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Sample records for arabidopsis lyrata complex

  1. Genomic analysis of differentiation between soil types reveals candidate genes for local adaptation in Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Thomas L Turner

    Full Text Available Serpentine soil, which is naturally high in heavy metal content and has low calcium to magnesium ratios, comprises a difficult environment for most plants. An impressive number of species are endemic to serpentine, and a wide range of non-endemic plant taxa have been shown to be locally adapted to these soils. Locating genomic polymorphisms which are differentiated between serpentine and non-serpentine populations would provide candidate loci for serpentine adaptation. We have used the Arabidopsis thaliana tiling array, which has 2.85 million probes throughout the genome, to measure genetic differentiation between populations of Arabidopsis lyrata growing on granitic soils and those growing on serpentinic soils. The significant overrepresentation of genes involved in ion transport and other functions provides a starting point for investigating the molecular basis of adaptation to soil ion content, water retention, and other ecologically and economically important variables. One gene in particular, calcium-exchanger 7, appears to be an excellent candidate gene for adaptation to low CaratioMg ratio in A. lyrata.

  2. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

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    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  3. Zinc distribution and speciation in Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidops is lyrata progenies presenting various zinc accumulation capacities

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    Sarret, Geraldine; Willems, Glenda; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Frerot, Helene; Pairis, Sebastien; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Manceau, Alain; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-04-08

    - The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the chemical form and localization of zinc (Zn) in plant leaves and their Zn accumulationcapacity. - An interspecific cross between Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petrea segregating for Zn accumulation was used. Zinc (Zn) speciation and Zn distribution in the leaves of the parent plants and of selected F1 and F2 progenies were investigated by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques and chemical analyses. - A correlation was observed between the proportion of Zn being in octahedral coordination complexed to organic acids and free in solution (Zn?OAs + Znaq) and Zn content in the leaves. This pool varied between 40percent and 80percent of total leaf Zn depending on the plant studied. Elemental mapping of the leaves revealed different Zn partitioning between the veins and the leaf tissue. The vein : tissue fluorescence ratio was negatively correlated with Zn accumulation. - The higher proportion of Zn?OAs + Znaq and the depletion of the veins in the stronger accumulators are attributed to a higher xylem unloading and vacuolar sequestration in the leaf cells. Elemental distributions in the trichomes were also investigated, and results support the role of carboxyl and⁄ or hydroxyl groups as major Zn ligands in these cells.

  4. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

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    Yu Song

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  5. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

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    Song, Yu; Gao, Jie; Yang, Fengxi; Kua, Chai-Shian; Liu, Jingxin; Cannon, Charles H

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL) proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana) and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds) and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  6. Geographical variation in the response to nitrogen deposition in Arabidopsis lyrata petraea.

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    Vergeer, Philippine; van den Berg, Leon L J; Bulling, Mark T; Ashmore, Mike R; Kunin, William E

    2008-01-01

    The adaptive responses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition for different European accessions of Arabidopsis lyrata petraea were analysed using populations along a strong atmospheric N-deposition gradient. Plants were exposed to three N-deposition rates, reflecting the rates at the different locations, in a full factorial design. Differences between accessions in the response to N were found for important phenological and physiological response variables. For example, plants from low-deposition areas had higher nitrogen-use efficiencies (NUE) and C : N ratios than plants from areas high in N deposition when grown at low N-deposition rates. The NUE decreased in all accessions at higher experimental deposition rates. However, plants from high-deposition areas showed a limited capacity to increase their NUE at lower experimental deposition rates. Plants from low-deposition areas had faster growth rates, higher leaf turnover rates and shorter times to flowering, and showed a greater increase in growth rate in response to N deposition than those from high-deposition areas. Indications for adaptation to N deposition were found, and results suggest that adaptation of plants from areas high in N deposition to increased N deposition has resulted in the loss of plasticity.

  7. Does speciation between Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata coincide with major changes in a molecular target of adaptation?

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    Camille Roux

    Full Text Available Ever since Darwin proposed natural selection as the driving force for the origin of species, the role of adaptive processes in speciation has remained controversial. In particular, a largely unsolved issue is whether key divergent ecological adaptations are associated with speciation events or evolve secondarily within sister species after the split. The plant Arabidopsis halleri is one of the few species able to colonize soils highly enriched in zinc and cadmium. Recent advances in the molecular genetics of adaptation show that the physiology of this derived ecological trait involves copy number expansions of the AhHMA4 gene, for which orthologs are found in single copy in the closely related A. lyrata and the outgroup A. thaliana. To gain insight into the speciation process, we ask whether adaptive molecular changes at this candidate gene were contemporary with important stages of the speciation process. We first inferred the scenario and timescale of speciation by comparing patterns of variation across the genomic backgrounds of A. halleri and A. lyrata. Then, we estimated the timing of the first duplication of AhHMA4 in A. halleri. Our analysis suggests that the historical split between the two species closely coincides with major changes in this molecular target of adaptation in the A. halleri lineage. These results clearly indicate that these changes evolved in A. halleri well before industrial activities fostered the spread of Zn- and Cd-polluted areas, and suggest that adaptive processes related to heavy-metal homeostasis played a major role in the speciation process.

  8. The predominantly selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana experienced a recent reduction in transposable element abundance compared to its outcrossing relative Arabidopsis lyrata

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    de la Chaux Nicole

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs are major contributors to genome evolution. One factor that influences their evolutionary dynamics is whether their host reproduces through selfing or through outcrossing. According to the recombinational spreading hypothesis, for instance, TEs can spread more easily in outcrossing species through recombination, and should thus be less abundant in selfing species. We here studied the distribution and evolutionary dynamics of TE families in the predominantly selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana and its close outcrossing relative Arabidopsis lyrata on a genome-wide scale. We characterized differences in TE abundance between them and asked which, if any, existing hypotheses about TE abundances may explain these differences. Results We identified 1,819 TE families representing all known classes of TEs in both species, and found three times more copies in the outcrossing A. lyrata than in the predominantly selfing A. thaliana, as well as ten times more TE families unique to A. lyrata. On average, elements in A. lyrata are younger than elements in A. thaliana. In particular, A. thaliana shows a marked decrease in element number that occurred during the most recent 10% of the time interval since A. thaliana split from A. lyrata. This most recent period in the evolution of A. thaliana started approximately 500,000 years ago, assuming a splitting time of 5 million years ago, and coincides with the time at which predominant selfing originated. Conclusions Our results indicate that the mating system may be important for determining TE copy number, and that selfing species are likely to have fewer TEs.

  9. Validation of Pooled Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing in Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Marco Fracassetti

    Full Text Available Sequencing pooled DNA of multiple individuals from a population instead of sequencing individuals separately has become popular due to its cost-effectiveness and simple wet-lab protocol, although some criticism of this approach remains. Here we validated a protocol for pooled whole-genome re-sequencing (Pool-seq of Arabidopsis lyrata libraries prepared with low amounts of DNA (1.6 ng per individual. The validation was based on comparing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP frequencies obtained by pooling with those obtained by individual-based Genotyping By Sequencing (GBS. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of sample number, sequencing depth per individual and variant caller on population SNP frequency estimates. For Pool-seq data, we compared frequency estimates from two SNP callers, VarScan and Snape; the former employs a frequentist SNP calling approach while the latter uses a Bayesian approach. Results revealed concordance correlation coefficients well above 0.8, confirming that Pool-seq is a valid method for acquiring population-level SNP frequency data. Higher accuracy was achieved by pooling more samples (25 compared to 14 and working with higher sequencing depth (4.1× per individual compared to 1.4× per individual, which increased the concordance correlation coefficient to 0.955. The Bayesian-based SNP caller produced somewhat higher concordance correlation coefficients, particularly at low sequencing depth. We recommend pooling at least 25 individuals combined with sequencing at a depth of 100× to produce satisfactory frequency estimates for common SNPs (minor allele frequency above 0.05.

  10. Cytoplasmic male sterility contributes to hybrid incompatibility between subspecies of Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Aalto, Esa A; Koelewijn, Hans-Peter; Savolainen, Outi

    2013-10-03

    In crosses between evolutionarily diverged populations, genomic incompatibilities may result in sterile hybrids, indicating evolution of reproductive isolation. In several plant families, crosses within a population can also lead to male sterile progeny because of conflict between the maternally and biparentally inherited genomes. We examined hybrid fertility between subspecies of the perennial outcrossing self-incompatible Lyrate rockcress (Arabidopsis lyrata) in large reciprocal F2 progenies and three generations of backcrosses. In one of the reciprocal F2 progenies, almost one-fourth of the plants were male-sterile. Correspondingly, almost one-half of the plants in one of the four reciprocal backcross progenies expressed male sterility. In an additional four independent F2 and backcross families, three segregated male sterility. The observed asymmetrical hybrid incompatibility is attributable to male sterility factors in one cytoplasm, for which the other population lacks effective fertility restorers. Genotyping of 96 molecular markers and quantitative trait locus mapping revealed that only 60% of the plants having the male sterile cytoplasm and lacking the corresponding restorers were phenotypically male-sterile. Genotyping data showed that there is only one restorer locus, which mapped to a 600-kb interval at the top of chromosome 2 in a region containing a cluster of pentatricopeptide repeat genes. Male fertility showed no trade-off with seed production. We discuss the role of cytoplasm and genomic conflict in incipient speciation and conclude that cytoplasmic male sterility-lowering hybrid fitness is a transient effect with limited potential to form permanent reproductive barriers between diverged populations of hermaphrodite self-incompatible species.

  11. Contrasting patterns of genetic structuring in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata Subsp. petraea across different regions in northern Europe.

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    Mohsen Falahati-Anbaran

    Full Text Available Level and partitioning of genetic diversity is expected to vary between contrasting habitats, reflecting differences in strength of ecological and evolutionary processes. Therefore, it is necessary to consider processes acting on different time scales when trying to explain diversity patterns in different parts of species' distributions. To explore how historical and contemporary factors jointly may influence patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation, we compared genetic composition in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea from the northernmost parts of its distribution range on Iceland to that previously documented in Scandinavia. Leaf tissue and soil were sampled from ten Icelandic populations of A. lyrata. Seedlings were grown from soil samples, and tissue from above-ground and seed bank individuals were genotyped with 21 microsatellite markers. Seed bank density in Icelandic populations was low but not significantly different from that observed in Norwegian populations. While within-population genetic diversity was relatively high on Iceland (H(E = 0.35, among-population differentiation was low (F(ST = 0.10 compared to Norwegian and Swedish populations. Population differentiation was positively associated with geographical distance in both Iceland and Scandinavia, but the strength of this relationship varied between regions. Although topography and a larger distribution range may explain the higher differentiation between mountainous Norwegian relative to lowland populations in Sweden, these factors cannot explain the lower differentiation in Icelandic compared to Swedish populations. We propose that low genetic differentiation among Icelandic populations is not caused by differences in connectivity, but is rather due to large historical effective population sizes. Thus, rather than contemporary processes, historical factors such as survival of Icelandic lineages in northern refugia during the last glacial

  12. Genetic changes in flowering and morphology in response to adaptation to a high-latitude environment in Arabidopsis lyrata

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    Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte; Leppälä, Johanna; Leinonen, Päivi H.; Waldmann, Patrik; Savolainen, Outi; Kuittinen, Helmi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The adaptive plastic reactions of plant populations to changing climatic factors, such as winter temperatures and photoperiod, have changed during range shifts after the last glaciation. Timing of flowering is an adaptive trait regulated by environmental cues. Its genetics has been intensively studied in annual plants, but in perennials it is currently not well characterized. This study examined the genetic basis of differentiation in flowering time, morphology, and their plastic responses to vernalization in two locally adapted populations of the perennial Arabidopsis lyrata: (1) to determine whether the two populations differ in their vernalization responses for flowering phenology and morphology; and (2) to determine the genomic areas governing differentiation and vernalization responses. Methods Two A. lyrata populations, from central Europe and Scandinavia, were grown in growth-chamber conditions with and without cold treatment. A QTL analysis was performed to find genomic regions that interact with vernalization. Key Results The population from central Europe flowered more rapidly and invested more in inflorescence growth than the population from alpine Scandinavia, especially after vernalization. The alpine population had consistently a low number of inflorescences and few flowers, suggesting strong constraints due to a short growing season, but instead had longer leaves and higher leaf rosettes. QTL mapping in the F2 population revealed genomic regions governing differentiation in flowering time and morphology and, in some cases, the allelic effects from the two populations on a trait were influenced by vernalization (QTL × vernalization interactions). Conclusions The results indicate that many potentially adaptive genetic changes have occurred during colonization; the two populations have diverged in their plastic responses to vernalization in traits closely connected to fitness through changes in many genomic areas. PMID:23519836

  13. Contrasting patterns of genetic structuring in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata Subsp. petraea across different regions in northern Europe.

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    Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Lundemo, Sverre; Ansell, Stephen W; Stenøien, Hans K

    2014-01-01

    Level and partitioning of genetic diversity is expected to vary between contrasting habitats, reflecting differences in strength of ecological and evolutionary processes. Therefore, it is necessary to consider processes acting on different time scales when trying to explain diversity patterns in different parts of species' distributions. To explore how historical and contemporary factors jointly may influence patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation, we compared genetic composition in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea from the northernmost parts of its distribution range on Iceland to that previously documented in Scandinavia. Leaf tissue and soil were sampled from ten Icelandic populations of A. lyrata. Seedlings were grown from soil samples, and tissue from above-ground and seed bank individuals were genotyped with 21 microsatellite markers. Seed bank density in Icelandic populations was low but not significantly different from that observed in Norwegian populations. While within-population genetic diversity was relatively high on Iceland (H(E) = 0.35), among-population differentiation was low (F(ST) = 0.10) compared to Norwegian and Swedish populations. Population differentiation was positively associated with geographical distance in both Iceland and Scandinavia, but the strength of this relationship varied between regions. Although topography and a larger distribution range may explain the higher differentiation between mountainous Norwegian relative to lowland populations in Sweden, these factors cannot explain the lower differentiation in Icelandic compared to Swedish populations. We propose that low genetic differentiation among Icelandic populations is not caused by differences in connectivity, but is rather due to large historical effective population sizes. Thus, rather than contemporary processes, historical factors such as survival of Icelandic lineages in northern refugia during the last glacial period may have

  14. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

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    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E M; Butlin, Roger K; Burke, Terry; Quick, W Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P

    2016-12-07

    While genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype-environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such as cold response, in

  15. The ARC1 E3 ligase gene is frequently deleted in self-compatible Brassicaceae species and has a conserved role in Arabidopsis lyrata self-pollen rejection.

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    Indriolo, Emily; Tharmapalan, Pirashaanthy; Wright, Stephen I; Goring, Daphne R

    2012-11-01

    Self-pollen rejection is an important reproductive regulator in flowering plants, and several different intercellular signaling systems have evolved to elicit this response. In the Brassicaceae, the self-incompatibility system is mediated by the pollen S-locus Cys-Rich/S-locus Protein11 (SCR/SP11) ligand and the pistil S Receptor Kinase (SRK). While the SCR/SP11-SRK recognition system has been identified in several species across the Brassicaceae, less is known about the conservation of the SRK-activated cellular responses in the stigma, following self-pollen contact. The ARM Repeat Containing1 (ARC1) E3 ubiquitin ligase functions downstream of SRK for the self-incompatibility response in Brassica, but it has been suggested that ARC1 is not required in Arabidopsis species. Here, we surveyed the presence of ARC1 orthologs in several recently sequenced genomes from Brassicaceae species that had diversified ∼20 to 40 million years ago. Surprisingly, the ARC1 gene was deleted in several species that had lost the self-incompatibility trait, suggesting that ARC1 may lose functionality in the transition to self-mating. To test the requirement of ARC1 in a self-incompatible Arabidopsis species, transgenic ARC1 RNA interference Arabidopsis lyrata plants were generated, and they exhibited reduced self-incompatibility responses resulting in successful fertilization. Thus, this study demonstrates a conserved role for ARC1 in the self-pollen rejection response within the Brassicaceae.

  16. Additive and non-additive effects of simulated leaf and inflorescence damage on survival, growth and reproduction of the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata.

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    Puentes, Adriana; Ågren, Jon

    2012-08-01

    Herbivores may damage both leaves and reproductive structures, and although such combined damage may affect plant fitness non-additively, this has received little attention. We conducted a 2-year field experiment with a factorial design to examine the effects of simulated leaf (0, 12.5, 25, or 50% of leaf area removed) and inflorescence damage (0 vs. 50% of inflorescences removed) on survival, growth and reproduction in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. Leaf and inflorescence damage negatively and independently reduced flower, fruit and seed production in the year of damage; leaf damage also reduced rosette size by the end of the first season and flower production in the second year. Leaf damage alone reduced the proportion of flowers forming a fruit and fruit production per plant the second year, but when combined with inflorescence damage no such effect was observed (significant leaf × inflorescence damage interaction). Damage to leaves (sources) caused a greater reduction in future reproduction than did simultaneous damage to leaves and inflorescences (sinks). This demonstrates that a full understanding of the effects of herbivore damage on plant fitness requires that consequences of damage to vegetative and reproductive structures are evaluated over more than 1 year and that non-additive effects are considered.

  17. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

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    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  18. Tethering complexes in the Arabidopsis endomembrane system

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    Nemanja eVukasinovic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTargeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defence against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model – Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA. The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology.

  19. A Polyamine Metabolon Involving Aminopropyl Transferase Complexes in Arabidopsis

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    Panicot, Mireia; Minguet, Eugenio G.; Ferrando, Alejandro; Alcázar, Rubén; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Carbonell, Juan; Altabella, Teresa; Koncz, Csaba; Tiburcio, Antonio F.

    2002-01-01

    The conversion of putrescine to spermidine in the biosynthetic pathway of plant polyamines is catalyzed by two closely related spermidine synthases, SPDS1 and SPDS2, in Arabidopsis. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SPDS2 was found to interact with SPDS1 and a novel protein, SPMS (spermine synthase), which is homologous with SPDS2 and SPDS1. SPMS interacts with both SPDS1 and SPDS2 in yeast and in vitro. Unlike SPDS1 and SPDS2, SPMS failed to suppress the speΔ3 deficiency of spermidine synthase in yeast. However, SPMS was able to complement the speΔ4 spermine deficiency in yeast, indicating that SPMS is a novel spermine synthase. The SPDS and SPMS proteins showed no homodimerization but formed heterodimers in vitro. Pairwise coexpression of hemagglutinin- and c-Myc epitope–labeled proteins in Arabidopsis cells confirmed the existence of coimmunoprecipitating SPDS1-SPDS2 and SDPS2-SPMS heterodimers in vivo. The epitope-labeled SPDS and SPMS proteins copurified with protein complexes ranging in size from 650 to 750 kD. Our data demonstrate the existence of a metabolon involving at least the last two steps of polyamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:12368503

  20. Regulation of flower development in Arabidopsis by SCF complexes.

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    Ni, Weimin; Xie, Daoxin; Hobbie, Lawrence; Feng, Baomin; Zhao, Dazhong; Akkara, Joseph; Ma, Hong

    2004-04-01

    SCF complexes are the largest and best studied family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases that facilitate the ubiquitylation of proteins targeted for degradation. The SCF core components Skp1, Cul1, and Rbx1 serve in multiple SCF complexes involving different substrate-specific F-box proteins that are involved in diverse processes including cell cycle and development. In Arabidopsis, mutations in the F-box gene UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) result in a number of defects in flower development. However, functions of the core components Cul1 and Rbx1 in flower development are poorly understood. In this study we analyzed floral phenotypes caused by altering function of Cul1 or Rbx1, as well as the effects of mutations in ASK1 and ASK2. Plants homozygous for a point mutation in the AtCUL1 gene showed reduced floral organ number and several defects in each of the four whorls. Similarly, plants with reduced AtRbx1 expression due to RNA interference also exhibited floral morphological defects. In addition, compared to the ask1 mutant, plants homozygous for ask1 and heterozygous for ask2 displayed enhanced reduction of B function, as well as other novel defects of flower development, including carpelloid sepals and an inhibition of petal development. Genetic analyses demonstrate that AGAMOUS (AG) is required for the novel phenotypes observed in the first and second whorls. Furthermore, the genetic interaction between UFO and AtCUL1 supports the idea that UFO regulates multiple aspects of flower development as a part of SCF complexes. These results suggest that SCF complexes regulate several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis.

  1. Quantitative divergence of the bacterial root microbiota in Arabidopsis thaliana relatives

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    Schlaeppi, K.; Dombrowski, N.; Oter, R. G.; Ver Loren van Themaat, E.; Schulze-Lefert, P

    2014-01-01

    All plants carry distinctive bacterial communities on and inside organs such as roots and leaves, collectively called the plant microbiota. How this microbiota diversifies in related plant species is unknown. We investigated the diversity of the bacterial root microbiota in the Brassicaceae family, including three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes, its sister species Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata, and Cardamine hirsuta. We show that differences in root microbiota profiles between the...

  2. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

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    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'.

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297801276 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 81972:42 hypothetical protein ARALYDRAFT_330283 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MFNYSVATNYYIMKLQKKQEERLQKMIEEEEIRMLRKEMVPKAQLMPFFDRPFLPQRSSRPLTMPKEPSFGNVHSTCWTCVFNNQHYLYHINHAHA ...

  4. DAC is involved in the accumulation of the cytochrome b6/f complex in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianwei; Li, Jing; Ouyang, Min; Yun, Tao; He, Baoye; Ji, Daili; Ma, Jinfang; Chi, Wei; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-12-01

    The biogenesis and assembly of photosynthetic multisubunit protein complexes is assisted by a series of nucleus-encoded auxiliary protein factors. In this study, we characterize the dac mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which shows a severe defect in the accumulation of the cytochrome b(6)/f complex, and provide evidence suggesting that the efficiency of cytochrome b(6)/f complex assembly is affected in the mutant. DAC is a thylakoid membrane protein with two predicted transmembrane domains that is conserved from cyanobacteria to vascular plants. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analyses revealed a specific interaction between DAC and PetD, a subunit of the cytochrome b(6)/f complex. However, DAC was found not to be an intrinsic component of the cytochrome b(6)/f complex. In vivo chloroplast protein labeling experiments showed that the labeling rates of the PetD and cytochrome f proteins were greatly reduced, whereas that of the cytochrome b(6) protein remained normal in the dac mutant. DAC appears to be a novel factor involved in the assembly/stabilization of the cytochrome b(6)/f complex, possibly through interaction with the PetD protein.

  5. Different Polycomb group complexes regulate common target genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevich, Grigory; Leroy, Olivier; Akinci, Umut; Schubert, Daniel; Clarenz, Oliver; Goodrich, Justin; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Köhler, Claudia

    2006-09-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins convey epigenetic inheritance of repressed transcriptional states. Although the mechanism of the action of PcG is not completely understood, methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) is important in establishing PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. We show that the plant PcG target gene PHERES1 is regulated by histone trimethylation on H3K27 residues mediated by at least two different PcG complexes in plants, containing the SET domain proteins MEDEA or CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. Furthermore, we identify FUSCA3 as a potential PcG target gene and show that FUSCA3 is regulated by MEDEA and CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. We propose that different PcG complexes regulate a common set of target genes during the different stages of plant development.

  6. News and Views into the SNARE Complexity in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Jin eKim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Secretory organelles are engaged in a continuous flux of membranes, which is believed to occur mostly via transport vesicles. Being critical in maintaining several cellular functions, transport vesicles are membrane-enclosed sacs that temporarily store and then deliver membrane lipids, protein and polysaccharides. SNAREs have a crucial role in vesicle traffic by driving membrane fusion and conferring fidelity through the formation of specific SNARE complexes. Additionally, specific roles of SNAREs in growth and development implicate that they are versatile components for the life of a plant. Here, we summarize the recent progress on the understanding of the role of SNAREs and highlight some of the questions that are still unsolved.

  7. Complexes with mixed primary and secondary cellulose synthases are functional in Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Andrew; Mansoori, N; Li, Shundai; Lei, Lei; Vernhettes, Samantha; Visser, Richard G. F.; Somerville, Chris R; Gu, Ying; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2012-10-01

    In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by so-called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as catalytic subunits of the complex. The CESAs are divided into two distinct families, three of which are thought to be specialized for the primary cell wall and three for the secondary cell wall. In this article, the potential of primary and secondary CESAs forming a functional rosette complex has been investigated. The membrane-based yeast two-hybrid and biomolecular fluorescence systems were used to assess the interactions between three primary (CESA1, CESA3, CESA6), and three secondary (CESA4, CESA7, CESA8) Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CESAs. The results showed that all primary CESAs can physically interact both in vitro and in planta with all secondary CESAs. Although CESAs are broadly capable of interacting in pairwise combinations, they are not all able to form functional complexes in planta. Analysis of transgenic lines showed that CESA7 can partially rescue defects in the primary cell wall biosynthesis in a weak cesa3 mutant. Green fluorescent protein-CESA protein fusions revealed that when CESA3 was replaced by CESA7 in the primary rosette, the velocity of the mixed complexes was slightly faster than the native primary complexes. CESA1 in turn can partly rescue defects in secondary cell wall biosynthesis in a cesa8ko mutant, resulting in an increase of cellulose content relative to cesa8ko. These results demonstrate that sufficient parallels exist between the primary and secondary complexes for cross-functionality and open the possibility that mixed complexes of primary and secondary CESAs may occur at particular times.

