-dependent transcription. We show that fln plants have severe phenotypes with fln1 resulting in an albino phenotype that is seedling lethal without a source of exogenous carbon. In contrast, fln2 plants display chlorosis prior to leaf expansion, but exhibit slow greening, remain autotrophic, can grow to maturity, and set viable seed. fln1 fln2 double mutant analysis reveals haplo-insufficiency, and fln1 fln2 plants have a similar, but more severe phenotype than either single mutant. Normal plastid development in both light and dark requires the FLNs, but surprisingly skotomorphogenesis is unaffected in fln seedlings. Seedlings genetically fln1-1 with dexamethasone-inducible FLN1-HA expression at germination are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type. Induction of FLN-HA after 24 hours of germination cannot rescue the mutant phenotype, indicating that the effects of loss of FLN are not always reversible. Examination of chloroplast gene expression in fln1-1 and fln2-1 by qRT-PCR reveals that transcripts of PEP-dependent genes were specifically reduced compared to NEP-dependent genes in both single mutants. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that each FLN protein contributes to wild type growth, and acting additively are

  5. Molecular Physiology of SPAK and OSR1: Two Ste20-Related Protein Kinases Regulating Ion Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Kenneth B; Delpire, Eric

    2012-01-01

    SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive kinase) are members of the germinal center kinase VI sub-family of the mammalian Ste20 (Sterile20)-related protein kinase family. Although there are 30 enzymes in this protein kinase family, their conservation across the fungi, plant and animal kingdom confirms their evolutionary importance. Already, a large volume of work has accumulated on the tissue distribution, binding partners, signaling cascades, and...

  6. Benzoselendiazole-based responsive long-lifetime photoluminiscent probes for protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekambaram, R; Enkvist, E; Manoharan, GB;

    2014-01-01

    Benzoselenadiazole-containing inhibitors of protein kinases were constructed and their capability to emit phosphorescence in the kinase-bound state was established. Labelling of the inhibitors with a red fluorescent dye led to sensitive responsive photoluminescent probes for protein kinase CK2 th...... that emitted red light with a long (microsecond-scale) decay time upon excitation of the probes with a pulse of near-UV light.......Benzoselenadiazole-containing inhibitors of protein kinases were constructed and their capability to emit phosphorescence in the kinase-bound state was established. Labelling of the inhibitors with a red fluorescent dye led to sensitive responsive photoluminescent probes for protein kinase CK2...

  7. Identification and characterization of an ABA-activated MAP kinase cascade in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Danquah, Agyemang

    2015-04-01

    Summary Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone involved in important stress-related and developmental plant processes. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses revealed a large set of ABA-triggered phosphoproteins as putative mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) targets, although the evidence for MAPKs involved in ABA signalling is still scarce. Here, we identified and reconstituted in vivo a complete ABA-activated MAPK cascade, composed of the MAP3Ks MAP3K17/18, the MAP2K MKK3 and the four C group MAPKs MPK1/2/7/14. In planta, we show that ABA activation of MPK7 is blocked in mkk3-1 and map3k17mapk3k18 plants. Coherently, both mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to ABA and altered expression of a set of ABA-dependent genes. A genetic analysis further reveals that this MAPK cascade is activated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR-SnRK2-PP2C ABA core signalling module through protein synthesis of the MAP3Ks, unveiling an atypical mechanism for MAPK activation in eukaryotes. Our work provides evidence for a role of an ABA-induced MAPK pathway in plant stress signalling. Significance Statement We report in this article the identification of a complete MAPK module, composed of MAP3K17/18, MKK3 and MPK1/2/7/14, which is activated by ABA through the ABA core signalling complex. We showed that the activation of this module requires the MAP3K protein synthesis which occurs after hours of stress treatment, suggesting that the pathway is involved in a delayed wave of cellular responses to ABA and drought. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Post-Translational Modification and Secretion of Azelaic Acid Induced 1 (AZI1, a Hybrid Proline-Rich Protein from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pitzschke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis EARLI-type hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs consist of a putative N-terminal secretion signal, a proline-rich domain (PRD, and a characteristic eight-cysteine-motif (8-CM. They have been implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. AZI1 is required for systemic acquired resistance and it has recently been identified as a target of the stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. AZI1 gel migration properties strongly indicate AZI1 to undergo major post-translational modifications. These occur in a stress-independent manner and are unrelated to phosphorylation by MAPKs. As revealed by transient expression of AZI1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and Tropaeolum majus, the Arabidopsis protein is similarly modified in heterologous plant species. Proline-rich regions, resembling arabinogalactan proteins point to a possible proline hydroxylation and subsequent O-glycosylation of AZI1. Consistently, inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase reduces its apparent protein size. AZI1 secretion was examined using Arabidopsis protoplasts and seedling exudates. Employing Agrobacterium-mediated leaf infiltration of N. benthamiana, we attempted to assess long-distance movement of AZI1. In summary, the data point to AZI1 being a partially secreted protein and a likely new member of the group of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Its dual location suggests AZI1 to exert both intra- and extracellular functions.

  9. Influence of Translation Initiation on Organellar Protein Targeting in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sally A. Mackenzie

    2011-04-18

    A primary focus of the Mackenzie laboratory is the elucidation of processes and machinery for mitochondrial genome maintenance and transmission in higher plants. We have found that numerous organellar DNA maintenance components in plants appear to be dual targeted to mitochondria and plastids. Of particular interest was the observation that some twin (tandemly arrayed) dual targeting presequences appeared to utilize non-AUG alternative translation initiation, allowing for multiple translation starts at a single gene. Two aspects of this phenomenon were of particular interest: (1) Alternative translation initiation might provide a mechanism to regulate protein targeting temporally and spatially, a possibility that had not been demonstrated previously, and (2) alternative translation initiation might occur in genes involved in nuclear-controlled mitochondrial genome recombination, thought to be exclusively mitochondrial in their function. During the course of this research, we pursued three aims, with an emphasis on two specific genes of interest: POLgamma2, an organellar DNA polymerase, and MSH1, a MutS homolog thought to participate in mitochondrial, but not plastid, genome recombination surveillance. Our aims were to (1) Identify additional genes within Arabidopsis and other genomes that employ non-AUG alternative translation initiation, (2) Locate sequences upstream to the annotated AUG that confer alternative non-AUG translation initiation activity, and (3) Identify cis and trans factors that influence start site selection in genes with non-AUG starts. Toward these ends, we have shown that non-AUG initiation occurs in a number of genes, likely influencing targeting behavior of the protein. We have also shown that start site selection is strongly influenced by Kozak consensus sequence environment, indicating that alternative translation initiation in plants occurs by relaxation of ribosome scanning.

  10. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengot, Laia; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-07-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport (PAT), allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima, and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, PAT is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell to cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the 'non-genomic' regulation of auxin transport, placing an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability, and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK, and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in PAT, noting that there are probably RLKs involved in co-ordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition, as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  11. Effects of protein kinase C activators and staurosporine on protein kinase activity, cell survival, and proliferation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, EM; Schousboe, P; Hansen, HQ;

    1997-01-01

    with either PMA or OAG, or at 2,500 cells ml-1. At 500 cells ml-1 PMA induced the in vivo phosphorylation of at least six proteins. The myelin basic protein fragment 4-14 was phosphorylated in vitro in crude extracts of a culture of 250,000 cells ml-1. Both the in vivo and the in vitro phosphorylation were......Autocrine factors prevent cell death in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a unicellular eukaryote, in a chemically defined medium. At certain growth conditions these factors are released at a sufficient concentration by > 500 cells ml-1 to support cell survival and proliferation. The protein...... kinase C activators phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1-oleyl 2-acetate glycerol (OAG) when added to 250 cells ml-1 supported cell survival and proliferation. In the presence of the serine and threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine the cells died both at 250 cells ml-1 in cultures supplemented...

  12. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  13. Phosphorylation of synaptosomal cytoplasmic proteins: Inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase c) by bay k 8644.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P J; Lovenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    The phosphorylation of specific substrates of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) was examined in striatal synaptosomal cytoplasm. The phosphoprotein substrata were termed group C phosphoprotems and were divided into two subgroups: group C(1) phosphoproteins (P83, P45A, P21 and P18) were found in both cytoplasm and synaptosomal membranes and, although stimulated by phosphatidylserine, only required exogamous calcium for their labeling; group C(2) phosphoproteins (P120, P96, P21.5, P18.5 and P16) were found predominantly in the cytoplasm and were absolutely dependent upon exogenous calcium and phosphatidylserme for their labeling. Several criteria were used to identify these proteins as specific protein kinase C substrates: (a) their phosphorylation was stimulated to a greater extent by Ca(2+) /phosphatidylserine/diolein than by Ca(2+) alone or Cal(2+) /calmodulin (group C(1)) or was completely dependent upon Ca(2+) /phosphatdylserine/diolein (group C(2)); (b) supermaximal concentrations of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor were without effect; (c) their phosphorylation was stimulated by oleic acid, which selectively activates protein kinase C in the absence of Ca(2+); (d) NaCl, which inhibited cAMP- and Ca(2+)/calmodulindependent phosphorylation, slightly increased phosphorylation of group C(1) and slightly decreased phosphorylation of group C(2) phosphoproteins. Maximal phosphorylation of P96 and other group C phosphoproteins occurred within 60 s and was followed by a slow decay rate while substrata of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase were maximally labeled within 20-30 s and rapidly dephosphorylated. The phosphorylation of all group C phosphoproteins was inhibited by the calcium channel agomst BAY K 8644, however, group C(2) phosphoproteins were considerably more sensitive. The IC(50) for inhibition of P96 labeling was 19 ?M. but for P83 was 190 ?M. Group B phosphoproteins were also slightly inhibited, and the

  14. Structural and functional diversity in the activity and regulation of DAPK-related protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, Koen; Simon, Bertrand; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Within the large group of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) of the human kinome, there is a distinct branch of highly related kinases that includes three families: death-associated protein-related kinases, myosin light-chain-related kinases and triple functional domain protein-related kinases. In this review, we refer to these collectively as DMT kinases. There are several functional features that span the three families, such as a broad involvement in apoptotic processes, cytoskeletal association and cellular plasticity. Other CAMKs contain a highly conserved HRD motif, which is a prerequisite for kinase regulation through activation-loop phosphorylation, but in all 16 members of the DMT branch, this is replaced by an HF/LD motif. This DMT kinase signature motif substitutes phosphorylation-dependent active-site interactions with a local hydrophobic core that maintains an active kinase conformation. Only about half of the DMT kinases have an additional autoregulatory domain, C-terminal to the kinase domain that binds calcium/calmodulin in order to regulate kinase activity. Protein substrates have been identified for some of the DMT kinases, but little is known about the mechanism of recognition. Substrate conformation could be an equally important parameter in substrate recognition as specific preferences in sequence position. Taking the data together, this kinase branch encapsulates a treasure trove of features that renders it distinct from many other protein kinases and calls for future research activities in this field. PMID:23745726

  15. Redox Regulation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Yingying Han; Qilong Wang; Ping Song; Yi Zhu; Ming-Hui Zou

    2010-01-01

    Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. Objectives The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC). Methods Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation. Results In BAEC, Berberine caused a dos...

  16. Role of protein kinase D signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Sushovan; Tanasanvimon, Suebpong; Sinnett-Smith, James; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2010-12-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers with dismal survival rates. Its intransigence to conventional therapy renders PDAC an aggressive disease with early metastatic potential. Thus, novel targets for PDAC therapy are urgently needed. Multiple signal transduction pathways are implicated in progression of PDAC. These pathways stimulate production of intracellular messengers in their target cells to modify their behavior, including the lipid-derived diacylglycerol (DAG). One of the prominent intracellular targets of DAG is the protein kinase C (PKC) family. However, the mechanisms by which PKC-mediated signals are decoded by the cell remain incompletely understood. Protein kinase D1 (PKD or PKD1, initially called atypical PKCμ), is the founding member of a novel protein kinase family that includes two additional protein kinases that share extensive overall homology with PKD, termed PKD2, and PKD3. The PKD family occupies a unique position in the signal transduction pathways initiated by DAG and PKC. PKD lies downstream of PKCs in a novel signal transduction pathway implicated in the regulation of multiple fundamental biological processes. We and others have shown that PKD-mediated signaling pathways promote mitogenesis and angiogenesis in PDAC. Our recent observations demonstrate that PKD also potentiates chemoresistance and invasive potential of PDAC cells. This review will briefly highlight diverse biological roles of PKD family in multiple neoplasias including PDAC. Further, this review will underscore our latest advancement with the development of a potent PKD family inhibitor and its effect both in vitro and in vivo in PDAC. PMID:20621068

  17. Novel regulation of protein kinase C-η

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Deepanwita; Outram, Shalini Persaud; Basu, Alakananda

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is the receptor for tumor promoting phorbol esters, which are potent activators of conventional and novel PKCs, but persistent treatment with phorbol esters leads to downregulation of these PKCs. However, PKCη, a novel PKC isozyme, resists downregulation by tumor-promoting phorbol esters, but little is known about how PKCη level is regulated. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play an important role in regulating activity and stability of PKCs. In the present study, ...

  18. Enzymatic characteristics of the c-Raf-1 protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Heidecker, G; Rapp, U; Avruch, J; Kyriakis, J M

    1994-02-15

    The c-Raf-1 protein kinase plays a central role in the mitogenic response of cells to growth factors, cytokines, and many oncogenes. Despite the critical importance of this enzyme, very little is known of its biochemical properties or mechanisms of regulation. In these experiments, we used the only candidate physiologic substrate identified as yet for c-Raf-1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK), to examine enzymatic characteristics and candidate modulators of c-Raf-1, c-Raf-1 was purified from Sf9 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus encoding a histidine-tagged c-Raf-1. The Km values of c-Raf-1 for ATP and MAPKK were 11.6 microM and 0.8 microM, respectively, and the stoichiometry of phosphorylation of MAPKK by c-Raf-1 was 1.67 mol of phosphate per mol of MAPKK. In contrast to prior reports, Mg2+ was the preferred cation at Mg2+ and Mn2+ concentrations > 5 mM. c-Raf-1 substrate specificity was extremely restricted, consistent with the identification of only one candidate physiologic substrate to date and highlighting the necessity of using MAPKK rather than artificial substrates in c-Raf-1 activity assays. Of multiple potential substrates tested, the only one phosphorylated to > 20% of the level of MAPKK phosphorylation was myelin basic protein (22%). Heat-denatured MAPKK was phosphorylated at only 2% the level of native MAPKK, indicating that the restricted substrate specificity may be due to tertiary-structural requirements. We also examined whether c-Raf-1 activity is modulated by lipid binding to the cysteine finger region in its regulatory domain. Of multiple mitogen-stimulated or cell-membrane lipids tested, only phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol in the presence of Ca2+ (2.5 mM) increased c-Raf-1 kinase activity significantly (1.5-fold). The increase is probably not of physiologic significance because it was about two orders of magnitude less than the stimulation of protein kinase C by these lipids. On gel-filtration chromatography, the

  19. GsLRPK, a novel cold-activated leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase from Glycine soja, is a positive regulator to cold stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Wu, Kangcheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Guangpu; Wu, Zujian

    2014-02-01

    Plant LRR-RLKs serve as protein interaction platforms, and as regulatory modules of protein activation. Here, we report the isolation of a novel plant-specific LRR-RLK from Glycine soja (termed GsLRPK) by differential screening. GsLRPK expression was cold-inducible and shows Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsLRPK is localized in the plasma membrane. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that temperature, salt, drought, and ABA treatment can alter GsLRPK gene transcription in G. soja. However, just protein induced by cold stress not by salinity and ABA treatment in tobacco was found to possess kinase activity. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsLRPK in yeast and Arabidopsis can enhance resistance to cold stress and increase the expression of a number of cold responsive gene markers.

  20. Pachastrissamine (jaspine B) and its stereoisomers inhibit sphingosine kinases and atypical protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimitsu, Yuji; Oishi, Shinya; Miyagaki, Jun; Inuki, Shinsuke; Ohno, Hiroaki; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-09-15

    Sphingosine kinases (SphKs) are oncogenic enzymes that regulate the critical balance between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Much effort has been dedicated to develop inhibitors against these enzymes. Naturally occurring pachastrissamine (jaspine B) and all its stereoisomers were prepared and evaluated for their inhibitory effects against SphKs. All eight stereoisomers exhibited moderate to potent inhibitory activity against SphK1 and SphK2. Inhibitory effects were profiled against protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms by in vitro experiments. Atypical PKCs (PKCζ and PKCι) were inhibited by several pachastrissamine stereoisomers. The improved activity over N,N-dimethylsphingosine suggests that the cyclic scaffold in pachastrissamines facilitates potential favorable interactions with SphKs and PKCs.

  1. The Arabidopsis DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed by basal phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C coupled to diacylglycerol kinase in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila eDjafi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipases C (PI-PLCs are activated in response to various stimuli. They utilize substrates provided by type III-Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinases (PI4KIII to produce inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol (DAG that is phosphorylated into phosphatidic acid (PA by DAG-kinases (DGKs. The roles of PI4KIIIs, PI-PLCs and DGKs in basal signalling are poorly understood. We investigated the control of gene expression by basal PI-PLC pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells. A transcriptome-wide analysis allowed the identification of genes whose expression was altered by edelfosine, 30 µM wortmannin or R59022, inhibitors of PI-PLCs, PI4KIIIs and DGKs, respectively. We found that a gene responsive to one of these molecules is more likely to be similarly regulated by the other two inhibitors. The common action of these agents is to inhibit PA formation, showing that basal PI-PLCs act, in part, on gene expression through their coupling to DGKs. Amongst the genes up-regulated in presence of the inhibitors, were some DREB2 genes, in suspension cells and in seedlings. The DREB2 genes encode transcription factors with major roles in responses to environmental stresses, including dehydration. They bind to C-repeat motifs, known as Drought-Responsive Elements, that are indeed enriched in the promoters of genes up-regulated by PI-PLC pathway inhibitors. PA can also be produced by phospholipases D (PLDs. We show that the DREB2 genes that are up-regulated by PI-PLC inhibitors are positively or negatively regulated, or indifferent, to PLD basal activity. Our data show that the DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed in resting conditions and that DGK coupled to PI-PLC is active in this process, in suspension cells and seedlings. We discuss how this basal negative regulation of DREB2 genes is compatible with their stress-triggered positive regulation.

  2. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jiang; Jianchun Wu; Chen He; Wending Yang; Honglin Li

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdkl activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chkl and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  3. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase specifically phosphorylates recombinant eNOS on Ser1179. Treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activates PKD and increases eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKD and gene silencing of both PKD1 and PKD2 abrogate VEGF signaling, resulting in a clear diminished migration of endothelial cells in a wound healing assay. Finally, inhibition of PKD in mice results in an almost complete disappearance of the VEGF-induced vasodilatation, as monitored through determination of the diameter of the carotid artery. Hence, our data indicate that PKD is a new regulatory kinase of eNOS in endothelial cells whose activity orchestrates mammalian vascular tone. PMID:24928905

  4. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbao Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1. Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma.

  5. Studies on the Differential Specificity of Protein Kinases and Its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Loog, Mart

    2001-01-01

    Protein kinases are enzymes that catalyse the phosphoryl transfer from the g-phosphate of ATP to acceptor amino acids in proteins. The specificity of selected model protein kinases was studied at three different levels using a) novel bi-substrate-analogue inhibitors, b) synthetic peptide substrates and c) mutated protein substrate analogues. A new class of protein kinase bi-substrate-analogue inhibitors was designed on the basis of adenosine-5’-carboxylic acid derivatives, where a short argi...

  6. GTP plus water mimic ATP in the active site of protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Pütter, M; Guerra, B;

    1999-01-01

    The structures of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays complexed with Mg2+ and with analogs of ATP or GTP were determined to 2.2 A resolution. Unlike most other protein kinases, CK2 from various sources shows 'dual-cosubstrate specificity', that is, the ability to efficiently...... that target CK2 or other kinases with this property....

  7. Proteomic analysis of secreted proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings: improved recovery following removal of phenolic compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Charmont, Stéphane; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in liquid culture were used to recover proteins secreted from the whole plant. The aim was to identify apoplastic proteins that may be lost during classical extraction procedures such as preparation of cell walls. The inclusion of polyvinyl-polypyrrolidone (PVPP) in the protocol of purification of secreted proteins allowed a more efficient identification of proteins after their separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry ...

  8. Synthetic sulfoglycolipids targeting the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Barbara; Dangate, Milind; Vetro, Maria; Donvito, Giulia; Gabrielli, Luca; Amigoni, Loredana; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Lanzi, Cinzia; Ceriani, Michela; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Cipolla, Laura; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Perego, Paola; Colombo, Diego

    2016-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is a key component of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mTOR axis. Deregulated activation of this pathway is frequent in human tumors and Akt-dependent signaling appears to be critical in cell survival. PI3K activation generates 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols that bind Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The blockage of Akt PH domain/phosphoinositides interaction represents a promising approach to interfere with the oncogenic potential of over-activated Akt. In the present study, phosphatidyl inositol mimics based on a β-glucoside scaffold have been synthesized as Akt inhibitors. The compounds possessed one or two lipophilic moieties of different length at the anomeric position of glucose, and an acidic or basic group at C-6. Docking studies, ELISA Akt inhibition assays, and cellular assays on different cell models highlighted 1-O-octadecanoyl-2-O-β-d-sulfoquinovopyranosyl-sn-glycerol as the best Akt inhibitor among the synthesized compounds, which could be considered as a lead for further optimization in the design of Akt inhibitors.

  9. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  10. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from the moss Funaria hygrometrica under nutritional starvation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doyel Mitra; Man Mohan Johri

    2000-12-01

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss Funaria hygrometrica, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach was adopted to clone the gene. Using degenerate PCR primers against conserved regions of CDPKs, a 900 bp amplicon was obtained from the genomic DNA of Funaria. Southern hybridization under low stringency conditions indicated the presence of several CDPK related sequences in the Funaria genome. This observation is consistent with reports of multigene families of CDPKs in other plants. The 900 bp fragment was subsequently used to isolate a 2.2 kb partial genomic clone of the CDPK gene from Funaria. The genomic clone encodes an open reading frame (ORF) of 518 amino acids. Interestingly, unlike other CDPK genes from plants, the entire 1.5 kb ORF is not interrupted by introns. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Funaria gene shows extensive homology with CDPKs from higher plants, 73% identity with the Fragaria CDPK and 71% identity with CDPK isoform 7 of Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Funaria CDPK is closer to the CDPKs from higher plants like strawberry and Arabidopsis as compared to those from lower plants such as the liverwort Marchantia, the green alga Chlamydomonas or another moss Tortula. Northern analysis shows enhanced expression of the CDPK transcript within 24–48 h of starvation for nitrogen, phosphorus or sulphur. So far the only other kinase which is known to be induced by nutrient starvation in plants is the wpk 4 which is a snf-1 related kinase (SnRKs). To our knowledge this is the first report that implicates a CDPK in the starvation response.

