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Sample records for arabidopsis lyrata ii

  1. Chloroplast genomes of Arabidopsis halleri ssp. gemmifera and Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea: Structures and comparative analysis.

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    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Yun, Byung-Wook; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-08-08

    We investigated the complete chloroplast (cp) genomes of non-model Arabidopsis halleri ssp. gemmifera and Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea using Illumina paired-end sequencing to understand their genetic organization and structure. Detailed bioinformatics analysis revealed genome sizes of both subspecies ranging between 154.4~154.5 kbp, with a large single-copy region (84,197~84,158 bp), a small single-copy region (17,738~17,813 bp) and pair of inverted repeats (IRa/IRb; 26,264~26,259 bp). Both cp genomes encode 130 genes, including 85 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes and 37 transfer RNA genes. Whole cp genome comparison of A. halleri ssp. gemmifera and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, along with ten other Arabidopsis species, showed an overall high degree of sequence similarity, with divergence among some intergenic spacers. The location and distribution of repeat sequences were determined, and sequence divergences of shared genes were calculated among related species. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of the entire genomic data set and 70 shared genes between both cp genomes confirmed the previous phylogeny and generated phylogenetic trees with the same topologies. The sister species of A. halleri ssp. gemmifera is A. umezawana, whereas the closest relative of A. lyrata spp. petraea is A. arenicola.

  2. Transmission ratio distortion in Arabidopsis lyrata: effects of population divergence and the S-locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppälä, J.; Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2008-01-01

    We investigated transmission ratio distortion within an Icelandic population of Arabidopsis lyrata using 16 molecular markers unlinked to the S-locus. Transmission ratio distortion was found more often than expected by chance at the gametic level, but not at the genotypic or zygotic level. The ga...

  3. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

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    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  4. Role of seed germination in adaptation and reproductive isolation in Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Hämälä, Tuomas; Mattila, Tiina M; Leinonen, Päivi H; Kuittinen, Helmi; Savolainen, Outi

    2017-07-01

    Seed germination is an important developmental and life history stage. Yet, the evolutionary impact of germination has mainly been studied in the context of dormancy, or for its role in reproductive isolation between species. Here, we aim to examine multiple consequences of genetic divergence on germination traits between two Arabidopsis lyrata subspecies: ssp. petraea (Eurasia) and ssp. lyrata (North America). Postdormancy germination time, a potentially adaptive trait, showed differentiation between the populations, and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping revealed that the trait variation is mainly controlled by two antagonistic loci. These QTL areas contain several candidate genes with known function in postdormancy germination in A. thaliana. The sequence variation of three genes was consistent with differential selection, and they also included fixed nonsynonymous substitutions with potential to account for the phenotypic differentiation. We further show that the divergence between the subspecies has led to a slight but significant reduction in hybrid germination proportions, indicating incipient reproductive isolation. Comparison of reciprocal F 1 and F 2 progenies suggests that Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities likely act through uniparentally inherited factors. Examination of genomewide transmission ratio distortion further revealed that cytonuclear interactions cause substantial pregermination inviability in the hybrids. These results confirm that seed germination has adaptive potential beyond the dormancy stage and that hybrid seed inviability can be one of the first reproductive barriers to arise during divergence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

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    Yu Song

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  6. Temperature-stress resistance and tolerance along a latitudinal cline in North American Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Guillaume Wos

    Full Text Available The study of latitudinal gradients can yield important insights into adaptation to temperature stress. Two strategies are available: resistance by limiting damage, or tolerance by reducing the fitness consequences of damage. Here we studied latitudinal variation in resistance and tolerance to frost and heat and tested the prediction of a trade-off between the two strategies and their costliness. We raised plants of replicate maternal seed families from eight populations of North American Arabidopsis lyrata collected along a latitudinal gradient in climate chambers and exposed them repeatedly to either frost or heat stress, while a set of control plants grew under standard conditions. When control plants reached maximum rosette size, leaf samples were exposed to frost and heat stress, and electrolyte leakage (PEL was measured and treated as an estimate of resistance. Difference in maximum rosette size between stressed and control plants was used as an estimate of tolerance. Northern populations were more frost resistant, and less heat resistant and less heat tolerant, but-unexpectedly-they were also less frost tolerant. Negative genetic correlations between resistance and tolerance to the same and different thermal stress were generally not significant, indicating only weak trade-offs. However, tolerance to frost was consistently accompanied by small size under control conditions, which may explain the non-adaptive latitudinal pattern for frost tolerance. Our results suggest that adaptation to frost and heat is not constrained by trade-offs between them. But the cost of frost tolerance in terms of plant size reduction may be important for the limits of species distributions and climate niches.

  7. Cytoplasmic male sterility contributes to hybrid incompatibility between subspecies of Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Aalto, Esa A; Koelewijn, Hans-Peter; Savolainen, Outi

    2013-10-03

    In crosses between evolutionarily diverged populations, genomic incompatibilities may result in sterile hybrids, indicating evolution of reproductive isolation. In several plant families, crosses within a population can also lead to male sterile progeny because of conflict between the maternally and biparentally inherited genomes. We examined hybrid fertility between subspecies of the perennial outcrossing self-incompatible Lyrate rockcress (Arabidopsis lyrata) in large reciprocal F2 progenies and three generations of backcrosses. In one of the reciprocal F2 progenies, almost one-fourth of the plants were male-sterile. Correspondingly, almost one-half of the plants in one of the four reciprocal backcross progenies expressed male sterility. In an additional four independent F2 and backcross families, three segregated male sterility. The observed asymmetrical hybrid incompatibility is attributable to male sterility factors in one cytoplasm, for which the other population lacks effective fertility restorers. Genotyping of 96 molecular markers and quantitative trait locus mapping revealed that only 60% of the plants having the male sterile cytoplasm and lacking the corresponding restorers were phenotypically male-sterile. Genotyping data showed that there is only one restorer locus, which mapped to a 600-kb interval at the top of chromosome 2 in a region containing a cluster of pentatricopeptide repeat genes. Male fertility showed no trade-off with seed production. We discuss the role of cytoplasm and genomic conflict in incipient speciation and conclude that cytoplasmic male sterility-lowering hybrid fitness is a transient effect with limited potential to form permanent reproductive barriers between diverged populations of hermaphrodite self-incompatible species.

  8. Zinc distribution and speciation in Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidops is lyrata progenies presenting various zinc accumulation capacities

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    Sarret, Geraldine; Willems, Glenda; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Frerot, Helene; Pairis, Sebastien; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Manceau, Alain; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-04-08

    - The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the chemical form and localization of zinc (Zn) in plant leaves and their Zn accumulationcapacity. - An interspecific cross between Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petrea segregating for Zn accumulation was used. Zinc (Zn) speciation and Zn distribution in the leaves of the parent plants and of selected F1 and F2 progenies were investigated by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques and chemical analyses. - A correlation was observed between the proportion of Zn being in octahedral coordination complexed to organic acids and free in solution (Zn?OAs + Znaq) and Zn content in the leaves. This pool varied between 40percent and 80percent of total leaf Zn depending on the plant studied. Elemental mapping of the leaves revealed different Zn partitioning between the veins and the leaf tissue. The vein : tissue fluorescence ratio was negatively correlated with Zn accumulation. - The higher proportion of Zn?OAs + Znaq and the depletion of the veins in the stronger accumulators are attributed to a higher xylem unloading and vacuolar sequestration in the leaf cells. Elemental distributions in the trichomes were also investigated, and results support the role of carboxyl and⁄ or hydroxyl groups as major Zn ligands in these cells.

  9. Reproductive Cycle of Hard Clam, Meretrix lyrata Sowerby, 1851 (Bivalvia: Veneridae) from Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Hamli, Hadi; Idris, Mohd Hanafi; Rajaee, Amy Halimah; Kamal, Abu Hena Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    A study of the reproductive cycle of the hard clam, Meretrix lyrata, was documented based on histological observation and Gonad Index (GI). Samples were taken from estuarine waters of the Buntal River in Sarawak, Malaysia. The gonad of M. lyrata started to develop in September 2013. Gametogenesis continued to develop until the maturation and spawning stage from February to April 2014. The GI pattern for a one-year cycle showed a significant correlation with chlorophyll a. The corresponding GI with chlorophyll a suggested that the development of the reproductive cycle of M. lyrata required a high amount of food to increase gametogenesis.

  10. Exogenous selection rather than cytonuclear incompatibilities shapes asymmetrical fitness of reciprocal Arabidopsis hybrids.

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    Muir, Graham; Ruiz-Duarte, Paola; Hohmann, Nora; Mable, Barbara K; Novikova, Polina; Schmickl, Roswitha; Guggisberg, Alessia; Koch, Marcus A

    2015-04-01

    Reciprocal crosses between species often display an asymmetry in the fitness of F1 hybrids. This pattern, referred to as isolation asymmetry or Darwin's corollary to Haldane's rule, is a general feature of reproductive isolation in plants, yet factors determining its magnitude and direction remain unclear. We evaluated reciprocal species crosses between two naturally hybridizing diploid species of Arabidopsis to assess the degree of isolation asymmetry at different postmating life stages. We found that pollen from Arabidopsis arenosa will usually fertilize ovules from Arabidopsis lyrata; the reverse receptivity being less complete. Maternal A. lyrata parents set more F1 hybrid seed, but germinate at lower frequency, reversing the asymmetry. As predicted by theory, A. lyrata (the maternal parent with lower seed viability in crosses) exhibited accelerated chloroplast evolution, indicating that cytonuclear incompatibilities may play a role in reproductive isolation. However, this direction of asymmetrical reproductive isolation is not replicated in natural suture zones, where delayed hybrid breakdown of fertility at later developmental stages, or later-acting selection against A. arenosa maternal hybrids (unrelated to hybrid fertility, e.g., substrate adaptation) may be responsible for an excess of A. lyrata maternal hybrids. Exogenous selection rather than cytonuclear incompatibilities thus shapes the asymmetrical postmating isolation in nature.

  11. Interspecific and interploidal gene flow in Central European Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae

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    Jørgensen Marte H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of polyploidisation on gene flow between natural populations are little known. Central European diploid and tetraploid populations of Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata are here used to study interspecific and interploidal gene flow, using a combination of nuclear and plastid markers. Results Ploidal levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. Network analyses clearly separated diploids according to species. Tetraploids and diploids were highly intermingled within species, and some tetraploids intermingled with the other species, as well. Isolation with migration analyses suggested interspecific introgression from tetraploid A. arenosa to tetraploid A. lyrata and vice versa, and some interploidal gene flow, which was unidirectional from diploid to tetraploid in A. arenosa and bidirectional in A. lyrata. Conclusions Interspecific genetic isolation at diploid level combined with introgression at tetraploid level indicates that polyploidy may buffer against negative consequences of interspecific hybridisation. The role of introgression in polyploid systems may, however, differ between plant species, and even within the small genus Arabidopsis, we find very different evolutionary fates when it comes to introgression.

  12. Linkage disequilibrium between incompatibility locus region genes in the plant Arabidopsis lyrata

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    Hagenblad, Jenny; Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    to the incompatibility locus, one being a pseudogene. We determined the phase of multiple haplotypes in families of plants from Icelandic and other populations. Different Aly8 sequence types are associated with different SRK alleles, while haplotypes with the same SRK sequences tend to have the same Aly8 sequence...... the evolutionary history of these populations. Overall, the results suggest that recombination rarely occurs in the interval between the S-loci and Aly8 and that linkage to the S-loci can probably account for the observed high Aly8 diversity....

  13. Condensin II Alleviates DNA Damage and Is Essential for Tolerance of Boron Overload Stress in Arabidopsis[W

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    Sakamoto, Takuya; Inui, Yayoi Tsujimoto; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Mastui, Minami; Umeda, Masaaki; Fukui, Kiichi; Fujiwara, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Although excess boron (B) is known to negatively affect plant growth, its molecular mechanism of toxicity is unknown. We previously isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, hypersensitive to excess B (heb1-1 and heb2-1). In this study, we found that HEB1 and HEB2 encode the CAP-G2 and CAP-H2 subunits, respectively, of the condensin II protein complex, which functions in the maintenance of chromosome structure. Growth of Arabidopsis seedlings in medium containing excess B induced expression of condensin II subunit genes. Simultaneous treatment with zeocin, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and aphidicolin, which blocks DNA replication, mimicked the effect of excess B on root growth in the heb mutants. Both excess B and the heb mutations upregulated DSBs and DSB-inducible gene transcription, suggesting that DSBs are a cause of B toxicity and that condensin II reduces the incidence of DSBs. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant atr-2, which is sensitive to replication-blocking reagents, was also sensitive to excess B. Taken together, these data suggest that the B toxicity mechanism in plants involves DSBs and possibly replication blocks and that plant condensin II plays a role in DNA damage repair or in protecting the genome from certain genotoxic stressors, particularly excess B. PMID:21917552

  14. Photosystem II function and dynamics in three widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

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    Lan Yin

    Full Text Available Columbia-0 (Col-0, Wassilewskija-4 (Ws-4, and Landsberg erecta-0 (Ler-0 are used as background lines for many public Arabidopsis mutant collections, and for investigation in laboratory conditions of plant processes, including photosynthesis and response to high-intensity light (HL. The photosystem II (PSII complex is sensitive to HL and requires repair to sustain its function. PSII repair is a multistep process controlled by numerous factors, including protein phosphorylation and thylakoid membrane stacking. Here we have characterized the function and dynamics of PSII complex under growth-light and HL conditions. Ws-4 displayed 30% more thylakoid lipids per chlorophyll and 40% less chlorophyll per carotenoid than Col-0 and Ler-0. There were no large differences in thylakoid stacking, photoprotection and relative levels of photosynthetic complexes among the three accessions. An increased efficiency of PSII closure was found in Ws-4 following illumination with saturation flashes or continuous light. Phosphorylation of the PSII D1/D2 proteins was reduced by 50% in Ws-4 as compared to Col-0 and Ler-0. An increase in abundance of the responsible STN8 kinase in response to HL treatment was found in all three accessions, but Ws-4 displayed 50% lower levels than Col-0 and Ler-0. Despite this, the HL treatment caused in Ws-4 the lagest extent of PSII inactivation, disassembly, D1 protein degradation, and the largest decrease in the size of stacked thylakoids. The dilution of chlorophyll-protein complexes with additional lipids and carotenoids in Ws-4 may represent a mechanism to facilitate lateral protein traffic in the membrane, thus compensating for the lack of a full complement of STN8 kinase. Nevertheless, additional PSII damage occurs in Ws-4, which exceeds the D1 protein synthesis capacity, thus leading to enhanced photoinhibition. Our findings are valuable for selection of appropriate background line for PSII characterization in Arabidopsis

  15. Variations in constitutive and inducible UV-B tolerance; dissecting photosystem II protection in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

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    Jansen, Marcel A K; Martret, Bénedicte Le; Koornneef, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    The rise in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) (280-315 nm) radiation levels, that is a consequence of stratospheric ozone layer depletion, has triggered extensive research on the effects of UV-B on plants. Plants raised under natural sunlight conditions are generally well protected from the potentially harmful effects of UV-B radiation. However, it is mostly unknown to which extent UV protection is constitutive and/or induced. In this study, we have analysed the role of constitutive and inducible protection responses in avoiding UV-B damage to photosystem II of photosynthesis. We have assayed the UV susceptibility of photosystem II in 224 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from across the Northern hemisphere, and found a continuum of constitutive UV-protection levels, with some accessions being UV sensitive and others UV tolerant. Statistical analysis showed only very weak associations between constitutive UV tolerance and the geographic origin of accessions. Instead, most of the variance in constitutive UV-B protection of photosynthesis is present at the level of local Arabidopsis populations originating in the same geographic and climatic area. The variance in constitutive UV protection is, however, small compared to the amplitude of environmentally induced changes in UV protection. Thus, our data emphasise the importance of inducible responses for the protection of photosystem II against UV-B. Remarkably, the conditions that induce UV-protective responses vary; accessions from lower latitudes were found to switch-on UV defences more readily than those of higher latitudes. Such altered regulation of induction may comprise a suitable adaptation response when levels of a stressor are fluctuating in the short term, but predictable over longer periods.

  16. Functional and composition differences between mitochondrial complex II in Arabidopsis and rice are correlated with the complex genetic history of the enzyme.

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    Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Narsai, Reena; Eubel, Holger; Whelan, James; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-02-01

    Complex II plays a central role in mitochondrial metabolism as a component of both the electron transport chain and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, the composition and function of the plant enzyme has been elusive and differs from the well-characterised enzymes in mammals and bacteria. Herewith, we demonstrate that mitochondrial Complex II from Arabidopsis and rice differ significantly in several aspects: (1) Stability-Rice complex II in contrast to Arabidopsis is not stable when resolved by native electrophoresis and activity staining. (2) Composition-Arabidopsis complex II contains 8 subunits, only 7 of which have homologs in the rice genome. SDH 1 and 2 subunits display high levels of amino acid identity between two species, while the remainder of the subunits are not well conserved at a sequence level, indicating significant divergence. (3) Gene expression-the pairs of orthologous SDH1 and SDH2 subunits were universally expressed in both Arabidopsis and rice. The very divergent genes for SDH3 and SDH4 were co-expressed in both species, consistent with their functional co-ordination to form the membrane anchor. The plant-specific SDH5, 6 and 7 subunits with unknown functions appeared to be differentially expressed in both species. (4) Biochemical regulation -succinate-dependent O(2) consumption and SDH activity of isolated Arabidopsis mitochondria were substantially stimulated by ATP, but a much more minor effect of ATP was observed for the rice enzyme. The ATP activation of succinate-dependent reduction of DCPIP in frozen-thawed and digitonin-solubilised mitochondrial samples, and with or without the uncoupler CCCP, indicate that the differential ATP effect on SDH is not via the protonmotive force but likely due to an allosteric effect on the plant SDH enzyme itself, in contrast to the enzyme in other organisms.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana RGXT1 and RGXT2 encode Golgi-localized (1,3)-alpha-D-xylosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of pectic rhamnogalacturonan-II

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    Madsen, Jack Egelund; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik

    2006-01-01

    in rhamnogalacturonan-II, a complex polysaccharide essential to vascular plants, and is conserved across higher plant families. Rhamnogalacturonan-II isolated from both RGXT1 and RGXT2 T-DNA insertional mutants functioned as specific acceptor molecules in the xylosyltransferase assay. Expression of RGXT1- and RGXT2......Two homologous plant-specific Arabidopsis thaliana genes, RGXT1 and RGXT2, belong to a new family of glycosyltransferases (CAZy GT-family-77) and encode cell wall (1,3)-alpha-d-xylosyltransferases. The deduced amino acid sequences contain single transmembrane domains near the N terminus, indicative...

  18. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription1

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    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  19. Photosystem II repair and plant immunity: Lessons learned from Arabidopsis mutant lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

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    Sari eJärvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425. Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light.

  20. Unraveling uranium induced oxidative stress related responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Part II: responses in the leaves and general conclusions.

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    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Cuypers, Ann; Horemans, Nele; Remans, Tony; Opdenakker, Kelly; Smeets, Karen; Bello, Daniel Martinez; Havaux, Michel; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2011-06-01

    The cellular redox balance seems an important modulator under heavy metal stress. While for other heavy metals these processes are well studied, oxidative stress related responses are also known to be triggered under uranium stress but information remains limited. This study aimed to further unravel the mechanisms by which plants respond to uranium stress. Seventeen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown on a modified Hoagland solution under controlled conditions, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM uranium for 1, 3 and 7 days. While in Part I of this study oxidative stress related responses in the roots were discussed, this second Part II discusses oxidative stress related responses in the leaves and general conclusions drawn from the results of the roots and the leaves will be presented. As several responses were already visible following 1 day exposure, when uranium concentrations in the leaves were negligible, a root-to-shoot signaling system was suggested in which plastids could be important sensing sites. While lipid peroxidation, based on the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive compounds, was observed after exposure to 100 μM uranium, affecting membrane structure and function, a transient concentration dependent response pattern was visible for lipoxygenase initiated lipid peroxidation. This transient character of uranium stress responses in leaves was emphasized by results of lipoxygenase (LOX2) and antioxidative enzyme transcript levels, enzyme capacities and glutathione concentrations both in time as with concentration. The ascorbate redox balance seemed an important modulator of uranium stress responses in the leaves as in addition to the previous transient responses, the total ascorbate concentration and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate redox balance increased in a concentration and time dependent manner. This could represent either a slow transient response or a stable increase with regard to plant acclimation to uranium stress. Copyright

  1. The MTP1 promoters from Arabidopsis halleri reveal cis-regulating elements for the evolution of metal tolerance.

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    Fasani, Elisa; DalCorso, Giovanni; Varotto, Claudio; Li, Mingai; Visioli, Giovanna; Mattarozzi, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2017-06-01

    In the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri, the zinc (Zn) vacuolar transporter MTP1 is a key component of hypertolerance. Because protein sequences and functions are highly conserved between A. halleri and Arabidopsis thaliana, Zn tolerance in A. halleri may reflect the constitutively higher MTP1 expression compared with A. thaliana, based on copy number expansion and different cis regulation. Three MTP1 promoters were characterized in A. halleri ecotype I16. The comparison with the A. thaliana MTP1 promoter revealed different expression profiles correlated with specific cis-acting regulatory elements. The MTP1 5' untranslated region, highly conserved among A. thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata and A. halleri, contains a dimer of MYB-binding motifs in the A. halleri promoters absent in the A. thaliana and A. lyrata sequences. Site-directed mutagenesis of these motifs revealed their role for expression in trichomes. A. thaliana mtp1 transgenic lines expressing AtMTP1 controlled by the native A. halleri promoter were more Zn-tolerant than lines carrying mutations on MYB-binding motifs. Differences in Zn tolerance were associated with different distribution of Zn among plant organs and in trichomes. The different cis-acting elements in the MTP1 promoters of A. halleri, particularly the MYB-binding sites, are probably involved in the evolution of Zn tolerance. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Unraveling uranium induced oxidative stress related responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Part II: responses in the leaves and general conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie, E-mail: nvanhoud@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Cuypers, Ann [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Horemans, Nele [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Remans, Tony; Opdenakker, Kelly; Smeets, Karen [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bello, Daniel Martinez [Hasselt University, Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Havaux, Michel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA)/Cadarache, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, Departement d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale et de Microbiologie, Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosynthese, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vangronsveld, Jaco [Hasselt University, Environmental Biology, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    The cellular redox balance seems an important modulator under heavy metal stress. While for other heavy metals these processes are well studied, oxidative stress related responses are also known to be triggered under uranium stress but information remains limited. This study aimed to further unravel the mechanisms by which plants respond to uranium stress. Seventeen-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, grown on a modified Hoagland solution under controlled conditions, were exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 {mu}M uranium for 1, 3 and 7 days. While in Part I of this study oxidative stress related responses in the roots were discussed, this second Part II discusses oxidative stress related responses in the leaves and general conclusions drawn from the results of the roots and the leaves will be presented. As several responses were already visible following 1 day exposure, when uranium concentrations in the leaves were negligible, a root-to-shoot signaling system was suggested in which plastids could be important sensing sites. While lipid peroxidation, based on the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive compounds, was observed after exposure to 100 {mu}M uranium, affecting membrane structure and function, a transient concentration dependent response pattern was visible for lipoxygenase initiated lipid peroxidation. This transient character of uranium stress responses in leaves was emphasized by results of lipoxygenase (LOX2) and antioxidative enzyme transcript levels, enzyme capacities and glutathione concentrations both in time as with concentration. The ascorbate redox balance seemed an important modulator of uranium stress responses in the leaves as in addition to the previous transient responses, the total ascorbate concentration and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate redox balance increased in a concentration and time dependent manner. This could represent either a slow transient response or a stable increase with regard to plant acclimation to uranium stress

  3. Application of HB17, an Arabidopsis class II homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, to regulate chloroplast number and photosynthetic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymus, Graham J; Cai, Suqin; Kohl, Elizabeth A; Holtan, Hans E; Marion, Colleen M; Tiwari, Shiv; Maszle, Don R; Lundgren, Marjorie R; Hong, Melissa C; Channa, Namitha; Loida, Paul; Thompson, Rebecca; Taylor, J Philip; Rice, Elena; Repetti, Peter P; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Reuber, T Lynne; Creelman, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Transcription factors are proposed as suitable targets for the control of traits such as yield or food quality in plants. This study reports the results of a functional genomics research effort that identified ATHB17, a transcription factor from the homeodomain-leucine zipper class II family, as a novel target for the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity. It was shown that ATHB17 is expressed natively in the root quiescent centre (QC) from Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings. Analysis of the functional composition of genes differentially expressed in the QC from a knockout mutant (athb17-1) compared with its wild-type sibling revealed the over-representation of genes involved in auxin stimulus, embryo development, axis polarity specification, and plastid-related processes. While no other phenotypes were observed in athb17-1 plants, overexpression of ATHB17 produced a number of phenotypes in Arabidopsis including enhanced chlorophyll content. Image analysis of isolated mesophyll cells of 35S::ATHB17 lines revealed an increase in the number of chloroplasts per unit cell size, which is probably due to an increase in the number of proplastids per meristematic cell. Leaf physiological measurements provided evidence of improved photosynthetic capacity in 35S::ATHB17 lines on a per unit leaf area basis. Estimates of the capacity for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-saturated and -limited photosynthesis were significantly higher in 35S::ATHB17 lines.

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK099152 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099152 J023070H02 At4g01900.1 P II nitrogen sensing protein (GLB I) identical to P II nitrogen... sensing protein GLB I (GI:7268574) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to nitrogen regulatory prot

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068407 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068407 J013149B08 At4g01900.1 P II nitrogen sensing protein (GLB I) identical to P II nitrogen... sensing protein GLB I (GI:7268574) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to nitrogen regulatory prot

  6. Identification, duplication, evolution and expression analyses of caleosins in Brassica plants and Arabidopsis subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Mingzhe; Wang, Lili; Li, Zhuowei; Taylor, David C; Li, Zhixi; Zhang, Meng

    2016-04-01

    Caleosins are a class of Ca(2+) binding proteins that appear to be ubiquitous in plants. Some of the main proteins embedded in the lipid monolayer of lipid droplets, caleosins, play critical roles in the degradation of storage lipids during germination and in lipid trafficking. Some of them have been shown to have histidine-dependent peroxygenase activity, which is believed to participate in stress responses in Arabidopsis. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, caleosins have been examined extensively. However, little is known on a genome-wide scale about these proteins in other members of the Brassicaceae. In this study, 51 caleosins in Brassica plants and Arabidopsis lyrata were investigated and analyzed in silico. Among them, 31 caleosins, including 7 in A. lyrata, 11 in Brassica oleracea and 13 in Brassica napus, are herein identified for the first time. Segmental duplication was the main form of gene expansion. Alignment, motif and phylogenetic analyses showed that Brassica caleosins belong to either the H-family or the L-family with different motif structures and physicochemical properties. Our findings strongly suggest that L-caleosins are evolved from H-caleosins. Predicted phosphorylation sites were differentially conserved in H-caleosin and L-caleosins, respectively. 'RY-repeat' elements and phytohormone-related cis-elements were identified in different caleosins, which suggest diverse physiological functions. Gene structure analysis indicated that most caleosins (38 out of 44) contained six exons and five introns and their intron phases were highly conserved. Structurally integrated caleosins, such as BrCLO3-3 and BrCLO4-2, showed high expression levels and may have important roles. Some caleosins, such as BrCLO2 and BoCLO8-2, lost motifs of the calcium binding domain, proline knot, potential phosphorylation sites and haem-binding sites. Combined with their low expression, it is suggested that these caleosins may have lost function.

  7. Evidence for a Role of Chloroplastic m-Type Thioredoxins in the Biogenesis of Photosystem II in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dongru; Da, Qingen; Wang, Peng; Shu, Shengying; Su, Jianbin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplastic m-type thioredoxins (TRX m) are essential redox regulators in the light regulation of photosynthetic metabolism. However, recent genetic studies have revealed novel functions for TRX m in meristem development, chloroplast morphology, cyclic electron flow, and tetrapyrrole synthesis. The focus of this study is on the putative role of TRX m1, TRX m2, and TRX m4 in the biogenesis of the photosynthetic apparatus in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To that end, we investigated the impact of single, double, and triple TRX m deficiency on chloroplast development and the accumulation of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, only inactivation of three TRX m genes led to pale-green leaves and specifically reduced stability of the photosystem II (PSII) complex, implying functional redundancy between three TRX m isoforms. In addition, plants silenced for three TRX m genes displayed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, which in turn interrupted the transcription of photosynthesis-related nuclear genes but not the expression of chloroplast-encoded PSII core proteins. To dissect the function of TRX m in PSII biogenesis, we showed that TRX m1, TRX m2, and TRX m4 interact physically with minor PSII assembly intermediates as well as with PSII core subunits D1, D2, and CP47. Furthermore, silencing three TRX m genes disrupted the redox status of intermolecular disulfide bonds in PSII core proteins, most notably resulting in elevated accumulation of oxidized CP47 oligomers. Taken together, our results suggest an important role for TRX m1, TRX m2, and TRX m4 proteins in the biogenesis of PSII, and they appear to assist the assembly of CP47 into PSII. PMID:24151299

  8. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-09-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella. Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  10. The structure, organization and radiation of Sadhu non-long terminal repeat retroelements in Arabidopsis species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangwala Sanjida H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sadhu elements are non-autonomous retroposons first recognized in Arabidopsis thaliana. There is a wide degree of divergence among different elements, suggesting that these sequences are ancient in origin. Here we report the results of several lines of investigation into the genomic organization and evolutionary history of this element family. Results We present a classification scheme for Sadhu elements in A. thaliana, describing derivative elements related to the full-length elements we reported previously. We characterized Sadhu5 elements in a set of A. thaliana strains in order to trace the history of radiation in this subfamily. Sequences surrounding the target sites of different Sadhu insertions are consistent with mobilization by LINE retroelements. Finally, we identified Sadhu elements grouping into distinct subfamilies in two related species, Arabidopsis arenosa and Arabidopsis lyrata. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the Sadhu retroelement family has undergone target primed reverse transcription-driven retrotransposition during the divergence of different A. thaliana strains. In addition, Sadhu elements can be found at moderate copy number in three distinct Arabidopsis species, indicating that the evolutionary history of these sequences can be traced back at least several millions of years.