  8. Crystal structures of two novel sulfonylurea herbicides in complex with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian-Guo; Lee, Patrick K.-M.; Dong, Yu-Hui; Pang, Siew Siew; Duggleby, Ronald G.; Li, Zheng-Ming; Guddat, Luke W.; (Queensland); (Nankai); (IHEP-Beijing)

    2009-08-17

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; EC 2.2.1.6) is the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the branched-chain amino acids. It catalyzes the conversion of two molecules of pyruvate into 2-acetolactate or one molecule of pyruvate and one molecule of 2-ketobutyrate into 2-aceto-2-hydroxybutyrate. AHAS requires the cofactors thiamine diphosphate (ThDP), Mg{sup 2+} and FAD for activity. The herbicides that target this enzyme are effective in protecting a broad range of crops from weed species. However, resistance in the field is now a serious problem worldwide. To address this, two new sulfonylureas, monosulfuron and monosulfuron ester, have been developed as commercial herbicides in China. These molecules differ from the traditional sulfonylureas in that the heterocyclic ring attached to the nitrogen atom of the sulfonylurea bridge is monosubstituted rather than disubstituted. The structures of these compounds in complex with the catalytic subunit of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS have been determined to 3.0 and 2.8 {angstrom}, respectively. In both complexes, these molecules are bound in the tunnel leading to the active site, such that the sole substituent of the heterocyclic ring is buried deepest and oriented towards the ThDP. Unlike the structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS in complex with the classic disubstituted sulfonylureas, where ThDP is broken, this cofactor is intact and present most likely as the hydroxylethyl intermediate.

  9. Interspecific and interploidal gene flow in Central European Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Marte H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of polyploidisation on gene flow between natural populations are little known. Central European diploid and tetraploid populations of Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata are here used to study interspecific and interploidal gene flow, using a combination of nuclear and plastid markers. Results Ploidal levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. Network analyses clearly separated diploids according to species. Tetraploids and diploids were highly intermingled within species, and some tetraploids intermingled with the other species, as well. Isolation with migration analyses suggested interspecific introgression from tetraploid A. arenosa to tetraploid A. lyrata and vice versa, and some interploidal gene flow, which was unidirectional from diploid to tetraploid in A. arenosa and bidirectional in A. lyrata. Conclusions Interspecific genetic isolation at diploid level combined with introgression at tetraploid level indicates that polyploidy may buffer against negative consequences of interspecific hybridisation. The role of introgression in polyploid systems may, however, differ between plant species, and even within the small genus Arabidopsis, we find very different evolutionary fates when it comes to introgression.

  10. Complexation of arsenite with phytochelatins reduces arsenite efflux and translocation from roots to shoots in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Ju; Wood, B Alan; Raab, Andrea; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Feldmann, Jörg

    2010-04-01

    Complexation of arsenite [As(III)] with phytochelatins (PCs) is an important mechanism employed by plants to detoxify As; how this complexation affects As mobility was little known. We used high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and accurate mass electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry coupled to HPLC to identify and quantify As(III)-thiol complexes and free thiol compounds in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to arsenate [As(V)]. As(V) was efficiently reduced to As(III) in roots. In wild-type roots, 69% of As was complexed as As(III)-PC4, As(III)-PC3, and As(III)-(PC2)2. Both the glutathione (GSH)-deficient mutant cad2-1 and the PC-deficient mutant cad1-3 were approximately 20 times more sensitive to As(V) than the wild type. In cad1-3 roots, only 8% of As was complexed with GSH as As(III)-(GS)3 and no As(III)-PCs were detected, while in cad2-1 roots, As(III)-PCs accounted for only 25% of the total As. The two mutants had a greater As mobility, with a significantly higher accumulation of As(III) in shoots and 4.5 to 12 times higher shoot-to-root As concentration ratio than the wild type. Roots also effluxed a substantial proportion of the As(V) taken up as As(III) to the external medium, and this efflux was larger in the two mutants. Furthermore, when wild-type plants were exposed to l-buthionine sulfoximine or deprived of sulfur, both As(III) efflux and root-to-shoot translocation were enhanced. The results indicate that complexation of As(III) with PCs in Arabidopsis roots decreases its mobility for both efflux to the external medium and for root-to-shoot translocation. Enhancing PC synthesis in roots may be an effective strategy to reduce As translocation to the edible organs of food crops.

  11. Transposed genes in Arabidopsis are often associated with flanking repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Woodhouse

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Much of the eukaryotic genome is known to be mobile, largely due to the movement of transposons and other parasitic elements. Recent work in plants and Drosophila suggests that mobility is also a feature of many nontransposon genes and gene families. Indeed, analysis of the Arabidopsis genome suggested that as many as half of all genes had moved to unlinked positions since Arabidopsis diverged from papaya roughly 72 million years ago, and that these mobile genes tend to fall into distinct gene families. However, the mechanism by which single gene transposition occurred was not deduced. By comparing two closely related species, Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, we sought to determine the nature of gene transposition in Arabidopsis. We found that certain categories of genes are much more likely to have transposed than others, and that many of these transposed genes are flanked by direct repeat sequence that was homologous to sequence within the orthologous target site in A. lyrata and which was predominantly genic in identity. We suggest that intrachromosomal recombination between tandemly duplicated sequences, and subsequent insertion of the circular product, is the predominant mechanism of gene transposition.

  12. Complex processing patterns of mRNAs of the large ATP synthase operon in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Malik Ghulam

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts are photosynthetic cell organelles which have evolved from endosymbiosis of the cyanobacterial ancestor. In chloroplasts, genes are still organized into transcriptional units as in bacteria but the corresponding poly-cistronic mRNAs undergo complex processing events, including inter-genic cleavage and 5' and 3' end-definition. The current model for processing proposes that the 3' end of the upstream cistron transcripts and the 5' end of the downstream cistron transcripts are defined by the same RNA-binding protein and overlap at the level of the protein-binding site. We have investigated the processing mechanisms that operate within the large ATP synthase (atp operon, in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. This operon is transcribed by the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase starting from two promoters, which are upstream and within the operon, respectively, and harbors four potential sites for RNA-binding proteins. In order to study the functional significance of the promoters and the protein-binding sites for the maturation processes, we have performed a detailed mapping of the atp transcript ends. Our data indicate that in contrast to maize, atpI and atpH transcripts with overlapping ends are very rare in Arabidopsis. In addition, atpA mRNAs, which overlap with atpF mRNAs, are even truncated at the 3' end, thus representing degradation products. We observe, instead, that the 5' ends of nascent poly-cistronic atp transcripts are defined at the first protein-binding site which follows either one of the two transcription initiation sites, while the 3' ends are defined at the subsequent protein-binding sites or at hairpin structures that are encountered by the progressing RNA polymerase. We conclude that the overlapping mechanisms of mRNA protection have only a limited role in obtaining stable processed atp mRNAs in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that during evolution of different plant species as maize and Arabidopsis, chloroplasts

  13. Gene coexpression analysis reveals complex metabolism of the monoterpene alcohol linalool in Arabidopsis flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J C; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (-)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined.

  14. Isolation of transcription factor complexes from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures by tandem affinity purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leene, Jelle; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Geerinck, Jan; Van Isterdael, Gert; Witters, Erwin; De Jaeger, Geert

    2011-01-01

    Defining protein complexes is critical to virtually all aspects of cell biology because most cellular processes are regulated by stable or more dynamic protein interactions. Elucidation of the protein-protein interaction network around transcription factors is essential to fully understand their function and regulation. In the last decade, new technologies have emerged to study protein-protein interactions under near-physiological conditions. We have developed a high-throughput tandem affinity purification (TAP)/mass spectrometry (MS) platform for cell suspension cultures to analyze protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana. This streamlined platform follows an integrated approach comprising generic Gateway-based vectors with high cloning flexibility, the fast generation of transgenic suspension cultures, TAP adapted for plant cells, and tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS for the identification of purified proteins. Recently, we evaluated the GS tag, originally developed to study mammalian protein complexes, that combines two IgG-binding domains of protein G with a streptavidin-binding peptide, separated by two tobacco etch virus cleavage sites. We found that this GS tag outperforms the traditional TAP tag in plant cells, regarding both specificity and complex yield. Here, we provide detailed protocols of the GS-based TAP platform that allowed us to characterize transcription factor complexes involved in signaling in response to the plant phytohormone jasmonate.

  15. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  16. The HIRA complex that deposits the histone H3.3 is conserved in Arabidopsis and facilitates transcriptional dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Nie

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In animals, replication-independent incorporation of nucleosomes containing the histone variant H3.3 enables global reprogramming of histone modifications and transcriptional profiles. H3.3 enrichment over gene bodies correlates with gene transcription in animals and plants. In animals, H3.3 is deposited into chromatin by specific protein complexes, including the HIRA complex. H3.3 variants evolved independently and acquired similar properties in animals and plants, questioning how the H3.3 deposition machinery evolved in plants and what are its biological functions. We performed phylogenetic analyses in the plant kingdom and identified in Arabidopsis all orthologs of human genes encoding members of the HIRA complex. Genetic analyses, biochemical data and protein localisation suggest that these proteins form a complex able to interact with H3.3 in Arabidopsis in a manner similar to that described in mammals. In contrast to animals, where HIRA is required for fertilization and early development, loss of function of HIRA in Arabidopsis causes mild phenotypes in the adult plant and does not perturb sexual reproduction and embryogenesis. Rather, HIRA function is required for transcriptional reprogramming during dedifferentiation of plant cells that precedes vegetative propagation and for the appropriate transcription of genes responsive to biotic and abiotic factors. We conclude that the molecular function of the HIRA complex is conserved between plants and animals. Yet plants diversified HIRA functions to enable asexual reproduction and responsiveness to the environment in response to the plant sessile lifestyle.

  17. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.

    2010-05-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Arabidopsis cellulose synthase complex: a proposed hexamer of CESA trimers in an equimolar stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph L; Hammudi, Mustafa B; Tien, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable polymer on Earth and a major component of the plant cell wall. In vascular plants, cellulose synthesis is catalyzed by a large, plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complex (CSC), visualized as a hexameric rosette structure. Three unique cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms are required for CSC assembly and function. However, elucidation of either the number or stoichiometry of CESAs within the CSC has remained elusive. In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This ratio was determined utilizing a simple but elegant method of quantitative immunoblotting using isoform-specific antibodies and (35)S-labeled protein standards for each CESA. Additionally, the observed equimolar stoichiometry was found to be fixed along the axis of the stem, which represents a developmental gradient. Our results complement recent spectroscopic analyses pointing toward an 18-chain cellulose microfibril. Taken together, we propose that the CSC is composed of a hexamer of catalytically active CESA trimers, with each CESA in equimolar amounts. This finding is a crucial advance in understanding how CESAs integrate to form higher order complexes, which is a key determinate of cellulose microfibril and cell wall properties.

  19. An improved toolbox to unravel the plant cellular machinery by tandem affinity purification of Arabidopsis protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leene, Jelle; Eeckhout, Dominique; Cannoot, Bernard; De Winne, Nancy; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vercruysse, Leen; Dedecker, Maarten; Verkest, Aurine; Vandepoele, Klaas; Martens, Lennart; Witters, Erwin; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is one of the most advanced methods to characterize protein complexes in plants, giving a comprehensive view on the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of a certain protein of interest (bait). The bait protein is fused to a double affinity tag, which consists of a protein G tag and a streptavidin-binding peptide separated by a very specific protease cleavage site, allowing highly specific protein complex isolation under near-physiological conditions. Implementation of this optimized TAP tag, combined with ultrasensitive MS, means that these experiments can be performed on small amounts (25 mg of total protein) of protein extracts from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures. It is also possible to use this approach to isolate low abundant protein complexes from Arabidopsis seedlings, thus opening perspectives for the exploration of protein complexes in a plant developmental context. Next to protocols for efficient biomass generation of seedlings (∼7.5 months), we provide detailed protocols for TAP (1 d), and for sample preparation and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS; ∼5 d), either from Arabidopsis seedlings or from cell cultures. For the identification of specific co-purifying proteins, we use an extended protein database and filter against a list of nonspecific proteins on the basis of the occurrence of a co-purified protein among 543 TAP experiments. The value of the provided protocols is illustrated through numerous applications described in recent literature.

  20. Tissue-specific expression patterns of Arabidopsis NF-Y transcription factors suggest potential for extensive combinatorial complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefers, Nicholas; Dang, Kristen K; Kumimoto, Roderick W; Bynum, William Edwards; Tayrose, Gregory; Holt, Ben F

    2009-02-01

    All aspects of plant and animal development are controlled by complex networks of transcription factors. Transcription factors are essential for converting signaling inputs, such as changes in daylength, into complex gene regulatory outputs. While some transcription factors control gene expression by binding to cis-regulatory elements as individual subunits, others function in a combinatorial fashion. How individual subunits of combinatorial transcription factors are spatially and temporally deployed (e.g. expression-level, posttranslational modifications and subcellular localization) has profound effects on their control of gene expression. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have identified 36 Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) transcription factor subunits (10 NF-YA, 13 NF-YB, and 13 NF-YC subunits) that can theoretically combine to form 1,690 unique complexes. Individual plant subunits have functions in flowering time, embryo maturation, and meristem development, but how they combine to control these processes is unknown. To assist in the process of defining unique NF-Y complexes, we have created promoter:beta-glucuronidase fusion lines for all 36 Arabidopsis genes. Here, we show NF-Y expression patterns inferred from these promoter:beta-glucuronidase lines for roots, light- versus dark-grown seedlings, rosettes, and flowers. Additionally, we review the phylogenetic relationships and examine protein alignments for each NF-Y subunit family. The results are discussed with a special emphasis on potential roles for NF-Y subunits in photoperiod-controlled flowering time.

  1. The CA domain of the respiratory complex I is required for normal embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Marchetti, Fernanda; Soto, Débora; Martin, María Victoria; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina; Zabaleta, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    The NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase [complex I (CI), EC 1.6.5.3] of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the principal entry point of electrons, and vital in maintaining metabolism and the redox balance. In a variety of eukaryotic organisms, except animal and fungi (Opisthokonta), it contains an extra domain composed of putative gamma carbonic anhydrases subunits, named the CA domain, which was proposed to be essential for complex I assembly. There are two kinds of carbonic anhydrase subunits: CAs (of which there are three) and carbonic anhydrase-like proteins (CALs) (of which there are two). In plants, the CA domain has been linked to photorespiration. In this work, we report that Arabidopsis mutant plants affected in two specific CA subunits show a lethal phenotype. Double homozygous knockouts ca1ca2 embryos show a significant developmental delay compared to the non-homozygous embryos, which show a wild-type (WT) phenotype in the same silique. Mutant embryos show impaired mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The characteristic embryo greening does not take place and fewer but larger oil bodies are present. Although seeds look dark brown and wrinkled, they are able to germinate 12 d later than WT seeds. However, they die immediately, most likely due to oxidative stress.Since the CA domain is required for complex I biogenesis, it is predicted that in ca1ca2 mutants no complex I could be formed, triggering the lethal phenotype. The in vivo composition of a functional CA domain is proposed.

  2. Arabidopsis COMPASS-like complexes mediate histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation to control floral transition and plant development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danhua Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4 methylation is associated with transcribed genes in eukaryotes. In Drosophila and mammals, both di- and tri-methylation of H3K4 are associated with gene activation. In contrast to animals, in Arabidopsis H3K4 trimethylation, but not mono- or di-methylation of H3K4, has been implicated in transcriptional activation. H3K4 methylation is catalyzed by the H3K4 methyltransferase complexes known as COMPASS or COMPASS-like in yeast and mammals. Here, we report that Arabidopsis homologs of the COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex core components known as Ash2, RbBP5, and WDR5 in humans form a nuclear subcomplex during vegetative and reproductive development, which can associate with multiple putative H3K4 methyltransferases. Loss of function of ARABIDOPSIS Ash2 RELATIVE (ASH2R causes a great decrease in genome-wide H3K4 trimethylation, but not in di- or mono-methylation. Knockdown of ASH2R or the RbBP5 homolog suppresses the expression of a crucial Arabidopsis floral repressor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, and FLC homologs resulting in accelerated floral transition. ASH2R binds to the chromatin of FLC and FLC homologs in vivo and is required for H3K4 trimethylation, but not for H3K4 dimethylation in these loci; overexpression of ASH2R causes elevated H3K4 trimethylation, but not H3K4 dimethylation, in its target genes FLC and FLC homologs, resulting in activation of these gene expression and consequent late flowering. These results strongly suggest that H3K4 trimethylation in FLC and its homologs can activate their expression, providing concrete evidence that H3K4 trimethylation accumulation can activate eukaryotic gene expression. Furthermore, our findings suggest that there are multiple COMPASS-like complexes in Arabidopsis and that these complexes deposit trimethyl but not di- or mono-methyl H3K4 in target genes to promote their expression, providing a molecular explanation for the observed coupling of H3K4 trimethylation (but not H3

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297815124 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 01:8747 59689:7110 81972:7110 predicted protein Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MANTKDKFDELEKGMGLVKDVVHKMQTGLGDKLCMIVLWKRQTQAYCSYGTPTTGAPPTSSAGLEYGVGVALLSTNVGPPLRWICASASPLWICSFQMGN ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297852830 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available QSAPSSYFSSFGESIEEFLDRPTSPETERILSGFLQTTDTSNNVDSFLHHTFNSDGTEKKPPEVKTEEDETEIPVTVTTME...972:1358 basic helix-loop-helix family protein Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MESEFQQHHFLLHDHQHQRPRNSGLIRY

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297840863 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 89:1469 81972:1469 hypothetical protein ARALYDRAFT_893879 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MVHYLQGSFFYEQVTKT...ENSDMKFPFLLASVECFSQDLGVHAYSAIALLELGKLIGSVSFYRKALNNAKEGLSFIASFGGLRLSEENTKSNLENVVLVAESMIPKLQGRVRSDSDTAAAESMIQAADTMKFFSVFFLW ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297802688 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 59689:2369 81972:2369 hypothetical protein ARALYDRAFT_913121 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MNSTCWSSQQRVNGIGLTCHVALLFCTGHPRLSPRPTKLKKTLVEKRALLSTEGGSSRRHQASNKPNADPQNLHRRQPPQSLIK ...

  7. APC/C-CCS52A complexes control meristem maintenance in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstraelen, Marleen; Baloban, Mikhail; Da Ines, Olivier; Cultrone, Antonietta; Lammens, Tim; Boudolf, Véronique; Brown, Spencer C; De Veylder, Lieven; Mergaert, Peter; Kondorosi, Eva

    2009-07-14

    Plant organs originate from meristems where stem cells are maintained to produce continuously daughter cells that are the source of different cell types. The cell cycle switch gene CCS52A, a substrate specific activator of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), controls the mitotic arrest and the transition of mitotic cycles to endoreduplication (ER) cycles as part of cell differentiation. Arabidopsis, unlike other organisms, contains 2 CCS52A isoforms. Here, we show that both of them are active and regulate meristem maintenance in the root tip, although through different mechanisms. The CCS52A1 activity in the elongation zone of the root stimulates ER and mitotic exit, and contributes to the border delineation between dividing and expanding cells. In contrast, CCS52A2 acts directly in the distal region of the root meristem to control identity of the quiescent center (QC) cells and stem cell maintenance. Cell proliferation assays in roots suggest that this control involves CCS52A2 mediated repression of mitotic activity in the QC cells. The data indicate that the CCS52A genes favor a low mitotic state in different cell types of the root tip that is required for meristem maintenance, and reveal a previously undescribed mechanism for APC/C mediated control in plant development.

  8. MicroProtein-mediated recruitment of CONSTANS into a TOPLESS trimeric complex represses flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeff, Moritz; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Tenai E.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana microProteins, miP1a and miP1b, physically interact with CONSTANS (CO) a potent regulator of flowering time. The miP1a/b-type microProteins evolved in dicotyledonous plants and have an additional carboxy-terminal PF(V/L)FL motif. This motif enables miP1a/b microProteins to interact......MicroProteins are short, single domain proteins that act by sequestering larger, multi-domain proteins into non-functional complexes. MicroProteins have been identified in plants and animals, where they are mostly involved in the regulation of developmental processes. Here we show that two...... with TOPLESS/TOPLESS-RELATED (TPL/TPR) proteins. Interaction of CO with miP1a/b/TPL causes late flowering due to a failure in the induction of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) expression under inductive long day conditions. Both miP1a and miP1b are expressed in vascular tissue, where CO and FT are active. Genetically...

  9. A Lesion-Mimic Syntaxin Double Mutant in Arabidopsis Reveals Novel Complexity of Pathogen Defense Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziguo Zhang; Hans Thordal-Christensen; Andrea Lenk; Mats X. Andersson; Torben Gjetting; Carsten Pedersen; Mads E. Nielsen; Marl-Anne Newman; Bi-Huei Hou; Shauna C. Somerville

    2008-01-01

    The lesion-mimicArabidopsis mutant, syp121 syp122, constitutively expresses the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and has low penetration resistance to powdery mildew fungi. Genetic analyses of the lesion-mimic phenotype have expanded our understanding of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. Inactivation of SA signaling genes in syp121 syp 122 only partially rescues the lesion-mimic phenotype, indicating that additional defenses contribute to the PCD. Whole genome transcriptome analysis confirmed that SA-induced transcripts, as well as numerous other known pathogenresponse transcripts, are up-regulated after inactivation of the syntaxin genes. A suppressor mutant analysis of syp121 syp122 revealed that FMO1, ALD1, and PAD4 are important for lesion development. Mutant alleles of EDS1, NDR1, RAR1, and SGT1b also partially rescued the lesion-mimic phenotype, suggesting that mutating syntaxin genes stimulates TIR-NB-LRR and CC-NB-LRR-type resistances. The syntaxin double knockout potentiated a powdery mildewinduced HR-like response. This required functional PAD4 but not functional SA signaling. However, SA signaling potentiated the PAD4-dependent HR-like response. Analyses of quadruple mutants suggest that EDS5 and SID2 confer separate SA-independent signaling functions, and that FMO1 and ALD1 mediate SA-independent signals that are NPRl-dependent.These studies highlight the contribution of multiple pathways to defense and point to the complexity of their interactions.

  10. Arabidopsis TTG2 regulates TRY expression through enhancement of activator complex-triggered activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Martina; Dartan, Burcu; Birkenbihl, Rainer; Somssich, Imre E; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Trichome patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a regulatory feedback loop of the trichome promoting factors TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), GLABRA3 (GL3)/ENHANCER OF GL3 (EGL3), and GL1 and a group of homologous R3MYB proteins that act as their inhibitors. Together, they regulate the temporal and spatial expression of GL2 and TTG2, which are considered to control trichome cell differentiation. In this work, we show that TTG2 is a specific activator of TRY (but not CPC or GL2). The WRKY protein TTG2 binds to W-boxes in a minimal promoter fragment of TRY, and these W-boxes are essential for rescue of the try mutant phenotype. We further show that TTG2 alone is not able to activate TRY expression, but rather drastically enhances the activation by TTG1 and GL3. As TTG2 physically interacts with TTG1 and because TTG2 can associate with GL3 through its interaction with TTG1, we propose that TTG2 enhances the activity of TTG1 and GL3 by forming a protein complex.

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01172-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 98M9, com... 46 4.5 1 ( EF491013 ) Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata strain Ontario 1... 46 4.5 1 ( EF491009 ...) Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata strain Ontario 0... 46 4.5 1 ( EF491006 ) Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata strain Ontario

  12. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  13. The Arabidopsis thaliana vernalization response requires a polycomb-like protein complex that also includes VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Craig C; Robertson, Masumi; Tanner, Greg; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Helliwell, Chris A

    2006-09-26

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the promotion of flowering by cold temperatures, vernalization, is regulated via a floral-repressive MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Vernalization leads to the epigenetic repression of FLC expression, a process that requires the polycomb group (PcG) protein VERNALIZATION 2 (VRN2) and the plant homeodomain protein VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3). We demonstrate that the repression of FLC by vernalization requires homologues of other Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 proteins and VRN2. We show in planta that VRN2 and VIN3 are part of a large protein complex that can include the PcG proteins FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM, CURLY LEAF, and SWINGER. These findings suggest a single protein complex is responsible for histone deacetylation at FLC and histone methylation at FLC in vernalized plants. The abundance of the complex increases during vernalization and declines after plants are returned to higher temperatures, consistent with the complex having a role in establishing FLC repression.

  14. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1/MOZART 1 is an integral component of the γ-tubulin-containing microtubule nucleating complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayoshi; Yagi, Noriyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Fujita, Satoshi; Kawashima, Noriyuki; Ehrhardt, David W; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Microtubules in eukaryotic cells are nucleated from ring-shaped complexes that contain γ-tubulin and a family of homologous γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs), but the subunit composition of the complexes can vary among fungi, animals and plants. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1 (GIP1), a small protein with no homology to the GCP family, interacts with GCP3 in vitro, and is a plant homolog of vertebrate mitotic-spindle organizing protein associated with a ring of γ-tubulin 1 (MOZART1), a recently identified component of the γ-tubulin complex in human cell lines. In this study, we characterized two closely related Arabidopsis GIP1s: GIP1a and GIP1b. Single mutants of gip1a and gip1b were indistinguishable from wild-type plants, but their double mutant was embryonic lethal, and showed impaired development of male gametophytes. Functional fusions of GIP1a with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to purify GIP1a-containing complexes from Arabidopsis plants, which contained all the subunits (except NEDD1) previously identified in the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes. GIP1a and GIP1b interacted specifically with Arabidopsis GCP3 in yeast. GFP-GIP1a labeled mitotic microtubule arrays in a pattern largely consistent with, but partly distinct from, the localization of the γ-tubulin complex containing GCP2 or GCP3 in planta. In interphase cortical arrays, the labeled complexes were preferentially recruited to existing microtubules, from which new microtubules were efficiently nucleated. However, in contrast to complexes labeled with tagged GCP2 or GCP3, their recruitment to cortical areas with no microtubules was rarely observed. These results indicate that GIP1/MOZART1 is an integral component of a subset of the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes.