  11. Heterotrimeric G Proteins Serve as a Converging Point in Plant Defense Signaling Activated by Multiple Receptor-Like Kinases1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinman; Ding, Pingtao; Sun, Tongjun; Nitta, Yukino; Dong, Oliver; Huang, Xingchuan; Yang, Wei; Li, Xin; Botella, José Ramón; Zhang, Yuelin

    2013-01-01

    In fungi and metazoans, extracellular signals are often perceived by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and transduced through heterotrimeric G-protein complexes to downstream targets. Plant heterotrimeric G proteins are also involved in diverse biological processes, but little is known about their upstream receptors. Moreover, the presence of bona fide GPCRs in plants is yet to be established. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), heterotrimeric G protein consists of one Gα subunit (G PROTEIN α-SUBUNIT1), one Gβ subunit (ARABIDOPSIS G PROTEIN β-SUBUNIT1 [AGB1]), and three Gγs subunits (ARABIDOPSIS G PROTEIN γ-SUBUNIT1 [AGG1], AGG2, and AGG3). We identified AGB1 from a suppressor screen of BAK1-interacting receptor-like kinase1-1 (bir1-1), a mutant that activates cell death and defense responses mediated by the receptor-like kinase (RLK) SUPPRESSOR OF BIR1-1. Mutations in AGB1 suppress the cell death and defense responses in bir1-1 and transgenic plants overexpressing SUPPRESSOR OF BIR1-1. In addition, agb1 mutant plants were severely compromised in immunity mediated by three other RLKs, FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE2 (FLS2), Elongation Factor-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE1 (CERK1), respectively. By contrast, G PROTEIN α-SUBUNIT1 is not required for either cell death in bir1-1 or pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity mediated by FLS2, EFR, and CERK1. Further analysis of agg1 and agg2 mutant plants indicates that AGG1 and AGG2 are also required for pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses mediated by FLS2, EFR, and CERK1, as well as cell death and defense responses in bir1-1. We hypothesize that the Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G proteins function as a converging point of plant defense signaling by mediating responses initiated by multiple RLKs, which may fulfill equivalent roles to GPCRs in fungi and animals. PMID:23424249

  12. Structural and functional analysis of VQ motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis as interacting proteins of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Chi, Ying-Jun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Jian-Ye; Wang, Fei; Fan, Baofang; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2012-06-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by a large gene superfamily with a broad range of roles in plants. Recently, several groups have reported that proteins containing a short VQ (FxxxVQxLTG) motif interact with WRKY proteins. We have recently discovered that two VQ proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 and SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN2, act as coactivators of WRKY33 in plant defense by specifically recognizing the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulating the DNA-binding activity of WRKY33. In this study, we have analyzed the entire family of 34 structurally divergent VQ proteins from Arabidopsis. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assays showed that Arabidopsis VQ proteins interacted specifically with the C-terminal WRKY domains of group I and the sole WRKY domains of group IIc WRKY proteins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified structural features of these two closely related groups of WRKY domains that are critical for interaction with VQ proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of a majority of Arabidopsis VQ genes was responsive to pathogen infection and salicylic acid treatment. Functional analysis using both knockout mutants and overexpression lines revealed strong phenotypes in growth, development, and susceptibility to pathogen infection. Altered phenotypes were substantially enhanced through cooverexpression of genes encoding interacting VQ and WRKY proteins. These findings indicate that VQ proteins play an important role in plant growth, development, and response to environmental conditions, most likely by acting as cofactors of group I and IIc WRKY transcription factors.

  13. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix molecules such as fibronectin can promote cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Although some interactions of fibronectin with cell surface receptors have now been identified, the consequent activation of intracellular messenger systems by cell/matrix interactions have...... still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form....... Fibroblasts spread within 1h on substrata composed of fibronectin and formed focal adhesions by 3h, as monitored by interference reflection microscopy (IRM) and by labeling for talin, vinculin and integrin beta 1 subunits. In addition, stress fibers were visible. When cells were allowed to spread for 1h...

  14. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  15. Stimulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase by micromolar concentrations of spermine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) is stimulated approximately 2-fold by spermine and spermidine. Half maximal effects were observed at 10 microM and 150 microM of spermine and spermidine, respectively. The phosphorylations of other substrates of A-kinase such as glycogen synthase, histone, and casein are not stimulated by these two polyamines. The rates, but not the final extents, of phosphorylation of both the alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase by A-kinase are stimulated by spermine. The results indicate that spermine and spermidine may play an important role in the activation of glycogenolysis in skeletal muscle

  16. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Deficiency Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan Freark; Dikkers, Arne; Jurdzinski, Angelika; von Felden, Johann; Gaestel, Matthias; Bavendiek, Udo; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is considered an important contributor to insulin resistance. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) is a major downstream target of p38 MAPK and enhances inflammatory processes. In line with the role of MK2 as contributor to inflammation, MK2(-

  17. A CHASE domain containing protein kinase OsCRL4, represents a new AtCRE1-like gene family in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩秋敏; 姜华武; 齐晓朋; 丁洁; 吴平

    2004-01-01

    AtCRE1 is known to be a cytokinin receptor inArabidopsis. The AtCRE1 protein contains CHASE domain at the N-terminal part, followed by a transmitter (histidine kinase) domain and two receiver domains. The N-terminal CHASE domain of AtCRE1 contains putative recognition sites for cytokinin. Five CHASE domains containing proteins were found in rice, OsCRLla, OsCRLlb, OsCRL2, OsCRL3, and OsCRL4. OsCRL1a, OsCRL1b, OsCRL2 and OsCRL3 contain the four domains existing in CRE1, whereas OsCRL4 only contains the CHASE domain and a putative Ser/Thr protein kinase domain The authors cloned the encoding gene OsCRL4 and found that it represents a new member of the cytokinin receptor protein in rice.

  18. Interactions of protein kinase CK2beta subunit within the holoenzyme and with other proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, M; Ahmed, R; Thomsen, B;

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous, highly conserved protein kinase with a tetrameric alpha2beta2 structure. For the formation of this tetrameric complex a beta-alpha dimer seems to be a prerequisite. Using the two-hybrid system and a series of CK2beta deletion mutants, we mapped domains involved...... in alpha-beta and beta-beta interactions. We also detected an intramolecular beta interaction within the amino acid stretch 132-165. Using CK2beta as a bait in a two-hybrid library screening several new putative cellular partners have been identified, among them the S6 kinase p90rsk, the putative tumor...... suppressor protein Doc-1, the Fas-associated protein FAF1, the mitochondrial translational initiation factor 2 and propionyl CoA carboxylase beta subunit....

  19. ABNORMAL PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To survey the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the pathogenesis of several hematopoietic malignancies. Methods: By reviewing the published laboratory and clinical studies on PTK-related oncoproteins and their causative role in some leukemias and lymphomas. Results: Protein tyrosine kinases are key participants in signal transduction pathways that regulate cellular growth, activation and differentiations. Aberrant PTK activity resulting from gene mutation (often accompanying chromosome translocation) plays an etiologic role in several clonal hematopoietic malignancies. For example, the PTK product of the BCR-ABL fusion gene resulting from the t (9; 22) translocation exhibits several fold higher tyrosine kinase activity than the product of the ABL gene. Evidence suggests that the BCR-ABL oncoprotein alone is sufficient to case chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other Ph positive acute leukemia. PTK over-activity resulting from chromosomal translocations creating TEL-ABL, TEL-JAK2 and TEL-PDGFR( fusion proteins plays an important role in the pathogenesis of other types of leukemia. Another example occurs in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Experimental and clinical evidences indicate that translocations involving ALK gene on chromosome 2p23, most commonly resulting in an NPM-ALK fusion oncogene, result in constitutive activation of ALK and cause ALCL. This group of lymphomas is now named ALK positive lymphoma or ALKoma. Conclusion: Genetic lesions creating aberrant fusion proteins that result in excessive PTK activity are increasingly being recognized as central to the pathogenesis of hemotopoietic malignancies. These chimeric PTK molecules represent attractive disease-specific targets against which new classes therapeutic agents are being developed.

  20. LOV Domain-Containing F-Box Proteins:Light-Dependent Protein Degradation Modules in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shogo Ito; Young Hun Song; Takato Imaizumi

    2012-01-01

    Plants constantly survey the surrounding environment using several sets of photoreceptors.They can sense changes in the quantity (=intensity) and quality (=wavelength) of light and use this information to adjust their physiological responses,growth,and developmental patterns.In addition to the classical photoreceptors,such as phytochromes,cryptochromes,and phototropins,ZEITLUPE (ZTL),FLAVIN-BINDING,KELCH REPEAT,F-BOX 1 (FKF1),and LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2 (LKP2) proteins have been recently identified as blue-light photoreceptors that are important for regulation of the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering.The ZTL/FKF1/LKP2 protein family possesses a unique combination of domains:a blue-light-absorbing LOV (Light,Oxygen,or Voltage) domain along with domains involved in protein degradation.Here,we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Arabidopsis ZTL/FKF1/LKP2 proteins.We summarize the distinct photochemical properties of their LOV domains and discuss the molecular mechanisms by which the ZTL/FKF1/LKP2 proteins regulate the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering by controlling blue-light-dependent protein degradation.

  1. Toward the rational design of protein kinase casein kinase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Stefania; Moro, Stefano; Meggio, Flavio; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Dal Ben, Diego; Ghisellini, Paola; Battistutta, Roberto; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2002-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) probably is the most pleiotropic member of the protein kinase family, with more than 200 substrates known to date. Unlike the great majority of protein kinases, which are tightly regulated enzymes, CK2 is endowed with high constitutive activity, a feature that is suspected to underlie its oncogenic potential and possible implication in viral infections. This makes CK2 an attractive target for anti-neoplastic and antiviral drugs. Here, we present an overview of our present knowledge about CK2 inhibitors, with special reference to the information drawn from two recently solved crystal structures of CK2alpha in complex with emodin and with 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TBB), this latter being the most specific CK2 inhibitor known to date. A comparison with a series of anthraquinone and xanthenone derivatives highlights the crucial relevance of the hydroxyl group at position 3 for inhibition by emodin, and discloses the possibility of increasing the inhibitory potency by placing an electron withdrawing group at position 5. We also present mutational data corroborating the relevance of two hydrophobic residues unique to CK2, Val66 and Ile174, for the interactions with emodin and TBB, but not with the flavonoid inhibitors quercetin and fisetin. In particular, the CK2alpha mutant V66A displays 27- and 11-fold higher IC(50) values with emodin and TBB, respectively, as compared with the wild-type, while the IC(50) value with quercetin is unchanged. The data presented pave the road toward the rational design of more potent and selective inhibitors of CK2 and the generation of CK2 mutants refractory to inhibition, useful to probe the implication of CK2 in specific cellular functions. PMID:12191608

  2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases control expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Juliane; Lerche Hansen, Jakob; Haunsø, Stig;

    2002-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates G protein-coupled receptors resulting in uncoupling from G proteins. Receptors modulate GRK2 expression, however the mechanistic basis for this effect is largely unknown. Here we report a novel mechanism by which receptors use...

  3. Photoswitchable diacylglycerols enable optical control of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, James Allen; Yushchenko, Dmytro A; Hodson, David J; Lipstein, Noa; Nagpal, Jatin; Rutter, Guy A; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Gottschalk, Alexander; Brose, Nils; Schultz, Carsten; Trauner, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Increased levels of the second messenger lipid diacylglycerol (DAG) induce downstream signaling events including the translocation of C1-domain-containing proteins toward the plasma membrane. Here, we introduce three light-sensitive DAGs, termed PhoDAGs, which feature a photoswitchable acyl chain. The PhoDAGs are inactive in the dark and promote the translocation of proteins that feature C1 domains toward the plasma membrane upon a flash of UV-A light. This effect is quickly reversed after the termination of photostimulation or by irradiation with blue light, permitting the generation of oscillation patterns. Both protein kinase C and Munc13 can thus be put under optical control. PhoDAGs control vesicle release in excitable cells, such as mouse pancreatic islets and hippocampal neurons, and modulate synaptic transmission in Caenorhabditis elegans. As such, the PhoDAGs afford an unprecedented degree of spatiotemporal control and are broadly applicable tools to study DAG signaling. PMID:27454932

  4. Trafficking of endoplasmic reticulum-retained recombinant proteins is unpredictable in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eDe Meyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of recombinant proteins has been produced in the dicot model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Many of these proteins are targeted for secretion by means of an N terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER signal peptide. In addition, they can also be designed for ER retention by adding a C terminal H/KDEL-tag. Despite extensive knowledge of the protein trafficking pathways, the final protein destination, especially of such H/KDEL-tagged recombinant proteins, is unpredictable. In this respect, glycoproteins are ideal study objects. Microscopy experiments reveal their deposition pattern and characterization of their N-glycans aids in elucidating the trafficking. Here, we combine microscopy and N glycosylation data generated in Arabidopsis leaves and seeds, and highlight the lack of a decent understanding of heterologous protein trafficking.

  5. Modulation of the protein kinase activity of mTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J C; Lin, T A; McMahon, L P; Choi, K M

    2004-01-01

    mTOR is a founding member of a family of protein kinases having catalytic domains homologous to those in phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase. mTOR participates in the control by insulin of the phosphorylation of lipin, which is required for adipocyte differentiation, and the two translational regulators, p70S6K and PHAS-I. The phosphorylation of mTOR, itself, is stimulated by insulin in Ser2448, a site that is also phosphorylated by protein kinase B (PKB) in vitro and in response to activation of PKB activity in vivo. Ser2448 is located in a short stretch of amino acids not found in the two TOR proteins in yeast. A mutant mTOR lacking this stretch exhibited increased activity, and binding of the antibody, mTAb-1, to this region markedly increased mTOR activity. In contrast, rapamycin-FKBP12 inhibited mTOR activity towards both PHAS-I and p70S6K, although this complex inhibited the phosphorylation of some sites more than that of others. Mutating Ser2035 to Ile in the FKBP12-rapamycin binding domain rendered mTOR resistant to inhibition by rapamycin. Unexpectedly, this mutation markedly decreased the ability of mTOR to phosphorylate certain sites in both PHAS-I and p70S6K. The results support the hypotheses that rapamycin disrupts substrate recognition instead of directly inhibiting phosphotransferase activity and that mTOR activity in cells is controlled by the phosphorylation of an inhibitory regulatory domain containing the mTAb-1 epitope. PMID:14560959

  6. Protein kinase CK2 structure-function relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A;

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 subunits alpha and beta were expressed either separately or together in a bacterial expression system (pT7-7/BL21(DE3)) and purified to homogeneity. After mixing the subunits, a CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2) was spontaneously reconstituted, which displays identical features...... conditions, (b) it protects the alpha subunit against denaturing agents or conditions, and (c) it alters the substrate specificity of the alpha subunit. By site-directed mutagenesis, certain functions of the beta subunit could be assigned to specific amino acids or domains. Twenty one mutants of the beta...

  7. TaSK5, an abiotic stress-inducible GSK3/shaggy-like kinase from wheat, confers salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Nikolai Kirilov; Christova, Petya Koeva; Kato, Hideki; Liu, Yuelin; Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2014-11-01

    A novel cold-inducible GSK3/shaggy-like kinase, TaSK5, was isolated from winter wheat using a macroarray-based differential screening approach. TaSK5 showed high similarity to Arabidopsis subgroup I GSK3/shaggy-like kinases ASK-alpha, AtSK-gamma and ASK-epsilon. RNA gel blot analyses revealed TaSK5 induction by cold and NaCl treatments and to a lesser extent by drought treatment. TaSK5 functionally complemented the cold- and salt-sensitive phenotypes of a yeast GSK3/shaggy-like kinase mutant, △mck1. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaSK5 cDNA showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stresses. By contrast, the tolerance of the transgenic plants to freezing stress was not altered. Microarray analysis revealed that a number of abiotic stress-inducible genes were constitutively induced in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaSK5 may function in a novel signal transduction pathway that appears to be unrelated to DREB1/CBF regulon and may involve crosstalk between abiotic and hormonal signals.

  8. Natural variation at Strubbelig Receptor Kinase 3 drives immune-triggered incompatibilities between Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alcazar, R.; Garcia, A.V.; Kronholm, I.; Meaux, De J.; Koornneef, M.; Parker, J.E.; Reymond, M.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of genetic incompatibilities within species can lead to reproductive isolation and, potentially, speciation. In this study, we show that allelic variation at SRF3 (Strubbelig Receptor Family 3), encoding a receptor-like kinase, conditions the occurrence of incompatibility between Arabid

  9. Detailed search for protein kinase(s) involved in plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity regulation of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata R; Castanheira, Diogo; Teixeira, Janaina A; Bouillet, Leoneide E M; Ribeiro, Erica M C; Trópia, Maria M J; Alvarez, Florencia; Correa, Lygia F M; Mota, Bruno E F; Conceição, Luis Eduardo F R; Castro, Ieso M; Brandão, Rogelio L

    2015-03-01

    This study displays a screening using yeast strains deficient in protein kinases known to exist in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From 95 viable single mutants, 20 mutants appear to be affected in the glucose-induced extracellular acidification. The mutants that are unaffected in calcium signaling were tested for their sensitivity to hygromycin B. Furthermore, we verified whether the remaining mutants produced enzymes that are appropriately incorporated at plasma membrane. Finally, we measure the kinetic properties of the enzyme in purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved as well as glucose-fermenting cells. We confirmed the kinase Ptk2 involvement in H(+)-ATPase regulation (increase of affinity for ATP). However, the identification of the kinase(s) responsible for phosphorylation that leads to an increase in Vmax appears to be more complex. Complementary experiments were performed to check how those protein kinases could be related to the control of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and/or the potential membrane. In summary, our results did not permit us to identify the protein kinase(s) involved in regulating the catalytic efficiency of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Therefore, our results indicate that the current regulatory model based on the phosphorylation of two different sites located in the C-terminus tail of the enzyme could be inappropriate.

  10. N-Terminus of the Protein Kinase CLK1 Induces SR Protein Hyper-Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubol, Brandon E.; Plocinik, Ryan M.; Keshwani, Malik M.; McGlone, Maria L.; Hagopian, Jonathan C.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors that are regulated through multisite phosphorylation of their RS (arginine-serine-rich) domains by two major families of protein kinases. The SRPKs efficiently phosphorylate the arginine-serine dipeptides in the RS domain using a conserved docking groove in the kinase domain. In contrast, CLKs lack a docking groove and phosphorylate both arginine-serine and serine-proline dipeptides, modifications that generate a hyper-phosphorylated state important for unique SR protein-dependent splicing activities. All CLKs contain long, flexible N-terminal extensions (140-300 residues) that resemble the RS domains present in their substrate SR proteins. We showed that the N-terminus in CLK1 contacts both the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein SRSF1. This interaction not only is essential for facilitating hyper-phosphorylation but also induces cooperative binding of SRSF1 to RNA. The N-terminus of CLK1 enhances the total phosphoryl contents of a panel of physiological substrates including SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF5 and Tra2β1 by 2–3-fold. These findings suggest that CLK1-dependent hyper-phosphorylation is the result of a general mechanism in which the N-terminus acts as a bridge connecting the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein. PMID:24869919

  11. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki, E-mail: sueyoshi@ag.kagawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  12. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang;

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants...... deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid...... (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA-ABA interaction may...

  13. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  14. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  15. Pyruvate kinase M2 is a phosphotyrosine-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christofk, H.R.; Vander Heiden, M.G.; Wu, N.; Asara, J.M.; Cantley, L.C. (Harvard-Med)

    2008-06-03

    Growth factors stimulate cells to take up excess nutrients and to use them for anabolic processes. The biochemical mechanism by which this is accomplished is not fully understood but it is initiated by phosphorylation of signalling proteins on tyrosine residues. Using a novel proteomic screen for phosphotyrosine-binding proteins, we have made the observation that an enzyme involved in glycolysis, the human M2 (fetal) isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), binds directly and selectively to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We show that binding of phosphotyrosine peptides to PKM2 results in release of the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, leading to inhibition of PKM2 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that this regulation of PKM2 by phosphotyrosine signalling diverts glucose metabolites from energy production to anabolic processes when cells are stimulated by certain growth factors. Collectively, our results indicate that expression of this phosphotyrosine-binding form of pyruvate kinase is critical for rapid growth in cancer cells.

  16. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  17. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  18. First inactive conformation of CK2 alpha, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha, catalytic subunit of CK2) attached to a dimer of two noncatalytic subunits (CK2beta, noncatalytic subunit of CK2). CK2alpha belongs to the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases...

  19. Protein kinase C-beta II (PKC-betaII) expression in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise; Lindebjerg, Jan; Lahn, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current development of targeted agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer include the clinical evaluation of kinase inhibitors, such as enzastaurin, a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor designed to suppress signaling through Protein Kinase C (PKC) and AKT pathways. Little is known abo...

  20. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by LKB1 and CaMKK in adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormand, Amélie; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer;

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. In adipose tissue, activation of AMPK has been demonstrated in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli. However, the upstream kinase that activates AMPK in adipocytes...

  1. p21WAF1/CIP1 interacts with protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götz, C; Wagner, P; Issinger, O G;

    1996-01-01

    p21WAF1/CIP1 which belongs to a class of regulatory proteins that interact with cyclin dependent kinases is a potent inhibitor of these kinases. The inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinases induces an arrest of cells in the G phase of the cell cycle. In addition p21WAF1/CIP1 associates with PCNA...

  2. Association of Common Genetic Variants in Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Han Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Li; Hong Qiao; Hui-Xin Tong; Tian-Wei Zhuang; Tong-Tong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:A study has identified several novel susceptibility variants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4) gene for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) within the German population.Among the variants,five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MAP4K4 (rs1003376,rs11674694,rs2236935,rs2236936,and rs6543087) showed significant association with T2DM or diabetes-related quantitative traits.We aimed to evaluate whether common SNPs in the MAP4K4 gene were associated with T2DM in the Chinese population.Methods:Five candidate SNPs were genotyped in 996 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and in 976 control subjects,using the SNPscanTM method.All subjects were recruited from the Second Affiliated Hospital,Harbin Medical University from October 2010 to September 2013.We evaluated the T2DM risk conferred by individual SNPs and haplotypes using logistic analysis,and the association between the five SNPs and metabolic traits in the subgroups.Results:Of the five variants,SNP rs2236935T/C was significantly associated with T2DM in this study population (odds ratio =1.293;95% confidence interval:1.034-1.619,P =0.025).In addition,among the controls,rs 1003376 was significantly associated with an increased body mass index (P =0.045) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (P =0.037).Conclusions:MAP4K4 gene is associated with T2DM in a Chinese Han population,and MAP4K4 gene variants may contribute to the risk toward the development of T2DM.

  3. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz.

  4. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus;

    2008-01-01

    kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from...... MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  5. Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein-Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Osman, Kim; Iqbal, Mudassar; Stekel, Dov J; Luo, Zewei; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Chris H

    2012-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases (DBs). It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa interactome that is based on the A. thaliana PPI data from two resources: (i) A. thaliana PPI data from three major DBs, BioGRID, IntAct, and TAIR. (ii) ortholog-based A. thaliana PPI predictions. Linking between B. rapa and A. thaliana was accomplished in three complementary ways: (i) ortholog predictions, (ii) identification of gene duplication based on synteny and collinearity, and (iii) BLAST sequence similarity search. A complementary approach was also applied, which used known/predicted domain-domain interaction data. Specifically, since the two species are closely related, we used PPI data from A. thaliana to predict interacting domains that might be conserved between the two species. The predicted interactome was investigated for the component that contains known A. thaliana meiotic proteins to demonstrate its usability. PMID:23293649

  6. Inferring the Brassica rapa interactome using protein-protein interaction data from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua eYang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI data are available from the major PPI databases. It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa interactome that is based on the A. thaliana PPI data from two resources: (i A. thaliana PPI data from three major databases, BioGRID, IntAct and TAIR. (ii ortholog-based A. thaliana PPI predictions. Linking between B. rapa and A. thaliana was accomplished in three complementary ways: (i ortholog predictions, (ii identification of gene duplication based on synteny and collinearity, and (iii BLAST sequence similarity search. A complementary approach was also applied, which used known/predicted domain-domain interaction data. Specifically, since the two species are closely related, we used PPI data from A. thaliana to predict interacting domains that might be conserved between the two species. The predicted interactome was investigated for the component that contains known A. thaliana meiotic proteins to demonstrate its usability.