  11. The fate of retrotransposed processed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkarim, Basma T M; Maranda, Vincent; Drouin, Guy

    2017-04-20

    Processed genes are functional genes that have arisen as a result of the retrotransposition of mRNA molecules. We found 6 genes that generated processed genes in the common ancestor of five Brassicaceae species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, Capsella rubella, Brassica rapa and Thellungiella parvula). These processed genes have therefore been kept for at least 30millionyears. Analyses of the Ka/Ks ratio of these genes, and of those having given rise to them, show that they evolve relatively slowly and suggest that the processed genes maintained the same function as that of their parental gene. There is a significant negative correlation between the number of ESTs and transcripts produced and the Ka/Ks ratios of the parental genes but not of the processed genes. This suggests that selection has not yet adapted the selective pressure the processed genes experience to their expression level. However, the A. thaliana processed genes tend to be expressed in the same tissues as that of their parental genes. Furthermore, most have a CAATT-box, a TATA-box and are located about 1kb from another protein-coding gene. Altogether, our results suggest that the processed genes found in the A. thaliana genome have been kept to produce more of the same product, and in the same tissues, as that encoded by their parental gene. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diuron treatment reveals the different roles of two cyclic electron transfer pathways in photosystem II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yujian; Chen, Si; Fan, Xiaoji; Song, Hao; Li, Xingxing; Xu, Jiahui; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-04-01

    Three ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, ecotype Columbia (Wild type, Wt) and two mutants (pgr5 and ndf4), were used to evaluate the effects of diuron on photosynthetic activity of A. thaliana. It was found that diuron adversely affected the fresh weight and chlorophyll content of the plants. Chlorophyll fluorescence studies determined that the pgr5 mutant was more sensitive to diuron than Wt and the ndf4 mutant. Gene expression analysis revealed different roles for the two cyclic electron transfer (CET) pathways, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) and proton gradient regulation (PGR5) pathways, in the plant after diuron treatment. For example, a gene in the NDH pathway, lhca5, was activated in the low dose (LD) group in the pgr5 mutant, but was down-regulated in the moderate dose (MD) group, along with two other NDH-related genes (ppl2 and ndhH). In the PGR5 pathway, the pgr5 gene was functional under conditions of increased stress (MD group), and was up-regulated to a greater extent in the ndf4 mutant than that in the Wt and pgr5 mutant. Our results suggest that the PGR5 pathway in plants is more important than the NDH pathway during resistance to environmental stress. Deficiencies in the PGR5 pathway could not be counteracted by the NDH pathway, but deficiencies in the NDH pathway could be overcome by stimulating PGR5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of recombinant nitrile-specifier proteins (NSPs) of Arabidopsis thaliana: dependency on Fe(II) ions and the effect of glucosinolate substrate and reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang Yi; Kissen, Ralph; Bones, Atle M

    2012-12-01

    Glucosinolates are plant secondary metabolites that are part of a plant defence system against pathogens and pests, the myrosinase-glucosinolate system, in which glucosinolates get activated by enzymic degradation through thioglucoside glucohydrolases called myrosinases. Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) and nitrile-specifier proteins (NSPs) divert myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of a given glucosinolate from the formation of isothiocyanate to that of epithionitrile and/or nitrile. As the biological activity of glucosinolate hydrolysis products varies considerably, a detailed characterization of these specifier proteins is of utmost importance to understand their biological role. Therefore, the Arabidopsis thaliana AtNSP1, AtNSP2 and AtNSP5 and a supposed ancestor protein AtNSP-like1 were expressed in Escherichia coli and the activity of the purified recombinant proteins was tested in vitro on three highly different glucosinolates and compared to that of purified AtESP. As previously reported, only AtESP showed epithiospecifier activity on 2-propenylglucosinolate. We further confirmed that purified AtNSP1, AtNSP2 and AtNSP5, but not the ancestor AtNSP-like1 protein, show nitrile-specifier activity on 2-propenylglucosinolate and benzylglucosinolate. We now show for the first time that in vitro AtNSP1, AtNSP2 and AtNSP5 are able to generate nitrile from indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. We also tested the effect of different Fe(II) ion concentrations on the nitrile-specifier activity of purified AtNSP1, AtNSP2 and AtNSP5 on 2-propenylglucosinolate and benzylglucosinolate. AtNSP-related nitrile production was highly dependent on the presence of Fe(II) ions in the reaction assay. In the absence of added Fe(II) ions nitriles were only detected when benzylglucosinolate was incubated with AtNSP1. While AtNSP1 also exhibited overall higher nitrile-specifier activity than AtNSP2 and AtNSP5 at a given Fe(II) ion concentration, the pattern of nitrile formation in relation to Fe(II

  14. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced.

  15. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  16. Subcellular localization of class II HDAs in Arabidopsis thaliana: nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDA15 is driven by light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malona V Alinsug

    Full Text Available Class II histone deacetylases in humans and other model organisms undergo nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. This unique functional regulatory mechanism has been well elucidated in eukaryotic organisms except in plant systems. In this study, we have paved the baseline evidence for the cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of Class II HDAs as well as their mRNA expression patterns. RT-PCR analysis on the different vegetative parts and developmental stages reveal that Class II HDAs are ubiquitously expressed in all tissues with minimal developmental specificity. Moreover, stable and transient expression assays using HDA-YFP/GFP fusion constructs indicate cytoplasmic localization of HDA5, HDA8, and HDA14 further suggesting their potential for nuclear transport and deacetylating organellar and cytoplasmic proteins. Organelle markers and stains confirm HDA14 to abound in the mitochondria and chloroplasts while HDA5 localizes in the ER. HDA15, on the other hand, shuttles in and out of the nucleus upon light exposure. In the absence of light, it is exported out of the nucleus where further re-exposition to light treatments signals its nuclear import. Unlike HDA5 which binds with 14-3-3 proteins, HDA15 fails to interact with these chaperones. Instead, HDA15 relies on its own nuclear localization and export signals to navigate its subcellular compartmentalization classifying it as a Class IIb HDA. Our study indicates that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is indeed a hallmark for all eukaryotic Class II histone deacetylases.

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase assembly factor 2 is needed for assembly and activity of mitochondrial complex II and for normal root elongation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria complex II (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) plays a central role in respiratory metabolism as a component of both the electron transport chain and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We report the identification of an SDH assembly factor by analysis of T-DNA insertions in At5g51040, a protein with unknown function that was identified by mass spectrometry analysis as a low abundance mitochondrial protein. This gene is co-expressed with a number of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, including SDH1-1, and has low partial sequence similarity to human SDHAF2, a protein required for flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) insertion into SDH. In contrast to observations of other SDH deficient lines in Arabidopsis, the sdhaf2 line did not affect photosynthetic rate or stomatal conductance, but instead showed inhibition of primary root elongation with early lateral root emergence, presumably due to the low SDH activity caused by the reduced abundance of SDHAF2. Both roots and leaves showed succinate accumulation but different responses in the abundance of other organic acids and amino acids assayed. Isolated mitochondria showed lowered SDH1 protein abundance, lowered maximal SDH activity and less protein-bound flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at the molecular mass of SDH1 in the gel separation. The short root phenotype and SDH function of sdhaf2 was fully complemented by transformation with SDHAF2. Application of the SDH inhibitor, malonate, phenocopied the sdhaf2 root architecture in WT. Whole root respiratory assays showed no difference between WT and sdhaf2, but micro-respirometry of the tips of roots clearly showed low oxygen consumption in sdhaf2 which could explain a metabolic deficit responsible for root tip growth. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Genome analysis methods: Arabidopsis lyrata [PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link and Genome analysis methods[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (http://genome.imim.es/software/geneid/) applying dicot and A. thaliana specific matrices 32,670 (v1.0) JGI; http://www.phytozome.net/alyrata v1.0 v1.0 10.1038/ng.807 21478890 ... ...8.3x Arachne 1,309 ... Fgenesh package of ab initio and homology-based gene predictors, EuGene12, and GeneID13

  19. An Arabidopsis introgression zone studied at high spatio-temporal resolution: interglacial and multiple genetic contact exemplified using whole nuclear and plastid genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Nora; Koch, Marcus A

    2017-10-23

    Gene flow between species, across ploidal levels, and even between evolutionary lineages is a common phenomenon in the genus Arabidopsis. However, apart from two genetically fully stabilized allotetraploid species that have been investigated in detail, the extent and temporal dynamics of hybridization are not well understood. An introgression zone, with tetraploid A. arenosa introgressing into A. lyrata subsp. petraea in the Eastern Austrian Forealps and subsequent expansion towards pannonical lowlands, was described previously based on morphological observations as well as molecular data using microsatellite and plastid DNA markers. Here we investigate the spatio-temporal context of this suture zone, making use of the potential of next-generation sequencing and whole-genome data. By utilizing a combination of nuclear and plastid genomic data, the extent, direction and temporal dynamics of gene flow are elucidated in detail and Late Pleistocene evolutionary processes are resolved. Analysis of nuclear genomic data significantly recognizes the clinal structure of the introgression zone, but also reveals that hybridization and introgression is more common and substantial than previously thought. Also tetraploid A. lyrata and A. arenosa subsp. borbasii from outside the previously defined suture zone show genomic signals of past introgression. A. lyrata is shown to serve usually as the maternal parent in these hybridizations, but one exception is identified from plastome-based phylogenetic reconstruction. Using plastid phylogenomics with secondary time calibration, the origin of A. lyrata and A. arenosa lineages is pre-dating the last three glaciation complexes (approx. 550,000 years ago). Hybridization and introgression followed during the last two glacial-interglacial periods (since approx. 300,000 years ago) with later secondary contact at the northern and southern border of the introgression zone during the Holocene. Footprints of adaptive introgression in the

  20. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs) in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes) and mitochondrial (28 genes) genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes). Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely related sister species

  1. Purifying selection acts on coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Robert D; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-06-13

    Whole-genome duplications in the ancestors of many diverse species provided the genetic material for evolutionary novelty. Several models explain the retention of paralogous genes. However, how these models are reflected in the evolution of coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes is unknown. Here, we analyzed the coding and non-coding sequences of paralogous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and compared these sequences with those of orthologous genes in Arabidopsis lyrata. Paralogs with lower expression than their duplicate had more nonsynonymous substitutions, were more likely to fractionate, and exhibited less similar expression patterns with their orthologs in the other species. Also, lower-expressed genes had greater tissue specificity. Orthologous conserved non-coding sequences in the promoters, introns, and 3' untranslated regions were less abundant at lower-expressed genes compared to their higher-expressed paralogs. A gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis showed that paralogs with similar expression levels were enriched in GO terms related to ribosomes, whereas paralogs with different expression levels were enriched in terms associated with stress responses. Loss of conserved non-coding sequences in one gene of a paralogous gene pair correlates with reduced expression levels that are more tissue specific. Together with increased mutation rates in the coding sequences, this suggests that similar forces of purifying selection act on coding and non-coding sequences. We propose that coding and non-coding sequences evolve concurrently following gene duplication.

  2. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  3. Differential SPL gene expression patterns reveal candidate genes underlying flowering time and architectural differences in Mimulus and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Stacy A; Preston, Jill C

    2014-04-01

    Evolutionary transitions in growth habit and flowering time responses to variable environmental signals have occurred multiple times independently across angiosperms and have major impacts on plant fitness. Proteins in the SPL family of transcription factors collectively regulate flowering time genes that have been implicated in interspecific shifts in annuality/perenniality. However, their potential importance in the evolution of angiosperm growth habit has not been extensively investigated. Here we identify orthologs representative of the major SPL gene clades in annual Arabidopsis thaliana and Mimulus guttatus IM767, and perennial A. lyrata and M. guttatus PR, and characterize their expression. Spatio-temporal expression patterns are complex across both diverse tissues of the same taxa and comparable tissues of different taxa, consistent with genic sub- or neo-functionalization. However, our data are consistent with a general role for several SPL genes in the promotion of juvenile to adult phase change and/or flowering time in Mimulus and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, several candidate genes were identified for future study whose differential expression correlates with growth habit and architectural variation in annual versus perennial taxa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multilocus Patterns of Nucleotide Diversity, Population Structure and Linkage Disequilibrium in Boechera stricta, a Wild Relative of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bao-Hua; Windsor, Aaron J.; Schmid, Karl J.; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastian; Schranz, M. Eric; Heidel, Andrew J.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Information about polymorphism, population structure, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) is crucial for association studies of complex trait variation. However, most genomewide studies have focused on model systems, with very few analyses of undisturbed natural populations. Here, we sequenced 86 mapped nuclear loci for a sample of 46 genotypes of Boechera stricta and two individuals of B. holboellii, both wild relatives of Arabidopsis. Isolation by distance was significant across the species range of B. stricta, and three geographic groups were identified by structure analysis, principal coordinates analysis, and distance-based phylogeny analyses. The allele frequency spectrum indicated a genomewide deviation from an equilibrium neutral model, with silent nucleotide diversity averaging 0.004. LD decayed rapidly, declining to background levels in ∼10 kb or less. For tightly linked SNPs separated by <1 kb, LD was dependent on the reference population. LD was lower in the specieswide sample than within populations, suggesting that low levels of LD found in inbreeding species such as B. stricta, Arabidopsis thaliana, and barley may result from broad geographic sampling that spans heterogeneous genetic groups. Finally, analyses also showed that inbreeding B. stricta and A. thaliana have ∼45% higher recombination per kilobase than outcrossing A. lyrata. PMID:19104077

  5. Bioavailability of nanoparticulate hematite to Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusenko, Yevgeniy; Shipp, Jessie; Hamilton, George A.; Morgan, Jennifer L.L.; Keebaugh, Michael; Hill, Hansina; Dutta, Arnab; Zhuo, Xiaoding; Upadhyay, Nabin; Hutchings, James; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D.; Shock, Everett; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental effects and bioavailability of nanoparticulate iron (Fe) to plants are currently unknown. Here, plant bioavailability of synthesized hematite Fe nanoparticles was evaluated using Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) as a model. Over 56-days of growing wild-type A. thaliana, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had lower plant biomass, lower chlorophyll concentrations, and lower internal Fe concentrations than the Fe-treatment. Results for the no-Fe and nanoparticle-Fe treatments were consistently similar throughout the experiment. These results suggest that nanoparticles (mean diameter 40.9 nm, range 22.3–67.0 nm) were not taken up and therefore not bioavailable to A. thaliana. Over 14-days growing wild-type and transgenic (Type I/II proton pump overexpression) A. thaliana, the Type I plant grew more than the wild-type in the nanoparticle-Fe treatment, suggesting Type I plants cope better with Fe limitation; however, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had similar growth for all plant types. -- Highlights: ► Iron nanoparticles were synthesized and assessed for bioavailability to Arabidopsis. ► Arabidopsis grew better in the presence of EDTA-bound iron than nanoparticulate iron. ► Arabidopsis grew the same in the presence of nanoparticulate iron compared to no iron. -- Synthesized iron nanoparticles were not bioavailable to Arabidopsis thaliana in agar nutrient media

  6. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  7. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng; Chen, Tao; Qin, Tao; Ding, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Liming

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  8. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 Regulate Mediator and RNA Polymerase II Recruitment to CBF-Responsive Cold-Regulated Genes[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Hurst, Charlotte H.; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R.; De Cothi, Elizabeth A.; Steele, John F.; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation–induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature–induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  9. STAY-GREEN and Chlorophyll Catabolic Enzymes Interact at Light-Harvesting Complex II for Chlorophyll Detoxification during Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Schelbert, Silvia; Park, So-Yon; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Andrès, Céline Besagni; Kessler, Felix; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2012-01-01

    During leaf senescence, plants degrade chlorophyll to colorless linear tetrapyrroles that are stored in the vacuole of senescing cells. The early steps of chlorophyll breakdown occur in plastids. To date, five chlorophyll catabolic enzymes (CCEs), NONYELLOW COLORING1 (NYC1), NYC1-LIKE, pheophytinase, pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO), and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase, have been identified; these enzymes catalyze the stepwise degradation of chlorophyll to a fluorescent intermediate, pFCC, which is then exported from the plastid. In addition, STAY-GREEN (SGR), Mendel’s green cotyledon gene encoding a chloroplast protein, is required for the initiation of chlorophyll breakdown in plastids. Senescence-induced SGR binds to light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), but its exact role remains elusive. Here, we show that all five CCEs also specifically interact with LHCII. In addition, SGR and CCEs interact directly or indirectly with each other at LHCII, and SGR is essential for recruiting CCEs in senescing chloroplasts. PAO, which had been attributed to the inner envelope, is found to localize in the thylakoid membrane. These data indicate a predominant role for the SGR-CCE-LHCII protein interaction in the breakdown of LHCII-located chlorophyll, likely to allow metabolic channeling of phototoxic chlorophyll breakdown intermediates upstream of nontoxic pFCC. PMID:22366162

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...

  11. Reference: 657 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available wth retardation. Double knockout atphb3 atphb4 plants were not viable, but transgenic lines overexpressing AtPHB3 or AtPHB...livier et al. 2007 Dec. Plant J. 52(5):850-64. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome expresses five evolutionarily... conserved prohibitin (PHB) genes that are divided into type-I (AtPHB3 and AtPHB4) and type-II (AtPHB1, AtPHB2 and AtPHB...6) classes, based on their phylogenetic relationships with yeast PHB1 and PHB...2, respectively. Yeast and animal PHBs are reported to have diverse roles in the cell cycle, mitocho

  12. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silenced...... lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout...... lines develop normally. However, when AHb2 knockout is combined with AHb1 silencing, seedlings die at an early vegetative stage suggesting that the two 3-on-3 hemoglobins, AHb1 and AHb2, together play an essential role for normal development of Arabidopsis seedlings. In conclusion, these results...

  13. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  14. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bussell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, there remains a considerable gap between peroxisomes and chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches.

  15. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  16. The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, H M; Ecker, J R; Dean, C

    1995-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a small flowering plant that is a member of the family cruciferae. It has many characteristics--diploid genetics, rapid growth cycle, relatively low repetitive DNA content, and small genome size--that recommend it as the model for a plant genome project. The current status of the genetic and physical maps, as well as efforts to sequence the genome, are presented. Examples are given of genes isolated by using map-based cloning. The importance of the Arabidopsis project ...

  17. Developmental transitions in Arabidopsis are regulated by antisense RNAs resulting from bidirectionally transcribed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Wroblewska-Swiniarska, Agata; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2017-07-03

    Transcription terminators are DNA elements located at the 3' end of genes that ensure efficient cleavage of nascent RNA generating the 3' end of mRNA, as well as facilitating disengagement of elongating DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. Surprisingly, terminators are also a potent source of antisense transcription. We have recently described an Arabidopsis antisense transcript originating from the 3' end of a master regulator of Arabidopsis thaliana seed dormancy DOG1. In this review, we discuss the broader implications of our discovery in light of recent developments in yeast and Arabidopsis. We show that, surprisingly, the key features of terminators that give rise to antisense transcription are preserved between Arabidopsis and yeast, suggesting a conserved mechanism. We also compare our discovery to known antisense-based regulatory mechanisms, highlighting the link between antisense-based gene expression regulation and major developmental transitions in plants.

  18. Efficient Plastid Transformation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiguo; Lutz, Kerry Ann; Maliga, Pal

    2017-09-01

    Plastid transformation is routine in tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) but 100-fold less frequent in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ), preventing its use in plastid biology. A recent study revealed that null mutations in ACC2 , encoding a plastid-targeted acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, cause hypersensitivity to spectinomycin. We hypothesized that plastid transformation efficiency should increase in the acc2 background, because when ACC2 is absent, fatty acid biosynthesis becomes dependent on translation of the plastid-encoded ACC β-carboxylase subunit. We bombarded ACC2 -defective Arabidopsis leaves with a vector carrying a selectable spectinomycin resistance ( aadA ) gene and gfp , encoding the green fluorescence protein GFP. Spectinomycin-resistant clones were identified as green cell clusters on a spectinomycin medium. Plastid transformation was confirmed by GFP accumulation from the second open reading frame of a polycistronic messenger RNA, which would not be translated in the cytoplasm. We obtained one to two plastid transformation events per bombarded sample in spectinomycin-hypersensitive Slavice and Columbia acc2 knockout backgrounds, an approximately 100-fold enhanced plastid transformation frequency. Slavice and Columbia are accessions in which plant regeneration is uncharacterized or difficult to obtain. A practical system for Arabidopsis plastid transformation will be obtained by creating an ACC2 null background in a regenerable Arabidopsis accession. The recognition that the duplicated ACCase in Arabidopsis is an impediment to plastid transformation provides a rational template to implement plastid transformation in related recalcitrant crops. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Reference: 783 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xpression of the Arabidopsis 10-kilodalton acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein ACBP6 en...phospholipid metabolism in Arabidopsis, including the possibility of ACBP6 in the cytosolic trafficking of phosphatidylcholine. Overe

  20. Reference: 774 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mu...e progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  2. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Sanchez-Serrano, J.J.; Salinas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  3. Different myrosinase and idioblast distribution in Arabidopsis and Brassica napus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Höglund, Anna-Stina

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry......Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry...

  4. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silence...... suggests that 3-on-3 hemoglobins apart from a role in hypoxic stress play a general role under non-stressed conditions where they are essential for normal development by controlling the level of NO which tends to accumulate in floral buds and leaf hydathodes of plants......In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silenced...... lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout...

  5. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  6. Reference: 255 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ases, AtIPK1 and AtIPK2beta, for the later steps of phytate synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Coincident disruption...olyphosphate kinases in phosphate signaling biology. Generation of phytate-free seeds in Arabidopsis through disruption

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108458 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108458 002-143-D05 At4g35000.1 L-ascorbate peroxidase 3 (APX3) identical to ascorbat...e peroxidase 3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2444019, L-ascorbate peroxidase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|152379...1|emb|CAA66926; similar to ascorbate peroxidase [Gossypium hirsutum] gi|1019946|gb|AAB52954 2e-35 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070842 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070842 J023074O14 At4g35000.1 L-ascorbate peroxidase 3 (APX3) identical to ascorbat...e peroxidase 3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2444019, L-ascorbate peroxidase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|1523791...|emb|CAA66926; similar to ascorbate peroxidase [Gossypium hirsutum] gi|1019946|gb|AAB52954 1e-112 ...

  9. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia; Li, Meichao; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-01-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. - Highlights: • It is necessary to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis. • Phytotoxicity of bromacil is investigated in an enantiomeric level. • Bromacil disturbed enantioselectively the photosystem II of Arabidopsis thaliana. • S-bromacil caused severer damage to photosynthesis of Arabidopsis than R-bromacil. • Photosynthesis should be considered for phytotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  10. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation & Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Li, Meichao [Research Center of Analysis and Measurement, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Wen, Yuezhong, E-mail: wenyuezhong@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation & Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. - Highlights: • It is necessary to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis. • Phytotoxicity of bromacil is investigated in an enantiomeric level. • Bromacil disturbed enantioselectively the photosystem II of Arabidopsis thaliana. • S-bromacil caused severer damage to photosynthesis of Arabidopsis than R-bromacil. • Photosynthesis should be considered for phytotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  11. Sulfinylated Azadecalins act as functional mimics of a pollen germination stimulant in Arabidopsis pistils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Wysocki, Ronald J; Somogyi, Arpad; Feinstein, Yelena; Franco, Jessica Y; Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Dunatunga, Damayanthi; Levy, Clara; Smith, Steven; Simpson, Robert; Gang, David; Johnson, Mark A; Palanivelu, Ravishankar

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Polarized cell elongation is triggered by small molecule cues during development of diverse organisms. During plant reproduction, pollen interactions with the stigma result in the polar outgrowth of a pollen tube, which delivers sperm cells to the female gametophyte to effect double fertilization. In many plants, pistils stimulate pollen germination. However, in Arabidopsis, the effect of pistils on pollen germination and the pistil factors that stimulate pollen germination remain poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that stigma, style, and ovules in Arabidopsis pistils stimulate pollen germination. We isolated an Arabidopsis pistil extract fraction that stimulates Arabidopsis pollen germination, and employed ultrahigh resolution ESI FT-ICR and MS/MS techniques to accurately determine the mass (202.126 daltons) of a compound that is specifically present in this pistil extract fraction. Using the molecular formula (C10H19NOS) and tandem mass spectral fragmentation patterns of the m/z (mass to charge ratio) 202.126 ion, we postulated chemical structures, devised protocols, synthesized N-Methanesulfinyl 1- and 2-azadecalins that are close structural mimics of the m/z 202.126 ion, and showed that they are sufficient to stimulate Arabidopsis pollen germination in vitro (30 µM stimulated ~50% germination) and elicit accession-specific response. Although N-Methanesulfinyl 2-azadecalin stimulated pollen germination in three species of Lineage I of Brassicaceae, it did not induce a germination response in Sisymbrium irio (Lineage II of Brassicaceae) and tobacco, indicating that activity of the compound is not random. Our results show that Arabidopsis pistils promote germination by producing azadecalin-like molecules to ensure rapid fertilization by the appropriate pollen. PMID:21801250

  12. Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding of Arabidopsis trehalose-phosphate synthase 5 in response to 2-deoxyglucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthill, Jean E; Meek, Sarah E M; Morrice, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate is a 'sugar signal' that regulates plant metabolism and development. The Arabidopsis genome encodes trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) and trehalose-6-phosphatase (TPP) enzymes. It also encodes class II proteins (TPS isoforms 5-11) that contain both TPS-like and TPP...

  13. Characterization of xanthophyll pigments, photosynthetic performance, photon energy dissipation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination during artemisinin-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Iftikhar Hussain

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0 seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40-160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis.

  14. Analyse fonctionnelle de la protéine WSCP chez Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Boex-Fontvieille , Edouard

    2010-01-01

    Class II WSCP proteins (Watersoluble Chlorophyll binding Proteins) are soluble proteins that interact with chlorophyll and its derivatives in Brassicaceae. These proteins belong to the protease inhibitor family and they are induced by abiotic stress under light conditions. To date, their functions in plants are not well documented. The aim of this study is to characterize the physiological function of a WSCP protein in model plants Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrated initially that theWSCP ...

  15. MEDIATOR18 and MEDIATOR20 confer susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Fallath, Thorya; Kidd, Brendan N.; Stiller, Jiri; Davoine, Celine; Bj?rklund, Stefan; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal; Schenk, Peer M.

    2017-01-01

    The conserved protein complex known as Mediator conveys transcriptional signals by acting as an intermediary between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. As a result, Mediator subunits play multiple roles in regulating developmental as well as abiotic and biotic stress pathways. In this report we identify the head domain subunits MEDIATOR18 and MEDIATOR20 as important susceptibility factors for Fusarium oxysporum infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutants of MED18 and MED20 display do...

  16. Reference: 21 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ication of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis...cation of mutants of Arabidopsis defective in acclimation of photosynthesis to th

  17. Reference: 789 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ylakoid membranes. Microarray analysis of the chl27-t mutant showed repression of numerous nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis...d CHL27 proteins. Role of Arabidopsis CHL27 protein for photosynthesis, chloroplast development and gene exp

  18. Reference: 306 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the endoreduplication cycle in Arabidopsis requires a plant homologue of archaeal DNA topoisomerase (topo) VI. To further understa...nd how DNA is endoreduplicated and how this process is r

  19. Reference: 150 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ridization, Pht1;4 was found mainly expressed in inorgan...physiological characterization of Arabidopsis pht1;4 high affinity phosphate transporter mutants. Using GUS-gene trap and in situ hyb

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241043 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 2e-41 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243135 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 7e-43 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  2. Reference: 346 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available th a function in purine turnover in Arabidopsis. To our knowledge this is the fir...ock in allantoate catabolism. AtAAH transcript was detected in all tissues examined by RT-PCR, consistent wi

  3. Reference: 510 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in support of PSII activity, whereas the interaction of PsbO2 with PSII regulates the turnover... its degradation. The Arabidopsis PsbO2 protein regulates dephosphorylation and turnover of the photosystem

  4. Reference: 278 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available functional ERA1 gene, which encodes the beta-subunit of protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), exhibit pleiotropic effects...gnaling and meristem development. Here, we report the effects of T-DNA insertion mutations in the Arabidopsi

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287673 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287673 J065121E18 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-17 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241272 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241272 J065132I19 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241712 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241712 J065197H24 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-27 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106306 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106306 002-101-C10 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-89 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287726 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287726 J065138E17 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109848 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109848 002-148-F05 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-73 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242387 J080051E14 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-45 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240892 J065030K10 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-88 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242957 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242957 J090089I15 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-28 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287621 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287621 J065066I09 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-85 ...