  15. Putative members of the Arabidopsis Nup107-160 nuclear pore sub-complex contribute to pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiermer, Marcel; Cheng, Yu Ti; Imkampe, Julia; Li, Meilan; Wang, Dongmei; Lipka, Volker; Li, Xin

    2012-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, transduction of external stimuli into the nucleus to induce transcription and export of mRNAs for translation in the cytoplasm is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) composed of nucleoporin proteins (Nups). We previously reported that Arabidopsis MOS3, encoding the homolog of vertebrate Nup96, is required for plant immunity and constitutive resistance mediated by the de-regulated Toll interleukin 1 receptor/nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat (TNL)-type R gene snc1. In vertebrates, Nup96 is a component of the conserved Nup107-160 nuclear pore sub-complex, and implicated in immunity-related mRNA export. Here, we used a reverse genetics approach to examine the requirement for additional subunits of the predicted Arabidopsis Nup107-160 complex in plant immunity. We show that, among eight putative complex members, beside MOS3, only plants with defects in Nup160 or Seh1 are impaired in basal resistance. Constitutive resistance in the snc1 mutant and immunity mediated by TNL-type R genes also depend on functional Nup160 and have a partial requirement for Seh1. Conversely, resistance conferred by coiled coil-type immune receptors operates largely independently of both genes, demonstrating specific contributions to plant defense signaling. Our functional analysis further revealed that defects in nup160 and seh1 result in nuclear accumulation of poly(A) mRNA, and, in the case of nup160, considerable depletion of EDS1, a key positive regulator of basal and TNL-triggered resistance. These findings suggest that Nup160 is required for nuclear mRNA export and full expression of EDS1-conditioned resistance pathways in Arabidopsis.

  16. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

  17. Differential SAGE analysis in Arabidopsis uncovers increased transcriptome complexity in response to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkin Isobel AP

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abiotic stress, including low temperature, limits the productivity and geographical distribution of plants, which has led to significant interest in understanding the complex processes that allow plants to adapt to such stresses. The wide range of physiological, biochemical and molecular changes that occur in plants exposed to low temperature require a robust global approach to studying the response. We have employed Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE to uncover changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana over a time course of low temperature stress. Results Five SAGE libraries were generated from A. thaliana leaf tissue collected at time points ranging from 30 minutes to one week of low temperature treatment (4°C. Over 240,000 high quality SAGE tags, corresponding to 16,629 annotated genes, provided a comprehensive survey of changes in the transcriptome in response to low temperature, from perception of the stress to acquisition of freezing tolerance. Interpretation of these data was facilitated by representing the SAGE data by gene identifier, allowing more robust statistical analysis, cross-platform comparisons and the identification of genes sharing common expression profiles. Simultaneous statistical calculations across all five libraries identified 920 low temperature responsive genes, only 24% of which overlapped with previous global expression analysis performed using microarrays, although similar functional categories were affected. Clustering of the differentially regulated genes facilitated the identification of novel loci correlated with the development of freezing tolerance. Analysis of their promoter sequences revealed subsets of genes that were independent of CBF and ABA regulation and could provide a mechanism for elucidating complementary signalling pathways. The SAGE data emphasised the complexity of the plant response, with alternate pre-mRNA processing events increasing at low temperatures

  18. Mutation of an Arabidopsis NatB N-alpha-terminal acetylation complex component causes pleiotropic developmental defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Ferrández-Ayela

    Full Text Available N-α-terminal acetylation is one of the most common, but least understood modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although a high degree of conservation exists between the N-α-terminal acetylomes of plants and animals, very little information is available on this modification in plants. In yeast and humans, N-α-acetyltransferase complexes include a single catalytic subunit and one or two auxiliary subunits. Here, we report the positional cloning of TRANSCURVATA2 (TCU2, which encodes the auxiliary subunit of the NatB N-α-acetyltransferase complex in Arabidopsis. The phenotypes of loss-of-function tcu2 alleles indicate that NatB complex activity is required for flowering time regulation and for leaf, inflorescence, flower, fruit and embryonic development. In double mutants, tcu2 alleles synergistically interact with alleles of ARGONAUTE10, which encodes a component of the microRNA machinery. In summary, NatB-mediated N-α-terminal acetylation of proteins is pleiotropically required for Arabidopsis development and seems to be functionally related to the microRNA pathway.

  19. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis FlowersW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginglinger, J.F.; Boachon, B.; Hofer, R.; Paetz, C.; Kollner, T.G.; Miesch, L.; Lugan, R.; Baltenweck, R.; Mutterer, J.; Ullman, P.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus

  20. SUPERKILLER Complex Components Are Required for the RNA Exosome-Mediated Control of Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Inflorescence Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Kunst, Ljerka

    2016-06-01

    ECERIFERUM7 (CER7)/AtRRP45B core subunit of the exosome, the main cellular 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, is a positive regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescence stems. CER7-dependent exosome activity determines stem wax load by controlling transcript levels of the wax-related gene CER3 Characterization of the second-site suppressors of the cer7 mutant revealed that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are direct effectors of CER3 expression. To explore the relationship between the exosome and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in regulating CER3 transcript levels, we investigated two additional suppressor mutants, wax restorer1 (war1) and war7. We show that WAR1 and WAR7 encode Arabidopsis SUPERKILLER3 (AtSKI3) and AtSKI2, respectively, components of the SKI complex that associates with the exosome during cytoplasmic 3'-to-5' RNA degradation, and that CER7-dependent regulation of wax biosynthesis also requires participation of AtSKI8. Our study further reveals that it is the impairment of the exosome-mediated 3'-5' decay of CER3 transcript in the cer7 mutant that triggers extensive production of siRNAs and efficient PTGS of CER3. This identifies PTGS as a general mechanism for eliminating highly abundant endogenous transcripts that is activated when 3'-to-5' mRNA turnover by the exosome is disrupted. Diminished efficiency of PTGS in ski mutants compared with cer7, as evidenced by lower accumulation of CER3-related siRNAs, suggests that reduced amounts of CER3 transcript are available for siRNA synthesis, possibly because CER3 mRNA that does not interact with SKI is degraded by 5'-to-3' XRN4 exoribonuclease.

  1. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T; Nixon, B Tracy; Haigler, Candace H; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Meiler, Jens; O'Neill, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    A cellulose synthesis complex with a "rosette" shape is responsible for synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. This work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. The conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. This study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  2. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis Flowers[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginglinger, Jean-François; Boachon, Benoit; Höfer, René; Paetz, Christian; Köllner, Tobias G.; Miesch, Laurence; Lugan, Raphael; Baltenweck, Raymonde; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ullmann, Pascaline; Beran, Franziska; Claudel, Patricia; Verstappen, Francel; Fischer, Marc J.C.; Karst, Francis; Bouwmeester, Harro; Miesch, Michel; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ehlting, Jürgen; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus predicted to be involved in monoterpenoid metabolism. We show that all four selected genes, the two terpene synthases (TPS10 and TPS14) and the two cytochrome P450s (CYP71B31 and CYP76C3), are simultaneously expressed at anthesis, mainly in upper anther filaments and in petals. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, the TPS enzymes colocalize in vesicular structures associated with the plastid surface, whereas the P450 proteins were detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in N. benthamiana, the TPS enzymes formed two different enantiomers of linalool: (−)-(R)-linalool for TPS10 and (+)-(S)-linalool for TPS14. Both P450 enzymes metabolize the two linalool enantiomers to form different but overlapping sets of hydroxylated or epoxidized products. These oxygenated products are not emitted into the floral headspace, but accumulate in floral tissues as further converted or conjugated metabolites. This work reveals complex linalool metabolism in Arabidopsis flowers, the ecological role of which remains to be determined. PMID:24285789

  3. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Joseph L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Hammudi, Mustafa B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Tien, Ming [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This ratio was determined utilizing a simple but elegant method of quantitative immunoblotting using isoform-specific antibodies and 35S-labeled protein standards for each CESA. Additionally, the observed equimolar stoichiometry was found to be fixed along the axis of the stem, which represents a developmental gradient. Our results complement recent spectroscopic analyses pointing toward an 18-chain cellulose microfibril. Taken together, we propose that the CSC is composed of a hexamer of catalytically active CESA trimers, with each CESA in equimolar amounts. This finding is a crucial advance in understanding how CESAs integrate to form higher order complexes, which is a key determinate of cellulose microfibril and cell wall properties.

  4. The interplay of RecA-related proteins and the MND1-HOP2 complex during meiosis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Vignard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, homologous chromosomes recognize each other, align, and exchange genetic information. This process requires the action of RecA-related proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 to catalyze DNA strand exchanges. The Mnd1-Hop2 complex has been shown to assist in Dmc1-dependent processes. Furthermore, higher eukaryotes possess additional RecA-related proteins, like XRCC3, which are involved in meiotic recombination. However, little is known about the functional interplay between these proteins during meiosis. We investigated the functional relationship between AtMND1, AtDMC1, AtRAD51, and AtXRCC3 during meiosis in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate the localization of AtMND1 to meiotic chromosomes, even in the absence of recombination, and show that AtMND1 loading depends exclusively on AHP2, the Arabidopsis Hop2 homolog. We provide evidence of genetic interaction between AtMND1, AtDMC1, AtRAD51, and AtXRCC3. In vitro assays suggest that this functional link is due to direct interaction of the AtMND1-AHP2 complex with AtRAD51 and AtDMC1. We show that AtDMC1 foci accumulate in the Atmnd1 mutant, but are reduced in number in Atrad51 and Atxrcc3 mutants. This study provides the first insights into the functional differences of AtRAD51 and AtXRCC3 during meiosis, demonstrating that AtXRCC3 is dispensable for AtDMC1 focus formation in an Atmnd1 mutant background, whereas AtRAD51 is not. These results clarify the functional interactions between key players in the strand exchange processes during meiotic recombination. Furthermore, they highlight a direct interaction between MND1 and RAD51 and show a functional divergence between RAD51 and XRCC3.

  5. Features of the primary wall CESA complex in wild type and cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Elliott, Janet E; Williamson, Richard E

    2008-01-01

    Evidence from genetics, co-precipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation suggest that three CESAs implicated in making primary wall cellulose in Arabidopsis thaliana form a complex. This study shows the complex has a M(r) of approximately 840 kDa in detergent extracts and that it has undergone distinctive changes when extracts are prepared from some cellulose-deficient mutants. The mobility of CESAs 1, 3, and 6 in a Triton-soluble microsomal fraction subject to blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was consistent with a M(r) of about 840 kDa. An antibody specific to any one CESA pulled down all three CESAs consistent with their occupying the same 840 kDa complex. In rsw1, a CESA1 missense mutant, extracts of seedlings grown at the permissive temperature have an apparently normal CESA complex that was missing from extracts of seedlings grown at the restrictive temperature where CESAs precipitated independently. In prc1-19, with no CESA6, CESAs 1 and 3 were part of a 420 kDa complex in extracts of light-grown seedlings that was absent from extracts of dark-grown seedlings where the CESAs precipitated independently. Two CESA3 missense mutants retained apparently normal CESA complexes as did four cellulose-deficient mutants defective in proteins other than CESAs. The 840 kDa complex could contain six CESA subunits and, since loss of plasma membrane rosettes accompanies its loss in rsw1, the complex could form one of the six particles which electron microscopy reveals in rosettes.

  6. Simultaneous quantification and validation of caffeoylquinic acids and flavonoids in Hemistepta lyrata and peroxynitrite-scavenging activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agung; Lim, Sang-Cheol; Byeon, Jeong Su; Choi, Jae Sue; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2013-03-25

    Traditionally, Hemistepta lyrata is consumed as a mountainous vegetable or a medicinal herb to treat inflammation, fever, hemorrhage, and hemorrhoids. In order to provide the scientific evidence of traditional uses of this plant, we identified and quantified thirteen active substances (caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid as caffeoylquinic acids; apigenin, isorhoifolin, acacetin, linarin, diosmetin, diosmin, pectolinarigenin, and pectolinarin as flavones or their glycosides; kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and rutin as flavonol glycosides) from H. lyrata and evaluated their peroxynitrite-scavenging activity. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Capcell Pak C18 column (5μm, 250mm×4.6mm i.d.) with a gradient elution of 0.05% TFA (trifluoroacetic acid) and 0.05% TFA in MeOH-CH(3)CN (60:40). Validation of HPLC methods on the linearity, LOD, LOQ, intra-day and inter-day variabilities, recovery, and repeatability proved that this method is selective, sensitive, precise, accurate, and reproducible. In peroxynitrite-scavenging assay, caffeic acid derivatives (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid) exhibited relatively lower IC(50) values than other substances tested. And HPLC simultaneous quantification showed that the 70% MeOH extract and the BuOH fraction contain a higher quantity of caffeic acid derivatives (17.82 and 30.09mg/g, consecutively). Therefore, caffeic acid derivatives could be the main contributors to the peroxynitrite-scavenging activity of H. lyrata than other phenolic substances.

  7. Comparison of in vitro antioxidant properties of extracts from three plants used for medical purpose in Cameroon:Acalypha racemosa, Garcinia lucida and Hymenocardia lyrata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Djacbou D Sylvie; Pieme Constant Anatole; Biapa Prosper Cabral; Penlap Beng Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the in vitro antiradical and antioxidant properties of methanol extracts of Garcinia lucida, Hymenocardia lyrata (H. lyrata) and Acalypha racemosa. Methods: We determined the in vitro antioxidant activity and the total phenolic content, and performed the phytochemical screening of the extracts from fruits, barks, leaves, roots and stems of these plants using standard procedures. Results:The results of the antioxidant properties showed that more than 60%of DPPH., NO. and HO. radicals were inhibited by the extracts. The radical scavenging activity, the total antioxidant capacity as well as the reducing power increased with the concentration of the extracts. The 50%inhibitory concentration (IC50) varied from 1.46 to 21.65 µg/mL depending of the type of extract and the antioxidant tests. The results indicated that all the extracts exhibited antioxidant properties and the roots of H. lyrata showed the best antioxidant activity [(217.17±9.45) mg Equivalent catechin/g of extract] while the highest total phenol content was found in its barks [(169.782±3.025) mg Eq cat/g of extract]. Conclusions:The methanol extract of H. lyrata possess the most antioxidant property among the three extracts.

  8. Arabidopsis SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 stabilizes and signals within an ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 complex in plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Bart J; Wiermer, Marcel; Bhat, Riyaz A; Moisan, Lisa J; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Neu, Christina; Cabral, Adriana; Parker, Jane E

    2005-09-01

    Plant innate immunity against invasive biotrophic pathogens depends on the intracellular defense regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1 interacts in vivo with another protein, SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 (SAG101), discovered through a proteomic approach to identify new EDS1 pathway components. Together with PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), a known EDS1 interactor, SAG101 contributes intrinsic and indispensable signaling activity to EDS1-dependent resistance. The combined activities of SAG101 and PAD4 are necessary for programmed cell death triggered by the Toll-Interleukin-1 Receptor type of nucleotide binding/leucine-rich repeat immune receptor in response to avirulent pathogen isolates and in restricting the growth of normally virulent pathogens. We further demonstrate by a combination of cell fractionation, coimmunoprecipitation, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments the existence of an EDS1-SAG101 complex inside the nucleus that is molecularly and spatially distinct from EDS1-PAD4 associations in the nucleus and cytoplasm. By contrast, EDS1 homomeric interactions were detected in the cytoplasm but not inside the nucleus. These data, combined with evidence for coregulation between individual EDS1 complexes, suggest that dynamic interactions of EDS1 and its signaling partners in multiple cell compartments are important for plant defense signal relay.

  9. LWD–TCP complex activates the morning gene CCA1 in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Fen; Tsai, Huang-Lung; Joanito, Ignasius; Wu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chin-Wen; Li, Yi-Hang; Wang, Ying; Hong, Jong Chan; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    A double-negative feedback loop formed by the morning genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1)/LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the evening gene TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) contributes to regulation of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis. A 24-h circadian cycle starts with the peak expression of CCA1 at dawn. Although CCA1 is targeted by multiple transcriptional repressors, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), PRR7, PRR5 and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), activators of CCA1 remain elusive. Here we use mathematical modelling to infer a co-activator role for LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) in CCA1 expression. We show that the TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF20 (TCP20) and TCP22 proteins act as LWD-interacting transcriptional activators. The concomitant binding of LWD1 and TCP20/TCP22 to the TCP-binding site in the CCA1 promoter activates CCA1. Our study reveals activators of the morning gene CCA1 and provides an action mechanism that ensures elevated expression of CCA1 at dawn to sustain a robust clock. PMID:27734958

  10. Molecular genetic investigations of root gravitropism and other complex growth behaviors using Arabidopsis and Brachypodium as models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Barker, Richard; Miller, Nathan; Su, Shih-Hao; Su, Shih-Heng

    2016-07-01

    When growing on hard surfaces, Arabidopsis roots tend to grown downward, as dictated by positive gravitropism. At the same time, surface-derived stimuli promote a wavy pattern of growth that is superimposed to a rightward root-skewing trend. This behavior is believed to facilitate obstacle avoidance in soil. To better understand these complex behaviors, we have isolated and characterized mutations that affect them. Some of these mutations were shown to affect gravitropism whereas others did not. Within the latter group, most of the mutations affected mechanisms that control anisotropic cell expansion. We have also characterized mutations that affect early steps of gravity signal transduction within the gravity-sensing columella cells of the root cap. Upon reorientation within the gravity field, starch-filled plastids sediment to the bottom-side of these cells, triggering a pathway that leads to re-localization of auxin efflux facilitators to the bottom membrane. Lateral auxin transport toward the bottom flank ensues, leading to gravitropic curvature. Several of the mutations we characterized affect genes that encode proteins associated with the vesicle trafficking pathway needed for this cell polarization. Other mutations were shown to affect components of the plastid outer envelope protein import complex (TOC). Their functional analysis suggests an active role for plastids in gravity signal transduction, beyond a simple contribution as sedimenting gravity susceptors. Because most cultivated crops are monocots, not dicots like Arabidopsis, we have also initiated studies of root-growth behavior with Brachypodium distachyon. When responding to a gravistimulus, the roots of Brachypodium seedlings develop a strong downward curvature that proceeds until the tip reaches a ~50-degree curvature. At that time, an oscillatory tip movement occurs while the root continues its downward reorientation. These root-tip oscillations also occur if roots are allowed to simply grow

  11. The Arabidopsis Wave Complex: Mechanisms Of Localized Actin Polymerization And Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Szymanski

    2012-10-23

    The objective of this project was to discover the protein complexes and control mechanisms that determine the location of actin filament roadways in plant cells. Our work provided the first molecular description of protein complexes that are converted from inactive complexes to active actin filament nucleators in the cell. These discoveries provided a conceptual framework to control to roadways in plant cells that determine the location and delivery of plant metabolites and storage molecules that are relevant to the bioenergy economy.

  12. Complexes with mixed primary and secondary cellulose synthases are functional in Arabidopsis plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll, A.; Mansoori Zangir, N.; Li, S.; Lei, L.; Vernhettes, S.; Visser, R.G.F.; Somerville, C.; Gu, Y.; Trindade, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by so-called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as catalytic subunits of the complex. The CESAs are divided into two distinct families, three of which are thought to be specialized for the primary cell wall and three for the secondar

  13. Arabidopsis TTG2 Regulates TRY Expression through Enhancement of Activator Complex-Triggered Activation[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Martina; Dartan, Burcu; Birkenbihl, Rainer; Somssich, Imre E.; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Trichome patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a regulatory feedback loop of the trichome promoting factors TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), GLABRA3 (GL3)/ENHANCER OF GL3 (EGL3), and GL1 and a group of homologous R3MYB proteins that act as their inhibitors. Together, they regulate the temporal and spatial expression of GL2 and TTG2, which are considered to control trichome cell differentiation. In this work, we show that TTG2 is a specific activator of TRY (but not CPC or GL2). The WRKY protein TTG2 binds to W-boxes in a minimal promoter fragment of TRY, and these W-boxes are essential for rescue of the try mutant phenotype. We further show that TTG2 alone is not able to activate TRY expression, but rather drastically enhances the activation by TTG1 and GL3. As TTG2 physically interacts with TTG1 and because TTG2 can associate with GL3 through its interaction with TTG1, we propose that TTG2 enhances the activity of TTG1 and GL3 by forming a protein complex. PMID:25304203

  14. Data on the identification of protein interactors with the Evening Complex and PCH1 in Arabidopsis using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry (TAP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Alvarez, Sophie; Nusinow, Dmitri A

    2016-09-01

    Tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) analysis is a powerful biochemical approach to identify protein-protein associations. Here we describe two datasets generated by a series of TAP-MS analyses to co-purify proteins associated with either ELF3 or ELF4 of the Evening Complex (EC) ("Identification of Evening Complex Associated Proteins in Arabidopsis by Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry" (Huang et al., 2016a) [1]) or proteins associated with PCH1, which is a newly identified output of the circadian clock to regulate photoperiodic growth in Arabidopsis thaliana ("PCH1 integrates circadian and light-signaling pathways to control photoperiod-responsive growth in Arabidopsis" (Huang et al. 2016b) [2]). We used either ELF3, ELF4 or PCH1 fused to a C-terminal tandem affinity tag (6xHis-3xFLAG) as baits and conducted purifications in various genetic mutant backgrounds. These data are discussed in recent publications [1,2], and are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002606 (for EC) and PRIDE: PXD003352 (for PCH1).

  15. Dissection of the complex phenotype in cuticular mutants of Arabidopsis reveals a role of SERRATE as a mediator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry Voisin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LACERATA (LCR, FIDDLEHEAD (FDH, and BODYGUARD (BDG cause a complex developmental syndrome that is consistent with an important role for these Arabidopsis genes in cuticle biogenesis. The genesis of their pleiotropic phenotypes is, however, poorly understood. We provide evidence that neither distorted depositions of cutin, nor deficiencies in the chemical composition of cuticular lipids, account for these features, instead suggesting that the mutants alleviate the functional disorder of the cuticle by reinforcing their defenses. To better understand how plants adapt to these mutations, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. We found that apparent compensatory transcriptional responses in these mutants involve the induction of wax, cutin, cell wall, and defense genes. To gain greater insight into the mechanism by which cuticular mutations trigger this response in the plants, we performed an overlap meta-analysis, which is termed MASTA (MicroArray overlap Search Tool and Analysis, of differentially expressed genes. This suggested that different cell integrity pathways are recruited in cesA cellulose synthase and cuticular mutants. Using MASTA for an in silico suppressor/enhancer screen, we identified SERRATE (SE, which encodes a protein of RNA-processing multi-protein complexes, as a likely enhancer. In confirmation of this notion, the se lcr and se bdg double mutants eradicate severe leaf deformations as well as the organ fusions that are typical of lcr and bdg and other cuticular mutants. Also, lcr does not confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in a se mutant background. We propose that there is a role for SERRATE-mediated RNA signaling in the cuticle integrity pathway.

  16. Live and let die: a REM complex promotes fertilization through synergid cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marta Adelina; Guerra, Rosalinda Fiorella; Castelnovo, Beatrice; Silva-Velazquez, Yuriria; Morandini, Piero; Manrique, Silvia; Baumann, Nadine; Groß-Hardt, Rita; Dickinson, Hugh; Colombo, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    Fertilization in flowering plants requires a complex series of coordinated events involving interaction between the male and female gametophyte. We report here molecular data on one of the key events underpinning this process - the death of the receptive synergid cell and the coincident bursting of the pollen tube inside the ovule to release the sperm. We show that two REM transcription factors, VALKYRIE (VAL) and VERDANDI (VDD), both targets of the ovule identity MADS-box complex SEEDSTICK-SEPALLATA3, interact to control the death of the receptive synergid cell. In vdd-1/+ mutants and VAL_RNAi lines, we find that GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 2 (GFA2), which is required for synergid degeneration, is downregulated, whereas expression of FERONIA (FER) and MYB98, which are necessary for pollen tube attraction and perception, remain unaffected. We also demonstrate that the vdd-1/+ phenotype can be rescued by expressing VDD or GFA2 in the synergid cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that the death of the receptive synergid cell is essential for maintenance of the following generations, and that a complex comprising VDD and VAL regulates this event.

  17. The AP-3 adaptor complex is required for vacuolar function in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Zwiewka; Elena Feraru; Barbara M(o)ller; Inhwan Hwang; Mugurel I Feraru; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn; Dolf Weijers; Ji(n) Friml

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular trafficking is required for a multitude of functions in eukaryotic cells.It involves regulation of cargo sorting,vesicle formation,trafficking and fusion processes at multiple levels.Adaptor protein (AP) complexes are key regulators of cargo sorting into vesicles in yeast and mammals but their existence and function in plants have not been demonstrated.Here we report the identification of the protein-affected trafficking 4 (pat4) mutant defective in the putative δ subunit of the AP-3 complex.pat4 and pat2,a mutant isolated from the same GFP imaging-based forward genetic screen that lacks a functional putative AP-3 β,as well as dominant negative AP-3 μ transgenic lines display undistinguishable phenotypes characterized by largely normal morphology and development,but strong intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins in aberrant vacuolar structures.All mutants are defective in morphology and function of lytic and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) but show normal sorting of reserve proteins to PSVs.Immunoprecipitation experiments and genetic studies revealed tight functional and physical associations of putative AP-3 β and AP-3 δ subunits.Furthermore,both proteins are closely linked with putative AP-3 μ and σ subunits and several components of the clathrin and dynamin machineries.Taken together,these results demonstrate that AP complexes,similar to those in other eukaryotes,exist in plants,and that AP-3 plays a specific role in the regulation of biogenesis and function of vacuoles in plant cells.

  18. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  19. Crystal Structures of DNA-Whirly Complexes and Their Role in Arabidopsis Organelle Genome Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Maréchal, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Lepage, Étienne; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand (Montreal)

    2010-09-07

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental to all organisms and need to be quickly and accurately repaired. Although several proteins are known to maintain plastid and mitochondrial genome stability in plants, little is known about the mechanisms of DNA repair in these organelles and the roles of specific proteins. Here, using ciprofloxacin as a DNA damaging agent specific to the organelles, we show that plastids and mitochondria can repair DNA double-strand breaks through an error-prone pathway similar to the microhomology-mediated break-induced replication observed in humans, yeast, and bacteria. This pathway is negatively regulated by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins from the Whirly family, thus indicating that these proteins could contribute to the accurate repair of plant organelle genomes. To understand the role of Whirly proteins in this process, we solved the crystal structures of several Whirly-DNA complexes. These reveal a nonsequence-specific ssDNA binding mechanism in which DNA is stabilized between domains of adjacent subunits and rendered unavailable for duplex formation and/or protein interactions. Our results suggest a model in which the binding of Whirly proteins to ssDNA would favor accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks over an error-prone microhomology-mediated break-induced replication repair pathway.