  7. Rho kinase acts as a downstream molecule to participate in protein kinase Cε regulation of vascular reactivity after hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhu, Yu; Zang, Jia-tao; Peng, Xiao-yong; Lan, Dan; Yang, Guang-ming; Xu, Jing; Liu, Liang-ming

    2014-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that Rho kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) played important parts in the regulation of vascular reactivity after shock. Using superior mesenteric arteries (SMAs) from hemorrhagic shock rats and hypoxia-treated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), relationship of PKCε regulation of vascular reactivity to Rho kinase, as well as the signal transduction after shock, was investigated. The results showed that inhibition of Rho kinase with the Rho kinase-specific inhibitor Y-27632 antagonized the PKCε-specific agonist carbachol and highly expressed PKCε-induced increase of vascular reactivity in SMAs and VSMCs, whereas inhibition of PKCε with its specific inhibitory peptide did not antagonize the Rho kinase agonist (U-46619)-induced increase of vascular reactivity in SMAs and VSMCs. Activation of PKCε or highly expressed PKCε upregulated the activity of Rho kinase and the phosphorylation of PKC-dependent phosphatase inhibitor 17 (CPI-17), zipper interacting protein kinase (ZIPK), and integrin-linked kinase (ILK), whereas activation of Rho kinase increased only CPI-17 phosphorylation. The specific neutralization antibodies of ZIPK and ILK antagonized PKCε-induced increases in the activity of Rho kinase, but CPI-17 neutralization antibody did not antagonize this effect. These results suggested that Rho kinase takes part in the regulation of PKCε on vascular reactivity after shock. Rho kinase is downstream of PKCε. Protein kinase Cε activates Rho kinase via ZIPK and ILK; CPI-17 is downstream of Rho kinase.

  8. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase is not involved in hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activation by neuroglucopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Kawashima

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia and neuroglucopenia stimulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity in the hypothalamus and this plays an important role in the counterregulatory responses, i.e. increased food intake and secretion of glucagon, corticosterone and catecholamines. Several upstream kinases that activate AMPK have been identified including Ca(2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK, which is highly expressed in neurons. However, the involvement of CaMKK in neuroglucopenia-induced activation of AMPK in the hypothalamus has not been tested. To determine whether neuroglucopenia-induced AMPK activation is mediated by CaMKK, we tested whether STO-609 (STO, a CaMKK inhibitor, would block the effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG-induced neuroglucopenia both ex vivo on brain sections and in vivo. Preincubation of rat brain sections with STO blocked KCl-induced α1 and α2-AMPK activation but did not affect AMPK activation by 2DG in the medio-basal hypothalamus. To confirm these findings in vivo, STO was pre-administrated intracerebroventricularly (ICV in rats 30 min before 2DG ICV injection (40 µmol to induce neuroglucopenia. 2DG-induced neuroglucopenia lead to a significant increase in glycemia and food intake compared to saline-injected control rats. ICV pre-administration of STO (5, 20 or 50 nmol did not affect 2DG-induced hyperglycemia and food intake. Importantly, activation of hypothalamic α1 and α2-AMPK by 2DG was not affected by ICV pre-administration of STO. In conclusion, activation of hypothalamic AMPK by 2DG-induced neuroglucopenia is not mediated by CaMKK.

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241519 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241519 J065170E12 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 3e-23 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242651 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242651 J090026B08 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 1e-16 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243050 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243050 J100011E04 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 2e-24 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242271 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242271 J075187A19 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 4e-17 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240655 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240655 J023135E11 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 1e-40 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242638 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242638 J090023J02 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 1e-29 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242681 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242681 J090032N04 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 8e-38 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288923 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288923 J090081P06 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 1e-59 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243187 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243187 J100039E11 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 4e-24 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111785 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111785 J023089N11 At5g62310.1 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) / protein kin...ase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 9e-31 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242859 J090073L24 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 2e-21 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242717 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242717 J090043H19 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 1e-23 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287631 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287631 J065073J24 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 2e-35 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242733 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242733 J090047O22 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 2e-24 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242758 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242758 J090051H03 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 1e-59 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair elongation (IRE) .../ protein kinase, putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj|BAA89783 6e-29 ...

  6. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  7. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  8. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  9. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  10. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  11. Arabidopsis inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6 kinase 2 is required for seed coat development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Tang; Shutang Tan; Hongwei Xue

    2013-01-01

    Inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6 kinase (ITPK) phosphorylates inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate to form inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate which can be finally transferred to inositoi hexaphosphate (IP6) and play important roles during plant growth and development.There are 4 putative ITPK members in Arabidopsis.Expression pattern analysis showed that ITPK2 is constitutively expressed in various tissues.A TDNA knockout mutant of ITPK2 was identified and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the epidermis structure of seed coat was irregularly formed in seeds of itpk2-1 mutant,resulting in the increased permeability of seed coat to tetrazolium salts.Further analysis by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of lipid polyester monomers in cell wall confirmed a dramatic decrease in composition of suberin and cutin,which relate to the permeability of seed coat and the formation of which is accompanied with seed coat development.These results indicate that ITPK2 plays an essential role in seed coat development and lipid polyester barrier formation.

  12. Using bacteria to determine protein kinase specificity and predict target substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Chou

    Full Text Available The identification of protein kinase targets remains a significant bottleneck for our understanding of signal transduction in normal and diseased cellular states. Kinases recognize their substrates in part through sequence motifs on substrate proteins, which, to date, have most effectively been elucidated using combinatorial peptide library approaches. Here, we present and demonstrate the ProPeL method for easy and accurate discovery of kinase specificity motifs through the use of native bacterial proteomes that serve as in vivo libraries for thousands of simultaneous phosphorylation reactions. Using recombinant kinases expressed in E. coli followed by mass spectrometry, the approach accurately recapitulated the well-established motif preferences of human basophilic (Protein Kinase A and acidophilic (Casein Kinase II kinases. These motifs, derived for PKA and CK II using only bacterial sequence data, were then further validated by utilizing them in conjunction with the scan-x software program to computationally predict known human phosphorylation sites with high confidence.

  13. Proteomics of loosely bound cell wall proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures: a critical analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Jauneau, Alain; Boudart, Georges; Monsarrat, Bernard; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Boudet, Alain; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    The complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allows the use of the recently developed mass spectrometry techniques to identify the cell wall proteins (CWPs). Most proteomic approaches depend on the quality of sample preparation. Extraction of CWPs is particularly complex since the proteins may be free in the apoplast or are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix where they are retained by Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic or ionic interactions, or cross-linked...

  14. Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein–Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jianhua; Osman, Kim; Iqbal, Mudassar; Stekel, Dov J; Luo, Zewei; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F. Chris H.

    2013-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein–protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases (DBs). It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B....

  15. Funktionelle Charakterisierung zweier Lipid Transfer Proteine in der Arabidopsis thaliana Pathogenantwort

    OpenAIRE

    Bieber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Die Multigenfamilie der Lipid Transfer Proteine (LTP) stellt eine Gruppe von kleinen Proteinen dar, welche in allen höheren Landpflanzen vorkommen. In der Modellpflanze Arabidopsis thaliana werden 92 Proteine zur Klasse der LTPs gezählt. Die Benennung der Proteinfamilie basiert auf dem beobachteten in vitro Transfer von Lipiden zwischen zwei Membranen. Alle LTPs weisen ein konserviertes, 8 Cysteine beinhaltendes Motiv und eine hydrophobe Tasche auf, welche für die Bindung hydrophober Moleküle...

  16. Protein kinase D regulates cell death pathways in experimental pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhen eYuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early events of pancreatitis including NF-kappaB activation and inappropriate intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In current studies, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PKD/PKD1 in the regulation of necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells by using two novel small molecule PKD inhibitors CID755673 and CRT0066101 and molecular approaches in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis. Our results demonstrated that both CID755673 and CRT0066101 are PKD-specific inhibitors and that PKD/PKD1 inhibition by either the chemical inhibitors or specific PKD/PKD1 siRNAs attenuated necrosis while promoting apoptosis induced by pathological doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK in pancreatic acinar cells. Conversely, upregulation of PKD expression in pancreatic acinar cells increased necrosis and decreased apoptosis. We further showed that PKD/PKD1 regulated several key cell death signals including inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs, caspases, receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1 to promote necrosis. PKD/PKD1 inhibition by CID755673 significantly ameliorated necrosis and severity of pancreatitis in an in vivo experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Thus, our studies indicate that PKD/PKD1 is a key mediator of necrosis in acute pancreatitis and that PKD/PKD1 may represent a potential therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis.

  17. Large-scale protein-protein interaction analysis in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts by split firefly luciferase complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Feng Li

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute the regulatory network that coordinates diverse cellular functions. There are growing needs in plant research for creating protein interaction maps behind complex cellular processes and at a systems biology level. However, only a few approaches have been successfully used for large-scale surveys of PPIs in plants, each having advantages and disadvantages. Here we present split firefly luciferase complementation (SFLC as a highly sensitive and noninvasive technique for in planta PPI investigation. In this assay, the separate halves of a firefly luciferase can come into close proximity and transiently restore its catalytic activity only when their fusion partners, namely the two proteins of interest, interact with each other. This assay was conferred with quantitativeness and high throughput potential when the Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplast system and a microplate luminometer were employed for protein expression and luciferase measurement, respectively. Using the SFLC assay, we could monitor the dynamics of rapamycin-induced and ascomycin-disrupted interaction between Arabidopsis FRB and human FKBP proteins in a near real-time manner. As a proof of concept for large-scale PPI survey, we further applied the SFLC assay to testing 132 binary PPIs among 8 auxin response factors (ARFs and 12 Aux/IAA proteins from Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the SFLC assay is ideal for in vivo quantitative PPI analysis in plant cells and is particularly powerful for large-scale binary PPI screens.

  18. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A;

    2010-01-01

    show that a knock down of the WRN protein in normal human fibroblasts induces phosphorylation and activation of several protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Using a tandem affinity purification strategy, we found that WRN physically and functionally interacts with receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1...... activity in vitro. Interestingly, knocking down RACK1 increased the cellular frequency of DNA breaks. Depletion of the WRN protein in return caused a fraction of nuclear RACK1 to translocate out of the nucleus to bind and activate PKCdelta and PKCbetaII in the membrane fraction of cells. In contrast......), a highly conserved anchoring protein involved in various biological processes, such as cell growth and proliferation. RACK1 binds strongly to the RQC domain of WRN and weakly to its acidic repeat region. Purified RACK1 has no impact on the helicase activity of WRN, but selectively inhibits WRN exonuclease...

  19. Conformational Dependence of a Protein Kinase Phosphate Transfer Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Henkelman, Graeme; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore,, P W; McMahon, Benjamin H

    2004-01-01

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are calculated by plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In the TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 0.2 eV barrier; while phosphate transfer is unfavorable by over 1.2 eV in the RC, with an even higher barrier. With the protein in the TC, the motions involved in reaction are small, with only P$_\\gamma$ and the catalytic proton moving more than 0.5 \\AA. Examination of the structures reveals that in the RC the active site cleft is not completely closed and there is insufficient space for the phosphorylated serine residue in the product state. Together, these observations imply that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by...

  20. The Snf1 Protein Kinase in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata

    2008-01-01

    that the stable isotope labeling approach is highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found, the major reason behind the discrepancy was the lack...... catabolism was SNF1 or SNF4 gene deletion specific. In comparison to the reference strain, growth delay on galactose was found to last 2.4 times (7 hours) longer for the Δsnf4, 3.1 times (10.5 hours) longer for the Δsnf1, and 9.6 times (43 hours) longer for the Δsnf1Δsnf4 strains. The maximum specific growth...... of reproducible sampling for proteins with low spectral counts. To reconstruct a regulatory map of the yeast Snf1 protein kinase, I used the abundances of 5716 mRNAs, 2388 proteins, and 44 metabolites measured for the wild-type, Δsnf1, Δsnf4, and Δsnf1Δsnf4 strains. By integrating these measurements with global...

  1. AtKP1, a kinesin-like protein, mainly localizes to mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Kinesins and kinesin-like proteins (KLPs) constitute a large family of microtubule-based motors that play important roles in many fundamental cellular and developmental processes. To date, a number of kinesins or KLPs have been identified in plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, a polyclonal antibody against AtKP1 (kinesin-like protein 1 in A.thaliana) was raised by injection the expressed AtKP1 specific C-terminal polypeptides in rabbits, and immunoblot analysis was conducted with the affinity-purified anti-AtKP1 antibody. The results indicated that this antibody recognized the AtKP1 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli and proteins of ~125 kDa in the soluble fractions of Arabidopsis extracts. The molecular weight was consistent with the calculated molecular weight based on deduced amino acids sequence of AtKP1. To acquire the subcellular localization of the protein, AtKP1 in Arabidopsis root cells was observed by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. AtKP1 was localized to particle-like organelles in interphase or dividing cells, but not to mitotic microtubule arrays. Relatively more AtKP1 was found in isolated mitochondria fraction on immunoblot of the subcellular fractions. The AtKP1 protein could not be released following a 0.6 M KI washing,indicating that AtKP1 is tightly bind to mitochondria and might function associated with this kind of organelles.

  2. Telencephalin protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis by activating the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Yang; Dapeng Wu; Xiaojie Zhang; Xiang Wang; Yi Peng; Zhiping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Telencephalin is a neural glycoprotein that reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid beta protein in the human neural tumor cell line PAJU.In this study,we examined the role of the ezrin/radixin/moesin protein family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway in this process.Western blot analysis demonstrated that telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B were not expressed in PAJU cells transfected with empty plasmid,while they were expressed in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid.After treatment with 1.0 nM amyloid beta protein 42,expression of telencephalin and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B in the transfected cells gradually diminished,while levels of phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin increased.In addition,the high levels of telencephalin,phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B expression in PAJU cells transfected with a telencephalin expression plasmid could be suppressed by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002.These findings indicate that telencephalin activates the ezrin/radixin/moesin family/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and protects PAJU cells from amyloid beta protein-induced apoptosis.

  3. Disrupting ER-associated protein degradation suppresses the abscission defect of a weak hae hsl2 mutant in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, John; Taylor, Isaiah; Walker, John C.

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the process of abscission, or the shedding of unwanted organs, is mediated by two genes, HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE 2 (HSL2), encoding receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). The double loss-of-function mutant hae-3 hsl2-3 is completely deficient in floral abscission, but, interestingly, the hae-3 hsl2-9 mutant displays a less severe defect. This mutant was chosen for an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) screen to isolate enhancer and suppressor mutants, and two such suppressors are the focus of this study. Pooled DNA from the F2 generation of a parental backcross was analyzed by genome sequencing to reveal candidate genes, two of which complement the suppressor phenotype. These genes, EMS-MUTAGENIZED BRI1 SUPPRESSOR 3 (EBS3) and EBS4, both encode mannosyltransferases involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) of proteins. Further analysis of these suppressor lines revealed that suppressor mutations are acting solely on the partially functional hsl2-9 mutant receptor to modify the abscission phenotype. Expressing a hsl2-9–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) transgene in ebs3 mutants yields a higher fluorescent signal than in EBS3/ebs3, suggesting that these mutants restore abscission by disrupting ERAD to allow accumulation of the hsl2-9 receptor, which probably escapes degradation to be trafficked to the plasma membrane to regain signaling. PMID:27566817

  4. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  5. A novel human STE20-related protein kinase, HGK, that specifically activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Z; Zhou, G; Wang, X S; Brown, A; Diener, K; Gan, H; Tan, T H

    1999-01-22

    The yeast serine/threonine kinase STE20 activates a signaling cascade that includes STE11 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase), STE7 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase), and FUS3/KSS1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to signals from both Cdc42 and the heterotrimeric G proteins associated with transmembrane pheromone receptors. Using degenerate polymerase chain reaction, we have isolated a human cDNA encoding a protein kinase homologous to STE20. This protein kinase, designated HPK/GCK-like kinase (HGK), has nucleotide sequences that encode an open reading frame of 1165 amino acids with 11 kinase subdomains. HGK was a serine/threonine protein kinase that specifically activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway when transfected into 293T cells, but it did not stimulate either the extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 kinase pathway. HGK also increased AP-1-mediated transcriptional activity in vivo. HGK-induced JNK activation was inhibited by the dominant-negative MKK4 and MKK7 mutants. The dominant-negative mutant of TAK1, but not MEKK1 or MAPK upstream kinase (MUK), strongly inhibited HGK-induced JNK activation. TNF-alpha activated HGK in 293T cells, as well as the dominant-negative HGK mutants, inhibited TNF-alpha-induced JNK activation. These results indicate that HGK, a novel activator of the JNK pathway, may function through TAK1, and that the HGK --> TAK1 --> MKK4, MKK7 --> JNK kinase cascade may mediate the TNF-alpha signaling pathway. PMID:9890973

  6. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Pisanty, Odelia; Barbosa, Inês C R; Zourelidou, Melina; Regnault, Thomas; Crocoll, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik; Weinstain, Roy; Schwechheimer, Claus; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Estelle, Mark; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA-ABA interaction may occur at the level of transport. PMID:27139299

  7. Protein kinase C mediates cholinergically regulated protein phosphorylation in a Cl(-)-secreting epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J A

    1990-02-01

    T84 cell monolayers were used to study the cholinergic regulation of protein phosphorylation in epithelial cells. When T84 cell monolayers are labeled with 32Pi and stimulated with carbachol, six proteins exhibit altered phosphorylation. The most prominent response is a fivefold increase in labeling of p83, an acidic protein of Mr 83,000. Increasing labeling of p83 parallels stimulated secretion with respect to the onset of agonist action, agonist potency, and antagonism by atropine. However, the p83 and secretory responses differ in that the p83 response is more sustained. When T84 cell fractions are incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, Ca2(+)-phospholipid stimulates p83 labeling. Phosphorylation of p83 also occurs when a T84 cell extract is incubated with purified protein kinase C and when intact cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate. p83 does not become phosphorylated in cell fractions incubated with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or in monolayers stimulated with agonists acting via cAMP. Thus carbachol stimulates the phosphorylation of an endogenous substrate for protein kinase C in T84 cells. The duration of this phosphorylation response suggests that protein kinase C may mediate a sustained response to carbachol, possibly acting to limit the duration of stimulated secretion.

  8. Systemic acquired resistance in soybean is regulated by two proteins, Orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Devinder

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is induced in non-inoculated leaves following infection with certain pathogenic strains. SAR is effective against many pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA is a signaling molecule of the SAR pathway. The development of SAR is associated with the induction of pathogenesis related (PR genes. Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1 is a regulatory gene of the SA signal pathway 123. SAR in soybean was first reported following infection with Colletotrichum trancatum that causes anthracnose disease. We investigated if SAR in soybean is regulated by a pathway, similar to the one characterized in Arabidopsis. Results Pathogenesis-related gene GmPR1 is induced following treatment of soybean plants with the SAR inducer, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA or infection with the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. In P. sojae-infected plants, SAR was induced against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Soybean GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes showed high identities to Arabidopsis NPR1. They showed similar expression patterns among the organs, studied in this investigation. GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 are the only soybean homologues of NPR1and are located in homoeologous regions. In GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 transformed Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutant plants, SAR markers: (i PR-1 was induced following INA treatment and (ii BGL2 following infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst, and SAR was induced following Pst infection. Of the five cysteine residues, Cys82, Cys150, Cys155, Cys160, and Cys216 involved in oligomer-monomer transition in NPR1, Cys216 in GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 proteins was substituted to Ser and Leu, respectively. Conclusion Complementation analyses in Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutants revealed that homoeologous GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes are orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1. Therefore, SAR pathway in soybean is most likely regulated by GmNPR1 genes. Substitution of Cys216 residue, essential

  9. Contraction-associated translocation of protein kinase C in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Cleland, P J; Rattigan, S;

    1987-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve of the anaesthetized rat in vivo led to a time-dependent translocation of protein kinase C from the muscle cytosol to the particulate fraction. Maximum activity of protein kinase C in the particulate fraction occurred after 2 min of intermittent short...... tetanic contractions of the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus muscle group and coincided with the loss of activity from the cytosol. Translocation of protein kinase C may imply a role for this kinase in contraction-initiated changes in muscle metabolism....

  10. Subtype activation and interaction of protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase controlling receptor expression in cerebral arteries and microvessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) still remains elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) subtypes in the pathophysiology of cerebral...... enhanced phosphorylation only at 48 hours after SAH. The pattern was identical in large cerebral arteries and in intracerebral microvessels. Treatment with either the PKC (RO-31-7549) or the raf (SB386023-b) inhibitor prevented the kinase activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that specific subtypes...... ischemia after SAH in cerebral arteries and microvessels and to examine temporal activation of the kinases. We hypothesize that treatment with a MAPK or PKC inhibitor will prevent the SAH-induced kinase activation in brain vessels. METHODS: SAH was induced by injecting 250 microL blood...

  11. In vivo imaging of the tonoplast intrinsic protein family in Arabidopsis roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khonsari Roman H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs are widely used as markers for vacuolar compartments in higher plants. Ten TIP isoforms are encoded by the Arabidopsis genome. For several isoforms, the tissue and cell specific pattern of expression are not known. Results We generated fluorescent protein fusions to the genomic sequences of all members of the Arabidopsis TIP family whose expression is predicted to occur in root tissues (TIP1;1 and 1;2; TIP2;1, 2;2 and 2;3; TIP4;1 and expressed these fusions, both individually and in selected pairwise combinations, in transgenic Arabidopsis. Analysis by confocal microscopy revealed that TIP distribution varied between different cell layers within the root axis, with extensive co-expression of some TIPs and more restricted expression patterns for other isoforms. TIP isoforms whose expression overlapped appeared to localise to the tonoplast of the central vacuole, vacuolar bulbs and smaller, uncharacterised structures. Conclusion We have produced a comprehensive atlas of TIP expression in Arabidopsis roots, which reveals novel expression patterns for not previously studied TIPs.

  12. Predicting protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana through integration of orthology, gene ontology and co-expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandepoele Klaas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale identification of the interrelationships between different components of the cell, such as the interactions between proteins, has recently gained great interest. However, unraveling large-scale protein-protein interaction maps is laborious and expensive. Moreover, assessing the reliability of the interactions can be cumbersome. Results In this study, we have developed a computational method that exploits the existing knowledge on protein-protein interactions in diverse species through orthologous relations on the one hand, and functional association data on the other hand to predict and filter protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. A highly reliable set of protein-protein interactions is predicted through this integrative approach making use of existing protein-protein interaction data from yeast, human, C. elegans and D. melanogaster. Localization, biological process, and co-expression data are used as powerful indicators for protein-protein interactions. The functional repertoire of the identified interactome reveals interactions between proteins functioning in well-conserved as well as plant-specific biological processes. We observe that although common mechanisms (e.g. actin polymerization and components (e.g. ARPs, actin-related proteins exist between different lineages, they are active in specific processes such as growth, cancer metastasis and trichome development in yeast, human and Arabidopsis, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that the integration of orthology with functional association data is adequate to predict protein-protein interactions. Through this approach, a high number of novel protein-protein interactions with diverse biological roles is discovered. Overall, we have predicted a reliable set of protein-protein interactions suitable for further computational as well as experimental analyses.