  15. Reference: 627 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omal processing protease (GPP) from the fat-storing cotyledons of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) by column ...ptidase, and a Lon-protease. Specific antibodies against the peroxisomal Deg-protease from Arabidopsis (Deg15) identify the watermelo

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At3g03050.1 68416.m00301 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose syntha

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At3g03050.1 68416.m00301 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose syntha

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110467 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110467 002-166-G08 At3g03050.1 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-7 (gi:962

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066835 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066835 J013087I16 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-171 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102695 J033103F21 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At3g03050.1 68416.m00301 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose syntha

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100523 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100523 J023100P04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065259 J013002J18 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102134 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102134 J033085F12 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  5. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  6. Systemic acquired resistance in soybean is regulated by two proteins, Orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Devinder

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is induced in non-inoculated leaves following infection with certain pathogenic strains. SAR is effective against many pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA is a signaling molecule of the SAR pathway. The development of SAR is associated with the induction of pathogenesis related (PR genes. Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1 is a regulatory gene of the SA signal pathway 123. SAR in soybean was first reported following infection with Colletotrichum trancatum that causes anthracnose disease. We investigated if SAR in soybean is regulated by a pathway, similar to the one characterized in Arabidopsis. Results Pathogenesis-related gene GmPR1 is induced following treatment of soybean plants with the SAR inducer, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA or infection with the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. In P. sojae-infected plants, SAR was induced against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Soybean GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes showed high identities to Arabidopsis NPR1. They showed similar expression patterns among the organs, studied in this investigation. GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 are the only soybean homologues of NPR1and are located in homoeologous regions. In GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 transformed Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutant plants, SAR markers: (i PR-1 was induced following INA treatment and (ii BGL2 following infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst, and SAR was induced following Pst infection. Of the five cysteine residues, Cys82, Cys150, Cys155, Cys160, and Cys216 involved in oligomer-monomer transition in NPR1, Cys216 in GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 proteins was substituted to Ser and Leu, respectively. Conclusion Complementation analyses in Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutants revealed that homoeologous GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes are orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1. Therefore, SAR pathway in soybean is most likely regulated by GmNPR1 genes. Substitution of Cys216 residue, essential

  7. Systemic acquired resistance in soybean is regulated by two proteins, Orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Devinder; Tasma, I Made; Frasch, Ryan; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2009-08-05

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is induced in non-inoculated leaves following infection with certain pathogenic strains. SAR is effective against many pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) is a signaling molecule of the SAR pathway. The development of SAR is associated with the induction of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1) is a regulatory gene of the SA signal pathway 123. SAR in soybean was first reported following infection with Colletotrichum trancatum that causes anthracnose disease. We investigated if SAR in soybean is regulated by a pathway, similar to the one characterized in Arabidopsis. Pathogenesis-related gene GmPR1 is induced following treatment of soybean plants with the SAR inducer, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or infection with the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. In P. sojae-infected plants, SAR was induced against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Soybean GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes showed high identities to Arabidopsis NPR1. They showed similar expression patterns among the organs, studied in this investigation. GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 are the only soybean homologues of NPR1and are located in homoeologous regions. In GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 transformed Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutant plants, SAR markers: (i) PR-1 was induced following INA treatment and (ii) BGL2 following infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and SAR was induced following Pst infection. Of the five cysteine residues, Cys82, Cys150, Cys155, Cys160, and Cys216 involved in oligomer-monomer transition in NPR1, Cys216 in GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 proteins was substituted to Ser and Leu, respectively. Complementation analyses in Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutants revealed that homoeologous GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes are orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1. Therefore, SAR pathway in soybean is most likely regulated by GmNPR1 genes. Substitution of Cys216 residue, essential for oligomer-monomer transition of Arabidopsis NPR1

  8. Reference: 398 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available modulate the photosynthetic potential of plant cells. Identification of genes required for light-induced chloroplast movement... is beginning to define the molecular machinery that controls these movement...s. In this work, we describe plastid movement impaired 2 (pmi2), a mutant in Arabidopsis (Arabi...dopsis thaliana) that displays attenuated chloroplast movements under intermediate and high light intensitie...s while maintaining a normal movement response under low light intensities. In wi

  9. Reference: 170 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rice A et al. 2005 Mar. Plant Cell 17(3):791-803. Environmental time cues, such as photocycles (light/dark) and thermocycles...h is known about entrainment of the Arabidopsis thaliana clock to photocycles, th...e determinants of thermoperception and entrainment to thermocycles are not known. The Arabidopsis PSEUDO-RES... an oscillation after entrainment to thermocycles and to reset its clock in response to cold pulses and thus

  10. Intracellular localization of Arabidopsis sulfurtransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Dietrich, Christof; Nowak, Katharina; Sierralta, Walter D; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2004-06-01

    Sulfurtransferases (Str) comprise a group of enzymes widely distributed in archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryota which catalyze the transfer of a sulfur atom from suitable sulfur donors to nucleophilic sulfur acceptors. In all organisms analyzed to date, small gene families encoding Str proteins have been identified. The gene products were localized to different compartments of the cells. Our interest concerns the localization of Str proteins encoded in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. Computer-based prediction methods revealed localization in different compartments of the cell for six putative AtStrs. Several methods were used to determine the localization of the AtStr proteins experimentally. For AtStr1, a mitochondrial localization was demonstrated by immunodetection in the proteome of isolated mitochondria resolved by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent blotting. The respective mature AtStr1 protein was identified by mass spectrometry sequencing. The same result was obtained by transient expression of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts, whereas AtStr2 was exclusively localized to the cytoplasm by this method. Three members of the single-domain AtStr were localized in the chloroplasts as demonstrated by transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions in protoplasts and stomata, whereas the single-domain AtStr18 was shown to be cytoplasmic. The remarkable subcellular distribution of AtStr15 was additionally analyzed by transmission electron immunomicroscopy using a monospecific antibody against green fluorescent protein, indicating an attachment to the thylakoid membrane. The knowledge of the intracellular localization of the members of this multiprotein family will help elucidate their specific functions in the organism.

  11. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  12. Loss of CDKC;2 increases both cell division and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Yaqiong; Xie, Qi; Wu, Yaorong

    2017-09-01

    Drought stress is one of the abiotic stresses that limit plant growth and agricultural productivity. To further understand the mechanism of drought tolerance and identify the genes involved in this process, a genetic screen for altered drought response was conducted in Arabidopsis. One mutant with enhanced drought tolerance was isolated and named Arabidopsis drought tolerance mutant 1 (atdtm1), which has larger lateral organs, prolonged growth duration, increased relative water content and a reduced leaf stomatal density compared with the wild type. The loss of AtDTM1 increases cell division during leaf development. The phenotype is caused by the loss of a T-DNA tagged gene encoding CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE C;2 (CDKC;2), which functions in the regulation of transcription by influencing the phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Here, we show that CDKC;2 affects the transcription of downstream genes such as cell cycle genes and genes involved in stomatal development, resulting in altered plant organ size as well as drought tolerance of the plant. These results reveal the crucial role of CDKC;2 in modulating both cell division and the drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  14. Glufosinate ammonium selection of transformed Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Detlef; Glazebrook, Jane

    2006-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONOne of the most commonly used markers for the selection of transgenic Arabidopsis is resistance to glufosinate ammonium, an herbicide that is sold under a variety of trade names including Basta and Finale. Resistance to glufosinate ammonium is conferred by the bacterial bialophos resistance gene (BAR) encoding the enzyme phosphinotricin acetyl transferase (PAT). This protocol describes the use of glufosinate ammonium to select transformed Arabidopsis plants. The major advantage of glufosinate ammonium selection is that it can be performed on plants growing in soil and does not require the use of sterile techniques.

  15. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288349 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288349 J090023P19 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-23 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241364 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241364 J065152E11 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-20 ...

  18. Reference: 439 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available or IID (TFIID) complex. Overexpression of atTAF10 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis impro...is TATA box-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor 10 (atTAF10), which constitutes the transcriptional fact

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064663 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064663 002-115-A10 At2g34450.1 high mobility group (HMG1/2) family protein simila...r to HMG protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2832361; contains Pfam profile PF00505: HMG (high mobility group) box 2e-27 ...

  20. Divergent regulation of Arabidopsis SAUR genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van Hilda; Dijk, van Aalt D.J.; Stortenbeker, Niek; Angenent, Gerco C.; Bemer, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Small Auxin-Upregulated RNA (SAUR) genes encode growth regulators that induce cell elongation. Arabidopsis contains more than 70 SAUR genes, of which the growth-promoting function has been unveiled in seedlings, while their role in other tissues remained largely unknown. Here, we

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK120871 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120871 J023026D19 At1g48900.1 signal recognition particle 54 kDa protein 3 / SRP5...4 (SRP-54C) identical to SP|P49967 Signal recognition particle 54 kDa protein 3 (SRP54) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 0.0 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071661 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071661 J023105D07 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-33 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-19 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-18 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241786 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241786 J065207F05 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-19 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-44 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-14 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-16 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-11 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108506 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108506 002-143-H11 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-14 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-41 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-25 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-19 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-20 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-44 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-17 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062711 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062711 001-106-C02 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-34 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-16 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-15 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068893 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068893 J023001G24 At4g15090.1 far-red impaired response protein (FAR1) / far-red impai...red responsive protein (FAR1) identical to far-red impaired response protein FAR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|5764395|gb|AAD51282; contains Pfam:PF03101 domain: FAR1 family 1e-39 ...

  3. Reference: 359 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 359 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16531491i Cnops Gerda...leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana. 4 852-66 16531491 2006 Apr The Plant cell Azmi Abdelkrim|Cnops Gerda

  4. Reference: 749 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available former mutant had decreased electron transport rates, a lower DeltapH gradient across the grana membranes, r...the PSII particles of these plants were organized in unusual two-dimensional arrays in the grana membranes. ...d the electron transport rate in grana membranes of Arabidopsis. 4 1012-28 18381925 2008 Apr The Plant cell

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241679 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241679 J065193F24 At3g29410.1 68416.m03695 terpene synthase/cyclase family protein similar to terpene... synthase GB:CAA72074 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], contains Pfam profile: PF01397 terpene synthase family 5e-65 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242212 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242212 J075171E13 At3g29410.1 68416.m03695 terpene synthase/cyclase family protein similar to terpene... synthase GB:CAA72074 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], contains Pfam profile: PF01397 terpene synthase family 1e-21 ...

  7. Reference: 486 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available time in many plant species through the photoperiod and vernalization pathways, re...cipates in both the photoperiod and vernalization pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression ... of VIN3 in a photoperiod-dependent manner. A PHD finger protein involved in both the vernalization and photoperiod pathways

  8. Reference: 751 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 751 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u18390806i Sitaraman ...unctions during Arabidopsis embryo and floral development. 2 672-81 18390806 2008 Jun Plant physiology Bui Minh|Liu Zhongchi|Sitaraman Jayashree

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103126 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0S proteasome beta subunit PBB1 (PBB1) GB:AAC32066 [Arabidopsis thaliana] (Genetics 149 (2), 677-692 (1998)); contains Pfam profile: PF00227 proteasome A-type and B-type; 1e-129 ...

  10. Roles of DNA methyltransferases in Arabidopsis development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutations that cause severe loss of DNA methylation often leads to abnormal development. In the present review, we summarized recent findings of the three major DNA methyltransferases mutants playing vital role in development of Arabidopsis thaliana. Keywords: DNA methylation, epigenetics, methyltransferase, mutant ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108796 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108796 002-151-C01 At2g25320.1 meprin and TRAF homology domain-containing protein / MATH... domain-containing protein weak similarity to ubiquitin-specific protease 12 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11993471; contains Pfam profile PF00917: MATH domain 3e-97 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102133 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102133 J033085E13 At5g43560.2 meprin and TRAF homology domain-containing protein / MATH... domain-containing protein weak similarity to ubiquitin-specific protease 12 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11993471; contains Pfam profile PF00917: MATH domain 1e-146 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105718 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105718 001-201-F09 At5g43560.2 meprin and TRAF homology domain-containing protein / MATH... domain-containing protein weak similarity to ubiquitin-specific protease 12 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11993471; contains Pfam profile PF00917: MATH domain 5e-22 ...

  14. Reference: 438 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ity and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. 18 6902-12 16943431 2006 Sep Molecular and cellular bio...logy Chen Zhizhong|Gong Zhizhong|Hong Xuhui|Jablonowski Daniel|Ren Xiaozhi|Schaffrath Raffael|Zhang Hairong|Zhou Xiaofeng|Zhu Jian-Kang

  15. Reference: 356 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 006 Mar Plant molecular biology Deng Xingwang|Dong Li|Wang Lei|Xue Yongbiao|Zhang Yansheng|Zhang Yu'e ...ein CEGENDUO negatively regulates auxin-mediated lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. 4 599-615 16525894 2

  16. Proteomics of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and

  17. Reference: 689 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the high affinity of MOT1 allows plants to obtain scarce Mo from soil. An Arabidopsis thaliana high-affinity... molybdate transporter required for efficient uptake of molybdate from soil. 47 18807-12 18003916 2007 Nov P

  18. Reference: 169 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e M et al. 2005 Mar. Plant J. 41(5):744-54. The recessive Arabidopsis thalianafumonisin B1-resistant (fbr6) ...opment and sensitivity to fumonisin B1. 5 744-54 15703061 2005 Mar The Plant journal Liang Xinwen|Nekl Emily R|Stiers Justin J|Stone Julie M

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243131 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243131 J100030A12 At1g21450.1 68414.m02682 scarecrow-like transcription factor 1 ...(SCL1) identical to scarecrow-like 1 GB:AAF21043 GI:6644390 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-46 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242412 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242412 J080076J05 At1g21450.1 68414.m02682 scarecrow-like transcription factor 1 ...(SCL1) identical to scarecrow-like 1 GB:AAF21043 GI:6644390 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-36 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065420 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065420 J013022D10 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, puta...tive / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:11...54627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 1e-166 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062262 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062262 001-047-H04 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, put...ative / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:1...154627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069545 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069545 J023025I06 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, puta...tive / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:11...54627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK067323 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067323 J013106B16 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, puta...tive / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:11...54627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060612 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060612 001-025-F03 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, put...ative / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:1...154627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK107208 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ala hydrolase, putative virtually identical to gr1-protein from [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3559811; similar t...AK107208 002-125-B11 At1g44350.1 IAA-amino acid hydrolase 6, putative (ILL6) / IAA-

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065124 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065124 J013001P04 At1g44446.1 chlorophyll a oxygenase (CAO) / chlorophyll b synthase identical to chloroph...yll a oxygenase GI:5853117 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam PF00355 Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain 0.0 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK067730 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067730 J013116K15 At1g44446.1 chlorophyll a oxygenase (CAO) / chlorophyll b synthase identical to chloroph...yll a oxygenase GI:5853117 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam PF00355 Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain 0.0 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103940 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103940 001-013-G08 At5g54190.1 protochlorophyllide reductase A, chloroplast / PCR A / NADPH-protochlorophy...llide oxidoreductase A (PORA) identical to SP:Q42536 protochlorophyllide reductase ...A, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.3.1.33) (PCR A) (NADPH-protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A) (POR A) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-130 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063367 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063367 001-114-D11 At1g44446.1 chlorophyll a oxygenase (CAO) / chlorophyll b synthase identical to chlorop...hyll a oxygenase GI:5853117 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam PF00355 Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain 0.0 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071899 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071899 J013059G06 At1g44446.1 chlorophyll a oxygenase (CAO) / chlorophyll b synthase identical to chloroph...yll a oxygenase GI:5853117 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam PF00355 Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain 1e-154 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104855 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104855 001-043-B11 At5g54190.1 protochlorophyllide reductase A, chloroplast / PCR A / NADPH-protochlorophy...llide oxidoreductase A (PORA) identical to SP:Q42536 protochlorophyllide reductase ...A, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.3.1.33) (PCR A) (NADPH-protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A) (POR A) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-130 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105724 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105724 001-201-G07 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bisph...osphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106106 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106106 001-207-C12 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bisph...osphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 9e-39 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK072243 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072243 J023003N10 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bispho...sphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065086 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065086 J013001L18 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bispho...sphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105066 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105066 001-044-F12 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bisph...osphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 1e-166 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069285 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069285 J023011N22 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bispho...sphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242707 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242707 J090040M15 At1g70550.2 68414.m08120 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241860 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241860 J065216G12 At1g70550.1 68414.m08119 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242707 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242707 J090040M15 At1g70550.1 68414.m08119 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241860 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241860 J065216G12 At1g70550.2 68414.m08120 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242472 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242472 J080303B22 At1g70550.2 68414.m08120 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073288 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073288 J033028L24 At1g70550.2 expressed protein similar to hypothetical protein G...B:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16072 [Arabidop

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242472 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242472 J080303B22 At1g70550.1 68414.m08119 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242472 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242472 J080303B22 At5g46200.1 68418.m05684 expressed protein contains similarity to carboxyl-term...inal proteinase contains Pfam profile PF03080: Arabidopsis proteins of unknown function; expression supported by MPSS 2e-33 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104980 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104980 001-125-D09 At1g70550.2 expressed protein similar to hypothetical protein ...GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16072 [Arabido

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289251 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289251 J100081E23 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 6e-21 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287737 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287737 J065143M09 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 7e-14 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288338 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288338 J090023E14 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 9e-22 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288935 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288935 J090082J19 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 8e-21 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241112 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241112 J065091K02 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 1e-16 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240855 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240855 J065021H02 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 7e-25 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288753 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288753 J090065M09 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 3e-29 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288612 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288612 J090053J15 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 5e-24 ...

  16. Reference: 632 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ludmila et al. 2007 Sep. Plant J. 51(5):874-85. One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental str...elopment in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene...R12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073859 J033073L16 At4g22260.1 alternative oxidase, putative / immutans protein (I...M) identical to IMMUTANS from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:4138855]; contains Pfam profile PF01786 alternative oxidase 5e-21 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK067891 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067891 J013124H21 At4g22260.1 alternative oxidase, putative / immutans protein (I...M) identical to IMMUTANS from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:4138855]; contains Pfam profile PF01786 alternative oxidase 1e-110 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241438 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241438 J065162G03 At4g32040.1 68417.m04561 homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) / home...odomain containing protein 1 (H1) identical to homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) SP:P48002 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-98 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241312 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241312 J065141L09 At4g32040.1 68417.m04561 homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) / home...odomain containing protein 1 (H1) identical to homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) SP:P48002 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-19 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243352 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243352 J100060L07 At4g32040.1 68417.m04561 homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) / home...odomain containing protein 1 (H1) identical to homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) SP:P48002 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-103 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289177 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289177 J100024E07 At4g32040.1 68417.m04561 homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) / home...odomain containing protein 1 (H1) identical to homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) SP:P48002 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-98 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119904 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119904 002-182-A05 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-78 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070528 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070528 J023060D13 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-99 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104030 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104030 001-020-C01 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-99 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104160 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104160 006-211-E09 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-99 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068433 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068433 J013156D16 At1g20620.2 catalase 3 (SEN2) almost identical to catalase 3 SP...:Q42547, GI:3123188 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to catalase 3 (SEN2) mRNA, partial cds GI:3158369 1e-63 ...

  8. Reference: 119 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the Arabidopsis homolog of MSH4 (AtMSH4). We demonstrate that AtMSH4 expression can only be detected in floral tissues, consisten...chromosomes. A T-DNA insertional mutant (Atmsh4) exhibited normal vegetative growth but a severe reduction in fertility, consistent

  9. Reference: 239 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 239 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16015335i Bundock Paul et al. 2005 Jul. Natur...functions. An Arabidopsis hAT-like transposase is essential for plant development. 7048 282-4 16015335 2005 Jul Nature Bundock Paul|Hooykaas Paul

  10. Reference: 590 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 590 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17450124i Caro Elena et al. 2007 May. Nature... to root epidermis patterning in Arabidopsis. 7141 213-7 17450124 2007 May Nature Caro Elena|Castellano M Mar|Gutierrez Crisanto

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 9e-17 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 3e-13 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242986 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-13 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241281 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-12 ...

  15. Reference: 223 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 223 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15923347i Dohmann Es... cause the cop/det/fus mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. 7 1967-78 15923347 2005 Jul The Plant cell Dohmann Esther M N|Kuhnle Carola|Schwechheimer Claus

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK072001 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072001 J013094L17 At2g22670.2 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induce...d protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-11 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069892 J023039N11 At2g33310.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induce...d protein 13 (IAA13) identical to SP|Q38831 Auxin-responsive protein IAA13 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 13) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-41 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061037 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061037 006-205-B07 At5g65670.2 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 9 (IAA9) identical to SP|Q38827 Auxin-responsive protein IAA9 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 9) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-25 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102396 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102396 J033092H03 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induce...d protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-50 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059838 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059838 006-206-C11 At3g04730.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 16 (IAA16) identical to SP|O24407 Auxin-responsive protein IAA16 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 16) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-45 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061495 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061495 006-309-C06 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-50 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK099253 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099253 J013168H04 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induce...d protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 4e-51 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063854 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063854 001-122-D03 At3g04730.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 16 (IAA16) identical to SP|O24407 Auxin-responsive protein IAA16 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 16) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-22 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104018 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104018 001-007-H11 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 4e-51 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106181 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106181 001-208-D03 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 4e-51 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109363 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109363 006-206-E12 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-51 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073365 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073365 J033030K18 At3g23030.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induce...d protein 2 (IAA2) identical to SP|P49678 Auxin-responsive protein IAA2 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 4e-20 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066518 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066518 J013070M23 At2g46990.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induce...d protein 20 (IAA20) identical to SP|O24410 Auxin-responsive protein IAA20 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 20) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-25 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106121 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106121 001-207-E11 At2g22670.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 8 (IAA8) identical to SP|Q38826 Auxin-responsive protein IAA8 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 8) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 7e-51 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104802 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104802 001-040-C05 At2g33310.1 auxin-responsive protein / indoleacetic acid-induc...ed protein 13 (IAA13) identical to SP|Q38831 Auxin-responsive protein IAA13 (Indoleacetic acid-induced protein 13) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-41 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100988 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100988 J023145H17 At1g63440.1 copper-exporting ATPase, putative / responsive-to-a...ntagonist 1, putative / copper-transporting ATPase, putative similar to ATP dependent copper transporter SP|Q9S7J8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063759 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063759 001-121-A10 At1g63440.1 copper-exporting ATPase, putative / responsive-to-...antagonist 1, putative / copper-transporting ATPase, putative similar to ATP dependent copper transporter SP|Q9S7J8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK072990 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072990 J023144D18 At1g63440.1 copper-exporting ATPase, putative / responsive-to-a...ntagonist 1, putative / copper-transporting ATPase, putative similar to ATP dependent copper transporter SP|Q9S7J8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287434 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287434 J043012F24 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 2e-27 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241784 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241784 J065206N09 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 4e-11 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121003 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121003 J023045B21 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 8e-63 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109812 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109812 002-147-H02 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 5e-90 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-26 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069071 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069071 J023010H01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-47 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110534 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110534 002-168-A07 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-114 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-31 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-28 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-25 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-126 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-45 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-25 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 2e-65 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-24 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-29 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 3e-66 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-124 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105393 001-123-B04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-45 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-130 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 1e-125 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061162 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061162 006-209-A01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-35 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-98 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-98 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 4e-27 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060286 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060286 001-006-C08 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 6e-78 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-50 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-48 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058440 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 20S proteasome beta subunit PBB1 (PBB1) GB:AAC32066 [Arabidopsis thaliana] (Genetics 149 (2), 677-692 (1998)); contains Pfam profile: PF00227 proteasome A-type and B-type; 1e-92 ...

  9. Reference: 671 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available with distinct vegetative or constitutive and reproductive expression patterns. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ectopic...ractions among the major classes of actins and ABPs, we ectopically coexpressed reproductive profilin (PRF4)...coexpression of these reproductive, but not vegetative, ABP isovariants suppressed the ectopic

  10. Diclofenac in Arabidopsis cells: Rapid formation of conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu; Zhang, Jianbo; Richards, Jaben; Borchardt, Dan; Gan, Jay

    2017-03-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) are continuously introduced into the soil-plant system, through practices such as agronomic use of reclaimed water and biosolids containing these trace contaminants. Plants may accumulate PPCPs from soil, serving as a conduit for human exposure. Metabolism likely controls the final accumulation of PPCPs in plants, but is in general poorly understood for emerging contaminants. In this study, we used diclofenac as a model compound, and employed 14 C tracing, and time-of-flight (TOF) and triple quadruple (QqQ) mass spectrometers to unravel its metabolism pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana cells. We further validated the primary metabolites in Arabidopsis seedlings. Diclofenac was quickly taken up into A. thaliana cells. Phase I metabolism involved hydroxylation and successive oxidation and cyclization reactions. However, Phase I metabolites did not accumulate appreciably; they were instead rapidly conjugated with sulfate, glucose, and glutamic acid through Phase II metabolism. In particular, diclofenac parent was directly conjugated with glutamic acid, with acyl-glutamatyl-diclofenac accounting for >70% of the extractable metabolites after 120-h incubation. In addition, at the end of incubation, >40% of the spiked diclofenac was in the non-extractable form, suggesting extensive sequestration into cell matter. The rapid formation of non-extractable residue and dominance of diclofenac-glutamate conjugate uncover previously unknown metabolism pathways for diclofenac. In particular, the rapid conjugation of parent highlights the need to consider conjugates of emerging contaminants in higher plants, and their biological activity and human health implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interstitial telomere-like repeats in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Wakana; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sugiyama, Ryuji; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2002-02-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomal ends are protected by telomeres, which are thought to play an important role in ensuring the complete replication of chromosomes. On the other hand, non-functional telomere-like repeats in the interchromosomal regions (interstitial telomeric repeats; ITRs) have been reported in several eukaryotes. In this study, we identified eight ITRs in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, each consisting of complete and degenerate 300- to 1200-bp sequences. The ITRs were grouped into three classes (class IA-B, class II, and class IIIA-E) based on the degeneracy of the telomeric repeats in ITRs. The telomeric repeats of the two ITRs in class I were conserved for the most part, whereas the single ITR in class II, and the five ITRs in class III were relatively degenerated. In addition, degenerate ITRs were surrounded by common sequences that shared 70-100% homology to each other; these are named ITR-adjacent sequences (IAS). Although the genomic regions around ITRs in class I lacked IAS, those around ITRs in class II contained IAS (IASa), and those around five ITRs in class III had nine types of IAS (IASb, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, and j). Ten IAS types in classes II and III showed no significant homology to each other. The chromosomal locations of ITRs and IAS were not category-related, but most of them were adjacent to, or part of, a centromere. These results show that the A. thaliana genome has undergone chromosomal rearrangements, such as end-fusions and segmental duplications.

  12. Comparison of the spaceflight transcriptome of four commonly used Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This experiment compared the spaceflight transcriptomes of four commonly used natural variants (ecotypes) of Arabidopsis thaliana using RNAseq. In nature Arabidopsis...

  13. Composition of secondary alcohols, ketones, alkanediols, and ketols in Arabidopsis thaliana cuticular waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Miao; Jetter, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis wax components containing secondary functional groups were examined (i) to test the biosynthetic relationship between secondary alcohols and ketols and (ii) to determine the regiospecificity and substrate preference of the enzyme involved in ketol biosynthesis. The stem wax of Arabidopsis wild type contained homologous series of C27 to C31 secondary alcohols (2.4 μg cm−2) and C28 to C30 ketones (6.0 μg cm−2) dominated by C29 homologues. In addition, compound classes containing two secondary functional groups were identified as C29 diols (∼0.05 μg cm−2) and ketols (∼0.16 μg cm−2). All four compound classes showed characteristic isomer distributions, with functional groups located between C-14 and C-16. In the mah1 mutant stem wax, diols and ketols could not be detected, while the amounts of secondary alcohols and ketones were drastically reduced. In two MAH1-overexpressing lines, equal amounts of C29 and C31 secondary alcohols were detected. Based on the comparison of homologue and isomer compositions between the different genotypes, it can be concluded that biosynthetic pathways lead from alkanes to secondary alcohols, and via ketones or diols to ketols. It seems plausible that MAH1 is the hydroxylase enzyme involved in all these conversions in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:19346242

  14. Identification of novel transcription factors regulating secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua eCassan-Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lignin in secondary cell walls (SCW is a major factor preventing hydrolytic enzymes from gaining access to cellulose, thereby limiting the saccharification potential of plant biomass. To understand how lignification is regulated is a prerequisite for selecting plant biomass better adapted to bioethanol production. Because transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling the expression of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, our aim was to identify novel transcription factors dictating lignin profiles in the model plant Arabidopsis. To this end, we have developed a post-genomic approach by combining four independent in-house SCW-related transcriptome datasets obtained from (i the fiber cell wall-deficient wat1 Arabidopsis mutant, (ii Arabidopsis lines over-expressing either the master regulatory activator EgMYB2 or (iii the repressor EgMYB1 and finally (iv Arabidopsis orthologs of Eucalyptus xylem-expressed genes. This allowed us to identify 502 up- or down-regulated transcription factors. We preferentially selected those present in more than one dataset and further analyzed their in silico expression patterns as an additional selection criteria. This selection process led to 80 candidates. Notably, 16 of them were already proven to regulate SCW formation, thereby validating the overall strategy. Then, we phenotyped 43 corresponding mutant lines focusing on histological observations of xylem and interfascicular fibers. This phenotypic screen revealed six mutant lines exhibiting altered lignification patterns. Two of them (blh6 and a zinc finger transcription factor presented hypolignified SCW. Three others (myb52, myb-like TF, hb5 showed hyperlignified SCW whereas the last one (hb15 showed ectopic lignification. In addition, our meta-analyses highlighted a reservoir of new potential regulators adding to the gene network regulating SCW but also opening new avenues to ultimately improve SCW composition for biofuel

  15. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Zobel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to 8 different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5 of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems.

  16. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H

    2001-01-01

    that, whereas high expression of AtCRL1 in mature seeds declines during subsequent vegetative growth, transcriptional activity from the AtCRL2 promoter increases during vegetative growth. Expression of both genes is restricted to vascular tissue. Based upon their homology to proteins involved in lignin......Two tandem genes were identified on Arabidopsis chromosome II (AtCRL1 and AtCRL2) encoding proteins with homology to members of the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) superfamily. The encoded CRL1 and CRL2 proteins share 87% mutual amino acid sequence identity whereas their promoter regions...

  17. Reference: 241 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 241 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16024589i Calderon-V...development of Arabidopsis thaliana. 9 2473-85 16024589 2005 Sep The Plant cell Bevan Mike|Calderon-Villalobos Luz I A|Dohmann Esther M N|Kuhnle Carola|Li Hanbing|Schwechheimer Claus

  18. Reference: 468 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available five NPR1 paralogs in Arabidopsis. Here we report knockout analysis of two of these, NPR3 and NPR4. npr3 single mutants have elevat...t complemented by either wild-type NPR3 or NPR4, and is not associated with an elevat...with our previous finding that basal PR-1 levels are also elevated in the tga2 tga5 tga6 triple mutant, we p

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Arabidopsis Pollen Transcriptome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honys, David; Twell, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 132, - (2003), s. 640ů652 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5038207 Grant - others:Royal Society(GB) NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship (to D.H.) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : transcriptome profiling * Arabidopsis pollen * male gametophyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.634, year: 2003

  20. Reference: 295 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 295 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16284313i Fujita Yas...ng that enhances drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. 12 3470-88 16284313 200...5 Dec The Plant cell Fujita Miki|Fujita Yasunari|Hiratsu Keiichiro|Maruyama Kyonoshin|Ohme-Takagi Masaru|Par

  1. Reference: 418 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 418 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16856986i Chai Mao-Feng...cid responses in Arabidopsis. 5 665-74 16856986 2006 Sep The Plant journal An Rui|Chai Mao-Feng|Chen Jia|Chen Qi-Jun|Wang Xue-Chen|Wei Peng-Cheng|Yang Shuhua

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065950 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065950 J013049M07 At3g11820.1 syntaxin 121 (SYP121) / syntaxin-related protein (S...YR1) contains Pfam profiles: PF00804 syntaxin and PF05739: SNARE domain; identical to cDNA syntaxin-related ...protein At-SYR1 (At-Syr1) GI:4206788, SP|Q9ZSD4 Syntaxin 121 (AtSYP121) (Syntaxin-related protein At-Syr1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-88 ...