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297788262 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 01:8083 59689:3013 81972:3013 predicted protein, partial Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata RWYSRNLCETESNFCEERTKHIDST...EVNIFSERWYSTNLCEAESNFCEERTQHLDSTEVNIFSERWYSENLCEAESNFSEERTQHLDSTEVNIFSERWYSKNLCEAESNFCEERTQHLDST...ERWYSRNLCVAESNFCEERTQHLDSTEVNIFSERWYSKNLCEAECNFCEERTQHLDSTEVNIFSERWYSKNLCEAESNFCEERTQHLDST...EVNIFSERWYSKNLCETESYFCEERTQHLDSTEVNIFSERWYSKNLCEAESSFCEEQTQYLDSTEVNIFSERWYSKNLCEAESNFCEERTQHLDSTEVNIFSERWYSKNLCEAESNFCEEQTRHLDSTELNIFSERLYFGKSP ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297841125 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 01:9380 59689:9243 81972:9243 predicted protein Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MALLGEMDQLGEVTQLNEMTELGIGVLSRHDESIGSSWRGIIVRRVIECRS...GRSVVRWVDRQVKECRSVCQGVSFGGSIDRSKSVIRQVDRRVKECRSAWQGESFRRSILH ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297802186 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :2733 59689:5090 81972:5090 ribosomal protein L12 family protein Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MRAPISGFLS...RSLGYLHRTTPLTTATRHLCAVASPEARTKKLERIADDLLNLNRIELYDYSILFSHKLGLNRYGSAVAVAGSDGEASGSTE

  3. Lack of FTSH4 Protease Affects Protein Carbonylation, Mitochondrial Morphology, and Phospholipid Content in Mitochondria of Arabidopsis: New Insights into a Complex Interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smakowska, Elwira; Skibior-Blaszczyk, Renata; Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Kwasniak-Owczarek, Malgorzata; Parys, Katarzyna; Funk, Christiane; Janska, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    FTSH4 is one of the inner membrane-embedded ATP-dependent metalloproteases in mitochondria of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In mutants impaired to express FTSH4, carbonylated proteins accumulated and leaf morphology was altered when grown under a short-day photoperiod, at 22°C, and a long-day photoperiod, at 30°C. To provide better insight into the function of FTSH4, we compared the mitochondrial proteomes and oxyproteomes of two ftsh4 mutants and wild-type plants grown under conditions inducing the phenotypic alterations. Numerous proteins from various submitochondrial compartments were observed to be carbonylated in the ftsh4 mutants, indicating a widespread oxidative stress. One of the reasons for the accumulation of carbonylated proteins in ftsh4 was the limited ATP-dependent proteolytic capacity of ftsh4 mitochondria, arising from insufficient ATP amount, probably as a result of an impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), especially complex V. In ftsh4, we further observed giant, spherical mitochondria coexisting among normal ones. Both effects, the increased number of abnormal mitochondria and the decreased stability/activity of the OXPHOS complexes, were probably caused by the lower amount of the mitochondrial membrane phospholipid cardiolipin. We postulate that the reduced cardiolipin content in ftsh4 mitochondria leads to perturbations within the OXPHOS complexes, generating more reactive oxygen species and less ATP, and to the deregulation of mitochondrial dynamics, causing in consequence the accumulation of oxidative damage.

  4. BRAHMA ATPase of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex acts as a positive regulator of gibberellin-mediated responses in arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Archacki

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes perform a pivotal function in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in major SWI/SNF subunits display embryo-lethal or dwarf phenotypes, indicating their critical role in molecular pathways controlling development and growth. As gibberellins (GA are major positive regulators of plant growth, we wanted to establish whether there is a link between SWI/SNF and GA signaling in Arabidopsis. This study revealed that in brm-1 plants, depleted in SWI/SNF BRAHMA (BRM ATPase, a number of GA-related phenotypic traits are GA-sensitive and that the loss of BRM results in markedly decreased level of endogenous bioactive GA. Transcriptional profiling of brm-1 and the GA biosynthesis mutant ga1-3, as well as the ga1-3/brm-1 double mutant demonstrated that BRM affects the expression of a large set of GA-responsive genes including genes responsible for GA biosynthesis and signaling. Furthermore, we found that BRM acts as an activator and directly associates with promoters of GA3ox1, a GA biosynthetic gene, and SCL3, implicated in positive regulation of the GA pathway. Many GA-responsive gene expression alterations in the brm-1 mutant are likely due to depleted levels of active GAs. However, the analysis of genetic interactions between BRM and the DELLA GA pathway repressors, revealed that BRM also acts on GA-responsive genes independently of its effect on GA level. Given the central position occupied by SWI/SNF complexes within regulatory networks controlling fundamental biological processes, the identification of diverse functional intersections of BRM with GA-dependent processes in this study suggests a role for SWI/SNF in facilitating crosstalk between GA-mediated regulation and other cellular pathways.

  5. Basic Pentacysteine Proteins Repress Abscisic Acid Insensitive4 Expression via Direct Recruitment of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ying; Zou, Meijuan; Sun, Xuwu; He, Baoye; Xu, Xiumei; Liu, Yini; Zhang, Lixin; Chi, Wei

    2017-01-30

    Plant transcription factors generally act in complex regulatory networks that function at multiple levels to govern plant developmental programs. Dissection of the interconnections among different classes of transcription factors can elucidate these regulatory networks and thus improve our understanding of plant development. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional relationships of the transcription factors ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) and members of the BASIC PENTACYSTEINE (BPC) family in lateral root (LR) development of Arabidopsis thaliana Genetic analysis showed that BPCs promote LR development by repressing ABI4 expression. Molecular analysis showed that BPCs bind to the ABI4 promoter and repress ABI4 transcription in roots. BPCs directly recruit the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to the ABI4 locus and epigenetically repress ABI4 expression by catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. In addition, BPCs and ABI4 coordinate their activities to fine-tune the levels of PIN-FORMED1, a component of the auxin signaling pathway, and thus modulate LR formation. These results establish a functional relationship between two universal and multiple-role transcription factors and provide insight into the mechanisms of the transcriptional regulatory networks that affect Arabidopsis organogenesis.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1, a key component of plant immunity, in complex with its signalling partner SAG101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stephan; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E; Niefind, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    In plants, the nucleocytoplasmic protein EDS1 (Enhanced disease susceptibility1) is an important regulator of innate immunity, coordinating host-cell defence and cell-death programs in response to pathogen attack. Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1 stabilizes and signals together with its partners PAD4 (Phytoalexin deficient4) and SAG101 (Senescence-associated gene101). Characterization of EDS1 molecular configurations in vitro and in vivo points to the formation of structurally and spatially distinct EDS1 homomeric dimers and EDS1 heteromeric complexes with either PAD4 or SAG101 as necessary components of the immune response. EDS1, PAD4 and SAG101 constitute a plant-specific protein family with a unique `EP' (EDS1-PAD4-specific) domain at their C-termini and an N-terminal domain resembling enzymes with an α/β-hydrolase fold. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of a functional EDS1 complex formed by EDS1 and SAG101 from Arabidopsis thaliana are reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 101.8, b = 115.9, c = 122.8 Å, and diffracted to 3.5 Å resolution.

  7. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Giorgio; Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A; Donald, Naomi A; Páldi, Katalin; Hannah, Matthew A; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes.

  8. A novel pathway of cytochrome c biogenesis is involved in the assembly of the cytochrome b6f complex in arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhneva, Lina; Kuras, Richard; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; de Vitry, Catherine

    2008-09-05

    We recently characterized a novel heme biogenesis pathway required for heme c(i)' covalent binding to cytochrome b6 in Chlamydomonas named system IV or CCB (cofactor assembly, complex C (b6f), subunit B (PetB)). To find out whether this CCB pathway also operates in higher plants and extend the knowledge of the c-type cytochrome biogenesis, we studied Arabidopsis insertion mutants in the orthologs of the CCB genes. The ccb1, ccb2, and ccb4 mutants show a phenotype characterized by a deficiency in the accumulation of the subunits of the cytochrome b6f complex and lack covalent heme binding to cytochrome b6. These mutants were functionally complemented with the corresponding wild type cDNAs. Using fluorescent protein reporters, we demonstrated that the CCB1, CCB2, CCB3, and CCB4 proteins are targeted to the chloroplast compartment of Arabidopsis. We have extended our study to the YGGT family, to which CCB3 belongs, by studying insertion mutants of two additional members of this family for which no mutants were previously characterized, and we showed that they are not functionally involved in the CCB system. Thus, we demonstrate the ubiquity of the CCB proteins in chloroplast heme c(i)' binding.

  9. A Novel Pathway of Cytochrome c Biogenesis Is Involved in the Assembly of the Cytochrome b6f Complex in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhneva, Lina; Kuras, Richard; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; de Vitry, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    We recently characterized a novel heme biogenesis pathway required for heme ci′ covalent binding to cytochrome b6 in Chlamydomonas named system IV or CCB (cofactor assembly, complex C (b6f), subunit B (PetB)). To find out whether this CCB pathway also operates in higher plants and extend the knowledge of the c-type cytochrome biogenesis, we studied Arabidopsis insertion mutants in the orthologs of the CCB genes. The ccb1, ccb2, and ccb4 mutants show a phenotype characterized by a deficiency in the accumulation of the subunits of the cytochrome b6f complex and lack covalent heme binding to cytochrome b6. These mutants were functionally complemented with the corresponding wild type cDNAs. Using fluorescent protein reporters, we demonstrated that the CCB1, CCB2, CCB3, and CCB4 proteins are targeted to the chloroplast compartment of Arabidopsis. We have extended our study to the YGGT family, to which CCB3 belongs, by studying insertion mutants of two additional members of this family for which no mutants were previously characterized, and we showed that they are not functionally involved in the CCB system. Thus, we demonstrate the ubiquity of the CCB proteins in chloroplast heme ci′ binding. PMID:18593701

  10. Differential Gene Expression and Protein Phosphorylation as Factors Regulating the State of the Arabidopsis SNX1 Protein Complexes in Response to Environmental Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal recycling of plasma membrane proteins contributes significantly to the regulation of cellular transport and signaling processes. Members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SORTING NEXIN (SNX) protein family were shown to mediate the endosomal retrieval of transporter proteins in response to external challenges. Our aim is to understand the possible ways through which external stimuli influence the activity of SNX1 in the root. Several proteins are known to contribute to the function of SNX1 through direct protein–protein interaction. We, therefore, compiled a list of all Arabidopsis proteins known to physically interact with SNX1 and employed available gene expression and proteomic data for a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this interactome. The genes encoding SNX1-interaction partners showed distinct expression patterns with some, like FAB1A, being uniformly expressed, while others, like MC9 and BLOS1, were expressed in specific root zones and cell types. Under stress conditions known to induce SNX1-dependent responses, two genes encoding SNX1-interacting proteins, MC9 and NHX6, showed major gene-expression variations. We could also observe zone-specific transcriptional changes of SNX1 under iron deficiency, which are consistent with the described role of the SNX1 protein. This suggests that the composition of potential SNX1-containing protein complexes in roots is cell-specific and may be readjusted in response to external stimuli. On the level of post-transcriptional modifications, we observed stress-dependent changes in the phosphorylation status of SNX1, FAB1A, and CLASP. Interestingly, the phosphorylation events affecting SNX1 interactors occur in a pattern which is largely complementary to transcriptional regulation. Our analysis shows that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation play distinct roles in SNX1-mediated endosomal recycling under external stress. PMID:27725825

  11. SWR1 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Subunits and H2A.Z Have Non-overlapping Functions in Immunity and Gene Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriri, Souha; Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Kumar, S Vinod

    2016-07-06

    Incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z into nucleosomes by the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex is a critical step in eukaryotic gene regulation. In Arabidopsis, SWR1c and H2A.Z have been shown to control gene expression underlying development and environmental responses. Although they have been implicated in defense, the specific roles of the complex subunits and H2A.Z in immunity are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the SWR1c subunits, PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1 (PIE1), ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), and SWR1 COMPLEX 6 (SWC6), as well as H2A.Z, in defense and gene regulation. We found that SWR1c components play different roles in resistance to different pathogens. Loss of PIE1 and SWC6 function as well as depletion of H2A.Z led to reduced basal resistance, while loss of ARP6 fucntion resulted in enhanced resistance. We found that mutations in PIE1 and SWC6 resulted in impaired effector-triggered immunity. Mutation in SWR1c components and H2A.Z also resulted in compromised jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated immunity. Genome-wide expression analyses similarly reveal distinct roles for H2A.Z and SWR1c components in gene regulation, and suggest a potential role for PIE1 in the regulation of the cross talk between defense signaling pathways. Our data show that although they are part of the same complex, Arabidopsis SWR1c components could have non-redundant functions in plant immunity and gene regulation.

  12. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella. Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  13. Quantitative divergence of the bacterial root microbiota in Arabidopsis thaliana relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaeppi, Klaus; Dombrowski, Nina; Oter, Ruben Garrido; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2014-01-14

    Plants host at the contact zone with soil a distinctive root-associated bacterial microbiota believed to function in plant nutrition and health. We investigated the diversity of the root microbiota within a phylogenetic framework of hosts: three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes along with its sister species Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata, as well as Cardamine hirsuta, which diverged from the former ∼ 35 Mya. We surveyed their microbiota under controlled environmental conditions and of A. thaliana and C. hirsuta in two natural habitats. Deep 16S rRNA gene profiling of root and corresponding soil samples identified a total of 237 quantifiable bacterial ribotypes, of which an average of 73 community members were enriched in roots. The composition of this root microbiota depends more on interactions with the environment than with host species. Interhost species microbiota diversity is largely quantitative and is greater between the three Arabidopsis species than the three A. thaliana ecotypes. Host species-specific microbiota were identified at the levels of individual community members, taxonomic groups, and whole root communities. Most of these signatures were observed in the phylogenetically distant C. hirsuta. However, the branching order of host phylogeny is incongruent with interspecies root microbiota diversity, indicating that host phylogenetic distance alone cannot explain root microbiota diversification. Our work reveals within 35 My of host divergence a largely conserved and taxonomically narrow root microbiota, which comprises stable community members belonging to the Actinomycetales, Burkholderiales, and Flavobacteriales.

  14. Unravelling the shape and structural assembly of the photosynthetic GAPDH-CP12-PRK complex from Arabidopsis thaliana by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Alessandra; Pavel, Nicolae Viorel; Galantini, Luciano; Falini, Giuseppe; Trost, Paolo; Fermani, Simona; Sparla, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms produce sugars through the Calvin-Benson cycle, a metabolism that is tightly linked to the light reactions of photosynthesis and is regulated by different mechanisms, including the formation of protein complexes. Two enzymes of the cycle, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK), form a supramolecular complex with the regulatory protein CP12 with the formula (GAPDH-CP122-PRK)2, in which both enzyme activities are transiently inhibited during the night. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis performed on both the GAPDH-CP12-PRK complex and its components, GAPDH-CP12 and PRK, from Arabidopsis thaliana showed that (i) PRK has an elongated, bent and screwed shape, (ii) the oxidized N-terminal region of CP12 that is not embedded in the GAPDH-CP12 complex prefers a compact conformation and (iii) the interaction of PRK with the N-terminal region of CP12 favours the approach of two GAPDH tetramers. The interaction between the GAPDH tetramers may contribute to the overall stabilization of the GAPDH-CP12-PRK complex, the structure of which is presented here for the first time.

  15. Towards in vivo mutation analysis: knock-out of specific chlorophylls bound to the light-harvesting complexes of Arabidopsis thaliana - the case of CP24 (Lhcb6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarini, Francesca; Xu, Pengqi; Caffarri, Stefano; Hille, Jacques; Croce, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    In the last ten years, a large series of studies have targeted antenna complexes of plants (Lhc) with the aim of understanding the mechanisms of light harvesting and photoprotection. Combining spectroscopy, modeling and mutation analyses, the role of individual pigments in these processes has been highlighted in vitro. In plants, however, these proteins are associated with multiple complexes of the photosystems and function within this framework. In this work, we have envisaged a way to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies by knocking out in vivo pigments that have been proposed to play an important role in excitation energy transfer between the complexes or in photoprotection. We have complemented a CP24 knock-out mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with the CP24 (Lhcb6) gene carrying a His-tag and with a mutated version lacking the ligand for chlorophyll 612, a specific pigment that in vitro experiments have indicated as the lowest energy site of the complex. Both complexes efficiently integrated into the thylakoid membrane and assembled into the PSII supercomplexes, indicating that the His-tag does not impair the organization in vivo. The presence of the His-tag allowed the purification of CP24-WT and of CP24-612 mutant in their native states. It is shown that CP24-WT coordinates 10 chlorophylls and 2 carotenoid molecules and has properties identical to those of the reconstituted complex, demonstrating that the complex self-assembled in vitro assumes the same folding as in the plant. The absence of the ligand for chlorophyll 612 leads to the loss of one Chl a and of lutein, again as in vitro, indicating the feasibility of the method. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  16. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest.

  17. Modeling of the catalytic core of Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like 4 protein and its complex with double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Sarzyńska, Joanna; Miłostan, Maciej; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Łukasiak, Piotr; Kuliński, Tadeusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Błażewicz, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Plant Dicer-like proteins (DCLs) belong to the Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzyme family. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression and antiviral defense through RNA interference pathways. A model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana encodes four DCL proteins (AtDCL1-4) that produce different classes of small regulatory RNAs. Our studies focus on AtDCL4 that processes double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) into 21 nucleotide trans-acting small interfering RNAs. So far, little is known about the structures of plant DCLs and the complexes they form with dsRNA. In this work, we present models of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 and AtDCL4-dsRNA complex constructed by computational methods. We built a homology model of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 comprising Platform, PAZ, Connector helix and two RNase III domains. To assemble the AtDCL4-dsRNA complex two modeling approaches were used. In the first method, to establish conformations that allow building a consistent model of the complex, we used Normal Mode Analysis for both dsRNA and AtDCL4. The second strategy involved template-based approach for positioning of the PAZ domain and manual arrangement of the Connector helix. Our results suggest that the spatial orientation of the Connector helix, Platform and PAZ relative to the RNase III domains is crucial for measuring dsRNA of defined length. The modeled complexes provide information about interactions that may contribute to the relative orientations of these domains and to dsRNA binding. All these information can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of AtDCL4-mediated dsRNA recognition and binding, to produce small RNA of specific size.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byung Woo [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Bingman, Craig A. [Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L. [Department of Biochemistry, The Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226-4801 (United States); Phillips, George N. Jr, E-mail: phillips@biochem.wisc.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  19. Lz-0 × Berkeley: a new Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population for the mapping of complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capron, Arnaud; Chang, Xue Feng; Shi, Chun; Beatson, Rodger; Berleth, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    This study describes the generation and test of a genetic resource suited to identify determinants of cell biological traits in plants. The use of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for a better genetic understanding of cell biological traits is still at an early stage, even for biotechnologically important cell properties, such as the dimensions of fiber cells. A common strategy, the mapping of QTLs in recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, is limited by the fact that the existing RIL populations exploit only a small fraction of the existing natural variation. Here, we report the mapping of QTLs impacting on the length of fiber cells in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems in a newly generated RIL population derived from a cross between the accessions Berkeley and the little known Lz-0. Through inbreeding of individual F(2) plants, a total of 159 new F8 lines were produced and genotyped with a set of 49 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The population was successfully used not only for the mapping of three QTLs controlling fiber length, but also to map five QTL controlling flowering time under short and long-day conditions. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of this new genetic resource by mapping in it QTLs underlying a poorly explored cellular trait as well as an already better explored regulatory pathway. The new RIL population and an online platform for the continuous supplementation of genetic markers will be generally available to substantially broaden the genetic diversity through which loci with impact on plant quantitative traits can be identified.

  20. Kinetics and heterogeneity of energy transfer from light harvesting complex II to photosystem I in the supercomplex isolated from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Tibiletti, Tania; Remelli, William; Caffarri, Stefano

    2017-03-29

    State transitions are a phenomenon that maintains the excitation balance between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI-LHCI) by controlling their relative absorption cross-sections. Under light conditions exciting PSII preferentially, a trimeric LHCII antenna moves from PSII to PSI-LHCI to form the PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplex. In this work, the excited state dynamics in the PSI-LHCI and PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplexes isolated from Arabidopsis have been investigated by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state decays were analysed using two approaches based on either (i) a sum of discrete exponentials or (ii) a continuous distribution of lifetimes. The results indicate that the energy transfer from LHCII to the bulk of the PSI antenna occurs with an average macroscopic transfer rate in the 35-65 ns(-1) interval. Yet, the most satisfactory description of the data is obtained when considering a heterogeneous population containing two PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplexes characterised by a transfer time of ∼15 and ∼60 ns(-1), likely due to the differences in the strength and orientation of LHCII harboured to PSI. Both these values are of the same order of magnitude of those estimated for the average energy transfer rates from the low energy spectral forms of LHCI to the bulk of the PSI antenna (15-40 ns(-1)), but they are slower than the transfer from the bulk antenna of PSI to the reaction centre (>150 ns(-1)), implying a relatively small kinetics bottleneck for the energy transfer from LHCII. Nevertheless, the kinetic limitation imposed by excited state diffusion has a negligible impact on the photochemical quantum efficiency of the supercomplex, which remains about 98% in the case of PSI-LHCI.

  1. Leucine zipper motif in RRS1 is crucial for the regulation of Arabidopsis dual resistance protein complex RPS4/RRS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iuchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-11

    Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins RPS4 and RRS1, known as dual resistance proteins, confer resistance to multiple pathogen isolates, such as the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Ralstonia solanacearum and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. RPS4 is a typical Toll/interleukin 1 Receptor (TIR)-type NLR, whereas RRS1 is an atypical TIR-NLR that contains a leucine zipper (LZ) motif and a C-terminal WRKY domain. RPS4 and RRS1 are localised near each other in a head-to-head orientation. In this study, direct mutagenesis of the C-terminal LZ motif in RRS1 caused an autoimmune response and stunting in the mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that full-length RPS4 and RRS1 are physically associated with one another. Furthermore, virus-induced gene silencing experiments showed that hypersensitive-like cell death triggered by RPS4/LZ motif-mutated RRS1 depends on EDS1. In conclusion, we suggest that the RRS1-LZ motif is crucial for the regulation of the RPS4/RRS1 complex.

  2. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  3. Thaxtomin A affects CESA-complex density, expression of cell wall genes, cell wall composition, and causes ectopic lignification in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Volker; Cookson, Sarah Jane; Wu, Shuang; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    Thaxtomin A, a phytotoxin produced by Streptomyces eubacteria, is suspected to act as a natural cellulose synthesis inhibitor. This view is confirmed by the results obtained from new chemical, molecular, and microscopic analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with thaxtomin A. Cell wall analysis shows that thaxtomin A reduces crystalline cellulose, and increases pectins and hemicellulose in the cell wall. Treatment with thaxtomin A also changes the expression of genes involved in primary and secondary cellulose synthesis as well as genes associated with pectin metabolism and cell wall remodelling, in a manner nearly identical to isoxaben. In addition, it induces the expression of several defence-related genes and leads to callose deposition. Defects in cellulose synthesis cause ectopic lignification phenotypes in A. thaliana, and it is shown that lignification is also triggered by thaxtomin A, although in a pattern different from isoxaben. Spinning disc confocal microscopy further reveals that thaxtomin A depletes cellulose synthase complexes from the plasma membrane and results in the accumulation of these particles in a small microtubule-associated compartment. The results provide new and clear evidence for thaxtomin A having a strong impact on cellulose synthesis, thus suggesting that this is its primary mode of action.

  4. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunit16 positively regulates salicylate-mediated systemic acquired resistance and jasmonate/ethylene-induced defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways.

  5. A developmental framework for complex plasmodesmata formation revealed by large-scale imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Jessica; Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Faulkner, Christine; Robatzek, Silke; Oparka, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) form tubular connections that function as intercellular communication channels. They are essential for transporting nutrients and for coordinating development. During cytokinesis, simple PDs are inserted into the developing cell plate, while during wall extension, more complex (branched) forms of PD are laid down. We show that complex PDs are derived from existing simple PDs in a pattern that is accelerated when leaves undergo the sink-source transition. Complex PDs are inserted initially at the three-way junctions between epidermal cells but develop most rapidly in the anisocytic complexes around stomata. For a quantitative analysis of complex PD formation, we established a high-throughput imaging platform and constructed PDQUANT, a custom algorithm that detected cell boundaries and PD numbers in different wall faces. For anticlinal walls, the number of complex PDs increased with increasing cell size, while for periclinal walls, the number of PDs decreased. Complex PD insertion was accelerated by up to threefold in response to salicylic acid treatment and challenges with mannitol. In a single 30-min run, we could derive data for up to 11k PDs from 3k epidermal cells. This facile approach opens the door to a large-scale analysis of the endogenous and exogenous factors that influence PD formation.

  6. Reference: 598 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omoter is markedly reduced in the cdkc;2 and cyct1;5 mutants, indicating that the kinase complexes are important... flowering. These results establish Arabidopsis CDKC kinase complexes as important...T1;4 and CYCT1;5, play important roles in infection with Cauliflower mosaic virus...hat Arabidopsis thaliana CDK9-like proteins, CDKC;1 and CDKC;2, and their interacting cyclin T partners, CYC

  7. Unique nucleotide polymorphism of ankyrin gene cluster in Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianchang Du; Xingna Wang; Mingsheng Zhang; Dacheng Tian; Yong-Hua Yang

    2007-01-01

    The ankyrin (ANK) gene cluster is a part of a multigene family encoding ANK transmembrane proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, and plays an important role in protein–protein interactions and in signal pathways. In contrast to other regions of a genome, the ANK gene cluster exhibits an extremely high level of DNA polymorphism in an ∼5-kb region, without apparent decay. Phylogenetic analysis detects two clear, deeply differentiated haplotypes (dimorphism). The divergence between haplotypes of accession Col-0 and Ler-0 (Hap-C and Hap-L) is estimated to be 10.7%, approximately equal to the 10.5% average divergence between A. thaliana and A. lyrata. Sequence comparisons for the ANK gene cluster homologues in Col-0 indicate that the members evolve independently, and that the similarity among paralogues is lower than between alleles. Very little intralocus recombination or gene conversion is detected in ANK regions. All these characteristics of the ANK gene cluster are consistent with a tandem gene duplication and birth-and-death process. The possible mechanisms for and implications of this elevated nucleotide variation are also discussed, including the suggestion of balancing selection.