  13. Comparison of Peptide Array Substrate Phosphorylation of c-Raf and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parikh, Kaushal; Diks, Sander H.; Tuynman, Jurriaan H. B.; Verhaar, Auke; Lowenberg, Mark; Hommes, Daan W.; Joore, Jos; Pandey, Akhilesh; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2009-01-01

    Kinases are pivotal regulators of cellular physiology. The human genome contains more than 500 putative kinases, which exert their action via the phosphorylation of specific substrates. The determinants of this specificity are still only partly understood and as a consequence it is difficult to pred

  14. Oscillatory change of SR-protein kinase activities during oocyte maturation meiosis in fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仲安; 曹丹; 桂建芳

    2000-01-01

    The SR-protein kinase activity was analyzed and the cytological changes were observed during oocyte maturation in bisexual transparent color crucian carp ( Carassius auratus color variety). The results revealed that the SR-protein kinase activity was sensitive to the artificially induced spawning hormones, and the change of oscillatory activity was similar to that of the maturation-promoting factor (MPF) kinase that regulates meiotic cell cycle in fish.

  15. Plant Raf-like kinase integrates abscisic acid and hyperosmotic stress signaling upstream of SNF1-related protein kinase2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruhashi, Masashi; Kumar Ghosh, Totan; Arai, Kenta; Ishizaki, Yumiko; Hagiwara, Kazuya; Komatsu, Kenji; Shiwa, Yuh; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Yoshikawa, Harunori; Umezawa, Taishi; Sakata, Yoichi; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2015-11-17

    Plant response to drought and hyperosmosis is mediated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), a sesquiterpene compound widely distributed in various embryophyte groups. Exogenous ABA as well as hyperosmosis activates the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2), which plays a central role in cellular responses against drought and dehydration, although the details of the activation mechanism are not understood. Analysis of a mutant of the moss Physcomitrella patens with reduced ABA sensitivity and reduced hyperosmosis tolerance revealed that a protein kinase designated "ARK" (for "ABA and abiotic stress-responsive Raf-like kinase") plays an essential role in the activation of SnRK2. ARK encoded by a single gene in P. patens belongs to the family of group B3 Raf-like MAP kinase kinase kinases (B3-MAPKKKs) mediating ethylene, disease resistance, and salt and sugar responses in angiosperms. Our findings indicate that ARK, as a novel regulatory component integrating ABA and hyperosmosis signals, represents the ancestral B3-MAPKKKs, which multiplied, diversified, and came to have specific functions in angiosperms. PMID:26540727

  16. Structures of Rhodopsin Kinase in Different Ligand States Reveal Key Elements Involved in G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Puja; Wang, Benlian; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2008-10-08

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated heptahelical receptors, leading to their uncoupling from G proteins. Here we report six crystal structures of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1), revealing not only three distinct nucleotide-binding states of a GRK but also two key structural elements believed to be involved in the recognition of activated GPCRs. The first is the C-terminal extension of the kinase domain, which was observed in all nucleotide-bound GRK1 structures. The second is residues 5-30 of the N terminus, observed in one of the GRK1{center_dot}(Mg{sup 2+}){sub 2} {center_dot}ATP structures. The N terminus was also clearly phosphorylated, leading to the identification of two novel phosphorylation sites by mass spectral analysis. Co-localization of the N terminus and the C-terminal extension near the hinge of the kinase domain suggests that activated GPCRs stimulate kinase activity by binding to this region to facilitate full closure of the kinase domain.

  17. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  18. The Development of Protein Microarrays and Their Applications in DNA-Protein and Protein-Protein Interaction Analyses of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gong; Kun He; Mike Covington; S.R Dinesh-Kumar; Michael Snyder; Stacey L.Harmer; Yu-Xian Zhu; Xing Wang Deng

    2008-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to constructprotein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and proteinprotein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale.

  19. Regulation of the MAPK pathway by raf kinase inhibitory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Drieke; Herrero, Ana; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Kolch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The Raf kinase inhibitor protein 1 (RKIP-1) was the first reported endogenous inhibitor of Raf-1-MEK-ERK/MAPK cascade, by interfering with the phosphorylation of MEK by Raf-1. However, RKIP's functions related to the MAPK signaling are far more complex. Newer data indicate that by modulating different protein-protein interactions, RKIP is involved in fine-tuning cell signaling, modulating ERK dynamics, and regulating cross talk between different pathways. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms by which RKIP controls MAPK signaling at different levels and vice versa and its regulation via feedback phosphorylation. We also focus on several discrepancies and questions that remain, such as the RKIP binding regulation by Raf-1 N-region phosphorylation, the possible B-Raf inhibition, and the effects of RKIP-lipid binding. We also describe how RKIP's role as key signaling modulator of many cell fate decisions leads to the fact that fine control of RKIP activity and regulation is crucial to avoid pathological processes, such as metastasis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and heart failure.

  20. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in pancreatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Noriaki; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2006-10-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) may act as a second messenger to mediate the actions of growth factors and cytokines. But the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation and regulation of cell functions in PSCs remains largely unknown. We here examined the effects of H(2)O(2) on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cell functions in PSCs. PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay. Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. The effects of H(2)O(2) on proliferation, alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production were evaluated. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed. H(2)O(2) at non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 100 microM) induced oxidative stress in PSCs. H(2)O(2) activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor kappaB. In addition, H(2)O(2) activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. H(2)O(2) induced alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression but did not induce proliferation or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. H(2)O(2) did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype. Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and collagen gene expression by H(2)O(2) may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis.

  2. A calcium sensor – protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H.; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca2+ signal formation and decoding of information by Ca2+ binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca2+ binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca2+ signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca2+ signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  3. A calcium sensor - protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca(2+) signal formation and decoding of information by Ca(2+) binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca(2+) binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca(2+) signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca(2+) signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  4. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Spindler

    Full Text Available Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT, the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and protein kinase C (PKC. If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  5. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes. PMID:27408918

  6. An atypical kinase under balancing selection confers broad-spectrum disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Huard-Chauveau

    Full Text Available The failure of gene-for-gene resistance traits to provide durable and broad-spectrum resistance in an agricultural context has led to the search for genes underlying quantitative resistance in plants. Such genes have been identified in only a few cases, all for fungal or nematode resistance, and encode diverse molecular functions. However, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of quantitative resistance variation to other enemies and the associated evolutionary forces shaping this variation remain largely unknown. We report the identification, map-based cloning and functional validation of QRX3 (RKS1, Resistance related KinaSe 1, conferring broad-spectrum resistance to Xanthomonas campestris (Xc, a devastating worldwide bacterial vascular pathogen of crucifers. RKS1 encodes an atypical kinase that mediates a quantitative resistance mechanism in plants by restricting bacterial spread from the infection site. Nested Genome-Wide Association mapping revealed a major locus corresponding to an allelic series at RKS1 at the species level. An association between variation in resistance and RKS1 transcription was found using various transgenic lines as well as in natural accessions, suggesting that regulation of RKS1 expression is a major component of quantitative resistance to Xc. The co-existence of long lived RKS1 haplotypes in A. thaliana is shared with a variety of genes involved in pathogen recognition, suggesting common selective pressures. The identification of RKS1 constitutes a starting point for deciphering the mechanisms underlying broad spectrum quantitative disease resistance that is effective against a devastating and vascular crop pathogen. Because putative RKS1 orthologous have been found in other Brassica species, RKS1 provides an exciting opportunity for plant breeders to improve resistance to black rot in crops.

  7. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells.

  8. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:27056740

  9. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction.

  10. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Jianming eLi; Yidan eLiu

    2014-01-01

    A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC) mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis...

  12. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  13. Prokaryotic expression of soluble Arabidopsis protein AtERF1 and preparation of its polyclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AtERF1 encodes a member of the ERF subfamily B-3 of ERF/AP2 transcription factor family.It has been demonstrated almost every member of the B3 subgroup of AP2/ERF genes is involved in defense responses in Arabidopsis.Codon usage within a gene is a critical determinant of achievable protein expression level in E.coli. Gene optimization,therefore,is an effective method for synthetic genes with the aim of enhancing soluble expression,particular in heterologous hosts.In this paper,the AtERF1 protein of Arabidopsis thaliana was expressed in Escherichia coli using its optimized DNA sequence for E.coli. and yielded high level of soluble AtERF-1 protein in recombinant E.coli. The AtERF1 protein was used as an antigen to immune rabbits and obtains high titer antibodies.The immunological specificity of the polyclonal antibodies to AtERF1 was confirmed by Western blot assay.The prepared antibody in this work would facilitate the further functional investigation of AtERF1 in biochemical levels in Arabidopsis anther development.

  14. C4 protein of Beet severe curly top virus is a pathomorphogenetic factor in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungan; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Buckley, Kenneth J; Park, Jong-Bum; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Giun; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2010-12-01

    The Curtovirus C4 protein is required for symptom development during infection of Arabidopsis. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing C4 from either Beet curly top virus or Beet severe curly top virus produced phenotypes that were similar to symptoms seen during infection with wild-type viruses. The pseudosymptoms caused by C4 protein alone were novel to transgenic Arabidopsis and included bumpy trichomes, severe enations, disorientation of vascular bundles and stomata, swelling, callus-like structure formation, and twisted siliques. C4 induced abnormal cell division and altered cell fate in a variety of tissues depending on the C4 expression level. C4 protein expression increased the expression levels of cell-cycle-related genes CYCs, CDKs and PCNA, and suppressed ICK1 and the retinoblastoma-related gene RBR1, resulting in activation of host cell division. These results suggest that the Curtovirus C4 proteins are involved actively in host cell-cycle regulation to recruit host factors for virus replication and symptom development. PMID:20960205

  15. [Effects of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase b/bone morphogenetic protein-15 pathway on the follicular development in the mammalian ovary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-qing; Chen, Li-yun; Zhang, Zheng-hong; wang, Zheng-chao

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, ovarian follicle is made of an oocyte with its surrounding granulosa cells and theca cells. Follicular growth and development is a highly coordinated programmable process, which guarantees the normal oocyte maturation and makes it having the fertilizing capacity. The paracrine and autocrine between oocytes and granulosa cells are essential for the follicular development to provide a suitable microenvironment. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase /protein kinase B is one of these important regulatory signaling pathways during this developmental process, and bone morphogenetic protein-15 an oocyte-specific secreted signal molecule, which regulates the follicular development by paracrine in the mammalian ovary. The present article overviewed the role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase / protein kinase B signaling during the follicular development based on our previous investigation about protein kinase B /forkhead transcription factor forkhead family of transcription factors -3a, and then focused on the regulatory effects of bone morphogenetic protein-15, as a downstream signal molecule of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase / forkhead family of transcription factors -3a pathway, on ovarian follicular development, which helped to further understand the molecular mechanism regulating the follicular development and to treat ovarian diseases like infertility.

  16. The Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI genes regulate seed germination by modulating degradation of ABI5 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenming; Guan, Chunmei; Feng, Jian; Liang, Yan; Zhan, Ni; Zuo, Jianru; Ren, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in inhibiting seed germination and in post-germination seedling establishment. In the ABA signaling pathway, ABI5, a basic Leu zipper transcription factor, has important functions in the regulation of seed germination. ABI5 protein localizes in nuclear bodies, along with AFP, COP1, and SIZ1, and was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. However, the mechanisms of ABI5 nuclear body formation and ABI5 protein degradation remain obscure. In this study, we found that the Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) proteins, predicted nuclear matrix proteins essential for maintenance of nuclear morphology, also participate in ABA-controlled seed germination by regulating the degradation of ABI5 protein. During seed germination, the crwn mutants are hypersensitive to ABA and have higher levels of ABI5 protein compared to wild type. Genetic analysis suggested that CRWNs act upstream of ABI5. The observation that CRWN3 colocalizes with ABI5 in nuclear bodies indicates that CRWNs might participate in ABI5 protein degradation in nuclear bodies. Moreover, we revealed that the extreme C-terminal of CRWN3 protein is necessary for its function in the response to ABA in germination. Our results suggested important roles of CRWNs in ABI5 nuclear body organization and ABI5 protein degradation during seed germination. PMID:26564029

  17. Multiple implications of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 in human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keum-Jin; Yang; Jongsun; Park

    2010-01-01

    3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a central mediator of cellular signaling between phosphoinositide-3 kinase and various intracellular serine/threonine kinases,including protein kinase B,p70 ribosomal S6 kinase,serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase,and protein kinase C.PDK1 activates members of the AGC family of protein kinases by phosphorylating serine/threonine residues in the activation loop.Here,we review the regulatory mechanisms of PDK1 and its roles in cancer.PDK1 is activated by autophosphorylation in the activation loop and other serine residues,as well as by phosphorylation of Tyr-9 and Tyr-373/376.Src appears to recognize PDK1 following tyrosine phosphorylation.The role of heat shock protein 90 in regulating PDK1 stability and PDK1-Src complex formation are also discussed.Furthermore,we summarize the subcellular distribution of PDK1.Finally,an important role for PDK1 in cancer chemotherapy is proposed.In conclusion,a better understanding of its molecular regulatory mechanisms in various signaling pathways will help to explain how PDK1 acts as an oncogenic kinase in various cancers,and will contribute to the development of novel cancer chemotherapies.

  18. Transcriptional regulation by protein kinase A in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanggan Hu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A defect in the PKA1 gene encoding the catalytic subunit of cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA is known to reduce capsule size and attenuate virulence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Conversely, loss of the PKA regulatory subunit encoded by pkr1 results in overproduction of capsule and hypervirulence. We compared the transcriptomes between the pka1 and pkr1 mutants and a wild-type strain, and found that PKA influences transcript levels for genes involved in cell wall synthesis, transport functions such as iron uptake, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and glycolysis. Among the myriad of transcriptional changes in the mutants, we also identified differential expression of ribosomal protein genes, genes encoding stress and chaperone functions, and genes for secretory pathway components and phospholipid synthesis. The transcriptional influence of PKA on these functions was reminiscent of the linkage between transcription, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional analyses confirmed that the PKA mutants have a differential response to temperature stress, caffeine, and lithium, and that secretion inhibitors block capsule production. Importantly, we also found that lithium treatment limits capsule size, thus reinforcing potential connections between this virulence trait and inositol and phospholipid metabolism. In addition, deletion of a PKA-regulated gene, OVA1, revealed an epistatic relationship with pka1 in the control of capsule size and melanin formation. OVA1 encodes a putative phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that appears to negatively influence capsule production and melanin accumulation. Overall, these findings support a role for PKA in regulating the delivery of virulence factors such as the capsular polysaccharide to the cell surface and serve to highlight the importance of secretion and phospholipid metabolism as potential

  19. Rapid Phosphatidic Acid Accumulation in Response to Low Temperature Stress in Arabidopsis is Generated through Diacylglycerol Kinase

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    Steven A. Arisz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidic acid (PtdOH is emerging as an important signalling lipid in abiotic stress responses in plants. The effect of cold stress was monitored using 32P-labelled seedlings and leaf discs of Arabidopsis thaliana. Low, non-freezing temperatures were found to trigger a very rapid 32P-PtdOH increase, peaking within 2 and 5 min, respectively. In principle, PtdOH can be generated through three different pathways, i.e. i via de novo phospholipid biosynthesis (through acylation of lyso-PtdOH, ii via phospholipase D hydrolysis of structural phospholipids or iii via phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG by DAG kinase (DGK. Using a differential 32P-labelling protocol and a PLD-transphosphatidylation assay, evidence is provided that the rapid 32P-PtdOH response was primarily generated through DGK. A simultaneous decrease in the levels of 32P-PtdInsP, correlating in time, temperature dependency and magnitude with the increase in 32P-PtdOH, suggested that a PtdInsP-hydrolyzing PLC generated the DAG in this reaction. Testing T-DNA insertion lines available for the seven DGK genes, revealed no clear changes in 32P-PtdOH responses, suggesting functional redundancy. Similarly, known cold-stress mutants were analyzed to investigate whether the PtdOH response acted downstream of the respective gene products. The hos1, los1 and fry1 mutants were found to exhibit normal PtdOH responses. Slight changes were found for ice1, snow1, and the overexpression line Super-ICE1, however, this was not cold-specific and likely due to pleiotropic effects. A tentative model illustrating direct cold effects on phospholipid metabolism is presented.

  20. Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein expression in thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Gou Young; Lim, Sung-Jig; Kim, Youn Wha

    2010-12-01

    Raf-1 kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) has been implicated in several fundamental signal transduction pathways that control cellular growth, differentiation, apoptosis and migration. RKIP is reduced in a variety of human carcinomas, but RKIP expression in thyroid carcinomas has not been analyzed at the protein level. In this study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of RKIP in various subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Immunostaining for RKIP was performed on 104 cases of primary thyroid carcinoma (40 papillary, 29 follicular, 11 medullary, 11 poorly differentiated, and 13 anaplastic carcinomas) and 26 cases of nodal metastatic tumor (17 papillary, 4 medullary, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas). Normal thyroid tissue and all cases of follicular, papillary, and medullary carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for RKIP. With the exception of one case, poorly differentiated carcinomas also revealed strong RKIP expression. In contrast, RKIP expression was completely absent in all anaplastic carcinomas. The transition zone from the differentiated carcinoma component (strong RKIP expression) to the anaplastic carcinoma component (no RKIP expression) demonstrated a completely opposite pattern of RKIP immunoreactivity. This reduction of RKIP expression in anaplastic carcinoma was statistically significant (P carcinomas showed uniform, strong cytoplasmic RKIP immunoreactivity, in contrast, in metastatic anaplastic carcinomas, RKIP expression was completely absent. RKIP expression is significantly reduced in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma as compared to other subtypes of thyroid carcinoma. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanism of RKIP action in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  1. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  2. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca(2+)-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  3. Purification and antipathogenic activity of lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) from the leaves of Arabidopsis and spinach

    OpenAIRE

    Segura, Ana; Moreno, Manuel; García Olmedo, Francisco

    1993-01-01

    Two homogeneous proteins active in vitro against the bacterial pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus were obtained from a crude cell-wall preparation from the leaves of Columbia wild-type Arabidopsis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these proteins allowed their identification as lipid transfer proteins (LTP-a1, LTP-a2); the LTP1-a1 sequence was identical to that deduced from a previously described cDNA (EMBL M80566) and LTP-a2 was quite divergent (44% identical position...

  4. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  5. Cell-Free Expression of Protein Kinase A for Rapid Activity Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Leippe, Donna M.; Kate Qin Zhao; Kevin Hsiao; Slater, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein analysis often calls for lengthy, laborious in vivo protein expression and purification, and can be complicated by the lack of stability of the purified protein. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a simplified procedure for functional protein analysis on magnetic particles using cell-free protein synthesis of the catalytic subunit of human cAMP-dependent protein kinase as a HaloTag® fusion protein. The cell-free protein synthesis systems provide quick access t...

  6. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like Function Is Shared by the Beta- and Gamma- Subset of the Conserved Herpesvirus Protein Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Kuny, Chad V.; Karen Chinchilla; Culbertson, Michael R.; Kalejta, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    The UL97 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or HHV-5 (human herpesvirus 5)), is a kinase that phosphorylates the cellular retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor and lamin A/C proteins that are also substrates of cellular cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). A functional complementation assay has further shown that UL97 has authentic Cdk-like activity. The other seven human herpesviruses each encode a kinase with sequence and positional homology to UL97. These UL97-homologous proteins have been...

  7. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  8. Protocols for Studying Protein Stability in an Arabidopsis Protoplast Transient Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchais, Séverine; Camborde, Laurent; Jupin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability influences many aspects of biology, and measuring their stability in vivo can provide important insights into biological systems.This chapter describes in details two methods to assess the stability of a specific protein based on its transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts. First, a pulse-chase assay based on radioactive metabolic labeling of cellular proteins, followed by immunoprecipitation of the protein of interest. The decrease in radioactive signal is monitored over time and can be used to determine the protein's half-life.Alternatively, we also present a nonradioactive assay based on the use of reporter proteins, whose ratio can be quantified. This assay can be used to determine the relative stability of a protein of interest under specific conditions. PMID:27424754

  9. Desaturase mutants reveal that membrane rigidification acts as a cold perception mechanism upstream of the diacylglycerol kinase pathway in Arabidopsis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Cantrel, Catherine; Vergnolle, Chantal; Justin, Anne-Marie; Demandre, Chantal; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Ciçek, Dominique; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2006-07-24

    Membrane rigidification could be the first step of cold perception in poikilotherms. We have investigated its implication in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) activation by cold stress in suspension cells from Arabidopsis mutants altered in desaturase activities. By lateral diffusion assay, we showed that plasma membrane rigidification with temperature decrease was steeper in cells deficient in oleate desaturase than in wild type cells and in cells overexpressing linoleate desaturase. The threshold for the activation of the DAGK pathway in each type of cells correlated with this order of rigidification rate, suggesting that cold induced-membrane rigidification is upstream of DAGK pathway activation. PMID:16839551

  10. Mixed - Lineage Protein kinases (MLKs) in inflammation, metabolism, and other disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craige, Siobhan M; Reif, Michaella M; Kant, Shashi

    2016-09-01

    Mixed lineage kinases, or MLKs, are members of the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family, which were originally identified among the activators of the major stress-dependent mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), JNK and p38. During stress, the activation of JNK and p38 kinases targets several essential downstream substrates that react in a specific manner to the unique stressor and thus determine the fate of the cell in response to a particular challenge. Recently, the MLK family was identified as a specific modulator of JNK and p38 signaling in metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the MLK family of kinases appears to be involved in a very wide spectrum of disorders. This review discusses the newly identified functions of MLKs in multiple diseases including metabolic disorders, inflammation, cancer, and neurological diseases. PMID:27259981

  11. Targeting Protein Kinase C Downstream of Growth Factor and Adhesion Signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Catríona M., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie; Kiely, Patrick A., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie [Department of Life Sciences, Materials and Surface Science Institute and Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland); Health Research Institute (HRI), University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The signaling outputs of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, G-protein coupled receptors and integrins converge to mediate key cell process such as cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion and cell proliferation. Once activated by their ligands, these cell surface proteins recruit and direct a diverse range of proteins to disseminate the appropriate response downstream of the specific environmental cues. One of the key groups of proteins required to regulate these activities is the family of serine/threonine intracellular kinases called Protein Kinase Cs. The activity and subcellular location of PKCs are mediated by a series of tightly regulated events and is dependent on several posttranslational modifications and the availability of second messengers. Protein Kinase Cs exhibit both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects making them an interesting target for anti-cancer treatment.