  3. Reference: 495 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . Emission of methanethiol from Arabidopsis plants supplied with 10 mM L-methionine was undetectable (cation in an alternat...>homocysteine-->cystathionine-->cysteine) in which methanethiol is an intermediate. Functional characterizat...wth on L-methionine as sole nitrogen source and conferred a high rate of methanethiol emission. The purified...mol min(-1) g(-1) FW), suggesting that AtMGL is not an important source of volatile methanethiol. Knocking o

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110331 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110331 002-164-D12 At2g31510.1 IBR domain-containing protein / ARIADNE-like prote...in ARI7 (ARI7) identical to ARIADNE-like protein ARI7 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:29125028; contains similarit...y to Swiss-Prot:Q94981 ariadne-1 protein (Ari-1) [Drosophila melanogaster]; contains Pfam profile PF01485: IBR domain 3e-59 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242789 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242789 J090057B20 At2g31510.1 68415.m03850 IBR domain-containing protein / ARIADN...E-like protein ARI7 (ARI7) identical to ARIADNE-like protein ARI7 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:29125028; contai...ns similarity to Swiss-Prot:Q94981 ariadne-1 protein (Ari-1) [Drosophila melanogaster]; contains Pfam profile PF01485: IBR domain 8e-12 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121264 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121264 J023105D06 At3g15730.1 phospholipase D alpha 1 / PLD alpha 1 (PLDALPHA1) (PLD1) / choli...ne phosphatase 1 identical to SP:Q38882 Phospholipase D alpha 1 (EC 3.1.4.4) (AtPLDalpha1) (PLD alpha 1) (Choli...ne phosphatase 1) (Phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D 1) (PLDalpha) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  7. Reference: 34 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al gene in different tissues, under normal growth conditions, and when the plants were subjected to anoxia or other environmental...e1 gene of Arabidopsis is required during anoxia but not other environmental stre...ronmental stresses. We also characterize the expression of the aldehyde dehydrogena...ed under oxygen limitation among the PDC1 gene family and that a pdc1 null mutant is comprised in anoxia tolerance but not other envi

  8. Reference: 2 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available at share 60 to 80% protein sequence identity. Gene disruptions of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ortho... that these syntaxins are not essential for growth in yeast. However, we have isolated and characterized gene disruption...s in two genes from each family, finding that disruption of individual syntaxins from these fami...lies is lethal in the male gametophyte of Arabidopsis. Complementation of the syp21-1 gene disruption

  9. Reference: 584 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root stem cell organizers. 7137 811-4 17429400 2007 Apr Nature Hashimo...nda K et al. 2007 Apr. Nature 446(7137):811-4. Throughout the lifespan of a plant, which in some cases can l... 584 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17429400i Sarkar Ana

  10. Reference: 435 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis. 7107 106-9 16936718 2006 Sep Nature Fobis-Loisy Isabelle|Gaude Thierry|Jaillais Yvon|Miège Christine|Rollin Claire ... 435 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16936718i Jaillais Yvon et al. 2006 Sep. Natu...re 443(7107):106-9. Polarized cellular distribution of the phytohormone auxin and i

  11. Reference: 126 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on of Hsp93 during protein import into chloroplasts, we isolated knockout mutant ...red to the wild type. Plastid protein composition, however, seems to be largely unaffected in atHsp93-V knock...out plants. Chloroplasts isolated from the atHsp93-V knockout mutant line are still able to import a variet...biogenesis of Arabidopsis chloroplasts. In contrast, knockout mutant plants for atHsp93-III, the second Arab

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119645 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-10 ... ...ve / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum and contains ...AK119645 002-130-G05 At1g12980.1 AP2 domain-containing transcription factor, putati

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101133 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-10 ... ...eneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum and contains P...AK101133 J033026F23 At1g12980.1 AP2 domain-containing transcription factor, putative / enhancer of shoot reg

  14. Reference: 497 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hal albino phenotype. Rescue of tha2 mutants and tha1 tha2 double mutants by overproduction of feedback-inse...-specific expression of feedback-insensitive Thr deaminase in both tha1 and tha2 Thr aldolase mutants greatl...nsitive Thr deaminase (OMR1) shows that Gly formation by THA1 and THA2 is not essential in Arabidopsis. Seed

  15. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  16. Comparative analysis of drought resistance genes in Arabidopsis and rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijatmiko, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords: rice, Arabidopsis, drought, genetic mapping,microarray, transcription factor, AP2/ERF, SHINE, wax, stomata, comparative genetics, activation tagging, Ac/Ds, En/IThis thesis describes the use of genomics information and tools from Arabidopsis and

  17. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de M.; Zaanen, van W.; Koornneef, A.; Korzelius, J.P.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van L.C.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the spectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced

  18. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Zaanen, W. van; Koornneef, A.; Korzelius, J.P.; Dicke, M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the sspectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced

  19. Soil mixture composition alters Arabidopsis susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas syringae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes disease on more than 100 different plant species, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Dissection of the Arabidopsis thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae pathosystem has identified many factors that contribute to successful ...

  20. Genetic analysis of seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana = [Genetische analyse van de zaadontwikkeling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon - Kloosterziel, K.

    1997-01-01


    This thesis deals with the genetic aspects of seed development in Arabidopsisthaliana. Mutants affected in several aspects of seed development and, more specifically, in seed maturation have been isolated by various selection

  1. Analyses of Catharanthus roseus and Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY transcription factors reveal involvement in jasmonate signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Patra, Barunava; Yuan, Ling

    2014-06-20

    To combat infection to biotic stress plants elicit the biosynthesis of numerous natural products, many of which are valuable pharmaceutical compounds. Jasmonate is a central regulator of defense response to pathogens and accumulation of specialized metabolites. Catharanthus roseus produces a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) and is an excellent model for understanding the regulation of this class of valuable compounds. Recent work illustrates a possible role for the Catharanthus WRKY transcription factors (TFs) in regulating TIA biosynthesis. In Arabidopsis and other plants, the WRKY TF family is also shown to play important role in controlling tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, as well as secondary metabolism. Here, we describe the WRKY TF families in response to jasmonate in Arabidopsis and Catharanthus. Publically available Arabidopsis microarrays revealed at least 30% (22 of 72) of WRKY TFs respond to jasmonate treatments. Microarray analysis identified at least six jasmonate responsive Arabidopsis WRKY genes (AtWRKY7, AtWRKY20, AtWRKY26, AtWRKY45, AtWRKY48, and AtWRKY72) that have not been previously reported. The Catharanthus WRKY TF family is comprised of at least 48 members. Phylogenetic clustering reveals 11 group I, 32 group II, and 5 group III WRKY TFs. Furthermore, we found that at least 25% (12 of 48) were jasmonate responsive, and 75% (9 of 12) of the jasmonate responsive CrWRKYs are orthologs of AtWRKYs known to be regulated by jasmonate. Overall, the CrWRKY family, ascertained from transcriptome sequences, contains approximately 75% of the number of WRKYs found in other sequenced asterid species (pepper, tomato, potato, and bladderwort). Microarray and transcriptomic data indicate that expression of WRKY TFs in Arabidopsis and Catharanthus are under tight spatio-temporal and developmental control, and potentially have a significant role in jasmonate signaling. Profiling of CrWRKY expression in response to jasmonate treatment

  2. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeown, Peter C

    2011-08-12

    Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs) displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination). We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag) which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i) their size and (ii) which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 seeds was

  3. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennblom Trevor J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination. We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i their size and (ii which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1

  4. Database Description - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Arabidopsis Phenome Database Database Description General information of database Database n... BioResource Center Hiroshi Masuya Database classification Plant databases - Arabidopsis thaliana Organism T...axonomy Name: Arabidopsis thaliana Taxonomy ID: 3702 Database description The Arabidopsis thaliana phenome i...heir effective application. We developed the new Arabidopsis Phenome Database integrating two novel database...seful materials for their experimental research. The other, the “Database of Curated Plant Phenome” focusing

  5. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding IMP dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart, F R; Osipiuk, J; Trent, J; Olsen, G J; Huberman, E

    1996-10-03

    We have cloned and characterized the gene encoding inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Arabidopsis thaliana (At). The transcription unit of the At gene spans approximately 1900 bp and specifies a protein of 503 amino acids with a calculated relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 54,190. The gene is comprised of a minimum of four introns and five exons with all donor and acceptor splice sequences conforming to previously proposed consensus sequences. The deduced IMPDH amino-acid sequence from At shows a remarkable similarity to other eukaryotic IMPDH sequences, with a 48% identity to human Type II enzyme. Allowing for conservative substitutions, the enzyme is 69% similar to human Type II IMPDH. The putative active-site sequence of At IMPDH conforms to the IMP dehydrogenase/guanosine monophosphate reductase motif and contains an essential active-site cysteine residue.

  6. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  7. Reference: 382 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ncentrations in the environment. To investigate how plants survive under conditions of B limitation, we cond...ronidase fusions indicated that NIP5;1 is strongly upregulated in the root elongation zone and the root hair zone under B limitation...e boric acid channel crucial for the B uptake required for plant growth and development under B limitation. ...The Arabidopsis major intrinsic protein NIP5;1 is essential for efficient boron uptake and plant development under boron limitation

  8. Reference: 462 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . ATAF1 was one of the first identified NAC proteins in Arabidopsis. In present study, we characterized the ATAF1 express...ion and biological function in response to water deficit stress. ATAF1 mRNA express...ater treatment, suggesting a general role in drought stress responses. Transient expression analysis in onio...otein. Yeast transactivation analysis showed that ATAF1 had ability to activate reporter gene expression. Fu...ught response test. This ataf1 phenotype was coincident with the enhanced expression of stress responsive ma

  9. Reference: 453 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor. We demonstrate that this protein functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo. The express...ion of all members of the CYCLINA2 (CYCA2) family was reduced in an ILP1 overexpressing l...ine, and the mouse (Mus musculus) homolog of ILP1 repressed cyclin A2 expression in mouse NIH3T3 cells. T-DN...A insertion mutants of ILP1 showed reduced polyploidy and upregulated all CYCA2 express...ion. Furthermore, loss of CYCA2;1 expression induces an increase in polyploidy in Arabidopsis. We demo

  10. Reference: 387 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Michael F et al. 2006 Jul. Plant Physiol. 141(3):957-65. Karyogamy, or nuclear fusion, is essential for sex...ual reproduction. In angiosperms, karyogamy occurs three times: twice during double fertilization of the egg...e two polar nuclei fuse to form the diploid central cell nucleus. The molecular mechanisms controlling karyoga...etected during megagametogenesis. nfd1 is also affected in karyogamy during double fertilization. Using tran...odes the Arabidopsis RPL21M protein and is required for karyogamy during female g

  11. Reference: 663 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available opsis thaliana) is dominated by alkanes, secondary alcohols, and ketones, all tho...nt alleles was found to be devoid of secondary alcohols and ketones (mah1-1) or to contain much lower levels...topic accumulation of secondary alcohols and ketones in Arabidopsis leaf wax, where only traces of these com...pounds are found in the wild type. The newly formed leaf alcohols and ketones had midchain functional groups... catalyze the hydroxylation reaction leading from alkanes to secondary alcohols and possibly also a second h

  12. Contrasting responses of photosynthesis to salt stress in the glycophyte Arabidopsis and the halophyte thellungiella: role of the plastid terminal oxidase as an alternative electron sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Piotr; Johnson, Giles N

    2009-02-01

    The effects of short-term salt stress on gas exchange and the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport were examined in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and its salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella (Thellungiella halophila). Plants cultivated on soil were challenged for 2 weeks with NaCl. Arabidopsis showed a much higher sensitivity to salt than Thellungiella; while Arabidopsis plants were unable to survive exposure to greater than 150 mM salt, Thellugiella could tolerate concentrations as high as 500 mM with only minimal effects on gas exchange. Exposure of Arabidopsis to sublethal salt concentrations resulted in stomatal closure and inhibition of CO2 fixation. This lead to an inhibition of electron transport though photosystem II (PSII), an increase in cyclic electron flow involving only PSI, and increased nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. In contrast, in Thellungiella, although gas exchange was marginally inhibited by high salt and PSI was unaffected, there was a large increase in electron flow involving PSII. This additional electron transport activity is oxygen dependent and sensitive to the alternative oxidase inhibitor n-propyl gallate. PSII electron transport in Thellungiella showed a reduced sensitivity to 2'-iodo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-2',4,4'-trinitrodiphenylether, an inhibitor of the cytochrome b6f complex. At the same time, we observed a substantial up-regulation of a protein reacting with antibodies raised against the plastid terminal oxidase. No such up-regulation was seen in Arabidopsis. We conclude that in salt-stressed Thellungiella, plastid terminal oxidase acts as an alternative electron sink, accounting for up to 30% of total PSII electron flow.

  13. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 → S transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Pooja; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Bhat, Abhay; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Sadhale, Parag P.; Nath, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. → TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 → S transition. → Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 → S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 → S arrest is discussed.

  14. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_003071 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [Arabidopsis thaliana] MAAKPTALGRPTVAPGHQLRLVFKGPEQTHQNRRMCDICDESAEGLYYQCKPCGFDVHPLCTQLPQHSWRYKCGQCRVDVHMECV...PSTLATFMHPQHELRLVFRGPEHTHQNKRMCDICDESAEGLYYQCEPCGFDVHPLCTQLPQHVRHVPHPAHLLELSQWGAS

  16. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  17. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehmsmeier Marc

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence.

  18. Arabidopsis Growth Simulation Using Image Processing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a method to represent the virtual Arabidopsis plant at each growth stage. It includes simulating the shape and providing growth parameters. The shape is described with elliptic Fourier descriptors. First, the plant is segmented from the background with the chromatic coordinates. With the segmentation result, the outer boundary series are obtained by using boundary tracking algorithm. The elliptic Fourier analysis is then carried out to extract the coefficients of the contour. The coefficients require less storage than the original contour points and can be used to simulate the shape of the plant. The growth parameters include total area and the number of leaves of the plant. The total area is obtained with the number of the plant pixels and the image calibration result. The number of leaves is derived by detecting the apex of each leaf. It is achieved by using wavelet transform to identify the local maximum of the distance signal between the contour points and the region centroid. Experiment result shows that this method can record the growth stage of Arabidopsis plant with fewer data and provide a visual platform for plant growth research.

  19. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  20. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Saez-Aguayo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed.

  1. Divergent regulation of Arabidopsis SAUR genes: a focus on the SAUR10-clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Hilda; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Stortenbeker, Niek; Angenent, Gerco C; Bemer, Marian

    2017-12-19

    Small Auxin-Upregulated RNA (SAUR) genes encode growth regulators that induce cell elongation. Arabidopsis contains more than 70 SAUR genes, of which the growth-promoting function has been unveiled in seedlings, while their role in other tissues remained largely unknown. Here, we focus on the regulatory regions of Arabidopsis SAUR genes, to predict the processes in which they play a role, and understand the dynamics of plant growth. In this study, we characterized in detail the entire SAUR10-clade: SAUR8, SAUR9, SAUR10, SAUR12, SAUR16, SAUR50, SAUR51 and SAUR54. Overexpression analysis revealed that the different proteins fulfil similar functions, while the SAUR expression patterns were highly diverse, showing expression throughout plant development in a variety of tissues. In addition, the response to application of different hormones largely varied between the different genes. These tissue-specific and hormone-specific responses could be linked to transcription factor binding sites using in silico analyses. These analyses also supported the existence of two groups of SAURs in Arabidopsis: Class I genes can be induced by combinatorial action of ARF-BZR-PIF transcription factors, while Class II genes are not regulated by auxin. SAUR10-clade genes generally induce cell-elongation, but exhibit diverse expression patterns and responses to hormones. Our experimental and in silico analyses suggest that transcription factors involved in plant development determine the tissue specific expression of the different SAUR genes, whereas the amplitude of this expression can often be controlled by hormone response transcription factors. This allows the plant to fine tune growth in a variety of tissues in response to internal and external signals.

  2. Induction and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants by Ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Y. H.; Choi, J. D.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, J. R.; Sohn, H. S.

    2008-03-01

    This study was conducted to search the proper conditions and times for irradiating proton beam to seeds generally used for induction of mutant. Arabidopsis as model plants has good characters that is a short generation time, producing a lot of seeds, sequenced genome, developed maker. This points were the best materials for plant breeding for this study. The data of inducing mutants of Arabidopsis is used to be applicate to crops have more longer generation that is the final goals of this study. The goals of this project were to inducing and characterizing arabidopsis mutants by the proton ion beam and γ-ray. As well as, the purpose of this study was securing more than 10 lines of arabidopsis mutants in this project and also to know the changed DNA structure of the mutants using the basic data for applying to the more study

  3. The Hidden Geometries of the Arabidopsis thaliana Epidermis

    KAUST Repository

    Staff, Lee; Hurd, Patricia; Reale, Lara; Seoighe, Cathal; Rockwood, Alyn; Gehring, Christoph A

    2012-01-01

    The quest for the discovery of mathematical principles that underlie biological phenomena is ancient and ongoing. We present a geometric analysis of the complex interdigitated pavement cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana (Col.) adaxial epidermis

  4. A potato NOA gene increased salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... in Arabidopsis thaliana salt stress responses and increased its salinity tolerance. Key words: StNOA1 ... (NR)-dependent pathways (Cueto et al., 1996; Delledonne ..... plastome-encoded proteins uncovers a mechanism for the.

  5. carboxylate synthase gene family in Arabidopsis, rice, grapevine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... evolutionary relationships of ACS genes in the four plant species. Chromosomal .... classification was consistent with the report from. Jakubowicz et al. ..... Analysis of the genome sequence of the flowering plant Arabidopsis ...

  6. Induction and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants by Ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Y. H.; Choi, J. D.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, J. R.; Sohn, H. S. [Gyeongbuk Institute for Bio Industry, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    This study was conducted to search the proper conditions and times for irradiating proton beam to seeds generally used for induction of mutant. Arabidopsis as model plants has good characters that is a short generation time, producing a lot of seeds, sequenced genome, developed maker. This points were the best materials for plant breeding for this study. The data of inducing mutants of Arabidopsis is used to be applicate to crops have more longer generation that is the final goals of this study. The goals of this project were to inducing and characterizing arabidopsis mutants by the proton ion beam and {gamma}-ray. As well as, the purpose of this study was securing more than 10 lines of arabidopsis mutants in this project and also to know the changed DNA structure of the mutants using the basic data for applying to the more study

  7. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  8. Identification of Polyadenylation Sites within Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal

    2011-09-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a field of artificial intelligence focused on the design and implementation of algorithms that enable creation of models for clustering, classification, prediction, ranking and similar inference tasks based on information contained in data. Many ML algorithms have been successfully utilized in a variety of applications. The problem addressed in this thesis is from the field of bioinformatics and deals with the recognition of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites in the genomic sequence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During the RNA processing, a tail consisting of a number of consecutive adenine (A) nucleotides is added to the terminal nucleotide of the 3’- untranslated region (3’UTR) of the primary RNA. The process in which these A nucleotides are added is called polyadenylation. The location in the genomic DNA sequence that corresponds to the start of terminal A nucleotides (i.e. to the end of 3’UTR) is known as a poly(A) site. Recognition of the poly(A) sites in DNA sequence is important for better gene annotation and understanding of gene regulation. In this study, we built an artificial neural network (ANN) for the recognition of poly(A) sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Our study demonstrates that this model achieves improved accuracy compared to the existing predictive models for this purpose. The key factor contributing to the enhanced predictive performance of our ANN model is a distinguishing set of features used in creation of the model. These features include a number of physico-chemical characteristics of relevance, such as dinucleotide thermodynamic characteristics, electron-ion interaction potential, etc., but also many of the statistical properties of the DNA sequences from the region surrounding poly(A) site, such as nucleotide and polynucleotide properties, common motifs, etc. Our ANN model was compared in performance with several other ML models, as well as with the PAC tool that is specifically developed for

  9. Altered expression of Aurora kinases in Arabidopsis results in aneu- and polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Dmitri; Lermontova, Inna; Weiss, Oda; Fuchs, Joerg; Rutten, Twan; Kumke, Katrin; Sharbel, Timothy F; Van Damme, Daniel; De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny; Houben, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Aurora is an evolutionary conserved protein kinase family involved in monitoring of chromosome segregation via phosphorylation of different substrates. In plants, however, the involvement of Aurora proteins in meiosis and in sensing microtubule attachment remains to be proven, although the downstream components leading to the targeting of spindle assembly checkpoint signals to anaphase-promoting complex have been described. To analyze the three members of Aurora family (AtAurora1, -2, and -3) of Arabidopsis we employed different combinations of T-DNA insertion mutants and/or RNAi transformants. Meiotic defects and the formation of unreduced pollen were revealed including plants with an increased ploidy level. The effect of reduced expression of Aurora was mimicked by application of the ATP-competitive Aurora inhibitor II. In addition, strong overexpression of any member of the AtAurora family is not possible. Only tagged or truncated forms of Aurora kinases can be overexpressed. Expression of truncated AtAurora1 resulted in a high number of aneuploids in Arabidopsis, while expression of AtAurora1-TAPi construct in tobacco resulted in 4C (possible tetraploid) progeny. In conclusion, our data demonstrate an essential role of Aurora kinases in the monitoring of meiosis in plants. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Proteomic profiling of tandem affinity purified 14-3-3 protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ing-Feng; Curran, Amy; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David; Cushman, John C; Mittler, Ron; Harmon, Alice; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2009-06-01

    In eukaryotes, 14-3-3 dimers regulate hundreds of functionally diverse proteins (clients), typically in phosphorylation-dependent interactions. To uncover new clients, 14-3-3 omega (At1g78300) from Arabidopsis was engineered with a "tandem affinity purification" tag and expressed in transgenic plants. Purified complexes were analyzed by tandem MS. Results indicate that 14-3-3 omega can dimerize with at least 10 of the 12 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in Arabidopsis. The identification here of 121 putative clients provides support for in vivo 14-3-3 interactions with a diverse array of proteins, including those involved in: (i) Ion transport, such as a K(+) channel (GORK), a Cl(-) channel (CLCg), Ca(2+) channels belonging to the glutamate receptor family (1.2, 2.1, 2.9, 3.4, 3.7); (ii) hormone signaling, such as ACC synthase (isoforms ACS-6, -7 and -8 involved in ethylene synthesis) and the brassinolide receptors BRI1 and BAK1; (iii) transcription, such as 7 WRKY family transcription factors; (iv) metabolism, such as phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase; and (v) lipid signaling, such as phospholipase D (beta and gamma). More than 80% (101) of these putative clients represent previously unidentified 14-3-3 interactors. These results raise the number of putative 14-3-3 clients identified in plants to over 300.

  11. Chloroplast Signaling Gates Thermotolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Dickinson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is a key environmental variable influencing plant growth and survival. Protection against high temperature stress in eukaryotes is coordinated by heat shock factors (HSFs, transcription factors that activate the expression of protective chaperones such as HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70; however, the pathway by which temperature is sensed and integrated with other environmental signals into adaptive responses is not well understood. Plants are exposed to considerable diurnal variation in temperature, and we have found that there is diurnal variation in thermotolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana, with maximal thermotolerance coinciding with higher HSP70 expression during the day. In a forward genetic screen, we identified a key role for the chloroplast in controlling this response, suggesting that light-induced chloroplast signaling plays a key role. Consistent with this, we are able to globally activate binding of HSFA1a to its targets by altering redox status in planta independently of a heat shock.

  12. Stochastic gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ilka Schultheiß; Pietsch, Jessica Magdalena; Keizer, Emma Mathilde; Greese, Bettina; Balkunde, Rachappa; Fleck, Christian; Hülskamp, Martin

    2017-12-14

    Although plant development is highly reproducible, some stochasticity exists. This developmental stochasticity may be caused by noisy gene expression. Here we analyze the fluctuation of protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the photoconvertible KikGR marker, we show that the protein expressions of individual cells fluctuate over time. A dual reporter system was used to study extrinsic and intrinsic noise of marker gene expression. We report that extrinsic noise is higher than intrinsic noise and that extrinsic noise in stomata is clearly lower in comparison to several other tissues/cell types. Finally, we show that cells are coupled with respect to stochastic protein expression in young leaves, hypocotyls and roots but not in mature leaves. Our data indicate that stochasticity of gene expression can vary between tissues/cell types and that it can be coupled in a non-cell-autonomous manner.

  13. Reference: 351 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available similarly high levels of ABA. ABA levels decreased rapidly upon imbibition, although they fell further in ND than in D. Gene express...e family (CYP707A)] genes. Of these, only the AtCYP707A2 gene was differentially expressed between D and ND seeds, being express...ed to a much higher level in ND seeds. Similarly, a barley CYP707 homologue, (HvABA8'OH-1) was express...ins. Consistent with this, in situ hybridization studies showed HvABA8'OH-1 mRNA expression was stronger in ... plays a key role in dormancy release. Constitutive expression of a CYP707A gene in transgenic Arabidopsis r

  14. The demise of chloroplast DNA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Beth A; Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2004-09-01

    Although it might be expected that chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) would be stably maintained in mature leaves, we report the surprising observation that cpDNA levels decline during plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col.) until most of the leaves contain little or no DNA long before the onset of senescence. We measured the cpDNA content in developing cotyledons, rosette leaves, and cauline leaves. The amount of cpDNA per chloroplast decreases as the chloroplasts develop, reaching undetectable levels in mature leaves. In young cauline leaves, most individual molecules of cpDNA are found in complex, branched forms. In expanded cauline leaves, cpDNA is present in smaller branched forms only at the base of the leaf and is virtually absent in the distal part of the leaf. We conclude that photosynthetic activity may persist long after the demise of the cpDNA. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

  15. The growing story of (ARABIDOPSIS) CRINKLY 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Nikonorova, Natalia; Meyer, Matthew R; Sandal, Priyanka; Shah, Shweta; Vu, Lam Dai; Gevaert, Kris; Rao, A Gururaj; De Smet, Ive

    2016-08-01

    Receptor kinases play important roles in plant growth and development, but only few of them have been functionally characterized in depth. Over the past decade CRINKLY 4 (CR4)-related research has peaked as a result of a newly discovered role of ARABIDOPSIS CR4 (ACR4) in the root. Here, we comprehensively review the available (A)CR4 literature and describe its role in embryo, seed, shoot, and root development, but we also flag an unexpected role in plant defence. In addition, we discuss ACR4 domains and protein structure, describe known ACR4-interacting proteins and substrates, and elaborate on the transcriptional regulation of ACR4 Finally, we address the missing knowledge in our understanding of ACR4 signalling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Intracellular Localization of Arabidopsis Sulfurtransferases1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Dietrich, Christof; Nowak, Katharina; Sierralta, Walter D.; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2004-01-01

    Sulfurtransferases (Str) comprise a group of enzymes widely distributed in archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryota which catalyze the transfer of a sulfur atom from suitable sulfur donors to nucleophilic sulfur acceptors. In all organisms analyzed to date, small gene families encoding Str proteins have been identified. The gene products were localized to different compartments of the cells. Our interest concerns the localization of Str proteins encoded in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. Computer-based prediction methods revealed localization in different compartments of the cell for six putative AtStrs. Several methods were used to determine the localization of the AtStr proteins experimentally. For AtStr1, a mitochondrial localization was demonstrated by immunodetection in the proteome of isolated mitochondria resolved by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent blotting. The respective mature AtStr1 protein was identified by mass spectrometry sequencing. The same result was obtained by transient expression of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts, whereas AtStr2 was exclusively localized to the cytoplasm by this method. Three members of the single-domain AtStr were localized in the chloroplasts as demonstrated by transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions in protoplasts and stomata, whereas the single-domain AtStr18 was shown to be cytoplasmic. The remarkable subcellular distribution of AtStr15 was additionally analyzed by transmission electron immunomicroscopy using a monospecific antibody against green fluorescent protein, indicating an attachment to the thylakoid membrane. The knowledge of the intracellular localization of the members of this multiprotein family will help elucidate their specific functions in the organism. PMID:15181206

  17. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  18. Interaction between sugar and abscisic acid signalling during early seedling development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, B.J.W.; Schuurmans, J.A.M.J.; Smeekens, J.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Sugars regulate important processes and affect the expression of many genes in plants. Characterization of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with altered sugar sensitivity revealed the function of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling in sugar responses. However, the exact interaction between

  19. Update History of This Database - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Arabidopsis Phenome Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/27 Arabidopsis Phenome Data...base English archive site is opened. - Arabidopsis Phenome Database (http://jphenom...e.info/?page_id=95) is opened. About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database... Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive ...

  20. Standardized Method for High-throughput Sterilization of Arabidopsis Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Benson E; Rivero, Luz; Calhoun, Chistopher S; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2017-10-17

    Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) seedlings often need to be grown on sterile media. This requires prior seed sterilization to prevent the growth of microbial contaminants present on the seed surface. Currently, Arabidopsis seeds are sterilized using two distinct sterilization techniques in conditions that differ slightly between labs and have not been standardized, often resulting in only partially effective sterilization or in excessive seed mortality. Most of these methods are also not easily scalable to a large number of seed lines of diverse genotypes. As technologies for high-throughput analysis of Arabidopsis continue to proliferate, standardized techniques for sterilizing large numbers of seeds of different genotypes are becoming essential for conducting these types of experiments. The response of a number of Arabidopsis lines to two different sterilization techniques was evaluated based on seed germination rate and the level of seed contamination with microbes and other pathogens. The treatments included different concentrations of sterilizing agents and times of exposure, combined to determine optimal conditions for Arabidopsis seed sterilization. Optimized protocols have been developed for two different sterilization methods: bleach (liquid-phase) and chlorine (Cl2) gas (vapor-phase), both resulting in high seed germination rates and minimal microbial contamination. The utility of these protocols was illustrated through the testing of both wild type and mutant seeds with a range of germination potentials. Our results show that seeds can be effectively sterilized using either method without excessive seed mortality, although detrimental effects of sterilization were observed for seeds with lower than optimal germination potential. In addition, an equation was developed to enable researchers to apply the standardized chlorine gas sterilization conditions to airtight containers of different sizes. The protocols described here allow easy, efficient, and

  1. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  2. A bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase gene as a negative selectable marker in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Fennema, M.; Hao, L.