  8. The molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis complex interacts with actin filaments via molybdenum insertase Cnx1 as anchor protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufholdt, David; Baillie, Christin-Kirsty; Bikker, Rolf; Burkart, Valentin; Dudek, Christian-Alexander; von Pein, Linn; Rothkegel, Martin; Mendel, Ralf R; Hänsch, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The pterin based molybdenum cofactor (Moco) plays an essential role in almost all organisms. Its biosynthesis is catalysed by six enzymes in a conserved four step reaction pathway. The last three steps are located in the cytoplasm, where a multimeric protein complex is formed to protect the intermediates from degradation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation was used to test for cytoskeleton association of the Moco biosynthesis enzymes with actin filaments and microtubules using known cytoskeleton associated proteins, thus permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. Coding sequences of binding proteins were cloned via the GATEWAY system. No Moco biosynthesis enzyme showed any interaction with microtubules. However, alone the two domain protein Cnx1 exhibited interaction with actin filaments mediated by both domains with the Cnx1G domain displaying a stronger interaction. Cnx6 showed actin association only if unlabelled Cnx1 was co-expressed in comparable amounts. So Cnx1 is likely to be the anchor protein for the whole biosynthesis complex on actin filaments. A stabilization of the whole Moco biosynthesis complex on the cytoskeleton might be crucial. In addition a micro-compartmentation might either allow a localisation near the mitochondrial ATM3 exporter providing the first Moco intermediate or near one of the three molybdate transporters enabling efficient molybdate incorporation.

  9. Elucidating the mechanisms of assembly and subunit interaction of the cellulose synthase complex of Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Ivan I; Pittman, Jon K; Turner, Simon R

    2009-02-06

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer in nature; however, questions relating to the biochemistry of its synthesis including the structure of the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) can only be answered by the purification of a fully functional complex. Despite its importance, this goal remains elusive. The work described here utilizes epitope tagging of cellulose synthase A (CESA) proteins that are known components of the CSC. To avoid problems associated with preferential purification of CESA monomers, we developed a strategy based on dual epitope tagging of the CESA7 protein to select for CESA multimers. With this approach, we used a two-step purification that preferentially selected for larger CESA oligomers. These preparations consisted solely of the three known secondary cell wall CESA proteins CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. No additional CESA isoforms or other proteins were identified. The data are consistent with a model in which CESA protein homodimerization occurs prior to formation of larger CESA oligomers. This suggests that the three different CESA proteins undergo dimerization independently, but the presence of all three subunits is required for higher order oligomerization. Analysis of purified CESA complex and crude extracts suggests that disulfide bonds and noncovalent interactions contribute to the stability of the CESA subunit interactions. These results demonstrate that this approach will provide an excellent framework for future detailed analysis of the CSC.

  10. The regulation of TiO2 nanoparticles on the expression of light-harvesting complex II and photosynthesis of chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze, Yuguan; Liu, Chao; Wang, Ling; Hong, Mengmeng; Hong, Fashui

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) could significantly promote photosynthesis and plant growth, but its mechanism is still unclear. In this article, we studied the mechanism of light absorption and transfer of chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana caused by TiO2 NPs treated. The results showed that TiO2 NPs could induce significant increases of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) b gene expression and LHCII II content on the thylakoid membrane in A. thaliana, and the increases in LHCII were higher than the non-nano TiO2 (bulk-TiO2) treatment. Meanwhile, spectroscopy assays indicated that TiO2 NPs obviously increased the absorption peak intensity of the chloroplast in red and blue region, the fluorescence quantum yield near 680 nm, the excitation peak intensity near 440 and 480 nm and/or near 650 and 680 nm of the chloroplast. TiO2 NPs treatment could reduce F480/F440 ratio and increase F650/F680 ratio and accelerate the rate of whole chain electron transport and oxygen evolution of the chloroplast. However, the photosynthesis improvement of the non-nanoTiO2 treatment was far less effective than TiO2 NPs treatment. Taken together, TiO2 NPs could promote the light absorption of chloroplast, regulate the distribution of light energy from PS I to PS II by increasing LHCII and accelerate the transformation from light energy to electronic energy, water photolysis, and oxygen evolution.

  11. Study on Tissue Culture and Effective Clone Establishment of Hemistepta lyrata Bunge%泥胡菜的组织培养及高效无性系建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文; 郭晓丹; 王艳; 徐娜; 姜长阳

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the rapid propagation technology and establish effective clone of Hemistepta lyrata Bunge. [Method] With tender stem of Hemistepta lyrata Bunge as material, the conditions needed in calluses induction and differentiation, adventitious bud differentiation and radication, test tube seedling cutting and transplantation were studied. [Result] The results showed that the optimum medium for granulated calluses induction from tender stem was MS+BA 0.3 mg/L+2,4-D 1-1.5 mg/L, for granulated calluses and adventitious bud differentiation was MS+AgNO3 1.5 mg/L +BA 0.4 mg/L +NAA 0.1 mg/L. 1/2 MS+IAA 0.6 mg/L was suitable for test tube seedling rooting and regeneration, and cinder was used as transplantation and cutting substrate. [Conclusion] This study will provide the scientific reference for choosing the feasible medium in tissue culture of Hemistepta lyrata Bunge.

  12. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

  13. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Qi; Liu, Chang Zhen; Li, Dan Dan; Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Pollen-stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen-stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen-stigma interactions during pollination.

  14. Latest Update of Dsl1 Complex and Its Arabidopsis Homologous Complex%Dsl1复合体及其拟南芥同源复合体的最新研究动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵潇男; 马洪娜; 李季; 李立新

    2013-01-01

    真核细胞中,各细胞器之间的物质交流是通过膜泡运输完成的.膜泡运输依赖多种跨膜蛋白和可溶性蛋白的协同作用来完成.膜泡运输主要包括运输囊泡的出芽(budding)、定向移动(transport)、拴留(tethering)、锚定(docking)和膜融合(fusion)过程.运输囊泡与靶膜融合的特异性依赖多种保守的跨膜蛋白和可溶性蛋白完成,如衣被蛋白(coat)、拴留蛋白(tether)、SNARE蛋白、SM蛋白和Rab蛋白等.其中,拴留因子负责运输囊泡和靶膜最初的接触.从高尔基体到内质网的逆行性运输过程中起作用的拴留因子是Dsl1复合体及其同源复合体.关于Dsl1复合体的研究目前已经有一定的进展,本文将对Dsl1复合体及其同源物的组成和功能进行介绍.%In eukaryotic cells, the communication between various organelles is mediated by vesicle transport. Vesicle transport relies on the cooperation of various transmembrane proteins and soluble proteins. Vesicular transport includes the process of vesicle budding, transport, tethering, docking and fusion. The specificity of transport vesicles fuse to target membrane depends on conserved transmembrane proteins and soluble proteins, such as coats, tethers, SNAREs, SM proteins and Rab proteins. Tethering factors are responsible for the initial contact of transport vesicles with target membrane. Tethering factors which playing the role on retrograde transportation from the Golgi apparatus to ER (endoplasmic reticulum) are Dsll complex and its homologous complex. There is certain progress on research of Dsll complex. Here we introduce components and function of Dsll complex and its Arabidopsis homologous complex.

  15. 中药泥胡菜化学成分的研究%STUDY ON CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF HEMISTEPTA LYRATA BUNGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任玉琳; 杨峻山

    2001-01-01

    目的研究泥胡菜(Hemistepta lyrata Bunge.)全草化学成分.方法采用现代色谱技术分离化合物,用化学方法和现代波谱技术(UV,IR,EIMS,FABMS,ESIMS,1HNMR,13CNMR,HMQC,HMBC)鉴定化合物的结构.结果从中药泥胡菜全草的乙醇提取物中分离得到5个化合物,分别鉴定为芹菜素(apigenin,I),芹菜素-7-O-β-D-芦丁糖苷(apigenin-7-0-β-D-lutinoside,Ⅱ),金合欢素-7-O-β-D-芦丁糖苷(acacetin-7-O-β-D-lutinoside,Ⅲ),紫云英苷(astragalin,Ⅳ)和泥胡木烯苷(hemislienoside,V).结论化合物V为新化合物,化合物I-Ⅳ为首次从该植物中分离得到.

  16. Hydrologic effects on diameter growth phenology for Celtis laevigata and Quercus lyrata in the floodplain of the lower White River, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott T; Cochran, Wesley; Krauss, Ken W.; Keim, Richard F.; King, Sammy L.; Schweitzer, Callie Jo; Clatterbuck, Wayne K.; Oswalt, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Bottomland hardwood (BLH) forests represent an extensive wetland system in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and southeastern USA, and it is currently undergoing widespread transition in species composition. One such transition involves increased establishment of sugarberry (Celtis laevigata), and decreased establishment of overcup oak (Quercus lyrata). The ecological mechanisms that control this transition are not well understood. We measured monthly diameter growth with dendrometer bands on 86 sugarberry and 42 overcup oak trees at eight sites in the floodplain of the White River (AR, USA) with differing hydrologic regimes. For both species, growth attenuated earlier at drier sites compared to wetter sites. Overcup oak grew slightly longer through late August, suggesting its growth period extends across both wet and dry periods. In contrast, sugarberry growth rate decreased substantially by mid-July. While these results did not necessarily indicate a mechanism for increased prominence of sugarberry, they suggest sugarberry growing season does not as much coincide with the typically drier period of late summer and may be less affected by these conditions. Overcup oak grows later into the dry season and water table conditions during this period may determine if overcup oak benefits from this relatively extended growth period.

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping of Uncapped and Cleaved Transcripts Reveals a Role for the Nuclear mRNA Cap-Binding Complex in Cotranslational RNA Decay in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA turnover is necessary for controlling proper mRNA levels posttranscriptionally. In general, RNA degradation is via exoribonucleases that degrade RNA either from the 5′ end to the 3′ end, such as XRN4, or in the opposite direction by the multisubunit exosome complex. Here, we use genome-wide mapping of uncapped and cleaved transcripts to reveal the global landscape of cotranslational mRNA decay in the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome. We found that this process leaves a clear three nucleotide periodicity in open reading frames. This pattern of cotranslational degradation is especially evident near the ends of open reading frames, where we observe accumulation of cleavage events focused 16 to 17 nucleotides upstream of the stop codon because of ribosomal pausing during translation termination. Following treatment of Arabidopsis plants with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide, cleavage events accumulate 13 to 14 nucleotides upstream of the start codon where initiating ribosomes have been stalled with these sequences in their P site. Further analysis in xrn4 mutant plants indicates that cotranslational RNA decay is XRN4 dependent. Additionally, studies in plants lacking CAP BINDING PROTEIN80/ABA HYPERSENSITIVE1, the largest subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap binding complex, reveal a role for this protein in cotranslational decay. In total, our results demonstrate the global prevalence and features of cotranslational RNA decay in a plant transcriptome. PMID:27758893

  18. Mutations in the Arabidopsis Lst8 and Raptor genes encoding partners of the TOR complex, or inhibition of TOR activity decrease abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Alena; Citerne, Sylvie; Jéhanno, Isabelle; Bersimbaev, Rakhmetkazhi I; Veit, Bruce; Meyer, Christian; Leprince, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-27

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates essential processes in plant growth and development by modulation of metabolism and translation in response to environmental signals. In this study, we show that abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism is also regulated by the TOR kinase. Indeed ABA hormone level strongly decreases in Lst8-1 and Raptor3g mutant lines as well as in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis plants treated with AZD-8055, a TOR inhibitor. However the growth and germination of these lines are more sensitive to exogenous ABA. The diminished ABA hormone accumulation is correlated with lower transcript levels of ZEP, NCED3 and AAO3 biosynthetic enzymes, and higher transcript amount of the CYP707A2 gene encoding a key-enzyme in abscisic acid catabolism. These results suggest that the TOR signaling pathway is implicated in the regulation of ABA accumulation in Arabidopsis.

  19. 温度、盐度、pH和饵料密度对皱肋文蛤清滤率的影响%Effects of temperature, salinity, pH, and microalgae density on clearance rates of Meretrix lyrata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栗志民; 刘志刚; 徐法军; 李明昊

    2011-01-01

    The farming of the clam Meretrix lyrata has been successfully developed since 1987 and brought high economic and social benefits to the coastal communities. As a highly valued fishery resource especially in Vietnam, recently M. Lyrata has become another new aqua-culture species with a potential for large-scale farming in the South China Sea and a good market prospects. In this study, by adopting the ecology experimental methods, the effects of seawater temperatures, salinities, pH, and microalgae densities on the clearance rates of M. Lyrata were investigated, which are expected to provide insight on culturing capacity, feeding behavior and energy of M. Lyrata and references for healthy culturing and extension of M. Lyrata. The results showed that the clearance rates of M. Lyrata (P<0. 01) at three sizes were significantly affected by varied temperature (13~33℃), salinity (13~33), pH (7~9), and diet density (2. 5×104~10×104 cell/ml). The maximum clearance rates of the large, medium, and small sized M. Lyrata were 1. 06, 1. 78 and 2. 42 L/g ? H at 28℃ respectively, 0. 35, 0. 65 and 1. 05 L/g ? H at salinity 23, 1. 26, 1. 67 and 2. 02 L/g ? H at pH 8,1. 29, 2. 07 and 2. 29 L/g ? H at microalgae density of 10 × 104 cell/ml. These results indicate that the optimum feeding environ mental conditions were: temperature 28℃, salinity 23, pH 8 and microalgae density 10 × 104 cell/ml. These results indicate that the sensitivity of the large, medium and small sized M. Lyrata to temperature, salinity, pH or microalgae density appeared in the following order: large size<[medium size

  20. Reference: 51 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available urce of acetyl-CoA formation in the plastids of plants and is composed of multiple copies of four different ...astidic E2 (dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase) subunit, plE2, of the complex in Arabidopsis destroys the expre

  1. Proteomics of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and down-

  2. Reference: 510 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ch stabilizes the water-oxidizing complex, is represented in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) by two isofo...rms. Two T-DNA insertion mutant lines deficient in either the PsbO1 or the PsbO2 protein were re...ally. Both PsbO proteins were able to support the oxygen evolution activity of PSII, although PsbO2 was less... efficient than PsbO1 under photoinhibitory conditions. Prolonged high light stress led to re...duced growth and fitness of the mutant lacking PsbO2 as compared with the wild type and the muta

  3. Regulation of the S-locus receptor kinase and self-incompatibility in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Susan R; Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, June B

    2013-02-01

    Intraspecific mate selectivity often is enforced by self-incompatibility (SI), a barrier to self-pollination that inhibits productive pollen-pistil interactions. In the Brassicaceae, SI specificity is determined by two highly-polymorphic proteins: the stigmatic S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) and its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein (SCR). Arabidopsis thaliana is self fertile, but several of its accessions can be made to express SI, albeit to various degrees, by transformation with functional SRK-SCR gene pairs isolated from its close self-incompatible relative, Arabidopsis lyrata. Here, we use a newly identified induced mutation that suppresses the SI phenotype in stigmas of SRK-SCR transformants of the Col-0 accession to investigate the regulation of SI and the SRK transgene. This mutation disrupts NRPD1a, a gene that encodes a plant-specific nuclear RNA polymerase required for genomic methylation and production of some types of silencing RNAs. We show that NRPD1a, along with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is required for SI in some A. thaliana accessions. We also show that Col-0 nrpd1a mutants exhibit decreased accumulation of SRK transcripts in stigmas, which is not, however, responsible for loss of SI in these plants. Together, our analysis of the nrpd1a mutation and of SRK promoter activity in various accessions reveals that the SRK transgene is subject to several levels of regulation, which vary substantially by tissue type and by accession. This study thus helps explain the well-documented differences in expression of SI exhibited by SRK-SCR transformants of different A. thaliana accessions.

  4. L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is an assembly factor of the membrane arm of mitochondrial complex I in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmeyer, Joram; Bock, Ralph; Meyer, Etienne H

    2016-01-01

    L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) catalyses the last enzymatic step of the ascorbate biosynthetic pathway in plants. GLDH is localised to mitochondria and several reports have shown that GLDH is associated with complex I of the respiratory chain. In a gldh knock-out mutant, complex I is not detectable, suggesting that GLDH is essential for complex I assembly or stability. GLDH has not been identified as a genuine complex I subunit, instead, it is present in a smaller, lowly abundant version of complex I called complex I*. In addition, GLDH activity has also been detected in smaller protein complexes within mitochondria membranes. Here, we investigated the role of GLDH during complex I assembly. We identified GLDH in complexes co-localising with some complex I assembly intermediates. Using a mutant that accumulates complex I assembly intermediates, we confirmed that GLDH is associated with the complex I assembly intermediates of 400 and 450 kDa. In addition, we detected accumulation of the 200 kDa complex I assembly intermediate in the gldh mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that GLDH is an assembly factor of the membrane arm of complex I. This function appears to be independent of the role of GLDH in ascorbate synthesis, as evidenced by the ascorbate-deficient mutant vtc2-1 accumulating wild-type levels of complex I. Therefore, we propose that GLDH is a dual-function protein that has a second, non-enzymatic function in complex I assembly as a plant-specific assembly factor. We propose an updated model for complex I assembly that includes complex I* as an assembly intermediate.

  5. Reconstitution of plant alkane biosynthesis in yeast demonstrates that Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM1 and ECERIFERUM3 are core components of a very-long-chain alkane synthesis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Amélie; Domergue, Frédéric; Pascal, Stéphanie; Jetter, Reinhard; Renne, Charlotte; Faure, Jean-Denis; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Lessire, René; Joubès, Jérôme

    2012-07-01

    In land plants, very-long-chain (VLC) alkanes are major components of cuticular waxes that cover aerial organs, mainly acting as a waterproof barrier to prevent nonstomatal water loss. Although thoroughly investigated, plant alkane synthesis remains largely undiscovered. The Arabidopsis thaliana ECERIFERUM1 (CER1) protein has been recognized as an essential element of wax alkane synthesis; nevertheless, its function remains elusive. In this study, a screen for CER1 physical interaction partners was performed. The screen revealed that CER1 interacts with the wax-associated protein ECERIFERUM3 (CER3) and endoplasmic reticulum-localized cytochrome b5 isoforms (CYTB5s). The functional relevance of these interactions was assayed through an iterative approach using yeast as a heterologous expression system. In a yeast strain manipulated to produce VLC acyl-CoAs, a strict CER1 and CER3 coexpression resulted in VLC alkane synthesis. The additional presence of CYTB5s was found to enhance CER1/CER3 alkane production. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that CER1 His clusters are essential for alkane synthesis, whereas those of CER3 are not, suggesting that CYTB5s are specific CER1 cofactors. Collectively, our study reports the identification of plant alkane synthesis enzymatic components and supports a new model for alkane production in which CER1 interacts with both CER3 and CYTB5 to catalyze the redox-dependent synthesis of VLC alkanes from VLC acyl-CoAs.

  6. Crystal structure of the protein At3g01520, a eukaryotic universal stress protein-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Jin; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo; Phillips, George N

    2015-07-01

    Members of the universal stress protein (USP) family are conserved in a phylogenetically diverse range of prokaryotes, fungi, protists, and plants and confer abilities to respond to a wide range of environmental stresses. Arabidopsis thaliana contains 44 USP domain-containing proteins, and USP domain is found either in a small protein with unknown physiological function or in an N-terminal portion of a multi-domain protein, usually a protein kinase. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic USP-like protein encoded from the gene At3g01520. The crystal structure of the protein At3g01520 was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to an R factor of 21.8% (Rfree = 26.1%) at 2.5 Å resolution. The crystal structure includes three At3g01520 protein dimers with one AMP molecule bound to each protomer, comprising a Rossmann-like α/β overall fold. The bound AMP and conservation of residues in the ATP-binding loop suggest that the protein At3g01520 also belongs to the ATP-binding USP subfamily members.

  7. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  8. Polycomb-group (Pc-G) Proteins Control Seed Development in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Xue Wang; Li-Geng Ma

    2007-01-01

    Polycomb-group (Pc-G) proteins repress their target gene expression by assemble complexes in Drosophila and mammals. Three groups of Pc-G genes, controlling seed development, flower development and vernalization response, have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.). MEDEA (MEA), FERTIL IZA TION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2), and FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) are Pc-G genes in Arabidopsis. Their functions in seed development have been extensively explored. The advanced findings of molecular mechanism on how MEA, FIS2 and FIE control seed development in Arabidopsis are reviewed in this paper.

  9. Reference: 517 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d isolated aleurone layers of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were used in experiments designed to iden...tify components of the Arabidopsis seed that contribute to seed dormancy and to lea

  10. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  11. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  12. Genetic adaptation associated with genome-doubling in autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse D Hollister

    Full Text Available Genome duplication, which results in polyploidy, is disruptive to fundamental biological processes. Genome duplications occur spontaneously in a range of taxa and problems such as sterility, aneuploidy, and gene expression aberrations are common in newly formed polyploids. In mammals, genome duplication is associated with cancer and spontaneous abortion of embryos. Nevertheless, stable polyploid species occur in both plants and animals. Understanding how natural selection enabled these species to overcome early challenges can provide important insights into the mechanisms by which core cellular functions can adapt to perturbations of the genomic environment. Arabidopsis arenosa includes stable tetraploid populations and is related to well-characterized diploids A. lyrata and A. thaliana. It thus provides a rare opportunity to leverage genomic tools to investigate the genetic basis of polyploid stabilization. We sequenced the genomes of twelve A. arenosa individuals and found signatures suggestive of recent and ongoing selective sweeps throughout the genome. Many of these are at genes implicated in genome maintenance functions, including chromosome cohesion and segregation, DNA repair, homologous recombination, transcriptional regulation, and chromatin structure. Numerous encoded proteins are predicted to interact with one another. For a critical meiosis gene, ASYNAPSIS1, we identified a non-synonymous mutation that is highly differentiated by cytotype, but present as a rare variant in diploid A. arenosa, indicating selection may have acted on standing variation already present in the diploid. Several genes we identified that are implicated in sister chromatid cohesion and segregation are homologous to genes identified in a yeast mutant screen as necessary for survival of polyploid cells, and also implicated in genome instability in human diseases including cancer. This points to commonalities across kingdoms and supports the hypothesis that

  13. Genetic adaptation associated with genome-doubling in autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Jesse D; Arnold, Brian J; Svedin, Elisabeth; Xue, Katherine S; Dilkes, Brian P; Bomblies, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Genome duplication, which results in polyploidy, is disruptive to fundamental biological processes. Genome duplications occur spontaneously in a range of taxa and problems such as sterility, aneuploidy, and gene expression aberrations are common in newly formed polyploids. In mammals, genome duplication is associated with cancer and spontaneous abortion of embryos. Nevertheless, stable polyploid species occur in both plants and animals. Understanding how natural selection enabled these species to overcome early challenges can provide important insights into the mechanisms by which core cellular functions can adapt to perturbations of the genomic environment. Arabidopsis arenosa includes stable tetraploid populations and is related to well-characterized diploids A. lyrata and A. thaliana. It thus provides a rare opportunity to leverage genomic tools to investigate the genetic basis of polyploid stabilization. We sequenced the genomes of twelve A. arenosa individuals and found signatures suggestive of recent and ongoing selective sweeps throughout the genome. Many of these are at genes implicated in genome maintenance functions, including chromosome cohesion and segregation, DNA repair, homologous recombination, transcriptional regulation, and chromatin structure. Numerous encoded proteins are predicted to interact with one another. For a critical meiosis gene, ASYNAPSIS1, we identified a non-synonymous mutation that is highly differentiated by cytotype, but present as a rare variant in diploid A. arenosa, indicating selection may have acted on standing variation already present in the diploid. Several genes we identified that are implicated in sister chromatid cohesion and segregation are homologous to genes identified in a yeast mutant screen as necessary for survival of polyploid cells, and also implicated in genome instability in human diseases including cancer. This points to commonalities across kingdoms and supports the hypothesis that selection has acted on

  14. Reference: 682 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available complex is a multiheme protein. Two b-type hemes are bound non-covalently to the protein, whereas the third ...hanesulfonate-induced nuclear mutant hcf208. This Arabidopsis mutant shows a high chlorophyll fluorescence p...nscript levels and patterns of the four major polypeptides of the complex are equal to those of the wild typ...e. The mutant cytochrome b(6) polypeptide shows a faster migration behavior in SDS-PAGE compared with the wi...ne was cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that HCF208 is a homolog of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CCB2 pro

  15. Arabidopsis AL PHD-PRC1 complexes promote seed germination through H3K4me3-to-H3K27me3 chromatin state switch in repression of seed developmental genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Anne Marie; Bu, Zhongyuan; Yu, Yu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Seed germination and subsequent seedling growth define crucial steps for entry into the plant life cycle. For those events to take place properly, seed developmental genes need to be silenced whereas vegetative growth genes are activated. Chromatin structure is generally known to play crucial roles in gene transcription control. However, the transition between active and repressive chromatin states during seed germination is still poorly characterized and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identified the Arabidopsis PHD-domain H3K4me3-binding ALFIN1-like proteins (ALs) as novel interactors of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) core components AtBMI1b and AtRING1a. The interactions were confirmed by diverse in vitro and in vivo assays and were shown to require the AL6 N-terminus containing PAL domain conserved in the AL family proteins and the AtRING1a C-terminus containing RAWUL domain conserved in animal and plant PRC1 ring-finger proteins (including AtRNIG1a/b and AtBMI1a/b). By T-DNA insertion mutant analysis, we found that simultaneous loss of AL6 and AL7 as well as loss of AtBMI1a and AtBMI1b retards seed germination and causes transcriptional derepression and a delayed chromatin state switch from H3K4me3 to H3K27me3 enrichment of several seed developmental genes (e.g. ABI3, DOG1, CRU3, CHO1). We found that AL6 and the PRC1 H3K27me3-reader component LHP1 directly bind at ABI3 and DOG1 loci. In light of these data, we propose that AL PHD-PRC1 complexes, built around H3K4me3, lead to a switch from the H3K4me3-associated active to the H3K27me3-associated repressive transcription state of seed developmental genes during seed germination. Our finding of physical interactions between PHD-domain proteins and PRC1 is striking and has important implications for understanding the connection between the two functionally opposite chromatin marks: H3K4me3 in activation and H3K27me3 in repression of gene transcription.