  12. Molecular physiology of SPAK and OSR1: two Ste20-related protein kinases regulating ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kenneth B; Delpire, Eric

    2012-10-01

    SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive kinase) are members of the germinal center kinase VI subfamily of the mammalian Ste20 (Sterile20)-related protein kinase family. Although there are 30 enzymes in this protein kinase family, their conservation across the fungi, plant, and animal kingdom confirms their evolutionary importance. Already, a large volume of work has accumulated on the tissue distribution, binding partners, signaling cascades, and physiological roles of mammalian SPAK and OSR1 in multiple organ systems. After reviewing this basic information, we will examine newer studies that demonstrate the pathophysiological consequences to SPAK and/or OSR1 disruption, discuss the development and analysis of genetically engineered mouse models, and address the possible role these serine/threonine kinases might have in cancer proliferation and migration. PMID:23073627

  13. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hincha Dirk K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE and/or low temperature response (LTRE elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for

  14. Protein kinase C-dependent activation of P44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 70 in signal transduction during hepatocyte ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Gao; Yu-Qiang Shan; Ming-Xin Pan; Yu Wang; Li-Jun Tang; Hao Li; Zhi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the significance of protein kinase C (PKC), P44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and heat shock protein (HSP)70 signal transduction during hepatocyte ischemic preconditioning.METHODS: In this study we used an in vitro ischemic preconditioning (IP) model for hepatocytes and an in vivo model for rat liver to investigate the significance of protein kinase C (PKC), P44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P44/42 MAPKs) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) signal transduction in IP. Through a normal liver cell hypoxic preconditioning (HP) model in which cultured normal liver cells were subjected to 3 cycles of 5 min of incubation under hypoxic conditions followed by 5 min of reoxygenation and subsequently exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation for 6 h and 9 h respectively. PKC inhibitor, activator and MEK inhibitor were utilized to analyze the phosphorylation of PKC, the expression of P44/42 MAPKs and HSP70.Viability and cellular ultrastructure were also observed. By using rat liver as an in vivo model of liver preconditioning (3 cycles of 10-min occlusion and 10-min reperfusion),in vivo phosphorylation of PKC and P44/42MAPKs, HSP70 expression were further analyzed. AST/ALT concentration,cellular structure and ultrastruture were also observed.All the data were statistically analyzed.RESULTS: Similar results were obtained in both in vivo and in vitro IP models. Compared with the control without IP (or HP), the phosphorylation of PKC and P44/42 MAPKs and the expression of HSP70 were obviously increased in IP (or HP) treated model in which cytoprotection could be found. The effects of preconditioning were mimicked by stimulating PKC with 4β phorobol-12-myristate13-acetate (PMA). Conversely, inhibiting PKC with chelerythrine abolished the protection given by preconditioning. PD98059,inhibitor of MEK (the upstream kinase of P44/42MAPKs),also reverted the cytoprotection exerted by preconditioning.CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that

  15. A G-protein β subunit, AGB1, negatively regulates the ABA response and drought tolerance by down-regulating AtMPK6-related pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-bei Xu

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins are versatile regulators involved in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the function of G-proteins is primarily associated with ABA signaling. However, the downstream effectors and the molecular mechanisms in the ABA pathway remain largely unknown. In this study, an AGB1 mutant (agb1-2 was found to show enhanced drought tolerance, indicating that AGB1 might negatively regulate drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Data showed that AGB1 interacted with protein kinase AtMPK6 that was previously shown to phosphorylate AtVIP1, a transcription factor responding to ABA signaling. Our study found that transcript levels of three ABA responsive genes, AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 (downstream gene of AtVIP1, were significantly up-regulated in agb1-2 lines after ABA or drought treatments. Other ABA-responsive and drought-inducible genes, such as RD29A (downstream gene of AtMYB44, were also up-regulated in agb1-2 lines. Furthermore, overexpression of AtVIP1 resulted in hypersensitivity to ABA at seed germination and seedling stages, and significantly enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. These results suggest that AGB1 was involved in the ABA signaling pathway and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis through down-regulating the AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 cascade.

  16. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R

    2016-05-01

    Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  17. Proteomic LC-MS analysis of Arabidopsis cytosolic ribosomes : Identification of ribosomal protein paralogs and re-annotation of the ribosomal protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Maureen; Dobrenel, Thomas; Cordewener, Jan J H G; Davanture, Marlène; Meyer, Christian; Smeekens, Sjef J C M; Bailey-Serres, Julia; America, Twan A H P; Hanson, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Arabidopsis thaliana cytosolic ribosomes are large complexes containing eighty-one distinct ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), four ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) and a plethora of associated (non-ribosomal) proteins. In plants, r-proteins of cytosolic ribosomes are each encoded by two to seven dif

  18. Amygdala kindling alters protein kinase C activity in dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S J; Desai, M A; Klann, E; Winder, D G; Sweatt, J D; Conn, P J

    1992-11-01

    Kindling is a use-dependent form of synaptic plasticity and a widely used model of epilepsy. Although kindling has been widely studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying induction of this phenomenon are not well understood. We determined the effect of amygdala kindling on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in various regions of rat brain. Kindling stimulation markedly elevated basal (Ca(2+)-independent) and Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation of an endogenous PKC substrate (which we have termed P17) in homogenates of dentate gyrus, assayed 2 h after kindling stimulation. The increase in P17 phosphorylation appeared to be due at least in part to persistent PKC activation, as basal PKC activity assayed in vitro using an exogenous peptide substrate was increased in kindled dentate gyrus 2 h after the last kindling stimulation. A similar increase in basal PKC activity was observed in dentate gyrus 2 h after the first kindling stimulation. These results document a kindling-associated persistent PKC activation and suggest that the increased activity of PKC could play a role in the induction of the kindling effect.

  19. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  20. Purification, renaturation, and reconstituted protein kinase activity of the Sendai virus large (L) protein: L protein phosphorylates the NP and P proteins in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Einberger, H; Mertz, R; Hofschneider, P H; Neubert, W J

    1990-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized Sendai virus large (L) protein was highly purified by a one-step procedure, using hydroxylapatite column chromatography. Monoclonal antibodies addressed to the carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequence of the L protein were used for monitoring L protein during purification. By removing sodium dodecyl sulfate from purified L protein, a protein kinase activity was successfully renatured. P and NP proteins served as its substrates. After immunoprecipitation with an...

  1. Opposite Stereoselectivities of Dirigent Proteins in Arabidopsis and Schizandra Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G. A.; Atwell, Kathleen M.; Costa, Michael A.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2012-08-01

    How stereoselective monolignol-derived phenoxy radical-radical coupling reactions are differentially biochemically orchestrated in planta, whereby for example they afford (+)- and (-)-pinoresinols, respectively, is both a fascinating mechanistic and evolutionary question. In earlier work, biochemical control of (+)-pinoresinol formation had been established to be engendered by a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein in Forsythia intermedia, whereas the presence of a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein was indirectly deduced based on the enantiospecificity of downstream pinoresinol reductases (AtPrRs) in Arabidopsis thaliana root tissue. In this study of 16 putative dirigent protein homologs in Arabidopsis, AtDIR6, AtDIR10, and AtDIR13 were established to be root-specific using a β-glucuronidase reporter gene strategy. Of these three, in vitro analyses established that only recombinant AtDIR6 was a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein, whose physiological role was further confirmed using overexpression and RNAi strategies in vivo. Interestingly, its closest homolog, AtDIR5, was also established to be a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein based on in vitro biochemical analyses. Both of these were compared in terms of properties with a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein from Schizandra chinensis. In this context, sequence analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and region swapping resulted in identification of putative substrate binding sites/regions and candidate residues controlling distinct stereoselectivities of coupling modes.

  2. A small molecule inhibitor partitions two distinct pathways for trafficking of tonoplast intrinsic proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrain E Rivera-Serrano

    Full Text Available Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs facilitate the membrane transport of water and other small molecules across the plant vacuolar membrane, and members of this family are expressed in specific developmental stages and tissue types. Delivery of TIP proteins to the tonoplast is thought to occur by vesicle-mediated traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole, and at least two pathways have been proposed, one that is Golgi-dependent and another that is Golgi-independent. However, the mechanisms for trafficking of vacuolar membrane proteins to the tonoplast remain poorly understood. Here we describe a chemical genetic approach to unravel the mechanisms of TIP protein targeting to the vacuole in Arabidopsis seedlings. We show that members of the TIP family are targeted to the vacuole via at least two distinct pathways, and we characterize the bioactivity of a novel inhibitor that can differentiate between them. We demonstrate that, unlike for TIP1;1, trafficking of markers for TIP3;1 and TIP2;1 is insensitive to Brefeldin A in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Using a chemical inhibitor that may target this BFA-insensitive pathway for membrane proteins, we show that inhibition of this pathway results in impaired root hair growth and enhanced vacuolar targeting of the auxin efflux carrier PIN2 in the dark. Our results indicate that the vacuolar targeting of PIN2 and the BFA-insensitive pathway for tonoplast proteins may be mediated in part by common mechanisms.

  3. Distribution of an Ankyrin-repeat Protein on the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin Wei; Yan Li

    2009-01-01

    There are many ankyrin-repeat proteins in plant cells. However, the distribution and function of these proteins are mostly unclear. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a gene encoding an ankyrin-like protein was cloned from Arabidopsis and named AtANK1 (GenBank accession no. NM_120340). The 6-His-tagged AtAnk1-N fusion protein was affinity-purified and its rabbit polyclonal antibody was obtained. Immuno-blotting with the purified anti-AtAnk1-N polyclonal antibody revealed that the relative molecular weight of the AtANK1 protein was about 76 kDa. By immunofluorescence labeling and immuno-gold labeling with the purified anti-AtAnk1-N polyclonal antibody, coupled with confocal and transmission electron microscopy observation, AtANK1 was found to be distributed on the membrane of the endoplaamic reticulum in Arabidopsis cells. Based on these results, we suggested that AtANK1 might be involved in endoplasmic reticulum-related protein localization and sorting in plant cells.

  4. Protein kinase A binds and activates heat shock factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Murshid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible transcription factors are regulated through batteries of posttranslational modifications that couple their activity to inducing stimuli. We have studied such regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, a key protein in control of the heat shock response, and a participant in carcinogenisis, neurological health and aging. As the mechanisms involved in the intracellular regulation of HSF1 in good health and its dysregulation in disease are still incomplete we are investigating the role of posttranslational modifications in such regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a proteomic study of HSF1 binding partners, we have discovered its association with the pleiotropic protein kinase A (PKA. HSF1 binds avidly to the catalytic subunit of PKA, (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on a novel serine phosphorylation site within its central regulatory domain (serine 320 or S320, both in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular PKAcα levels and phosphorylation of HSF1 at S320 were both required for HSF1 to be localized to the nucleus, bind to response elements in the promoter of an HSF1 target gene (hsp70.1 and activate hsp70.1 after stress. Reduction in PKAcα levels by small hairpin RNA led to HSF1 exclusion from the nucleus, its exodus from the hsp70.1 promoter and decreased hsp70.1 transcription. Likewise, null mutation of HSF1 at S320 by alanine substitution for serine led to an HSF1 species excluded from the nucleus and deficient in hsp70.1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings of PKA regulation of HSF1 through S320 phosphorylation add to our knowledge of the signaling networks converging on this factor and may contribute to elucidating its complex roles in the stress response and understanding HSF1 dysregulation in disease.

  5. Redox regulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Han

    Full Text Available Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death.The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC.Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation.In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-N(G-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC.Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells.

  6. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  7. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengot, Laia; Caldarella, Eleonora; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Martínez, M Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID), an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling. PMID:27275924

  8. The Protein Kinase CK2 Mediates Cross-Talk between Auxin- and Salicylic Acid-Signaling Pathways in the Regulation of PINOID Transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Armengot

    Full Text Available The protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous and highly conserved enzyme, the activity of which is vital for eukaryotic cells. We recently demonstrated that CK2 modulates salicylic acid (SA homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that functional interplay between CK2 and SA sustains transcriptional expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN genes. In this work, we show that CK2 also plays a key role in the transcriptional regulation of PINOID (PID, an AGC protein kinase that modulates the apical/basal localization of auxin-efflux transporters. We show that PID transcription is up-regulated by auxin and by SA and that CK2 is involved in both pathways. On the one hand, CK2 activity is required for proteosome-dependent degradation of AXR3, a member of the AUX/IAA family of auxin transcriptional repressors that must be degraded to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. On the other hand, the role of CK2 in SA homeostasis and, indirectly, in SA-driven PID transcription, was confirmed by using Arabidopsis NahG transgenic plants, which cannot accumulate SA. In conclusion, our results evidence a role for CK2 as a functional link in the negative cross-talk between auxin- and SA-signaling.

  9. Cold Shock Domain Protein 3 Regulates Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2009-01-01

    In response to cold, Escherichia coli produces cold shock proteins (CSPs) that have essential roles in cold adaptation as RNA chaperones. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis cold shock domain protein 3 (AtCSP3), which shares a cold shock domain with bacterial CSPs, is involved in the acquisition of freezing tolerance in plants. AtCSP3 complemented a cold-sensitive phenotype of the E. coli CSP quadruple mutant and displayed nucleic acid duplex melting activity, suggesting that AtCSP3 also fu...

  10. An early nodulin-like protein accumulates in the sieve element plasma membrane of Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Junaid A.; Wang, Qi; Sjölund, Richard D.;

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins within the sieve element-companion cell complex have essential roles in the physiological functioning of the phloem. The monoclonal antibody line RS6, selected from hybridomas raised against sieve elements isolated from California shield leaf (Streptanthus tortuosus; Brassicaceae......) tissue cultures, recognizes an antigen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia that is associated specifically with the plasma membrane of sieve elements, but not companion cells, and accumulates at the earliest stages of sieve element differentiation. The identity of the RS6 antigen...... floral and vegetative tissues, the sieve element-specific ENOD is expressed only within the phloem. Members of the ENOD subfamily of the cupredoxin superfamily do not appear to bind copper and have unknown functions. Phenotypic analysis of homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for the gene At3g20570 shows...

  11. Exploring the function of protein kinases in schistosomes: perspectives from the laboratory and from comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony John Walker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic protein kinases are well conserved through evolution. The genome of Schistosoma mansoni, which causes intestinal schistosomiasis, encodes over 250 putative protein kinases with all of the main eukaryotic groups represented. However, unraveling functional roles for these kinases is a considerable endeavour, particularly as protein kinases regulate multiple and sometimes overlapping cell and tissue functions in organisms. In this article, elucidating protein kinase signal transduction and function in schistosomes is considered from the perspective of the state-of-the-art methodologies used and comparative organismal biology, with a focus on current advances and future directions. Using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a comparator we predict roles for various schistosome protein kinases in processes vital for host invasion and successful parasitism such as sensory behaviour, growth and development. It is anticipated that the characterization of schistosome protein kinases in the context of parasite function will catalyze cutting edge research into host-parasite interactions and will reveal new targets for developing drug interventions against human schistosomiasis.

  12. Quinalizarin as a potent, selective and cell-permeable inhibitor of protein kinase CK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Giorgio; Mazzorana, Marco; Papinutto, Elena; Bain, Jenny; Elliott, Matthew; di Maira, Giovanni; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Pagano, Mario A; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Battistutta, Roberto; Meggio, Flavio; Moro, Stefano; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2009-08-01

    Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone) is a moderately potent and poorly selective inhibitor of protein kinase CK2, one of the most pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinases, implicated in neoplasia and in other global diseases. By virtual screening of the MMS (Molecular Modeling Section) database, we have now identified quinalizarin (1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone) as an inhibitor of CK2 that is more potent and selective than emodin. CK2 inhibition by quinalizarin is competitive with respect to ATP, with a Ki value of approx. 50 nM. Tested at 1 microM concentration on a panel of 75 protein kinases, quinalizarin drastically inhibits only CK2, with a promiscuity score (11.1), which is the lowest ever reported so far for a CK2 inhibitor. Especially remarkable is the ability of quinalizarin to discriminate between CK2 and a number of kinases, notably DYRK1a (dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and -regulated kinase), PIM (provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukaemia virus) 1, 2 and 3, HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2), MNK1 [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-interacting kinase 1], ERK8 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 8) and PKD1 (protein kinase D 1), which conversely tend to be inhibited as drastically as CK2 by commercially available CK2 inhibitors. The determination of the crystal structure of a complex between quinalizarin and CK2alpha subunit highlights the relevance of polar interactions in stabilizing the binding, an unusual characteristic for a CK2 inhibitor, and disclose other structural features which may account for the narrow selectivity of this compound. Tested on Jurkat cells, quinalizarin proved able to inhibit endogenous CK2 and to induce apoptosis more efficiently than the commonly used CK2 inhibitors TBB (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole) and DMAT (2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole). PMID:19432557

  13. Structure of protein kinase CK2: dimerization of the human beta-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Mietens, U; Issinger, O G

    1996-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been shown to be elevated in all so far investigated solid tumors and its catalytic subunit has been shown to serve as an oncogene product. CK2 is a heterotetrameric serine-threonine kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta...

  14. The Sensitivity of Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation to Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis and Kinases: Computational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yili; Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Memory consolidation and reconsolidation require kinase activation and protein synthesis. Blocking either process during or shortly after training or recall disrupts memory stabilization, which suggests the existence of a critical time window during which these processes are necessary. Using a computational model of kinase synthesis and…

  15. Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B; Poppinga, W J; Schmidt, M

    2015-01-01

    Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease

  16. Identification of novel pheromone-response regulators through systematic overexpression of 120 protein kinases in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchett, S A; Scott, A; Errede, B; Dohlman, H G

    2001-07-13

    Protein kinases are well known to transmit and regulate signaling pathways. To identify additional regulators of the pheromone signaling apparatus in yeast, we evaluated an array of 120 likely protein kinases encoded by the yeast genome. Each kinase was fused to glutathione S-transferase, overexpressed, and tested for changes in pheromone responsiveness in vivo. As expected, several known components of the pathway (YCK1, STE7, STE11, FUS3, and KSS1) impaired the growth arrest response. Seven other kinases also interfered with pheromone-induced growth arrest; in rank order they are as follows: YKL116c (renamed PRR1) = YDL214c (renamed PRR2) > YJL141c (YAK1, SRA1) > YNR047w = YCR091w (KIN82) = YIL095w (PRK1) > YCL024w (KCC4). Inhibition of pheromone signaling by PRR1, but not PRR2, required the glutathione S-transferase moiety. Both kinases inhibited gene transcription after stimulation with pheromone, a constitutively active kinase mutant STE11-4, or overexpression of the transcription factor STE12. Neither protein altered the ability of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fus3 to feedback phosphorylate a known substrate, the MAPK kinase Ste7. These results reveal two new components of the pheromone-signaling cascade in yeast, each acting at a point downstream of the MAPK. PMID:11337509

  17. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Lt...

  18. A versatile mass spectrometry-based method to both identify kinase client-relationships and characterize signaling network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    While more than a thousand protein kinases (PK) have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, relatively little progress has been made towards identifying their individual client proteins. Herein we describe use of a mass spectrometry-based in vitro phosphorylation strategy, termed Kinase...

  19. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  20. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J. (Abbott)

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  1. Tv-RIO1 – an atypical protein kinase from the parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus vitrinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternberg Paul W

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are key enzymes that regulate a wide range of cellular processes, including cell-cycle progression, transcription, DNA replication and metabolic functions. These enzymes catalyse the transfer of phosphates to serine, threonine and tyrosine residues, thus playing functional roles in reversible protein phosphorylation. There are two main groups, namely eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs and atypical protein kinases (aPKs; RIO kinases belong to the latter group. While there is some information about RIO kinases and their roles in animals, nothing is known about them in parasites. This is the first study to characterise a RIO1 kinase from any parasite. Results A full-length cDNA (Tv-rio-1 encoding a RIO1 protein kinase (Tv-RIO1 was isolated from the economically important parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus vitrinus (Order Strongylida. The uninterrupted open reading frame (ORF of 1476 nucleotides encoded a protein of 491 amino acids, containing the characteristic RIO1 motif LVHADLSEYNTL. Tv-rio-1 was transcribed at the highest level in the third-stage larva (L3, and a higher level in adult females than in males. Comparison with homologues from other organisms showed that protein Tv-RIO1 had significant homology to related proteins from a range of metazoans and plants. Amino acid sequence identity was most pronounced in the ATP-binding motif, active site and metal binding loop. Phylogenetic analyses of selected amino acid sequence data revealed Tv-RIO1 to be most closely related to the proteins in the species of Caenorhabditis. A structural model of Tv-RIO1 was constructed and compared with the published crystal structure of RIO1 of Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Af-Rio1. Conclusion This study provides the first insights into the RIO1 protein kinases of nematodes, and a foundation for further investigations into the biochemical and functional roles of this molecule in biological processes in parasitic nematodes.

  2. Arabidopsis mRNA polyadenylation machinery: comprehensive analysis of protein-protein interactions and gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Min

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polyadenylation of mRNA is one of the critical processing steps during expression of almost all eukaryotic genes. It is tightly integrated with transcription, particularly its termination, as well as other RNA processing events, i.e. capping and splicing. The poly(A tail protects the mRNA from unregulated degradation, and it is required for nuclear export and translation initiation. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that the polyadenylation process is also involved in the regulation of gene expression. The polyadenylation process requires two components, the cis-elements on the mRNA and a group of protein factors that recognize the cis-elements and produce the poly(A tail. Here we report a comprehensive pairwise protein-protein interaction mapping and gene expression profiling of the mRNA polyadenylation protein machinery in Arabidopsis. Results By protein sequence homology search using human and yeast polyadenylation factors, we identified 28 proteins that may be components of Arabidopsis polyadenylation machinery. To elucidate the protein network and their functions, we first tested their protein-protein interaction profiles. Out of 320 pair-wise protein-protein interaction assays done using the yeast two-hybrid system, 56 (~17% showed positive interactions. 15 of these interactions were further tested, and all were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and/or in vitro co-purification. These interactions organize into three distinct hubs involving the Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors. These hubs are centered around AtCPSF100, AtCLPS, and AtFIPS. The first two are similar to complexes seen in mammals, while the third one stands out as unique to plants. When comparing the gene expression profiles extracted from publicly available microarray datasets, some of the polyadenylation related genes showed tissue-specific expression, suggestive of potential different polyadenylation complex configurations. Conclusion An

  3. Phosphorylation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by checkpoint kinase Chk1: identification of the in vitro CK2beta phosphorylation site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Højrup, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 mediates the formation of the CK2 tetrameric form and it has functions independent of CK2 catalytic subunit through interaction with several intracellular proteins. Recently, we have shown that CK2beta associates with the human checkpoint kinase Chk...... by the modification of Thr213 but it does require the presence of an active Chk1 kinase....

  4. Affinity Purification of O-Acetylserine(thiollyase from Chlorella sorokiniana by Recombinant Proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Salbitani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the unicellular green alga Chlorella sorokiniana (211/8 k, the protein O-acetylserine(thiollyase (OASTL, representing the key-enzyme in the biosynthetic cysteine pathway, was isolated and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purification was carried out in cells grown in the presence of all nutrients or in sulphate (S deprived cells. After 24 h of S-starvation, a 17-fold increase in the specific activity of OASTL was measured. In order to enable the identification of OASTL proteins from non-model organisms such as C. sorokiniana, the recombinant his-tagged SAT5 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana was immobilized by metal chelate chromatography. OASTL proteins from C. sorokiniana were affinity purified in one step and activities were enhanced 29- and 41-fold, from S-sufficient and S-starved (24 h cells, respectively. The successful application of SAT/OASTL interaction for purification confirms for the first time the existence of the cysteine synthase complexes in microalgae. The purified proteins have apparent molecular masses between 32–34 kDa and are thus slightly larger compared to those found in Arabidopsis thaliana and other vascular plants. The enhanced OASTL activity in S-starved cells can be attributed to increased amounts of plastidic and the emergence of cytosolic OASTL isoforms. The results provide proof-of-concept for the biochemical analysis of the cysteine synthase complex in diverse microalgal species.

  5. Identification and molecular properties of SUMO-binding proteins in arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyeongcheol

    2011-05-20

    Reversible conjugation of the small ubiquitin modifier (SUMO) peptide to proteins (SUMOylation) plays important roles in cellular processes in animals and yeasts. However, little is known about plant SUMO targets. To identify SUMO substrates in Arabidopsis and to probe for biological functions of SUMO proteins, we constructed 6xHis-3xFLAG fused AtSUMO1 (HFAtSUMO1) controlled by the CaMV35S promoter for transformation into Arabidopsis Col-0. After heat treatment, an increased sumoylation pattern was detected in the transgenic plants. SUMO1-modified proteins were selected after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) image analysis and identified using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We identified 27 proteins involved in a variety of processes such as nucleic acid metabolism, signaling, metabolism, and including proteins of unknown functions. Binding and sumoylation patterns were confirmed independently. Surprisingly, MCM3 (At5G46280), a DNA replication licensing factor, only interacted with and became sumoylated by AtSUMO1, but not by SUMO1ΔGG or AtSUMO3. The results suggest specific interactions between sumoylation targets and particular sumoylation enzymes. ©2011 KSMCB.