    1999-01-01

    , including Arabidopsis, tobacco, oil seed rape and rice, do not express detectable haloalkane dehalogenase activities, and that wild-type Arabidopsis grows in the presence of DCE. In contrast, DCE applied as a volatile can be used to select on plates or in soil transgenic Arabidopsis which express dhl...

  3. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures......Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport...... accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development....

  4. MEDIATOR18 and MEDIATOR20 confer susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Jiri; Davoine, Celine; Björklund, Stefan; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal; Schenk, Peer M.

    2017-01-01

    The conserved protein complex known as Mediator conveys transcriptional signals by acting as an intermediary between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. As a result, Mediator subunits play multiple roles in regulating developmental as well as abiotic and biotic stress pathways. In this report we identify the head domain subunits MEDIATOR18 and MEDIATOR20 as important susceptibility factors for Fusarium oxysporum infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutants of MED18 and MED20 display down-regulation of genes associated with jasmonate signaling and biosynthesis while up-regulation of salicylic acid associated pathogenesis related genes and reactive oxygen producing and scavenging genes. We propose that MED18 and MED20 form a sub-domain within Mediator that controls the balance of salicylic acid and jasmonate associated defense pathways. PMID:28441405

  5. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Pauly, Markus; Orellana, Ariel; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2016-07-06

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development.

  6. Identification of a novel group of putative Arabidopsis thaliana beta-(1,3)-galactosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Yongmei; Egelund, Jack; Gilson, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    To begin biochemical and molecular studies on the biosynthesis of the type II arabinogalactan chains on arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs), we adopted a bioinformatic approach to identify and systematically characterise the putative galactosyltransferases (GalTs) responsible for synthesizing the beta......-(1,3)-Gal linkage from CAZy GT-family-31 from Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses confirmed that 20 members of the GT-31 family contained domains/motifs typical of biochemically characterised beta-(1,3)-GTs from mammalian systems. Microarray data confirm that members of this family are expressed......,3)-GalT activity. This bioinformatic/molecular study of CAZy GT-family-31 was validated by the recent report of Strasser et al. (Plant Cell 19:2278-2292, 2007) that another member of this family (At1g26810; GALT1) encodes a beta-(1,3)-GalT involved in the biosynthesis of the Lewis a epitope of N...

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool to identify traits involved in Verticillium dahliae biocontrol by the olive root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mercedes eMaldonado-González

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The effective management of Verticillium wilts, diseases affecting many crops and caused by some species of the soil-borne fungus Verticillium, is problematic. The use of microbial antagonists to control these pathologies fits modern sustainable agriculture criteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from olive roots with demonstrated ability to control Verticillium wilt of olive caused by the highly-virulent, defoliating (D pathotype of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. However, the study of the PICF7-V.dahliae-olive tripartite interaction poses difficulties because of the inherent characteristics of woody, long-living plants. To overcome these problems we explored the use of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Results obtained in this study showed that: (i olive D and non-defoliating (ND V. dahliae pathotypes produce differential disease severity in A. thaliana plants; (ii strain PICF7 is able to colonize and persist in the A. thaliana rhizosphere but is not endophytic in Arabidopsis; and (iii strain PICF7 controls Verticillium wilt (VW in Arabidopsis. Additionally, as previously observed in olive, neither swimming motility nor siderophore production by PICF7 are required for VW control in A. thaliana, whilst cysteine auxotrophy decreased the effectiveness of PICF7. Moreover, when applied to the roots PICF7 controlled Botrytis cinerea infection in the leaves of Arabidopsis, suggesting that this strain is able to induce systemic resistance. Arabidopsis thaliana is therefore a suitable alternative to olive bioassays to unravel biocontrol traits involved in biological control of V. dahliae by P. fluorescens PICF7.

  8. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Zebrowski, Jacek; Oklejewicz, Bernadetta; Czarnik, Justyna; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage

  9. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra, E-mail: A.Kwiatkows@gmail.com [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Zebrowski, Jacek [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Oklejewicz, Bernadetta [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Czarnik, Justyna [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Halibart-Puzio, Joanna [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wnuk, Maciej [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  10. Mutually Exclusive Alterations in Secondary Metabolism Are Critical for the Uptake of Insoluble Iron Compounds by Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Celma, Jorge; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Guin-Mau; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The generally low bioavailability of iron in aerobic soil systems forced plants to evolve sophisticated genetic strategies to improve the acquisition of iron from sparingly soluble and immobile iron pools. To distinguish between conserved and species-dependent components of such strategies, we analyzed iron deficiency-induced changes in the transcriptome of two model species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Medicago truncatula. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing revealed a massive up-regulation of genes coding for enzymes involved in riboflavin biosynthesis in M. truncatula and phenylpropanoid synthesis in Arabidopsis upon iron deficiency. Coexpression and promoter analysis indicated that the synthesis of flavins and phenylpropanoids is tightly linked to and putatively coregulated with other genes encoding proteins involved in iron uptake. We further provide evidence that the production and secretion of phenolic compounds is critical for the uptake of iron from sources with low bioavailability but dispensable under conditions where iron is readily available. In Arabidopsis, homozygous mutations in the Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family gene F6′H1 and defects in the expression of PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE9, encoding a putative efflux transporter for products from the phenylpropanoid pathway, compromised iron uptake from an iron source of low bioavailability. Both mutants were partially rescued when grown alongside wild-type Arabidopsis or M. truncatula seedlings, presumably by secreted phenolics and flavins. We concluded that production and secretion of compounds that facilitate the uptake of iron is an essential but poorly understood aspect of the reduction-based iron acquisition strategy, which is likely to contribute substantially to the efficiency of iron uptake in natural conditions. PMID:23735511

  11. G2 Checkpoint Responses in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Anne [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-03-18

    This project focused on the mechanism and biological significance of the G2 arrest response to replication stress in plants. We employed both forward and reverse genetic approaches to identify genes required for this response. A total of 3 different postdocs, 5 undergraduates, and 2 graduate students participated in the project. We identified several genes required for damage response in plants, including homologs of genes previously identified in animals (ATM and ATR), novel, a plant-specific genes (SOG1) and a gene known in animals but previously thought to be missing from the Arabidopsis genome (ATRIP). We characterized the transcriptome of gamma-irradiated plants, and found that plants, unlike animals, express a robust transcriptional response to damage, involving genes that regulate the cell cycle and DNA metabolism. This response requires both ATM and the transcription factor SOG1. We found that both ATM and ATR play a role in meiosis in plants. We also found that plants have a cell-type-specific programmed cell death response to ionizing radiation and UV light, and that this response requires ATR, ATM, and SOG1. These results were published in a series of 5 papers.

  12. The pattern of polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We resequenced 876 short fragments in a sample of 96 individuals of Arabidopsis thaliana that included stock center accessions as well as a hierarchical sample from natural populations. Although A. thaliana is a selfing weed, the pattern of polymorphism in general agrees with what is expected for a widely distributed, sexually reproducing species. Linkage disequilibrium decays rapidly, within 50 kb. Variation is shared worldwide, although population structure and isolation by distance are evident. The data fail to fit standard neutral models in several ways. There is a genome-wide excess of rare alleles, at least partially due to selection. There is too much variation between genomic regions in the level of polymorphism. The local level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with gene density and positively correlated with segmental duplications. Because the data do not fit theoretical null distributions, attempts to infer natural selection from polymorphism data will require genome-wide surveys of polymorphism in order to identify anomalous regions. Despite this, our data support the utility of A. thaliana as a model for evolutionary functional genomics.

  13. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Rubisco activase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, Dirk; Larsson, Anna M; Andersson, Inger

    2015-04-01

    The CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is inactivated by the formation of dead-end complexes with inhibitory sugar phosphates. In plants and green algae, the ATP-dependent motor protein Rubisco activase restores catalytic competence by facilitating conformational changes in Rubisco that promote the release of the inhibitory compounds from the active site. Here, the crystal structure of Rubisco activase from Arabidopsis thaliana is presented at 2.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals an AAA+ two-domain structure. More than 100 residues in the protein were not visible in the electron-density map owing to conformational disorder, but were verified to be present in the crystal by mass spectrometry. Two sulfate ions were found in the structure. One was bound in the loop formed by the Walker A motif at the interface of the domains. A second sulfate ion was bound at the N-terminal end of the first helix of the C-terminal domain. The protein packs in a helical fashion in the crystal, as observed previously for Rubisco activase, but differences in the helical pitch indicate flexibility in the packing of the protein.

  14. Proteomic identification of S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindermayr, C.; Saalbach, G.; Durner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although nitric oxide (NO) has grown into a key signaling molecule in plants during the last few years, less is known about how NO regulates different events in plants. Analyses of NO-dependent processes in animal systems have demonstrated protein S-nitrosylation of cysteine (Cys) residues...... to be one of the dominant regulation mechanisms for many animal proteins. For plants, the principle of S-nitrosylation remained to be elucidated. We generated S-nitrosothiols by treating extracts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures with the NO-donor S......-nitrosoglutathione. Furthermore, Arabidopsis plants were treated with gaseous NO to analyze whether S-nitrosylation can occur in the specific redox environment of a plant cell in vivo. S-Nitrosylated proteins were detected by a biotin switch method, converting S-nitrosylated Cys to biotinylated Cys. Biotin-labeled proteins were...

  15. Genome interrogation for novel salinity tolerant Arabidopsis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Niels; Pinas, Johan; Schat, Henk; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2016-12-01

    Soil salinity is becoming an increasingly large problem in agriculture. In this study, we have investigated whether a capacity to withstand salinity can be induced in the salinity sensitive plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, and whether it can be maintained in subsequent generations. To this end, we have used zinc finger artificial transcription factor (ZF-ATFs) mediated genome interrogation. Already within a relatively small collection Arabidopsis lines expressing ZF-ATFs, we found 41 lines that were tolerant to 100 mM NaCl. Furthermore, ZF-ATF encoding gene constructs rescued from the most strongly salinity tolerant lines were indeed found to act as dominant and heritable agents for salinity tolerance. Altogether, our data provide evidence that a silent capacity to withstand normally lethal levels of salinity exists in Arabidopsis and can be evoked relatively easily by in trans acting transcription factors like ZF-ATFs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Expression of the Arabidopsis Sigma Factor SIG5 Is Photoreceptor and Photosynthesis Controlled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mellenthin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two collections of Arabidopsis GAL4 enhancer trap lines were screened for light-intensity dependent reporter gene activation. Line N9313 was isolated for its strong light-intensity regulation. The T-DNA element trapped distant enhancers of the SIG5 promoter, which drives expression of a sigma factor involved in regulation of chloroplast genes for photosystem II core proteins. The T-DNA insertion 715 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site splits the promoter in a distal and proximal part. Both parts are sensitive to blue and red light and depend on photosynthetic electron transport activity between photosystem II and the plastoquinone pool. The mainblue-light sensitivity is localized within a 196-bp sequence (–887 to –691 bp in the proximal promoter region It is preferentially CRY1 and PHYB controlled. Type-I and type-II phytochromes mediate red-light sensitivity via various promoter elements spread over the proximal and distal upstream region. This work characterizes SIG5 as an anterograde control factor of chloroplast gene expression, which is controlled by chloroplast signals in a retrograde manner.

  17. Mediator subunit18 controls flowering time and floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengui Zheng

    Full Text Available Mediator is a conserved multi-protein complex that plays an important role in regulating transcription by mediating interactions between transcriptional activator proteins and RNA polymerase II. Much evidence exists that Mediator plays a constitutive role in the transcription of all genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. However, evidence is mounting that specific Mediator subunits may control the developmental regulation of specific subsets of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Although the Mediator complex has been extensively studied in yeast and mammals, only a few reports on Mediator function in flowering time control of plants, little is known about Mediator function in floral organ identity. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, MEDIATOR SUBUNIT 18 (MED18 affects flowering time and floral organ formation through FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and AGAMOUS (AG. A MED18 loss-of-function mutant showed a remarkable syndrome of later flowering and altered floral organ number. We show that FLC and AG mRNA levels and AG expression patterns are altered in the mutant. Our results support parallels between the regulation of FLC and AG and demonstrate a developmental role for Mediator in plants.

  18. Identification of proteins interacting with Arabidopsis ACD11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Joensen, Jan; McKinney, Lea V

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ACD11 gene encodes a sphingosine transfer protein and was identified by the accelerated cell death phenotype of the loss of function acd11 mutant, which exhibits heightened expression of genes involved in the disease resistance hypersensitive response (HR). We used ACD11 as bait...... in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an Arabidopsis cDNA library to identify ACD11 interacting proteins. One interactor identified is a protein of unknown function with an RNA recognition motif (RRM) designated BPA1 (binding partner of ACD11). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the ACD11-BPA1...

  19. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M 1 lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by γirradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and γ-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  20. Hybrid mimics and hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Greaves, Ian K.; Groszmann, Michael; Wu, Li Min; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Peacock, W. James

    2015-01-01

    F1 hybrids can outperform their parents in yield and vegetative biomass, features of hybrid vigor that form the basis of the hybrid seed industry. The yield advantage of the F1 is lost in the F2 and subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, from F2 plants that have a F1-like phenotype, we have by recurrent selection produced pure breeding F5/F6 lines, hybrid mimics, in which the characteristics of the F1 hybrid are stabilized. These hybrid mimic lines, like the F1 hybrid, have larger leaves than the parent plant, and the leaves have increased photosynthetic cell numbers, and in some lines, increased size of cells, suggesting an increased supply of photosynthate. A comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the F1 hybrid with those of eight hybrid mimic lines identified metabolic pathways altered in both; these pathways include down-regulation of defense response pathways and altered abiotic response pathways. F6 hybrid mimic lines are mostly homozygous at each locus in the genome and yet retain the large F1-like phenotype. Many alleles in the F6 plants, when they are homozygous, have expression levels different to the level in the parent. We consider this altered expression to be a consequence of transregulation of genes from one parent by genes from the other parent. Transregulation could also arise from epigenetic modifications in the F1. The pure breeding hybrid mimics have been valuable in probing the mechanisms of hybrid vigor and may also prove to be useful hybrid vigor equivalents in agriculture. PMID:26283378

  1. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  2. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the search for answers to pressing root developmental genetic issues, plant science has turned to a small genome dicot plant (Arabidopsis) to be used as a model to study and use to develop hypotheses for testing other species. Through out the published research only three classes of root are des...

  3. The development of Arabidopsis as a plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.; Meinke, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Arabidopsis thaliana emerged as the model organism of choice for research in plant biology. A consensus was reached about the need to focus on a single organism to integrate the classical disciplines of plant science with the expanding fields of genetics and molecular biology.

  4. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  5. Transcriptome Responses to Combinations of Stresses in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Barah, Pankaj; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the response of the majority of the genes cannot be predicted from single stress experiments and only a small fraction of the genes have potential antagonistic responses, indicating that plants have evolved to cope with combinations of stresses and therefore may be bred to endure...

  6. Highlights of meiotic genes in Arabidopsis thaliana | Consiglio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meiosis is a fascinating and complex phenomenon and, despite its central role in sexual plant reproduction, little is known on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We review the progress made in recent years using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for isolating meiotic genes. In particular, emphasis is given on ...

  7. Interplay between cytochrome c and gibberellins during Arabidopsis vegetative development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Racca, S.; Welchen, E.; Gras, D. E.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Turečková, Veronika; Maurino, V. G.; Gonzalez, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 1 (2018), s. 105-121 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * cytochrome c * DELLA protein * gibberellin * mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  8. Proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2001-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and

  9. Whitefly and aphid inducible promoters of Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NEERAJ KUMAR DUBEY

    2018-02-16

    Feb 16, 2018 ... binary expression vector to validate the inducible behaviour of these promoters in eight independent transgenic Nicotiana ..... a 50-fold induction of the W250 gene was observed in ..... indicate the involvement of ABA and ACC cross-talk in ... Hosokawa C. D. and Shinozaki K. 1997 Role of arabidopsis.

  10. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also discus...

  11. Changes in leaf proteome profile of Arabidopsis thaliana in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-25

    Apr 25, 2013 ... Changes in leaf proteome profile of Arabidopsis thaliana in response to salicylic ... ethylene (ET) plays a key role in plant defence response by controlling ..... Oryza sativa. ( japonica cultivar-group). 24. 33.855/5.85. RT8702.

  12. Metabolic changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing chalcone synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, Thi Thanh Hien

    2010-01-01

    The study has shown that it is possible to introduce the heterologous CHS gene in Arabidopsis thaliana and common multicopies of transgenes containing plants were obtained. Analysis of the change in metabolome of CHS transgenic plants, high expression transgenic lines can be identified by markers

  13. Uptake and metabolism of sulphur dioxide by Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, T.A.W.; De Kok, L.J.; Haneklaus, S.; Schnug, E.

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. was exposed to various concentrations of SO2 during almost the entire life cycle. No negative effects of SO2 on shoot biomass production were observed. There was a linear relation between the deposition of SO2 and the atmospheric SO2 concentration. Sulphur

  14. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328228818; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241338735

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana

  15. Differential effects of carbohydrates on arabidopsis pollen germination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirsche, J.; Fernández, J. M. G.; Stabentheiner, E.; Großkinsky, D.K.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2017), s. 691-701 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Carbohydrates * Metabolic regulation * Pollen germination * Signaling * Structure-function relationship Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  16. Non-Coding RNAs in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wonterghem, Miranda

    This work evolves around elucidating the mechanisms of micro RNAs (miRNAs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. I identified a new class of nuclear non-coding RNAs derived from protein coding genes. The genes are miRNA targets with extensive gene body methylation. The RNA species are nuclear localized and de...

  17. The Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Jun; Parsons, Harriet Tempé; Heazlewood, Joshua L.

    2014-01-01

    compartments. However, a detailed study of enriched cytosolic fractions from Arabidopsis cell culture has been performed only recently, with over 1,000 proteins reproducibly identified by mass spectrometry. The number of proteins allocated to the cytosol nearly doubles to 1,802 if a series of targeted...

  18. Gene expression in arabidopsis shoot tips after liquid nitrogen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips can be successfully cryopreserved using either Plant Vitrification Solution 2 (PVS2) or Plant Vitrification Solution 3 (PVS3) as the cryoprotectant. We used this model system to identify suites of genes that were either upregulated or downregulated as shoot tips recov...

  19. Ecology of Arabidopsis thaliana : local adaptation and interaction with herbivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosleh Arany, A.

    2006-01-01

    As first step the impact of herbivory and abiotic factors on population dynamics of Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Ceutorhynchus atomus and C. contractus were identified as the major insect herbivores on A. thaliana population, reducing seed production by more than 40%. Mortality from February

  20. Mahalanobis distance screening of Arabidopsis mutants with chlorophyll fluorescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Codrea, C. C.; Hakala-Yatkin, M.; Karlund-Marttila, A.; Nedbal, Ladislav; Aittokallio, T.; Nevalainen, O. S.; Tyystjärvi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2010), s. 273-283 ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : arabidopsis thaliana * chlorophyll fluorescence * fluorescence imaging * mutant detection * outlier detection Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.410, year: 2010 http://www.springerlink.com/content/x3586512462pn006/

  1. Cleaning the GenBank Arabidopsis thaliana data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korning, Peter G.; Hebsgaard, Stefan M.; Rouze, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Data driven computational biology relies on the large quantities of genomic data stored in international sequence data banks. However, the possibilities are drastically impaired if the stored data is unreliable. During a project aiming to predict splice sites in the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana, we...... through anonymous FTP....

  2. Proteomic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC) system, ProteomeLab PF 2D, was employed to study the defence proteome of Arabidopsis following infection with the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. This system demonstrated differential protein expression in control and treated samples in some fractions.

  3. The influences of Hygromycin B on growth of Arabidopsis thaliana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling cotyledon and leaf were evidently affected by Hygromycin B. As compared to the control, cotyledon of seedling on Murashige and Skoog (MS) with Hygromycin B was very small and its leaf was not formed. Along with increase in culture time, cells in the ...

  4. Sugar signalling during germination and early seedling establishment in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, S.J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Sugars have pronounced effects on many plant processes like gene expression, germination and early seedling development. Several screens for sugar insensitive mutants were performed to identify genes involved in sugar response pathways using the model plant Arabidopsis. These include sun, gin and

  5. Multidimensional fluorescence microscopy of multiple organelles in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The isolation of green fluorescent protein (GFP and the development of spectral variants over the past decade have begun to reveal the dynamic nature of protein trafficking and organelle motility. In planta analyses of this dynamic process have typically been limited to only two organelles or proteins at a time in only a few cell types. Results We generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant that contains four spectrally different fluorescent proteins. Nuclei, plastids, mitochondria and plasma membranes were genetically tagged with cyan, red, yellow and green fluorescent proteins, respectively. In addition, methods to track nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts and quantify the interaction between these organelles at a submicron resolution were developed. These analyzes revealed that N-ethylmaleimide disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial but not nuclear-plastids interactions in root epidermal cells of live Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusion We developed a tool and associated methods for analyzing the complex dynamic of organelle-organelle interactions in real time in planta. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis (Kaleidocell is available through Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center.

  6. Reduction of mineral nutrient availability accelerates flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Jan; Seňková, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 15 (2008), s. 1601-1609 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600380510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Flowering * Landsberg erecta Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2008

  7. Mining the plant-herbivore interface with a leafmining Drosophila of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Noah K.; Groen, Simon C.; Chevasco, Daniela; Bear, Ashley; Beckwith, Noor; Gregory, T. Ryan; Denoux, Carine; Mammarella, Nicole; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental infections of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with genomically characterized plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae have facilitated dissection of canonical eukaryotic defense pathways and parasite virulence factors. Plants are also attacked by herbivorous insects, and the development of an ecologically relevant genetic model herbivore that feeds on Arabidopsis will enable the parallel dissection of host defense and reciprocal resistance pathways such as those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. An ideal candidate is Scaptomyza flava, a drosophilid fly whose leafmining larvae are true herbivores that can be found in nature feeding on Arabidopsis and other crucifers. Here we describe the eukaryotic life cycle of S. flava on Arabidopsis, and use multiple approaches to characterize the response of Arabidopsis to S. flava attack. Oviposition choice tests and growth performance assays on different Arabidopsis ecotypes, defense-related mutants, and hormone and chitin-treated plants revealed significant differences in host preference and variation in larval performance across Arabidopsis accessions. The jasmonate (JA) and glucosinolate pathways in Arabidopsis are important in mediating quantitative resistance against S. flava, and priming with JA or chitin resulted in increased resistance. Expression of xenobiotic detoxification genes was reduced in S. flava larvae reared on Arabidopsis JA signaling mutants, and increased in plants pre-treated with chitin. These results and future research directions are discussed in the context of developing a genetic model system to analyze insect/plant interactions. PMID:21073583

  8. Autophagy Deficiency Compromises Alternative Pathways of Respiration following Energy Deprivation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Jessica A S; Cavalcanti, João Henrique F; Medeiros, David B; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Avin-Wittenberg, Tamar; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2017-09-01

    Under heterotrophic conditions, carbohydrate oxidation inside the mitochondrion is the primary energy source for cellular metabolism. However, during energy-limited conditions, alternative substrates are required to support respiration. Amino acid oxidation in plant cells plays a key role in this by generating electrons that can be transferred to the mitochondrial electron transport chain via the electron transfer flavoprotein/ubiquinone oxidoreductase system. Autophagy, a catabolic mechanism for macromolecule and protein recycling, allows the maintenance of amino acid pools and nutrient remobilization. Although the association between autophagy and alternative respiratory substrates has been suggested, the extent to which autophagy and primary metabolism interact to support plant respiration remains unclear. To investigate the metabolic importance of autophagy during development and under extended darkness, Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) mutants with disruption of autophagy ( atg mutants) were used. Under normal growth conditions, atg mutants showed lower growth and seed production with no impact on photosynthesis. Following extended darkness, atg mutants were characterized by signatures of early senescence, including decreased chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II coupled with increases in dark respiration. Transcript levels of genes involved in alternative pathways of respiration and amino acid catabolism were up-regulated in atg mutants. The metabolite profiles of dark-treated leaves revealed an extensive metabolic reprogramming in which increases in amino acid levels were partially compromised in atg mutants. Although an enhanced respiration in atg mutants was observed during extended darkness, autophagy deficiency compromises protein degradation and the generation of amino acids used as alternative substrates to the respiration. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Network modeling reveals prevalent negative regulatory relationships between signaling sectors in Arabidopsis immune signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanao Sato

    Full Text Available Biological signaling processes may be mediated by complex networks in which network components and network sectors interact with each other in complex ways. Studies of complex networks benefit from approaches in which the roles of individual components are considered in the context of the network. The plant immune signaling network, which controls inducible responses to pathogen attack, is such a complex network. We studied the Arabidopsis immune signaling network upon challenge with a strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae expressing the effector protein AvrRpt2 (Pto DC3000 AvrRpt2. This bacterial strain feeds multiple inputs into the signaling network, allowing many parts of the network to be activated at once. mRNA profiles for 571 immune response genes of 22 Arabidopsis immunity mutants and wild type were collected 6 hours after inoculation with Pto DC3000 AvrRpt2. The mRNA profiles were analyzed as detailed descriptions of changes in the network state resulting from the genetic perturbations. Regulatory relationships among the genes corresponding to the mutations were inferred by recursively applying a non-linear dimensionality reduction procedure to the mRNA profile data. The resulting static network model accurately predicted 23 of 25 regulatory relationships reported in the literature, suggesting that predictions of novel regulatory relationships are also accurate. The network model revealed two striking features: (i the components of the network are highly interconnected; and (ii negative regulatory relationships are common between signaling sectors. Complex regulatory relationships, including a novel negative regulatory relationship between the early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered signaling sectors and the salicylic acid sector, were further validated. We propose that prevalent negative regulatory relationships among the signaling sectors make the plant immune signaling network a "sector

  10. LIL3, a Light-Harvesting Complex Protein, Links Terpenoid and Tetrapyrrole Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Daniel; Rothbart, Maxi; Herbst, Josephine; Wang, Peng; Müller, Jakob; Wittmann, Daniel; Gruhl, Kirsten; Grimm, Bernhard

    2017-06-01

    The LIL3 protein of Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) belongs to the light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein family, which also includes the light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding proteins of photosystems I and II, the early-light-inducible proteins, PsbS involved in nonphotochemical quenching, and the one-helix proteins and their cyanobacterial homologs designated high-light-inducible proteins. Each member of this family is characterized by one or two LHC transmembrane domains (referred to as the LHC motif) to which potential functions such as chlorophyll binding, protein interaction, and integration of interacting partners into the plastid membranes have been attributed. Initially, LIL3 was shown to interact with geranylgeranyl reductase (CHLP), an enzyme of terpene biosynthesis that supplies the hydrocarbon chain for chlorophyll and tocopherol. Here, we show another function of LIL3 for the stability of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR). Multiple protein-protein interaction analyses suggest the direct physical interaction of LIL3 with POR but not with chlorophyll synthase. Consistently, LIL3-deficient plants exhibit substantial loss of POR as well as CHLP, which is not due to defective transcription of the POR and CHLP genes but to the posttranslational modification of their protein products. Interestingly, in vitro biochemical analyses provide novel evidence that LIL3 shows high binding affinity to protochlorophyllide, the substrate of POR. Taken together, this study suggests a critical role for LIL3 in the organization of later steps in chlorophyll biosynthesis. We suggest that LIL3 associates with POR and CHLP and thus contributes to the supply of the two metabolites, chlorophyllide and phytyl pyrophosphate, required for the final step in chlorophyll a synthesis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reduces damages to freezing temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan eSU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses, including low temperatures. However, mechanisms underlying this protection are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the endophytic PGPR, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN (Bp PsJN, on Arabidopsis thaliana cold tolerance using photosynthesis parameters as physiological markers.Under standard conditions, our results indicated that Bp PsJN inoculation led to growth promotion of Arabidopsis plants without significant modification on photosynthesis parameters and chloroplast organization. However, bacterial colonization induced a cell wall strengthening in the mesophyllImpact of inoculation modes (either on seeds or by soil irrigation and their effects overnight at 0, -1 or -3°C, were investigated by following photosystem II (PSII activity and gas exchanges. Following low temperatures stress, a decrease of photosynthesis parameters was observed. In addition, during three consecutive nights or days at -1°C, PSII activity was monitored. Pigment contents, RuBisCO protein abundance, expression of several genes including RbcS, RbcL, CBF1, CBF2, CBF3, ICE1, COR15a, and COR78 were evaluated at the end of exposure. To assess the impact of the bacteria on cell ultrastructure under low temperatures, microscopic observations were achieved. Results indicated that freezing treatment induced significant changes in PSII activity as early as the first cold day, whereas the same impact on PSII activity was observed only during the third cold night. The significant effects conferred by PsJN were differential accumulation of pigments, and reduced expression of RbcL and COR78. Microscopical observations showed an alteration/disorganization in A. thaliana leaf mesophyll cells independently of the freezing treatments. The presence of bacteria during the three successive nights or days did not significantly improved A

  12. The Arabidopsis thylakoid chloride channel AtCLCe functions in chloride homeostasis and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei eHerdean

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chloride ions can be translocated across cell membranes through Cl− channels or Cl−/H+ exchangers. The thylakoid-located member of the Cl− channel CLC family in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCLCe was hypothesized to play a role in photosynthetic regulation based on the initial photosynthetic characterization of clce mutant lines. The reduced nitrate content of Arabidopsis clce mutants suggested a role in regulation of plant nitrate homeostasis. In this study, we aimed to further investigate the role of AtCLCe in the regulation of ion homeostasis and photosynthetic processes in the thylakoid membrane. We report that the size and composition of proton motive force were mildly altered in two independent Arabidopsis clce mutant lines. Most pronounced effects in the clce mutants were observed on the photosynthetic electron transport of dark-adapted plants, based on the altered shape and associated parameters of the polyphasic OJIP kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. Other alterations were found in the kinetics of state transition and in the macro-organisation of photosystem II supercomplexes, as indicated by circular dichroism measurements. Pre-treatment with KCl but not with KNO3 restored the wild-type photosynthetic phenotype. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy revealed a bow-like arrangement of the thylakoid network and a large thylakoid-free stromal region in chloroplast sections from the dark-adapted clce plants. Based on these data, we propose that AtCLCe functions in Cl− homeostasis after transition from light to dark, which affects chloroplast ultrastructure and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport.