  16. Arabidopsis AL PHD-PRC1 complexes promote seed germination through H3K4me3-to-H3K27me3 chromatin state switch in repression of seed developmental genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Molitor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed germination and subsequent seedling growth define crucial steps for entry into the plant life cycle. For those events to take place properly, seed developmental genes need to be silenced whereas vegetative growth genes are activated. Chromatin structure is generally known to play crucial roles in gene transcription control. However, the transition between active and repressive chromatin states during seed germination is still poorly characterized and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identified the Arabidopsis PHD-domain H3K4me3-binding ALFIN1-like proteins (ALs as novel interactors of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1 core components AtBMI1b and AtRING1a. The interactions were confirmed by diverse in vitro and in vivo assays and were shown to require the AL6 N-terminus containing PAL domain conserved in the AL family proteins and the AtRING1a C-terminus containing RAWUL domain conserved in animal and plant PRC1 ring-finger proteins (including AtRNIG1a/b and AtBMI1a/b. By T-DNA insertion mutant analysis, we found that simultaneous loss of AL6 and AL7 as well as loss of AtBMI1a and AtBMI1b retards seed germination and causes transcriptional derepression and a delayed chromatin state switch from H3K4me3 to H3K27me3 enrichment of several seed developmental genes (e.g. ABI3, DOG1, CRU3, CHO1. We found that AL6 and the PRC1 H3K27me3-reader component LHP1 directly bind at ABI3 and DOG1 loci. In light of these data, we propose that AL PHD-PRC1 complexes, built around H3K4me3, lead to a switch from the H3K4me3-associated active to the H3K27me3-associated repressive transcription state of seed developmental genes during seed germination. Our finding of physical interactions between PHD-domain proteins and PRC1 is striking and has important implications for understanding the connection between the two functionally opposite chromatin marks: H3K4me3 in activation and H3K27me3 in repression of gene transcription.

  17. The transcription factors MS188 and AMS form a complex to activate the expression of CYP703A2 for sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shuang-Xi; Lu, Jie-Yang; Lou, Yue; Teng, Xiao-Dong; Gu, Jing-Nan; Zhang, Cheng; Shi, Qiang-Sheng; Yang, Zhong-Nan; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    The sexine layer of pollen grain is mainly composed of sporopollenins. The sporophytic secretory tapetum is required for the biosynthesis of sporopollenin. Although several enzymes involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis have been reported, the regulatory mechanism of these enzymes in tapetal layer remains elusive. ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) and MALE STERILE 188/MYB103/MYB80 (MS188/MYB103/MYB80) are two tapetal cell-specific transcription factors required for pollen wall formation. AMS functions upstream of MS188. Here we report that AMS and MS188 target the CYP703A2 gene, which is involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis. We found that AMS and MS188 were localized in tapetum while CYP703A2 was localized in both tapetum and locule. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that MS188 directly bound to the promoter of CYP703A2 and luciferase-inducible assay showed that MS188 activated the expression of CYP703A2. Yeast two-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) further demonstrated that MS188 complexed with AMS. The expression of CYP703A2 could be partially restored by the elevated levels of MS188 in the ams mutant. Therefore, our data reveal that MS188 coordinates with AMS to activate CYP703A2 in sporopollenin biosynthesis of plant tapetum.

  18. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  19. Proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2001-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and down-

  20. Reference: 776 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available urice et al. 2008 Jun. Plant Cell 20(6):1652-64. Glycosyltransferases are involved in the biosynthesis of li... localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in yeast and in plants. A homozygous T-DNA insertion mutant, alg3-2,... was identified in Arabidopsis with residual levels of wild-type ALG3, derived fr... complex-glycan-less mutant background, which lacks N-acetylglucosaminyl-transferase I activity, reveals tha...t when ALG3 activity is strongly reduced, almost all N-glycans transferred to proteins are

  1. Defining the core Arabidopsis thaliana root microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Jase; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tremblay, Julien; Engelbrektson, Anna; Kunin, Victor; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Edgar, Robert C.; Eickhorst, Thilo; Ley, Ruth E.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tringe, Susannah Green; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Land plants associate with a root microbiota distinct from the complex microbial community present in surrounding soil. The microbiota colonizing therhizosphere(immediately surroundingthe root) and the endophytic compartment (within the root) contribute to plant growth, productivity, carbon sequestration and phytoremediation1-3. Colonization of the root occurs despite a sophisticated plant immune system4,5, suggesting finely tuned discrimination of mutualists and commensals from pathogens. Genetic principles governing the derivation of host-specific endophyte communities from soil communities are poorly understood. Here we report the pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of more than 600 Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test the hypotheses that the root rhizosphere and endophytic compartment microbiota of plants grown under controlled conditions in natural soils are sufficiently dependent on the host to remain consistent across different soil types and developmental stages, and sufficiently dependent on host genotype to vary between inbred Arabidopsis accessions. We describe different bacterial communities in two geochemically distinct bulk soils and in rhizosphere and endophytic compartments prepared from roots grown in these soils. The communities in each compartment are strongly influenced by soil type. Endophytic compartments from both soils feature overlapping, low-complexity communities that are markedly enriched in Actinobacteria and specific families from other phyla, notably Proteobacteria. Some bacteria vary quantitatively between plants of different developmental stage and genotype. Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plantmicrobe interactions derived from complex soil communities. PMID:22859206

  2. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  3. Reference: 774 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mu...e progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is

  4. Reference: 398 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plays attenuated chloroplast movements under intermediate and high light intensitie...hese movements. In this work, we describe plastid movement impaired 2 (pmi2), a mutant in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that dis

  5. Reference: 173 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mical approaches to elucidate the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. A...tic and chemical analyses of the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. 8 3129-34 15710899 2005 Feb P

  6. Reference: 718 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available displayed a moderate but significant decrease in germination in the presence of D...NA damage. This report links Ubc13-Uev with functions in DNA damage response in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis UEV

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068856 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 GB:AF132475; annotation upd...ated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104955 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B:AF132475; annotation updated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ... ...heme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 G

  9. Reference: 110 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on process. Our study shows that an Arabidopsis SNM protein, although structurally closer to the SNM1/PSO2 members, shares some prope...rties with ARTEMIS but also has novel characteristics. Arabidopsis plants defective

  10. Oxylipin Pathway in Rice and Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Wassim Chehab; John V. Perea; Banu Gopalan; Steve Theg; Katayoon Dehesh

    2007-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex signaling pathways to coordinate responses to developmental and environmental information. The oxylipin pathway is one pivotal lipid-based signaling network, composed of several competing branch pathways, that determines the plant's ability to adapt to various stimuli. Activation of the oxylipin pathway induces the de novo synthesis of biologically active metabolltes called "oxylipins". The relative levels of these metabolltes are a distinct indicator of each plant species and determine the ability of plants to adapt to different stimuli. The two major branches of the oxylipln pathway, allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) are responsible for production of the signaling compounds,jasmonates and aldehydes respectively. Here, we compare and contrast the regulation of AOS and HPL branch pathways in rice and Arabidopsis as model monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous systems. These analyses provide new Insights into the evolution of JAs and aldehydes signaling pathways, and the complex network of processes responsible for stress adaptations in monocots and dicots.

  11. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones.

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  13. The Metabolic Response of Arabidopsis Roots to Oxidative Stress is Distinct from that of Heterotrophic Cells in Culture and Highlights a Complex Relationship between the Levels of Transcripts,Metabolites,and Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Lehmann; Markus Schwarzl(a)inder; Toshihiro Obata; Supaart Sirikantaramas; Meike Burow; Carl Erik Olsen; Takayuki Tohge; Mark D.Fricker; Birger Lindberg Mφller; Alisdair R.Fernie; Lee J.Sweetloveb; Miriam Laxa

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic adjustments are a significant,but poorly understood,part of the response of plants to oxidative stress.In a previous study (Baxter et al.,2007),the metabolic response of Arabidopsis cells in culture to induction of ox-idative stress by menadione was characterized.An emergency survival strategy was uncovered in which anabolic primary metabolism was largely down-regulated in favour of catabolic and antioxidant metabolism.The response in whole plant tissues may be different and we have therefore investigated the response of Arabidopsis roots to menadione treatment,analyzing the transcriptome,metabolome and key metabolic fluxes with focus on primary as well as secondary metab-olism.Using a redox-sensitive GFP,it was also shown that menadione causes redox perturbation,not just in the mitochon-drion,but also in the cytosol and plastids of roots.In the first 30 min of treatment,the response was similar to the cell culture:there was a decrease in metabolites of the TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis and the transcriptomic response was dominated by up-regulation of DNA regulatory proteins.After 2 and 6 h of treatment,the response of the roots was different to the cell culture.Metabolite levels did not remain depressed,but instead recovered and,in the case of pyruvate,some amino acids and aliphatic glucosinolates showed a steady increase above control levels.However,no major changes in fluxes of central carbon metabolism were observed and metabolic transcripts changed largely independently of the corresponding metabolites.Together,the results suggest that root tissues can recover metabolic activity after oxidative inhibition and highlight potentially important roles for glycolysis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway.

  14. Chromosomal proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehs, C P; McElwain, E F; Spiker, S

    1988-07-01

    In plants with large genomes, each of the classes of the histones (H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4) are not unique polypeptides, but rather families of closely related proteins that are called histone variants. The small genome and preponderance of single-copy DNA in Arabidopsis thaliana has led us to ask if this plant has such families of histone variants. We have thus isolated histones from Arabidopsis and analyzed them on four polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic systems: an SDS system; an acetic acid-urea system; a Triton transverse gradient system; and a two-dimensional system combining SDS and Triton-acetic acid-urea systems. This approach has allowed us to identify all four of the nucleosomal core histones in Arabidopsis and to establish the existence of a set of H2A and H2B variants. Arabidopsis has at least four H2A variants and three H2B variants of distinct molecular weights as assessed by electrophoretic mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Thus, Arabidopsis displays a diversity in these histones similar to the diversity displayed by plants with larger genomes such as wheat.The high mobility group (HMG) non-histone chromatin proteins have attracted considerable attention because of the evidence implicating them as structural proteins of transcriptionally active chromatin. We have isolated a group of non-histone chromatin proteins from Arabidopsis that meet the operational criteria to be classed as HMG proteins and that cross-react with antisera to HMG proteins of wheat.

  15. Histone Deacetylase Genes in Arabidopsis Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtney Hollender; Zhongchi Liu

    2008-01-01

    Histone acetylatlon and deacetylation are directly connected with transcriptional activation and silencing in eukaryotas.Gene families for enzymes that accomplish these histone modifications show surprising complexity in domain organization,tissue-specific expression, and function. This review is focused on the family of histone deacetylases (HDACs) that remove the acetyl group from core histone tails, resulting in a "closed" chromatin and transcriptional repression. In Arabidopsis,18 HDAC genes are divided in to three different types - RPD3-1ike, HD-tuin and sirtuin - with two or more members ineach type. The structural feature of each HDAC class, the expression profile of each HDAC gene during development and functional insights of important family members are summarized here. It is clear that HDACs are an important class of global transcriptional regulators that play crucial roles in plant development, defense, and adaptation.

  16. Exploiting Natural Variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana . This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  17. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Molenaar; J.J.B. Keurentjes

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of g

  18. The salty tale of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D

    2000-06-29

    High concentrations of sodium chloride are toxic to most plant species. New insights into the mechanisms by which plants tolerate salt have emerged from the identification of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that play a critical part in physiological resistance to salt.

  19. Prediction of anther-expressed gene resulation in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG JiFeng; YANG JingJin; WANG Guan; YU QingBo; YANG ZhongNan

    2008-01-01

    Anther development in Arabidopsis, a popular model plant for plant biology and genetics, is controlled by a complex gene network. Despite the extensive use of this genus for genetic research, little is known about its regulatory network. In this paper, the direct transcriptional regulatory relationships between genes expressed in Arabidopsis anther development were predicted with an integrated bioinformatic method that combines mining of microarray data with promoter analysis. A total of 7710 transcription factor-gene pairs were obtained. The 80 direct regulatory relationships demonstrating the highest con-fidence were screened from the initial 7710 pairs; three of the 80 were validated by previous experi-ments. The results indicate that our predicted results were reliable. The regulatory relationships re-vealed by this research and described in this paper may facilitate further investigation of the molecular mechanisms of anther development. The bioinformatic method used in this work can also be applied to the prediction of gene regulatory relationships in other organisms.

  20. Composition and function of P bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis David Maldonado-Bonilla

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available mRNA accumulation is tightly regulated by diverse molecular pathways. The identification and characterization of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in controlling the fate of mRNA offers the possibility to broaden our understanding of posttranscriptional gene regulation. Processing bodies (P bodies, PB are cytoplasmic protein complexes involved in degradation and translational arrest of mRNA. Composition and dynamics of these subcellular structures have been studied in animal systems, yeasts and in the model plant Arabidopsis. Their assembly implies the aggregation of specific factors related to decapping, deadenylation and exoribonucleases that operate synchronously to regulate certain mRNA targets during development and adaptation to stress. Although the general function of PB along with the flow of genetic information is understood, several questions still remain open. This review summarizes data on the composition, potential molecular roles, and biological significance of PB and potentially related proteins in Arabidopsis.

  1. Reference: 710 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n factor family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) induced AtMYB44 tr...anscript accumulation within 30 min. The gene was also activated under various abiotic stre...sses, such as dehydration, low temperature, and salinity. In transgenic Arabidopsis carrying an At...MYB44 promoter-driven beta-glucuronidase (GUS) construct, strong GUS activity was observed in the vasculature... and leaf epidermal guard cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing AtMYB44 is more

  2. Interactions between selenium and sulphur nutrition in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P J; Bowen, H C; Parmaguru, P; Fritz, M; Spracklen, W P; Spiby, R E; Meacham, M C; Mead, A; Harriman, M; Trueman, L J; Smith, B M; Thomas, B; Broadley, M R

    2004-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential plant micronutrient, but is toxic at high tissue concentrations. It is chemically similar to sulphur (S), an essential plant macronutrient. The interactions between Se and S nutrition were investigated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Arabidopsis plants were grown on agar containing a complete mineral complement and various concentrations of selenate and sulphate. The Se/S concentration ratio in the shoot ([Se](shoot)/[S](shoot)) showed a complex dependence on the ratio of selenate to sulphate concentration in the agar ([Se](agar)/[S](agar)). Increasing [S](agar) increased shoot fresh weight (FW) and [S](shoot), but decreased [Se](shoot). Increasing [Se](agar) increased both [Se](shoot) and [S](shoot), but reduced shoot FW. The reduction in shoot FW in the presence of Se was linearly related to the shoot Se/S concentration ratio. These data suggest (i) that Se and S enter Arabidopsis through multiple transport pathways with contrasting sulphate/selenate selectivities, whose activities vary between plants of contrasting nutritional status, (ii) that rhizosphere sulphate inhibits selenate uptake, (iii) that rhizosphere selenate promotes sulphate uptake, possibly by preventing the reduction in the abundance and/or activity of sulphate transporters by sulphate and/or its metabolites, and (iv) that Se toxicity occurs because Se and S compete for a biochemical process, such as assimilation into amino acids of essential proteins.

  3. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuha Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr effectors by resistance (R genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1 R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  4. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  5. JUNGBRUNNEN1, a Reactive Oxygen Species–Responsive NAC Transcription Factor, Regulates Longevity in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, A.; Devi Allu, A.; Garapati, P.; Siddiqui, H.; Dortay, H.; Zanor, M.I.; Amparo Asensi-Fabado, M.; Munne´ -Bosch, S.; Antonio, C.; Tohge, T.; Fernie, A.R.; Kaufmann, K.; Xue, G.P.; Mueller-Roeber, B.; Balazadeh, S.

    2012-01-01

    The transition from juvenility through maturation to senescence is a complex process that involves the regulation of longevity. Here, we identify JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1), a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced NAC transcription factor, as a central longevity regulator in Arabidopsis thaliana. JUB1 overexpre

  6. Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, Natalie M.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Hinde, Elizabeth; Fisher, Adam P.; Crosti, Giuseppe; Blilou, Ikram; Gratton, Enrico; Benfey, Philip N.; Sozzani, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction

  7. Modelling the molecular interactions in the flower developmental network of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, K.; Nagasaki, M.; Jáuregui., R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a dynamical model of the gene network controlling flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana. The network is centered at the regulation of the floral organ identity genes (AP1, AP2, AP3, PI and AG) and ends with the transcription factor complexes responsible for differentiation of floral

  8. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105527 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105527 001-127-G05 At5g63090.4 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries prot...ein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-52 ...

  18. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240730 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240730 J043030K09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 2e-11 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288052 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288052 J075151I09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 6e-14 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240911 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240911 J065037E05 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 4e-22 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241119 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241119 J065094C22 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 2e-13 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243149 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243149 J100032I21 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 7e-12 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241581 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241581 J065181K09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 4e-15 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287479 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287479 J043023O14 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 1e-17 ...

  6. Reference: 631 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ggest that atRZ-1a has a negative impact on seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis under salt o...binding protein, atRZ-1a, has a negative impact on seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis thali

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297847396 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 59689:9698 81972:9698 indigoidine synthase A family protein Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MASSSAHSRISNLQ...8024:13549 3398:13549 71240:8145 91827:8145 71275:10370 91836:7597 3699:7597 3700:7597 980083:7597 3701:7597

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297829390 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 24:2811 3398:2811 71240:2716 91827:2716 71275:2448 91836:4490 3699:4490 3700:4490 980083:4490 3701:4490 59689:3736 81972:3736 alphavi...rus core protein family Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MAAMAAKLQLSAKSDQSSVRLPRVIN

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297816520 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 24:3030 3398:3030 71240:4268 91827:4268 71275:1386 91836:2076 3699:2076 3700:2076 980083:2076 3701:2076 59689:6295 81972:6295 phytoal...exin deficient 4 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MEDCRFETSELQASLMMSTPLFTDSWSSCNAAN

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297850166 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sphoric monoester hydrolase Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MANRNNIVIVFDFDKTIIDVDS...2 58024:8242 3398:8242 71240:7162 91827:7162 71275:147 91836:2470 3699:2470 3700:2470 980083:2470 3701:2470 59689:5727 81972:5727 pho

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297820148 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 58024:7047 3398:7047 71240:6768 91827:6768 71275:7265 91836:3724 3699:3724 3700:3724 980083:3724 3701:3724 59689:7591 81972:7591 jose...phin family protein Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MERTSNGGMLYHEVQESNLCAVHCVNTVLQ

  12. Genome wide association mapping for the tolerance to the polyamine oxidase inhibitor guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostadin Evgeniev eAtanasov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines. Here we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1 within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2. The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2 and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine.

  13. Jasmonate Signal Pathway in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yi Shan; Zhi-Long Wang; Daoxin Xie

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs), which include jasmonic acid and its cyclopentane derivatives are synthesized from the octadecanoid pathway and widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. JAs modulate the expression of numerous genes and mediate responses to stress, wounding, insect attack, pathogen infection, and UV damage. They also affect a variety of processes in many plant developmental processes. The JA signal pathway involves two important events: the biosynthesis of JA and the transduction of JA signal. Several important Arabidopsis mutants in jasmonate signal pathway were described in this review.

  14. Reference: 572 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available et al. 2007 May. Plant J. 50(3):439-51. Although glycine-rich RNA-binding protein 2 (GRP2) has been implicated in plant re...sponses to environmental stresses, the function and importance of GRP2 in stress responses are largely unknown. Here...haliana under high-salinity, cold or osmotic stress. GRP2 affects seed germination of Arabidopsis plants under salt stre...ss, but does not influence seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis plants under osmotic stre...ss. GRP2 accelerates seed germination and seedling growth in Arabidopsis plants under cold stre

  15. Reference: 446 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rk E et al. 2006 Nov. Plant Physiol. 142(3):1004-13. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) QUARTET (QRT) genes are require...d for pollen separation during normal floral development. In qrt mutants, the four products of microsporogenesis re...main fused and pollen grains are released as tetrads. In Arabid...opsis, tetrad analysis in qrt mutants has been used to map all five centromeres, easily distinguish sporophy...tic from gametophytic mutations, and accurately assess crossover interference. Using a combination of forward and re

  16. Arabidopsis MSI1 functions in photoperiodic flowering time control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Yvonne; Hennig, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is crucial for crop yield and the reproductive success of plants. Flowering can be induced by a number of molecular pathways that respond to internal and external signals such as photoperiod, vernalization or light quality, ambient temperature and biotic as well as abiotic stresses. The key florigenic signal FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is regulated by several flowering activators, such as CONSTANS (CO), and repressors, such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Chromatin modifications are essential for regulated gene expression, which often involves the well conserved MULTICOPY SUPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1)-like protein family. MSI1-like proteins are ubiquitous partners of various complexes, such as POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX2 or CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR 1. In Arabidopsis, one of the functions of MSI1 is to control the switch to flowering. Arabidopsis MSI1 is needed for the correct expression of the floral integrator gene SUPPRESSOR OF CO 1 (SOC1). Here, we show that the histone-binding protein MSI1 acts in the photoperiod pathway to regulate normal expression of CO in long day (LD) photoperiods. Reduced expression of CO in msi1-mutants leads to failure of FT and SOC1 activation and to delayed flowering. MSI1 is needed for normal sensitivity of Arabidopsis to photoperiod, because msi1-mutants responded less than wild type to an intermittent LD treatment of plants grown in short days. Finally, genetic analysis demonstrated that MSI1 acts upstream of the CO-FT pathway to enable an efficient photoperiodic response and to induce flowering.

  17. Metabolic fluxes in an illuminated Arabidopsis rosette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecowka, Marek; Heise, Robert; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Vosloh, Daniel; Huege, Jan; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John; Nikoloski, Zoran; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Arrivault, Stéphanie

    2013-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis for life, and its optimization is a key biotechnological aim given the problems of population explosion and environmental deterioration. We describe a method to resolve intracellular fluxes in intact Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes based on time-dependent labeling patterns in the metabolome. Plants photosynthesizing under limiting irradiance and ambient CO2 in a custom-built chamber were transferred into a (13)CO2-enriched environment. The isotope labeling patterns of 40 metabolites were obtained using liquid or gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Labeling kinetics revealed striking differences between metabolites. At a qualitative level, they matched expectations in terms of pathway topology and stoichiometry, but some unexpected features point to the complexity of subcellular and cellular compartmentation. To achieve quantitative insights, the data set was used for estimating fluxes in the framework of kinetic flux profiling. We benchmarked flux estimates to four classically determined flux signatures of photosynthesis and assessed the robustness of the estimates with respect to different features of the underlying metabolic model and the time-resolved data set.

  18. Isolation and Suborganellar Fractionation of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Pérez, Úrsula; Jarvis, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplasts are structurally complex organelles containing ~2000-3000 proteins. They are delimited by a double membrane system or envelope, have an inner aqueous compartment called the stroma, and possess a second internal membrane system called the thylakoids. Thus, determining the suborganellar location of a chloroplast protein is vital to understanding or verifying its function. One way in which protein localization can be addressed is through fractionation. Here we present two rapid and simple methods that may be applied sequentially on the same day: (a) The isolation of intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants that may be used directly (e.g., for functional studies such as protein import analysis), or for further processing as follows; (b) separation of isolated chloroplasts into three suborganellar fractions (envelope membranes, a soluble fraction containing stromal proteins, and the thylakoids). These methods are routinely used in our laboratory, and they provide a good yield of isolated chloroplasts and suborganellar fractions that can be used for various downstream applications.

  19. Proteolysis in Plastids of Arabidopsis Thaliana: Functional Analysis of ClpS1,2,T and their Physical and Genetic Interactions with the ClpPR Protease Core Complex and Clp Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Wijk, Klaas

    2009-01-12

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles required for plant growth and biomass production. They synthesize many essential secondary metabolites (e.g. hormones, isoprenoids, amino acids, etc.) and house the photosynthetic apparatus needed for conversion of light energy and CO2 into chemical energy [in the form of reduced carbohydrates, ATP and NADPH]. Thus chloroplasts are essential for life on earth and essential for production of bioenergy. Formation and maintenance of a functional chloroplast requires an extensive investment in the biogenesis and homeostasis apparatus. Protease and proteolysis play a critical role in these processes, with the Clp gene family being particularly central. Proteolysis of proteins and protein complexes in plastids is poorly understood, and is not only critical for biogenesis, adaptation and maintenance but is also important for plant development. Several years ago, the vanWijk lab identified a large and relatively abundant ClpP/R/S complex, along with ClpC1,C2 and ClpD chaperones and a putative Clp affinity modulator in plastids. So far, no substrate recognition mechanism has been determined for any Clp complex in plants. The purpose of this grant was to initiate functional analysis of three members of the Clp family.

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065259 J013002J18 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102134 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102134 J033085F12 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066835 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066835 J013087I16 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-171 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100523 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100523 J023100P04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102695 J033103F21 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  5. Reference: 488 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Inactivation of ATAB2 strongly affects Arabidopsis development and thylakoid mem...n center subunits is decreased and the association of their mRNAs with polysomes is affected. ATAB2 is a chl

  6. Reference: 212 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available identified in pea (Pisum sativum) using biochemical approaches. The Arabidopsis (...C75-IV, which we studied using a range of molecular, genetic, and biochemical techniques. Expression of atTO

  7. Reference: 480 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available activity was analyzed. Compared to all other Suc transporters, AtSUC9 had an ult...abidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh., was expressed in Xenopus (Xenopus laevis) oocytes, and transport

  8. Reference: 507 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available een them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cro...ss-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA inserti

  9. Reference: 278 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available functional ERA1 gene, which encodes the beta-subunit of protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), exhibit pleiotropic effects...gnaling and meristem development. Here, we report the effects of T-DNA insertion mutations in the Arabidopsi

  10. Reference: 185 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available organisms, we suggest that AtARP4 is likely to exert its effects on plant develop...nuclear actin-related protein AtARP4 in Arabidopsis has multiple effects on plant development, including ear

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069960 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-60 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064768 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-112 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061551 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-67 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104764 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-67 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK098998 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-57 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-100 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ntical to SC35-like splicing factor SCL28, 28 kD [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9843655; contains Pfam profile PF00076: RNA recognition motif. (a.k.a. RRM, RBD, or RNP domain) 2e-34 ...