  6. Luminidependens (LD) is an Arabidopsis protein with prion behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortee, Sohini; Kayatekin, Can; Newby, Greg A; Mendillo, Marc L; Lancaster, Alex; Lindquist, Susan

    2016-05-24

    Prion proteins provide a unique mode of biochemical memory through self-perpetuating changes in protein conformation and function. They have been studied in fungi and mammals, but not yet identified in plants. Using a computational model, we identified candidate prion domains (PrDs) in nearly 500 plant proteins. Plant flowering is of particular interest with respect to biological memory, because its regulation involves remembering and integrating previously experienced environmental conditions. We investigated the prion-forming capacity of three prion candidates involved in flowering using a yeast model, where prion attributes are well defined and readily tested. In yeast, prions heritably change protein functions by templating monomers into higher-order assemblies. For most yeast prions, the capacity to convert into a prion resides in a distinct prion domain. Thus, new prion-forming domains can be identified by functional complementation of a known prion domain. The prion-like domains (PrDs) of all three of the tested proteins formed higher-order oligomers. Uniquely, the Luminidependens PrD (LDPrD) fully replaced the prion-domain functions of a well-characterized yeast prion, Sup35. Our results suggest that prion-like conformational switches are evolutionarily conserved and might function in a wide variety of normal biological processes. PMID:27114519

  7. Protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate movement, attachment, pairing and egg release in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Ressurreição

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases C (PKCs and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using 'smart' antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance.

  8. Association of protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha (a proline-directed kinase and a regulator of protooncogenes) with human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S D; Yu, J S; Lee, T T; Ni, M H; Yang, C C; Ho, Y S; Tsen, T Z

    1995-10-01

    Computer analysis of protein phosphorylation-sites sequence revealed that most transcriptional factors and viral oncoproteins are prime targets for regulation of proline-directed protein phosphorylation, suggesting an association of proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) family with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. In this report, an immunoprecipitate activity assay of protein kinase FA/glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha (kinase FA/GSK-3alpha) (a particular member of PDPK family) has been optimized for human cervical tissue and used to demonstrate for the first time significantly increased (P < 0.001) activity in poorly differentiated cervical carcinoma (82.8 +/- 6.6 U/mg of protein), moderately differentiated carcinoma (36.2 +/- 3.4 U/mg of protein), and well-differentiated carcinoma (18.3 +/- 2.4 U/mg of protein) from 36 human cervical carcinoma samples when compared to 12 normal controls (4.9 +/- 0.6 U/mg of protein). Immunoblotting analysis further revealed that increased activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha in cervical carcinoma is due to overexpression of protein synthesis of the kinase. Taken together, the results provide initial evidence that overexpression of protein synthesis and cellular activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may be involved in human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression, supporting an association of proline-directed protein kinase with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. Since protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may function as a possible regulator of transcription factors/proto-oncogenes, the results further suggest that kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may play a potential role in human cervical carcinogenesis, especially in its dedifferentiation and progression.

  9. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-08-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC8), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 M. Diolein (100 M), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4US -phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4 -phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable (TVS)methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua.

  10. In silico identification of carboxylate clamp type tetratricopeptide repeat proteins in Arabidopsis and rice as putative co-chaperones of Hsp90/Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishun D Prasad

    Full Text Available The essential eukaryotic molecular chaperone Hsp90 operates with the help of different co-chaperones, which regulate its ATPase activity and serve as adaptors to recruit client proteins and other molecular chaperones, such as Hsp70, to the Hsp90 complex. Several Hsp90 and Hsp70 co-chaperones contain the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain, which interacts with the highly conserved EEVD motif at the C-terminal ends of Hsp90 and Hsp70. The acidic side chains in EEVD interact with a subset of basic residues in the TPR binding pocket called a 'carboxylate clamp'. Since the carboxylate clamp residues are conserved in the TPR domains of known Hsp90/Hsp70 co-chaperones, we carried out an in silico search for TPR proteins in Arabidopsis and rice comprising of at least one three-motif TPR domain with conserved amino acid residues required for Hsp90/Hsp70 binding. This approach identified in Arabidopsis a total of 36 carboxylate clamp (CC-TPR proteins, including 24 novel proteins, with potential to interact with Hsp90/Hsp70. The newly identified CC-TPR proteins in Arabidopsis and rice contain additional protein domains such as ankyrin, SET, octicosapeptide/Phox/Bem1p (Phox/PB1, DnaJ-like, thioredoxin, FBD and F-box, and protein kinase and U-box, indicating varied functions for these proteins. To provide proof-of-concept of the newly identified CC-TPR proteins for interaction with Hsp90, we demonstrated interaction of AtTPR1 and AtTPR2 with AtHsp90 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull down assays. These findings indicate that the in silico approach used here successfully identified in a genome-wide context CC-TPR proteins with potential to interact with Hsp90/Hsp70, and further suggest that the Hsp90/Hsp70 system relies on TPR co-chaperones more than it was previously realized.

  11. THE EFFECTS OF HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN AND TYROSINE PROTEIN KINASE ON THE GROWTHOF HYBRIDOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANShou-Wei; LIUShah-Ling; CAOZe-Yi; CHENMan-Ling

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the production and development of receptor monoclonal antibodies (McAB) have been attentively studied. Wc observed the effects of human ehorionicgonadotropin (HCG) and tyrosinc protein kinase (TPK) on the growth of two hybridoma

  12. INHIBITION OF IL-6-INDUCED STAT3 ACTIVATION IN MYELOMA CELLS BY PROTEIN KINASE A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋伦; 黎燕; 沈倍奋

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the regulation effect of protein kinase A on IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in myeloma cells. Methods: Two human myeloma cell lines-Sko-007 and U266 were pretreated with Forskolin, a protein kinase A antagonist, and then stimulated by IL-6. The activation state of STAT3 in these two cells were examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results: Although PKA pathway itself doesn't participate in IL-6 signal transduction in Sko-007 and U266 cells, activation of protein kinase A can inhibit IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in these two cell lines. Conclusion: There exists an inhibitory effect of protein kinase A on STAT3 activation in human myeloma cells treated by IL-6.

  13. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  14. Crystallographic characterization of a multidomain histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component regulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    The multidomain cytoplasmic portion of the histidine protein kinase from an essential two-component signal transduction system has been crystallized and X-ray data have been collected to 2.8 Å resolution.

  15. Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G-protein Regulates Cell Wall Defense and Resistance to Necrotrophic Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena Delcado-Cerezo; Paul Schulze-Lefert; Shauna Somerville; José Manuel Estevez; Staffan Persson; Antonio Molina; Clara Sánchez-Rodríguez; Viviana Escudero; Eva Miedes; Paula Virginia Fernández; Lucía Jordá; Camilo Hernández-Blanco; Andrea Sánchez-Vallet; Pawel Bednarek

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein controls defense responses to necrotrophic and vascular fungi.The agb1 mutant impaired in the Gβ subunit displays enhanced susceptibility to these pathogens.Gβ/AGB1 forms an obligate dimer with either one of the Arabidopsis Gγ subunits (γ1/AGG1 and γ2/AGG2).Accordingly,we now demonstrate that the agg1 agg2 double mutant is as susceptible as agb1 plants to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina.To elucidate the molecular basis of heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated resistance,we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of agb1-1 mutant and wild-type plants upon inoculation with P cucumerina.This analysis,together with metabolomic studies,demonstrated that G-protein-mediated resistance was independent of defensive pathways required for resistance to necrotrophic fungi,such as the salicylic acid,jasmonic acid,ethylene,abscisic acid,and tryptophan-derived metabolites signaling,as these pathways were not impaired in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants.Notably,many mis-regulated genes in agb1 plants were related with cell wall functions,which was also the case in agg1 agg2 mutant.Biochemical analyses and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy of cell walls from G-protein mutants revealed that the xylose content was lower in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants than in wild-type plants,and that mutant walls had similar FTIR spectratypes,which differed from that of wild-type plants.The data presented here suggest a canonical functionality of the Gβ and Gγ1/γ2 subunits in the control of Arabidopsis immune responses and the regulation of cell wall composition.

  16. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  17. Kinase-specific prediction of protein phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Blom, Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    As extensive mass spectrometry-based mapping of the phosphoproteome progresses, computational analysis of phosphorylation-dependent signaling becomes increasingly important. The linear sequence motifs that surround phosphorylated residues have successfully been used to characterize kinase...

  18. An improved toolbox to unravel the plant cellular machinery by tandem affinity purification of Arabidopsis protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leene, Jelle; Eeckhout, Dominique; Cannoot, Bernard; De Winne, Nancy; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vercruysse, Leen; Dedecker, Maarten; Verkest, Aurine; Vandepoele, Klaas; Martens, Lennart; Witters, Erwin; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is one of the most advanced methods to characterize protein complexes in plants, giving a comprehensive view on the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of a certain protein of interest (bait). The bait protein is fused to a double affinity tag, which consists of a protein G tag and a streptavidin-binding peptide separated by a very specific protease cleavage site, allowing highly specific protein complex isolation under near-physiological conditions. Implementation of this optimized TAP tag, combined with ultrasensitive MS, means that these experiments can be performed on small amounts (25 mg of total protein) of protein extracts from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures. It is also possible to use this approach to isolate low abundant protein complexes from Arabidopsis seedlings, thus opening perspectives for the exploration of protein complexes in a plant developmental context. Next to protocols for efficient biomass generation of seedlings (∼7.5 months), we provide detailed protocols for TAP (1 d), and for sample preparation and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS; ∼5 d), either from Arabidopsis seedlings or from cell cultures. For the identification of specific co-purifying proteins, we use an extended protein database and filter against a list of nonspecific proteins on the basis of the occurrence of a co-purified protein among 543 TAP experiments. The value of the provided protocols is illustrated through numerous applications described in recent literature.

  19. A PII-like protein in Arabidopsis: putative role in nitrogen sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, M H; Lam, H M; van de Loo, F J; Coruzzi, G

    1998-11-10

    PII is a protein allosteric effector in Escherichia coli and other bacteria that indirectly regulates glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional and post-translational levels in response to nitrogen availability. Data supporting the notion that plants have a nitrogen regulatory system(s) includes previous studies showing that the levels of mRNA for plant nitrogen assimilatory genes such as glutamine synthetase (GLN) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) are modulated by carbon and organic nitrogen metabolites. Here, we have characterized a PII homolog (GLB1) in two higher plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Ricinus communis (Castor bean). Each plant PII-like protein has high overall identity to E. coli PII (50%). Western blot analyses reveal that the plant PII-like protein is a nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein. The PII-like protein of plants appears to be regulated at the transcriptional level in that levels of GLB1 mRNA are affected by light and metabolites. To initiate studies of the in vivo function of the Arabidopsis PII-like protein, we have constructed transgenic lines in which PII expression is uncoupled from its native regulation. Analyses of these transgenic plants support the notion that the plant PII-like protein may serve as part of a complex signal transduction network involved in perceiving the status of carbon and organic nitrogen. Thus, the PII protein found in archaea, bacteria, and now in higher eukaryotes (plants) is one of the most widespread regulatory proteins known, providing evidence for an ancestral metabolic regulatory mechanism that may have existed before the divergence of these three domains of life. PMID:9811909

  20. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  1. The cyst nematode effector protein 10A07 targets and recruits host posttranslational machinery to mediate its nuclear trafficking and to promote parasitism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants.

  2. The cyst nematode effector protein 10A07 targets and recruits host posttranslational machinery to mediate its nuclear trafficking and to promote parasitism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants. PMID:25715285

  3. Fas-associated factor 1 interacts with protein kinase CK2 in vivo upon apoptosis induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    2001-01-01

    We show here that in several different cell lines protein kinase CK2 and Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1) exist together in a complex which is stable to high monovalent salt concentration. The CK2/FAF1 complex formation is significantly increased after induction of apoptosis with various DNA damaging...... the view that protein kinase CK2 plays an important role in certain steps of apoptosis....

  4. Protein kinase C is involved in regulation of Ca2+ channels in plasmalemma of Nitella syncarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherelova, O M

    1989-01-01

    Ca2+ current recordings have been made on Nitella syncarpa cells using the intracellular perfusion and the voltage-clamp technique. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), a substance capable of activating protein kinase C from plasmalemma of Nitella cells, modulates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Polymixin B, inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks the Nitella plasmalemma Ca2+ channels; the rate of channel blockage depends on the concentration and exposure time of the substance. PMID:2536617

  5. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  6. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of chromatin-associated proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    The nucleus is the organelle where basically all DNA-related processes take place in eukaryotes, such as replication, transcription, and splicing as well as epigenetic regulation. The identification and description of the nuclear proteins is one of the requisites toward a comprehensive understanding of the biological functions accomplished in the nucleus. Many of the regulatory mechanisms of protein functions rely on their PTMs among which phosphorylation is probably one of the most important properties affecting enzymatic activity, interaction with other molecules, localization, or stability. So far, the nuclear and subnuclear proteome and phosphoproteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been the subject of very few studies. In this work, we developed a purification protocol of Arabidopsis chromatin-associated proteins and performed proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses identifying a total of 879 proteins of which 198 were phosphoproteins that were mainly involved in chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and RNA processing. From 230 precisely localized phosphorylation sites (phosphosites), 52 correspond to hitherto unidentified sites. This protocol and data thereby obtained should be a valuable resource for many domains of plant research.

  7. Effects of externally supplied protein on root morphology and biomass allocation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonhienne, Thierry G A; Trusov, Yuri; Young, Anthony; Rentsch, Doris; Näsholm, Torgny; Schmidt, Susanne; Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat

    2014-01-01

    Growth, morphogenesis and function of roots are influenced by the concentration and form of nutrients present in soils, including low molecular mass inorganic N (IN, ammonium, nitrate) and organic N (ON, e.g. amino acids). Proteins, ON of high molecular mass, are prevalent in soils but their possible effects on roots have received little attention. Here, we investigated how externally supplied protein of a size typical of soluble soil proteins influences root development of axenically grown Arabidopsis. Addition of low to intermediate concentrations of protein (bovine serum albumen, BSA) to IN-replete growth medium increased root dry weight, root length and thickness, and root hair length. Supply of higher BSA concentrations inhibited root development. These effects were independent of total N concentrations in the growth medium. The possible involvement of phytohormones was investigated using Arabidopsis with defective auxin (tir1-1 and axr2-1) and ethylene (ein2-1) responses. That no phenotype was observed suggests a signalling pathway is operating independent of auxin and ethylene responses. This study expands the knowledge on N form-explicit responses to demonstrate that ON of high molecular mass elicits specific responses. PMID:24852366

  8. Metal binding affinity and structural properties of calmodulin-like protein 14 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Rosario; La Verde, Valentina; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola; Astegno, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin, plants possess many calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that are predicted to have specific roles in the cell. Herein, we described the biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana CML14. We applied isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the energetics of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to CML14, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, together with intrinsic and ANS-based fluorescence, to evaluate the structural effects of metal binding and metal-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and limited proteolysis were used to characterize protein thermal and local stability. Our data demonstrate that CML14 binds one Ca(2+) ion with micromolar affinity (Kd ∼ 12 µM) and the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) decreases the Ca(2+) affinity by ∼5-fold. Although binding of Ca(2+) to CML14 increases protein stability, it does not result in a more hydrophobic protein surface and does not induce the large conformational rearrangement typical of Ca(2+) sensors, but causes only localized structural changes in the unique functional EF-hand. Our data, together with a molecular modelling prediction, provide interesting insights into the biochemical properties of Arabidopsis CML14 and may be useful to direct additional studies aimed at understanding its physiological role. PMID:27124620

  9. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  10. Similar pathogen targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and homo sapiens protein networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Shakarian

    Full Text Available We study the behavior of pathogens on host protein networks for humans and Arabidopsis - noting striking similarities. Specifically, we preform [Formula: see text]-shell decomposition analysis on these networks - which groups the proteins into various "shells" based on network structure. We observe that shells with a higher average degree are more highly targeted (with a power-law relationship and that highly targeted nodes lie in shells closer to the inner-core of the network. Additionally, we also note that the inner core of the network is significantly under-targeted. We show that these core proteins may have a role in intra-cellular communication and hypothesize that they are less attacked to ensure survival of the host. This may explain why certain high-degree proteins are not significantly attacked.

  11. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity by in vitro phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2. Differential phosphorylation of NDP kinases in HeLa cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, R M; Engel, M; Sauane, M;

    1996-01-01

    that in vitro protein kinase CK2 catalyzed phosphorylation of human NDPK A inhibits its enzymatic activity by inhibiting the first step of its ping-pong mechanism of catalysis: its autophosphorylation. Upon in vivo 32P labeling of HeLa cells, we observed that both human NDPKs, A and B, were autophosphorylated......Although a number of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) have been reported to act as inhibitors of metastasis or as a transcription factor in mammals, it is not known whether these functions are linked to their enzymatic activity or how this protein is regulated. In this report, we show...... on histidine residues, however, only the B isoform appeared to be serine phosphorylated....

  12. Hepatitis B virus x protein induces autophagy via activating death-associated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H-T; Chen, G G; Hu, B-G; Zhang, Z-Y; Yun, J-P; He, M-L; Lai, P B S

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus x protein (HBX), a product of hepatitis B virus (HBV), is a multifunctional protein that regulates viral replication and various cellular functions. Recently, HBX has been shown to induce autophagy; however, the responsible mechanism is not fully known. In this study, we established stable HBX-expressing epithelial Chang cells as the platform to study how HBX induced autophagy. The results showed that the overexpression of HBX resulted in starvation-induced autophagy. HBX-induced autophagy was related to its ability to dephosphorylate/activate death-associated protein kinase (DAPK). The block of DAPK by its siRNA significantly counteracted HBX-mediated autophagy, confirming the positive role of DAPK in this process. HBX also induced Beclin 1, which functions at the downstream of the DAPK-mediated autophagy pathway. Although HBX could activate JNK, a kinase known to participate in autophagy in certain conditions, the change in JNK failed to influence HBX-induced autophagy. In conclusion, HBX induces autophagy via activating DAPK in a pathway related to Beclin 1, but not JNK. This new finding should help us to understand the role of autophagy in HBX-mediated pathogenesis and thus may provide targets for intervening HBX-related disorders.

  13. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  14. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-26

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer sitting in the active site of another monomer of the same protein in the crystal. We utilized a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by generating all unique kinase/kinase interfaces within and between asymmetric units of each crystal and measuring the distance between the hydroxyl oxygen of potential autophosphorylation sites and the oxygen atoms of the active site aspartic acid residue side chain. We have identified 15 unique autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes have not previously been described in the relevant publications on the crystal structures (N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of CSF1R and EPHA2, activation loop tyrosines of LCK and IGF1R, and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CLK2. Mutation of residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK either severely impaired autophosphorylation or increased it. Taking the autophosphorylation complexes as a whole and comparing them with peptide-substrate/kinase complexes, we observe a number of important features among them. The novel and previously observed autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, indicating that by homology we can extend the relevance of these complexes to many other clinically relevant drug targets.

  15. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins from rabbit reticulocytes by a ribosome-associated casein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  16. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase activity in nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum, L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.3 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified 80,000-fold by salt fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography, after which it has a high specific activity of about 100 picomoles per minute per microgram in the presence of Ca2+ and reaches half-maximal activation at about 3 x 10(-7) molar free Ca2+, without calmodulin. It is a monomer with a molecular weight near 90,000. It can efficiently use histone III-S, ribosomal S6 protein, and casein as artificial substrates, but it phosphorylates phosvitin only weakly. Its Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity is half-maximally inhibited by 0.1 millimolar chlorpromazine, by 35 nanomolar K-252a and by 7 nanomolar staurosporine. It is insensitive to sphingosine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, and to basic polypeptides that block other Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. It is not stimulated by exogenous phospholipids or fatty acids. In intact isolated pea nuclei it preferentially phosphorylates several chromatin-associated proteins, with the most phosphorylated protein band being near the same molecular weight (43,000) as a nuclear protein substrate whose phosphorylation has been reported to be stimulated by phytochrome in a calcium-dependent fashion.

  17. Characterization of a tomato protein kinase gene induced by infection by Potato spindle tuber viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R W; Zhao, Y

    2000-09-01

    Viroids--covalently closed, circular RNA molecules in the size range of 250 to 450 nucleotides-are the smallest known infectious agents and cause a number of diseases of crop plants. Viroids do not encode proteins and replicate within the nucleus without a helper virus. In many cases, viroid infection results in symptoms of stunting, epinasty, and vein clearing. In our study of the molecular basis of the response of tomato cv. Rutgers to infection by Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), we have identified a specific protein kinase gene, pkv, that is transcriptionally activated in plants infected with either the intermediate or severe strain of PSTVd, at a lower level in plants inoculated with a mild strain, and not detectable in mock-inoculated plants. A full-length copy of the gene encoding the 55-kDa PKV (protein kinase viroid)-induced protein has been isolated and sequence analysis revealed significant homologies to cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. Although the sequence motifs in the catalytic domain suggest that it is a serine/threonine protein kinase, the recombinant PKV protein autophosphorylates in vitro on serine and tyrosine residues, suggesting that it is a putative member of the class of dual-specificity protein kinases. PMID:10975647

  18. Arabidopsis scaffold protein RACK1A modulates rare sugar D-allose regulated gibberellin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fennell, Herman; Olawin, Abdulquadri; Mizanur, Rahman M; Izumori, Ken; Chen, Jin-Gui; Ullah, Hemayet

    2012-01-01

    As energy sources and structural components, sugars are the central regulators of plant growth and development. In addition to the abundant natural sugars in plants, more than 50 different kinds of rare sugars exist in nature, several of which show distinct roles in plant growth and development. Recently, one of the rare sugars, D-allose, an epimer of D-glucose at C3, is found to suppress plant hormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in rice. Scaffold protein RACK1A in the model plant Arabidopsis ...

  19. Expression and detection of the FMDV VP1 transgene and expressed structural protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu; Lv, Jianliang; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhongwang

    2011-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of developing a new type of plantderived foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) oral vaccine, the plant seed-specific expression vector p7SBin438/VP1 carrying the VP1 gene of the FMDV strain O/China/99 was constructed and transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101. This strain was used for transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana via the floral-dip method. The kanamycin-resistant transgenic plants were selected, and the VP1 gene and protein expressions were...

  20. A bioinformatics approach to investigate the function of non specific lipid transfer proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Jayachandra Pandiyan, Muneeswaran

    2010-01-01

    Plant non specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) enhance in vitro transfer of phospholipids between membranes. Our analysis exploited the large amount of Arabidopsis transcriptome data in public databases to learn more about the function of nsLTPs. The analysis revealed that some nsLTPs are expressed only in roots, some are seed specific, and others are specific for tissues above ground whereas certain nsLTPs show a more general expression pattern. Only few nsLTPs showed a strong up or dow...

  1. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    and adhesion turnover. Focal adhesions, or focal contacts, are widespread organelles at the cell-matrix interface. They arise as a result of receptor interactions with matrix ligands, together with clustering. Recent analysis shows that focal adhesions contain a very large number of protein components......Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration...... in their intracellular compartment. Among these are tyrosine kinases, which have received a great deal of attention, whereas the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C has received much less. Here the status of protein kinase C in focal adhesions and cell migration is reviewed, together with discussion of its roles...

  2. Involvement of protein kinases on the upregulation of endothelin receptors in rat basilar and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamali, Roya; Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    were determined with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cellular localization and protein level of ET(B) receptors were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The PKC and ERK1/2 inhibitors attenuated the contraction induced by S6c in the basilar arteries more than in the mesenteric arteries....... Immunohistochemistry revealed that the ET(B) receptor upregulation occured in the smooth-muscle cells and that it had the same pattern as in the quantitative PCR. Our results show that the PKC, ERK1/2, and JNK are more important for the upregulation of contractile ET(B) receptors in cerebral arteries compared...... of protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK], protein kinase C [PKC], and extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK1/2]) in ET(B) receptor upregulation after organ culture. Rat basilar and mesenteric arteries were incubated for 24 hrs in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with or without the PKC...