  13. Reference: 508 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r, GH3.9, in root growth. Unlike most other Group II family members, GH3.9 expression was repressed by low concentrations of exogenou...on was also observed in lateral root tips when seedlings were treated with exogenous IAA. Inverse PCR was us

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105400 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105400 001-123-C10 At1g14130.1 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, putative similar to adventitious root...ing related oxygenase ARRO-1 from Malus x domestica, gi|3492806; contains Pfam domain PF03171, 2OG-Fe(II) oxygenase superfamily 2e-66 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121520 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121520 J033028J23 At1g14130.1 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, putative similar to adventitious rooti...ng related oxygenase ARRO-1 from Malus x domestica, gi|3492806; contains Pfam domain PF03171, 2OG-Fe(II) oxygenase superfamily 2e-66 ...

  16. Hydroponics on a chip: analysis of the Fe deficient Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Gómez, Stephen M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Nishio, John N

    2009-04-13

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used to evaluate the thylakoid membrane proteome under Fe-deficient conditions. Plants were cultivated using a novel hydroponic system, called "hydroponics on a chip", which yields highly reproducible plant tissue samples for physiological analyses, and can be easily used for in vivo stable isotope labeling. The thylakoid membrane proteome, from intact chloroplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient plants grown with hydroponics on a chip, was analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Intact masses of thylakoid membrane proteins were measured, many for the first time, and several proteins were identified with post-translational modifications that were altered by Fe deficiency; for example, the doubly phosphorylated form of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex, PSBH, increased under Fe-deficiency. Increased levels of photosystem II protein subunit PSBS were detected in the Fe-deficient samples. Antioxidant enzymes, including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxiredoxin Q, were only detected in the Fe-deficient samples. We present the first biochemical evidence that the two major LHC IIb proteins (LHCB1 and LHCB2) may have significantly different functions in the thylakoid membrane. The study illustrates the utility of intact mass proteomics as an indispensable tool for functional genomics. "Hydroponics on a chip" provides the ability to grow A. thaliana under defined conditions that will be useful for systems biology.

  17. Involvement of Arabidopsis glutaredoxin S14 in the maintenance of chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Pascal; Becuwe, Noëlle; Tourrette, Sébastien; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    Plant class-II glutaredoxins (GRXs) are oxidoreductases carrying a CGFS active site signature and are able to bind iron-sulfur clusters in vitro. In order to explore the physiological functions of the 2 plastidial class-II isoforms, GRXS14 and GRXS16, we generated knockdown and overexpression Arabidopsis thaliana lines and characterized their phenotypes using physiological and biochemical approaches. Plants deficient in one GRX did not display any growth defect, whereas the growth of plants lacking both was slowed. Plants overexpressing GRXS14 exhibited reduced chlorophyll content in control, high-light, and high-salt conditions. However, when exposed to prolonged darkness, plants lacking GRXS14 showed accelerated chlorophyll loss compared to wild-type and overexpression lines. We observed that the GRXS14 abundance and the proportion of reduced form were modified in wild type upon darkness and high salt. The dark treatment also resulted in decreased abundance of proteins involved in the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins. We propose that the phenotype of GRXS14-modified lines results from its participation in the control of chlorophyll content in relation with light and osmotic conditions, possibly through a dual action in regulating the redox status of biosynthetic enzymes and contributing to the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters, which are essential cofactors in chlorophyll metabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A Putative Chloroplast-Localized Ca(2+)/H(+) Antiporter CCHA1 Is Involved in Calcium and pH Homeostasis and Required for PSII Function in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Weitao; Jin, Honglei; Zhang, Taijie; Lai, Jianbin; Zhou, Xuan; Zhang, Shengchun; Liu, Shengjie; Duan, Xuewu; Wang, Hongbin; Peng, Changlian; Yang, Chengwei

    2016-08-01

    Calcium is important for chloroplast, not only in its photosynthetic but also nonphotosynthetic functions. Multiple Ca(2+)/H(+) transporters and channels have been described and studied in the plasma membrane and organelle membranes of plant cells; however, the molecular identity and physiological roles of chloroplast Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporters have remained unknown. Here we report the identification and characterization of a member of the UPF0016 family, CCHA1 (a chloroplast-localized potential Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter), in Arabidopsis thaliana. We observed that the ccha1 mutant plants developed pale green leaves and showed severely stunted growth along with impaired photosystem II (PSII) function. CCHA1 localizes to the chloroplasts, and the levels of the PSII core subunits and the oxygen-evolving complex were significantly decreased in the ccha1 mutants compared with the wild type. In high Ca(2+) concentrations, Arabidopsis CCHA1 partially rescued the growth defect of yeast gdt1Δ null mutant, which is defective in a Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter. The ccha1 mutant plants also showed significant sensitivity to high concentrations of CaCl2 and MnCl2, as well as variation in pH. Taken these results together, we propose that CCHA1 might encode a putative chloroplast-localized Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter with critical functions in the regulation of PSII and in chloroplast Ca(2+) and pH homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  20. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...significantly attacked. Citation: Shakarian P, Wickiser JK (2012) Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks...to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  1. JMJ27, an Arabidopsis H3K9 histone demethylase, modulates defense against Pseudomonas syringae and flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Aditya; Choudhary, Pratibha; Caruana, Julie; Raina, Ramesh

    2017-09-01

    Histone methylation is known to dynamically regulate diverse developmental and physiological processes. Histone methyl marks are written by methyltransferases and erased by demethylases, and result in modification of chromatin structure to repress or activate transcription. However, little is known about how histone methylation may regulate defense mechanisms and flowering time in plants. Here we report characterization of JmjC DOMAIN-CONTAINING PROTEIN 27 (JMJ27), an Arabidopsis JHDM2 (JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase 2) family protein, which modulates defense against pathogens and flowering time. JMJ27 is a nuclear protein containing a zinc-finger motif and a catalytic JmjC domain with conserved Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate binding sites, and displays H3K9me1/2 demethylase activity both in vitro and in vivo. JMJ27 is induced in response to virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens and is required for resistance against these pathogens. JMJ27 is a negative modulator of WRKY25 (a repressor of defense) and a positive modulator of several pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Additionally, loss of JMJ27 function leads to early flowering. JMJ27 negatively modulates the major flowering regulator CONSTANS (CO) and positively modulates FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Taken together, our results indicate that JMJ27 functions as a histone demethylase to modulate both physiological (defense) and developmental (flowering time) processes in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genome-wide search for miRNA-target interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana with an integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jiandong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MiRNA are about 22nt long small noncoding RNAs that post transcriptionally regulate gene expression in animals, plants and protozoa. Confident identification of MiRNA-Target Interactions (MTI is vital to understand their function. Currently, several integrated computational programs and databases are available for animal miRNAs, the mechanisms of which are significantly different from plant miRNAs. Methods Here we present an integrated MTI prediction and analysis toolkit (imiRTP for Arabidopsis thaliana. It features two important functions: (i combination of several effective plant miRNA target prediction methods provides a sufficiently large MTI candidate set, and (ii different filters allow for an efficient selection of potential targets. The modularity of imiRTP enables the prediction of high quality targets on genome-wide scale. Moreover, predicted MTIs can be presented in various ways, which allows for browsing through the putative target sites as well as conducting simple and advanced analyses. Results Results show that imiRTP could always find high quality candidates compared with single method by choosing appropriate filter and parameter. And we also reveal that a portion of plant miRNA could bind target genes out of coding region. Based on our results, imiRTP could facilitate the further study of Arabidopsis miRNAs in real use. All materials of imiRTP are freely available under a GNU license at (http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/imiRTP.htm.

  3. Genome-wide comparative in silico analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Zea mays and Glycine max: a comparison with Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruirui; Zhang, Shizhong; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-01-01

    RNA helicases are enzymes that are thought to unwind double-stranded RNA molecules in an energy-dependent fashion through the hydrolysis of NTP. RNA helicases are associated with all processes involving RNA molecules, including nuclear transcription, editing, splicing, ribosome biogenesis, RNA export, and organelle gene expression. The involvement of RNA helicase in response to stress and in plant growth and development has been reported previously. While their importance in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa has been partially studied, the function of RNA helicase proteins is poorly understood in Zea mays and Glycine max. In this study, we identified a total of RNA helicase genes in Arabidopsis and other crop species genome by genome-wide comparative in silico analysis. We classified the RNA helicase genes into three subfamilies according to the structural features of the motif II region, such as DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box, and different species showed different patterns of alternative splicing. Secondly, chromosome location analysis showed that the RNA helicase protein genes were distributed across all chromosomes with different densities in the four species. Thirdly, phylogenetic tree analyses identified the relevant homologs of DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box RNA helicase proteins in each of the four species. Fourthly, microarray expression data showed that many of these predicted RNA helicase genes were expressed in different developmental stages and different tissues under normal growth conditions. Finally, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of 10 genes in Arabidopsis and 13 genes in Zea mays were in close agreement with the microarray expression data. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a comparative genome-wide analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays and Glycine max. This study provides valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of

  4. A KAS2 cDNA complements the phenotypes of the Arabidopsis fab1 mutant that differs in a single residue bordering the substrate binding pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, A.S.; LaBrie, S.T.; Kinney, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The fab1 mutant of Arabidopsis is partially deficient in activity of ß-ketoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] synthase II (KAS II). This defect results in increased levels of 16 : 0 fatty acid and is associated with damage and death of the mutants at low temperature. Transformation of fab1 plants with a c......DNA from Brassica napus encoding a KAS II enzyme resulted in complementation of both mutant phenotypes. The dual complementation by expression of the single gene proves that low-temperature damage is a consequence of altered membrane unsaturation. The fab1 mutation is a single nucleotide change...... chain to bend. For functional analysis the equivalent Leu207Phe mutation was introduced into the fabB gene encoding the E. coli KAS I enzyme. Compared to wild-type, the Leu207Phe protein showed a 10-fold decrease in binding affinity for the fatty acid substrate, exhibited a modified behavior during size...

  5. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    This investigation describes the use of non-living biomass of Aspergillus caespitosus for removal of ... Pb(II) production has exceeded 3.5 million tons per year. It has been used in the ... This biomass was selected after screening a wide range of microbes. .... prolonged, which proved better biopolymer in metal uptake (Gadd ...

  6. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjin; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Xiong, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Composition and function of P bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis David Maldonado-Bonilla

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available mRNA accumulation is tightly regulated by diverse molecular pathways. The identification and characterization of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in controlling the fate of mRNA offers the possibility to broaden our understanding of posttranscriptional gene regulation. Processing bodies (P bodies, PB are cytoplasmic protein complexes involved in degradation and translational arrest of mRNA. Composition and dynamics of these subcellular structures have been studied in animal systems, yeasts and in the model plant Arabidopsis. Their assembly implies the aggregation of specific factors related to decapping, deadenylation and exoribonucleases that operate synchronously to regulate certain mRNA targets during development and adaptation to stress. Although the general function of PB along with the flow of genetic information is understood, several questions still remain open. This review summarizes data on the composition, potential molecular roles, and biological significance of PB and potentially related proteins in Arabidopsis.

  8. Effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis by heavy ion beam-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.Y.; Saito, H.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Yoshida, S.; Abe, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Arabidopsis researches frequently include the genetic approach, so efficient, convenient, and safe methods for mutagenesis are required. Currently, the most popular method for in house mutagenesis is application of EMS. Although this method is very effective, its base substitution-type mutations often gives leaky mutants with residual gene functions, leading some difficulty in understanding the corresponding gene functions. Heavy ion beam generated by accelerators gives highest energy transfer rates among known radiation-based mutagenesis methods including X ray, gamma ray, fast neutron, electron and proton irradiation. This feature is thought to give high frequency of the double strand break of genomic DNA and resultant short deletions, resulting frame shift-type mutations. At RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF, http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/index-e.html), we have optimized conditions for effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis regarding to ion species and irradiation dose, and achieved comparable mutation rates to the method with EMS. (author)

  9. Lil3 dimerization and chlorophyll binding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Gargano, Daniela; Kmiec, Karol; Furnes, Clemens; Shevela, Dmitriy; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2015-10-07

    The two-helix light harvesting like (Lil) protein Lil3 belongs to the family of chlorophyll binding light harvesting proteins of photosynthetic membranes. A function in tetrapyrrol synthesis and stabilization of geranylgeraniol reductase has been shown. Lil proteins contain the chlorophyll a/b-binding motif; however, binding of chlorophyll has not been demonstrated. We find that Lil3.2 from Arabidopsis thaliana forms heterodimers with Lil3.1 and binds chlorophyll. Lil3.2 heterodimerization (25±7.8 nM) is favored relative to homodimerization (431±59 nM). Interaction of Lil3.2 with chlorophyll a (231±49 nM) suggests that heterodimerization precedes binding of chlorophyll in Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FRIENDLY regulates mitochondrial distribution, fusion, and quality control in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zawily, Amr M; Schwarzländer, Markus; Finkemeier, Iris; Johnston, Iain G; Benamar, Abdelilah; Cao, Yongguo; Gissot, Clémence; Meyer, Andreas J; Wilson, Ken; Datla, Raju; Macherel, David; Jones, Nick S; Logan, David C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are defining components of most eukaryotes. However, higher plant mitochondria differ biochemically, morphologically, and dynamically from those in other eukaryotes. FRIENDLY, a member of the CLUSTERED MITOCHONDRIA superfamily, is conserved among eukaryotes and is required for correct distribution of mitochondria within the cell. We sought to understand how disruption of FRIENDLY function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to mitochondrial clustering and the effects of this aberrant chondriome on cell and whole-plant physiology. We present evidence for a role of FRIENDLY in mediating intermitochondrial association, which is a necessary prelude to mitochondrial fusion. We demonstrate that disruption of mitochondrial association, motility, and chondriome structure in friendly affects mitochondrial quality control and leads to mitochondrial stress, cell death, and strong growth phenotypes. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  13. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  14. Phosphoproteomic studies in Arabidopsis and tobacco male gametophytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fíla, Jan; Čapková, Věra; Honys, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2014), s. 383-387 ISSN 0300-5127 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1462; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/2611; GA ČR GA13-06943S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13049 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * male gametophyte * mature pollen Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.194, year: 2014

  15. Computational analyses and annotations of the Arabidopsis peroxidasegene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Jespersen, Hans M.

    1998-01-01

    Classical heme-containing plant peroxidases have been ascribed a wide variety of functional roles related to development, defense, lignification and hormonal signaling. More than 40 peroxidase genes are now known in Arabidopsis thaliana for which functional association is complicated by a general...... containing 40-71% adenine, a rare feature observed also in cDNAs which predominantly encode stress-induced proteins, and which may indicate translational regulation....

  16. Functional genetics of intraspecific ecological interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jason B.; Mutic, Joshua J.; Kover, Paula X.

    2011-01-01

    Studying the genetic basis of traits involved in ecological interactions is a fundamental part of elucidating the connections between evolutionary and ecological processes. Such knowledge allows one to link genetic models of trait evolution with ecological models describing interactions within and between species. Previous work has shown that connections between genetic and ecological processes in Arabidopsis thaliana may be mediated by the fact that quantitative trait loci (QTL) with ‘direct...

  17. Collection of apoplastic fluids from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Svend Roesen; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    The leaf apoplast comprises the extracellular continuum outside cell membranes. A broad range of processes take place in the apoplast, including intercellular signaling, metabolite transport, and plant-microbe interactions. To study these processes, it is essential to analyze the metabolite conte...... in apoplastic fluids. Due to the fragile nature of leaf tissues, it is a challenge to obtain apoplastic fluids from leaves. Here, methods to collect apoplastic washing fluid and guttation fluid from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves are described....

  18. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  19. Characterization of a Cytokinin Response Factor in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Ketelsen, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The papers of this thesis are not available in Munin: 1. Bernd Ketelsen, Rainer Schwacke, Kirsten Krause and Karsten Fischer: 'Transcriptional activation by Cytokinin Response Factor 5 is governed by an acidic Cterminus containing two conserved domains' (manuscript) 2. Bernd Ketelsen, Stian Olsen, Kirsten Krause and Karsten Fischer: 'Cytokinin responsive factor 5 (CRF5) is involved in root development, hormonal crosstalk and sugar metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana' (manuscript) 3. Bernd K...

  20. Differential Effects of Carbohydrates on Arabidopsis Pollen Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsche, Jörg; García Fernández, José M; Stabentheiner, Edith; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Pollen germination as a crucial process in plant development strongly depends on the accessibility of carbon as energy source. Carbohydrates, however, function not only as a primary energy source, but also as important signaling components. In a comprehensive study, we analyzed various aspects of the impact of 32 different sugars on in vitro germination of Arabidopsis pollen comprising about 150 variations of individual sugars and combinations. Twenty-six structurally different mono-, di- and oligosaccharides, and sugar analogs were initially tested for their ability to support pollen germination. Whereas several di- and oligosaccharides supported pollen germination, hexoses such as glucose, fructose and mannose did not support and even considerably inhibited pollen germination when added to germination-supporting medium. Complementary experiments using glucose analogs with varying functional features, the hexokinase inhibitor mannoheptulose and the glucose-insensitive hexokinase-deficient Arabidopsis mutant gin2-1 suggested that mannose- and glucose-mediated inhibition of sucrose-supported pollen germination depends partially on hexokinase signaling. The results suggest that, in addition to their role as energy source, sugars act as signaling molecules differentially regulating the complex process of pollen germination depending on their structural properties. Thus, a sugar-dependent multilayer regulation of Arabidopsis pollen germination is supported, which makes this approach a valuable experimental system for future studies addressing sugar sensing and signaling. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  2. Similarities between Reproductive and Immune Pistil Transcriptomes of Arabidopsis Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; John-Arputharaj, Ajay; Pallmann, Maria; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Independent lines of evidence suggest that members from ancient and polymorphic gene families such as defensins and receptor-like kinases mediate intercellular communication during both the immune response and reproduction. Here, we report a large-scale analysis to investigate the extent of overlap between these processes by comparing differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the pistil transcriptomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis halleri during self-pollination and interspecific pollination and during infection with Fusarium graminearum In both Arabidopsis species, the largest number of DEGs was identified in infected pistils, where genes encoding regulators of cell division and development were most frequently down-regulated. Comparison of DEGs between infection and various pollination conditions showed that up to 79% of down-regulated genes are shared between conditions and include especially defensin-like genes. Interspecific pollination of A. thaliana significantly up-regulated thionins and defensins. The significant overrepresentation of similar groups of DEGs in the transcriptomes of reproductive and immune responses of the pistil makes it a prime system in which to study the consequences of plant-pathogen interactions on fertility and the evolution of intercellular communication in pollination. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Proteomics investigation of endogenous S-nitrosylation in Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, Abasse; Rossignol, Michel; Peltier, Jean-Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Identification and quantification of nitrosothiols. ► A first dataset of endogenously nitrosylated cysteines in Arabidopsis cells. ► Nitrosothiols display apolar motifs not located in close vicinity of cysteines. ► Salt stress alters the endogenous nitrosylation of specific cysteines in Arabidopsis. -- Abstract: S-Nitrosylation emerges as an important protein modification in many processes. However, most data were obtained at the protein level after addition of a NO donor, particularly in plants where information about the cysteines nitrosylated in these proteins is scarce. An adapted work-flow, combining the classical biotin switch method and labeling with isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), is proposed. Without addition of NO donor, a total of 53 endogenous nitrosocysteines was identified in Arabidopsis cells, in proteins belonging to all cell territories, including membranes, and covering a large panel of functions. This first repertoire of nitrosothiols in plants enabled also preliminary structural description. Three apolar motifs, not located in close vicinity of cysteines and accounting for half the dataset, were detected and are proposed to complement nitrosylation prediction algorithms, poorly trained with plant data to date. Analysis of changes induced by a brief salt stress showed that NaCl modified the nitrosylation level of a small proportion of endogenously nitrosylated proteins and did not concern all nitrosothiols in these proteins. The possible role of some NO targets in the response to salt stress was discussed.

  4. Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Amanda; Mason, Michael Glenn; De Cuyper, Carolien; Brewer, Philip B; Herold, Silvia; Agusti, Javier; Geelen, Danny; Greb, Thomas; Goormachtig, Sofie; Beeckman, Tom; Beveridge, Christine Anne

    2012-04-01

    Adventitious root formation is essential for the propagation of many commercially important plant species and involves the formation of roots from nonroot tissues such as stems or leaves. Here, we demonstrate that the plant hormone strigolactone suppresses adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and pea (Pisum sativum). Strigolactone-deficient and response mutants of both species have enhanced adventitious rooting. CYCLIN B1 expression, an early marker for the initiation of adventitious root primordia in Arabidopsis, is enhanced in more axillary growth2 (max2), a strigolactone response mutant, suggesting that strigolactones restrain the number of adventitious roots by inhibiting the very first formative divisions of the founder cells. Strigolactones and cytokinins appear to act independently to suppress adventitious rooting, as cytokinin mutants are strigolactone responsive and strigolactone mutants are cytokinin responsive. In contrast, the interaction between the strigolactone and auxin signaling pathways in regulating adventitious rooting appears to be more complex. Strigolactone can at least partially revert the stimulatory effect of auxin on adventitious rooting, and auxin can further increase the number of adventitious roots in max mutants. We present a model depicting the interaction of strigolactones, cytokinins, and auxin in regulating adventitious root formation.

  5. Role of methyl salicylate on oviposition deterrence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groux, Raphaël; Hilfiker, Olivier; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Erb, Matthias; Reymond, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Plants attacked by herbivores have evolved different strategies that fend off their enemies. Insect eggs deposited on leaves have been shown to inhibit further oviposition through visual or chemical cues. In some plant species, the volatile methyl salicylate (MeSA) repels gravid insects but whether it plays the same role in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana is currently unknown. Here we showed that Pieris brassicae butterflies laid fewer eggs on Arabidopsis plants that were next to a MeSA dispenser or on plants with constitutively high MeSA emission than on control plants. Surprisingly, the MeSA biosynthesis mutant bsmt1-1 treated with egg extract was still repellent to butterflies when compared to untreated bsmt1-1. Moreover, the expression of BSMT1 was not enhanced by egg extract treatment but was induced by herbivory. Altogether, these results provide evidence that the deterring activity of eggs on gravid butterflies is independent of MeSA emission in Arabidopsis, and that MeSA might rather serve as a deterrent in plants challenged by feeding larvae.

  6. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Heijmans, K.; Airoldi, C.A.; Davies, B.; Angenent, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally

  7. Comparison of arabidopsis stomatal density mutants indicates variation in water stress responses and potential epistatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneka S. Lawson; Paula M. Pijut; Charles H. Michler

    2014-01-01

    Recent physiological analysis of Arabidopsis stomatal density (SD) mutants indicated that SD was not the major factor controlling aboveground biomass accumulation. Despite the general theory that plants with fewer stomata have limited biomass acquisition capabilities, epf1 and several other Arabidopsis mutants varied significantly in leaf fresh...

  8. The next generation of training for Arabidopsis researchers: bioinformatics and quantitative biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been more than 50 years since Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was first introduced as a model organism to understand basic processes in plant biology. A well-organized scientific community has used this small reference plant species to make numerous fundamental plant biology discoveries (P...

  9. Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM9 involvement in cuticle formation and maintenance of plant water status

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Shiyou; Zhao, Huayan; Des Marais, David L.; Parsons, Eugene P.; Wen, Xiaoxue; Xu, Xiaojing; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth Kumar; Wang, Guangchao; Rowland, Owen; Juenger, Thomas E.; Bressan, Ray Anthony; Jenks, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation of the ECERIFERUM9 (CER9) gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) causes elevated amounts of 18-carbon-length cutin monomers and a dramatic shift in the cuticular wax profile (especially on leaves) toward the very-long-chain free fatty

  10. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermans, Paul C A; Bakker, Peter A H M; Pieterse, Corné M J

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium.

  11. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermans, P.C.A.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium.

  12. Structure and biochemical function of a prototypical Arabidopsis U-box domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille; Kragelund, Birthe B; Olsen, Addie N

    2004-01-01

    U-box proteins, as well as other proteins involved in regulated protein degradation, are apparently over-represented in Arabidopsis compared with other model eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis protein AtPUB14 contains a typical U-box domain followed by an Armadillo repeat region, a domain organization t...

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome reveals interaction of phosphate and sugar metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Renate; Morant, Marc; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2007-01-01

    Global gene expression was analyzed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by microarrays comprising 21,500 genes. Leaf segments derived from phosphorus (P)-starved and P-replenished plants were incubated with or without sucrose (Suc) to obtain tissues with contrasting combinations of P and carboh...

  14. Arabidopsis genotypes resistant and susceptible to diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Putellidea): No net effects on insect growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plutella xylostella (L.), diamondback moth (DBM) is a destructive pest of the Brassicaceae including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynhold. Ecotypes of Arabidopsis vary in the amounts of leaf area consumed when fed on by DBM, which has been used as a measure of resistance to DBM. Recombinant inbred lin...

  15. Gene expression in response to cryoprotectant and liquid nitrogen exposure in Arabidopsis shoot tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana is an ideal model system to study plant cryopreservation at the molecular level. We have developed reliable cryopreservation methods for Arabidopsis shoot tips using Plant Vitrification Solution 2 and Plant Vitrification Solution 3 (PVS3) cryoprotectants. We have made use of th...

  16. Identification and molecular properties of SUMO-binding proteins in arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyeongcheol; Choi, Wonkyun; Park, Heejin; Cheong, Misun; Koo, Yoonduck; Shin, Gilok; Chung, Woosik; Kim, Woeyeon; Kim, Mingab; Bressan, Ray Anthony; Bohnert, Hans Jü rgen; Lee, Sangyeol; Yun, Daejin

    2011-01-01

    in Arabidopsis and to probe for biological functions of SUMO proteins, we constructed 6xHis-3xFLAG fused AtSUMO1 (HFAtSUMO1) controlled by the CaMV35S promoter for transformation into Arabidopsis Col-0. After heat treatment, an increased sumoylation pattern

  17. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely ...

  18. Reassessing the role of phospholipase D in the Arabidopsis wounding response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O.R.; Laxalt, Ana M.; Riet, Bas ter; Testerink, Christa; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Mosblech, Alina; Leon Reyes, H.A.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Haring, Michel A.; Heilmann, Ingo; Bartels, Dorothea; Munnik, Teun

    2009-01-01

    Plants respond to wounding by means of a multitude of reactions, with the purpose of stifling herbivore assault. Phospholipase D (PLD) has previously been implicated in the wounding response. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtPLDa1 has been proposed to be activated in intact cells, and the

  19. Nucleotide variation in ATHK1 region of Arabidopsis thaliana and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ATHK1 gene in Arabidopsis encodes a putative histidine kinase that is transcriptionally upregulated in response to changes in external osmolarity. In this work, we investigated the nucleotide variability of the ATHK1 gene in a sample of 32 core Arabidopsis accessions originating from different ecoclimatic regions and ...

  20. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-439 Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense... Bomb Increment II (SDB II) DoD Component Air Force Joint Participants Department of the Navy Responsible Office References SAR Baseline (Production...Mission and Description Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) is a joint interest United States Air Force (USAF) and Department of the Navy

  1. Overexpression of CHMP7 from rapeseed and Arabidopsis causes dwarfism and premature senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Liu, Jing; Lin, Jiulu; Deng, Linbin; Fan, Shihang; Guo, Yan; Sun, Fengming; Hua, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) are well known in mammalians and yeast and plays an essential role in the formation of multi-vesicular bodies. Accumulating evidence has shown that ESCRT proteins contribute to proper plant development. CHMP7 (charged multi-vesicular body protein 7) is an ESCRT-III-related protein and functions in the endosomal sorting pathway in humans. However, its function in plants has not been explored in detail. In this study, we isolate the putative homolog of CHMP7 from rapeseed, BnCHMP7, which contains eight exons and encodes a protein consisting of 423 amino acid residues. Compared with the wild-type, overexpression of BnCHMP7 in Arabidopsis disturbs plant growth and decreases seed yield. Moreover, the transgenic plants also display early leaf senescence and hypersensitivity to dark treatment due to defects in autophagic degradation. Further study showed that BnCHMP7 is highly expressed in leaves and that YFP-BnCHMP7 is predominantly localized in endosome. Compared with human CHMP7, we found that BnCHMP7 not only interacts with ESCRT-III subunits SNF7.2 (CHMP4B), but also with VPS2.2 and CHMP1B. As expected, microarray analysis revealed that the expression of ESCRT transport genes is significantly affected. Additionally, the expression of some genes that are involved in senescence, protein synthesis and protein degradation is also altered in BnCHMP7-overexpressing plants. Taken together, BnCHMP7 encodes an endosome-localized protein, which causes dwarfism and leaf senescence as an ESCRT-III-related component. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. PathMAPA: a tool for displaying gene expression and performing statistical tests on metabolic pathways at multiple levels for Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ligeng

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, many genomic and pathway-related tools and databases have been developed to analyze microarray data. In published web-based applications to date, however, complex pathways have been displayed with static image files that may not be up-to-date or are time-consuming to rebuild. In addition, gene expression analyses focus on individual probes and genes with little or no consideration of pathways. These approaches reveal little information about pathways that are key to a full understanding of the building blocks of biological systems. Therefore, there is a need to provide useful tools that can generate pathways without manually building images and allow gene expression data to be integrated and analyzed at pathway levels for such experimental organisms as Arabidopsis. Results We have developed PathMAPA, a web-based application written in Java that can be easily accessed over the Internet. An Oracle database is used to store, query, and manipulate the large amounts of data that are involved. PathMAPA allows its users to (i upload and populate microarray data into a database; (ii integrate gene expression with enzymes of the pathways; (iii generate pathway diagrams without building image files manually; (iv visualize gene expressions for each pathway at enzyme, locus, and probe levels; and (v perform statistical tests at pathway, enzyme and gene levels. PathMAPA can be used to examine Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression patterns associated with metabolic pathways. Conclusion PathMAPA provides two unique features for the gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana: (i automatic generation of pathways associated with gene expression and (ii statistical tests at pathway level. The first feature allows for the periodical updating of genomic data for pathways, while the second feature can provide insight into how treatments affect relevant pathways for the selected experiment(s.