  18. Reference: 564 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 39-44 17360695 2007 Feb Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the Un...tion in plants. Arabidopsis plasma membrane protein crucial for Ca2+ influx and touch sensing in roots. 9 36

  19. Reference: 796 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America DeBolt...required for normal microtubule dynamics and organization in Arabidopsis. 46 18064-9 19004800 2008 Nov Pro

  20. Reference: 67 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A complete knockout of AGD2 renders embryos inviable. We suggest that AGD2 synthesizes an important amino a...no acid-derived molecule important for activating defense signaling. Divergent roles in Arabidopsis thaliana

  1. Reference: 420 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available are found in various compartments in plant cells. The cytosolic and chloroplast APXs appear to play important...d development, suggesting that APX3 may not be an important antioxidant enzyme in Arabidopsis, at least unde

  2. Reference: 771 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RCADIAN TIMEKEEPER (XCT), an Arabidopsis thaliana gene important for light regula...l elongation in xct is hyposensitive to red light but hypersensitive to blue light. Finally, XCT is important

  3. Reference: 797 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available that the level of GMPase activity regulates Arabidopsis sensitivity to NH(4)(+). Further analysis showed that defective N-glycosylati...on of proteins, unfolded protein response, and cell death in the roots are likely i

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241712 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241712 J065197H24 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-27 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242957 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242957 J090089I15 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-28 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287726 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287726 J065138E17 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242387 J080051E14 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-45 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106306 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106306 002-101-C10 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-89 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241272 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241272 J065132I19 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240892 J065030K10 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-88 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109848 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109848 002-148-F05 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-73 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287673 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287673 J065121E18 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-17 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287621 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287621 J065066I09 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-85 ...

  14. Reference: 142 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te S-glucosyltransferase, UGT74B1, to determine its role in the Arabidopsis glucosinolate pathway. Biochem...ical analyses demonstrate that recombinant UGT74B1 specifically glucosylates the th

  15. Reference: 522 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tol phosphate (InsP) and phosphoinositide phosphate (PtdInsP) substrates. Arabidopsis thaliana has 15 genes encoding 5PTases. Biochem...ical analyses of a subgroup of 5PTase enzymes suggest th

  16. Reference: 459 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plants. These results suggest an additive contribution of AMT1;1 and AMT1;3 to the overall ammonium uptake ...capacity in Arabidopsis roots under nitrogen-deficiency conditions. Additive contribution

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288065 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al to sulfate tansporter Sultr1;3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:10716805; contains Pfam profile PF00916: Sulfate... transporter family; contains Pfam profile PF01740: STAS domain; contains TIGRfam profile TIGR00815: sulfate permease 1e-145 ...

  18. Reference: 645 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rter AtDUR3 in nitrogen nutrition in Arabidopsis. In transgenic lines expressing ... impaired growth on urea as a sole nitrogen source were used to investigate a role of the H+/urea co-transpo

  19. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  20. Reference: 711 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the RLK signaling pathway, which also mediates adaptation to Na(+) stress. RLK pathway components, known... The Arabidopsis kinase-associated protein phosphatase regulates adaptation to Na+ stress. 2 612-22 18162596

  1. Reference: 734 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available umi et al. 2008 Apr. Development 135(7):1335-45. CAPRICE (CPC) encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif ...doreduplication. Arabidopsis CAPRICE-LIKE MYB 3 (CPL3) controls endoreduplication and flowering development

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101526 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucosaminyltransferase, putative similar to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5139335]; contains AT-AC non-consensus splice sites at intron 13 1e-179 ...

  3. Reference: 733 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available role in this transition. Specifically, two autonomous factors in the Arabidopsis...tes FCA alternative polyadenylation and promotes flowering as a novel factor in the autonomous pathway. Firs

  4. Reference: 343 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the characterization of a T-DNA insertion mutant of the Arabidopsis CAP-C gene. Analysis of the progeny of selfe...matin was observed between segregating mitotic chromosomes in pollen produced by selfed heterozygotes. Addit

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241281 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 3e-19 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241243 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 6e-11 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243188 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 8e-23 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242986 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 protein) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; a false single bp exon was added to circumvent a single basepair insertion in the genomic sequence, supported by cDNA/genome alignment. 1e-17 ...

  9. Reference: 30 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ponse to various biotic and abiotic stresses. However the physiological role of t...his pathway remains obscure. To elucidate its role in plants, we analyzed Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062082 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062082 001-044-F11 At3g59970.3 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 1 (MTHFR1) ide...ntical to methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase MTHFR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:5911425 4e-81 ...

  11. Reference: 783 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis ACBP6 was confirmed by analyses of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing autofluorescence-tagged ACBP6 and w... mRNA encoding phospholipase Ddelta. Lipid profiling analyses of rosettes from co

  12. Reference: 789 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ylakoid membranes. Microarray analysis of the chl27-t mutant showed repression of numerous nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis...d CHL27 proteins. Role of Arabidopsis CHL27 protein for photosynthesis, chloroplast development and gene exp

  13. Reference: 352 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available em II and has a specific function distinct from 2-Cys peroxiredoxin in protecting photosynthesis. Its absenc...f Arabidopsis thaliana is attached to the thylakoids and functions in context of photosynthesis

  14. Reference: 21 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ication of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis...cation of mutants of Arabidopsis defective in acclimation of photosynthesis to th

  15. Reference: 413 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ollination and fertilization, and, in the absence of fertilization, flowers senesce. In the Arabidopsis thal...ARF8 acts as an inhibitor to stop further carpel development in the absence of fertilization and the generat

  16. Reference: 405 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available as previously thought. These mutants will prove to be valuable resources for understanding laccase functions in vivo. Mutant identifi...cation and characterization of the laccase gene family in Arabidopsis. 11 2563-9 16

  17. Reference: 263 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available idopsis leaves GLB1 expression and PII protein levels were not significantly affected by either the day/nigh...bolism. Physiological characterisation of Arabidopsis mutants affected in the expression of the putative reg

  18. Reference: 160 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available excessive accumulation of these toxic compounds impairs cell death containment and counteracts the effect...iveness of the plant defenses to restrict pathogen infection. Arabidopsis SHMT1, a

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242550 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242550 J080319D10 At2g35630.1 68415.m04369 microtubule organization 1 protein (MO...R1) identical to microtubule organization 1 protein GI:14317953 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-44 ...

  20. Reference: 301 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n phosphatidylinositol metabolism and is encoded by an At5PTase gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. A previous study...ntracellular calcium levels. In this study, we provide evidence that At5PTase13 m

  1. Reference: 724 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is required in the roots during early signaling steps of rhizobacteria-mediated ...ISR. MYB72 is required in early signaling steps of rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis.

  2. Reference: 289 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f flavonoids in Arabidopsis seed coat. 11 2966-80 16243908 2005 Nov The Plant cell Caboche Michel|Debeaujon Isabelle|Kerhoas Lucien|Lepiniec Loïc|Pourcel Lucille|Routaboul Jean-Marc

  3. Reference: 684 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cellular proliferation and expansion at nanomolar concentrations. PSY1 is widely expressed in various Arabi...ulfated glycopeptide involved in cellular proliferation and expansion in Arabidopsis. 46 18333-8 17989228 20

  4. Reference: 147 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the region-specific control of trichome development of Arabidopsis. 3 389-98 15604688 2004 May Plant molecular biology Hulskamp Mart...in|Kirik Victor|Schiefelbein John|Simon Marissa|Wester Katja

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241043 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 2e-41 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243135 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 7e-43 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  7. Reference: 798 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption factors, control the delicately tuned reorientation and timing of cell div...EZ and SOMBRERO control the orientation of cell division plane in Arabidopsis root stem cells. 6 913-22 1908

  8. Mechanisms guiding Polycomb activities during gene silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongsheng eHe

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins act in an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic pathway that regulates chromatin structures in plants and animals, repressing many developmentally important genes by modifying histones. PcG proteins can form at least two multiprotein complexes: Polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2, respectively. The functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PRCs have been characterized in multiple stages of development and have diverse roles in response to environmental stimuli. Recently, the mechanism that precisely regulates Arabidopsis PcG activity was extensively studied. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries in the regulations of PcG at the three different layers: the recruitment of PRCs to specific target loci, the polyubiquitination and degradation of PRC2, and the antagonism of PRC2 activity by the Trithorax group proteins. Current knowledge indicates that the powerful activity of the PcG pathway is strictly controlled for specific silencing of target genes during plant development and in response to environmental stimuli.

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071710 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071710 J023110L07 At4g14030.1 selenium-binding protein, putative contains Pfam profile PF05694: 56kDa sele...nium binding protein (SBP56); identical to Putative selenium-binding protein (Swiss...-Prot:O23264) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to selenium binding protein (GI:15485232) [Arabidopsis thalian...a]; identical to cDNA from partial mRNA for selenium binding protein (sbp gene) GI:15485231 1e-162 ...

  10. Reference: 221 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ell cycle. In addition, RAD51 is required for meiosis and its Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog is important... cell cultures, the RAD51 paralog RAD51C is also important for mitotic homologous...ortant for recombination and DNA repair in the mitotic c...chromosome (homolog) pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) RAD51 gene is known to be imp

  11. TAF13 interacts with PRC2 members and is essential for Arabidopsis seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Matias; Simonini, Sara; Kooiker, Maarten; Gagliardini, Valeria; Somssich, Marc; Hohenstatt, Mareike; Simon, Rüdiger; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kater, Martin M

    2013-07-01

    TBP-Associated Factors (TAFs) are components of complexes like TFIID, TFTC, SAGA/STAGA and SMAT that are important for the activation of transcription, either by establishing the basic transcription machinery or by facilitating histone acetylation. However, in Drosophila embryos several TAFs were shown to be associated with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), even though the role of this interaction remains unclear. Here we show that in Arabidopsis TAF13 interacts with MEDEA and SWINGER, both members of a plant variant of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 variants play important roles during the plant life cycle, including seed development. The taf13 mutation causes seed defects, showing embryo arrest at the 8-16 cell stage and over-proliferation of the endosperm in the chalazal region, which is typical for Arabidopsis PRC2 mutants. Our data suggest that TAF13 functions together with PRC2 in transcriptional regulation during seed development.

  12. The Arabidopsis NIMIN proteins affect NPR1 differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike eHermann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1 is the central regulator of the pathogen defense reaction systemic acquired resistance (SAR. NPR1 acts by sensing the SAR signal molecule salicylic acid (SA to induce expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR genes. Mechanistically, NPR1 is the core of a transcription complex interacting with TGA transcription factors and NIM1 INTERACTING (NIMIN proteins. Arabidopsis NIMIN1 has been shown to suppress NPR1 activity in transgenic plants. The Arabidopsis NIMIN family comprises four structurally related, yet distinct members. Here, we show that NIMIN1, NIMIN2 and NIMIN3 are expressed differentially, and that the encoded proteins affect expression of the SAR marker PR-1 differentially. NIMIN3 is expressed constitutively at a low level, but NIMIN2 and NIMIN1 are both responsive to SA. While NIMIN2 is an immediate early SA-induced and NPR1-independent gene, NIMIN1 is activated after NIMIN2, but clearly before PR-1. Notably, NIMIN1, like PR-1, depends on NPR1. In a transient assay system, NIMIN3 suppresses SA-induced PR-1 expression, albeit to a lesser extent than NIMIN1, whereas NIMIN2 does not negatively affect PR-1 gene activation. Furthermore, although binding to the same domain in the C-terminus, NIMIN1 and NIMIN2 interact differentially with NPR1, thus providing a molecular basis for their opposing effects on NPR1. Together, our data suggest that the Arabidopsis NIMIN proteins are regulators of the SAR response. We propose that NIMINs act in a strictly consecutive and SA-regulated manner on the SA sensor protein NPR1, enabling NPR1 to monitor progressing threat by pathogens and to promote appropriate defense gene activation at distinct stages of SAR. In this scenario, the defense gene PR-1 is repressed at the onset of SAR by SA-induced, yet instable NIMIN1.

  13. Advances in Arabidopsis research in China from 2006 to 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yan; ZUO JianRu; YANG WeiCai

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species, has a number of advantages over other plant species as an experimental organism due to many of its genetic and genomic features. The Chinese Arabidopsis community has made significant contributions to plant biology research in recent years[1,2]. In 2006, studies of plant biology in China received more attention than ever before, especially those pertaining to Arabidopsis research. Here we briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented.

  15. The COP9 signalosome interacts with SCF UFO and participates in Arabidopsis flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiping; Feng, Suhua; Nakayama, Naomi; Crosby, W L; Irish, Vivian; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2003-05-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is involved in multiple developmental processes. It interacts with SCF ubiquitin ligases and deconjugates Nedd8/Rub1 from cullins (deneddylation). CSN is highly expressed in Arabidopsis floral tissues. To investigate the role of CSN in flower development, we examined the expression pattern of CSN in developing flowers. We report here that two csn1 partially deficient Arabidopsis strains exhibit aberrant development of floral organs, decline of APETALA3 (AP3) expression, and low fertility in addition to defects in shoot and inflorescence meristems. We show that UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) forms a SCF(UFO) complex, which is associated with CSN in vivo. Genetic interaction analysis indicates that CSN is necessary for the gain-of-function activity of the F-box protein UFO in AP3 activation and in floral organ transformation. Compared with the previously reported csn5 antisense and csn1 null mutants, partial deficiency of CSN1 causes a reduction in the level of CUL1 in the mutant flowers without an obvious defect in CUL1 deneddylation. We conclude that CSN is an essential regulator of Arabidopsis flower development and suggest that CSN regulates Arabidopsis flower development in part by modulating SCF(UFO)-mediated AP3 activation.

  16. SHUGOSHINs and PATRONUS protect meiotic centromere cohesion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamariola, Linda; De Storme, Nico; Vannerum, Katrijn; Vandepoele, Klaas; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Geelen, Danny

    2014-03-01

    In meiosis, chromosome cohesion is maintained by the cohesin complex, which is released in a two-step manner. At meiosis I, the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit Rec8 is cleaved by the protease Separase along chromosome arms, allowing homologous chromosome segregation. Next, in meiosis II, cleavage of the remaining centromere cohesin results in separation of the sister chromatids. In eukaryotes, protection of centromeric cohesion in meiosis I is mediated by SHUGOSHINs (SGOs). The Arabidopsis genome contains two SGO homologs. Here we demonstrate that Atsgo1 mutants show a premature loss of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres at anaphase I and that AtSGO2 partially rescues this loss of cohesion. In addition to SGOs, we characterize PATRONUS which is specifically required for the maintenance of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres in meiosis II. In contrast to the Atsgo1 Atsgo2 double mutant, patronus T-DNA insertion mutants only display loss of sister chromatid cohesion after meiosis I, and additionally show disorganized spindles, resulting in defects in chromosome segregation in meiosis. This leads to reduced fertility and aneuploid offspring. Furthermore, we detect aneuploidy in sporophytic tissue, indicating a role for PATRONUS in chromosome segregation in somatic cells. Thus, ploidy stability is preserved in Arabidopsis by PATRONUS during both meiosis and mitosis.

  17. In Silico Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro D. Fernández-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH, whose regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways, is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis. Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles with a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling and stress processes by molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO. NADPH is required by several peroxisomal enzymes involved in β-oxidation, NO, and glutathione (GSH generation. Plants have various NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, one of which is 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH. Arabidopsis contains three 6PGDH genes that probably are encoded for cytosolic, chloroplastic/mitochondrial, and peroxisomal isozymes, although their specific functions remain largely unknown. This study focuses on the in silico analysis of the biochemical characteristics and gene expression of peroxisomal 6PGDH (p6PGDH with the aim of understanding its potential function in the peroxisomal NADPH-recycling system. The data show that a group of plant 6PGDHs contains an archetypal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS, while in silico gene expression analysis using affymetrix microarray data suggests that Arabidopsis p6PGDH appears to be mainly involved in xenobiotic response, growth, and developmental processes.

  18. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  19. ASK1 physically interacts with COI1 and is required for male fertility in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴良英; 徐领会; 黄大昉; 李栒; 罗宽; 官春云

    2002-01-01

    Jasmonates are a new class of plant hormones that play important roles in plant development and plant defense. The COI1 gene was previously shown to be required for jasmonate- regulated plant fertility and defense. We demonstrated for the first time that COI1 interacts with the Arabidopsis SKP1-LIKE1 (ASK1) to form a complex that is required for jasmonate action in planta. Functional analysis by antisense strategy showed that ASK1 is involved in male fertility.

  20. Recent Progress in Arabidopsis Research in China: A Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xu

    2006-01-01

    @@ In 2002, a workshop on Arabidopsis research in China was held in Shanghai, when a small group of Chinese plant scientists was working on this model species. Since then, we have witnessed the rapid growth of Arabidopsis research in China. This special issue of Journal of Integrative Plant Biology is dedicated exclusively to the Fourth Workshop on Arabidopsis Research in China, scheduled on November 30, 2005, in Beijing. In addition to reports collected in this special issue, the Chinese Arabidopsis community has been able to make significant contributions to many research fields. Here, I briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of ethylene perception and signaling in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, George Eric

    2014-03-19

    The simple gas ethylene functions as an endogenous regulator of plant growth and development, and modulates such energy relevant processes as photosynthesis and biomass accumulation. Ethylene is perceived in the plant Arabidopsis by a five-member family of receptors related to bacterial histidine kinases. Our data support a general model in which the receptors exist as parts of larger protein complexes. Our goals have been to (1) characterize physical interactions among members of the signaling complex; (2) the role of histidine-kinase transphosphorylation in signaling by the complex; and (3) the role of a novel family of proteins that regulate signal output by the receptors.

  2. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  3. Isolation of Promoters and Fragments of Genes Controlling Endosperm Development Without Fertilization in Arabidopsis and Engineering of the Antisense Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory A. Gerashchenkov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apomixis is asexual seed reproduction without both meiosis and fertilization based on the complex developmental processes such as apomeiosis, parthenogenesis and specific endosperm development. This investigation is aimed at engineering of apomixis in Arabidopsis thaliana with sexual seed reproduction. The fragments of known genes of endosperm formation MEA, FIE, FIS2 and gene of apomeiosis DYAD (as control were isolated using Q5 high fidelity DNA polymerase. These gene fragments of interest at the antisense orientation were fused with isolated constitutive and meiosis specific promoters of Arabidopsis at NcoI sites. The fused promoter-gene fragment modules were cloned in pCambia1301 at SalI cites. The engineered constructions will be used for the floral dip transformation of Arabidopsis and down regulation of these genes at engineering of apomixis.

  4. Reference: 600 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n M et al. 2007 Jun. Plant J. 50(5):810-24. A novel abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant, aba4, was identified in a scre...en for paclobutrazol-resistant germination. Compared with wild-type, the mutant showed reduced e...by map-based cloning, and found to be a unique gene in the Arabidopsis genome. The predicted protein has fou...r putative helical transmembrane domains and shows significant similarity to pred...icted proteins from tomato, rice and cyanobacteria. Constitutive expression of the ABA4 gene in Arabidopsis

  5. Reference: 59 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 59 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u14563930i Kaczorowski Kare...naling network in Arabidopsis, we used a sensitized genetic screen for deetiolation-defective seedlings. Two allelic mutants were... isolated that exhibited reduced sensitivity to both continuous red and far-re...d light, suggesting involvement in both phyA and phyB signaling. The molecular lesions res...ponsible for the phenotype were shown to be mutations in the Arabidopsis PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) g

  6. Reference: 640 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available er Alois et al. 2007 Jul. Plant Cell 19(7):2213-24. Wound signaling pathways in plants are mediated by mitog...en-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and stress hormones, such as ethylene and jasmonates. In Arabidopsis th...ed investigations; however, the involvement of specific phosphatases in wound signaling is not known. Here, ...we show that AP2C1, an Arabidopsis Ser/Thr phosphatase of type 2C, is a novel stress signal regulator that inactivates the stress-re... significantly higher amounts of jasmonate upon wounding and are more resistant to phytophagous mites (Tetra

  7. Reference: 756 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available elle et al. 2008 Jun. Plant Physiol. 147(2):595-610. Treatment of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) alterna...tive oxidase1a (aox1a) mutant plants with moderate light under drought conditions resulted in a phenotypic difference compare...d with ecotype Columbia (Col-0), as evidenced by a 10-fold incre...ase in the accumulation of anthocyanins in leaves, alterations in photosynthetic efficiency, and increased superoxide radical and re...duced root growth at the early stages of seedling growth. Analysis of metabolite profiles re

  8. Reference: 457 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n et al. 2006 Oct. Plant J. 48(2):238-48. The Arabidopsis BAP1 gene encodes a small protein with a C2-like domain. Here...er and is associated with membranes in vivo. We identify multiple roles of BAP1 in negatively re...gulating defense responses and cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana. The loss of BAP1 function ...confers an enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial and oomycete pathogens. The enhanced resistance... is mediated by salicylic acid, PAD4 and a disease resistance gene SNC1. BAP1 is

  9. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning.

  10. Effector-Triggered Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Quantitative Trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovidis, Michail; Teixeira, Paulo J P L; Exposito-Alonso, Moises; Cowper, Matthew G; Law, Theresa F; Liu, Qingli; Vu, Minh Chau; Dang, Troy Minh; Corwin, Jason A; Weigel, Detlef; Dangl, Jeffery L; Grant, Sarah R

    2016-09-01

    We identified loci responsible for natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) responses to a bacterial pathogen virulence factor, HopAM1. HopAM1 is a type III effector protein secreted by the virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain Pto DC3000. Delivery of HopAM1 from disarmed Pseudomonas strains leads to local cell death, meristem chlorosis, or both, with varying intensities in different Arabidopsis accessions. These phenotypes are not associated with differences in bacterial growth restriction. We treated the two phenotypes as quantitative traits to identify host loci controlling responses to HopAM1. Genome-wide association (GWA) of 64 Arabidopsis accessions identified independent variants highly correlated with response to each phenotype. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in a recombinant inbred population between Bur-0 and Col-0 accessions revealed genetic linkage to regions distinct from the top GWA hits. Two major QTL associated with HopAM1-induced cell death were also associated with HopAM1-induced chlorosis. HopAM1-induced changes in Arabidopsis gene expression showed that rapid HopAM1-dependent cell death in Bur-0 is correlated with effector-triggered immune responses. Studies of the effect of mutations in known plant immune system genes showed, surprisingly, that both cell death and chlorosis phenotypes are enhanced by loss of EDS1, a regulatory hub in the plant immune-signaling network. Our results reveal complex genetic architecture for response to this particular type III virulence effector, in contrast to the typical monogenic control of cell death and disease resistance triggered by most type III effectors.

  11. The genetic basis of constitutive and herbivore-induced ESP-independent nitrile formation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Meike; Losansky, Anja; Müller, René; Plock, Antje; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Wittstock, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a group of thioglucosides that are components of an activated chemical defense found in the Brassicales. Plant tissue damage results in hydrolysis of glucosinolates by endogenous thioglucosidases known as myrosinases. Spontaneous rearrangement of the aglucone yields reactive isothiocyanates that are toxic to many organisms. In the presence of specifier proteins, alternative products, namely epithionitriles, simple nitriles, and thiocyanates with different biological activities, are formed at the expense of isothiocyanates. Recently, simple nitriles were recognized to serve distinct functions in plant-insect interactions. Here, we show that simple nitrile formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia-0 rosette leaves increases in response to herbivory and that this increase is independent of the known epithiospecifier protein (ESP). We combined phylogenetic analysis, a screen of Arabidopsis mutants, recombinant protein characterization, and expression quantitative trait locus mapping to identify a gene encoding a nitrile-specifier protein (NSP) responsible for constitutive and herbivore-induced simple nitrile formation in Columbia-0 rosette leaves. AtNSP1 is one of five Arabidopsis ESP homologues that promote simple nitrile, but not epithionitrile or thiocyanate, formation. Four of these homologues possess one or two lectin-like jacalin domains, which share a common ancestry with the jacalin domains of the putative Arabidopsis myrosinase-binding proteins MBP1 and MBP2. A sixth ESP homologue lacked specifier activity and likely represents the ancestor of the gene family with a different biochemical function. By illuminating the genetic and biochemical bases of simple nitrile formation, our study provides new insights into the evolution of metabolic diversity in a complex plant defense system.

  12. Effector-Triggered Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Quantitative Trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovidis, Michail; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Exposito-Alonso, Moises; Cowper, Matthew G.; Law, Theresa F.; Liu, Qingli; Vu, Minh Chau; Dang, Troy Minh; Corwin, Jason A.; Weigel, Detlef; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Grant, Sarah R.