  3. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a cytosolic protein required for sorbitol metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, María Francisca; Ampuero, Diego; Mandujano, Patricio; Parada, Roberto; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Gallart, Marta; Altabella, Teresa; Cabrera, Ricardo; Stange, Claudia; Handford, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Sorbitol is converted to fructose in Rosaceae species by SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), especially in sink organs. SDH has also been found in non-Rosaceae species and here we show that the protein encoded by At5g51970 in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. possesses the molecular characteristics of an SDH. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged version and anti-SDH antisera, we determined that SDH is cytosolically localized, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. We also show that SDH is widely expressed, and that SDH protein accumulates in both source and sink organs. In the presence of NAD+, recombinant SDH exhibited greatest oxidative activity with sorbitol, ribitol and xylitol as substrates; other sugar alcohols were oxidized to a lesser extent. Under standard growth conditions, three independent sdh- mutants developed as wild-type. Nevertheless, all three exhibited reduced dry weight and primary root length compared to wild-type when grown in the presence of sorbitol. Additionally, under short-day conditions, the mutants were more resistant to dehydration stress, as shown by a reduced loss of leaf water content when watering was withheld, and a greater survival rate on re-watering. This evidence suggests that limitations in the metabolism of sugar alcohols alter the growth of Arabidopsis and its response to drought.

  4. Arabidopsis VIRE2 INTERACTING PROTEIN2 is required for Agrobacterium T-DNA integration in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ajith; Krichevsky, Alexander; Schornack, Sebastian; Lahaye, Thomas; Tzfira, Tzvi; Tang, Yuhong; Citovsky, Vitaly; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2007-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation is an efficient tool for genetic engineering of plants. VirE2 is a single-stranded DNA binding Agrobacterium protein that is transported into the plant cell and presumably protects the T-DNA from degradation. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we identified Arabidopsis thaliana VIRE2-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (VIP2) with a NOT domain that is conserved in both plants and animals. Furthermore, we provide evidence supporting VIP2 interaction with VIP1, a basic domain/leucine zipper motif-containing protein required for nuclear import and integration of T-DNA. Virus-induced gene silencing of VIP2 in Nicotiana benthamiana and characterization of the Arabidopsis vip2 mutant (At vip2) demonstrate that VIP2 is required for Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation but not for transient transformation. Assays based upon a promoter-trap vector and quantification of T-DNA integration further confirmed VIP2 involvement in T-DNA integration. Interestingly, VIP2 transcripts were induced to a greater extent over prolonged periods after infection with a T-DNA transfer-competent Agrobacterium strain compared with the transfer-deficient Agrobacterium strain. Transcriptome analyses of At vip2 suggest that VIP2 is likely a transcriptional regulator, and the recalcitrancy to transformation in At vip2 is probably due to the combination of muted gene expression response upon Agrobacterium infection and repression of histone genes resulting in decreased T-DNA integration events. PMID:17496122

  5. A VAMP-associated protein, PVA31 is involved in leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Mie; Nakai, Yusuke; Arima, Keita; Nishiyama, Sayo; Hirano, Tomoko; Sato, Masa H

    2015-01-01

    VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs) are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Here, we report a functional analysis of one of the VAPs, PVA31, and demonstrate its novel function on leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. The expression of PVA31 is highly induced in senescence leaves, and localizes to the plasma membrane as well as the ARA7-positive endosomes. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrates that PVA31 is interacted with the plasma membrane localized-VAMP proteins, VAMP721/722/724 but not with the endosome-localized VAMPs, VAMP711 and VAMP727, indicating that PVA31 is associated with VAMP721/722/724 on the plasma membrane. Strong constitutive expression of PVA31 under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter induces the typical symptom of leaf senescence earlier than WT in normal growth and an artificially induced senescence conditions. In addition, the marker genes for the SA-mediated signaling pathways, PR-1, is promptly expressed with elicitor application. These data indicate that PVA31-overexpressing plants exhibit the early senescence phenotype in their leaves, and suggest that PVA31 is involved in the SA-mediated programmed cell death process during leaf senescence and PR-protein secretion during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis.

  6. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  7. Allele-specific virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a type III effector via the Arabidopsis ZAR1 resistance protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Lewis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant resistance (R proteins provide a robust surveillance system to defend against potential pathogens. Despite their importance in plant innate immunity, relatively few of the approximately 170 R proteins in Arabidopsis have well-characterized resistance specificity. In order to identify the R protein responsible for recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector (T3SE HopZ1a, we assembled an Arabidopsis R gene T-DNA Insertion Collection (ARTIC from publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana insertion lines and screened it for plants lacking HopZ1a-induced immunity. This reverse genetic screen revealed that the Arabidopsis R protein HOPZ-activated resistance 1 (ZAR1; At3g50950 is required for recognition of HopZ1a in Arabidopsis. ZAR1 belongs to the coiled-coil (CC class of nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR containing R proteins; however, the ZAR1 CC domain phylogenetically clusters in a clade distinct from other related Arabidopsis R proteins. ZAR1-mediated immunity is independent of several genes required by other R protein signaling pathways, including NDR1 and RAR1, suggesting that ZAR1 possesses distinct signaling requirements. The closely-related T3SE protein, HopZ1b, is still recognized by zar1 Arabidopsis plants indicating that Arabidopsis has evolved at least two independent R proteins to recognize the HopZ T3SE family. Also, in Arabidopsis zar1 plants HopZ1a promotes P. syringae growth indicative of an ancestral virulence function for this T3SE prior to the evolution of recognition by the host resistance protein ZAR1. Our results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis resistance protein ZAR1 confers allele-specific recognition and virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE protein HopZ1a.

  8. The carboxy terminus of p53 mimics the polylysine effect of protein kinase CK2-catalyzed MDM2 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Götz, C; Wagner, P;

    1997-01-01

    The oncogene product MDM2 can be phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2 in vitro 0.5-1 mol of phosphate were incorporated per mol MDM2 protein. The catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 (alpha-subunit) catalyzed the incorporation of twice as much phosphate into the MDM2 protein as it was obtained...

  9. The role of Protein Kinase Cη in T cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R.J. Gascoigne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase Cη (PKCη is a member of the novel PKC subfamily, which also includes δ, ε, and θ isoforms. Compared to the other novel PKCs, the function of PKCη in the immune system is largely unknown. Several studies have started to reveal the role of PKCη, particularly in T cells. PKCη is highly expressed in T cells, and is upregulated during thymocyte positive selection. Interestingly, like the θ isoform, PKCη is also recruited to the immunological synapse that is formed between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. However, unlike PKCθ, which becomes concentrated to the central region of the synapse, PKCη remains in a diffuse pattern over the whole area of the synapse, suggesting distinctive roles of these two isoforms in signal transduction. Although PKCη is dispensable for thymocyte development, further analysis of PKCη− or PKCθ−deficient and double knockout mice revealed the redundancy of these two isoforms in thymocyte development. In contrast, PKCη rather than PKCθ, plays an important role for T cell homeostatic proliferation, which requires recognition of self-antigen. Another piece of evidence demonstrating that PKCη and PKCθ have isoform specific as well as redundant roles come from the analysis of CD4 to CD8 T cell ratios in the periphery of these knockout mice. Deficiency in PKCη or PKCθ had opposing effects as PKCη knockout mice had a higher ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells compared to that of wild-type mice, whereas PKCθ-deficient mice had a lower ratio. Biochemical studies showed that calcium flux and NFκB translocation is impaired in PKCη-deficient T cells upon TCR crosslinking stimulation, a character shared with PKCθ-deficient T cells. However, unlike the case with PKCθ, the mechanistic study of PKCη is at early stage and the signaling pathways involving PKCη, at least in T cells, are essentially unknown. In this review, we will cover the topics mentioned above as well as provide some

  10. PIN2 turnover in Arabidopsis root epidermal cells explored by the photoconvertible protein Dendra2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Jásik

    Full Text Available The steady state level of integral membrane proteins is dependent on a strictly controlled delivery and removal. Here we show that Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein, is a suitable tool to study protein turnover in plants. We characterized the fluorescence properties of Dendra2 expressed either as a free protein or as a tag in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and optimized photoconversion settings to study protein turnover. Dendra2 was fused to the PIN2 protein, an auxin transporter in the root tip, and by time-lapse imaging and assessment of red and green signal intensities in the membrane after photoconversion we quantified directly and simultaneously the rate of PIN2 delivery of the newly synthesized protein into the plasma membrane as well as the disappearance of the protein from the plasma membrane due to degradation. Additionally we have verified several factors which are expected to affect PIN2 protein turnover and therefore potentially regulate root growth.

  11. Neuron Membrane Trafficking and Protein Kinases Involved in Autism and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kitagishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1 are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT. AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Emerging Roles of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    or has focused on specific physiological situations and tissues. The present PhD thesis has addressed the role of AMPK in regulation of: 1) substrate utilisation during and in recovery from exercise, 2) adipose tissue metabolism during weight loss, and 3) autophagy in skeletal muscle during exercise...... is an upstream kinase phosphorylating Unc51 like kinase 1 (ULK1) at Ser555, but this interaction per se seems not to be sufficient to change the autophagosome content. It cannot be excluded whether the AMPK-ULK1 association is important and necessary for regulation of autophagy and autophagosome biogenesis...

  13. Signal transduction protein array analysis links LRRK2 to Ste20 kinases and PKC zeta that modulate neuronal plasticity.

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    Susanne Zach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dominant mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, however, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Several in vitro studies have shown that the most frequent mutation, LRRK2(G2019S, increases kinase activity and impairs neuronal survival. LRRK2 has been linked to the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family and the receptor-interacting protein kinases based on sequence similarity within the kinase domain and in vitro substrate phosphorylation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify the kinase signaling pathways wherein LRRK2 may be active. By incubation of protein microarrays containing 260 signal transduction proteins we detected four arrayed Ste20 serine/threonine kinase family members (TAOK3, STK3, STK24, STK25 as novel LRRK2 substrates and LRRK2 interacting proteins, respectively. Moreover, we found that protein kinase C (PKC zeta binds and phosphorylates LRRK2 both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ste20 kinases and PKC zeta contribute to neuronal Tau phosphorylation, neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity under physiological conditions. Our data suggest that these kinases may also be involved in synaptic dysfunction and neurite fragmentation in transgenic mice and in human PD patients carrying toxic gain-of-function LRRK2 mutations.

  14. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

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    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  15. Receptor-like kinase SOBIR1/EVR interacts with receptor-like proteins in plant immunity against fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrand, Thomas W H; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Zhang, Zhao; Smit, Patrick; Cordewener, Jan H G; America, Antoine H P; America, Antione H P; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M E; Tameling, Wladimir I L; Robatzek, Silke; Thomma, Bart P H J; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2013-06-11

    The plant immune system is activated by microbial patterns that are detected as nonself molecules. Such patterns are recognized by immune receptors that are cytoplasmic or localized at the plasma membrane. Cell surface receptors are represented by receptor-like kinases (RLKs) that frequently contain extracellular leucine-rich repeats and an intracellular kinase domain for activation of downstream signaling, as well as receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that lack this signaling domain. It is therefore hypothesized that RLKs are required for RLPs to activate downstream signaling. The RLPs Cf-4 and Ve1 of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mediate resistance to the fungal pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Verticillium dahliae, respectively. Despite their importance, the mechanism by which these immune receptors mediate downstream signaling upon recognition of their matching ligand, Avr4 and Ave1, remained enigmatic. Here we show that the tomato ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana RLK Suppressor Of BIR1-1/Evershed (SOBIR1/EVR) and its close homolog S. lycopersicum (Sl)SOBIR1-like interact in planta with both Cf-4 and Ve1 and are required for the Cf-4- and Ve1-mediated hypersensitive response and immunity. Tomato SOBIR1/EVR interacts with most of the tested RLPs, but not with the RLKs FLS2, SERK1, SERK3a, BAK1, and CLV1. SOBIR1/EVR is required for stability of the Cf-4 and Ve1 receptors, supporting our observation that these RLPs are present in a complex with SOBIR1/EVR in planta. We show that SOBIR1/EVR is essential for RLP-mediated immunity and propose that the protein functions as a regulatory RLK of this type of cell-surface receptors.

  16. Overexpression of AtBMI1C, a polycomb group protein gene, accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis.

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    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Polycomb group protein (PcG-mediated gene silencing is emerging as an essential developmental regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic organisms. PcGs inactivate or maintain the silenced state of their target chromatin by forming complexes, including Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1 and 2 (PRC2. Three PRC2 complexes have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis; of these, the EMF and VRN complexes suppress flowering by catalyzing the trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 of FLOWER LOCUS T (FT and FLOWER LOCUS C (FLC. However, little is known about the role of PRC1 in regulating the floral transition, although AtRING1A, AtRING1B, AtBMI1A, and AtBMI1B are believed to regulate shoot apical meristem and embryonic development as components of PRC1. Moreover, among the five RING finger PcGs in the Arabidopsis genome, four have been characterized. Here, we report that the fifth, AtBMI1C, is a novel, ubiquitously expressed nuclear PcG protein and part of PRC1, which is evolutionarily conserved with Psc and BMI1. Overexpression of AtBMI1C caused increased H2A monoubiquitination and flowering defects in Arabidopsis. Both the suppression of FLC and activation of FT were observed in AtBMI1C-overexpressing lines, resulting in early flowering. No change in the H3K27me3 level in FLC chromatin was detected in an AtBMI1C-overexpressing line. Our results suggest that AtBMI1C participates in flowering time control by regulating the expression of FLC; moreover, the repression of FLC by AtBMI1C is not due to the activity of PRC2. Instead, it is likely the result of PRC1 activity, into which AtBMI1C is integrated.

  17. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köpper, Frederik; Bierwirth, Cathrin; Schön, Margarete;

    2013-01-01

    knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation......DNA damage can obstruct replication forks, resulting in replicative stress. By siRNA screening, we identified kinases involved in the accumulation of phosphohistone 2AX (γH2AX) upon UV irradiation-induced replication stress. Surprisingly, the strongest reduction of phosphohistone 2AX followed....... Moreover, MK2 activity was required for damage response, accumulation of ssDNA, and decreased survival when cells were treated with the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine or when the checkpoint kinase Chk1 was antagonized. By using DNA fiber assays, we found that MK2 inhibition or knockdown rescued DNA...

  18. WNK1: analysis of protein kinase structure, downstream targets, and potential roles in hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-e XU; Byung-Hoon LEE; Xiaoshan MIN; Lisa LENERTZ; Charles J HEISE; Steve STIPPEC; Elizabeth J GOLDSMITH; Melanie H. COBB

    2005-01-01

    The WNK kinases are a recently discovered family of serine-threonine kinases that have been shown to play an essential role in the regulation of electrolyte homeostasis. Intronic deletions in the WNK1 gene result in its overexpression and lead to pseudohypoaldosteronism type Ⅱ, a disease with salt-sensitive hypertension and hyperkalemia. This review focuses on the recent evidence elucidating the structure of the kinase domain of WNK1 and functions of these kinases in normal and disease physiology. Their functions have implications for understanding the biochemical mechanism that could lead to the retention or insertion of proteins in the plasma membrane. The WNK kinases may be able to influence ion homeostasis through its effects on synaptotagmin function.

  19. The mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxin S15 is essential for iron-sulfur protein maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseler, Anna; Aller, Isabel; Wagner, Stephan; Nietzel, Thomas; Przybyla-Toscano, Jonathan; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Berndt, Carsten; Rouhier, Nicolas; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.

    2015-01-01

    The iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) is an ancient and essential cofactor of many proteins involved in electron transfer and metabolic reactions. In Arabidopsis, three pathways exist for the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins in the cytosol, plastids, and mitochondria. We functionally characterized the role of mitochondrial glutaredoxin S15 (GRXS15) in biogenesis of ISC containing aconitase through a combination of genetic, physiological, and biochemical approaches. Two Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants were identified as null mutants with early embryonic lethal phenotypes that could be rescued by GRXS15. Furthermore, we showed that recombinant GRXS15 is able to coordinate and transfer an ISC and that this coordination depends on reduced glutathione (GSH). We found the Arabidopsis GRXS15 able to complement growth defects based on disturbed ISC protein assembly of a yeast Δgrx5 mutant. Modeling of GRXS15 onto the crystal structures of related nonplant proteins highlighted amino acid residues that after mutation diminished GSH and subsequently ISC coordination, as well as the ability to rescue the yeast mutant. When used for plant complementation, one of these mutant variants, GRXS15K83/A, led to severe developmental delay and a pronounced decrease in aconitase activity by approximately 65%. These results indicate that mitochondrial GRXS15 is an essential protein in Arabidopsis, required for full activity of iron-sulfur proteins. PMID:26483494

  20. AtGRIP protein locates to the secretory vesicles of trans Golgi-network in Arabidopsis root cap cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; ZHANG Wei; ZHAO Lei; LI Yan

    2008-01-01

    GRIP domain proteins, locating to the trans-Golgi network, are thought to play an essential role in Golgi apparatus trafficking in yeast and animal cells. In the present study, AtGRIP cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR from RNA isolated from Arabidopsis seedling. The GST fusion protein of AtGRIP was affinity-purified and its rabbit polyclonal antibody was obtained. Immuno-blotting with the purified anti-AtGRIP polyclonal antibody demonstrated that the molecular mass of AtGRIP protein is about 92 kD, and its expression is not tissue-specific in Arabidopsis. Immunoflourescent labeling and confocal microscopy revealed that the AtGRIP protein was co-localized with Golgi stacks in Arabidop-sis root cells. Immuno-gold labeling and electron microscopy observation showed that AtGRIP protein was mainly located to the membrane of the secretory vesicles of trans-Golgi network in Arabidopsis root cap cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the localization of GRIP domain proteins be-tween plants and animal cells are conserved. These results also suggest that the AtGRIP may be in-volved in regulating the formation or sorting of Golgi-associated vesicles in plant cells.

  1. Redundant role of protein kinase C delta and epsilon during mouse embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carracedo

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon are mediators of important cellular events, such as cell proliferation, migration or apoptosis. The formation of blood vessels, i.e., vasculo- and angiogenesis, is a process where these isoforms have also been shown to participate. However, mice deficient in either Protein Kinase C delta or epsilon are viable and therefore their individual contribution to the formation of the vasculature appeared so far dispensable. In this study, we show that double null mutation of Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon causes embryonic lethality at approximately E9.5. At this stage, whole mount staining of the endothelial marker CD31 in double null embryos revealed defective blood vessel formation. Moreover, culture of double deficient mouse allantois showed impaired endothelial cell organization, and analyses of double deficient embryo sections showed dilated vessels, decreased endothelial-specific adherent junctions, and decreased contact of endothelial cells with mural cells. Protein kinase C delta and epsilon also appeared essential for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, since α-smooth muscle actin, a classical marker for vascular smooth muscle cells, was almost undetectable in double deficient embryonic aorta at E9.5. Subsequent qPCR analyses showed decreased VE-cadherin, Vegfr2, Cd31, Cdh2, Ets1, and Fli-1, among other angiogenesis related transcripts in double deficient embryos. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time an in vivo redundant role between members of the novel Protein Kinase C subfamily that allows for mutual compensation during mouse embryonic development, with vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as an obvious common function of these two Protein Kinase Cs. Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon might therefore be useful targets for inhibiting vasculo- and/or angiogenesis.

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent apoptosis in norcan-tharidin-treated A375-S2 cells is proceeded by the activation of protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Wei-wei; WANG Min-wei; Tashiro Shin-ichi; Onodera Satoshi; Ikejima Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Background We have reported that norcantharidin (NCTD) induces human melanoma A375-S2 cell apoptosis and that the activation of caspase and the mitochondrial pathway are involved in the apoptotic process. This study aimed at investigating the roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) in A375-S2 cell apoptosis induced by NCTD. Methods We assessed the effects of NCTD on cell growth inhibition using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dipheyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, DNA fragmentation (DNA agarose gel electrophoresis), and MAPK protein levels (Western blot analysis) in A375-S2 cells. Photomicroscopic data were also collected.Results The NCTD inhibitory effect on A375-S2 cells was partially reversed by MAPK and PKC inhibitors. The expression of phosphorylated JNK and p38 also increased after the treatment with NCTD, and inhibitors of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 (SP600125 and SB203580, respectively) had significant inhibitory effects on the upregulation of phosphorylated JNK and p38 expression. Simultaneously, the PKC inhibitor staurosporine blocked the upregulation of phosphorylated JNK and phosphorylated p38, but had little effect on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression. Conclusion These results suggest that the activation of JNK and p38 MAPK promotes the process of NCTD-induced A375-S2 cell apoptosis and that PKC plays an important regulation role in the activation of MAPKs.

  3. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  4. Variation in the Subcellular Localization and Protein Folding Activity among Arabidopsis thaliana Homologs of Protein Disulfide Isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen Y. L. Yuen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs catalyze the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds to properly fold nascent polypeptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Classical animal and yeast PDIs possess two catalytic thioredoxin-like domains (a, a′ and two non-catalytic domains (b, b′, in the order a-b-b′-a′. The model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes 12 PDI-like proteins, six of which possess the classical PDI domain arrangement (AtPDI1 through AtPDI6. Three additional AtPDIs (AtPDI9, AtPDI10, AtPDI11 possess two thioredoxin domains, but without intervening b-b′ domains. C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP fusions to each of the nine dual-thioredoxin PDI homologs localized predominantly to the ER lumen when transiently expressed in protoplasts. Additionally, expression of AtPDI9:GFP-KDEL and AtPDI10: GFP-KDDL was associated with the formation of ER bodies. AtPDI9, AtPDI10, and AtPDI11 mediated the oxidative folding of alkaline phosphatase when heterologously expressed in the Escherichia coli protein folding mutant, dsbA−. However, only three classical AtPDIs (AtPDI2, AtPDI5, AtPDI6 functionally complemented dsbA−. Interestingly, chemical inducers of the ER unfolded protein response were previously shown to upregulate most of the AtPDIs that complemented dsbA−. The results indicate that Arabidopsis PDIs differ in their localization and protein folding activities to fulfill distinct molecular functions in the ER.

  5. Identification of Novel Components of the Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Amir; Henríquez-Valencia, Carlos; Gómez-Páez, Marcela; Medina, Joaquín; Orellana, Ariel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Zouhar, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Unfavorable environmental and developmental conditions may cause disturbances in protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are recognized and counteracted by components of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling pathways. The early cellular responses include transcriptional changes to increase the folding and processing capacity of the ER. In this study, we systematically screened a collection of inducible transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a library of transcription factors for resistance toward UPR-inducing chemicals. We identified 23 candidate genes that may function as novel regulators of the UPR and of which only three genes (bZIP10, TBF1, and NF-YB3) were previously associated with the UPR. The putative role of identified candidate genes in the UPR signaling is supported by favorable expression patterns in both developmental and stress transcriptional analyses. We demonstrated that WRKY75 is a genuine regulator of the ER-stress cellular responses as its expression was found to be directly responding to ER stress-inducing chemicals. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing WRKY75 showed resistance toward salt stress, connecting abiotic and ER-stress responses. PMID:27242851

  6. Control of root meristem size by DA1-RELATED PROTEIN2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuancheng; Ma, Wenying; Chen, Liangliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shengjun; Zhao, Hongtao; Zhao, Yankun; Jin, Weihuan; Li, Na; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Xia; Tong, Yiping; Li, Yunhai

    2013-03-01

    The control of organ growth by coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is a fundamental developmental process. In plants, postembryonic root growth is sustained by the root meristem. For maintenance of root meristem size, the rate of cell differentiation must equal the rate of cell division. Cytokinin and auxin interact to affect the cell proliferation and differentiation balance and thus control root meristem size. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine root meristem size still remain largely unknown. Here, we report that da1-related protein2 (dar2) mutants produce small root meristems due to decreased cell division and early cell differentiation in the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). dar2 mutants also exhibit reduced stem cell niche activity in the root meristem. DAR2 encodes a Lin-11, Isl-1, and Mec-3 domain-containing protein and shows an expression peak in the border between the transition zone and the elongation zone. Genetic analyses show that DAR2 functions downstream of cytokinin and SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 to maintain normal auxin distribution by influencing auxin transport. Further results indicate that DAR2 acts through the PLETHORA pathway to influence root stem cell niche activity and therefore control root meristem size. Collectively, our findings identify the role of DAR2 in root meristem size control and provide a novel link between several key regulators influencing root meristem size.