  3. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. A microarray analysis of the rice transcriptome and its comparison to Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ligeng; Chen, Chen; Liu, Xigang

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis and rice are the only two model plants whose finished phase genome sequence has been completed. Here we report the construction of an oligomer microarray based on the presently known and predicted gene models in the rice genome. This microarray was used to analyze the transcriptional...... with similar genome-wide surveys of the Arabidopsis transcriptome, our results indicate that similar proportions of the two genomes are expressed in their corresponding organ types. A large percentage of the rice gene models that lack significant Arabidopsis homologs are expressed. Furthermore, the expression...... patterns of rice and Arabidopsis best-matched homologous genes in distinct functional groups indicate dramatic differences in their degree of conservation between the two species. Thus, this initial comparative analysis reveals some basic similarities and differences between the Arabidopsis and rice...

  5. The Arabidopsis histone chaperone FACT is required for stress-induced expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfab, Alexander; Breindl, Matthias; Grasser, Klaus D

    2018-03-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is involved in the expression of genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthetic enzymes also upon induction by moderate high-light and therefore contributes to the stress-induced plant pigmentation. The histone chaperone FACT consists of the SSRP1 and SPT16 proteins and associates with transcribing RNAPII (RNAPII) along the transcribed region of genes. FACT can promote transcriptional elongation by destabilising nucleosomes in the path of RNA polymerase II, thereby facilitating efficient transcription of chromatin templates. Transcript profiling of Arabidopsis plants depleted in SSRP1 or SPT16 demonstrates that only a small subset of genes is differentially expressed relative to wild type. The majority of these genes is either up- or down-regulated in both the ssrp1 and spt16 plants. Among the down-regulated genes, those encoding enzymes of the biosynthetic pathway of the plant secondary metabolites termed anthocyanins (but not regulators of the pathway) are overrepresented. Upon exposure to moderate high-light stress several of these genes are up-regulated to a lesser extent in ssrp1/spt16 compared to wild type plants, and accordingly the mutant plants accumulate lower amounts of anthocyanin pigments. Moreover, the expression of SSRP1 and SPT16 is induced under these conditions. Therefore, our findings indicate that FACT is a novel factor required for the accumulation of anthocyanins in response to light-induction.

  6. Analysis of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana based on methylation-sensitive AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M T; Ruiz-García, L; Martínez-Zapater, J M

    2002-12-01

    AFLP analysis using restriction enzyme isoschizomers that differ in their sensitivity to methylation of their recognition sites has been used to analyse the methylation state of anonymous CCGG sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana. The technique was modified to improve the quality of fingerprints and to visualise larger numbers of scorable fragments. Sequencing of amplified fragments indicated that detection was generally associated with non-methylation of the cytosine to which the isoschizomer is sensitive. Comparison of EcoRI/ HpaII and EcoRI/ MspI patterns in different ecotypes revealed that 35-43% of CCGG sites were differentially digested by the isoschizomers. Interestingly, the pattern of digestion among different plants belonging to the same ecotype is highly conserved, with the rate of intra-ecotype methylation-sensitive polymorphisms being less than 1%. However, pairwise comparisons of methylation patterns between samples belonging to different ecotypes revealed differences in up to 34% of the methylation-sensitive polymorphisms. The lack of correlation between inter-ecotype similarity matrices based on methylation-insensitive or methylation-sensitive polymorphisms suggests that whatever the mechanisms regulating methylation may be, they are not related to nucleotide sequence variation.

  7. Interact to survive: Phyllobacterium brassicacearum improves Arabidopsis tolerance to severe water deficit and growth recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Bresson

    Full Text Available Mutualistic bacteria can alter plant phenotypes and confer new abilities to plants. Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve both plant growth and tolerance to multiple stresses, including drought, but reports on their effects on plant survival under severe water deficits are scarce. We investigated the effect of Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 strain, a PGPR isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape, on survival, growth and physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to severe water deficits combining destructive and non-destructive high-throughput phenotyping. Soil inoculation with STM196 greatly increased the survival rate of A. thaliana under several scenarios of severe water deficit. Photosystem II efficiency, assessed at the whole-plant level by high-throughput fluorescence imaging (Fv/Fm, was related to the probability of survival and revealed that STM196 delayed plant mortality. Inoculated surviving plants tolerated more damages to the photosynthetic tissues through a delayed dehydration and a better tolerance to low water status. Importantly, STM196 allowed a better recovery of plant growth after rewatering and stressed plants reached a similar biomass at flowering than non-stressed plants. Our results highlight the importance of plant-bacteria interactions in plant responses to severe drought and provide a new avenue of investigations to improve drought tolerance in agriculture.

  8. Establishment of an Indirect Genetic Transformation Method for Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulbul AHMED

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana is a small flowering plant belonging to the Brassicaceae family, which is adopted as a model plant for genetic research. Agrobacterium tumifaciensmediated transformation method for A. thaliana ecotype Bangladesh was established. Leaf discs of A. thaliana were incubated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 containing chimeric nos. nptII. nos and intron-GUS genes. Following inoculation and co-cultivation, leaf discs were cultured on selection medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin + 50 mg/l cefotaxime + 1.5 mg/l NAA and kanamycin resistant shoots were induced from the leaf discs after two weeks. Shoot regeneration was achieved after transferring the tissues onto fresh medium of the same combination. Finally, the shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 50 mg/l kanamycin. Incorporation and expression of the transgenes were confirmed by PCR analysis. Using this protocol, transgenic A. thaliana plants can be obtained and indicates that genomic transformation in higher plants is possible through insertion of desired gene. Although Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation is established for A. thaliana, this study was the conducted to transform A. thaliana ecotype Bangladesh.

  9. Identification of a Xylogalacturonan Xylosyltransferase Involved in Pectin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, Markus; Sorensen, Susanne Oxenboll; Harholt, Jesper; Geshi, Naomi; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Moller, Isabel; Zandleven, Joris; Bernal, Adriana J.; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Sorensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Jacob K.; Beldman, Gerrit; Willats, William G.T.; Scheller, Henrik

    2009-08-19

    Xylogalacturonan (XGA) is a class of pectic polysaccharide found in plant cell walls. The Arabidopsis thaliana locus At5g33290 encodes a predicted Type II membrane protein, and insertion mutants of the At5g33290 locus had decreased cell wall xylose. Immunological studies, enzymatic extraction of polysaccharides, monosaccharide linkage analysis, and oligosaccharide mass profiling were employed to identify the affected cell wall polymer. Pectic XGA was reduced to much lower levels in mutant than in wild-type leaves, indicating a role of At5g33290 in XGA biosynthesis. The mutated gene was designated xylogalacturonan deficient1 (xgd1). Transformation of the xgd1-1 mutant with the wild-type gene restored XGA to wild-type levels. XGD1 protein heterologously expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana catalyzed the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose onto oligogalacturonides and endogenous acceptors. The products formed could be hydrolyzed with an XGA-specific hydrolase. These results confirm that the XGD1 protein is a XGA xylosyltransferase. The protein was shown by expression of a fluorescent fusion protein in N. benthamiana to be localized in the Golgi vesicles as expected for a glycosyltransferase involved in pectin biosynthesis.

  10. Statistical modeling of nitrogen-dependent modulation of root system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Takao; Kubo, Takuya; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Takahashi, Hideki

    2016-03-01

    Plant root development is strongly affected by nutrient availability. Despite the importance of structure and function of roots in nutrient acquisition, statistical modeling approaches to evaluate dynamic and temporal modulations of root system architecture in response to nutrient availability have remained as widely open and exploratory areas in root biology. In this study, we developed a statistical modeling approach to investigate modulations of root system architecture in response to nitrogen availability. Mathematical models were designed for quantitative assessment of root growth and root branching phenotypes and their dynamic relationships based on hierarchical configuration of primary and lateral roots formulating the fishbone-shaped root system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana. Time-series datasets reporting dynamic changes in root developmental traits on different nitrate or ammonium concentrations were generated for statistical analyses. Regression analyses unraveled key parameters associated with: (i) inhibition of primary root growth under nitrogen limitation or on ammonium; (ii) rapid progression of lateral root emergence in response to ammonium; and (iii) inhibition of lateral root elongation in the presence of excess nitrate or ammonium. This study provides a statistical framework for interpreting dynamic modulation of root system architecture, supported by meta-analysis of datasets displaying morphological responses of roots to diverse nitrogen supplies. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Identification of a Chlorophyll Dephytylase Involved in Chlorophyll Turnover in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll turns over in green organs during photosystem repair and is salvaged via de- and rephytylation, but the enzyme involved in dephytylation is unknown. We have identified an Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid protein with a putative hydrolase domain that can dephytylate chlorophyll in vitro and in vivo. The corresponding locus, CHLOROPHYLL DEPHYTYLASE1 (CLD1), was identified by mapping a semidominant, heat-sensitive, missense allele (cld1-1). CLD1 is conserved in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, sharing structural similarity with pheophytinase, which functions in chlorophyll breakdown during leaf senescence. Unlike pheophytinase, CLD1 is predominantly expressed in green organs and can dephytylate chlorophyll in vitro. The specific activity is significantly higher for the mutant protein encoded by cld1-1 than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the semidominant nature of the cld1-1 mutation. Supraoptimal CLD1 activities in cld1-1 mutants and transgenic seedlings led to the proportional accumulation of chlorophyllides derived from chlorophyll dephytylation after heat shock, which resulted in light-dependent cotyledon bleaching. Reducing CLD1 expression diminished thermotolerance and the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II under prolonged moderate heat stress. Taken together, our results suggest that CLD1 is the long-sought enzyme for removing the phytol chain from chlorophyll during its turnover at steady state within the chloroplast. PMID:27920339

  12. Identification of a Chlorophyll Dephytylase Involved in Chlorophyll Turnover in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yao-Pin; Wu, Meng-Chen; Charng, Yee-Yung

    2016-12-01

    Chlorophyll turns over in green organs during photosystem repair and is salvaged via de- and rephytylation, but the enzyme involved in dephytylation is unknown. We have identified an Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid protein with a putative hydrolase domain that can dephytylate chlorophyll in vitro and in vivo. The corresponding locus, CHLOROPHYLL DEPHYTYLASE1 (CLD1), was identified by mapping a semidominant, heat-sensitive, missense allele (cld1-1). CLD1 is conserved in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, sharing structural similarity with pheophytinase, which functions in chlorophyll breakdown during leaf senescence. Unlike pheophytinase, CLD1 is predominantly expressed in green organs and can dephytylate chlorophyll in vitro. The specific activity is significantly higher for the mutant protein encoded by cld1-1 than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the semidominant nature of the cld1-1 mutation. Supraoptimal CLD1 activities in cld1-1 mutants and transgenic seedlings led to the proportional accumulation of chlorophyllides derived from chlorophyll dephytylation after heat shock, which resulted in light-dependent cotyledon bleaching. Reducing CLD1 expression diminished thermotolerance and the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II under prolonged moderate heat stress. Taken together, our results suggest that CLD1 is the long-sought enzyme for removing the phytol chain from chlorophyll during its turnover at steady state within the chloroplast. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Data integration for plant genomics--exemplars from the integration of Arabidopsis thaliana databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Artem; Lysenko, Atem; Hindle, Matthew Morritt; Taubert, Jan; Saqi, Mansoor; Rawlings, Christopher John

    2009-11-01

    The development of a systems based approach to problems in plant sciences requires integration of existing information resources. However, the available information is currently often incomplete and dispersed across many sources and the syntactic and semantic heterogeneity of the data is a challenge for integration. In this article, we discuss strategies for data integration and we use a graph based integration method (Ondex) to illustrate some of these challenges with reference to two example problems concerning integration of (i) metabolic pathway and (ii) protein interaction data for Arabidopsis thaliana. We quantify the degree of overlap for three commonly used pathway and protein interaction information sources. For pathways, we find that the AraCyc database contains the widest coverage of enzyme reactions and for protein interactions we find that the IntAct database provides the largest unique contribution to the integrated dataset. For both examples, however, we observe a relatively small amount of data common to all three sources. Analysis and visual exploration of the integrated networks was used to identify a number of practical issues relating to the interpretation of these datasets. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches to the analysis of groups of coexpressed genes from an individual microarray experiment, in the context of pathway information and for the combination of coexpression data with an integrated protein interaction network.

  14. Structure of Voltage-gated Two-pore Channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2015-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca2+. Ca2+ binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices (IS6 helices) from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain (VSD2) whose conformational changes are coupled to the pair of inner helices (IIS6 helices) from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca2+ or Ba2+ can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing VSD2 in the resting state and shifts voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba2+ bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  15. Photocycle dynamics of the E149A mutant of cryptochrome 3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Moldt, J; Pokorny, R; Batschauer, A; Essen, L-O

    2009-11-09

    The E149A mutant of the cryDASH member cryptochrome 3 (cry3) from Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized in vitro by optical absorption and emission spectroscopic studies. The mutant protein non-covalently binds the chromophore flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). In contrast to the wild-type protein it does not bind N5,N10-methenyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (MTHF). Thus, the photo-dynamics caused by FAD is accessible without the intervening coupling with MTHF. In dark adapted cry3-E149A, FAD is present in the oxidized form (FAD(ox)), semiquinone form (FADH(.)), and anionic hydroquinone form (FAD(red)H(-)). Blue-light photo-excitation of previously unexposed cry3-E149A transfers FAD(ox) to the anionic semiquinone form (FAD()(-)) with a quantum efficiency of about 2% and a back recovery time of about 10s (photocycle I). Prolonged photo-excitation leads to an irreversible protein re-conformation with structure modification of the U-shaped FAD and enabling proton transfer. Thus, a change in the photocycle dynamics occurs with photo-conversion of FAD(ox) to FADH(.), FADH(.) to FAD(red)H(-), and thermal back equilibration in the dark (photocycle II). The photocycle dynamics of cry3-E149A is compared with the photocycle behaviour of wild-type cry3 and other photo-sensory cryptochromes.

  16. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Suppression of non-photochemical quenching in Arabidopsis leaves to a ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ran Moon; Jin-Hong Kim; Min Hee Lee; Byung Yeoup Chung; Jae-Sung Kim

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence has been known to be involved in a protection of photosystems against photoinhibition through a dissipation of excess light absorbed by photosynthetic pigments. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of a ionizing radiation on NPQ by comparing alterations in the development and release of NPQ after gamma-irradiation between the wild-type (WT) and the npq1-2 mutant of Arabidopsis. The npq1-2 mutant can't develop with a normal NPQ under excess light, since it is defective in its de-epoxidase activity for conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin. Gamma-irradiation with a dose of 200 Gy inhibited the development of NPQ in both the WT and mutant but more noticeably in the latter. Moreover, Fv/Fm as an indice of the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) was almost the same in both the WT and npq1-2 mutant throughout the post-irradiation period of 5 d. The obtained results will be also discussed with those from photoinhibition induced by non-ionizing radiations such as visible light and UV-B.

  18. Arabidopsis Intracellular NHX-Type Sodium-Proton Antiporters are Required for Seed Storage Protein Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashnest, Joanne R; Huynh, Dung L; Dragwidge, Jonathan M; Ford, Brett A; Gendall, Anthony R

    2015-11-01

    The Arabidopsis intracellular sodium-proton exchanger (NHX) proteins AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 have a well-documented role in plant development, and have been used to improve salt tolerance in a variety of species. Despite evidence that intracellular NHX proteins are important in vacuolar trafficking, the mechanism of this role is poorly understood. Here we show that NHX5 and NHX6 are necessary for processing of the predominant seed storage proteins, and also influence the processing and activity of a vacuolar processing enzyme. Furthermore, we show by yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technology that the C-terminal tail of NHX6 interacts with a component of Retromer, another component of the cell sorting machinery, and that this tail is critical for NHX6 activity. These findings demonstrate that NHX5 and NHX6 are important in processing and activity of vacuolar cargo, and suggest a mechanism by which NHX intracellular (IC)-II antiporters may be involved in subcellular trafficking. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e inhibitor family protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] MNILSQTQILHLSIAILLFITTSSSSLSPSSSSPSLSPSPPSSSPSSAPPSSLSPSSPPPLSLSPSS...PPPPPPSSSPLSSLSPSLSPSPPSSSPSSAPPSSLSPSSPPPLSLSPSSPPPPPPSSSPLSSLSPSSSSSTYSNQTNLDYIKTSCNITLYKTICYNSLS

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y protein / glyoxalase I family protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] MKDETGNPLHIKSLNHISLLCRSVEESISFYQNVLGFLPIRRPDS...FDFDGAWLFGHGIGIHLLQSPEPEKLLKKTEINPKDNHISFQCESMEAVEKKLKEMEIEYVRAVVEEGGIQVDQLFFHDPDAFMIEICNCDSLPVIPLAGEMARSCSRLNIRQLVQPTQIHP

  1. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. II. Radical-pair reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, A.; Górecka, A.; Kurzyński, P.; Paterek, T.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2016-03-01

    We apply the quantum-walk approach proposed in the preceding paper [A. Chia et al., preceding paper, Phys. Rev. E 93, 032407 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.032407] to a radical-pair reaction where realistic estimates for the intermediate transition rates are available. The well-known average hitting time from quantum walks can be adopted as a measure of how quickly the reaction occurs and we calculate this for varying degrees of dephasing in the radical pair. The time for the radical pair to react to a product is found to be independent of the amount of dephasing introduced, even in the limit of no dephasing where the transient population dynamics exhibits strong coherent oscillations. This can be seen to arise from the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction and we argue that in such examples, a purely classical model based on rate equations can be used for estimating the time scale of the reaction but not necessarily its population dynamics.

  2. Tomo II

    OpenAIRE

    Llano Zapata, José Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    Memorias, histórico, físicas, crítico, apologéticas de la América Meridional con unas breves advertencias y noticias útiles, a los que de orden de Su Majestad hubiesen de viajar y describir aquellas vastas regiones. Reino Vegetal, Tomo II. Por un anónimo americano en Cádiz por los años de 1757. Muy Señor mío, juzgo que los 20 artículos del libro que remití a Vuestra Merced le habrán hecho formar el concepto que merece la fecundidad de aquellos países en las producciones minerales. Y siendo es...

  3. Comparative molecular modeling study of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase and its hybrid protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Lee

    Full Text Available 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs play important roles in the protection of chloroplast proteins from oxidative damage. Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase isotype C (AtNTRC was identified as efficient electron donor for chloroplastic 2-Cys Prx-A. There are three isotypes (A, B, and C of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR in Arabidopsis. AtNTRA contains only TrxR domain, but AtNTRC consists of N-terminal TrxR and C-terminal thioredoxin (Trx domains. AtNTRC has various oligomer structures, and Trx domain is important for chaperone activity. Our previous experimental study has reported that the hybrid protein (AtNTRA-(Trx-D, which was a fusion of AtNTRA and Trx domain from AtNTRC, has formed variety of structures and shown strong chaperone activity. But, electron transfer mechanism was not detected at all. To find out the reason of this problem with structural basis, we performed two different molecular dynamics (MD simulations on AtNTRC and AtNTRA-(Trx-D proteins with same cofactors such as NADPH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD for 50 ns. Structural difference has found from superimposition of two structures that were taken relatively close to average structure. The main reason that AtNTRA-(Trx-D cannot transfer the electron from TrxR domain to Trx domain is due to the difference of key catalytic residues in active site. The long distance between TrxR C153 and disulfide bond of Trx C387-C390 has been observed in AtNTRA-(Trx-D because of following reasons: i unstable and unfavorable interaction of the linker region, ii shifted Trx domain, and iii different or weak interface interaction of Trx domains. This study is one of the good examples for understanding the relationship between structure formation and reaction activity in hybrid protein. In addition, this study would be helpful for further study on the mechanism of electron transfer reaction in NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase proteins.

  4. ATM-mediated transcriptional and developmental responses to gamma-rays in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Ricaud

    Full Text Available ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated is an essential checkpoint kinase that signals DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotes. Its depletion causes meiotic and somatic defects in Arabidopsis and progressive motor impairment accompanied by several cell deficiencies in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT. To obtain a comprehensive view of the ATM pathway in plants, we performed a time-course analysis of seedling responses by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of root development and genome-wide expression profiling of wild-type (WT and homozygous ATM-deficient mutants challenged with a dose of gamma-rays (IR that is sublethal for WT plants. Early morphologic defects in meristematic stem cells indicated that AtATM, an Arabidopsis homolog of the human ATM gene, is essential for maintaining the quiescent center and controlling the differentiation of initial cells after exposure to IR. Results of several microarray experiments performed with whole seedlings and roots up to 5 h post-IR were compiled in a single table, which was used to import gene information and extract gene sets. Sequence and function homology searches; import of spatio-temporal, cell cycling, and mutant-constitutive expression characteristics; and a simplified functional classification system were used to identify novel genes in all functional classes. The hundreds of radiomodulated genes identified were not a random collection, but belonged to functional pathways such as those of the cell cycle; cell death and repair; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; and transcription; translation; and signaling, indicating the strong cell reprogramming and double-strand break abrogation functions of ATM checkpoints. Accordingly, genes in all functional classes were either down or up-regulated concomitantly with downregulation of chromatin deacetylases or upregulation of acetylases and methylases, respectively. Determining the early transcriptional indicators of

  5. Characterization and Prediction of Protein Phosphorylation Hotspots in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Jan-Ole; Braginets, Rostyslav; Schulze, Waltraud X; Walther, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of protein function by modulating the surface charge status via sequence-locally enriched phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in so called phosphorylation "hotspots" has gained increased attention in recent years. We set out to identify P-hotspots in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the spacing of experimentally detected P-sites within peptide-covered regions along Arabidopsis protein sequences as available from the PhosPhAt database. Confirming earlier reports (Schweiger and Linial, 2010), we found that, indeed, P-sites tend to cluster and that distributions between serine and threonine P-sites to their respected closest next P-site differ significantly from those for tyrosine P-sites. The ability to predict P-hotspots by applying available computational P-site prediction programs that focus on identifying single P-sites was observed to be severely compromised by the inevitable interference of nearby P-sites. We devised a new approach, named HotSPotter, for the prediction of phosphorylation hotspots. HotSPotter is based primarily on local amino acid compositional preferences rather than sequence position-specific motifs and uses support vector machines as the underlying classification engine. HotSPotter correctly identified experimentally determined phosphorylation hotspots in A. thaliana with high accuracy. Applied to the Arabidopsis proteome, HotSPotter-predicted 13,677 candidate P-hotspots in 9,599 proteins corresponding to 7,847 unique genes. Hotspot containing proteins are involved predominantly in signaling processes confirming the surmised modulating role of hotspots in signaling and interaction events. Our study provides new bioinformatics means to identify phosphorylation hotspots and lays the basis for further investigating novel candidate P-hotspots. All phosphorylation hotspot annotations and predictions have been made available as part of the PhosPhAt database at http://phosphat.mpimp-golm.mpg.de.

  6. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.; Belzile, F.; Page, T.; Dean, C.

    1997-01-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity

  7. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieterse Corné MJ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian systems, but since substrates from many organisms are present we decided to test these arrays for the determination of kinase activities in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Kinome profiling using Arabidopsis cell extracts resulted in the labelling of many consensus peptides by kinases from the plant, indicating the usefulness of this kinome profiling tool for plants. Method development showed that fresh and frozen plant material could be used to make cell lysates containing active kinases. Dilution of the plant extract increased the signal to noise ratio and non-radioactive ATP enhances full development of spot intensities. Upon infection of Arabidopsis with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, we could detect differential kinase activities by measuring phosphorylation of consensus peptides. Conclusion We show that kinome profiling on arrays with consensus substrates can be used to monitor kinase activities in plants. In a case study we show that upon infection with avirulent P. syringae differential kinase activities can be found. The PepChip can for example be used to purify (unknown kinases that play a role in P. syringae infection. This paper shows that kinome profiling using arrays of consensus peptides is a valuable new tool to study signal-transduction in plants. It complements the available methods for genomics and proteomics research.

  8. Characterization Of Laccase T-DNA Mutants In Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Reitan; Asp, Torben; Mansfield, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Laccases (P-diphenol:O2 oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2), also termed laccase-like multicopper oxidases, are blue copper-containing oxidases which comprise multigene families in plants. In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 17 laccase genes (LAC1 to LAC17) have been annotated. To identify laccases...... for LAC15 T-DNA mutant seeds and an approximate 24 hour delay in germination was observed for these seeds. An approximate 20% reduction in glucose, galactose, and xylose was observed in primary stem cell walls of the LAC2 T-DNA mutants while similar relative increases in xylose were observed for LAC8...

  9. Abscisic acid deficiency increases defence responses against Myzus persicae in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwig, Melissa S; Chiozza, Mariana; Casteel, Clare L; Lau, Siau Ting; Hohenstein, Jessica; Hernández, Enrique; Jander, Georg; MacIntosh, Gustavo C

    2016-02-01

    Comparison of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) gene expression induced by Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) feeding, aphid saliva infiltration and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment showed a significant positive correlation. In particular, ABA-regulated genes are over-represented among genes that are induced by M. persicae saliva infiltration into Arabidopsis leaves. This suggests that the induction of ABA-related gene expression could be an important component of the Arabidopsis-aphid interaction. Consistent with this hypothesis, M. persicae populations induced ABA production in wild-type plants. Furthermore, aphid populations were smaller on Arabidopsis aba1-1 mutants, which cannot synthesize ABA, and showed a significant preference for wild-type plants compared with the mutant. Total free amino acids, which play an important role in aphid nutrition, were not altered in the aba1-1 mutant line, but the levels of isoleucine (Ile) and tryptophan (Trp) were differentially affected by aphids in wild-type and mutant plants. Recently, indole glucosinolates have been shown to promote aphid resistance in Arabidopsis. In this study, 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate was more abundant in the aba1-1 mutant than in wild-type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the induction of ABA signals that decrease the accumulation of defence compounds may be beneficial for aphids. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Radiosensitivity of Arabidopsis thaliana L. in condition of influence of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shershunova, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a convenient genetic object. This work represents the date of laboratory experiments concerning research of influence of chronic γ-irradiation on plants of arabidopsis at rosette stage (short stemmed mutant Lansberg Erecta). The findings contribute to the high sensitivity of rosette stage of arabidopsis to irradiation by γ-rays in low doses (0.67-10.0 cGy). It is shown in depressing effects of ionising radiation on growth, development, vitality and bearing of plants, but also in hightened output morphological anomalies of plants and embryonic lethalities in pods. (authors)

  11. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S.; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  12. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  13. Meiotically stable natural epialleles of Sadhu, a novel Arabidopsis retroposon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjida H Rangwala

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic variation is a potential source of genomic and phenotypic variation among different individuals in a population, and among different varieties within a species. We used a two-tiered approach to identify naturally occurring epigenetic alleles in the flowering plant Arabidopsis: a primary screen for transcript level polymorphisms among three strains (Col, Cvi, Ler, followed by a secondary screen for epigenetic alleles. Here, we describe the identification of stable, meiotically transmissible epigenetic alleles that correspond to one member of a previously uncharacterized non-LTR retroposon family, which we have designated Sadhu. The pericentromeric At2g10410 element is highly expressed in strain Col, but silenced in Ler and 18 other strains surveyed. Transcription of this locus is inversely correlated with cytosine methylation and both the expression and DNA methylation states map in a Mendelian manner to stable cis-acting variation. The silent Ler allele can be converted by the epigenetic modifier mutation ddm1 to a meiotically stable expressing allele with an identical primary nucleotide sequence, demonstrating that the variation responsible for transcript level polymorphism among Arabidopsis strains is epigenetic. We extended our characterization of the Sadhu family members and show that different elements are subject to both genetic and epigenetic variation in natural populations. These findings support the view that an important component of natural variation in retroelements is epigenetic.

  14. Methylation controls the low temperature induction of flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, E S; Bilodeau, P; Burn, J; Finnegan, E J; Genger, R; Helliwell, C; Kang, B J; Sheldon, C C; Peacock, W J

    1998-01-01

    Control of the transition to flowering is critical for reproductive success of a plant. Studies in Arabidopsis have led us to suggest how this species has harnessed the environmental cue of a period of low temperature to ensure flowering occurs at an appropriate time. We propose that Arabidopsis has both vernalization-independent and vernalization-dependent pathways for the initiation of inflorescence development in the shoot apex. The vernalization-independent pathway may be concerned with the supply of carbohydrate to the shoot apex. In late flowering ecotypes which respond to vernalization the vernalization-independent pathway is blocked by the action of two dominant repressors of flowering, FRI and FLC, which interact to produce very late flowering plants which respond strongly to vernalization. We have isolated a gene which may correspond to FLC. We suggest the vernalization-dependent pathway, which may be concerned with apical GA biosynthesis, is blocked by methylation of a gene critical for flowering. This gene may correspond to that encoding kaurenoic acid hydroxylase (KAH), an enzyme catalysing a step in the GA biosynthetic pathway. Under this scheme vernalization causes unblocking of this pathway by demethylation possibly of the KAH gene and consequent biosynthesis of active GAs in the apex.

  15. Methylation of Gibberellins by Arabidopsis GAMT1 and GAMT2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varbanova,M.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yang, Y.; McKelvey, K.; Hanada, A.; Borochov, R.; Yu, F.; Jikumaru, Y.; Ross, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana GAMT1 and GAMT2 encode enzymes that catalyze formation of the methyl esters of gibberellins (GAs). Ectopic expression of GAMT1 or GAMT2 in Arabidopsis, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and petunia (Petunia hybrida) resulted in plants with GA deficiency and typical GA deficiency phenotypes, such as dwarfism and reduced fertility. GAMT1 and GAMT2 are both expressed mainly in whole siliques (including seeds), with peak transcript levels from the middle until the end of silique development. Within whole siliques, GAMT2 was previously shown to be expressed mostly in developing seeds, and we show here that GAMT1 expression is also localized mostly to seed, suggesting a role in seed development. Siliques of null single GAMT1 and GAMT2 mutants accumulated high levels of various GAs, with particularly high levels of GA1 in the double mutant. Methylated GAs were not detected in wild-type siliques, suggesting that methylation of GAs by GAMT1 and GAMT2 serves to deactivate GAs and initiate their degradation as the seeds mature. Seeds of homozygous GAMT1 and GAMT2 null mutants showed reduced inhibition of germination, compared with the wild type, when placed on plates containing the GA biosynthesis inhibitor ancymidol, with the double mutant showing the least inhibition. These results suggest that the mature mutant seeds contained higher levels of active GAs than wild-type seeds.