    2016-01-01

    We identified loci responsible for natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) responses to a bacterial pathogen virulence factor, HopAM1. HopAM1 is a type III effector protein secreted by the virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain Pto DC3000. Delivery of HopAM1 from disarmed Pseudomonas strains leads to local cell death, meristem chlorosis, or both, with varying intensities in different Arabidopsis accessions. These phenotypes are not associated with differences in bacterial growth restriction. We treated the two phenotypes as quantitative traits to identify host loci controlling responses to HopAM1. Genome-wide association (GWA) of 64 Arabidopsis accessions identified independent variants highly correlated with response to each phenotype. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in a recombinant inbred population between Bur-0 and Col-0 accessions revealed genetic linkage to regions distinct from the top GWA hits. Two major QTL associated with HopAM1-induced cell death were also associated with HopAM1-induced chlorosis. HopAM1-induced changes in Arabidopsis gene expression showed that rapid HopAM1-dependent cell death in Bur-0 is correlated with effector-triggered immune responses. Studies of the effect of mutations in known plant immune system genes showed, surprisingly, that both cell death and chlorosis phenotypes are enhanced by loss of EDS1, a regulatory hub in the plant immune-signaling network. Our results reveal complex genetic architecture for response to this particular type III virulence effector, in contrast to the typical monogenic control of cell death and disease resistance triggered by most type III effectors. PMID:27412712

  13. Epigenomic Diversity in a Global Collection of Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Taiji; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Jupe, Florian; Sasaki, Eriko; Schmitz, Robert J; Urich, Mark A; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Barragan, Cesar; He, Yupeng; Chen, Huaming; Dubin, Manu; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Wang, Congmao; Bemm, Felix; Becker, Claude; O'Neil, Ryan; O'Malley, Ronan C; Quarless, Danjuma X; Schork, Nicholas J; Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-14

    The epigenome orchestrates genome accessibility, functionality, and three-dimensional structure. Because epigenetic variation can impact transcription and thus phenotypes, it may contribute to adaptation. Here, we report 1,107 high-quality single-base resolution methylomes and 1,203 transcriptomes from the 1001 Genomes collection of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the genetic basis of methylation variation is highly complex, geographic origin is a major predictor of genome-wide DNA methylation levels and of altered gene expression caused by epialleles. Comparison to cistrome and epicistrome datasets identifies associations between transcription factor binding sites, methylation, nucleotide variation, and co-expression modules. Physical maps for nine of the most diverse genomes reveal how transposons and other structural variants shape the epigenome, with dramatic effects on immunity genes. The 1001 Epigenomes Project provides a comprehensive resource for understanding how variation in DNA methylation contributes to molecular and non-molecular phenotypes in natural populations of the most studied model plant.

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-47 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-28 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-26 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-45 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-24 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 2e-65 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110534 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110534 002-168-A07 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-114 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-50 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-25 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-98 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061162 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061162 006-209-A01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-35 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 3e-66 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069071 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069071 J023010H01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121003 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121003 J023045B21 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-45 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-98 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060286 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060286 001-006-C08 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 6e-78 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 1e-125 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-25 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-31 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-130 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105393 001-123-B04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-48 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-29 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109812 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109812 002-147-H02 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 5e-90 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 8e-63 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-126 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-124 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 4e-27 ...

  6. Reference: 415 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available study focuses on the seven other Arabidopsis CAD for which functions are not yet elucidated. Their expression patterns were determine...ession of CAD 1, B1, and G genes was determined using their promoters fused to the GUS reporter gene. CAD 1

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit ClpX, putative similar to CLP protease regulatory subunit CLPX GI:2674203 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; non-consensus... splice donor GC at exon 4; non-consensus splice donor AA at exon 7 1e-151 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242797 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit ClpX, putative similar to CLP protease regulatory subunit CLPX GI:2674203 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; non-consensus... splice donor GC at exon 4; non-consensus splice donor AA at exon 7 2e-23 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit ClpX, putative similar to CLP protease regulatory subunit CLPX GI:2674203 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; non-consensus... splice donor GC at exon 4; non-consensus splice donor AA at exon 7 2e-12 ...

  10. Reference: 767 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Mutation analysis of 25 of the 27 member genes representing 13 of the 14 sub-families... of the UBP gene family revealed that single-gene mutants of three genes in two sub-families exhibit v

  11. Reference: 158 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available onika et al. 2005 Feb. Plant J. 41(3):386-99. Cullin proteins, which belong to multigenic families in all eu...ic search revealed the existence of at least 76 BTB-domain proteins in Arabidopsis belonging to 11 major families.... Yeast two-hybrid experiments indicate that representative members of certain families are able to phy

  12. Reference: 456 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available h other Spo11/topo VIA proteins, but their functional relationship during meiosis or other processes is not ...s. Thus, the three Arabidopsis Spo11 homologues appear to function in two discrete processes, i.e. AtSPO11-1

  13. Reference: 412 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the tobacco arcA gene, mediates hormone responses and plays a regulatory role in multiple developmental processes...in RACK1A confer defects in multiple developmental processes including seed germination, leaf production, an...ltiple hormone responsiveness and developmental processes in Arabidopsis. 11 2697-708 16829549 2006 Journal

  14. Reference: 567 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ith findings that noxy2 and mutants with defective 9-LOX activity showed increased numbers of lateral roots,...or of lateral root formation. Histochemical and molecular analyses revealed that 9-HOT activated events comm...in Arabidopsis regulate lateral root development and defense responses through a specific signaling cascade.

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287911 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287911 J065213B08 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 3e-85 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK318551 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318551 J075138M12 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 4e-27 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241823 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241823 J065212G21 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 1e-150 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243378 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243378 J100063A13 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 5e-18 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288351 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288351 J090024C17 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 2e-24 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242252 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242252 J075182G16 At1g12110.1 68414.m01402 nitrate/chlorate transporter (NRT1.1) ...(CHL1) identical to nitrate/chlorate transporter SP:Q05085 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00854 POT family 6e-88 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073411 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073411 J033041P20 At4g02060.1 prolifera protein (PRL) / DNA replication licensing... factor Mcm7 (MCM7) identical to DNA replication licensing factor Mcm7 SP|P43299 PROLIFERA protein {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam profile PF00493: MCM2/3/5 family 0.0 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100867 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100867 J023124E13 At2g29640.1 josephin family protein contains Pfam domain PF02099: Jose...phin; similar to Josephin-like protein (Swiss-Prot:O82391) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-59 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241402 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241402 J065159A02 At4g19070.1 68417.m02810 cadmium-responsive protein / cadmium i...nduced protein (AS8) identical to cadmium induced protein AS8 SP:P42735 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-11 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241096 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241096 J065076O13 At3g10520.1 68416.m01262 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (HB2) (GLB2...) identical to SP|O24521 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (Hb2) (ARAth GLB2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-40 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240885 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240885 J065029A17 At3g10520.1 68416.m01262 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (HB2) (GLB2...) identical to SP|O24521 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 2 (Hb2) (ARAth GLB2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 6e-34 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241096 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241096 J065076O13 At2g16060.1 68415.m01841 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (HB1) (GLB1...) identical to SP|O24520 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (Hb1) (ARAth GLB1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-59 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240885 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240885 J065029A17 At2g16060.1 68415.m01841 non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (HB1) (GLB1...) identical to SP|O24520 Non-symbiotic hemoglobin 1 (Hb1) (ARAth GLB1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-49 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241728 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241728 J065199H08 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 3e-36 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240645 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240645 J023003B03 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 1e-17 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243302 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243302 J100054J17 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 4e-82 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241015 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241015 J065054A13 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 8e-37 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288091 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288091 J075184D14 At1g50310.1 68414.m05640 monosaccharide transporter (STP9) iden...tical to monosaccharide transporter STP9 protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15487254; contains Pfam profile PF00083: major facilitator superfamily protein 4e-29 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK318617 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318617 J100090H20 At1g19850.1 68414.m02490 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) /... auxin-responsive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-63 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103452 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103452 J033129I11 At1g19850.1 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) / auxin-respon...sive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-166 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243230 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243230 J100044L04 At1g19850.1 68414.m02490 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) /... auxin-responsive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-65 ...

  16. Reference: 346 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 346 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16496096i Todd Christopher...midohydrolase activity from Arabidopsis thaliana. 5 1108-13 16496096 2006 Apr Planta Polacco Joe C|Todd Christopher D

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242980 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242980 J090094F15 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-19 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241644 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241644 J065189M04 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-37 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241055 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241055 J065063N18 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-26 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242211 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242211 J075171C16 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-21 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243669 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243669 J100089N11 At3g58780.1 68416.m06551 agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 / shatterproof... 1 (AGL1) (SHP1) identical to SP|P29381 Agamous-like MADS box protein AGL1 (Protein Shatterproof 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 6e-14 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100613 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100613 J023107M18 At4g10180.1 light-mediated development protein 1 / deetiolated1... (DET1) identical to Light-mediated development protein DET1 (Deetiolated1) (Swiss-Prot:P48732) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058683 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058683 001-019-A06 At4g10180.1 light-mediated development protein 1 / deetiolated...1 (DET1) identical to Light-mediated development protein DET1 (Deetiolated1) (Swiss-Prot:P48732) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241645 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241645 J065189N07 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243043 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243043 J100008P08 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241277 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241277 J065134P20 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241074 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241074 J065068E03 At5g20000.1 68418.m02380 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit, putative almost... identical to 26S proteasome AAA-ATPase subunit RPT6a GI:6652888 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; almost

  8. Reference: 386 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 386 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16698900i Hricová Andrea...d mesophyll cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. 3 942-56 16698900 2006 Jul Plant physiology Hricová Andrea|Micol José Luis|Quesada Victor

  9. Reference: 394 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 394 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16766689i Rudella Andrea...and defects in chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis. 7 1704-21 16766689 2006 Jul The Plant cell Alonso Jose M|Ecker Joseph R|Friso Giulia|Rudella Andrea|van Wijk Klaas J

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243428 J100067L15 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-36 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288699 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288699 J090061C22 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-36 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243271 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243271 J100049K04 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 4e-35 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241812 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241812 J065210K15 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-22 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241549 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241549 J065176M15 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-32 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241615 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241615 J065186D02 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-35 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288487 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288487 J090040H24 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-37 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287469 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287469 J043021L20 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-36 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241370 J065154C10 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-31 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288415 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288415 J090031E07 At5g14750.1 68418.m01731 myb family transcription factor (MYB66) / werewolf...iption factor (MYB66) mRNA, partial cds GI:3941491; identical to GP:9755743 myb transcription factor werewolf (WER)/ MYB66 {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-37 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287447 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287447 J043016O04 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-30 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241364 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241364 J065152E11 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-20 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 3e-13 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241281 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-12 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 9e-17 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242986 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-13 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287689 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-23 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240736 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-22 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241705 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-11 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287483 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available avonol 3-O-methyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to ...1.1.76) (AtOMT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-37 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK107208 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ala hydrolase, putative virtually identical to gr1-protein from [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3559811; similar t...AK107208 002-125-B11 At1g44350.1 IAA-amino acid hydrolase 6, putative (ILL6) / IAA-

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062144 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062144 001-045-G08 At5g54080.2 homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase / homogentisicase/ho... (EC 1.13.11.5) (Homogentisicase) (Homogentisate oxygenase) (Homogentisic acid oxidase) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam profile PF04209: homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase 1e-155 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061294 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061294 006-301-D01 At3g08900.1 reversibly glycosylated polypeptide-3 (RGP3) nearl...y identical to reversibly glycosylated polypeptide-3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11863238; contains non-consensus GA-donor splice site at intron 2 0.0 ...

  13. Reference: 119 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the Arabidopsis homolog of MSH4 (AtMSH4). We demonstrate that AtMSH4 expression can only be detected in floral tissues, consisten...chromosomes. A T-DNA insertional mutant (Atmsh4) exhibited normal vegetative growth but a severe reduction in fertility, consistent

  14. Reference: 428 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on was delayed in the psb27 mutant, suggesting that Psb27 is required for efficient...icient repair of photodamaged photosystem II. 4-5 567-75...he involvement of this lumenal protein in the recovery process of PSII. A Psb27 homologue in Arabidopsis thaliana is required for eff

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105724 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105724 001-201-G07 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bisph...osphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK072243 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072243 J023003N10 At1g07110.1 fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase / fructose-2,6-bispho...sphatase (F2KP) identical to fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13096098 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243221 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243221 J100043L21 At5g15410.2 68418.m01803 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic... nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-40 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK067626 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067626 J013112I06 At5g15410.1 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic nu...cleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243602 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243602 J100084P18 At5g15410.2 68418.m01803 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic... nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-98 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288592 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288592 J090051B06 At5g15410.2 68418.m01803 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic... nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-145 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060339 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060339 001-008-C12 At5g15410.2 cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel / cyclic n...ucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2) identical to cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel GI:3894399 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-175 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069395 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069395 J023011N07 At1g71440.1 tubulin folding cofactor E / Pfifferling (PFI) almo...st identical to tubulin folding cofactor E (Pfifferling; PFI) GI:20514267 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA tubulin folding cofactor E, GI:20514266 7e-41 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102150 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102150 J033086D17 At3g10220.1 tubulin folding cofactor B identical to tubulin folding... cofactor B GI:20514259 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA tubulin folding cofactor B GI:20514258 6e-91 ...

  4. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Miklós Pogány; Tamás Dankó; Evelin Kámán-Tóth; Ildikó Schwarczinger; Zoltán Bozsó

    2015-01-01

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is s...

  5. Reference: 566 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utations in the MKK3-MPK6 cascade, which indicates important roles in JA signaling. We provide a model expla...tress - into three different sets of responses in Arabidopsis. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade MKK3-MPK6 is an important

  6. Reference: 392 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pment. The Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF AUXIN RESISTANCE proteins are nucleoporins with an important role in ho...olyadenylated RNA within the nucleus, indicating that SAR1 and SAR3 are required for mRNA export. Our results demonstrate the importa...nt role of the plant NPC in hormone signaling and develo

  7. Reference: 438 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ity and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. 18 6902-12 16943431 2006 Sep Molecular and cellular bio...logy Chen Zhizhong|Gong Zhizhong|Hong Xuhui|Jablonowski Daniel|Ren Xiaozhi|Schaffrath Raffael|Zhang Hairong|Zhou Xiaofeng|Zhu Jian-Kang

  8. Reference: 356 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 006 Mar Plant molecular biology Deng Xingwang|Dong Li|Wang Lei|Xue Yongbiao|Zhang Yansheng|Zhang Yu'e ...ein CEGENDUO negatively regulates auxin-mediated lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. 4 599-615 16525894 2

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059353 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059353 001-026-D01 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative ...similar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 2e-29 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066771 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066771 J013083K07 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative s...imilar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 2e-29 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059160 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059160 001-023-D05 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative ...similar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 3e-28 ...

  12. Reference: 234 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 234 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15980261i Stepanova ...ion of two root-specific ethylene-insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis. 8 2230-42 15980261 2005 Aug The Plant cell Alonso Jose M|Hamilton Alexandra A|Hoyt Joyce M|Stepanova Anna N

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101721 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101721 J033061A20 At3g57040.1 two-component responsive regulator / response reactor... 4 (RR4) identical to responce reactor4 GI:3273202 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00072 response regulator receiver domain 9e-49 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058585 001-017-G01 At3g57040.1 two-component responsive regulator / response reactor... 4 (RR4) identical to responce reactor4 GI:3273202 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF00072 response regulator receiver domain 6e-55 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066153 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amino... terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287906 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit / ClpC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF028...61: Clp amino terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100126 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amino... terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058510 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lpC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amin...o terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069552 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pC almost identical to ClpC GI:2921158 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF02861: Clp amino... terminal domain; contains Pfam profile PF00004: ATPase, AAA family; contains Pfam profile PF02151: UvrB/uvrC motif 0.0 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288349 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288349 J090023P19 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affect...ing germination 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-23 ...

  1. Reference: 396 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ht to be encoded in Arabidopsis by the ATS1 locus. A number of genetic mutants deficient in this activity have been described. How...hosphatidylglycerol raised the question of whether an alternative pathway of phosphatidylglycerol assembly in the plastid exists. How

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103126 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0S proteasome beta subunit PBB1 (PBB1) GB:AAC32066 [Arabidopsis thaliana] (Genetics 149 (2), 677-692 (1998)); contains Pfam profile: PF00227 proteasome A-type and B-type; 1e-129 ...

  3. Reference: 750 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 750 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u18390594i Fulton Daniel...in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. 4 1040-58 18390594 2008 Apr The Plant cell Dorken Gary|Eicke Simona|Francisco Perigio|Fulton Daniel

  4. Reference: 161 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis have not been identified. We tested whether several Arabidopsis thaliana enzy...ith the fact that GH3.6 was active on each of these auxins. By contrast, GH3.6 and the other five enzymes tested

  5. Reference: 267 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tien et al. 2005 Sep. Plant J. 43(6):824-36. The sucrose transporter gene AtSUC5 was studied as part of a programme aimed at identify...ing and studying the genes involved in seed maturation in Arabidopsis. Expression p

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242807 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242807 J090060H17 At5g37500.1 68418.m04516 guard cell outward rectifying K+ chann...el (GORK) identical to guard cell outward rectifying K+ channel [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|11414742|emb|CAC17

  7. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110694 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110694 002-170-A08 At5g59560.2 sensitivity to red light reduced protein (SRR1) id...entical to sensitivity to red light reduced protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:25527089; supporting cDNA gi|25527088|gb|AY127047.1| 1e-18 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243061 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243061 J100014C18 At5g24520.2 68418.m02892 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 1e-102 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288081 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288081 J075172F18 At5g24520.3 68418.m02893 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 4e-13 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287566 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287566 J065027L04 At1g34790.1 68414.m04337 transparent testa 1 protein (TT1) / zi...nc finger (C2H2 type) protein TT1 identical to transparent testa 1 GI:18253279 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00096: Zinc finger, C2H2 type 2e-77 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288081 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288081 J075172F18 At5g24520.1 68418.m02891 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 4e-13 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289209 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289209 J100058I16 At1g34790.1 68414.m04337 transparent testa 1 protein (TT1) / zi...nc finger (C2H2 type) protein TT1 identical to transparent testa 1 GI:18253279 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00096: Zinc finger, C2H2 type 1e-12 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243061 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243061 J100014C18 At5g24520.1 68418.m02891 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 1e-102 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243061 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243061 J100014C18 At5g24520.3 68418.m02893 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 1e-102 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243285 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243285 J100051N01 At1g34790.1 68414.m04337 transparent testa 1 protein (TT1) / zi...nc finger (C2H2 type) protein TT1 identical to transparent testa 1 GI:18253279 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00096: Zinc finger, C2H2 type 1e-24 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288081 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288081 J075172F18 At5g24520.2 68418.m02892 transparent testa glabra 1 protein (TTG1) identical to transpar...ent testa glabra 1 (Ttg1) protein (GI:10177852) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; contains Pfam PF00400: WD domain, G-beta repeat (4 copies,1 weak); 4e-13 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-44 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-20 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-41 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-11 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-16 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062711 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062711 001-106-C02 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-34 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108506 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108506 002-143-H11 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-14 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-17 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071661 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071661 J023105D07 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-33 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-18 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-25 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-15 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-14 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-19 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-19 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-16 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-44 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241786 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241786 J065207F05 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-19 ...

  18. Reference: 204 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ified in Arabidopsis based on a growth defect of the dark-grown hypocotyl and an abnormal composition of the...on defects of cells in the central cylinder. These defects were accompanied by changes in the non-cellulosic polysaccharide compositi...on, including the accumulation of ectopic callose. Interestingly, in contrast to ot

  19. Reference: 207 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available generated Arabidopsis transgenic lines showing various albino patterns caused by IspH transgene-induced gen...he late dark period (4-6 h). The expression patterns of DXS and IspG are similar to that of IspH, indicating

  20. Reference: 747 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 747 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u18364466i Hong Yueyu...dance. Phospholipase Dalpha3 is involved in the hyperosmotic response in Arabidopsis. 3 803-16 18364466 2008 Mar The Plant cell Hong Yueyun|Pan Xiangqing|Wang Xuemin|Welti Ruth

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240809 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240809 J065006K12 At4g17030.1 68417.m02569 expansin-related identical to SWISS-PROT:O23547 expansi...n-related protein 1 precursor (At-EXPR1)[Arabidopsis thaliana]; related to expansins, http://www.bio.psu.edu/expansins/ 2e-21 ...

  2. Reference: 504 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 504 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17202180i Iwama Ayako et al. 2007 Fe...ion through an ETR1-dependent abscisic acid and ethylene signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. 2 375-80 17202180 2007 Fe

  3. Reference: 143 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of AtMYB32 and AtMYB4 expression may influence pollen development by changing the flux along the phenylpropanoid pathways, affe...for normal pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. 6 979-95 15584962 2004 Dec The Plant journal Heazlewood Joshua|Li Song Feng|Parish Roger W|Preston Jeremy|Wheeler Janet

  4. Reference: 727 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s established in tobacco BY-2 cells. In Arabidopsis, sdg4 knockout showed reproductive defects. Tissue-specific expression analyse...sed in the pollen. Immunological analyses demonstrated that SDG4 was involved in the methylation of histone

  5. Reference: 88 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 88 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15155874i Field Ben e...biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. 2 828-39 15155874 2004 Jun Plant physiology Botterman Johan|Cardon Guillermo|Field Ben|Mithen Richard|Traka Maria|Vancanneyt Guy

  6. Reference: 389 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 389 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16716192i Jolivet Sy...of the Ski8/Rec103 homolog in Arabidopsis. 6 615-22 16716192 2006 Jun Genes to cells Froger Nicole|Jolivet Sylvie|Mercier Raphaël|Vezon Daniel

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108796 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108796 002-151-C01 At2g25320.1 meprin and TRAF homology domain-containing protein / MATH... domain-containing protein weak similarity to ubiquitin-specific protease 12 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11993471; contains Pfam profile PF00917: MATH domain 3e-97 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105718 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105718 001-201-F09 At5g43560.2 meprin and TRAF homology domain-containing protein / MATH... domain-containing protein weak similarity to ubiquitin-specific protease 12 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11993471; contains Pfam profile PF00917: MATH domain 5e-22 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102133 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102133 J033085E13 At5g43560.2 meprin and TRAF homology domain-containing protein / MATH... domain-containing protein weak similarity to ubiquitin-specific protease 12 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:11993471; contains Pfam profile PF00917: MATH domain 1e-146 ...

  10. Reference: 239 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 239 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16015335i Bundock Paul et al. 2005 Jul. Natur...functions. An Arabidopsis hAT-like transposase is essential for plant development. 7048 282-4 16015335 2005 Jul Nature Bundock Paul|Hooykaas Paul

  11. Reference: 71 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ific functions among family members. Type-A Arabidopsis response regulators are partially...ary response to cytokinin is affected. Spatial patterns of ARR gene expression were consistent with partia...lly redundant function of these genes in cytokinin signaling. The arr mutants show

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240892 J065030K10 At4g36920.1 68417.m05233 floral homeotic protein APETALA2 (AP2)... Identical to (SP:P47927) Floral homeotic protein APETALA2. [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-41 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287726 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287726 J065138E17 At4g36920.1 68417.m05233 floral homeotic protein APETALA2 (AP2)... Identical to (SP:P47927) Floral homeotic protein APETALA2. [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-41 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242980 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242980 J090094F15 At1g69120.1 68414.m07909 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1)... / agamous-like MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-18 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242211 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242211 J075171C16 At1g69120.1 68414.m07909 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1)... / agamous-like MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-22 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242957 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242957 J090089I15 At4g36920.1 68417.m05233 floral homeotic protein APETALA2 (AP2)... Identical to (SP:P47927) Floral homeotic protein APETALA2. [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-56 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287621 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287621 J065066I09 At4g36920.1 68417.m05233 floral homeotic protein APETALA2 (AP2)... Identical to (SP:P47927) Floral homeotic protein APETALA2. [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana} 6e-43 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241055 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241055 J065063N18 At1g69120.1 68414.m07909 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1)... / agamous-like MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-28 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241272 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241272 J065132I19 At4g36920.1 68417.m05233 floral homeotic protein APETALA2 (AP2)... Identical to (SP:P47927) Floral homeotic protein APETALA2. [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-41 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243669 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243669 J100089N11 At1g69120.1 68414.m07909 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1)... / agamous-like MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-15 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241644 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241644 J065189M04 At1g69120.1 68414.m07909 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1)... / agamous-like MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-32 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242387 J080051E14 At4g36920.1 68417.m05233 floral homeotic protein APETALA2 (AP2)... Identical to (SP:P47927) Floral homeotic protein APETALA2. [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-27 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069331 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069331 J023019N01 At1g69120.1 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1) / agamous-li...ke MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-58 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121171 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121171 J023081C04 At1g69120.1 floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AP1) / agamous-li...ke MADS box protein (AGL7) identical to SP|P35631 Floral homeotic protein APETALA1 (AGL7 protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-37 ...

  5. Reference: 218 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rpenes found in the Arabidopsis floral volatile blend. Two independent mutant lines with T-DNA insertions in...version of farnesyl diphosphate into over 15 sesquiterpenes in similar proportions to those found in the floral volatile blend

  6. Reference: 616 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Disruption of AtOCT1 in an Arabidopsis oct1-1 knockout mutant affected both the expression of carnitine-rela... exhibited a higher degree of root branching than the wild-type, showing that the disruption of AtOCT1 affected

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857 2e-15 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At4g31370.1 68417.m04448 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857 9e-20 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At2g24450.1 68415.m02922 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108772 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108772 002-150-H07 At3g12660.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like ara...binogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857; 1e-35 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119375 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119375 001-132-A06 At3g46550.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like ara...binogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 2e-85 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 1e-21 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At3g46550.1 68416.m05053 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121828 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121828 J033099G20 At3g46550.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like arab...inogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 4e-87 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289211 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 4e-90 ... ...AK289211 J100060N06 At3g46550.1 68416.m05053 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857; 3e-21 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At3g12660.1 68416.m01578 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109762 002-146-G11 At3g12660.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like ara...binogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857; 3e-24 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071407 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ain protein 6 (LBD6) / asymmetric leaves2 (AS2) identical to SP|O04479 LOB domain protein 6 (ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-43 ... ...AK071407 J023089G14 At1g65620.1 LOB domain protein 6 / lateral organ boundaries dom

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119575 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available main protein 6 (LBD6) / asymmetric leaves2 (AS2) identical to SP|O04479 LOB domain protein 6 (ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-43 ... ...AK119575 002-117-B04 At1g65620.1 LOB domain protein 6 / lateral organ boundaries do

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064839 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064839 J013000F24 At2g18600.1 RUB1-conjugating enzyme, putative strong similarity... to gi:6635457 RUB1 conjugating enzyme [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00179: Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 6e-69 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104158 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104158 006-210-H05 At2g18600.1 RUB1-conjugating enzyme, putative strong similarit...y to gi:6635457 RUB1 conjugating enzyme [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00179: Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 3e-58 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070541 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070541 J023056A05 At2g18600.1 RUB1-conjugating enzyme, putative strong similarity... to gi:6635457 RUB1 conjugating enzyme [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile PF00179: Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 5e-75 ...