  7. A rapid chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells for protein analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Tetsuo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein extraction is a frequent procedure in biological research. For preparation of plant cell extracts, plant materials usually have to be ground and homogenized to physically break the robust cell wall, but this step is laborious and time-consuming when a large number of samples are handled at once. Results We developed a chemical method for lysing Arabidopsis cells without grinding. In this method, plants are boiled for just 10 minutes in a solution containing a Ca2+ chelator and detergent. Cell extracts prepared by this method were suitable for SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis. This method was also applicable to genomic DNA extraction for PCR analysis. Our method was applied to many other plant species, and worked well for some of them. Conclusions Our method is rapid and economical, and allows many samples to be prepared simultaneously for protein analysis. Our method is useful not only for Arabidopsis research but also research on certain other species.

  8. Molecular basis for activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boguth, Cassandra A.; Singh, Puja; Huang, Chih-chin; Tesmer, John J.G. (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) selectively recognize and are allosterically regulated by activated GPCRs, but the molecular basis for this interaction is not understood. Herein, we report crystal structures of GRK6 in which regions known to be critical for receptor phosphorylation have coalesced to stabilize the kinase domain in a closed state and to form a likely receptor docking site. The crux of this docking site is an extended N-terminal helix that bridges the large and small lobes of the kinase domain and lies adjacent to a basic surface of the protein proposed to bind anionic phospholipids. Mutation of exposed, hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal helix selectively inhibits receptor, but not peptide phosphorylation, suggesting that these residues interact directly with GPCRs. Our structural and biochemical results thus provide an explanation for how receptor recognition, phospholipid binding, and kinase activation are intimately coupled in GRKs.

  9. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8

  10. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  11. Computational Simulations to Predict Creatine Kinase-Associated Factors: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies of Brain and Muscle Types of Creatine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jiang Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2 is related to several skin diseases such as psoriasis and dermatomyositis. CK is important in skin energy homeostasis because it catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group from MgATP to creatine. In this study, we predicted CK binding proteins via the use of bioinformatic tools such as protein-protein interaction (PPI mappings and suggest the putative hub proteins for CK interactions. We obtained 123 proteins for brain type CK and 85 proteins for muscle type CK in the interaction networks. Among them, several hub proteins such as NFKB1, FHL2, MYOC, and ASB9 were predicted. Determination of the binding factors of CK can further promote our understanding of the roles of CK in physiological conditions.

  12. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  13. Emerging roles of protein kinase CK2 in abscisic acid (ABA signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro eVilela

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA regulates many aspects of plant growth and development as well as responses to multiple stresses. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitination have pivotal roles in the regulation of ABA signaling. In addition to the positive regulator sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2, the relevance of the role of other protein kinases, such as CK2, has been recently highlighted. We have recently established that CK2 phosphorylates the maize ortholog of open stomata 1 OST1, ZmOST1, suggesting a role of CK2 phosphorylation in the control of ZmOST1 protein degradation (Vilela et al., 2015. CK2 is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in multiple developmental and stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes recent advances that taken together suggest a prominent role of protein kinase CK2 in ABA signaling and related processes.

  14. GPCR kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (GIT1) regulates osteoclast function and bone mass

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, Prashanthi; Yin, Guoyong; Smolock, Elaine M.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Yan, Chen; Berk, Bradford C.

    2010-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 interacting protein-1 (GIT1) is a scaffold protein expressed in various cell types including neurons, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. The GIT1 knockout (KO) mouse has a pulmonary phenotype due to impaired endothelial function. Because GIT1 is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src kinase, we anticipated that GIT1 KO should have a bone phenotype similar to Src KO. Microcomputed tomography of the long bones revealed that GIT1 KO mice have a 2.3-f...

  15. Identification of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase in bovine and human follicular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L S; Kadam, A L; Koide, S S

    1993-11-01

    A soluble protein kinase (PK) was purified from bovine and human follicular fluids (FF) by ultrafiltration through a PM-10 membrane followed by chromatography on heparin-agarose, DEAE-cellulose and cellulose phosphate columns. The PK phosphorylated calf thymus histones and endogenous FF proteins having estimated Mrs of 40, 62, 128 and 180 KD. cAMP enhanced PK activity; whereas protein kinase A (PKA)-inhibitor peptide blocked the activity. The present findings suggest that the enzyme is a cAMP-dependent PK. PMID:8118427

  16. Identification of a protein kinase activity in purified foot- and-mouth disease virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Grubman, M J; Baxt, B; La Torre, J L; Bachrach, H L

    1981-01-01

    Purified preparations of foot-and-mouth disease virus types A, O, and C contain a protein kinase activity which can transfer the gamma phosphate of [32P]ATP to virion structural proteins VP2 and VP3 and exogenous acceptor proteins. Utilizing protamine sulfate as an acceptor, the kinase activity can be demonstrated in disrupted virus but not in intact virus. The enzyme is heat labile with optimal activity at pH 7 or greater. Serine residues of protamine sulfate were identified as the amino aci...

  17. The endogenous inhibitor of protein kinase-C in the rat ovary is a protein phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, K M; Waller, M S; Miller, T L; Miller, C J; Johnson, M J; Persing, J S

    1993-09-01

    Calcium- and lipid-dependent protein kinase (PKC) activity in the ovary of the pseudopregnant rat is masked by an endogenous inhibitor of PKC. These studies were undertaken to examine the mechanism of action of the endogenous inhibitor of PKC in the rat ovary. The addition of the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin-A (0.09 nM), microcystin-LR (6.4 nM), and okadaic acid (10 nM) resulted in the loss of PKC inhibitory activity and an increase in basal PKC activity in rat ovarian cytosol. In phosphatase assays, significant dephosphorylation of histone-III-S or myelin basic protein that had been phosphorylated by PKC occurred within 4 min after the addition of ovarian cytosol from the pseudopregnant rat. This dephosphorylation was prevented from the pseudopregnant rat. This dephosphorylation was prevented by the addition of calyculin-A (0.73 nM) and was removed by fractionation of ovarian cytosol on diethylaminoethyl cellulose. No inhibition of PKC activity was observed when the PKC-specific peptides AcMBP-(4-14) and [Ser25]PKC-(19-31) were used as the substrate for phosphorylation. In addition, rat ovarian cytosol did not exhibit phosphatase activity when the peptide AcMBP-(4-14) was used as the substrate. Addition of ovarian cytosol resulted in dephosphorylation of phosphorylase-alpha phosphorylated by phosphorylase kinase, but not dephosphorylation of histone-II-A or histone-VIII-S phosphorylated by PKA. The data suggest that the endogenous inhibitor of PKC in the rat ovary is a protein phosphatase. PMID:7689949

  18. Defective insulin response of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase in insulin-resistant humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Y; Nyomba, B L; Bogardus, C; Mott, D M

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthase activity in human muscle correlates with insulin-mediated glucose disposal and is reduced in insulin-resistant subjects. Inhibition of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase) is considered as a possible mechanism of insulin action for glycogen synthase activation. In this study, we investigated the time course of insulin action on human muscle A-kinase activity during a 2-h insulin infusion in 13 insulin-sensitive (group S) and 7 insulin-resista...

  19. Activation of tracheal smooth muscle contraction: synergism between Ca2+ and activators of protein kinase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S.; Rasmussen, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of divalent ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin), Ca2+ channel agonist (BAY K 8644), and protein kinase C (C-kinase) activators [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), mezerein] on bovine tracheal smooth muscle contraction were investigated. A23187 (5 microM) and ionomycin (0.5 microM) produced a prompt but transient contraction. C-kinase activators either produced no effect--e.g., PMA at 200 nM--or produced a rise in tension that was slow in onset but then gradually increased--e.g.,...

  20. SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on days...

  1. Integrin-like proteins are localized to plasma membrane fractions, not plastids, in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatzell, L. J.; Edelmann, R. E.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral membrane proteins that function in signal transduction in animal systems. These proteins are conserved in vertebrates, invertebrates, and fungi. Evidence from previous research suggests that integrin-like proteins may be present in plants as well, and that these proteins may function in signal transduction during gravitropism. In past studies, researchers have used monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to localize beta 1 integrin-like proteins in plants. However, there is a disparity between data collected from these studies, especially since molecular weights obtained from these investigations range from 55-120 kDa for integrin-like proteins. To date, a complete investigation which employs all three basic immunolabeling procedures, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunogold labeling, in addition to extensive fractionation and exhaustive controls, has been lacking. In this paper, we demonstrate that use of a polyclonal antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of avian beta 1-integrin can produce potential artifacts in immunolocalization studies. However, these problems can be eliminated through use of starchless mutants or proper specimen preparation prior to electrophoresis. We also show that this antibody, when applied within the described parameters and with careful controls, identifies a large (100 kDa) integrin-like protein that is localized to plasma membrane fractions in Arabidopsis.

  2. Characterisation of biological effects of a novel protein kinase D inhibitor in endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Ian M; Bagherzadeh, Azadeh; Charles, Mark; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Chris; Boakes, Alexandra; Kelland, Lloyd; Ian C. Zachary

    2010-01-01

    VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) plays an essential role in angiogenesis during development and in disease largely mediated by signalling events initiated by binding of VEGF to its receptor, VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2)/KDR (kinase insert domain receptor). Recent studies indicate that VEGF activates PKD (protein kinase D) in endothelial cells to regulate a variety of cellular functions, including signalling events, proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. To better understand the role ...

  3. Protein kinase D2 induces invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases

    OpenAIRE

    Wille, Christoph; Köhler, Conny; Armacki, Milena; Jamali, Arsia; Gössele, Ulrike; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cell invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis are major challenges for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are involved in controlling tumor cell motility, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In particular PKD2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is lowered. We report that both kinases control pancreatic cancer cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific manner. PKD2 enhances invasion in three-dime...

  4. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase in regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Dziewulska; Paweł Dobrzyń; Agnieszka Dobrzyń

    2010-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic enzyme that is activated in response to increasing AMP level. Regulation of AMPK activity in skeletal muscle is coordinated by contraction and phosphorylation by upstream kinases and a growing number of hormones and cytokines. Once activated, AMPK turns on catabolic, ATP-generating pathways, and turns off ATP-consuming metabolic processes such as biosynthesis and proliferation. Activation of AMPK promotes gl...

  5. Fructose-bisphosphatase as a substrate of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Hosey, M M; Marcus, F

    1981-01-01

    We have tested rat liver fructose-bisphosphatase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate 1-phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.11) and three other gluconeogenic fructose-bisphosphatases as substrates for the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. In contrast to the rat liver enzyme, homogeneous preparations of mouse liver, rabbit liver, and pig kidney fructose-bisphosphatase could not be phosphorylated by the kinase. Comparative sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the ...

  6. Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Han, B.; Poppinga, W J; Schmidt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Compartmentalization of cellular signaling is a common strategy used to ensure the accuracy and efficiency of cellular responses. Compartmentalizati...

  7. Scaffold Proteins Regulating Extracellular Regulated Kinase Function in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yan; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway is a central downstream signaling pathway that is activated in cardiac muscle cells during mechanical and agonist-mediated hypertrophy. Studies in genetic mouse models deficient in ERK-associated MAPK components pathway have further reinforced a direct role for this pathway in stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and disease. However, more recent studies have highlighted that these signaling pathways...

  8. Pheromone-induced signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the sequential function of three protein kinases.

    OpenAIRE

    Z.Zhou; Gartner, A...; Cade, R.; Ammerer, G; Errede, B

    1993-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in pheromone-induced differentiation processes of haploid yeast cells. Among the components necessary for signal transduction are the STE7 and STE11 kinases and either one of the redundant FUS3 and KSS1 kinases. FUS3 and presumably KSS1 are phosphorylated and activated during pheromone induction by a STE7-dependent mechanism. Pheromone also induces the accumulation of STE7 in a hyperphosphorylated form. This modification of STE7 requires the STE...

  9. Role of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.

    2008-01-01

    5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is recognized as an important intracellular energy sensor, shutting down energy-consuming processes and turning on energy-generating processes. Discovery of target proteins of AMPK has dramatically increased in the past 10 years. Historically, AMPK was first...

  10. Feedback phosphorylation of an RGS protein by MAP kinase in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, T R; Zhang, Y; Pausch, M; Apanovitch, D; Aebersold, R; Dohlman, H G

    1999-12-17

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) are well known to accelerate G protein GTPase activity in vitro and to promote G protein desensitization in vivo. Less is known about how RGS proteins are themselves regulated. To address this question we purified the RGS in yeast, Sst2, and used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify post-translational modifications. This analysis revealed that Sst2 is phosphorylated at Ser-539 and that phosphorylation occurs in response to pheromone stimulation. Ser-539 lies within a consensus mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation site, Pro-X-Ser-Pro. Phosphorylation is blocked by mutations in the MAP kinase genes (FUS3, KSS1), as well as by mutations in components needed for MAP kinase activation (STE11, STE7, STE4, STE18). Phosphorylation is also blocked by replacing Ser-539 with Ala, Asp, or Glu (but not Thr). These point mutations do not alter pheromone sensitivity, as determined by growth arrest and reporter transcription assays. However, phosphorylation appears to slow the rate of Sst2 degradation. These findings indicate that the G protein-regulated MAP kinase in yeast can act as a feedback regulator of Sst2, itself a regulator of G protein signaling. PMID:10593933

  11. 拟南芥PKS5激酶磷酸化ABI5参与植物ABA响应%PKS5 Kinase is Involved in ABA Response through Phosphorylating ABI5 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菲佚; 焦成瑾; 陈荃; 王太术; 田春芳; 高雅梅

    2015-01-01

    植物激素脱落酸(abscisic acid, ABA)在植物生长、发育及环境胁迫中起着重要的作用。本研究发现拟南芥PKSes (SOS2-like protein kinases)蛋白激酶家族成员PKS5(SOS2-like protein kinase 5)参与植物ABA响应。PKS5功能获得性点突变体pks5-3与pks5-4表现出对ABA的敏感表型。在外源ABA处理下, pks5-3与pks5-4种子萌发率降低,幼苗生长矮小、黄化。体外磷酸化测试显示, PKS5特异磷酸化ABA响应元件ABI5(ABA-insensitive 5) N末端多肽(1~211 aa)。qRT-PCR分析表明pks5-3与pks5-4突变体中ABI5下游ABA响应基因RAB18(RESPONSIVE TO ABA18)与EM6(LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT 6)表达均发生改变。这些研究结果表明,拟南芥PKS5通过磷酸化ABI5的N末端参与植物ABA响应过程。%The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an essential role in plant growth and development as well as abiotic stress responses. In this study, we found that PKS5 (SOS2-like protein kinase 5), a family mem-ber of PKSes (SOS2-like protein kinases), involved in ABA response inArabidopsis.PKS5 gain-of-function point mutantspks5-3andpks5-4 exhibited hypersensitive to ABA in the phenotypic test. Additionally, seed ger-minations ofpks5-3andpks5-4 decreased and seedlings of them showed stunted growth and leaf chlorotic symptoms under exogenous ABA treatment.In vitro phosphorylation assay indicated that PKS5 speciifcally phosphorylates the ABA-responsive component ABI5 (ABA-insensitive 5) N terminus fragment range from 1 to 211 amino acids. Moreover, the relative expression levels ofRAB18 andEM6, which are the downstream ABA-responsive genes of ABI5, signiifcantly altered inpks5-3andpks5-4 mutants compared with the wild-type plants by quantitative real-time PCR using gene-speciifc primers. Taken together, the results of this study revealed that PKS5 involves in ABA response via phosphorylating the N-terminus of ABI5 in Arabidopsis.

  12. Novel nuclear protein ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 is expressed in vascular and mesocarp cells in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2008-07-01

    Pod shattering is an agronomical trait that is a result of the coordinated action of cell differentiation and separation. In Arabidopsis, pod shattering is controlled by a complex genetic network in which ALCATRAZ (ALC), a member of the basic helix-loop-helix family, is critical for cell separation during fruit dehiscence. Herein, we report the identification of ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 (ACI1) via the yeast two-hybrid screen. ACI1 encodes a nuclear protein with a lysine-rich domain and a C-terminal serine-rich domain. ACI1 is mainly expressed in the vascular system throughout the plant and mesocarp of the valve in siliques. Our data showed that ACI1 interacts strongly with the N-terminal portion of ALC in yeast cells and in plant cells in the nucleus as demonstrated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Both ACI1 and ALC share an overlapping expression pattern, suggesting that they likely function together in planta. However, no detectable phenotype was found in plants with reduced ACI1 expression by RNA interference technology, suggesting that ACI1 may be redundant. Taken together, these data indicate that ALC may interact with ACI1 and its homologs to control cell separation during fruit dehiscence in Arabidopsis. PMID:18713402

  13. Novel Nuclear Protein ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 is Expressed in Vascular and Mesocarp Cells in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wang; Dong-Qiao Shi; Jie Liu; Wei-Cai Yang

    2008-01-01

    Pod shattering is an agronomical trait that is a result of the coordinated action of cell differentiation and separation. In Arabidopsis, pod shattering is controlled by a complex genetic network in which ALCATRAZ (ALC), a member of the basic helix-loop-helix family, is critical for cell separation during fruit dehiscence. Herein, we report the identification of ALC-INTERACTiNG PROTEIN1 (ACI1) via the yeast two-hybrid screen. ACI1 encodes a nuclear protein with a lysine-rich domain and a C-terminal serine-rich domain. ACI1 is mainly expressed in the vascular system throughout the plant and mesocarp of the valve in siliques. Our data showed that ACI1 interacts strongly with the N-terminal portion of ALC in yeast cells and in plant cells in the nucleus as demonstrated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Both ACl1 and ALC share an overlapping expression pattern, suggesting that they likely function together in planta. However, no detectable phenotype was found in plants with reduced ACI1 expression by RNA interference technology, suggesting that ACI1 may be redundant. Taken together, these data indicate that ALC may interact with ACll and its homologs to control cell separation during fruit dehiscence in Arabidopsis.

  14. Analysis on sliding helices and strands in protein structural comparisons: A case study with protein kinases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Gowri; K Anamika; S Gore; N Srinivasan

    2007-08-01

    Protein structural alignments are generally considered as ‘golden standard’ for the alignment at the level of amino acid residues. In this study we have compared the quality of pairwise and multiple structural alignments of about 5900 homologous proteins from 718 families of known 3-D structures. We observe shifts in the alignment of regular secondary structural elements (helices and strands) between pairwise and multiple structural alignments. The differences between pairwise and multiple structural alignments within helical and -strand regions often correspond to 4 and 2 residue positions respectively. Such shifts correspond approximately to “one turn” of these regular secondary structures. We have performed manual analysis explicitly on the family of protein kinases. We note shifts of one or two turns in helix-helix alignments obtained using pairwise and multiple structural alignments. Investigations on the quality of the equivalent helix-helix, strand-strand pairs in terms of their residue side-chain accessibilities have been made. Our results indicate that the quality of the pairwise alignments is comparable to that of the multiple structural alignments and, in fact, is often better. We propose that pairwise alignment of protein structures should also be used in formulation of methods for structure prediction and evolutionary analysis.

  15. The Arabidopsis PLAT domain protein1 is critically involved in abiotic stress tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; van der Graaff, Eric; Albacete, Alfonso;

    2014-01-01

    of functional genetic and physiological approaches. PLAT1 overexpression conferred increased abiotic stress tolerance, including cold, drought and salt stress, while loss-of-function resulted in opposite effects on abiotic stress tolerance. Strikingly, PLAT1 promoted growth under non-stressed conditions...... and belong to the PLAT-plant-stress protein family are ubiquitously present in monocot and dicots. However, the function of PLAT-plant-stress proteins is still poorly understood. Therefore, we have assessed the function of the uncharacterised Arabidopsis PLAT-plant-stress family members through a combination....... Abiotic stress treatments induced PLAT1 expression and caused expansion of its expression domain. The ABF/ABRE transcription factors, which are positive mediators of abscisic acid signalling, activate PLAT1 promoter activity in transactivation assays and directly bind to the ABRE elements located...

  16. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Giorgio; Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A; Donald, Naomi A; Páldi, Katalin; Hannah, Matthew A; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes.

  17. Repertoire of Protein Kinases Encoded in the Genome of Takifugu rubripes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rakshambikai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Takifugu rubripes is teleost fish widely used in comparative genomics to understand the human system better due to its similarities both in number of genes and structure of genes. In this work we survey the fugu genome, and, using sensitive computational approaches, we identify the repertoire of putative protein kinases and classify them into groups and subfamilies. The fugu genome encodes 519 protein kinase-like sequences and this number of putative protein kinases is comparable closely to that of human. However, in spite of its similarities to human kinases at the group level, there are differences at the subfamily level as noted in the case of KIS and DYRK subfamilies which contribute to differences which are specific to the adaptation of the organism. Also, certain unique domain combination of galectin domain and YkA domain suggests alternate mechanisms for immune response and binding to lipoproteins. Lastly, an overall similarity with the MAPK pathway of humans suggests its importance to understand signaling mechanisms in humans. Overall the fugu serves as a good model organism to understand roles of human kinases as far as kinases such as LRRK and IRAK and their associated pathways are concerned.

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by anthraquinone-related compounds. A structural insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moliner, Erika; Moro, Stefano; Sarno, Stefania; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Battistutta, Roberto

    2003-01-17

    Protein kinases play key roles in signal transduction and therefore are among the most attractive targets for drug design. The pharmacological aptitude of protein kinase inhibitors is highlighted by the observation that various diseases with special reference to cancer are because of the abnormal expression/activity of individual kinases. The resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the target kinase in complex with inhibitors is often the starting point for the rational design of this kind of drugs, some of which are already in advanced clinical trial or even in clinical practice. Here we present and discuss three new crystal structures of ATP site-directed inhibitors in complex with "casein kinase-2" (CK2), a constitutively active protein kinase implicated in a variety of cellular functions and misfunctions. With the help of theoretical calculations, we disclose some key features underlying the inhibitory efficiency of anthraquinone derivatives, outlining three different binding modes into the active site. In particular, we show that a nitro group in a hydroxyanthraquinone scaffold decreases the inhibitory constants K(i) because of electron-withdrawing and resonance effects that enhance the polarization of hydroxylic substituents in paraposition. PMID:12419810

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in brain is dependent on method of sacrifice and tissue preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Scharf, Matthew T.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Naidoo, Nirinjini; O'Callaghan, James P.; Pack, Allan I.

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is activated when the catalytic α subunit is phosphorylated on Thr172 and therefore, phosphorylation of the α subunit is used as a measure of activation. However, measurement of α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo can be technically challenging. To determine the most accurate method for measuring α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in the mouse brain, we compared different methods of sacrifice and tissue preparation. We found that fre...

  20. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Jong Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1, the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1, which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs–deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.