  16. Zoospore exudates from Phytophthora nicotianae affect immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; McDowell, John M; Hong, Chuanxue

    2017-01-01

    Zoospore exudates play important roles in promoting zoospore communication, homing and germination during plant infection by Phytophthora. However, it is not clear whether exudates affect plant immunity. Zoospore-free fluid (ZFF) and zoospores of P. nicotianae were investigated comparatively for effects on resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and mutants that affect signaling mediated by salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA): eds16 (enhanced disease susceptibility16), pad4 (phytoalexin deficient4), and npr1 (nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1). Col-0 attracted more zoospores and had severe tissue damage when flooded with a zoospore suspension in ZFF. Mutants treated with ZFF alone developed disease symptoms similar to those inoculated with zoospores and requirements of EDS16 and PAD4 for plant responses to zoospores and the exudates was apparent. Zoospore and ZFFs also induced expression of the PR1 and PDF1.2 marker genes for defense regulated by SA and JA, respectively. However, ZFF affected more JA defense signaling, down regulating PR1 when SA signaling or synthesis is deficient, which may be responsible for Arabidopsis mutant plants more susceptible to infection by high concentration of P. nicotianae zoospores. These results suggest that zoospore exudates can function as virulence factors and inducers of plant immune responses during plant infection by Phytophthora.

  17. Arabidopsis DREB2C modulates ABA biosynthesis during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Jihyun; Chen, Huan; Song, Chieun; Lim, Chae Oh

    2014-09-12

    Plant dehydration-responsive element binding factors (DREBs) are transcriptional regulators of the APETELA2/Ethylene Responsive element-binding Factor (AP2/ERF) family that control expression of abiotic stress-related genes. We show here that under conditions of mild heat stress, constitutive overexpression seeds of transgenic DREB2C overexpression Arabidopsis exhibit delayed germination and increased abscisic acid (ABA) content compared to untransformed wild-type (WT). Treatment with fluridone, an inhibitor of the ABA biosynthesis abrogated these effects. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis-related gene, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 9 (NCED9) was up-regulated in the DREB2C overexpression lines compared to WT. DREB2C was able to trans-activate expression of NCED9 in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts in vitro. Direct and specific binding of DREB2C to a complete DRE on the NCED9 promoter was observed in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Exogenous ABA treatment induced DREB2C expression in germinating seeds of WT. Vegetative growth of transgenic DREB2C overexpression lines was more strongly inhibited by exogenous ABA compared to WT. These results suggest that DREB2C is a stress- and ABA-inducible gene that acts as a positive regulator of ABA biosynthesis in germinating seeds through activating NCED9 expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface.

  19. Novel disease susceptibility factors for fungal necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobón, Albor; Canet, Juan Vicente; García-Andrade, Javier; Angulo, Carlos; Neumetzler, Lutz; Persson, Staffan; Vera, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs) from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence) factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

  20. Phosphorylation sites of Arabidopsis MAP Kinase Substrate 1 (MKS1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, M.B.; Qiu, J.-L.; Zhang, X.

    2007-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified by electrophore......The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified...... phosphopeptide detection. As MAP kinases generally phosphorylate serine or threonine followed by proline (Ser/Thr-Pro), theoretical masses of potentially phosphorylated peptides were calculated and mass spectrometric peaks matching these masses were fragmented and searched for a neutral-loss signal...... at approximately 98 Da indicative of phosphorylation. Additionally, mass spectrometric peaks present in the MPK4-treated MKS1, but not in the control peptide map of untreated MKS1, were fragmented. Fragmentation spectra were subjected to a MASCOT database search which identified three of the twelve Ser-Pro serine...

  1. Functional characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana transthyretin-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, João; Sárkány, Zsuzsa; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Martins, Sónia; Almeida, Maria R; Li, Jianming; Damas, Ana M

    2010-02-18

    Arabidopsis thaliana transthyretin-like (TTL) protein is a potential substrate in the brassinosteroid signalling cascade, having a role that moderates plant growth. Moreover, sequence homology revealed two sequence domains similar to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) decarboxylase (N-terminal domain) and 5-hydroxyisourate (5-HIU) hydrolase (C-terminal domain). TTL is a member of the transthyretin-related protein family (TRP), which comprises a number of proteins with sequence homology to transthyretin (TTR) and the characteristic C-terminal sequence motif Tyr-Arg-Gly-Ser. TRPs are single domain proteins that form tetrameric structures with 5-HIU hydrolase activity. Experimental evidence is fundamental for knowing if TTL is a tetrameric protein, formed by the association of the 5-HIU hydrolase domains and, in this case, if the structural arrangement allows for OHCU decarboxylase activity. This work reports about the biochemical and functional characterization of TTL. The TTL gene was cloned and the protein expressed and purified for biochemical and functional characterization. The results show that TTL is composed of four subunits, with a moderately elongated shape. We also found evidence for 5-HIU hydrolase and OHCU decarboxylase activities in vitro, in the full-length protein. The Arabidopsis thaliana transthyretin-like (TTL) protein is a tetrameric bifunctional enzyme, since it has 5-HIU hydrolase and OHCU decarboxylase activities, which were simultaneously observed in vitro.

  2. Functional characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana transthyretin-like protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Maria R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabidopsis thaliana transthyretin-like (TTL protein is a potential substrate in the brassinosteroid signalling cascade, having a role that moderates plant growth. Moreover, sequence homology revealed two sequence domains similar to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU decarboxylase (N-terminal domain and 5-hydroxyisourate (5-HIU hydrolase (C-terminal domain. TTL is a member of the transthyretin-related protein family (TRP, which comprises a number of proteins with sequence homology to transthyretin (TTR and the characteristic C-terminal sequence motif Tyr-Arg-Gly-Ser. TRPs are single domain proteins that form tetrameric structures with 5-HIU hydrolase activity. Experimental evidence is fundamental for knowing if TTL is a tetrameric protein, formed by the association of the 5-HIU hydrolase domains and, in this case, if the structural arrangement allows for OHCU decarboxylase activity. This work reports about the biochemical and functional characterization of TTL. Results The TTL gene was cloned and the protein expressed and purified for biochemical and functional characterization. The results show that TTL is composed of four subunits, with a moderately elongated shape. We also found evidence for 5-HIU hydrolase and OHCU decarboxylase activities in vitro, in the full-length protein. Conclusions The Arabidopsis thaliana transthyretin-like (TTL protein is a tetrameric bifunctional enzyme, since it has 5-HIU hydrolase and OHCU decarboxylase activities, which were simultaneously observed in vitro.

  3. Flavonoid accumulation patterns of transparent testa mutants of arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, W. A.; Brown, D. E.; Tague, B. W.; Muday, G. K.; Taiz, L.; Murphy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells.

  4. Lipidomic analysis of Arabidopsis seed genetically engineered to contain DHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Rong eZhou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic engineering of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LC-PUFA in oilseeds has been one of the key metabolic engineering targets in recent years. By expressing a transgenic pathway for enhancing the synthesis of the ω3 LC-PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA from endogenous -linolenic acid (ALA, we obtained the production of fish oil-like proportions of DHA in Arabidopsis seed oil. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS was used to characterize the triacylglycerol (TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG and phospholipid (PL lipid classes in the transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis seeds at both developing and mature stages. The analysis identified the appearance of several abundant DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC, DAG and TAG molecular species in mature seeds. The relative abundances of PL, DAG and TAG species showed a preferred combination of LC-PUFA with ALA in the transgenic seeds, where LC-PUFA were esterified in positions usually occupied by 20:1ω9. Trace amounts of di-DHA PC and tri-DHA TAG were identified, and confirmed by high resolution MS/MS. Studying the lipidome in transgenic seeds provides insights into where DHA accumulated and composed with other fatty acids of neutral and phospholipids from the developing and mature seeds.

  5. Heterologous Reconstitution of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of nonnative, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana was undertaken. The introduction of three primary biosynthetic activities to cells requires the stable coexpression of multiple proteins within the same cell. Herein, we report that C22 VLC-PUFAs were synthesized from C18 precursors by reactions catalyzed by Δ6-desaturase, an ELOVL5-like enzyme involved in VLC-PUFA elongation, and Δ5-desaturase. Coexpression of the corresponding genes (McD6DES, AsELOVL5, and PtD5DES under the control of the seed-specific vicilin promoter resulted in production of docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3 and docosatetraenoic acid (22:4 n-6 as well as eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3 and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6 in Arabidopsis seeds. The contributions of the transgenic enzymes and endogenous fatty acid metabolism were determined. Specifically, the reasonable synthesis of omega-3 stearidonic acid (18:4 n-3 could be a useful tool to obtain a sustainable system for the production of omega-3 fatty acids in seeds of a transgenic T3 line 63-1. The results indicated that coexpression of the three proteins was stable. Therefore, this study suggests that metabolic engineering of oilseed crops to produce VLC-PUFAs is feasible.

  6. Zoospore exudates from Phytophthora nicotianae affect immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kong

    Full Text Available Zoospore exudates play important roles in promoting zoospore communication, homing and germination during plant infection by Phytophthora. However, it is not clear whether exudates affect plant immunity. Zoospore-free fluid (ZFF and zoospores of P. nicotianae were investigated comparatively for effects on resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and mutants that affect signaling mediated by salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA: eds16 (enhanced disease susceptibility16, pad4 (phytoalexin deficient4, and npr1 (nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1. Col-0 attracted more zoospores and had severe tissue damage when flooded with a zoospore suspension in ZFF. Mutants treated with ZFF alone developed disease symptoms similar to those inoculated with zoospores and requirements of EDS16 and PAD4 for plant responses to zoospores and the exudates was apparent. Zoospore and ZFFs also induced expression of the PR1 and PDF1.2 marker genes for defense regulated by SA and JA, respectively. However, ZFF affected more JA defense signaling, down regulating PR1 when SA signaling or synthesis is deficient, which may be responsible for Arabidopsis mutant plants more susceptible to infection by high concentration of P. nicotianae zoospores. These results suggest that zoospore exudates can function as virulence factors and inducers of plant immune responses during plant infection by Phytophthora.

  7. Novel disease susceptibility factors for fungal necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albor Dobón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens.

  8. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutants deficient in flavonoid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, B.W.; Kubasek, W.L.; Storz, G.; Bruggemann, E.; Koornneef, M.; Ausubel, F.M.; Goodman, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Eleven loci that play a role in the synthesis of flavonoids in Arabidopsis are described. Mutations at these loci, collectively named transparent testa (tt), disrupt the synthesis of brown pigments in the seed coat (testa). Several of these loci (tt3, tt4, tt5 and ttg) are also required for the accumulation of purple anthocyanins in leaves and stems and one locus (ttg) plays additional roles in trichome and root hair development. Specific functions were previously assigned to tt1-7 and ttg. Here, the results of additional genetic, biochemical and molecular analyses of these mutants are described. Genetic map positions were determined for tt8, tt9 and tt10. Thin-layer chromatography identified tissue- and locus-specific differences in the flavonols and anthocyanidins synthesized by mutant and wild-type plants. It was found that UV light reveals distinct differences in the floral tissues of tt3, tt4, tt5, tt6 and ttg, even though these tissues are indistinguishable under visible light. Evidence was also uncovered that tt8 and ttg specifically affect dihydroflavonol reductase gene expression. A summary of these and previously published results are incorporated into an overview of the genetics of flavonoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

  9. Towards systems biology of the gravity response of higher plants -multiscale analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Klaus; Aubry, D.; Bensch, M.; Schmidt, T.; Ronneberger, O.; Neu, C.; Li, X.; Wang, H.; Santos, F.; Wang, B.; Paponov, I.; Ditengou, F. A.; Teale, W. T.; Volkmann, D.; Baluska, F.; Nonis, A.; Trevisan, S.; Ruperti, B.; Dovzhenko, A.

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Up to now, little is known about the molecular organisation of the signal transduction cascades and networks which co-ordinate gravity perception and response. By using an integrated systems biological approach, a systems analysis of gravity perception and the subsequent tightly-regulated growth response is planned in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This approach will address questions such as: (i) what are the components of gravity signal transduction pathways? (ii) what are the dynamics of these components? (iii) what is their spatio-temporal regulation in different tis-sues? Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model-we use root growth to obtain insights in the gravity response. New techniques enable identification of the individual genes affected by grav-ity and further integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data into interaction networks and cell communication events that operate during gravitropic curvature. Using systematic multiscale analysis we have identified regulatory networks consisting of transcription factors, the protein degradation machinery, vesicle trafficking and cellular signalling during the gravire-sponse. We developed approach allowing to incorporate key features of the root system across all relevant spatial and temporal scales to describe gene-expression patterns and correlate them with individual gene and protein functions. Combination of high-resolution microscopy and novel computational tools resulted in development of the root 3D model in which quantitative descriptions of cellular network properties and of multicellular interactions important in root growth and gravitropism can be integrated for the first time.

  10. A downy mildew effector attenuates salicylic acid-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis by interacting with the host mediator complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Cécile Caillaud

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are continually exposed to pathogen attack but usually remain healthy because they can activate defences upon perception of microbes. However, pathogens have evolved to overcome plant immunity by delivering effectors into the plant cell to attenuate defence, resulting in disease. Recent studies suggest that some effectors may manipulate host transcription, but the specific mechanisms by which such effectors promote susceptibility remain unclear. We study the oomycete downy mildew pathogen of Arabidopsis, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa, and show here that the nuclear-localized effector HaRxL44 interacts with Mediator subunit 19a (MED19a, resulting in the degradation of MED19a in a proteasome-dependent manner. The Mediator complex of ∼25 proteins is broadly conserved in eukaryotes and mediates the interaction between transcriptional regulators and RNA polymerase II. We found MED19a to be a positive regulator of immunity against Hpa. Expression profiling experiments reveal transcriptional changes resembling jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET signalling in the presence of HaRxL44, and also 3 d after infection with Hpa. Elevated JA/ET signalling is associated with a decrease in salicylic acid (SA-triggered immunity (SATI in Arabidopsis plants expressing HaRxL44 and in med19a loss-of-function mutants, whereas SATI is elevated in plants overexpressing MED19a. Using a PR1::GUS reporter, we discovered that Hpa suppresses PR1 expression specifically in cells containing haustoria, into which RxLR effectors are delivered, but not in nonhaustoriated adjacent cells, which show high PR1::GUS expression levels. Thus, HaRxL44 interferes with Mediator function by degrading MED19, shifting the balance of defence transcription from SA-responsive defence to JA/ET-signalling, and enhancing susceptibility to biotrophs by attenuating SA-dependent gene expression.

  11. Heterologous expression of three Camellia sinensis small heat shock protein genes confers temperature stress tolerance in yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingle; Zou, Zhongwei; Li, Qinghui; Xin, Huahong; Zhu, Xujun; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xinghui

    2017-07-01

    CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 expressions are induced by heat and cold stresses, and CsHSP overexpression confers tolerance to heat and cold stresses in transgenic Pichia pastoris and Arabidopsis thaliana. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are crucial for protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses, especially heat stress. However, knowledge concerning the functions of Camellia sinensis sHSP in heat and cold stresses remains poorly understood. In this study, three C. sinensis sHSP genes (i.e., CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8) were isolated and characterized using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology. The CsHSPs expression levels in C. sinensis leaves were significantly up-regulated by heat and cold stresses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 belong to sHSP Classes I, II, and IV, respectively. Heterologous expression of the three CsHSP genes in Pichia pastoris cells enhanced heat and cold stress tolerance. When exposed to heat and cold treatments, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 had lower malondialdehyde contents, ion leakage, higher proline contents, and transcript levels of stress-related genes (e.g., AtPOD, AtAPX1, AtP5CS2, and AtProT1) compared with the control line. In addition, improved seed germination vigor was also observed in the CsHSP-overexpressing seeds under heat stress. Taken together, our results suggest that the three identified CsHSP genes play key roles in heat and cold tolerance.

  12. Ascophyllum nodosum Seaweed Extract Alleviates Drought Stress in Arabidopsis by Affecting Photosynthetic Performance and Related Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Santaniello

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought represents one of the most relevant abiotic stress affecting growth and yield of crop plants. In order to improve the agricultural productivity within the limited water and land resources, it is mandatory to increase crop yields in presence of unfavorable environmental stresses. The use of biostimulants, often containing seaweed extracts, represents one of the options for farmers willing to alleviate abiotic stress consequences on crops. In this work, we investigated the responses of Arabidopsis plants treated with an extract from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE, under drought stress conditions, demonstrating that ANE positively influences Arabidopsis survival. Pre-treatment with ANE induced a partial stomatal closure, associated with changes in the expression levels of genes involved in ABA-responsive and antioxidant system pathways. The pre-activation of these pathways results in a stronger ability of ANE-treated plants to maintain a better photosynthetic performance compared to untreated plants throughout the dehydration period, combined with a higher capacity to dissipate the excess of energy as heat in the reaction centers of photosystem II. Our results suggest that drought stressed plants treated with ANE are able to maintain a strong stomatal control and relatively higher values of both water use efficiency (WUE and mesophyll conductance during the last phase of dehydration. Simultaneously, the activation of a pre-induced antioxidant defense system, in combination with a more efficient energy dissipation mechanism, prevents irreversible damages to the photosynthetic apparatus. In conclusion, pre-treatment with ANE is effective to acclimate plants to the incoming stress, promoting an increased WUE and dehydration tolerance.

  13. Chrysanthemum WRKY gene CmWRKY17 negatively regulates salt stress tolerance in transgenic chrysanthemum and Arabidopsis plants.

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    Li, Peiling; Song, Aiping; Gao, Chunyan; Wang, Linxiao; Wang, Yinjie; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi; Chen, Sumei

    2015-08-01

    CmWRKY17 was induced by salinity in chrysanthemum, and it might negatively regulate salt stress in transgenic plants as a transcriptional repressor. WRKY transcription factors play roles as positive or negative regulators in response to various stresses in plants. In this study, CmWRKY17 was isolated from chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium). The gene encodes a 227-amino acid protein and belongs to the group II WRKY family, but has an atypical WRKY domain with the sequence WKKYGEK. Our data indicated that CmWRKY17 was localized to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells. CmWRKY17 showed no transcriptional activation in yeast; furthermore, luminescence assay clearly suggested that CmWRKY17 functions as a transcriptional repressor. DNA-binding assay showed that CmWRKY17 can bind to W-box. The expression of CmWRKY17 was induced by salinity in chrysanthemum, and a higher expression level was observed in the stem and leaf compared with that in the root, disk florets, and ray florets. Overexpression of CmWRKY17 in chrysanthemum and Arabidopsis increased the sensitivity to salinity stress. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase and proline content in the leaf were significantly lower in transgenic chrysanthemum than those in the wild type under salinity stress, whereas electrical conductivity was increased in transgenic plants. Expression of the stress-related genes AtRD29, AtDREB2B, AtSOS1, AtSOS2, AtSOS3, and AtNHX1 was reduced in the CmWRKY17 transgenic Arabidopsis compared with that in the wild-type Col-0. Collectively, these data suggest that CmWRKY17 may increase the salinity sensitivity in plants as a transcriptional repressor.

  14. MicroRNA160 Modulates Plant Development and Heat Shock Protein Gene Expression to Mediate Heat Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Shane Lin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is causing a negative impact on plant growth and adversely impacts on crop yield. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical in regulating the expression of genes involved in plant development as well as defense responses. The effects of miRNAs on heat-stressed Arabidopsis warrants further investigation. Heat stress increased the expression of miR160 and its precursors but considerably reduced that of its targets, ARF10, ARF16, and ARF17. To study the roles of miR160 during heat stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing miR160 precursor a (160OE and artificial miR160 (MIM160, which mimics an inhibitor of miR160, were created. T-DNA insertion mutants of miR160 targets were also used to examine their tolerances to heat stress. Results presented that overexpressing miR160 improved seed germination and seedling survival under heat stress. The lengths of hypocotyl elongation and rachis were also longer in 160OE than the wild-type (WT plants under heat stress. Interestingly, MIM160 plants showed worse adaption to heat. In addition, arf10, arf16, and arf17 mutants presented similar phenotypes to 160OE under heat stress to advance abilities of thermotolerance. Moreover, transcriptome and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that HSP17.6A, HSP17.6II, HSP21, and HSP70B expression levels were regulated by heat in 160OE, MIM160, arf10, arf16, and arf17 plants. Hence, miR160 altered the expression of the heat shock proteins and plant development to allow plants to survive heat stress.

  15. Cd(II), Cu(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Depending on the way goethite was pretreated with oxalic acid, affinity for Cd(II) varied ...... Effects and mechanisms of oxalate on Cd(II) adsorption on goethite at different ... precipitation, surfactant mediation, hydrothermal and micro-emulsion.

  16. Suppressor of Overexpression of CO 1 Negatively Regulates Dark-Induced Leaf Degreening and Senescence by Directly Repressing Pheophytinase and Other Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jun; Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2017-03-01

    Although the biochemical pathway of chlorophyll (Chl) degradation has been largely elucidated, how Chl is rapidly yet coordinately degraded during leaf senescence remains elusive. Pheophytinase (PPH) is the enzyme for catalyzing the removal of the phytol group from pheophytin a , and PPH expression is significantly induced during leaf senescence. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of PPH , we used a yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) one-hybrid system to screen for its trans-regulators. SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO 1 (SOC1), a key flowering pathway integrator, was initially identified as one of the putative trans-regulators of PPH After dark treatment, leaves of an SOC1 knockdown mutant ( soc1-6 ) showed an accelerated yellowing phenotype, whereas those of SOC1 -overexpressing lines exhibited a partial stay-green phenotype. SOC1 and PPH expression showed a negative correlation during leaf senescence. Substantially, SOC1 protein could bind specifically to the CArG box of the PPH promoter in vitro and in vivo, and overexpression of SOC1 significantly inhibited the transcriptional activity of the PPH promoter in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) protoplasts. Importantly, soc1-6 pph-1 (a PPH knockout mutant) double mutant displayed a stay-green phenotype similar to that of pph-1 during dark treatment. These results demonstrated that SOC1 inhibits Chl degradation via negatively regulating PPH expression. In addition, measurement of the Chl content and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of soc1-6 and SOC1-OE leaves after dark treatment suggested that SOC1 also negatively regulates the general senescence process. Seven SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENES ( SAGs ) were thereafter identified as its potential target genes, and NONYELLOWING1 and SAG113 were experimentally confirmed. Together, we reveal that SOC1 represses dark-induced leaf Chl degradation and senescence in general in Arabidopsis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All

  17. Drought-responsive WRKY transcription factor genes TaWRKY1 and TaWRKY33 from wheat confer drought and/or heat resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guan-Hua; Xu, Ji-Yuan; Wang, Yan-Xia; Liu, Jia-Ming; Li, Pan-Song; Chen, Ming; Ma, You-Zhi; Xu, Zhao-Shi

    2016-05-23

    Drought stress is one of the major causes of crop loss. WRKY transcription factors, as one of the largest transcription factor families, play important roles in regulation of many plant processes, including drought stress response. However, far less information is available on drought-responsive WRKY genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the three staple food crops. Forty eight putative drought-induced WRKY genes were identified from a comparison between de novo transcriptome sequencing data of wheat without or with drought treatment. TaWRKY1 and TaWRKY33 from WRKY Groups III and II, respectively, were selected for further investigation. Subcellular localization assays revealed that TaWRKY1 and TaWRKY33 were localized in the nuclei in wheat mesophyll protoplasts. Various abiotic stress-related cis-acting elements were observed in the promoters of TaWRKY1 and TaWRKY33. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that TaWRKY1 was slightly up-regulated by high-temperature and abscisic acid (ABA), and down-regulated by low-temperature. TaWRKY33 was involved in high responses to high-temperature, low-temperature, ABA and jasmonic acid methylester (MeJA). Overexpression of TaWRKY1 and TaWRKY33 activated several stress-related downstream genes, increased germination rates, and promoted root growth in Arabidopsis under various stresses. TaWRKY33 transgenic Arabidopsis lines showed lower rates of water loss than TaWRKY1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines and wild type plants during dehydration. Most importantly, TaWRKY33 transgenic lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to heat stress. The functional roles highlight the importance of WRKYs in stress response.

  18. Violaxanthin de-epoxidase is rate-limiting for non-photochemical quenching under subsaturating light or during chilling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Gallie, Daniel R

    2012-09-01

    In response to conditions of excess light energy, plants induce non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) as a protective mechanism to prevent over reduction of photosystem II and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The xanthophyll cycle, which contributes significantly to reversible NPQ to thermally dissipate excess absorbed light energy, involves de-epoxidation of violaxanthin and antheraxanthin to zeaxanthin in response to excess light energy. The activation of violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), which catalyzes the de-epoxidation reaction, requires the generation of a light-induced, transthylakoid pH gradient. In this work, we overexpressed or repressed the expression of VDE in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to examine whether VDE is rate-limiting for the induction of NPQ. Increasing VDE expression increased the de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll pigments, the rate of NPQ induction, and the level of NPQ achieved under subsaturating light. In saturating light, however, overexpression of VDE did not increase the xanthophyll pigment de-epoxidation state, the level of NPQ achieved following its initial induction, or substantially improve tolerance to high light. Only under chilling, which reduces VDE activity, did an increase in VDE expression provide slightly greater phototolerance. Repression of VDE expression impaired violaxanthin de-epoxidation, reduced the generation of NPQ, and lowered the level of NPQ achieved while increasing photosensitivity. These results demonstrate that the endogenous level of VDE is rate-limiting for NPQ in Arabidopsis under subsaturating but not saturating light and can become rate-limiting under chilling conditions. These results also show that increasing VDE expression confers greater phototolerance mainly under conditions which limit endogenous VDE activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Zeaxanthin Has Enhanced Antioxidant Capacity with Respect to All Other Xanthophylls in Arabidopsis Leaves and Functions Independent of Binding to PSII Antennae1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaux, Michel; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The ch1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lacks chlorophyll (Chl) b. Leaves of this mutant are devoid of photosystem II (PSII) Chl-protein antenna complexes and have a very low capacity of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of Chl fluorescence. Lhcb5 was the only PSII antenna protein that accumulated to a significant level in ch1 mutant leaves, but the apoprotein did not assemble in vivo with Chls to form a functional antenna. The abundance of Lhca proteins was also reduced to approximately 20% of the wild-type level. ch1 was crossed with various xanthophyll mutants to analyze the antioxidant activity of carotenoids unbound to PSII antenna. Suppression of zeaxanthin by crossing ch1 with npq1 resulted in oxidative stress in high light, while removing other xanthophylls or the PSII protein PsbS had no such effect. The tocopherol-deficient ch1 vte1 double mutant was as sensitive to high light as ch1 npq1, and the triple mutant ch1 npq1 vte1 exhibited an extreme sensitivity to photooxidative stress, indicating that zeaxanthin and tocopherols have cumulative effects. Conversely, constitutive accumulation of zeaxanthin in the ch1 npq2 double mutant led to an increased phototolerance relative to ch1. Comparison of ch1 npq2 with another zeaxanthin-accumulating mutant (ch1 lut2) that lacks lutein suggests that protection of polyunsaturated lipids by zeaxanthin is enhanced when lutein is also present. During photooxidative stress, α-tocopherol noticeably decreased in ch1 npq1 and increased in ch1 npq2 relative to ch1, suggesting protection of vitamin E by high zeaxanthin levels. Our results indicate that the antioxidant activity of zeaxanthin, distinct from NPQ, can occur in the absence of PSII light-harvesting complexes. The capacity of zeaxanthin to protect thylakoid membrane lipids is comparable to that of vitamin E but noticeably higher than that of all other xanthophylls of Arabidopsis leaves. PMID:17932304

  20. Zeaxanthin has enhanced antioxidant capacity with respect to all other xanthophylls in Arabidopsis leaves and functions independent of binding to PSII antennae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaux, Michel; Dall'osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto

    2007-12-01

    The ch1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lacks chlorophyll (Chl) b. Leaves of this mutant are devoid of photosystem II (PSII) Chl-protein antenna complexes and have a very low capacity of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of Chl fluorescence. Lhcb5 was the only PSII antenna protein that accumulated to a significant level in ch1 mutant leaves, but the apoprotein did not assemble in vivo with Chls to form a functional antenna. The abundance of Lhca proteins was also reduced to approximately 20% of the wild-type level. ch1 was crossed with various xanthophyll mutants to analyze the antioxidant activity of carotenoids unbound to PSII antenna. Suppression of zeaxanthin by crossing ch1 with npq1 resulted in oxidative stress in high light, while removing other xanthophylls or the PSII protein PsbS had no such effect. The tocopherol-deficient ch1 vte1 double mutant was as sensitive to high light as ch1 npq1, and the triple mutant ch1 npq1 vte1 exhibited an extreme sensitivity to photooxidative stress, indicating that zeaxanthin and tocopherols have cumulative effects. Conversely, constitutive accumulation of zeaxanthin in the ch1 npq2 double mutant led to an increased phototolerance relative to ch1. Comparison of ch1 npq2 with another zeaxanthin-accumulating mutant (ch1 lut2) that lacks lutein suggests that protection of polyunsaturated lipids by zeaxanthin is enhanced when lutein is also present. During photooxidative stress, alpha-tocopherol noticeably decreased in ch1 npq1 and increased in ch1 npq2 relative to ch1, suggesting protection of vitamin E by high zeaxanthin levels. Our results indicate that the antioxidant activity of zeaxanthin, distinct from NPQ, can occur in the absence of PSII light-harvesting complexes. The capacity of zeaxanthin to protect thylakoid membrane lipids is comparable to that of vitamin E but noticeably higher than that of all other xanthophylls of Arabidopsis leaves.